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Sample records for binding affibody molecules

  1. Phage display selection of Affibody molecules with specific binding to the extracellular domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Nordberg, E; Höidén-Guthenberg, I; Brismar, H; Adams, G P; Nilsson, F Y; Carlsson, J; Ståhl, S

    2007-04-01

    Affibody molecules specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been selected by phage display technology from a combinatorial protein library based on the 58-residue, protein A-derived Z domain. EGFR is overexpressed in various malignancies and is frequently associated with poor patient prognosis, and the information provided by targeting this receptor could facilitate both patient diagnostics and treatment. Three selected Affibody variants were shown to selectively bind to the extracellular domain of EGFR (EGFR-ECD). Kinetic biosensor analysis revealed that the three monomeric Affibody molecules bound with similar affinity, ranging from 130 to 185 nM. Head-to-tail dimers of the Affibody molecules were compared for their binding to recombinant EGFR-ECD in biosensor analysis and in human epithelial cancer A431 cells. Although the dimeric Affibody variants were found to bind in a range of 25-50 nM affinities in biosensor analysis, they were found to be low nanomolar binders in the cellular assays. Competition assays using radiolabeled Affibody dimers confirmed specific EGFR-binding and demonstrated that the three Affibody molecules competed for the same epitope. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the selected Affibody dimers were initially binding to EGFR at the cell surface of A431, and confocal microscopy analysis showed that the Affibody dimers could thereafter be internalized. The potential use of the described Affibody molecules as targeting agents for radionuclide based imaging applications in various carcinomas is discussed. PMID:17452435

  2. Engineering and characterization of a bispecific HER2 x EGFR-binding affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Lindström, Sara; Ekerljung, Lina; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Carlsson, Jörgen; Brismar, Hjalmar; Gedda, Lars; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    HER2 (human epidermal-growth-factor receptor-2; ErbB2) and EGFR (epidermal-growth-factor receptor) are overexpressed in various forms of cancer, and the co-expression of both HER2 and EGFR has been reported in a number of studies. The simultaneous targeting of HER2 and EGFR has been discussed as a strategy with which to potentially increase efficiency and selectivity in molecular imaging and therapy of certain cancers. In an effort to generate a molecule capable of bispecifically targeting HER2 and EGFR, a gene fragment encoding a bivalent HER2-binding affibody molecule was genetically fused in-frame with a bivalent EGFR-binding affibody molecule via a (G4S)3 [(Gly4-Ser)3]-encoding gene fragment. The encoded 30 kDa affibody construct (ZHER2)2-(G4S)3-(ZEGFR)2, with potential for bs (bispecific) binding to HER2 and EGFR, was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized in terms of its binding capabilities. The retained ability to bind HER2 and EGFR separately was demonstrated using both biosensor technology and flow-cytometric analysis, the latter using HER2- and EGFR-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, simultaneous binding to HER2 and EGFR was demonstrated in: (i) a sandwich format employing real-time biospecific interaction analysis where the bs affibody molecule bound immobilized EGFR and soluble HER2; (ii) immunofluorescence microscopy, where the bs affibody molecule bound EGFR-overexpressing cells and soluble HER2; and (iii) a cell-cell interaction analysis where the bs affibody molecule bound HER2-overexpressing SKBR-3 cells and EGFR-overexpressing A-431 cells. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported bs affinity protein with potential ability for the simultaneous targeting of HER2 and EGFR. The potential future use of this and similar constructs, capable of bs targeting of receptors to increase the efficacy and selectivity in imaging and therapy, is discussed. PMID:19492986

  3. Effects of an EGFR-binding affibody molecule on intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Ekerljung, L; Sahlberg, S H; Carlsson, J; Lennartsson, J; Glimelius, B

    2010-04-01

    Effects on intracellular signaling were studied in cells treated with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2 that targets the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR is overexpressed in many types of cancers and plays a fundamental role in cell signaling and it is of interest to find targeting agents capable of blocking the receptor. The clinically approved antibody cetuximab (Erbitux) and the natural ligand EGF were included as reference molecules. Two EGFR-rich cell lines, A-431 and U-343, were exposed to the three targeting agents and lysed. The cell lysates were immunoprecipitated with the receptors, or directly separated by SDS-Page. Autophosphorylation of the receptors and phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins Erk and Akt, were evaluated by Western blotting. Although the three different agents compete for the same binding site on EGFR, they influenced the signaling differently. The affibody molecule did not induce autophosphorylation of EGFR or any other receptor in the EGFR-family but, in spite of this, induced phosphorylation of Erk in both cell lines and Akt in the A-431 cells. Thus, the results suggest that the signaling pattern induced by (ZEGFR:955)2 is only partly similar to that induced by cetuximab. This makes the affibody molecule a potentially interesting alternative to cetuximab for EGFR-targeted therapy since it might give different therapy-related effects on tumor cells and different side effects on normal tissues. PMID:20198342

  4. Biodistribution of 211At labeled HER-2 binding affibody molecules in mice.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Almqvist, Ylva; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Lundqvist, Hans; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Wilbur, D Scott; Carlsson, Jörgen

    2007-05-01

    The size of affibody molecules makes them suitable as targeting agents for targeted radiotherapy with the alpha-emitter 211At, since their biokinetic properties match the short physical half-live of 211At. In this study, the potential for this approach was investigated in vivo. Two different HER-2 binding affibody molecules were radiolabeled with 211At using both the linker PAB (N-succinimidyl-para-astatobenzoate) and a decaborate-based linker, and the biodistribution in tumor-bearing nude mice was investigated. The influence of L-lysine and Na-thiocyanate on the 211At uptake in normal tissues was also studied. Based on the biokinetic information obtained, the absorbed dose was calculated for different organs. Compared with a previous biodistribution with 125I, the 211At biodistribution using the PAB linker showed higher uptake in lungs, stomach, thyroid and salivary glands, indicating release of free 211At. When the decaborate-based linker was used, the uptake in those organs was decreased, but instead, high uptake in kidneys and liver was found. The uptake, when using the PAB linker, could be significantly reduced in some organs by the use of L-lysine and/or Na-thiocyanate. In conclusion, affibody molecules have suitable blood-kinetics for targeted radionuclide therapy with 211At. However, the labeling chemistry affects the distribution in normal organs to a high degree and needs to be improved to allow clinical use. PMID:17390057

  5. Quantification of internalization of EGFR-binding Affibody molecules: Methodological aspects.

    PubMed

    Göstring, Lovisa; Chew, Ming Tsuey; Orlova, Anna; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Wennborg, Anders; Carlsson, Jörgen; Frejd, Fredrik Y

    2010-04-01

    Tumor cell internalization of targeting agents is of interest, since internalization influences the local retention time of a radionuclide and thereby imaging quality in PET and SPECT and effects of radionuclide therapy. In cases where nuclear methods are not applicable at the cellular level, quantitative fluorescent techniques are useful as described in this article. Two fluorescence-based methods to study cellular internalization were applied: the CypHer and the Alexa488-quenching methods, both utilized in fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Two EGFR-binding Affibody molecules were analyzed in A431 cells: the monomer Z1907 and the dimer (Z1907)2. EGF, cetuximab and non-specific Affibody molecules were used as controls. For comparison, internalization of 111In-labeled Z1907 was studied with the acid wash internalization assay. The Cypher method is straightforward, but requires equal labeling of all compounds for accurate quantification. The Alexa488-quenching method is preferable since it is independent of the dye-to-protein ratio. According to this method, about 45% of EGF and 19-24% of the bound Affibody molecules and cetuximab were internalized within one hour. Similar results were seen with 111In-Z1907 in the acid wash method, while (Z1907)2 was not removed by acid and thus could not be studied this way. The fluorescence-based Alexa488-quenching method is well suited to quantitatively analyze internalization of targeting agents, also those that resist acid wash. The internalized fraction showed that both the monomeric and dimeric Affibody molecules are expected to give good uptake and thereby good retention of metallic radionuclides which will render good tumor to background values. PMID:20198317

  6. Inhibitory effects of H-Ras/Raf-1-binding affibody molecules on synovial cell function.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Nygren, Per-Åke; Sano, Hajime; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Affibody molecules specific for H-Ras and Raf-1 were evaluated for their ability to inhibit synovial cell function. Affibody molecules targeting H-Ras (Zras122, Zras220, and Zras521) or Raf-1 (Zraf322) were introduced into the MH7A synovial cell line using two delivery methods: transfection with plasmids encoding the affibody molecules or direct introduction of affibody protein using a cell-penetrating peptide reagent. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by MH7A cells were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Cell proliferation was also analyzed. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was analyzed by western blot. All affibody molecules could inhibit IL-6 and PGE2 production in TNF-α-stimulated MH7A cells. The inhibitory effect was stronger when affibody molecules were delivered as proteins via a cell-penetrating peptide reagent than when plasmid-DNA encoding the affibody moelcules was transfected into the cells. Plasmid-expressed Zras220 inhibited phosphorylation of ERK in TNF-α-stimulated MH7A cells. Protein-introduced Zraf322 inhibited the production of IL-6 and PGE2 and inhibited cell proliferation in MH7A cells. These findings suggest that affibody molecules specific for H-Ras and Raf-1 can affect intracellular signal transduction through the MAP kinase pathway to inhibit cell proliferation and production of inflammatory mediators by synovial cells. PMID:26267111

  7. Simultaneous targeting of two ligand-binding sites on VEGFR2 using biparatopic Affibody molecules results in dramatically improved affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Klint, Susanne; Hanze, Martin; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer and ophthalmic disorders such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family and corresponding receptors are regulators of angiogenesis and have been much investigated as therapeutic targets. The aim of this work was to generate antagonistic VEGFR2-specific affinity proteins having adjustable pharmacokinetic properties allowing for either therapy or molecular imaging. Two antagonistic Affibody molecules that were cross-reactive for human and murine VEGFR2 were selected by phage and bacterial display. Surprisingly, although both binders independently blocked VEGF-A binding, competition assays revealed interaction with non-overlapping epitopes on the receptor. Biparatopic molecules, comprising the two Affibody domains, were hence engineered to potentially increase affinity even further through avidity. Moreover, an albumin-binding domain was included for half-life extension in future in vivo experiments. The best-performing of the biparatopic constructs demonstrated up to 180-fold slower dissociation than the monomers. The new Affibody constructs were also able to specifically target VEGFR2 on human cells, while simultaneously binding to albumin, as well as inhibit VEGF-induced signaling. In summary, we have generated small antagonistic biparatopic Affibody molecules with high affinity for VEGFR2, which have potential for both future therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25515662

  8. Directed evolution to low nanomolar affinity of a tumor-targeting epidermal growth factor receptor-binding affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Orlova, Anna; Johansson, Eva; Eriksson, Tove L J; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) is overexpressed in various malignancies and is associated with a poor patient prognosis. A small, receptor-specific, high-affinity imaging agent would be a useful tool in diagnosing malignant tumors and in deciding upon treatment and assessing the response to treatment. We describe here the affinity maturation procedure for the generation of Affibody molecules binding with high affinity and specificity to EGFR. A library for affinity maturation was constructed by rerandomization of selected positions after the alignment of first-generation binding variants. New binders were selected with phage display technology, using a single oligonucleotide in a single-library effort, and the best second-generation binders had an approximately 30-fold improvement in affinity (K(d)=5-10 nM) for the soluble extracellular domain of EGFR in biospecific interaction analysis using Biacore. The dissociation equilibrium constant, K(d), was also determined for the Affibody with highest affinity using EGFR-expressing A431 cells in flow cytometric analysis (K(d)=2.8 nM). A retained high specificity for EGFR was verified by a dot blot assay showing staining only of EGFR proteins among a panel of serum proteins and other EGFR family member proteins (HER2, HER3, and HER4). The EGFR-binding Affibody molecules were radiolabeled with indium-111, showing specific binding to EGFR-expressing A431 cells and successful targeting of the A431 tumor xenografts with 4-6% injected activity per gram accumulated in the tumor 4 h postinjection. PMID:18207161

  9. Cellular Effects of HER3-Specific Affibody Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John; Gedda, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have led to the recognition of the epidermal growth factor receptor HER3 as a key player in cancer, and consequently this receptor has gained increased interest as a target for cancer therapy. We have previously generated several Affibody molecules with subnanomolar affinity for the HER3 receptor. Here, we investigate the effects of two of these HER3-specific Affibody molecules, Z05416 and Z05417, on different HER3-overexpressing cancer cell lines. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the Affibody molecules were shown to bind to HER3 on three different cell lines. Furthermore, the receptor binding of the natural ligand heregulin (HRG) was blocked by addition of Affibody molecules. In addition, both molecules suppressed HRG-induced HER3 and HER2 phosphorylation in MCF-7 cells, as well as HER3 phosphorylation in constantly HER2-activated SKBR-3 cells. Importantly, Western blot analysis also revealed that HRG-induced downstream signalling through the Ras-MAPK pathway as well as the PI3K-Akt pathway was blocked by the Affibody molecules. Finally, in an in vitro proliferation assay, the two Affibody molecules demonstrated complete inhibition of HRG-induced cancer cell growth. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Z05416 and Z05417 exert an anti-proliferative effect on two breast cancer cell lines by inhibiting HRG-induced phosphorylation of HER3, suggesting that the Affibody molecules are promising candidates for future HER3-targeted cancer therapy. PMID:22768204

  10. Update: affibody molecules for molecular imaging and therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Anna; Feldwisch, Joachim; Abrahmsén, Lars; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2007-10-01

    Affibody molecules are scaffold proteins, having a common frame of amino acids determining the overall fold or tertiary structure, but with each member characterized by a unique amino acid composition in an exposed binding surface determining binding specificity and affinity for a certain target. Affibody molecules represent a new class of affinity proteins based on a 58-amino acid residue protein domain, derived from one of the IgG binding domains of staphylococcal protein A. They combine small size ( approximately 6.5 kDa) with high affinity and specificity. Affibody molecules with nanomolar affinities were selected from an initial library (3 x 10(9) members) and, after affinity maturation, picomolar binders were obtained. The small size and simple structure of affibody molecules allow their production by chemical synthesis with homogeneous site-specific incorporation of moieties for further labeling using a wide range of labeling chemistries. The robustness and the refolding properties of affibody molecules make them amenable to labeling conditions that denature most proteins, including incubation at pH 11 at 60 degrees C for up to 60 minutes. Affibody molecules meet the requirements which are key for successful clinical use as imaging agents: high-affinity binding to the chosen target; short plasma half-life time; rapid renal clearance for nonbound drug substance and, high, continuously increasing tumor-to-organ ratios, resulting in high-contrast in vivo images shortly after injection of the diagnostic agent. PMID:17979560

  11. The HER2-Binding Affibody Molecule (ZHER2∶342)2 Increases Radiosensitivity in SKBR-3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ekerljung, Lina; Lennartsson, Johan; Gedda, Lars

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that the HER2-specific affibody molecule (ZHER2∶342)2 inhibits proliferation of SKBR-3 cells. Here, we continue to investigate its biological effects in vitro by studying receptor dimerization and clonogenic survival following irradiation. We found that (ZHER2∶342)2 sensitizes the HER2-overexpressing cell line SKBR-3 to ionizing radiation. The survival after exposure to (ZHER2∶342)2 and 8 Gy (S8Gy 0.006) was decreased by a factor four compared to the untreated (S8Gy 0.023). The low HER2-expressing cell line MCF-7 was more radiosensitive than SKBR-3 but did not respond to (ZHER2∶342)2. Treatment by (ZHER2∶342)2 strongly increased the levels of dimerized and phosphorylated HER2 even after 5 minutes of stimulation. The monomeric ZHER2∶342 does not seem to be able to induce receptor phosphorylation and dimerization or sensitize cells to irradiation. PMID:23166716

  12. Generation and evaluation of bispecific affibody molecules for simultaneous targeting of EGFR and HER2.

    PubMed

    Ekerljung, Lina; Wållberg, Helena; Sohrabian, Azita; Andersson, Karl; Friedman, Mikaela; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan; Gedda, Lars

    2012-09-19

    Coexpression of several ErbB receptors has been found in many cancers and has been linked with increased aggressiveness of tumors and a worse patient prognosis. This makes the simultaneous targeting of two surface receptors by using bispecific constructs an increasingly appreciated strategy. Here, we have generated six such bispecific targeting proteins, each comprising two monomeric affibody molecules with specific binding to either of the two human epidermal growth factor receptors, EGFR and HER2, respectively. The bispecific constructs were designed with (i) alternative positioning (N- or C-terminal) of the different affibody molecules, (ii) two alternative peptide linkers (Gly(4)Ser)(3) or (Ser(4)Gly)(3), and (iii) affibody molecules with different affinity (nanomolar or picomolar) for HER2. Using both Biacore technology and cell binding assays, it was demonstrated that all six constructs could bind simultaneously to both their target proteins. N-terminal positioning of the inherent monomeric affibody molecules was favorable to promote the binding to the respective target. Interestingly, bispecific constructs containing the novel (Ser(4)Gly)(3) linker displayed a higher affinity in cell binding, as compared to constructs containing the more conventional linker, (Gly(4)Ser)(3). It could further be concluded that bispecific constructs (but not the monomeric affibody molecules) induced dimer formation and phosphorylation of EGFR in SKBR3 cells, which express fairly high levels of both receptors. It was also investigated whether the bispecific binding would influence cell growth or sensitize cells for ionizing radiation, but no such effects were observed. PMID:22882002

  13. Feasibility of Affibody Molecule-Based PNA-Mediated Radionuclide Pretargeting of Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Honarvar, Hadis; Westerlund, Kristina; Altai, Mohamed; Sandström, Mattias; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2016-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa), non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a potential as targeting agents for radionuclide imaging of cancer. However, high renal re-absorption of Affibody molecules prevents their use for radionuclide therapy with residualizing radiometals. We hypothesized that the use of Affibody-based peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated pretargeting would enable higher accumulation of radiometals in tumors than in kidneys. To test this hypothesis, we designed an Affibody-PNA chimera ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 containing a 15-mer HP1 PNA recognition tag and a complementary HP2 hybridization probe permitting labeling with both 125I and 111In. 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 bound specifically to HER2-expressing BT474 and SKOV-3 cancer cells in vitro, with a KD of 6±2 pM for binding to SKOV-3 cells. Specific high affinity binding of the radiolabeled complementary PNA probe 111In-/125I-HP2 to ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-treated cells was demonstrated. 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 demonstrated specific accumulation in SKOV-3 xenografts in BALB/C nu/nu mice and rapid clearance from blood. Pre-saturation of SKOV-3 with non-labeled anti-HER2 Affibody or the use of HER2-negative Ramos xenografts resulted in significantly lower tumor uptake of 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1. The complementary PNA probe 111In/125I-HP2 accumulated in SKOV-3 xenografts when ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 was injected 4 h earlier. The tumor accumulation of 111In/125I-HP2 was negligible without ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-injection. The uptake of 111In-HP2 in SKOV-3 xenografts was 19±2 %ID/g at 1 h after injection. The uptake in blood and kidneys was approximately 50- and 2-fold lower, respectively. In conclusion, we have shown that the use of Affibody-based PNA-mediated pretargeting enables specific delivery of radiometals to tumors and provides higher radiometal concentration in tumors than in kidneys. PMID:26722376

  14. Evaluation of maleimide derivative of DOTA for site-specific labeling of recombinant affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Sara; Orlova, Anna; Rosik, Daniel; Sandström, Mattias; Sjöberg, Anna; Baastrup, Barbro; Widmark, Olof; Fant, Gunilla; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Affibody molecules are a new class of small (7 kDa) scaffold affinity proteins, which demonstrate promising properties as agents for in vivo radionuclide targeting. The Affibody scaffold is cysteine-free and therefore independent of disulfide bonds. Thus, a single thiol group can be engineered into the protein by introduction of one cysteine. Coupling of thiol-reactive bifunctional chelators can enable site-specific labeling of recombinantly produced Affibody molecules. In this study, the use of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-maleimidoethylacetamide (MMA-DOTA) for 111 In-labeling of anti-HER2 Affibody molecules His 6-Z HER2:342-Cys and Z HER2:2395-Cys has been evaluated. The introduction of a cysteine residue did not affect the affinity of the proteins, which was 29 pM for His 6-Z HER2:342-Cys and 27 pM for Z HER2:2395-Cys, comparable with 22 pM for the parental Z HER2:342. MMA-DOTA was conjugated to DTT-reduced Affibody molecules with a coupling efficiency of 93% using a 1:1 molar ratio of chelator to protein. The conjugates were labeled with 111 In to a specific radioactivity of up to 7 GBq/mmol, with preserved binding for the target HER2. In vivo, the non-His-tagged variant 111 In-[MMA-DOTA-Cys61]-Z HER2:2395-Cys demonstrated appreciably lower liver uptake than its His-tag-containing counterpart. In mice bearing HER2-expressing LS174T xenografts, 111 In-[MMA-DOTA-Cys61]-Z HER2:2395-Cys showed specific and rapid tumor localization, and rapid clearance from blood and nonspecific compartments, leading to a tumor-to-blood-ratio of 18 +/- 8 already 1 h p.i. Four hours p.i., the tumor-to-blood ratio was 138 +/- 8. Xenografts were clearly visualized already 1 h p.i. PMID:18163536

  15. HAHAHA, HEHEHE, HIHIHI, or HKHKHK: influence of position and composition of histidine containing tags on biodistribution of [(99m)Tc(CO)3](+)-labeled affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Hofström, Camilla; Altai, Mohamed; Honarvar, Hadis; Strand, Joanna; Malmberg, Jennie; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Orlova, Anna; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2013-06-27

    Engineered affibody molecules can be used for high contrast in vivo molecular imaging. Extending a recombinantly produced HER2 binding affibody molecule with a hexa-histidine tag allows for convenient purification by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and labeling with [(99m)Tc(CO)3](+) but increases radioactivity uptake in the liver. To investigate the impact of charge, lipophilicity, and position on biodistribution, 10 variants of a histidine-based tag was attached to a HER2 binding affibody molecule. The biochemical properties and the HER2 binding affinity appeared to be similar for all variants. In vivo, positive charge promoted liver uptake. For N-terminally placed tags, lipophilicity promoted liver uptake and decreased kidney uptake. Kidney uptake was higher for C-terminally placed tags compared to their N-terminal counterparts. The variant with the amino acid composition HEHEHE placed in the N-terminus gave the lowest nonspecific uptake. PMID:23692562

  16. Improved tumor-to-organ ratios of a novel 67Ga-human epidermal growth factor radionuclide conjugate with preadministered antiepidermal growth factor receptor affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Sandström, Karl; Haylock, Anna-Karin; Velikyan, Irina; Spiegelberg, Diana; Kareem, Heewa; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Lundqvist, Hans; Nestor, Marika

    2011-10-01

    The overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is associated with poor prognosis. Targeted nuclear imaging of the EGFR expression could improve the diagnostics in patients with HNSCC. However, the high expression of EGFR in normal organs may conceal the tumor uptake and therefore limit the use. This study assesses the biodistribution of a novel human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) radionuclide conjugate after preinjection with anti-EGFR affibody molecules. hEGF was conjugated with p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and labeled with (67)Ga. The biodistribution of [(67)Ga]Ga-NOTA-Bn-NCS-hEGF in nude mice with EGFR-expressing xenografts was evaluated either alone or 45 minutes after preinjection with one of the anti-EGFR affibody molecules Z(EGFR:1907), (Z(EGFR:1907))(2), or (Z(EGFR:955))(2). The novel radioimmunoconjugate, [(67)Ga]Ga-NOTA-Bn-NCS-hEGF, demonstrated high stability in vitro and specific binding to hEGF in vitro and in vivo. Preinjection with anti-EGFR affibody molecules improved the tumor-to-organ ratio in the liver, salivary glands, and colon. Overall, the dimeric high-affinity affibody molecule (Z(EGFR:1907))(2) exhibited the best results. These findings show that preblocking with an anti-EGFR affibody molecule is a promising tool that could improve the outcome of radionuclide-based imaging of EGFR-expressing tumors. PMID:21834651

  17. Imaging of CAIX-expressing xenografts in vivo using 99mTc-HEHEHE-ZCAIX:1 Affibody molecule

    PubMed Central

    HONARVAR, HADIS; GAROUSI, JAVAD; GUNNERIUSSON, ELIN; HÖIDÉN-GUTHENBERG, INGMARIE; ALTAI, MOHAMED; WIDSTRÖM, CHARLES; TOLMACHEV, VLADIMIR; FREJD, FREDRIK Y.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a transmembrane enzyme involved in regulation of tissue pH balance. In cancer, CAIX expression is associated with tumor hypoxia. CAIX is also overexpressed in renal cell carcinoma and is a molecular target for the therapeutic antibody cG250 (girentuximab). Radionuclide imaging of CAIX expression might be used for identification of patients who may benefit from cG250 therapy and from treatment strategies for hypoxic tumors. Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa) scaffold proteins having a high potential as probes for radionuclide molecular imaging. The aim of the present study was to evaluate feasibility of in vivo imaging of CAIX-expression using radiolabeled Affibody molecules. A histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate (HE)3-tag-containing CAIX-binding Affibody molecule (HE)3-ZCAIX:1 was labeled with [99mTc(CO)3]+. Its binding properties were evaluated in vitro using CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 renal carcinoma cells. 99mTc-(HE)3-ZCAIX:1 was evaluated in NMRI nu/nu mice bearing SK-RC-52 xenografts. The in vivo specificity test confirmed CAIX-mediated tumor targeting. 99mTc-(HE)3-ZCAIX:1 cleared rapidly from blood and normal tissues except for kidneys. At optimal time-point (4 h p.i.), the tumor uptake was 9.7±0.7% ID/g, and tumor-to-blood ratio was 53±10. Experimental imaging of CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 xenografts at 4 h p.i. provided high contrast images. The use of radioiodine label for ZCAIX:1 enabled the reduction of renal uptake, but resulted in significantly lower tumor uptake and tumor-to-blood ratio. Results of the present study suggest that radiolabeled Affibody molecules are promising probes for imaging of CAIX-expression in vivo. PMID:25434612

  18. Design, Preparation, and Characterization of PNA-Based Hybridization Probes for Affibody-Molecule-Mediated Pretargeting.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Kristina; Honarvar, Hadis; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie

    2015-08-19

    In radioimmunotherapy, the contrast between tumor and normal tissue can be improved by using a pretargeting strategy with a primary targeting agent, which is conjugated to a recognition tag, and a secondary radiolabeled molecule binding specifically to the recognition tag. The secondary molecule is injected after the targeting agent has accumulated in the tumor and is designed to have a favorable biodistribution profile, with fast clearance from blood and low uptake in normal tissues. In this study, we have designed and evaluated two complementary peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based probes for specific and high-affinity association in vivo. An anti-HER2 Affibody-PNA chimera, Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1, was produced by a semisynthetic approach using sortase A catalyzed ligation of a recombinantly produced Affibody molecule to a PNA-based HP1-probe assembled using solid-phase chemistry. A complementary HP2 probe carrying a DOTA chelator and a tyrosine for dual radiolabeling was prepared by solid-phase synthesis. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and UV thermal melts showed that the probes can hybridize to form a structured duplex with a very high melting temperature (T(m)), both in HP1:HP2 and in Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1:HP2 (T(m) = 86-88 °C), and the high binding affinity between Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1 and HP2 was confirmed in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based binding study. Following a moderately fast association (1.7 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), the dissociation of the probes was extremely slow and <5% dissociation was observed after 17 h. The equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D)) for Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1:HP2 binding to HER2 was estimated by SPR to be 212 pM, suggesting that the conjugation to PNA does not impair Affibody binding to HER2. The biodistribution profiles of (111)In- and (125)I-labeled HP2 were measured in NMRI mice, showing very fast blood clearance rates and low accumulation of radioactivity in kidneys and other organs. The measured radioactivity in blood was 0.63

  19. Radionuclide therapy of HER2-positive microxenografts using a 177Lu-labeled HER2-specific Affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Pehrson, Rikard; Galli, Joakim; Baastrup, Barbro; Andersson, Karl; Sandström, Mattias; Rosik, Daniel; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lundqvist, Hans; Wennborg, Anders; Nilsson, Fredrik Y

    2007-03-15

    A radiolabeled anti-HER2 Affibody molecule (Z(HER2:342)) targets HER2-expressing xenografts with high selectivity and gives good imaging contrast. However, the small size (approximately 7 kDa) results in rapid glomerular filtration and high renal accumulation of radiometals, thus excluding targeted therapy. Here, we report that reversible binding to albumin efficiently reduces the renal excretion and uptake, enabling radiometal-based nuclide therapy. The dimeric Affibody molecule (Z(HER2:342))(2) was fused with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) conjugated with the isothiocyanate derivative of CHX-A''-DTPA and labeled with the low-energy beta-emitter (177)Lu. The obtained conjugate [CHX-A''-DTPA-ABD-(Z(HER2:342))(2)] had a dissociation constant of 18 pmol/L to HER2 and 8.2 and 31 nmol/L for human and murine albumin, respectively. The radiolabeled conjugate displayed specific binding to HER2-expressing cells and good cellular retention in vitro. In vivo, fusion with ABD enabled a 25-fold reduction of renal uptake in comparison with the nonfused dimer molecule (Z(HER2:342))(2). Furthermore, the biodistribution showed high and specific uptake of the conjugate in HER2-expressing tumors. Treatment of SKOV-3 microxenografts (high HER2 expression) with 17 or 22 MBq (177)Lu-CHX-A''-DTPA-ABD-(Z(HER2:342))(2) completely prevented formation of tumors, in contrast to mice given PBS or 22 MBq of a radiolabeled non-HER2-binding Affibody molecule. In LS174T xenografts (low HER2 expression), this treatment resulted in a small but significant increase of the survival time. Thus, fusion with ABD improved the in vivo biodistribution, and the results highlight (177)Lu-CHX-A''-DTPA-ABD-(Z(HER2:342))(2) as a candidate for treatment of disseminated tumors with a high level of HER2 expression. PMID:17363599

  20. Dimeric HER2-specific affibody molecules inhibit proliferation of the SKBR-3 breast cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerljung, Lina Lindborg, Malin; Gedda, Lars; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Carlsson, Joergen; Lennartsson, Johan

    2008-12-12

    HER2-specific affibody molecules in different formats have previously been shown to be useful tumor targeting agents for radionuclide-based imaging and therapy applications, but their biological effect on tumor cells is not well known. In this study, two dimeric ((Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2} and (Z{sub HER2:342}){sub 2}) and one monomeric (Z{sub HER2:342}) HER2-specific affibody molecules are investigated with respect to biological activity. Both (Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2} and (Z{sub HER2:342}){sub 2} were found to decrease the growth rate of SKBR-3 cells to the same extent as the antibody trastuzumab. When the substances were removed, the cells treated with the dimeric affibody molecules continued to be growth suppressed while the cells treated with trastuzumab immediately resumed normal proliferation. The effects of Z{sub HER2:342} were minor on both proliferation and cell signaling. The dimeric (Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2} and (Z{sub HER2:342}){sub 2} both reduced growth of SKBR-3 cells and may prove therapeutically useful either by themselves or as carriers of radionuclides or other cytotoxic agents.

  1. Site-Specific Radioiodination of HER2-Targeting Affibody Molecules using 4-Iodophenethylmaleimide Decreases Renal Uptake of Radioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Joanna; Nordeman, Patrik; Honarvar, Hadis; Altai, Mohamed; Orlova, Anna; Larhed, Mats; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small scaffold-based affinity proteins with promising properties as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. However, a high reabsorption of radiolabeled Affibody molecules in kidneys is an issue. We have shown that the use of 125I-3-iodo-((4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl)maleimide (IHPEM) for site-specific labeling of cysteine-containing Affibody molecules provides high tumor uptake but low radioactivity retention in kidneys. We hypothesized that the use of 4-iodophenethylmaleimide (IPEM) would further reduce renal retention of radioactivity because of higher lipophilicity of radiometabolites. An anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) Affibody molecule (ZHER2:2395) was labeled using 125I-IPEM with an overall yield of 45±3 %. 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 bound specifically to HER2-expressing human ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV-3 cell line). In NMRI mice, the renal uptake of 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 (24±2 and 5.7±0.3 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively) was significantly lower than uptake of 125I-IHPEM-ZHER2:2395 (50±8 and 12±2 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively). In conclusion, the use of a more lipophilic linker for the radioiodination of Affibody molecules reduces renal radioactivity. PMID:25969816

  2. Cy5.5-labeled Affibody molecule for near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zheng; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-05-01

    Affibody protein is an engineered protein scaffold with a three-helical bundle structure. Affibody molecules of small size (7 kD) have great potential for targeting overexpressed cancer biomarkers in vivo. To develop an Affibody-based molecular probe for in vivo optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive tumors, an anti-EGFR Affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 (7 kD), is site-specifically conjugated with a near-IR fluorescence dye, Cy5.5-mono-maleimide. Using fluorescent microscopy, the binding specificity of the probe Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 is checked by a high-EGFR-expressing A431 cell and low-EGFR-expressing MCF7 cells. The binding affinity of Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 (KD) to EGFR is 43.6+/-8.4 nM, as determined by flow cytometry. For an in vivo imaging study, the probe shows fast tumor targeting and good tumor contrast as early as 0.5 h postinjection (p.i.) for A431 tumors, while MCF7 tumors are barely visible. An ex vivo imaging study also demonstrates that Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 has high tumor, liver, and kidney uptakes at 24 h p.i.. In conclusion, Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 shows good affinity and high specificity to the EGFR. There is rapid achievement of good tumor-to-normal-tissue contrasts of Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907, thus demonstrating its potential for EGFR-targeted molecular imaging of cancers.

  3. Cy5.5-labeled Affibody molecule for near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zheng; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Affibody protein is an engineered protein scaffold with a three-helical bundle structure. Affibody molecules of small size (7 kD) have great potential for targeting overexpressed cancer biomarkers in vivo. To develop an Affibody-based molecular probe for in vivo optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive tumors, an anti-EGFR Affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) (7 kD), is site-specifically conjugated with a near-IR fluorescence dye, Cy5.5-mono-maleimide. Using fluorescent microscopy, the binding specificity of the probe Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) is checked by a high-EGFR-expressing A431 cell and low-EGFR-expressing MCF7 cells. The binding affinity of Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) (K(D)) to EGFR is 43.6+/-8.4 nM, as determined by flow cytometry. For an in vivo imaging study, the probe shows fast tumor targeting and good tumor contrast as early as 0.5 h postinjection (p.i.) for A431 tumors, while MCF7 tumors are barely visible. An ex vivo imaging study also demonstrates that Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) has high tumor, liver, and kidney uptakes at 24 h p.i.. In conclusion, Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) shows good affinity and high specificity to the EGFR. There is rapid achievement of good tumor-to-normal-tissue contrasts of Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907), thus demonstrating its potential for EGFR-targeted molecular imaging of cancers. PMID:20615009

  4. PET imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in tumours using 89Zr-labelled ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecules

    PubMed Central

    GAROUSI, JAVAD; ANDERSSON, KEN G.; MITRAN, BOGDAN; PICHL, MARIE-LOUISE; STÅHL, STEFAN; ORLOVA, ANNA; LÖFBLOM, JOHN; TOLMACHEV, VLADIMIR

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, which is overexpressed in many types of cancer. The use of EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine-kinase inhibitors improves significantly survival of patients with colorectal, non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Detection of EGFR overexpression provides important prognostic and predictive information influencing management of the patients. The use of radionuclide molecular imaging would enable non-invasive repeatable determination of EGFR expression in disseminated cancer. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) would provide superior sensitivity and quantitation accuracy in EGFR expression imaging. Affibody molecules are a new type of imaging probes, providing high contrast in molecular imaging. In the present study, an EGFR-binding affibody molecule (ZEGFR:2377) was site-specifically conjugated with a deferoxamine (DFO) chelator and labelled under mild conditions (room temperature and neutral pH) with a positron-emitting radionuclide 89Zr. The 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 tracer demonstrated specific high affinity (160±60 pM) binding to EGFR-expressing A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. In mice bearing A431 xenografts, 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 demonstrated specific uptake in tumours and EGFR-expressing tissues. The tracer provided tumour uptake of 2.6±0.5% ID/g and tumour-to-blood ratio of 3.7±0.6 at 24 h after injection. 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 provides higher tumour-to-organ ratios than anti-EGFR antibody 89Zr-DFO-cetuximab at 48 h after injection. EGFR-expressing tumours were clearly visualized by microPET using 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 at both 3 and 24 h after injection. In conclusion, 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 is a potential probe for PET imaging of EGFR-expression in vivo. PMID:26847636

  5. PET imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in tumours using 89Zr-labelled ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Garousi, Javad; Andersson, Ken G; Mitran, Bogdan; Pichl, Marie-Louise; Ståhl, Stefan; Orlova, Anna; Löfblom, John; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, which is overexpressed in many types of cancer. The use of EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine-kinase inhibitors improves significantly survival of patients with colorectal, non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Detection of EGFR overexpression provides important prognostic and predictive information influencing management of the patients. The use of radionuclide molecular imaging would enable non-invasive repeatable determination of EGFR expression in disseminated cancer. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) would provide superior sensitivity and quantitation accuracy in EGFR expression imaging. Affibody molecules are a new type of imaging probes, providing high contrast in molecular imaging. In the present study, an EGFR-binding affibody molecule (ZEGFR:2377) was site-specifically conjugated with a deferoxamine (DFO) chelator and labelled under mild conditions (room temperature and neutral pH) with a positron-emitting radionuclide (89)Zr. The (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 tracer demonstrated specific high affinity (160 ± 60 pM) binding to EGFR-expressing A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. In mice bearing A431 xenografts, (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 demonstrated specific uptake in tumours and EGFR-expressing tissues. The tracer provided tumour uptake of 2.6 ± 0.5% ID/g and tumour-to-blood ratio of 3.7 ± 0.6 at 24 h after injection. (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 provides higher tumour-to-organ ratios than anti-EGFR antibody (89)Zr-DFO-cetuximab at 48 h after injection. EGFR‑expressing tumours were clearly visualized by microPET using (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 at both 3 and 24 h after injection. In conclusion, 8(9)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 is a potential probe for PET imaging of EGFR-expression in vivo. PMID:26847636

  6. In vivo and in vitro uptake of 111In, delivered with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2, in EGFR expressing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Orlova, A; Friedman, M; Tolmachev, V; Ståhl, S; Nilsson, F Y; Glimelius, B; Carlsson, J

    2008-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, is overexpressed in many carcinomas. Targeting this receptor with radionuclides is important for imaging and therapy applications in nuclear medicine. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo properties of a new high affinity EGFR binding affibody molecule, (ZEGFR:955)2, when conjugated with CHX-A''-DTPA and labelled with 111In. The binding time patterns and retention studies were performed using cultured squamous carcinoma A431 cells that overexpress EGFR. In the in vivo studies, female BALB/c nu/nu mice carrying tumours from xenografted A431 cells were used. The in vitro studies showed EGFR specific binding, high uptake and good retention of 111In when delivered as [111In](ZEGFR:955)2. The retention after 72 h of incubation was 38.0+/-1.15% of the initial level. The biodistribution study showed a tumour specific 111In uptake of 3.8+/-1.4% of injected dose per gram tumour tissue 4 h post-injection. The tumour to blood ratio was 9.1 and the tumours could easily be visualized with a gamma camera at this time-point. 111In delivered with [111In](ZEGFR:955)2 gave an EGFR specific uptake and the results indicated that the (ZEGFR:955)2 affibody molecule is a candidate for radionuclide-based tumour imaging. Potential therapy applications are discussed. PMID:18357367

  7. Increasing the Net Negative Charge by Replacement of DOTA Chelator with DOTAGA Improves the Biodistribution of Radiolabeled Second-Generation Synthetic Affibody Molecules.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Kristina; Honarvar, Hadis; Norrström, Emily; Strand, Joanna; Mitran, Bogdan; Orlova, Anna; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A promising strategy to enable patient stratification for targeted therapies is to monitor the target expression in a tumor by radionuclide molecular imaging. Affibody molecules (7 kDa) are nonimmunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a 25-fold smaller size than intact antibodies. They have shown an apparent potential as molecular imaging probes both in preclinical and clinical studies. Earlier, we found that hepatic uptake can be reduced by the incorporation of negatively charged purification tags at the N-terminus of Affibody molecules. We hypothesized that liver uptake might similarly be reduced by positioning the chelator at the N-terminus, where the chelator-radionuclide complex will provide negative charges. To test this hypothesis, a second generation synthetic anti-HER2 ZHER2:2891 Affibody molecule was synthesized and labeled with (111)In and (68)Ga using DOTAGA and DOTA chelators. The chelators were manually coupled to the N-terminus of ZHER2:2891 forming an amide bond. Labeling DOTAGA-ZHER2:2891 and DOTA-ZHER2:2891 with (68)Ga and (111)In resulted in stable radioconjugates. The tumor-targeting and biodistribution properties of the (111)In- and (68)Ga-labeled conjugates were compared in SKOV-3 tumor-bearing nude mice at 2 h postinjection. The HER2-specific binding of the radioconjugates was verified both in vitro and in vivo. Using the DOTAGA chelator gave significantly lower radioactivity in liver and blood for both radionuclides. The (111)In-labeled conjugates showed more rapid blood clearance than the (68)Ga-labeled conjugates. The most pronounced influence of the chelators was found when they were labeled with (68)Ga. The DOTAGA chelator gave significantly higher tumor-to-blood (61 ± 6 vs 23 ± 5, p < 0.05) and tumor-to-liver (10.4 ± 0.6 vs 4.5 ± 0.5, p < 0.05) ratios than the DOTA chelator. This study demonstrated that chelators may be used to alter the uptake of Affibody molecules, and most likely other scaffold-based imaging probes, for improvement

  8. In vivo targeting of HER2-positive tumor using 2-helix affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gang; Webster, Jack M; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Rong; Miao, Zheng; Liu, Hongguang; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Syud, Faisal A; Cheng, Zhen

    2012-07-01

    Molecular imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression has drawn significant attention because of the unique role of the HER2 gene in diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of human breast cancer. In our previous research, a novel cyclic 2-helix small protein, MUT-DS, was discovered as an anti-HER2 Affibody analog with high affinity through rational protein design and engineering. MUT-DS was then evaluated for positron emission tomography (PET) of HER2-positive tumor by labeling with two radionuclides, 68Ga and 18F, with relatively short half-life (t1/2<2 h). In order to fully study the in vivo behavior of 2-helix small protein and demonstrate that it could be a robust platform for labeling with a variety of radionuclides for different applications, in this study, MUT-DS was further radiolabeled with 64Cu or 111In and evaluated for in vivo targeting of HER2-positive tumor in mice. Design 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated MUT-DS (DOTA-MUT-DS) was chemically synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesizer and I2 oxidation. DOTA-MUT-DS was then radiolabeled with 64Cu or 111In to prepare the HER2 imaging probe (64Cu/111In-DOTA-MUT-DS). Both biodistribution and microPET imaging of the probe were evaluated in nude mice bearing subcutaneous HER2-positive SKOV3 tumors. DOTA-MUT-DS could be successfully synthesized and radiolabeled with 64Cu or 111In. Biodistribution study showed that tumor uptake value of 64Cu or 111In-labeled DOTA-MUT-DS was 4.66±0.38 or 2.17±0.15%ID/g, respectively, in nude mice bearing SKOV3 xenografts (n=3) at 1 h post-injection (p.i.). Tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios for 64Cu-DOTA-MUT-DS were attained to be 3.05 and 3.48 at 1 h p.i., respectively, while for 111In-DOTA-MUT-DS, they were 2.04 and 3.19, respectively. Co-injection of the cold Affibody molecule ZHER2:342 with 64Cu-DOTA-MUT-DS specifically reduced the SKOV3 tumor uptake of the probe by 48%. 111In

  9. Targeting of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expressing tumor cells with sterically stabilized affibody liposomes (SAL).

    PubMed

    Beuttler, Julia; Rothdiener, Miriam; Müller, Dafne; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Kontermann, Roland E

    2009-06-01

    Affibody molecules are small and stable antigen-binding molecules derived from the B domain of protein A. We applied a bivalent, high-affinity epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-specific affibody molecule for the generation of targeted PEGylated liposomes. These sterically stabilized affibody liposomes (SAL) were produced by chemical coupling of the cysteine-modified affibody molecule to maleimide-PEG(2000)-DSPE and subsequent insertion into PEGylated liposomes. These SAL showed strong and selective binding to EGFR-expressing tumor cell lines. Binding was dependent on the amount of inserted affibody molecule-lipid conjugates and could be blocked by soluble EGF. Approximately 30% of binding activity was still retained after 6 days of incubation in human plasma at 37 degrees C. Binding of SAL to cells led to efficient internalization of the liposomes. Using mitoxantrone-loaded liposomes, we observed for SAL, compared to untargeted liposomes, an enhanced cytotoxicity toward EGFR-expressing cells. In summary, we show that SAL can be easily prepared from affibody molecules and thus may be suitable for the development of carrier systems for targeted delivery of drugs. PMID:19435362

  10. In vivo imaging of xenograft tumors using an epidermal growth factor receptor-specific affibody molecule labeled with a near-infrared fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibiao; Kovar, Joy; Little, Garrick; Chen, Huaxian; Olive, David Michael

    2010-02-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with many types of cancers. It is of great interest to noninvasively image the EGFR expression in vivo. In this study, we labeled an EGFR-specific Affibody molecule (Eaff) with a near-infrared (NIR) dye IRDye800CW maleimide and tested the binding of this labeled molecule (Eaff800) in cell culture and xenograft mouse tumor models. Unlike EGF, Eaff did not activate the EGFR signaling pathway. Results showed that Eaff800 was bound and taken up specifically by EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. When Eaff800 was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing A431 xenograft tumors, the tumor could be identified 1 hour after injection and it became most prominent after 1 day. Images of dissected tissue sections demonstrated that the accumulation of Eaff800 was highest in the liver, followed by the tumor and kidney. Moreover, in combination with a human EGFR type 2 (HER2)-specific probe Haff682, Eaff800 could be used to distinguish between EGFR- and HER2-overexpressing tumors. Interestingly, the organ distribution pattern and the clearance rate of Eaff800 were different from those of Haff682. In conclusion, Eaff molecule labeled with a NIR fluorophore is a promising molecular imaging agent for EGFR-overexpressing tumors. PMID:20126472

  11. Imaging agents for in vivo molecular profiling of disseminated prostate cancer--targeting EGFR receptors in prostate cancer: comparison of cellular processing of [111In]-labeled affibody molecule Z(EGFR:2377) and cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Jennie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna

    2011-04-01

    Expression of receptor tyrosine-kinase (RTK) EGFR is low in normal prostate, but increases in prostate cancer. This receptor is significantly up-regulated as tumors progress into higher grade, androgen-insensitive and metastatic lesions. The up-regulated receptors could serve as targets for novel selective anti-cancer drugs, e.g. antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Radionuclide imaging of RTK can facilitate patient stratification and monitoring of anti-RTK therapy of prostate cancer. The goal of the study was to evaluate binding and cellar processing of radiolabeled EGFR-targeting conjugates by prostate cancer cell lines. Receptor expression of EGFR was studied in three prostate cancer cell lines: DU145 (brain metastasis of PC, hormone insensitive), PC3 (bone metastasis of PC) and LNCaP (lymph node metastasis of PC, androgen and estrogen receptor positive). Uptake and internalization of anti-EGFR mAbs (cetuximab) and affibody molecule (Z2377) labeled with indium-111 was investigated. EGFR expression on prostate cancer cell lines was clearly demonstrated. Both labelled conjugates 111In-Z2377 and 111In-cetuximab bound to prostate cancer cells in the receptor mediated model. Expression levels were modest but correlate with degree of hormone independence. Internalization of Affibody molecules was relatively slow in all cell lines. Internalization of mAbs was more rapid. The level of EGFR expression in these cell lines is sufficient for in vivo molecular imaging. Slow internalization indicates possibility of the use of non-residualizing labels for affibody molecules. PMID:21253675

  12. Inhibiting HER3-Mediated Tumor Cell Growth with Affibody Molecules Engineered to Low Picomolar Affinity by Position-Directed Error-Prone PCR-Like Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Magdalena; Kronqvist, Nina; Lindberg, Hanna; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Bass, Tarek; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Varasteh, Zohreh; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2013-01-01

    The HER3 receptor is implicated in the progression of various cancers as well as in resistance to several currently used drugs, and is hence a potential target for development of new therapies. We have previously generated Affibody molecules that inhibit heregulin-induced signaling of the HER3 pathways. The aim of this study was to improve the affinity of the binders to hopefully increase receptor inhibition efficacy and enable a high receptor-mediated uptake in tumors. We explored a novel strategy for affinity maturation of Affibody molecules that is based on alanine scanning followed by design of library diversification to mimic the result from an error-prone PCR reaction, but with full control over mutated positions and thus less biases. Using bacterial surface display and flow-cytometric sorting of the maturation library, the affinity for HER3 was improved more than 30-fold down to 21 pM. The affinity is among the higher that has been reported for Affibody molecules and we believe that the maturation strategy should be generally applicable for improvement of affinity proteins. The new binders also demonstrated an improved thermal stability as well as complete refolding after denaturation. Moreover, inhibition of ligand-induced proliferation of HER3-positive breast cancer cells was improved more than two orders of magnitude compared to the previously best-performing clone. Radiolabeled Affibody molecules showed specific targeting of a number of HER3-positive cell lines in vitro as well as targeting of HER3 in in vivo mouse models and represent promising candidates for future development of targeted therapies and diagnostics. PMID:23675426

  13. Position for site-specific attachment of a DOTA chelator to synthetic affibody molecules has a different influence on the targeting properties of 68Ga- compared to 111in-labeled conjugates.

    PubMed

    Honarvar, Hadis; Strand, Joanna; Perols, Anna; Orlova, Anna; Selvaraju, Ram Kumar; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Affibody molecules, small (7 kDa) scaffold proteins, are a promising class of probes for radionuclide molecular imaging. Radiolabeling of Affibody molecules with the positron-emitting nuclide 68Ga would permit the use of positron emission tomography (PET), providing better resolution, sensitivity, and quantification accuracy than single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The synthetic anti-HER2 ZHER2:S1 Affibody molecule was conjugated with DOTA at the N-terminus, in the middle of helix 3, or at the C-terminus. The biodistribution of 68Ga- and 111In-labeled Affibody molecules was directly compared in NMRI nu/nu mice bearing SKOV3 xenografts. The position of the chelator strongly influenced the biodistribution of the tracers, and the influence was more pronounced for 68Ga-labeled Affibody molecules than for the 111In-labeled counterparts. The best 68Ga-labeled variant was 68Ga-[DOTA-A1]-ZHER2:S1, which provided a tumor uptake of 13 ± 1 %ID/g and a tumor to blood ratio of 39 ± 12 at 2 hours after injection. 111In-[DOTA-A1]-ZHER2:S1 and 111In-[DOTA-K58]-ZHER2:S1 were equally good at this time point, providing a tumor uptake of 15 to 16 %ID/g and a tumor to blood ratio in the range of 60 to 80. In conclusion, the selection of the best position for a chelator in Affibody molecules can be used for optimization of their imaging properties. This may be important for the development of Affibody-based and other protein-based imaging probes. PMID:25249017

  14. Positron binding to molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    While there is theoretical evidence that positrons can bind to atoms, calculations for molecules are much less precise. Unfortunately, there have been no measurements of positron-atom binding, due primarily to the difficulty in forming positron-atom bound states in two-body collisions. In contrast, positrons attach to molecules via Feshbach resonances (VFR) in which a vibrational mode absorbs the excess energy. Using a high-resolution positron beam, this VFR process has been studied to measure binding energies for more than 40 molecules. New measurements will be described in two areas: positron binding to relatively simple molecules, for which theoretical calculations appear to be possible; and positron binding to molecules with large permanent dipole moments, which can be compared to analogous, weakly bound electron-molecule (negative-ion) states. Binding energies range from 75 meV for CS2 (no dipole moment) to 180 meV for acetonitrile (CH3CN). Other species studied include aldehydes and ketones, which have permanent dipole moments in the range 2.5 - 3.0 debye. The measured binding energies are surprisingly large (by a factor of 10 to 100) compared to those for the analogous negative ions, and these differences will be discussed. New theoretical calculations for positron-molecule binding are in progress, and a recent result for acetonitrile will be discussed. This ability to compare theory and experiment represents a significant step in attempts to understand positron binding to matter. In collaboration with A. C. L. Jones, J. J. Gosselin, and C. M. Surko, and supported by NSF grant PHY 07-55809.

  15. Efficient [(18)F]AlF Radiolabeling of ZHER3:8698 Affibody Molecule for Imaging of HER3 Positive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Da Pieve, Chiara; Allott, Louis; Martins, Carlos D; Vardon, Andrew; Ciobota, Daniela M; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Smith, Graham

    2016-08-17

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is overexpressed in several cancers, being linked to a more resistant phenotype and hence leading to poor patient prognosis. Imaging HER3 is challenging owing to the modest receptor number (<50000 receptors/cell) in overexpressing cancer cells. Therefore, to image HER3 in vivo, high target affinity PET probes need to be developed. This work describes two different [(18)F]AlF radiolabeling strategies of the ZHER3:8698 affibody molecule specifically targeting HER3. The one-pot radiolabeling of ZHER3:8698 performed at 100 °C and using 1,4,7-triazanonane-1,4,7-triacetate (NOTA) as chelator resulted in radiolabeled products with variable purity attributed to radioconjugate thermolysis. An alternative approach based on the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reaction between a novel tetrazine functionalized 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetate (NODA) chelator and the trans-cyclooctene (TCO) functionalized affibody molecule was also investigated. This method enabled the radiolabeling of the protein at room temperature. The [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-ZHER3:8698 and [(18)F]AlF-NODA-ZHER3:8698 conjugates showed a specific uptake at 1 h after injection in high HER3-expressing MCF-7 tumors of 4.36 ± 0.92% ID/g and 4.96 ± 0.65% ID/g, respectively. The current results are encouraging for further investigation of [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-ZHER3:8698 as a HER3 imaging agent. PMID:27357023

  16. The effect of a dimeric Affibody molecule (ZEGFR:1907)2 targeting EGFR in combination with radiation in colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Häggblad Sahlberg, Sara; Spiegelberg, Diana; Lennartsson, Johan; Nygren, Peter; Glimelius, Bengt; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in colorectal cancer and is therefore an attractive target for treatment. (ZEGFR:1907)2 is a newly developed dimeric affibody molecule with high affinity to the extracellular part of EGFR. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of (ZEGFR:1907)2 in combination with external radiation and the possible inhibitory effects in the EGFR signalling pathways in the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and HCT116. The effects were compared with an EGFR antibody (cetuximab) and the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (erlotinib and sunitinib). These cell lines are genotypically different with respect to e.g. KRAS and BRAF mutational status, recently shown to be of clinical significance for therapeutic effects. Both cell lines express approximately 100,000-150,000 EGFRs per cell but differ in the radiation response (HCT116, SF2=0.28 and HT-29, SF2=0.70). Exposure to (ZEGFR:1907)2 produced a small, but significant, reduction in survival in HCT116 but did not affect HT-29 cells. Similar results were obtained after exposure to EGF and the EGFR antibody cetuximab. The EGFR tyrosine kinase targeting inhibitor erlotinib and the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib reduced survival in both cell lines. However, none of the drugs had any significant radiosensitizing effects in combination with radiation. Akt and Erk are central proteins in the EGFR downstream signalling and in the cellular response to ionizing radiation. The activation of Akt (Ser 473) and Erk (Thr202/Tyr204) by radiation was both dose- and time-dependent. However the activation of EGFR was not clearly affected by radiation. Neither (ZEGFR:1907)2 nor any of the other drugs were able to completely inactivate Akt or Erk. On the contrary, erlotinib stimulated Akt phosphorylation in both cell lines and in HCT116 cells Erk was activated. Overall the results illustrate the complexity in response to radiation and drugs in cells with differential

  17. Fluorogen Activating Protein–Affibody Probes: Modular, No-Wash Measurement of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence is essential for dynamic live cell imaging, and affinity reagents are required for quantification of endogenous proteins. Various fluorescent dyes can report on different aspects of biological trafficking, but must be independently conjugated to affinity reagents and characterized for specific biological readouts. Here we present the characterization of a new modular platform for small anti-EGFR affinity probes for studying rapid changes in receptor pools. A protein domain (FAP dL5**) that binds to malachite-green (MG) derivatives for fluorescence activation was expressed as a recombinant fusion to one or two copies of the compact EGFR binding affibody ZEGFR:1907. This is a recombinant and fluorogenic labeling reagent for native EGFR molecules. In vitro fluorescence assays demonstrated that the binding of these dyes to the FAP–affibody fusions produced thousand-fold fluorescence enhancements, with high binding affinity and fast association rates. Flow cytometry assays and fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that these probes label endogenous EGFR on A431 cells without disruption of EGFR function, and low nanomolar surface Kd values were observed with the double-ZEGFR:1907 constructs. The application of light-harvesting fluorogens (dyedrons) significantly improved the detected fluorescence signal. Altering the order of addition of the ligand, probe, and dyes allowed differentiation between surface and endocytotic pools of receptors to reveal the rapid dynamics of endocytic trafficking. Therefore, FAP/affibody coupling provides a new approach to construct compact and modular affinity probes that label endogenous proteins on living cells and can be used for studying rapid changes in receptor pools involved in trafficking. PMID:25490520

  18. Fluorogen activating protein-affibody probes: modular, no-wash measurement of epidermal growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Telmer, Cheryl A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Franke, Josef D; Ort, Stephan; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2015-01-21

    Fluorescence is essential for dynamic live cell imaging, and affinity reagents are required for quantification of endogenous proteins. Various fluorescent dyes can report on different aspects of biological trafficking, but must be independently conjugated to affinity reagents and characterized for specific biological readouts. Here we present the characterization of a new modular platform for small anti-EGFR affinity probes for studying rapid changes in receptor pools. A protein domain (FAP dL5**) that binds to malachite-green (MG) derivatives for fluorescence activation was expressed as a recombinant fusion to one or two copies of the compact EGFR binding affibody ZEGFR:1907. This is a recombinant and fluorogenic labeling reagent for native EGFR molecules. In vitro fluorescence assays demonstrated that the binding of these dyes to the FAP-affibody fusions produced thousand-fold fluorescence enhancements, with high binding affinity and fast association rates. Flow cytometry assays and fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that these probes label endogenous EGFR on A431 cells without disruption of EGFR function, and low nanomolar surface Kd values were observed with the double-ZEGFR:1907 constructs. The application of light-harvesting fluorogens (dyedrons) significantly improved the detected fluorescence signal. Altering the order of addition of the ligand, probe, and dyes allowed differentiation between surface and endocytotic pools of receptors to reveal the rapid dynamics of endocytic trafficking. Therefore, FAP/affibody coupling provides a new approach to construct compact and modular affinity probes that label endogenous proteins on living cells and can be used for studying rapid changes in receptor pools involved in trafficking. PMID:25490520

  19. Hydrophobic fluorescent probes introduce artifacts into single molecule tracking experiments due to non-specific binding.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C; Tynan, Christopher J; Rolfe, Daniel J; Clarke, David T; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools to investigate the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes; however, data quality can suffer because of weak specific signal, background noise and dye bleaching and blinking. It is less well-known, but equally important, that non-specific binding of probe to substrates results in a large number of immobile fluorescent molecules, introducing significant artifacts in live cell experiments. Following from our previous work in which we investigated glass coating substrates and demonstrated that the main contribution to this non-specific probe adhesion comes from the dye, we carried out a systematic investigation of how different dye chemistries influence the behaviour of spectrally similar fluorescent probes. Single-molecule brightness, bleaching and probe mobility on the surface of live breast cancer cells cultured on a non-adhesive substrate were assessed for anti-EGFR affibody conjugates with 14 different dyes from 5 different manufacturers, belonging to 3 spectrally homogeneous bands (491 nm, 561 nm and 638 nm laser lines excitation). Our results indicate that, as well as influencing their photophysical properties, dye chemistry has a strong influence on the propensity of dye-protein conjugates to adhere non-specifically to the substrate. In particular, hydrophobicity has a strong influence on interactions with the substrate, with hydrophobic dyes showing much greater levels of binding. Crucially, high levels of non-specific substrate binding result in calculated diffusion coefficients significantly lower than the true values. We conclude that the physic-chemical properties of the dyes should be considered carefully when planning single-molecule experiments. Favourable dye characteristics such as photostability and brightness can be offset by the propensity of a conjugate for non-specific adhesion. PMID:24066121

  20. Anion binding to the ubiquitin molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Makhatadze, G. I.; Lopez, M. M.; Richardson, J. M.; Thomas, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of different salts (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2, GdmCl, NaBr, NaClO4, NaH2PO4, Na2SO4) on the stability of the ubiquitin molecule at pH 2.0 have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism, and Tyr fluorescence spectroscopies. It is shown that all of the salts studied significantly increase the thermostability of the ubiquitin molecule, and that this stabilization can be interpreted in terms of anion binding. Estimated thermodynamic parameters of binding for Cl- show that this binding is relatively weak (Kd = 0.15 M) and is characterized by a negative enthalpy of -15 kJ/mol per site. Particularly surprising was the observed stabilizing effect of GdmCl through the entire concentration range studied (0.01-2 M), however, to a lesser extent than stabilization by NaCl. This stabilizing effect of GdmCl appears to arise from the binding of Cl- ions. Analysis of the observed changes in the stability of the ubiquitin molecule in the presence of GdmCl can be adequately described by combining the thermodynamic model of denaturant binding with Cl- binding effects. PMID:9541401

  1. Inclusion of a non-immunoglobulin binding protein in two-site ELISA for quantification of human serum proteins without interference by heterophilic serum antibodies.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Mårten; Rönnmark, Jenny; Areström, Iréne; Nygren, Per Ake; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2003-12-01

    Measurement of human serum molecules with two-site ELISA can be biased by the presence of human heterophilic anti-animal immunoglobulin antibodies (HAIA) that cause false-positive signals by cross-linking the monoclonal (mAb) and/or polyclonal antibodies (pAb) used for the pre- (capture) and post-analyte steps (detection). To evaluate a novel ELISA format designed to avoid interference by HAIA, a target-specific non-immunoglobulin (Ig) affinity protein (affibody) was used to replace one of the antibodies. First, a human IgA-binding affibody (Z(IgA)) selected by phage display technology from a combinatorial library of a single Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain was used. The detection range of IgA standard using an ELISA based on Z(IgA) for capture and goat pAb against IgA (pAb(IgA)) for detection was comparable with that of using pAb(IgA) for both capture and detection. Secondly, another affibody (Z(Apo)) was combined with mAb and used to detect recombinant human apolipoprotein A-1. The affibody/antibody ELISAs were also used to quantify human serum levels of IgA and apolipoprotein A1. To verify that human serum did not cause false-positive signals in the affibody/antibody ELISA format, the ability of human serum to cross-link affibodies, mAb (mouse or rat) and/or pAb (goat) displaying non-matched specificities was assessed; affibodies and antibodies were not cross-linked whereas all combinations of mAb and/or pAb were cross-linked. The combination of affibodies and antibodies for analysis of human serum molecules represents a novel two-site ELISA format which precludes false-positive signals caused by HAIA. PMID:14659914

  2. An affibody in complex with a target protein: Structure and coupled folding

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Elisabet; Lendel, Christofer; Helgstrand, Magnus; Allard, Peter; Dincbas-Renqvist, Vildan; Hedqvist, Anders; Berglund, Helena; Nygren, Per-Åke; Härd, Torleif

    2003-01-01

    Combinatorial protein engineering provides powerful means for functional selection of novel binding proteins. One class of engineered binding proteins, denoted affibodies, is based on the three-helix scaffold of the Z domain derived from staphylococcal protein A. The ZSPA-1 affibody has been selected from a phage-displayed library as a binder to protein A. ZSPA-1 also binds with micromolar affinity to its own ancestor, the Z domain. We have characterized the ZSPA-1 affibody in its uncomplexed state and determined the solution structure of a Z:ZSPA-1 protein–protein complex. Uncomplexed ZSPA-1 behaves as an aggregation-prone molten globule, but folding occurs on binding, and the original (Z) three-helix bundle scaffold is fully formed in the complex. The structural basis for selection and strong binding is a large interaction interface with tight steric and polar/nonpolar complementarity that directly involves 10 of 13 mutated amino acid residues on ZSPA-1. We also note similarities in how the surface of the Z domain responds by induced fit to binding of ZSPA-1 and Ig Fc, respectively, suggesting that the ZSPA-1 affibody is capable of mimicking the morphology of the natural binding partner for the Z domain. PMID:12594333

  3. Comparison of two site-specifically (18)F-labeled affibodies for PET imaging of EGFR positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinhui; Cheng, Kai; Jeon, Jongho; Shen, Bin; Venturin, Gianina Teribele; Hu, Xiang; Rao, Jianghong; Chin, Frederick T; Wu, Hua; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-11-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) serves as an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Our previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed that the EGFR-targeting affibody molecules (64)Cu-DOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-FBEM-ZEGFR:1907 can discriminate between high and low EGFR-expression tumors and have the potential for patient selection for EGFR-targeted therapy. Compared with (64)Cu, (18)F may improve imaging of EGFR-expression and is more suitable for clinical application, but the labeling reaction of (18)F-FBEM-ZEGFR:1907 requires a long synthesis time. The aim of the present study is to develop a new generation of (18)F labeled affibody probes (Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907) and to determine whether they are suitable agents for imaging of EGFR expression. The first approach consisted of conjugating ZEGFR:1907 with NOTA and radiolabeling with Al(18)F to produce Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907. In a second approach the prosthetic group (18)F-labeled-2-cyanobenzothiazole ((18)F-CBT) was conjugated to Cys-ZEGFR:1907 to produce (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907. Binding affinity and specificity of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 to EGFR were evaluated using A431 cells. Biodistribution and PET studies were conducted on mice bearing A431 xenografts after injection of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 or (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 with or without coinjection of unlabeled affibody proteins. The radiosyntheses of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 were completed successfully within 40 and 120 min with a decay-corrected yield of 15% and 41% using a 2-step, 1-pot reaction and 2-step, 2-pot reaction, respectively. Both probes bound to EGFR with low nanomolar affinity in A431 cells. Although (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 showed instability in vivo, biodistribution studies revealed rapid and high tumor accumulation and quick clearance from normal tissues except the bones. In contrast, Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 demonstrated high in

  4. Nanobubble-Affibody: Novel ultrasound contrast agents for targeted molecular ultrasound imaging of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengli; Cai, Wenbin; Xu, Lei; Lv, Xiuhua; Qiao, Youbei; Li, Pan; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yunyou

    2015-01-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs), as novel ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have attracted increasing attention in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging for tumors. However, the preparation of uniform-sized NBs is considered to be controversial, and poor tumor selectivity in in vivo imaging has been reported. In this study, we fabricated uniform nano-sized NBs (478.2 ± 29.7 nm with polydispersity index of 0.164 ± 0.044, n = 3) using a thin-film hydration method by controlling the thickness of phospholipid films; we then conjugated the NBs with Affibody molecules to produce nano-sized UCAs referred to as NB-Affibody with specific affinity to human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. NB-Affibody presented good ultrasound enhancement, demonstrating a peak intensity of 104.5 ± 2.1 dB under ultrasound contrast scanning. Ex vivo experiments further confirmed that the NB-Affibody conjugates were capable of targeting HER2-expressing tumor cells in vivo with high affinity. The newly prepared nano-sized NB-Affibody conjugates were observed to be novel targeted UCAs for efficient and safe specific molecular imaging and may have potential applications in early cancer quantitative diagnosis and targeted therapy in the future. PMID:25453958

  5. Programmable DNA-binding Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Meghan S.; Melander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant gene expression is responsible for a myriad of human diseases from infectious diseases to cancer. Precise regulation of these genes via specific interactions with the DNA double helix could pave the way for novel therapeutics. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamides are small molecules capable of binding to pre-determined DNA sequences up to 16 base pairs with affinity and specificity comparable to natural transcription factors. In the three decades since their development, great strides have been made relating to synthetic accessibility and improved sequence specificity and binding affinity. This perspective presents a brief history of early seminal developments in the field and highlights recent reports of the utility of polyamides as both genetic modulators and molecular probes. PMID:23665141

  6. Tomography of epidermal growth factor receptor binding to fluorescent Affibody in vivo studied with magnetic resonance guided fluorescence recovery in varying orthotopic glioma sizes

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Robert W.; Demers, Jennifer-Lynn H.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Gunn, Jason R.; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to image targeted tracer binding to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was studied in vivo in orthotopically grown glioma tumors of different sizes. The binding potential was quantified using a dual-tracer approach, which employs a fluorescently labeled peptide targeted to EGFR and a reference tracer with similar pharmacokinetic properties but no specific binding, to estimate the relative bound fraction from kinetic compartment modeling. The recovered values of binding potential did not vary significantly as a function of tumor size (1 to 33  mm3), suggesting that binding potential may be consistent in the U251 tumors regardless of size or stage after implantation. However, the fluorescence yield of the targeted fluorescent tracers in the tumor was affected significantly by tumor size, suggesting that dual-tracer imaging helps account for variations in absolute uptake, which plague single-tracer imaging techniques. Ex vivo analysis showed relatively high spatial heterogeneity in each tumor that cannot be resolved by tomographic techniques. Nonetheless, the dual-tracer tomographic technique is a powerful tool for longitudinal bulk estimation of receptor binding. PMID:25652703

  7. Tomography of epidermal growth factor receptor binding to fluorescent Affibody in vivo studied with magnetic resonance guided fluorescence recovery in varying orthotopic glioma sizes.

    PubMed

    Holt, Robert W; Demers, Jennifer-Lynn H; Sexton, Kristian J; Gunn, Jason R; Davis, Scott C; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Pogue, Brian W

    2015-02-01

    The ability to image targeted tracer binding to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was studied in vivo in orthotopically grown glioma tumors of different sizes. The binding potential was quantified using a dual-tracer approach, which employs a fluorescently labeled peptide targeted to EGFR and a reference tracer with similar pharmacokinetic properties but no specific binding, to estimate the relative bound fraction from kinetic compartment modeling. The recovered values of binding potential did not vary significantly as a function of tumor size (1 to 33 mm3), suggesting that binding potential may be consistent in the U251 tumors regardless of size or stage after implantation. However, the fluorescence yield of the targeted fluorescent tracers in the tumor was affected significantly by tumor size, suggesting that dual-tracer imaging helps account for variations in absolute uptake, which plague single-tracer imaging techniques. Ex vivo analysis showed relatively high spatial heterogeneity in each tumor that cannot be resolved by tomographic techniques. Nonetheless, the dual-tracer tomographic technique is a powerful tool for longitudinal bulk estimation of receptor binding. PMID:25652703

  8. Tomography of epidermal growth factor receptor binding to fluorescent Affibody in vivo studied with magnetic resonance guided fluorescence recovery in varying orthotopic glioma sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Robert W.; Demers, Jennifer-Lynn H.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Gunn, Jason R.; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-02-01

    The ability to image targeted tracer binding to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was studied in vivo in orthotopically grown glioma tumors of different sizes. The binding potential was quantified using a dual-tracer approach, which employs a fluorescently labeled peptide targeted to EGFR and a reference tracer with similar pharmacokinetic properties but no specific binding, to estimate the relative bound fraction from kinetic compartment modeling. The recovered values of binding potential did not vary significantly as a function of tumor size (1 to 33 mm3), suggesting that binding potential may be consistent in the U251 tumors regardless of size or stage after implantation. However, the fluorescence yield of the targeted fluorescent tracers in the tumor was affected significantly by tumor size, suggesting that dual-tracer imaging helps account for variations in absolute uptake, which plague single-tracer imaging techniques. Ex vivo analysis showed relatively high spatial heterogeneity in each tumor that cannot be resolved by tomographic techniques. Nonetheless, the dual-tracer tomographic technique is a powerful tool for longitudinal bulk estimation of receptor binding.

  9. Radiolabeled Affibody-Albumin Bioconjugates for HER2 Positive Cancer Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hoppmann, Susan; Miao, Zheng; Liu, Shuanglong; Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Bao, Ande; Cheng, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Affibody molecules have received significant attention in the fields of molecular imaging and drug development. However, Affibody scaffolds display an extremely high renal uptake, especially when modified with chelators and then labeled with radiometals. This unfavorable property may impact their use as radiotherapeutic agents in general and as imaging probes for the detection of tumors adjacent to kidneys in particular. Herein, we present a simple and generalizable strategy for reducing the renal uptake of Affibody molecules while maintaining their tumor uptake. Human serum albumin (HSA) was consecutively modified by 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid mono-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (DOTA-NHS ester) and the bifunctional crosslinker sulfosuccinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (Sulfo-SMCC). The HER2 Affibody analog, Ac-Cys-ZHER2:342, was covalently conjugated with HSA, and the resulting bioconjugate DOTA-HSA-ZHER2:342 was further radiolabeled with 64Cu and 111In and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Radiolabeled DOTA-HSA-ZHER2:342 conjugates displayed a significant and specific cell uptake into SKOV3 cell cultures. Positron emission tomography (PET) investigations using 64Cu-DOTA-HSA-ZHER2:342 were performed in SKOV3 tumor-bearing nude mice. High tumor uptake values (> 14% ID/g at 24 h and 48 h) and high liver accumulations but low kidney accumulations were observed. Biodistribution studies and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) investigations using 111In-DOTA-HSA-ZHER2:342 validated these results. At 24 h post injection, the bio distribution data revealed high tumor (16.26% ID/g) and liver uptake (14.11% ID/g) but relatively low kidney uptake (6.06% ID/g). Blocking studies with co-injected, non-labeled Ac-Cys-ZHER2:342 confirmed the in vivo specificity of HER2. Radiolabeled DOTA-HSA-ZHER2:342 Affibody conjugates are promising SPECT and PET-type probes for the imaging of HER2 positive cancer. More importantly

  10. Influence of molecular design on biodistribution and targeting properties of an Affibody-fused HER2-recognising anticancer toxin.

    PubMed

    Altai, Mohamed; Liu, Hao; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2016-09-01

    Targeted delivery of toxins is a promising way to treat disseminated cancer. The use of monoclonal antibodies as targeting moiety has provided proof-of-principle for this approach. However, extravasation and tissue penetration rates of antibody-based immunotoxins are limited due to antibody bulkiness. The use of a novel class of targeting probes, Affibody molecules, provides smaller toxin-conjugated constructs, which may improve targeting. Earlier, we have demonstrated that affitoxins containing a HER2-targeting Affibody moiety and a deimmunized and truncated exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PE38X8, provide highly selective toxicity to HER2-expressing cancer cells. To evaluate the influence of molecular design on targeting and biodistribution properties, a series of novel affitoxins were labelled with the residualizing radionuclide 111In. In this study, we have shown that the novel conjugates are more rapidly internalized compared with the parental affitoxin. The use of a (HE)3 purification tag instead of a hexahistidine tag enabled significant (p<0.05) reduction of the hepatic uptake of the affitoxin in a murine model. Fusion of the affitoxin with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) caused appreciable extension of the residence time in circulation and several-fold reduction of the renal uptake. The best variant, 111In-(HE)3-ZHER2-ABD-PE38X8, demonstrated receptor-specific accumulation in HER2-expressing SKOV-3 xenografts. In conclusion, a careful molecular design of scaffold protein based anticancer targeted toxins can appreciably improve their biodistribution and targeting properties. PMID:27573289

  11. DNA Triplexes That Bind Several Cofactor Molecules.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Sven; Richert, Clemens

    2015-12-14

    Cofactors are critical for energy-consuming processes in the cell. Harnessing such processes for practical applications requires control over the concentration of cofactors. We have recently shown that DNA triplex motifs with a designed binding site can be used to capture and release nucleotides with low micromolar dissociation constants. In order to increase the storage capacity of such triplex motifs, we have explored the limits of ligand binding through designed cavities in the oligopurine tract. Oligonucleotides with up to six non-nucleotide bridges between purines were synthesized and their ability to bind ATP, cAMP or FAD was measured. Triplex motifs with several single-nucleotide binding sites were found to bind purines more tightly than triplexes with one large binding site. The optimized triplex consists of 59 residues and four C3-bridges. It can bind up to four equivalents of ligand with apparent Kd values of 52 µM for ATP, 9 µM for FAD, and 2 µM for cAMP. An immobilized version fuels bioluminescence via release of ATP at body temperature. These results show that motifs for high-density capture, storage and release of energy-rich biomolecules can be constructed from synthetic DNA. PMID:26561335

  12. DNA Triplexes That Bind Several Cofactor Molecules.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Sven; Richert, Clemens

    2015-12-14

    Invited for the cover of this issue are Sven Vollmer and Clemens Richert of the University of Stuttgart. The cover image hints at the analogy between a honey comb, as a macroscopic storage device, and DNA triplexes with designed binding sites, as molecular storage motifs that can release ATP to fuel a bioluminescence reaction. Read the full text of the article at 10.1002/chem.201503220. PMID:26534779

  13. Torsional sensing of small-molecule binding using magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, Jan; Klijnhout, Sven; Dekker, Nynke H

    2010-11-01

    DNA-binding small molecules are widespread in the cell and heavily used in biological applications. Here, we use magnetic tweezers, which control the force and torque applied to single DNAs, to study three small molecules: ethidium bromide (EtBr), a well-known intercalator; netropsin, a minor-groove binding anti-microbial drug; and topotecan, a clinically used anti-tumor drug. In the low-force limit in which biologically relevant torques can be accessed (<10 pN), we show that ethidium intercalation lengthens DNA ∼1.5-fold and decreases the persistence length, from which we extract binding constants. Using our control of supercoiling, we measure the decrease in DNA twist per intercalation to be 27.3±1° and demonstrate that ethidium binding delays the accumulation of torsional stress in DNA, likely via direct reduction of the torsional modulus and torque-dependent binding. Furthermore, we observe that EtBr stabilizes the DNA duplex in regimes where bare DNA undergoes structural transitions. In contrast, minor groove binding by netropsin affects neither the contour nor persistence length significantly, yet increases the twist per base of DNA. Finally, we show that topotecan binding has consequences similar to those of EtBr, providing evidence for an intercalative binding mode. These insights into the torsional consequences of ligand binding can help elucidate the effects of small-molecule drugs in the cellular environment. PMID:20624816

  14. Computational evaluation of protein – small molecule binding

    PubMed Central

    Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    Determining protein – small molecule binding affinity is a key component of present-day rational drug discovery. To circumvent the time, labor, and materials costs associated with experimental protein – small molecule binding assays, a variety of structure-based computational methods have been developed for determining protein – small molecule binding affinities. These methods can be placed in one of two classes: accurate but slow (Class 1), and fast but approximate (Class 2). Class 1 methods, which explicitly take into account protein flexibility and include an atomic-level description of solvation, are capable of quantitatively reproducing experimental protein – small molecule absolute binding free energies. However, Class 1 computational requirements make screening thousands to millions of small molecules against a protein, as required for rational drug design, infeasible for the foreseeable future. Class 2 methods, on the other hand, are sufficiently fast to perform such inhibitor screening, yet they suffer from limited descriptions of protein flexibility and solvation, which in turn limit their ability to select and rank-order small molecules by computed binding affinities. This review presents an overview of Class 1 and Class 2 methods, avenues of research in Class 2 methods aimed at bringing them closer to Class 1 accuracy, and intermediate approaches that incorporate features of both Class 1 and Class 2 methods. PMID:19162472

  15. Molecular forces for the binding and condensation of DNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xian-E; Yang, Jie

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to investigate the binding between a double-stranded DNA and bilayers of cationic lipids and zwitterionic lipids in low ionic-strength solutions. The binding of a DNA molecule to freshly cleaved mica surface in solution has also been measured. The binding of DNA molecules to cationic lipid bilayers has a minimal strength of approximately 45 pN. On zwitterionic lipid bilayers and mica surface, the minimal binding strength is approximately twice that value. The binding also has a dynamic nature, with only a certain percentage of recorded force curves containing the binding characteristics. Divalent Mg(2+) ions enhance the binding by increasing that percentage without any effect on the binding strength. We have also observed a long-range attraction between DNA molecules and cationic lipid bilayers with a strength much larger than the minimum force and a range well over 50 nm, possibly related to the driving force responsible for the two-dimensional condensation of DNA. PMID:11751322

  16. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  17. Affibody-mediated PET imaging of HER3 expression in malignant tumours

    PubMed Central

    Rosestedt, Maria; Andersson, Ken G.; Mitran, Bogdan; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Löfblom, John; Orlova, Anna; Ståhl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is involved in the progression of various cancers and in resistance to therapies targeting the HER family. In vivo imaging of HER3 expression would enable patient stratification for anti-HER3 immunotherapy. Key challenges with HER3-targeting are the relatively low expression in HER3-positive tumours and HER3 expression in normal tissues. The use of positron-emission tomography (PET) provides advantages of high resolution, sensitivity and quantification accuracy compared to SPECT. Affibody molecules, imaging probes based on a non-immunoglobulin scaffold, provide high imaging contrast shortly after injection. The aim of this study was to evaluate feasibility of PET imaging of HER3 expression using 68Ga-labeled affibody molecules. The anti-HER3 affibody molecule HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA was successfully labelled with 68Ga with high yield, purity and stability. The agent bound specifically to HER3-expressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. At 3 h pi, uptake of 68Ga-HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA was significantly higher in xenografts with high HER3 expression (BT474, BxPC-3) than in xenografts with low HER3 expression (A431). In xenografts with high expression, tumour-to-blood ratios were >20, tumour-to-muscle >15, and tumour-to-bone >7. HER3-positive xenografts were visualised using microPET 3 h pi. In conclusion, PET imaging of HER3 expression is feasible using 68Ga-HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA shortly after administration. PMID:26477646

  18. Concentration profiles of actin-binding molecules in lamellipodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcke, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Motile cells form lamellipodia in the direction of motion, which are flat membrane protrusions containing an actin filament network. The network flows rearward relative to the leading edge of the lamellipodium due to actin polymerization at the front. Thus, actin binding molecules are subject to transport towards the rear of the cell in the bound state and diffuse freely in the unbound state. We analyze this reaction-diffusion-advection process with respect to the concentration profiles of these species and provide an analytic approximation for them. Network flow may cause a depletion zone of actin binding molecules close to the leading edge. The existence of such zone depends on the free molecule concentration in the cell body, on the ratio of the diffusion length to the distance bound molecules travel rearward with the flow before dissociating, and the ratio of the diffusion length to the width of the region with network flow and actin binding. Our calculations suggest the existence of depletion zones for the F-actin cross-linkers filamin and α-actinin in fish keratocytes (and other cell types), which is in line with the small elastic moduli of the F-actin network close to the leading edge found in measurements of the force motile cells are able to exert.

  19. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  20. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  1. EGFR-directed Affibody for fluorescence-guided glioma surgery: time-dose analysis (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro de Souza, Ana Luiza; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason R.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Draney, Daniel R.; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    The key to fluorescence guided surgical oncology is the ability to create specific contrast between normal and glioma tissue. The blood brain barrier that limits the delivery of substances to the normal brain is broken in tumors, allowing accumulation of agents in the tumor interior. However, for a clinical success, imaging agents should be in the infiltrative edges to minimize the resection of normal brain while enable the removal of tumor. The aberrant overexpression and/or activation of EGFR is associated with many types of cancers, including glioblastoma and the injection of a fluorescent molecule targeted to these receptors would improve tumor contrast during fluorescence guided surgery. Affibody molecules have intentional medium affinity and high potential specificity, which are the desirable features of a good surgical imaging agent. The aim of this study was evaluate the brain/glioma uptake of ABY029 labeled with near-infrared dye IRDye800CW after intravenous injection. Rats were either inoculated with orthotopic implantations of U251 human glioma cell line or PBS (shams control) in the brain. The tumors were allowed to grow for 2-3 weeks before carrying out fluorescent tracer experiments. Fluorescent imaging of ex vivo brain slices from rats was acquired at different time points after infection of fluorescently labeled EGFR-specific affibody to verify which time provided maximal contrast tumor to normal brain. Although the tumor was most clearly visualized after 1h of IRDye800CW-labeled ABY029 injection, the tumor location could be identified from the background after 48h. These results suggest that the NIR-labeled affibody examined shows excellent potential to increase surgical visualization for confirmed EGFR positive tumors.

  2. Covalent Binding on the Femtometer Scale: Nuclear Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Oertzen, Wolfram; Milin, Matko

    Nuclear molecules are objects having two or more individual clusters as centres with extra nucleons (usually neutrons) binding them. The clusters have to be strongly bound themselves, while they get bound into molecules due to the specific properties of the nucleus-nucleus potentials and exchange of nucleons. The molecular, quantum mechanical covalent binding effect via the exchange of neutrons is the dominant source of binding in many light nuclei, overcoming the Coulomb repulsion in such structures. This results in states having valence neutrons in the π and σ orbitals, known from molecules in atomic physics; in this paper we discuss the structural properties of such states in light nuclei. The interaction between clusters resulting in nuclear molecules should show a repulsive interaction at smaller distances. This is generally the case for strongly bound clusters, like α-particles (but also for the 12C and 16O nuclei)—due to the Pauli principle, nucleons penetrating the second cluster show then a strong repulsion effect. The particular properties of nuclear clusters needed for the formation of bound molecules is their intrinsic stiffness (a large gap to the first excited states), which inhibits their excitation and allows their survival in a two-centre configuration. A large number of strongly deformed nuclear states in light nuclei with neutron excess have been experimentally identified in the last decades, and some of them have been associated with covalent structures, mainly via their grouping into rotational bands. These results have been confirmed in many theoretical studies with nuclear cluster models, but also in model independent calculations, e.g. in the Antisymmetrized Molecular Dynamics approach, where no a priori cluster structure is assumed.

  3. Staphylococcal enterotoxins bind H-2Db molecules on macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We screened a panel of monoclonal antibodies against selected macrophage cell surface molecules for their ability to inhibit enterotoxin binding to major histocompatibility complex class II-negative C2D (H-2b) macrophages. Two monoclonal antibodies, HB36 and TIB126, that are specific for the alpha 2 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I, blocked staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB, respectively) binding to C2D macrophages in a specific and concentration-dependent manner. Inhibitory activities were haplotype-specific in that SEA and SEB binding to H-2k or H-2d macrophages was not inhibited by either monoclonal antibody. HB36, but not TIB126, inhibited enterotoxin-induced secretion of cytokines by H-2b macrophages. Lastly, passive protection of D-galactosamine-sensitized C2D mice by injection with HB36 antibody prevented SEB-induced death. Therefore, SEA and SEB binding to the alpha 2 domain of the H-2Db molecule induces biological activity and has physiological consequences.

  4. Disordered Binding of Small Molecules to Aβ(12–28)*

    PubMed Central

    Convertino, Marino; Vitalis, Andreas; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of small molecules and short peptides have been identified that interfere with aggregation and/or oligomerization of the Alzheimer β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Many of them possess aromatic moieties, suggesting a dominant role for those in interacting with Aβ along various stages of the aggregation process. In this study, we attempt to elucidate whether interactions of such aromatic inhibitors with monomeric Aβ(12–28) point to a common mechanism of action by performing atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at equilibrium. Our results suggest that, independently of the presence of inhibitors, monomeric Aβ(12–28) populates a partially collapsed ensemble that is largely devoid of canonical secondary structure at 300 K and neutral pH. The small molecules have different affinities for Aβ(12–28) that can be partially rationalized by the balance of aromatic and charged moieties constituting the molecules. There are no predominant binding modes, although aggregation inhibitors preferentially interact with the N-terminal portion of the fragment (residues 13–20). Analysis of the free energy landscape of Aβ(12–28) reveals differences highlighted by altered populations of a looplike conformer in the presence of inhibitors. We conclude that intrinsic disorder of Aβ persists at the level of binding small molecules and that inhibitors can significantly alter properties of monomeric Aβ via multiple routes of differing specificity. PMID:21969380

  5. Binding configurations and intramolecular strain in single-molecule devices.

    PubMed

    Rascón-Ramos, Habid; Artés, Juan Manuel; Li, Yuanhui; Hihath, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    The development of molecular-scale electronic devices has made considerable progress over the past decade, and single-molecule transistors, diodes and wires have all been demonstrated. Despite this remarkable progress, the agreement between theoretically predicted conductance values and those measured experimentally remains limited. One of the primary reasons for these discrepancies lies in the difficulty to experimentally determine the contact geometry and binding configuration of a single-molecule junction. In this Article, we apply a small-amplitude, high-frequency, sinusoidal mechanical signal to a series of single-molecule devices during junction formation and breakdown. By measuring the current response at this frequency, it is possible to determine the most probable binding and contact configurations for the molecular junction at room temperature in solution, and to obtain information about how an applied strain is distributed within the molecular junction. These results provide insight into the complex configuration of single-molecule devices, and are in excellent agreement with previous predictions from theoretical models. PMID:25686263

  6. Synthetic and natural consensus design for engineering charge within an affibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Case, Brett A; Hackel, Benjamin J

    2016-08-01

    Protein ligand charge can impact physiological delivery with charge reduction often benefiting performance. Yet neutralizing mutations can be detrimental to protein function. Herein, three approaches are evaluated to introduce charged-to-neutral mutations of three cations and three anions within an affibody engineered to bind epidermal growth factor receptor. These approaches-combinatorial library sorting or consensus design, based on natural homologs or library-sorted mutants-are used to identify mutations with favorable affinity, stability, and recombinant yield. Consensus design, based on 942 affibody homologs, yielded a mutant of modest function (Kd  = 11 ±4 nM, Tm  = 62°C, and yield = 4.0 ± 0.8 mg/L as compared to 5.3 ± 1.7 nM, 71°C, and 3.5 ± 0.3 mg/L for the parental affibody). Extension of consensus design to 10 additional mutants exhibited varied performance including a substantially improved mutant (Kd  = 6.9 ± 1.4 nM, Tm  = 71°C, and 12.7 ± 0.9 mg/L yield). Sorting a homolog-based combinatorial library of 7 × 10(5) mutants generated a distribution of mutants with lower stability and yield, but did identify one strongly binding variant (Kd  = 1.2 ± 0.3 nM, Tm  = 69°C, and 6.0 ± 0.4 mg/L yield). Synthetic consensus design, based on the amino acid distribution in functional library mutants, yielded higher affinities (P = 0.05) with comparable stabilities and yields. The best of four analyzed clones had Kd  = 1.7 ± 0.5 nM, Tm  = 68°C, and 7.0 ± 0.5 mg/L yield. While all three approaches were effective in creating targeted affibodies with six charged-to-neutral mutations, synthetic consensus design proved to be the most robust. Synthetic consensus design provides a valuable tool for ligand engineering, particularly in the context of charge manipulation. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1628-1638. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26724421

  7. Identification of Biologically Active, HIV TAR RNA-Binding Small Molecules Using Small Molecule Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identifying small molecules that selectively bind to structured RNA motifs remains an important challenge in developing potent and specific therapeutics. Most strategies to find RNA-binding molecules have identified highly charged compounds or aminoglycosides that commonly have modest selectivity. Here we demonstrate a strategy to screen a large unbiased library of druglike small molecules in a microarray format against an RNA target. This approach has enabled the identification of a novel chemotype that selectively targets the HIV transactivation response (TAR) RNA hairpin in a manner not dependent on cationic charge. Thienopyridine 4 binds to and stabilizes the TAR hairpin with a Kd of 2.4 μM. Structure–activity relationships demonstrate that this compound achieves activity through hydrophobic and aromatic substituents on a heterocyclic core, rather than cationic groups typically required. Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) analysis was performed on a 365-nucleotide sequence derived from the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of the HIV-1 genome to determine global structural changes in the presence of the molecule. Importantly, the interaction of compound 4 can be mapped to the TAR hairpin without broadly disrupting any other structured elements of the 5′ UTR. Cell-based anti-HIV assays indicated that 4 inhibits HIV-induced cytopathicity in T lymphocytes with an EC50 of 28 μM, while cytotoxicity was not observed at concentrations approaching 1 mM. PMID:24820959

  8. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria C.

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then used in various applications. These applications range from therapeutic uses to biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, the small molecular weights of these targets, including the drastic size difference between the target and the oligonucleotides, make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for their detection. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed. PMID:27242994

  9. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then used in various applications. These applications range from therapeutic uses to biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, the small molecular weights of these targets, including the drastic size difference between the target and the oligonucleotides, make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for their detection. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed. PMID:27242994

  10. Molecular imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts with epidermal growth factor receptor targeted affibody probes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Yang, Xiaoyang; Qi, Shibo; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Han; Hoppmann, Susan; Cao, Qizhen; Chua, Mei-Sze; So, Samuel K; Cheng, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly aggressive and lethal cancer. It is typically asymptomatic at the early stage, with only 10%-20% of HCC patients being diagnosed early enough for appropriate surgical treatment. The delayed diagnosis of HCC is associated with limited treatment options and much lower survival rates. Therefore, the early and accurate detection of HCC is crucial to improve its currently dismal prognosis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been reported to be involved in HCC tumorigenesis and to represent an attractive target for HCC imaging and therapy. In this study, an affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907, targeting the extracellular domain of EGFR, was used for the first time to assess its potential to detect HCC xenografts. By evaluating radio- or fluorescent-labeled Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 as a probe for positron emission tomography (PET) or optical imaging of HCC, subcutaneous EGFR-positive HCC xenografts were found to be successfully imaged by the PET probe. Thus, affibody-based PET imaging of EGFR provides a promising approach for detecting HCC in vivo. PMID:23710458

  11. Phosphate binding energy and catalysis by small and large molecules.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Janet R; Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2008-04-01

    Catalysis is an important process in chemistry and enzymology. The rate acceleration for any catalyzed reaction is the difference between the activation barriers for the uncatalyzed (Delta G(HO)(#)) and catalyzed (Delta G(Me)(#)) reactions, which corresponds to the binding energy (Delta G(S)(#) = Delta G(Me)(#)-Delta G(HO)(#)) for transfer of the reaction transition state from solution to the catalyst. This transition state binding energy is a fundamental descriptor of catalyzed reactions, and its evaluation is necessary for an understanding of any and all catalytic processes. We have evaluated the transition state binding energies obtained from interactions between low molecular weight metal ion complexes or high molecular weight protein catalysts and the phosphate group of bound substrate. Work on catalysis by small molecules is exemplified by studies on the mechanism of action of Zn2(1)(H2O). A binding energy of Delta G(S)(#) = -9.6 kcal/mol was determined for Zn2(1)(H2O)-catalyzed cleavage of the RNA analogue HpPNP. The pH-rate profile for this cleavage reaction showed that there is optimal catalytic activity at high pH, where the catalyst is in the basic form [Zn2(1)(HO-)]. However, it was also shown that the active form of the catalyst is Zn2(1)(H2O) and that this recognizes the C2-oxygen-ionized substrate in the cleavage reaction. The active catalyst Zn2(1)(H2O) shows a high affinity for oxyphosphorane transition state dianions and a stable methyl phosphate transition state analogue, compared with the affinity for phosphate monoanion substrates. The transition state binding energies, Delta G(S)(#), for cleavage of HpPNP catalyzed by a variety of Zn2+ and Eu3+ metal ion complexes reflect the increase in the catalytic activity with increasing total positive charge at the catalyst. These values of Delta G(S)(#) are affected by interactions between the metal ion and its ligands, but these effects are small in comparison with Delta G(S)(#) observed for catalysis

  12. Measurement of Peptide Binding to MHC Class II Molecules by Fluorescence Polarization.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-01-01

    Peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecules is a key process in antigen presentation and CD4+ T cell epitope selection. This unit describes a fairly simple but powerful fluorescence polarization-based binding competition assay to measure peptide binding to soluble recombinant MHCII molecules. The binding of a peptide of interest to MHCII molecules is assessed based on its ability to inhibit the binding of a fluorescence-labeled probe peptide, with the strength of binding characterized as IC50 (concentration required for 50% inhibition of probe peptide binding). Data analysis related to this method is discussed. In addition, this unit includes a support protocol for fluorescence labeling peptide using an amine-reactive probe. The advantage of this protocol is that it allows simple, fast, and high-throughput measurements of binding for a large set of peptides to MHCII molecules. PMID:25081912

  13. An affibody-adalimumab hybrid blocks combined IL-6 and TNF-triggered serum amyloid A secretion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Feifan; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Akal, Anastassja; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik; Nygren, Per-Åke

    2014-01-01

    In inflammatory disease conditions, the regulation of the cytokine system is impaired, leading to tissue damages. Here, we used protein engineering to develop biologicals suitable for blocking a combination of inflammation driving cytokines by a single construct. From a set of interleukin (IL)-6-binding affibody molecules selected by phage display, five variants with a capability of blocking the interaction between complexes of soluble IL-6 receptor α (sIL-6Rα) and IL-6 and the co-receptor gp130 were identified. In cell assays designed to analyze any blocking capacity of the classical or the alternative (trans) signaling IL-6 pathways, one variant, ZIL-6_13 with an affinity (KD) for IL-6 of ∼500 pM, showed the best performance. To construct fusion proteins (“AffiMabs”) with dual cytokine specificities, ZIL-6_13 was fused to either the N- or C-terminus of both the heavy and light chains of the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibody adalimumab (Humira®). One AffiMab construct with ZIL-6_13 positioned at the N-terminus of the heavy chain, denoted ZIL-6_13-HCAda, was determined to be the most optimal, and it was subsequently evaluated in an acute Serum Amyloid A (SAA) model in mice. Administration of the AffiMab or adalimumab prior to challenge with a mix of IL-6 and TNF reduced the levels of serum SAA in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the highest dose (70 mg/kg body weight) of adalimumab only resulted in a 50% reduction of SAA-levels, whereas the corresponding dose of the ZIL-6_13-HCAda AffiMab with combined IL-6/TNF specificity, resulted in SAA levels below the detection limit. PMID:25484067

  14. Single Molecule Kinetics of ENTH Binding to Lipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rozovsky, Sharon; Forstner, Martin B.; Sondermann, Holger; Groves, Jay T.

    2012-04-03

    Transient recruitment of proteins to membranes is a fundamental mechanism by which the cell exerts spatial and temporal control over proteins’ localization and interactions. Thus, the specificity and the kinetics of peripheral proteins’ membrane residence are an attribute of their function. In this article, we describe the membrane interactions of the interfacial epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain with its target lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The direct visualization and quantification of interactions of single ENTH molecules with supported lipid bilayers is achieved using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) with a time resolution of 13 ms. This enables the recording of the kinetic behavior of ENTH interacting with membranes with physiologically relevant concentrations of PtdIns(4,5)P2 despite the low effective binding affinity. Subsequent single fluorophore tracking permits us to build up distributions of residence times and to measure ENTH dissociation rates as a function of membrane composition. In addition, due to the high time resolution, we are able to resolve details of the motion of ENTH associated with a simple, homogeneous membrane. In this case ENTH’s diffusive transport appears to be the result of at least three different diffusion processes.

  15. Identification of telomere-associated molecules by engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP)

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Asano, Yoshinori; Ohtsuka, Junko; Takada, Yoko; Saito, Kazunobu; Ohki, Rieko; Fujii, Hodaka

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical analysis of molecular interactions in specific genomic regions requires their isolation while retaining molecular interactions in vivo. Here, we report isolation of telomeres by engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP) using a transcription activator-like (TAL) protein recognizing telomere repeats. Telomeres recognized by the tagged TAL protein were immunoprecipitated with an antibody against the tag and subjected to identification of telomere-binding molecules. enChIP-mass spectrometry (enChIP-MS) targeting telomeres identified known and novel telomere-binding proteins. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000461. In addition, we showed that RNA associated with telomeres could be isolated by enChIP. Identified telomere-binding molecules may play important roles in telomere biology. enChIP using TAL proteins would be a useful tool for biochemical analysis of specific genomic regions of interest. PMID:24201379

  16. Identification of five different Patr class I molecules that bind HLA supertype peptides and definition of their peptide binding motifs.

    PubMed

    McKinney, D M; Erickson, A L; Walker, C M; Thimme, R; Chisari, F V; Sidney, J; Sette, A

    2000-10-15

    We have sequenced the Pan troglodytes class I (Patr) molecules from three common chimpanzees and expressed them as single molecules in a class I-deficient cell line. These lines were utilized to obtain purified class I molecules to define the peptide binding motifs associated with five different Patr molecules. Based on these experiments, as well as analysis of the predicted structure of the B and F polymorphic MHC pockets, we classified five Patr molecules (Patr-A*0101, Patr-B*0901, Patr-B*0701, Patr-A*0602, and Patr-B*1301) within previously defined supertype specificities associated with HLA class I molecules (HLA-A3, -B7, -A1, and -A24 supertypes). The overlap in the binding repertoire between specific HLA and Patr class I molecules was in the range of 33 to 92%, depending on the particular Patr molecule as assessed by the binding of HIV-, hepatitis B virus-, and hepatitis C virus-derived epitopes. Finally, live cell binding assays of nine chimpanzee-derived B cell lines demonstrated that HLA supertype peptides bound to Patr class I molecules with frequencies in the 20-50% range. PMID:11035079

  17. Identification of a small molecule [beta]-secretase inhibitor that binds without catalytic aspartate engagement

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Thomas G.; Hills, Ivory D.; Nomland, Ashley A.; de León, Pablo; Allison, Timothy; McGaughey, Georgia; Colussi, Dennis; Tugusheva, Katherine; Haugabook, Sharie J.; Espeseth, Amy S.; Zuck, Paul; Graham, Samuel L.; Stachel, Shawn J.

    2010-09-02

    A small molecule inhibitor of beta-secretase with a unique binding mode has been developed. Crystallographic determination of the enzyme-inhibitor complex shows the catalytic aspartate residues in the active site are not engaged in inhibitor binding. This unprecedented binding mode in the field of aspartyl protease inhibition is described.

  18. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) heparin binding domain binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Kallapur, S G; Akeson, R A

    1992-12-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been strongly implicated in several aspects of neural development. NCAM mediated adhesion has been proposed to involve a homophilic interaction between NCAMs on adjacent cells. The heparin binding domain (HBD) is an amino acid sequence within NCAM and has been shown to be involved in NCAM mediated adhesion but the relationship of this domain to NCAM segments mediating homophilic adhesion has not been defined. In the present study, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the HBD has been used as a substrate to determine its role in NCAM mediated adhesion. A neural cell line expressing NCAM (B35) and its derived clone which does not express NCAM (B35 clone 3) adhered similarly to plates coated with HBD peptide. A polyclonal antiserum to NCAM inhibited B35 cell-HBD peptide adhesion by only 10%, a value not statistically different from inhibition caused by preimmune serum. Both these experiments suggested no direct NCAM-HBD interactions. To test whether the HBD peptide bound to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), HSPG synthesis was inhibited using beta-D-xyloside. After treatment, B35 cell adhesion to the HBD peptide, but not to control substrates, was significantly decreased. B35 cell adhesion to the HBD peptide could be inhibited by 10(-7) M heparin but not chondroitin sulfate. Preincubation of the substrate (HBD peptide) with heparin caused dramatic reduction of B35 cell-HBD peptide adhesion whereas preincubation of B35 cells with heparin caused only modest reductions in cell-HBD adhesion. Furthermore, inhibition of HSPG sulfation with sodium chlorate also decreased the adhesion of B35 cells to the HBD peptide. These results strongly suggest that, within the assay system, the NCAM HBD does not participate in homophilic interactions but binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan. This interaction potentially represents an important mechanism of NCAM adhesion and further supports the view that NCAM has

  19. Effect of dipole polarizability on positron binding by strongly polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribakin, G. F.; Swann, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    A model for positron binding to polar molecules is considered by combining the dipole potential outside the molecule with a strongly repulsive core of a given radius. Using existing experimental data on binding energies leads to unphysically small core radii for all of the molecules studied. This suggests that electron-positron correlations neglected in the simple model play a large role in determining the binding energy. We account for these by including the polarization potential via perturbation theory and non-perturbatively. The perturbative model makes reliable predictions of binding energies for a range of polar organic molecules and hydrogen cyanide. The model also agrees with the linear dependence of the binding energies on the polarizability inferred from the experimental data (Danielson et al 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 235203). The effective core radii, however, remain unphysically small for most molecules. Treating molecular polarization non-perturbatively leads to physically meaningful core radii for all of the molecules studied and enables even more accurate predictions of binding energies to be made for nearly all of the molecules considered.

  20. Affibody modified and radiolabeled gold-iron oxide hetero-nanostructures for tumor PET, optical and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Cheng, Kai; Qi, Shibo; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Yuxin; Jiang, Han; Li, Jinbo; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Huimao; Cheng, Zhen

    2013-04-01

    A highly monodispersed hetero-nanostructure with two different functional nanomaterials (gold (Au) and iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4,) IO)) within one structure was successfully developed as Affibody based trimodality nanoprobe (positron emission tomography, PET; optical imaging; and magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) for imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive tumors. Unlike other regular nanostructures with a single component, the Au-IO hetero-nanostructures (Au-IONPs) with unique chemical and physical properties have capability to combine several imaging modalities together to provide complementary information. The IO component within hetero-nanostructures serve as a T(2) reporter for MRI; and gold component serve as both optical and PET reporters. Moreover, such hetero-nanoprobes could provide a robust nano-platform for surface-specific modification with both targeting molecules (anti-EGFR Affibody protein) and PET imaging reporters (radiometal (64)Cu chelators) in highly efficient and reliable manner. In vitro and in vivo study showed that the resultant nanoprobe provided high specificity, sensitivity, and excellent tumor contrast for both PET and MRI imaging in the human EGFR-expressing cells and tumors. Our study data also highlighted the EGFR targeting efficiency of hetero-nanoparticles and the feasibility for their further theranostic applications. PMID:23343632

  1. Small Molecule Microarrays Enable the Identification of a Selective, Quadruplex-Binding Inhibitor of MYC Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC plays a pivotal role in cancer initiation, progression, and maintenance. However, it has proven difficult to develop small molecule inhibitors of MYC. One attractive route to pharmacological inhibition of MYC has been the prevention of its expression through small molecule-mediated stabilization of the G-quadruplex (G4) present in its promoter. Although molecules that bind globally to quadruplex DNA and influence gene expression are well-known, the identification of new chemical scaffolds that selectively modulate G4-driven genes remains a challenge. Here, we report an approach for the identification of G4-binding small molecules using small molecule microarrays (SMMs). We use the SMM screening platform to identify a novel G4-binding small molecule that inhibits MYC expression in cell models, with minimal impact on the expression of other G4-associated genes. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal melt assays demonstrated that this molecule binds reversibly to the MYC G4 with single digit micromolar affinity, and with weaker or no measurable binding to other G4s. Biochemical and cell-based assays demonstrated that the compound effectively silenced MYC transcription and translation via a G4-dependent mechanism of action. The compound induced G1 arrest and was selectively toxic to MYC-driven cancer cell lines containing the G4 in the promoter but had minimal effects in peripheral blood mononucleocytes or a cell line lacking the G4 in its MYC promoter. As a measure of selectivity, gene expression analysis and qPCR experiments demonstrated that MYC and several MYC target genes were downregulated upon treatment with this compound, while the expression of several other G4-driven genes was not affected. In addition to providing a novel chemical scaffold that modulates MYC expression through G4 binding, this work suggests that the SMM screening approach may be broadly useful as an approach for the identification of new G4-binding small

  2. The mechanism of binding of neural cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, S; Edelman, G M

    1984-01-01

    The experimental results reviewed in this paper strongly suggest that the molecular mechanism of N-CAM-mediated cell adhesion involves the direct interaction of N-CAM molecules on one cell with N-CAM molecules on a second cell. The rate of this aggregation has a high-order dependence on the local N-CAM concentration, and is inversely related to the sialic acid content of the N-CAM molecules involved. In accordance with their relative sialic acid concentrations, the relative rates of aggregation mediated by E and A forms of N-CAM are A-A greater than A-E greater than E-E. Further removal of sialic acid from N-CAM below the level found in the A form gives little further enhancement of aggregation. These results provide one basis upon which to interpret the modulation hypothesis (Edelman, 1983) for control of N-CAM function, i.e. the adhesive strength of N-CAM bonds in an in vitro system can be altered in a graded manner over a wide range by variations in the local surface density of N-CAM or by chemical modification of N-CAM (differential sialylation). It is important to stress that these results do not preclude the possibility of other forms of modulation of N-CAM function or the function of other molecules in cell-cell interactions. It will be much more difficult to assess the role of N-CAM and the modulation of its function on pattern formation in vivo. It is pertinent to mention, however, that recent experiments on transformed neural cells (Greenberg et al., 1984) show loss of N-CAM following transformation with accompanying loss of aggregation and increased motility of the transformed cells. Aside from the possible implications for metastasis (transformation has for the first time been shown to affect a defined CAM and alter cellular sociology), these findings are consonant with the notion that alteration of surface N-CAM affects expression of other cellular processes. Clearly additional experiments are required to define the mechanisms by which this occurs. In

  3. Investigation of the binding modes between AIE-active molecules and dsDNA by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Ma, Ke; Hu, Ting; Jiang, Bo; Xu, Bin; Tian, Wenjing; Sun, Jing Zhi; Zhang, Wenke

    2015-05-01

    AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active molecules hold promise for the labeling of biomolecules as well as living cells. The study of the binding modes of such molecules to biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, will shed light on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of molecular interactions and eventually facilitate the design/preparation of new AIE-active bioprobes. Herein, we studied the binding modes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with two types of synthetic AIE-active molecules, namely, tetraphenylethene-derived dicationic compounds (cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy) and anthracene-derived dicationic compounds (DSAI and DSABr-C6) using single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The experimental data indicate that DSAI can strongly intercalate into DNA base pairs, while DSABr-C6 is unable to intercalate into DNA due to the steric hindrance of the alkyl side chains. Cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy can also intercalate into DNA base pairs, but the binding shows strong ionic strength dependence. Multiple binding modes of TPEDPy with dsDNA have been discussed. In addition, the electrostatic interaction enhanced intercalation of cis-TPEDPy with dsDNA has also been revealed.AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active molecules hold promise for the labeling of biomolecules as well as living cells. The study of the binding modes of such molecules to biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, will shed light on a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of molecular interactions and eventually facilitate the design/preparation of new AIE-active bioprobes. Herein, we studied the binding modes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with two types of synthetic AIE-active molecules, namely, tetraphenylethene-derived dicationic compounds (cis-TPEDPy and trans-TPEDPy) and anthracene-derived dicationic compounds (DSAI and DSABr-C6) using single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The

  4. DNA binding fluorescent proteins for the direct visualization of large DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonghyun; Oh, Yeeun; Lee, Jungyoon; Choe, Sojeong; Lim, Sangyong; Lee, Hyun Soo; Jo, Kyubong; Schwartz, David C

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that also bind DNA molecules are useful reagents for a broad range of biological applications because they can be optically localized and tracked within cells, or provide versatile labels for in vitro experiments. We report a novel design for a fluorescent, DNA-binding protein (FP-DBP) that completely 'paints' entire DNA molecules, whereby sequence-independent DNA binding is accomplished by linking a fluorescent protein to two small peptides (KWKWKKA) using lysine for binding to the DNA phosphates, and tryptophan for intercalating between DNA bases. Importantly, this ubiquitous binding motif enables fluorescent proteins (Kd = 14.7 μM) to confluently stain DNA molecules and such binding is reversible via pH shifts. These proteins offer useful robust advantages for single DNA molecule studies: lack of fluorophore mediated photocleavage and staining that does not perturb polymer contour lengths. Accordingly, we demonstrate confluent staining of naked DNA molecules presented within microfluidic devices, or localized within live bacterial cells. PMID:26264666

  5. DNA binding fluorescent proteins for the direct visualization of large DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonghyun; Oh, Yeeun; Lee, Jungyoon; Choe, Sojeong; Lim, Sangyong; Lee, Hyun Soo; Jo, Kyubong; Schwartz, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that also bind DNA molecules are useful reagents for a broad range of biological applications because they can be optically localized and tracked within cells, or provide versatile labels for in vitro experiments. We report a novel design for a fluorescent, DNA-binding protein (FP-DBP) that completely ‘paints’ entire DNA molecules, whereby sequence-independent DNA binding is accomplished by linking a fluorescent protein to two small peptides (KWKWKKA) using lysine for binding to the DNA phosphates, and tryptophan for intercalating between DNA bases. Importantly, this ubiquitous binding motif enables fluorescent proteins (Kd = 14.7 μM) to confluently stain DNA molecules and such binding is reversible via pH shifts. These proteins offer useful robust advantages for single DNA molecule studies: lack of fluorophore mediated photocleavage and staining that does not perturb polymer contour lengths. Accordingly, we demonstrate confluent staining of naked DNA molecules presented within microfluidic devices, or localized within live bacterial cells. PMID:26264666

  6. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  7. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  8. Monitoring dynamic binding of chromatin proteins in vivo by single-molecule tracking.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Davide; Ganguly, Sourav; McNally, James G

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy has been used for decades to quantify macromolecular dynamics occurring in specimens that are in direct contact with a coverslip. This has permitted in vitro analysis of single-molecule motion in various biochemically reconstituted systems as well as in vivo studies of single-molecule motion on cell membranes. More recently, thanks to improvements in fluorescent tags and microscopes, it has been possible to follow individual molecules inside thicker specimens such as the nucleus of living cells. This has enabled a detailed description of the live-cell binding of nuclear proteins to DNA. In this protocol we describe a method to quantify intranuclear binding using single-molecule tracking (SMT). PMID:23980004

  9. Measuring HER2-Receptor Expression In Metastatic Breast Cancer Using [68Ga]ABY-025 Affibody PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Jens; Velikyan, Irina; Sandberg, Dan; Wennborg, Anders; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Sandström, Mattias; Lubberink, Mark; Olofsson, Helena; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lindman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of HER2 expression could potentially be used to select patients for HER2-targed therapy, predict response based on uptake and be used for monitoring. In this phase I/II study the HER2-binding Affibody molecule ABY-025 was labeled with 68Ga-gallium ([68Ga]ABY-025) for PET to study effect of peptide mass, test-retest variability and correlation of quantified uptake in tumors to histopathology. Experimental design: Sixteen women with known metastatic breast cancer and on-going treatment were included and underwent FDG PET/CT to identify viable metastases. After iv injection of 212±46 MBq [68Ga]ABY-025 whole-body PET was performed at 1, 2 and 4 h. In the first 10 patients (6 with HER2-positive and 4 with HER2-negative primary tumors), [68Ga]ABY-025 PET/CT with two different doses of injected peptide was performed one week apart. In the last six patients (5 HER2-positive and 1 HER2-negative primary tumors), repeated [68Ga]ABY-025 PET were performed one week apart as a test-retest of uptake in individual lesions. Biopsies from 16 metastases in 12 patients were collected for verification of HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Results: Imaging 4h after injection with high peptide content discriminated HER2-positive metastases best (p<0.01). PET SUV correlated with biopsy HER2-scores (r=0.91, p<0.001). Uptake was five times higher in HER2-positive than in HER2-negative lesions with no overlap (p=0.005). The test-retest intra-class correlation was r=0.996. [68Ga]ABY-025 PET correctly identified conversion and mixed expression of HER2 and targeted treatment was changed in 3 of the 16 patients. Conclusion: [68Ga]ABY-025 PET accurately quantifies whole-body HER2-receptor status in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26877784

  10. Perlecan is recruited by dystroglycan to nodes of Ranvier and binds the clustering molecule gliomedin

    PubMed Central

    Colombelli, Cristina; Palmisano, Marilena; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Zambroni, Desirée; Pavoni, Ernesto; Ferri, Cinzia; Saccucci, Stefania; Nicole, Sophie; Soininen, Raija; McKee, Karen K.; Yurchenco, Peter D.; Peles, Elior; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Fast neural conduction requires accumulation of Na+ channels at nodes of Ranvier. Dedicated adhesion molecules on myelinating cells and axons govern node organization. Among those, specific laminins and dystroglycan complexes contribute to Na+ channel clustering at peripheral nodes by unknown mechanisms. We show that in addition to facing the basal lamina, dystroglycan is found near the nodal matrix around axons, binds matrix components, and participates in initial events of nodogenesis. We identify the dystroglycan-ligand perlecan as a novel nodal component and show that dystroglycan is required for the selective accumulation of perlecan at nodes. Perlecan binds the clustering molecule gliomedin and enhances clustering of node of Ranvier components. These data show that proteoglycans have specific roles in peripheral nodes and indicate that peripheral and central axons use similar strategies but different molecules to form nodes of Ranvier. Further, our data indicate that dystroglycan binds free matrix that is not organized in a basal lamina. PMID:25646087

  11. Microarray-based technologies for the discovery of selective, RNA-binding molecules.

    PubMed

    Abulwerdi, Fardokht A; Schneekloth, John S

    2016-07-01

    The identification of small molecules that bind specifically to RNA is a challenge. However, the recent explosion in knowledge about the role RNA plays in a number of physiological processes apart from coding for protein sequences makes it a highly interesting target for chemical probes and therapeutics. One technology that has played an important role in the discovery of RNA-binding molecules is microarrays. Microarrays have been broadly employed to screen, profile, and quantify RNA interactions, and will likely play an important role in the discovery of new classes of ligands going forward. Here, we discuss the development of microarray technologies, including aminoglycoside, peptide, peptoid, and small molecule microarrays, and their use in studying RNA-interacting molecules. PMID:27109057

  12. Inhibition of peptide binding to DR molecules by a leupeptin-induced invariant chain fragment.

    PubMed

    Demotz, S; Danieli, C; Wallny, H J; Majdic, O

    1994-08-01

    Loading of peptides onto DR molecules was studied by characterizing precursors of the mature peptide-DR complexes expressed at the surface of B cells. Since invariant chain (Ii) prevents binding of peptides by DR molecules, it was speculated that analysis of complexes between DR heterodimers and proteolytic fragments of Ii offers the possibility to examine how DR molecules and peptides assemble. Using a procedure combining a two-step affinity chromatography and gel filtration, we isolated from leupeptin-treated B cells complexes between DR molecules and N-terminal Ii fragments previously called "leupeptin-induced polypeptides" (LIP; Blum and Cresswell, 1988, Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 85, 3975-3979). It was observed that the most prominent LIP fragment has a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 16 kDa. In addition, we show that this polypeptide species does not bear N-linked glycans, indicating that this fragment does not extend beyond residue 129 of Ii. Similarly to DR alpha beta heterodimers associated with the full length 33 and 35 kDa Ii forms, DR alpha beta heterodimers associated with LIP fragments are unstable in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at ambient temperature, whereas mature DR alpha beta heterodimers are resistant to dissociation with SDS. These results are indirect evidence that LIP-DR complexes are devoid of bound peptides. This possibility was supported by showing that LIP-DR complexes fail to bind a radioiodinated tetanus toxin peptide (125I-p2), while DR molecules, which are spontaneously released from complexes with LIP fragments, bind the labeled peptide. These results demonstrate that association with LIP fragments is sufficient to prevent binding of peptides by DR molecules. This notion was further documented by showing that binding of 125I-p2 on DR heterodimers is inhibited by preparations of LIP fragment. By contrast, a soluble recombinant fragment corresponding to the extracytoplasmic region of Ii did not block 125I-p2 binding. The results

  13. Dynamics of Protein Folding and Cofactor Binding Monitored by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Li, Hongbin

    2011-01-01

    Many proteins in living cells require cofactors to carry out their biological functions. To reach their functional states, these proteins need to fold into their unique three-dimensional structures in the presence of their cofactors. Two processes, folding of the protein and binding of cofactors, intermingle with each other, making the direct elucidation of the folding mechanism of proteins in the presence of cofactors challenging. Here we use single-molecule atomic force microscopy to directly monitor the folding and cofactor binding dynamics of an engineered metal-binding protein G6-53 at the single-molecule level. Using the mechanical stability of different conformers of G6-53 as sensitive probes, we directly identified different G6-53 conformers (unfolded, apo- and Ni2+-bound) populated along the folding pathway of G6-53 in the presence of its cofactor Ni2+. By carrying out single-molecule atomic force microscopy refolding experiments, we monitored kinetic evolution processes of these different conformers. Our results suggested that the majority of G6-53 folds through a binding-after-folding mechanism, whereas a small fraction follows a binding-before-folding pathway. Our study opens an avenue to utilizing force spectroscopy techniques to probe the folding dynamics of proteins in the presence of cofactors at the single-molecule level, and we anticipated that this method can be used to study a wide variety of proteins requiring cofactors for their function. PMID:22004755

  14. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  15. Resolving dual binding conformations of cellulosome cohesin-dockerin complexes using single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Markus A; Milles, Lukas F; Schoeler, Constantin; Ott, Wolfgang; Fried, Daniel B; Bayer, Edward A; Gaub, Hermann E; Nash, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Receptor-ligand pairs are ordinarily thought to interact through a lock and key mechanism, where a unique molecular conformation is formed upon binding. Contrary to this paradigm, cellulosomal cohesin-dockerin (Coh-Doc) pairs are believed to interact through redundant dual binding modes consisting of two distinct conformations. Here, we combined site-directed mutagenesis and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to study the unbinding of Coh:Doc complexes under force. We designed Doc mutations to knock out each binding mode, and compared their single-molecule unfolding patterns as they were dissociated from Coh using an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever. Although average bulk measurements were unable to resolve the differences in Doc binding modes due to the similarity of the interactions, with a single-molecule method we were able to discriminate the two modes based on distinct differences in their mechanical properties. We conclude that under native conditions wild-type Doc from Clostridium thermocellum exocellulase Cel48S populates both binding modes with similar probabilities. Given the vast number of Doc domains with predicteddual binding modes across multiple bacterial species, our approach opens up newpossibilities for understanding assembly and catalytic properties of a broadrange of multi-enzyme complexes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10319.001 PMID:26519733

  16. Binding and Translocation of Termination Factor Rho Studied at the Single-Molecule Level

    PubMed Central

    Koslover, Daniel J.; Fazal, Furqan M.; Mooney, Rachel A.; Landick, Robert; Block, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Rho termination factor is an essential hexameric helicase responsible for terminating 20–50% of all mRNA synthesis in E. coli. We used single- molecule force spectroscopy to investigate Rho-RNA binding interactions at the Rho- utilization (rut) site of the ? tR1 terminator. Our results are consistent with Rho complexes adopting two states, one that binds 57 ±2 nucleotides of RNA across all six of the Rho primary binding sites, and another that binds 85 ±2 nucleotides at the six primary sites plus a single secondary site situated at the center of the hexamer. The single-molecule data serve to establish that Rho translocates 5′-to-3′ towards RNA polymerase (RNAP) by a tethered-tracking mechanism, looping out the intervening RNA between the rut site and RNAP. These findings lead to a general model for Rho binding and translocation, and establish a novel experimental approach that should facilitate additional single- molecule studies of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:22885804

  17. Binding and translocation of termination factor rho studied at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Koslover, Daniel J; Fazal, Furqan M; Mooney, Rachel A; Landick, Robert; Block, Steven M

    2012-11-01

    Rho termination factor is an essential hexameric helicase responsible for terminating 20-50% of all mRNA synthesis in Escherichia coli. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to investigate Rho-RNA binding interactions at the Rho utilization site of the λtR1 terminator. Our results are consistent with Rho complexes adopting two states: one that binds 57 ± 2nt of RNA across all six of the Rho primary binding sites, and another that binds 85 ± 2nt at the six primary sites plus a single secondary site situated at the center of the hexamer. The single-molecule data serve to establish that Rho translocates 5'→3' toward RNA polymerase (RNAP) by a tethered-tracking mechanism, looping out the intervening RNA between the Rho utilization site and RNAP. These findings lead to a general model for Rho binding and translocation and establish a novel experimental approach that should facilitate additional single-molecule studies of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:22885804

  18. Identification of small molecule binding sites within proteins using phage display technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodi, D. J.; Agoston, G. E.; Manon, R.; Lapcevich, R.; Green, S. J.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; EntreMed Inc.; Florida State Univ.

    2001-11-01

    Affinity selection of peptides displayed on phage particles was used as the basis for mapping molecular contacts between small molecule ligands and their protein targets. Analysis of the crystal structures of complexes between proteins and small molecule ligands revealed that virtually all ligands of molecular weight 300 Da or greater have a continuous binding epitope of 5 residues or more. This observation led to the development of a technique for binding site identification which involves statistical analysis of an affinity-selected set of peptides obtained by screening of libraries of random, phage-displayed peptides against small molecules attached to solid surfaces. A random sample of the selected peptides is sequenced and used as input for a similarity scanning program which calculates cumulative similarity scores along the length of the putative receptor. Regions of the protein sequence exhibiting the highest similarity with the selected peptides proved to have a high probability of being involved in ligand binding. This technique has been employed successfully to map the contact residues in multiple known targets of the anticancer drugs paclitaxel (Taxol), docetaxel (Taxotere) and 2-methoxyestradiol and the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and to identify a novel paclitaxel receptor [1]. These data corroborate the observation that the binding properties of peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles can mimic the binding properties of peptides in naturally occurring proteins. It follows directly that structural context is relatively unimportant for determining the binding properties of these disordered peptides. This technique represents a novel, rapid, high resolution method for identifying potential ligand binding sites in the absence of three-dimensional information and has the potential to greatly enhance the speed of development of novel small molecule pharmaceuticals.

  19. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. Mark; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-01

    The separation of molecules with similar size and shape is an important technological challenge. For example, rare gases can pose either an economic opportunity or an environmental hazard and there is a need to separate these spherical molecules selectively at low concentrations in air. Likewise, chiral molecules are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, but chiral enantiomers, by definition, have identical size and shape, and their separation can be challenging. Here we show that a porous organic cage molecule has unprecedented performance in the solid state for the separation of rare gases, such as krypton and xenon. The selectivity arises from a precise size match between the rare gas and the organic cage cavity, as predicted by molecular simulations. Breakthrough experiments demonstrate real practical potential for the separation of krypton, xenon and radon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million. We also demonstrate selective binding of chiral organic molecules such as 1-phenylethanol, suggesting applications in enantioselective separation.

  20. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S; Chong, Samantha Y; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K Mark; Armstrong, Jayne A; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M; Thallapally, Praveen K; Cooper, Andrew I

    2014-10-01

    The separation of molecules with similar size and shape is an important technological challenge. For example, rare gases can pose either an economic opportunity or an environmental hazard and there is a need to separate these spherical molecules selectively at low concentrations in air. Likewise, chiral molecules are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, but chiral enantiomers, by definition, have identical size and shape, and their separation can be challenging. Here we show that a porous organic cage molecule has unprecedented performance in the solid state for the separation of rare gases, such as krypton and xenon. The selectivity arises from a precise size match between the rare gas and the organic cage cavity, as predicted by molecular simulations. Breakthrough experiments demonstrate real practical potential for the separation of krypton, xenon and radon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million. We also demonstrate selective binding of chiral organic molecules such as 1-phenylethanol, suggesting applications in enantioselective separation. PMID:25038731

  1. Origins of concentration dependence of waiting times for single-molecule fluorescence binding.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Pearson, John E

    2012-06-28

    Binary fluorescence time series obtained from single-molecule imaging experiments can be used to infer protein binding kinetics, in particular, association and dissociation rate constants from waiting time statistics of fluorescence intensity changes. In many cases, rate constants inferred from fluorescence time series exhibit nonintuitive dependence on ligand concentration. Here, we examine several possible mechanistic and technical origins that may induce ligand dependence of rate constants. Using aggregated Markov models, we show under the condition of detailed balance that non-fluorescent bindings and missed events due to transient interactions, instead of conformation fluctuations, may underly the dependence of waiting times and thus apparent rate constants on ligand concentrations. In general, waiting times are rational functions of ligand concentration. The shape of concentration dependence is qualitatively affected by the number of binding sites in the single molecule and is quantitatively tuned by model parameters. We also show that ligand dependence can be caused by non-equilibrium conditions which result in violations of detailed balance and require an energy source. As to a different but significant mechanism, we examine the effect of ambient buffers that can substantially reduce the effective concentration of ligands that interact with the single molecules. To demonstrate the effects by these mechanisms, we applied our results to analyze the concentration dependence in a single-molecule experiment EGFR binding to fluorophore-labeled adaptor protein Grb2 by Morimatsu et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 18013 (2007)]. PMID:22755586

  2. Synthesis of Zn-MOF incorporating titanium-hydrides as active sites binding H2 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongsik; Ok Kim, Dong; Wook Kim, Dong; Sagong, Kil

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the synthetic effort for a Zn-MOF imparting Ti-H as a preferential binding site potentially capturing H2 molecules via Kubas-type interaction. The formation mechanism of Ti-H innate to the final material was potentially demonstrated to follow a radical dissociation rather than a β-hydrogen elimination and a C-H reductive elimination.

  3. Ca2+-bound calmodulin forms a compact globular structure on binding four trifluoperazine molecules in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, N; Hayashi, N; Jinbo, Y; Izumi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), which determines the radius of gyration, R(g), and the pair distance distribution function, was used to investigate the conformational changes of calmodulin (CaM) on binding to an antagonist, trifluoperazine (TFP), with or without Ca(2+) in solution. We previously applied this SAXS method to CaM complexed with N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulphonamide (W-7) [Osawa, Kuwamoto, Izumi, Yap, Ikura, Shibanuma, Yokokura, Hidaka and Matsushima (1999) FEBS Lett. 442, 173-177] and found that the binding of two W-7 TFP molecules to one Ca(2+)-saturated CaM molecule induces structural changes from a 'dumb-bell' shape to a compact globular shape. We report here that the most compact globular shape whose size is consistent with that of the 1:2 Ca(2+)-saturated CaM-W-7 complex is formed by the binding of four TFP molecules to one Ca(2+)-saturated CaM molecule. Even in the absence of Ca(2+), the conformational changes of CaM occur on TFP binding, giving a slightly smaller R(g) than Ca(2+)-free CaM alone. PMID:10727421

  4. Detection of Protein–Small Molecule Binding Using a Self-Referencing External Cavity Laser Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening has enabled the identification of small molecule modulators of important drug targets via well-established colorimetric or fluorimetric activity assays. However, existing methods to identify small molecule binders of nonenzymatic protein targets lack either the simplicity (e.g., require labeling one of the binding partners with a reporter) or throughput inherent in enzymatic assays widely used for HTS. Thus, there is intense interest in the development of high-throughput technologies for label-free detection of protein–small molecule interactions. Here we describe a novel self-referencing external cavity laser (ECL) biosensor approach that achieves high resolution and high sensitivity, while eliminating thermal noise with subpicometer wavelength accuracy. Using the self-referencing ECL biosensor, we demonstrate detection of binding between small molecules and a variety of immobilized protein targets, pairs that have binding affinities or inhibition constants ranging from subnanomolar to low micromolar. Finally, a “needle-in-the-haystack” screen for inhibitors against carbonic anhydrase isozyme II is performed, in which known inhibitors are clearly differentiated from inactive molecules within a compound library. PMID:24720510

  5. Detection of protein-small molecule binding using a self-referencing external cavity laser biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-04-23

    High-throughput screening has enabled the identification of small molecule modulators of important drug targets via well-established colorimetric or fluorimetric activity assays. However, existing methods to identify small molecule binders of nonenzymatic protein targets lack either the simplicity (e.g., require labeling one of the binding partners with a reporter) or throughput inherent in enzymatic assays widely used for HTS. Thus, there is intense interest in the development of high-throughput technologies for label-free detection of protein-small molecule interactions. Here we describe a novel self-referencing external cavity laser (ECL) biosensor approach that achieves high resolution and high sensitivity, while eliminating thermal noise with subpicometer wavelength accuracy. Using the self-referencing ECL biosensor, we demonstrate detection of binding between small molecules and a variety of immobilized protein targets, pairs that have binding affinities or inhibition constants ranging from subnanomolar to low micromolar. Finally, a "needle-in-the-haystack" screen for inhibitors against carbonic anhydrase isozyme II is performed, in which known inhibitors are clearly differentiated from inactive molecules within a compound library. PMID:24720510

  6. DEPTH: a web server to compute depth and predict small-molecule binding cavities in proteins.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kuan Pern; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Madhusudhan, M S

    2011-07-01

    Depth measures the extent of atom/residue burial within a protein. It correlates with properties such as protein stability, hydrogen exchange rate, protein-protein interaction hot spots, post-translational modification sites and sequence variability. Our server, DEPTH, accurately computes depth and solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) values. We show that depth can be used to predict small molecule ligand binding cavities in proteins. Often, some of the residues lining a ligand binding cavity are both deep and solvent exposed. Using the depth-SASA pair values for a residue, its likelihood to form part of a small molecule binding cavity is estimated. The parameters of the method were calibrated over a training set of 900 high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of single-domain proteins bound to small molecules (molecular weight <1.5  KDa). The prediction accuracy of DEPTH is comparable to that of other geometry-based prediction methods including LIGSITE, SURFNET and Pocket-Finder (all with Matthew's correlation coefficient of ∼0.4) over a testing set of 225 single and multi-chain protein structures. Users have the option of tuning several parameters to detect cavities of different sizes, for example, geometrically flat binding sites. The input to the server is a protein 3D structure in PDB format. The users have the option of tuning the values of four parameters associated with the computation of residue depth and the prediction of binding cavities. The computed depths, SASA and binding cavity predictions are displayed in 2D plots and mapped onto 3D representations of the protein structure using Jmol. Links are provided to download the outputs. Our server is useful for all structural analysis based on residue depth and SASA, such as guiding site-directed mutagenesis experiments and small molecule docking exercises, in the context of protein functional annotation and drug discovery. PMID:21576233

  7. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, C.; Plochberger, B.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Rankl, C.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Danzberger, J.; Lukanov, P.; Flahaut, E.; Schütz, G.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ebner, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity.

  8. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Paul; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antony G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. PMID:25860507

  9. Sensitive NMR Approach for Determining the Binding Mode of Tightly Binding Ligand Molecules to Protein Targets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Na; Nitsche, Christoph; Pilla, Kala Bharath; Graham, Bim; Huber, Thomas; Klein, Christian D; Otting, Gottfried

    2016-04-01

    Structure-guided drug design relies on detailed structural knowledge of protein-ligand complexes, but crystallization of cocomplexes is not always possible. Here we present a sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to determine the binding mode of tightly binding lead compounds in complex with difficult target proteins. In contrast to established NMR methods, it does not depend on rapid exchange between bound and free ligand or on stable isotope labeling, relying instead on a tert-butyl group as a chemical label. tert-Butyl groups are found in numerous protein ligands and deliver an exceptionally narrow and tall (1)H NMR signal. We show that a tert-butyl group also produces outstandingly intense intra- and intermolecular NOESY cross-peaks. These enable measurements of pseudocontact shifts generated by lanthanide tags attached to the protein, which in turn allows positioning of the ligand on the protein. Once the ligand has been located, assignments of intermolecular NOEs become possible even without prior resonance assignments of protein side chains. The approach is demonstrated with the dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease in complex with a high-affinity ligand containing a tert-butyl group. PMID:26974502

  10. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chempath, Shaji; Pratt, Lawrence R

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  11. First-principles Hubbard U approach for small molecule binding in metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gregory W.; Lee, Kyuho; Cococcioni, Matteo; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2016-05-01

    We apply first-principles approaches with Hubbard U corrections for calculation of small molecule binding energetics to open-shell transition metal atoms in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Using density functional theory with van der Waals dispersion-corrected functionals, we determine Hubbard U values ab initio through an established linear response procedure for M-MOF-74, for a number of different metal centers (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). While our ab initio U values differ from those used in previous work, we show that they result in lattice parameters and electronic contributions to CO2-MOF binding energies that lead to excellent agreement with experiments and previous results, yielding lattice parameters within 3%. In addition, U-dependent calculations for an example system, Co-MOF-74, suggest that the CO2 binding energy grows monotonically with the value of Hubbard U, with the binding energy shifting 4 kJ/mol (or 0.041 eV) over the range of U = 0-5.4 eV. These results provide insight into an approximate but computationally efficient means for calculation of small molecule binding energies to open-shell transition metal atoms in MOFs and suggest that the approach can be predictive with good accuracy, independent of the cations used and the availability of experimental data.

  12. First-principles Hubbard U approach for small molecule binding in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Mann, Gregory W; Lee, Kyuho; Cococcioni, Matteo; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    We apply first-principles approaches with Hubbard U corrections for calculation of small molecule binding energetics to open-shell transition metal atoms in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Using density functional theory with van der Waals dispersion-corrected functionals, we determine Hubbard U values ab initio through an established linear response procedure for M-MOF-74, for a number of different metal centers (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). While our ab initio U values differ from those used in previous work, we show that they result in lattice parameters and electronic contributions to CO2-MOF binding energies that lead to excellent agreement with experiments and previous results, yielding lattice parameters within 3%. In addition, U-dependent calculations for an example system, Co-MOF-74, suggest that the CO2 binding energy grows monotonically with the value of Hubbard U, with the binding energy shifting 4 kJ/mol (or 0.041 eV) over the range of U = 0-5.4 eV. These results provide insight into an approximate but computationally efficient means for calculation of small molecule binding energies to open-shell transition metal atoms in MOFs and suggest that the approach can be predictive with good accuracy, independent of the cations used and the availability of experimental data. PMID:27155622

  13. Both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via CD74 surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwon; Cox, Chasity M; Jenkins, Mark C; Fetterer, Ray H; Miska, Katarzyna B; Dalloul, Rami A

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. Our group has identified both chicken and Eimeria MIFs, and characterized their function in enhancing innate immune responses during inflammation. In this study, we report that chicken CD74 (ChCD74), a type II transmembrane protein, functions as a macrophage surface receptor that binds to MIF molecules. First, to examine the binding of MIF to chicken monocytes/macrophages, fresh isolated chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with rChIFN-γ and then incubated with recombinant chicken MIF (rChMIF). Immunofluorescence staining with anti-ChMIF followed by flow cytometry revealed the binding of MIF to stimulated PBMCs. To verify that ChCD74 acts as a surface receptor for MIF molecules, full-length ChCD74p41 was cloned, expressed and its recombinant protein (rChCD74p41) transiently over-expressed with green fluorescent protein in chicken fibroblast DF-1 cells. Fluorescence analysis revealed a higher population of cells double positive for CD74p41 and rChMIF, indicating the binding of rChMIF to DF-1 cells via rChCD74p41. Using a similar approach, it was found that Eimeria MIF (EMIF), which is secreted by Eimeria sp. during infection, bound to chicken macrophages via ChCD74p41 as a surface receptor. Together, this study provides conclusive evidence that both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via the surface receptor ChCD74. PMID:25086294

  14. Calreticulin is a microbial-binding molecule with phagocytosis-enhancing capacity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuemei; Xu, Na; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-09-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a highly conserved calcium-binding protein mainly involved in directing proper conformation of proteins and controlling calcium level. Accumulating data also show that CRT is emerging as an immune-relevant molecule. In this study, we demonstrated that the CRT gene from the amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum, named Bjcrt, consisted of a signal peptide, three domains (N-, P-, C-domains) and an ER retrieval signal sequence (KDEL), which appears to be the ancient form of vertebrate CRTs, and Bjcrt was expressed in a tissue-specific manner, with the most abundant expression in the notochord. We also demonstrated for the first time that the recombinant BjCRT (rBjCRT) was able to bind the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, both BjCRT as well as human recombinant calreticulin were able to promote the phagocytosis of E. coli and S. aureus by sea bass macrophages. These results indicate that CRT is a microbial-binding molecule and possesses an ability to enhance phagocytosis, a novel function assigned to CRT, reenforcing the notion that CRT is an immune-relevant molecule associated with host immune responses. PMID:23791863

  15. Electroosmotic enhancement of the binding of a neutral molecule to a transmembrane pore

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Li-Qun; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan

    2003-01-01

    The flux of solvent water coupled to the transit of ions through protein pores is considerable. The effect of this electroosmotic solvent flow on the binding of a neutral molecule [β-cyclodextrin (βCD)] to sites within the staphylococcal α-hemolysin pore was investigated. Mutant α-hemolysin pores were used to which βCD can bind from either entrance and through which the direction of water flow can be controlled by choosing the charge selectivity of the pore and the polarity of the applied potential. The Kd values for βCD for individual mutant pores varied by >100-fold with the applied potential over a range of –120 to +120 mV. In all cases, the signs of the changes in binding free energy and the influence of potential on the association and dissociation rate constants for βCD were consistent with an electroosmotic effect. PMID:14676320

  16. Measuring p53 Binding to Single DNA Molecules in a Nanofluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelsky, Amber; Gonzalez, Nicholas, Jr.; Gal, Susannah; Levy, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Protein-DNA binding is central to several important cellular processes, for instance, the transfer of genetic information into proteins. The p53 protein plays a central role in regulating several major cell cycle pathways, in part by binding to well-characterized DNA sequences in the promoters of specific genes. Recent studies show that the most common mutation to the protein occurs in the region responsible for its binding to DNA. We have fabricated slit-like nanofluidic devices that allow us to trap and stretch single molecules of DNA containing a known recognition sequence of p53. We use fluorescent microscopy to observe the diffusion of a single p53 protein as it searches for its DNA recognition site. We measure the reaction rates of binding to selected DNA sequences as well as the one-dimensional, non-sequence specific diffusion of p53 along a stretched DNA molecule as a function of salt concentration. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion attempts to explain how proteins seem able to find their DNA target sequences much more quickly than would be expected from three-dimensional diffusion alone. We compare the observed search mechanism used by normal and mutated p53 from cancer cells to predictions based on this theory.

  17. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Robson F; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2009-01-01

    The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan. PMID:19682383

  18. Three-dimensional model of a selective theophylline-binding RNA molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chang-Shung; Oprea, T.I.; Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E.

    1995-07-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) model for an RNA molecule that selectively binds theophylline but not caffeine. This RNA, which was found using SELEX [Jenison, R.D., et al., Science (1994) 263:1425] is 10,000 times more specific for theophylline (Kd=320 nM) than for caffeine (Kd=3.5 mM), although the two ligands are identical except for a methyl group substituted at N7 (present only in caffeine). The binding affinity for ten xanthine-based ligands was used to derive a Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) model (R{sup 2} = 0.93 for 3 components, with cross-validated R{sup 2} of 0.73), using the SYBYL and GOLPE programs. A pharmacophoric map was generated to locate steric and electrostatic interactions between theophylline and the RNA binding site. This information was used to identify putative functional groups of the binding pocket and to generate distance constraints. Based on a model for the secondary structure (Jenison et al., idem), the 3D structure of this RNA was then generated using the following method: each helical region of the RNA molecule was treated as a rigid body; single-stranded loops with specific end-to-end distances were generated. The structures of RNA-xanthine complexes were studied using a modified Monte Carlo algorithm. The detailed structure of an RNA-ligand complex model, as well as possible explanations for the theophylline selectivity will be discussed.

  19. Assembly of an antiparallel homo-adenine DNA duplex by small-molecule binding.

    PubMed

    Persil, Ozgül; Santai, Catherine T; Jain, Swapan S; Hud, Nicholas V

    2004-07-21

    Molecules that reversibly bind DNA and trigger the formation of non-Watson-Crick secondary structures would be useful in the design of dynamic DNA nanostructures and as potential leads for new therapeutic agents. We demonstrate that coralyne, a small crescent-shaped molecule, promotes the formation of a duplex secondary structure from homo-adenine oligonucleotides. AFM studies reveal that the staggered alignment of homo-adenine oligonucleotides upon coralyne binding produces polymers of micrometers in length, but only 2 nm in height. A DNA duplex was also studied that contained eight A.A mismatches between two flanking 7-bp Watson-Crick helices. CD spectra confirm that the multiple A.A mismatches of this duplex bind coralyne in manner similar to that of homo-adenine oligonucleotides. Furthermore, the melting temperature of this hybrid duplex increases by 13 degrees C upon coralyne binding. These observations illustrate that the helical structure of the homo-adenine-coralyne duplex is compatible with the B-form DNA helix. PMID:15250704

  20. Highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence displacement method for the study of DNA/small molecule binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongfu; Wang, Li-Rong; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2010-08-31

    Non-covalent binding interactions of small molecules with DNA play important roles in regulating gene expression and gene function. In this work, a highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) displacement method has been developed to investigate such interactions, particularly for weak DNA binders. This ECL method relies on a double-stranded DNA film deposited on an indium tin oxide electrode (ITO) surface by layer-by-layer self-assembly. A DNA intercalator, [Ru(bpy)(2)(dppz)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2'3'-c]phenazine), is employed as the ECL signal indicator. If a test compound competes with the indicator for the same binding sites in DNA, it would displace the indicator from the film and reduce ECL signal. The new method was validated by measuring five well-known DNA-binding organic molecules including quinacrine, H33258, thiazole orange, ethidium bromide and 4,6-diamidine-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride. Due to high ECL sensitivity, only 0.4 micromol L(-1) [Ru(bpy)(2)(dppz)](2+) was needed in the ECL displacement measurement, which is about 75-fold less than the concentration in the voltammetric measurement. The lowered concentration permitted direct measurement of IC(50) values of eight hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in their ECL displacement curves and subsequent calculation of their binding constants with DNA. The ECL displacement method is particularly useful for investigating weak DNA binders with limited aqueous solubility. PMID:20800740

  1. Visualizing repetitive diffusion activity of double-strand RNA binding proteins by single molecule fluorescence assays.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Wang, Xinlei; Myong, Sua

    2016-08-01

    TRBP, one of double strand RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs), is an essential cofactor of Dicer in the RNA interference pathway. Previously we reported that TRBP exhibits repetitive diffusion activity on double strand (ds)RNA in an ATP independent manner. In the TRBP-Dicer complex, the diffusion mobility of TRBP facilitates Dicer-mediated RNA cleavage. Such repetitive diffusion of dsRBPs on a nucleic acid at the nanometer scale can be appropriately captured by several single molecule detection techniques. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to four different single molecule fluorescence assays by which the diffusion activity of dsRBPs on dsRNA can be detected. One color assay, termed protein induced fluorescence enhancement enables detection of unlabeled protein binding and diffusion on a singly labeled RNA. Two-color Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in which labeled dsRBPs is applied to labeled RNA, allows for probing the motion of protein along the RNA axis. Three color FRET reports on the diffusion movement of dsRBPs from one to the other end of RNA. The single molecule pull down assay provides an opportunity to collect dsRBPs from mammalian cells and examine the protein-RNA interaction at single molecule platform. PMID:27012177

  2. Crystal structures of bovine odorant-binding protein in complex with odorant molecules.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Florence; Ramoni, Roberto; Spinelli, Silvia; Grolli, Stefano; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2004-10-01

    The structure of bovine odorant-binding protein (bOBP) revealed a striking feature of a dimer formed by domain swapping [Tegoni, M., Ramoni, R., Bignetti, E., Spinelli, S. & Cambillau, C. (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol.3, 863-867; Bianchet, M.A., Bains, G., Pelosi, P., Pevsner, J., Snyder, S.H., Monaco, H.L. & Amzel, L.M. (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol.3, 934-939] and the presence of a naturally occuring ligand [Ramoni, R., Vincent, F., Grolli, S., Conti, V., Malosse, C., Boyer, F.D., Nagnan-Le Meillour, P., Spinelli, S., Cambillau, C. & Tegoni, M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem.276, 7150-7155]. These features led us to investigate the binding of odorant molecules with bOBP in solution and in the crystal. The behavior of odorant molecules in bOBP resembles that observed with porcine OBP (pOBP), although the latter is monomeric and devoid of ligand when purified. The odorant molecules presented K(d) values with bOBP in the micromolar range. Most of the X-ray structures revealed that odorant molecules interact with a common set of residues forming the cavity wall and do not exhibit specific interactions. Depending on the ligand and on the monomer (A or B), a single residue--Phe89--presents alternate conformations and might control cross-talking between the subunits. Crystal data on both pOBP and bOBP, in contrast with binding and spectroscopic studies on rat OBP in solution, reveal an absence of significant conformational changes involving protein loops or backbone. Thus, the role of OBP in signal triggering remains unresolved. PMID:15373829

  3. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-01

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27388036

  4. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  5. Single-Molecule Studies of Unlabeled Full-Length p53 Protein Binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Philippa; Lee, Kidan; Ciccarella, Pietro; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Kim, Ki-Bum; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-03-10

    p53 is an antitumor protein that plays an important role in apoptosis, preserving genomic stability and preventing angiogenesis, and it has been implicated in a large number of human cancers. For this reason it is an interesting target for both fundamental studies, such as the mechanism of interaction with DNA, and applications in biosensing. Here, we report a comprehensive study of label-free, full length p53 (flp53) and its interaction with engineered double-stranded DNA in vitro, at the single-molecule level, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and solid-state nanopore sensing. AFM data show that dimeric and tetrameric p53 bind to the DNA in a sequence-specific manner, confirming previously reported relative binding affinities. The statistical significance is tested using both the Grubbs test and stochastic simulations. For the first time, ultralow noise solid-state nanopore sensors are employed for the successful differentiation between bare DNA and p53/DNA complexes. Furthermore, translocation statistics reflect the binding affinities of different DNA sequences, in accordance with AFM data. Our results thus highlight the potential of solid-state nanopore sensors for single-molecule biosensing, especially when labeling is either not possible or at least not a viable option. PMID:26855037

  6. Proteomic analysis of egg white heparin-binding proteins: towards the identification of natural antibacterial molecules.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Nicolas; Labas, Valérie; Harichaux, Grégoire; Chessé, Magali; Poirier, Jean-Claude; Nys, Yves; Réhault-Godbert, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The chicken egg resists most environmental microbes suggesting that it potentially contains efficient antimicrobial molecules. Considering that some heparin-binding proteins in mammals are antibacterial, we investigated the presence and the antimicrobial activity of heparin-binding proteins from chicken egg white. Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins recovered after heparin-affinity chromatography, revealed 20 proteins, including known antimicrobial proteins (avidin, lysozyme, TENP, ovalbumin-related protein X and avian bêta-defensin 11). The antibacterial activity of three new egg candidates (vitelline membrane outer layer protein 1, beta-microseminoprotein-like (LOC101750704) and pleiotrophin) was demonstrated against Listeria monocytogenes and/or Salmonella enterica Enteritidis. We showed that all these molecules share the property to inhibit bacterial growth through their heparin-binding domains. However, vitelline membrane outer layer 1 has additional specific structural features that can contribute to its antimicrobial potential. Moreover, we identified potential supplementary effectors of innate immunity including mucin 5B, E-selectin ligand 1, whey acidic protein 3, peptidyl prolyl isomerase B and retinoic acid receptor responder protein 2. These data support the concept of using heparin affinity combined to mass spectrometry to obtain an overview of the various effectors of innate immunity composing biological milieus, and to identify novel antimicrobial candidates of interest in the race for alternatives to antibiotics. PMID:27294500

  7. Proteomic analysis of egg white heparin-binding proteins: towards the identification of natural antibacterial molecules

    PubMed Central

    Guyot, Nicolas; Labas, Valérie; Harichaux, Grégoire; Chessé, Magali; Poirier, Jean-Claude; Nys, Yves; Réhault-Godbert, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The chicken egg resists most environmental microbes suggesting that it potentially contains efficient antimicrobial molecules. Considering that some heparin-binding proteins in mammals are antibacterial, we investigated the presence and the antimicrobial activity of heparin-binding proteins from chicken egg white. Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins recovered after heparin-affinity chromatography, revealed 20 proteins, including known antimicrobial proteins (avidin, lysozyme, TENP, ovalbumin-related protein X and avian bêta-defensin 11). The antibacterial activity of three new egg candidates (vitelline membrane outer layer protein 1, beta-microseminoprotein-like (LOC101750704) and pleiotrophin) was demonstrated against Listeria monocytogenes and/or Salmonella enterica Enteritidis. We showed that all these molecules share the property to inhibit bacterial growth through their heparin-binding domains. However, vitelline membrane outer layer 1 has additional specific structural features that can contribute to its antimicrobial potential. Moreover, we identified potential supplementary effectors of innate immunity including mucin 5B, E-selectin ligand 1, whey acidic protein 3, peptidyl prolyl isomerase B and retinoic acid receptor responder protein 2. These data support the concept of using heparin affinity combined to mass spectrometry to obtain an overview of the various effectors of innate immunity composing biological milieus, and to identify novel antimicrobial candidates of interest in the race for alternatives to antibiotics. PMID:27294500

  8. The blot rolling assay: a method for identifying adhesion molecules mediating binding under shear conditions.

    PubMed

    Sackstein, Robert; Fuhlbrigge, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Adhesive interactions of cells with blood vessel walls under flow conditions are critical to a variety of processes, including hemostasis, leukocyte trafficking, tumor metastasis, and atherosclerosis. We have developed a new technique for the observation of binding interactions under shear, which we have termed the "blot rolling assay." In this method, molecules in a complex mixture are resolved by gel electrophoresis and transferred to a membrane. This membrane can be rendered semitransparent and incorporated into a parallel-plate flow chamber apparatus. Cells or particles bearing adhesion proteins of interest are then introduced into the chamber under controlled flow, and their interactions with individual components of the immobilized substrates can be visualized in real time. The substrate molecules can be identified by staining with specific antibodies or by excising the relevant band(s) and performing mass spectrometry or microsequencing of the isolated material. Thus, this method allows for the identification, within a complex mixture and without previous isolation or purification, of both known and novel adhesion molecules capable of binding under shear conditions. PMID:16799202

  9. Diatomic molecules and metallic adhesion, cohesion, and chemisorption - A single binding-energy relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Potential-energy relations involving a few parameters in simple analytic forms have been found to represent well the energetics of a wide variety of diatomic molecules. However, such two-atom potential functions are not appropriate for metals. It is well known that, in the case of metals, there exist strong volume-dependent forces which can never be expressed as pairwise interactions. The present investigation has the objective to show that, in spite of the observation concerning metals, a single binding-energy relation can be found which accurately describes diatomic molecules as well as adhesion, cohesion, and chemisorption on metals. This universality reveals a commonality between the molecular and metallic bond.

  10. Identifying Sequential Substrate Binding at the Single-Molecule Level by Enzyme Mechanical Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Ramírez-Sarmiento, César A.; Fernandez, Julio M.; Guixé, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-substrate binding is a dynamic process intimately coupled to protein structural changes, which in turn changes the unfolding energy landscape. By the use of single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), we characterize the open-to-closed conformational transition experienced by the hyperthermophilic ADP-dependent glucokinase from Thermococcus litoralis triggered by the sequential binding of substrates. In the absence of substrates, the mechanical unfolding of TlGK shows an intermediate I, which is stabilized in the presence of Mg·ADP-, the first substrate to bind to the enzyme. However, in the presence of this substrate, an additional unfolding event is observed, intermediate-1*. Finally, in the presence of both substrates, the unfolding force of intermediates-1 and -1*, increases as a consequence of the domain closure. These results show that SMFS could be used as a powerful experimental tool to investigate binding mechanisms of different enzymes with more than one ligand, expanding the repertoire of protocols traditionally used in enzymology. PMID:25840594

  11. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals That Argonaute Reshapes the Binding Properties of Its Nucleic Acid Guides

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, William E.; Jolly, Samson M.; Moore, Melissa J.; Zamore, Phillip D.; Serebrov, Victor

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Argonaute proteins repress gene expression and defend against foreign nucleic acids using short RNAs or DNAs to specify the correct target RNA or DNA sequence. We have developed single-molecule methods to analyze target binding and cleavage mediated by the Argonaute:guide complex, RISC. We find that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Argonaute proteins reshape the fundamental properties of RNA:RNA, RNA:DNA, and DNA:DNA hybridization: a small RNA or DNA bound to Argonaute as a guide no longer follows the well-established rules by which oligonucleotides find, bind, and dissociate from complementary nucleic acid sequences. Argonautes distinguish substrates from targets with similar complementarity. Mouse AGO2, for example, binds tighter to miRNA targets than its RNAi cleavage product, even though the cleaved product contains more base pairs. By re-writing the rules for nucleic acid hybridization, Argonautes allow oligonucleotides to serve as specificity determinants with thermodynamic and kinetic properties more typical of RNA-binding proteins than of RNA or DNA. PMID:26140592

  12. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals that Argonaute Reshapes the Binding Properties of Its Nucleic Acid Guides.

    PubMed

    Salomon, William E; Jolly, Samson M; Moore, Melissa J; Zamore, Phillip D; Serebrov, Victor

    2015-07-01

    Argonaute proteins repress gene expression and defend against foreign nucleic acids using short RNAs or DNAs to specify the correct target RNA or DNA sequence. We have developed single-molecule methods to analyze target binding and cleavage mediated by the Argonaute:guide complex, RISC. We find that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Argonaute proteins reshape the fundamental properties of RNA:RNA, RNA:DNA, and DNA:DNA hybridization—a small RNA or DNA bound to Argonaute as a guide no longer follows the well-established rules by which oligonucleotides find, bind, and dissociate from complementary nucleic acid sequences. Argonautes distinguish substrates from targets with similar complementarity. Mouse AGO2, for example, binds tighter to miRNA targets than its RNAi cleavage product, even though the cleaved product contains more base pairs. By re-writing the rules for nucleic acid hybridization, Argonautes allow oligonucleotides to serve as specificity determinants with thermodynamic and kinetic properties more typical of RNA-binding proteins than of RNA or DNA. PMID:26140592

  13. Properties of complexes formed by Na(+), Mg(2+), and Fe(2+) binding with benzene molecules.

    PubMed

    Kolakkandy, Sujitha; Pratihar, Subha; Aquino, Adelia J A; Wang, Hai; Hase, William L

    2014-10-01

    A theoretical investigation was performed to study cation-π interactions in complexes of benzene (Bz) with cations, that is, M(z+)(Bz)n for M(z+) = Na(+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+) and n = 1-3, using MP2 theory with the 6-31+G* and 6-311++G** basis sets and the DFT/(B3LYP and B3LYP-D)/6-311++G** methods. Binding energies and structures of the complexes are reported. The splitting between the quintet and single states of the Fe(2+) complexes was found to depend on the number of benzene molecules in the complex and the complex's structure. All of the M(z+)(Bz) complexes prefer a half-sandwich geometry. A geometry with the cation sandwiched between the two benzene rings was found for the M(z+)(Bz)2 complexes, with the benzene rings either in an eclipsed or staggered conformation. An approximate cyclic structure, with the cation at its center, was found for three benzene molecules interacting with the cation. The cation-benzene binding energy is substantial and equal to 22, 108, and 151 kcal/mol for the Na(+)(Bz), Mg(2+)(Bz), and Fe(2+)(Bz) complexes, respectively. The strength of the interaction of the cation with an individual benzene molecule decreases as the number of benzene molecules bound to the cation increases; for example, it is 108 kcal/mol for Mg(2+)(Bz), but only 71 kcal/mol for Mg(2+)(Bz)3. There is a range of values for the M(z+)(Bz)n intermolecular vibrational frequencies; for example, they are ∼230-360 and ∼10-330 cm(-1) for the Mg(2+)(Bz) and Mg(2+)(Bz)3 complexes, respectively. Binding of the cation to benzene both red and blue shifts the benzene vibrational frequencies. This shifting is larger for the Mg(2+) and Fe(2+) complexes, as compared to those for Na(+), as a result of the former's stronger cation-benzene binding. The present study is an initial step to understand the possible importance of cation-π interactions for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon aggregation processes during soot formation. PMID:25144574

  14. Mapping the protein-binding sites for iridium(iii)-based CO-releasing molecules.

    PubMed

    Caterino, Marco; Petruk, Ariel A; Vergara, Alessandro; Ferraro, Giarita; Marasco, Daniela; Doctorovich, Fabio; Estrin, Dario A; Merlino, Antonello

    2016-07-26

    A combination of mass spectrometry, Raman microspectroscopy, circular dichroism and X-ray crystallography has been used to obtain detailed information on the reaction of an iridium-based CO-releasing molecule (Ir-CORM), Cs2IrCl5CO, with a model protein, bovine pancreatic ribonuclease. The results show that Ir-compound fragments bind to the N-terminal amine and close to histidine and methionine side chains, and the CO ligand is retained for a long time. The data provide helpful information for identifying protein targets for Ir-CORMs and for studying the mechanism that allows them to exhibit their interesting biological properties. PMID:27411388

  15. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Burton, D R

    1988-07-22

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used. PMID:2840465

  16. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Paul E; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antoni G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05345.001 PMID:25860507

  17. A Novel Affibody-Auristatin E Conjugate With a Potent and Selective Activity Against HER2+ Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Sochaj-Gregorczyk, Alicja M; Serwotka-Suszczak, Anna M; Otlewski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a new type of cancer treatment that most often uses biologically active drugs attached to a monoclonal antibody. This so called antibody-drug conjugate strategy allows the use of highly toxic substances that target tumor cells specifically, leaving healthy tissues largely unaffected. Over the last few years, antibody-drug conjugates have become a powerful tool in cancer treatment. We developed and characterized a novel cytotoxic conjugate against HER2 tumors in which the antibody has been substituted with a much smaller molecule: the affibody. The conjugate is composed of the ZHER2:2891 affibody that recognizes HER2 and a highly potent cytotoxic drug auristatin E. The ZHER2:2891 molecule does not contain cysteine(s) in its amino acid sequence. We generated 3 variants of ZHER2:2891, each containing a single cysteine to allow conjugation through the maleimide group that is present in the cytotoxic component. In 2 variants, we introduced single S46C and D53C substitutions. In the third variant, a short Drug Conjugation Sequence (DCS) containing a single cysteine was introduced at the C-terminus of ZHER2:2891, resulting in ZHER2:2891-DCS. The latter variant exhibited a significantly higher conjugation yield, and therefore its cytotoxicity has been studied more thoroughly. The ZHER2:2891-DCS-MMAE conjugate killed the HER2-overexpressing SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-453 cells efficiently (IC50 values of 5.2 and 24.8 nM, respectively). The T-47-D and MDA-MB-231 cells that express normal levels of HER2 were significantly less sensitive to the conjugate (IC50 values of 135.6 and 161.5 nM, respectively). Overall, we have demonstrated for the first time that proteins other than antibodies/antibody fragments can be successfully combined with a linker-drug module, resulting in conjugates that eliminate cancer cells selectively. PMID:27227324

  18. A Novel Peptide Binding Prediction Approach for HLA-DR Molecule Based on Sequence and Structural Information

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Zhao, Yilei; Pan, Gaofeng; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    MHC molecule plays a key role in immunology, and the molecule binding reaction with peptide is an important prerequisite for T cell immunity induced. MHC II molecules do not have conserved residues, so they appear as open grooves. As a consequence, this will increase the difficulty in predicting MHC II molecules binding peptides. In this paper, we aim to propose a novel prediction method for MHC II molecules binding peptides. First, we calculate sequence similarity and structural similarity between different MHC II molecules. Then, we reorder pseudosequences according to descending similarity values and use a weight calculation formula to calculate new pocket profiles. Finally, we use three scoring functions to predict binding cores and evaluate the accuracy of prediction to judge performance of each scoring function. In the experiment, we set a parameter α in the weight formula. By changing α value, we can observe different performances of each scoring function. We compare our method with the best function to some popular prediction methods and ultimately find that our method outperforms them in identifying binding cores of HLA-DR molecules. PMID:27340658

  19. Multiple CaMKII Binding Modes to the Actin Cytoskeleton Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid; Conte, Ianina; Carter, Tom; Bayer, K Ulrich; Molloy, Justin E

    2016-07-26

    Localization of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) to dendritic spine synapses is determined in part by the actin cytoskeleton. We determined binding of GFP-tagged CaMKII to tag-RFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton within live cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking. Stepwise photobleaching showed that CaMKII formed oligomeric complexes. Photoactivation experiments demonstrated that diffusion out of the evanescent field determined the track lifetimes. Latrunculin treatment triggered a coupled loss of actin stress fibers and the colocalized, long-lived CaMKII tracks. The CaMKIIα (α) isoform, which was previously thought to lack F-actin interactions, also showed binding, but this was threefold weaker than that observed for CaMKIIβ (β). The βE' splice variant bound more weakly than α, showing that binding by β depends critically on the interdomain linker. The mutations βT287D and αT286D, which mimic autophosphorylation states, also abolished F-actin binding. Autophosphorylation triggers autonomous CaMKII activity, but does not impair GluN2B binding, another important synaptic protein interaction of CaMKII. The CaMKII inhibitor tatCN21 or CaMKII mutations that inhibit GluN2B association by blocking binding of ATP (βK43R and αK42M) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin (βA303R) had no effect on the interaction with F-actin. These results provide the first rationale for the reduced synaptic spine localization of the αT286D mutant, indicating that transient F-actin binding contributes to the synaptic localization of the CaMKIIα isoform. The track lifetime distributions had a stretched exponential form consistent with a heterogeneously diffusing population. This heterogeneity suggests that CaMKII adopts different F-actin binding modes, which is most easily rationalized by multiple subunit contacts between the CaMKII dodecamer and the F-actin cytoskeleton that stabilize the initial weak (micromolar

  20. General approach for engineering small-molecule-binding DNA split aptamers.

    PubMed

    Kent, Alexandra D; Spiropulos, Nicholas G; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2013-10-15

    Here we report a general method for engineering three-way junction DNA aptamers into split aptamers. Split aptamers show significant potential for use as recognition elements in biosensing applications, but reliable methods for generating these sequences are currently lacking. We hypothesize that the three-way junction is a "privileged architecture" for the elaboration of aptamers into split aptamers, as it provides two potential splitting sites that are distal from the target binding pocket. We propose a general method for split aptamer engineering that involves removing one loop region, then systematically modifying the number of base pairs in the remaining stem regions in order to achieve selective assembly only in the presence of the target small molecule. We screen putative split aptamer sequence pairs using split aptamer proximity ligation (StAPL) technology developed by our laboratory, but we validate that the results obtained using StAPL translate directly to systems in which the aptamer fragments are assembling noncovalently. We introduce four new split aptamer sequences, which triples the number of small-molecule-binding DNA split aptamers reported to date, and the methods described herein provide a reliable route for the engineering of additional split aptamers, dramatically advancing the potential substrate scope of DNA assembly based biosensors. PMID:24033257

  1. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. I. Organic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, T. J.; Lozovoi, A. Y.; Kohanoff, J. J.; Pashov, D. L.; Paxton, A. T.

    2014-07-28

    As is now well established, a first order expansion of the Hohenberg–Kohn total energy density functional about a trial input density, namely, the Harris–Foulkes functional, can be used to rationalize a non self consistent tight binding model. If the expansion is taken to second order then the energy and electron density matrix need to be calculated self consistently and from this functional one can derive a charge self consistent tight binding theory. In this paper we have used this to describe a polarizable ion tight binding model which has the benefit of treating charge transfer in point multipoles. This admits a ready description of ionic polarizability and crystal field splitting. It is necessary in constructing such a model to find a number of parameters that mimic their more exact counterparts in the density functional theory. We describe in detail how this is done using a combination of intuition, exact analytical fitting, and a genetic optimization algorithm. Having obtained model parameters we show that this constitutes a transferable scheme that can be applied rather universally to small and medium sized organic molecules. We have shown that the model gives a good account of static structural and dynamic vibrational properties of a library of molecules, and finally we demonstrate the model's capability by showing a real time simulation of an enolization reaction in aqueous solution. In two subsequent papers, we show that the model is a great deal more general in that it will describe solvents and solid substrates and that therefore we have created a self consistent quantum mechanical scheme that may be applied to simulations in heterogeneous catalysis.

  2. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. I. Organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, T. J.; Lozovoi, A. Y.; Pashov, D. L.; Kohanoff, J. J.; Paxton, A. T.

    2014-07-01

    As is now well established, a first order expansion of the Hohenberg-Kohn total energy density functional about a trial input density, namely, the Harris-Foulkes functional, can be used to rationalize a non self consistent tight binding model. If the expansion is taken to second order then the energy and electron density matrix need to be calculated self consistently and from this functional one can derive a charge self consistent tight binding theory. In this paper we have used this to describe a polarizable ion tight binding model which has the benefit of treating charge transfer in point multipoles. This admits a ready description of ionic polarizability and crystal field splitting. It is necessary in constructing such a model to find a number of parameters that mimic their more exact counterparts in the density functional theory. We describe in detail how this is done using a combination of intuition, exact analytical fitting, and a genetic optimization algorithm. Having obtained model parameters we show that this constitutes a transferable scheme that can be applied rather universally to small and medium sized organic molecules. We have shown that the model gives a good account of static structural and dynamic vibrational properties of a library of molecules, and finally we demonstrate the model's capability by showing a real time simulation of an enolization reaction in aqueous solution. In two subsequent papers, we show that the model is a great deal more general in that it will describe solvents and solid substrates and that therefore we have created a self consistent quantum mechanical scheme that may be applied to simulations in heterogeneous catalysis.

  3. Measurement of Small Molecule Binding Kinetics on a Protein Microarray by Plasmonic-Based Electrochemical Impedance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on a quantitative study of small molecule binding kinetics on protein microarrays with plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance microscopy (P-EIM). P-EIM measures electrical impedance optically with high spatial resolution by converting a surface charge change to a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image intensity change, and the signal is not scaled to the mass of the analyte. Using P-EIM, we measured binding kinetics and affinity between small molecule drugs (imatinib and SB202190) and their target proteins (kinases Abl1 and p38-α). The measured affinity values are consistent with reported values measured by an indirect competitive binding assay. We also found that SB202190 has weak bindings to ABL1 with KD > 10 μM, which is not reported in the literature. Furthermore, we found that P-EIM is less prone to nonspecific binding, a long-standing issue in SPR. Our results show that P-EIM is a novel method for high-throughput measurement of small molecule binding kinetics and affinity, which is critical to the understanding of small molecules in biological systems and discovery of small molecule drugs. PMID:25153794

  4. The new generation drug candidate molecules: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding and anticancer activity properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gölcü, Ayşegül; Muslu, Harun; Kılıçaslan, Derya; Çeşme, Mustafa; Eren, Özge; Ataş, Fatma; Demirtaş, İbrahim

    2016-09-01

    The new generation drug candidate molecules [Cu(5-Fu)2Cl2H2O] (NGDCM1) and [Zn(5-Fu)2(CH3COO)2] (NGDCM2) were obtained from the reaction of copper(II) and zinc(II) salts with the anticancer drug 5-fluoracil (5-Fu). These compounds have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the compounds were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of the compounds have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the 5-Fu and metal derivatives with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. Thermal decomposition of the compounds lead to the formation of CuO and ZnO as final products. The effect of proliferation 5-Fu, NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 were examined on the HeLa cells using real-time cell analyzer with three different concentrations.

  5. Predictive DFT +U Methods for Small Molecule Binding in MOF-74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gregory; Lee, Kyuho; Cococcioni, Matteo; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    In order to use density functional theory (DFT) to reliably treat small molecule binding at open metal sites in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), electron correlation effects associated with the localized d-states present at the metal centers must be accounted for. Incorporation of a Hubbard U-like term can be an approximate but computationally efficient means, yielding excellent agreement with experiment provided an appropriate value for the parameter U is chosen. To predict adsorption energetics for as-yet unsynthesized MOFs, we would need to select U using a systematic, physically motivated approach rather than the ad hoc methods typically employed. Here, we use an ab initiolinear response approach to calculate U. We show that U values determined with this method reproduce previous results for the binding of carbon dioxide in Co-MOF-74 and Cu-MOF-74, and we discuss the method's application to other 3d metals in theMOF-74 framework; our preliminary results suggest that a wide range of U's above a critical value will produce accurate binding energies. Finally, we present U values calculated for Co2 + ions in other systems, probing the environment dependence of this parameter. This work supported by DOE, and computational resources provided by NERSC.

  6. Association of Catechin Molecules in Water: Quantitative Binding Study and Complex Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ujihara, Tomomi; Hayashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-22

    Associations between catechin molecules were investigated by (1)H NMR titration experiments. Eight green tea catechins formed self-assembled dimers in water, and gallate-type catechins had a greater tendency to self-associate than non-gallate-type catechins. All eight catechins also associated as 1:1 heterodimer complexes. Investigation of complex formation of epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCg) and epigallocatechin (EGC) with the other catechins showed that the affinity between EGCg and 2,3-trans-gallate-type catechins was remarkably high, and the binding affinity of EGCg for ECg was also rather strong. In contrast, the non-gallate-type catechin EGC exhibited generally low binding affinity for other catechins. Structural analyses of the complexes by ROESY experiments and density functional theory calculations demonstrated that the higher binding abilities of gallate-type catechins are due to providing multiple intermolecular interactions that remain effective in an aqueous environment, such as aromatic/aromatic or CH/π interactions. PMID:26720794

  7. Theoretical investigation of the binding of a positron to vibrational excited states of hydrogen cyanide molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Yukiumi; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2014-05-01

    We theoretically analyzed positron affinities (PA) of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) molecule at vibrational excited states to elucidate the effect of molecular vibrations on the binding of a positron to the molecule. Using the configuration interaction method in the multi-component molecular orbital theory and anharmonic vibrational state analysis with the variational Monte Carlo technique, we found that the vibrational excitations of the CN and CH stretching modes enhance the PA value compared to that of the vibrational ground state, whereas the excitation of bending mode deenhances it. The largest PA enhancement is found at the excited states of the CH stretching mode; the PA values are 43.02 (1) and 46.34 (2) meV for the fundamental tone and overtone states, respectively. With the linear regression analysis, we confirmed that the PA variation of HCN molecule at each vibrational state arises from the variation of permanent dipole moment and dipole-polarizability due to each vibrational excitation. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Electron and Positron Induced Processes", edited by Michael Brunger, Radu Campeanu, Masamitsu Hoshino, Oddur Ingólfsson, Paulo Limão-Vieira, Nigel Mason, Yasuyuki Nagashima and Hajime Tanuma.

  8. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2015-01-01

    Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE) proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) (CRISPR/Cas) system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing. PMID:26404236

  9. Small-animal PET imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumor with a 64Cu labeled affibody protein.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zheng; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-05-19

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has become an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Affibody proteins against EGFR have been reported, and thus, we were interested in evaluating their potential for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of EGFR positive cancer. An Affibody analogue (Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907)) binding to EGFR was made through conventional solid phase peptide synthesis. The purified protein was site-specifically coupled with the 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-aceticacid-10-maleimidethylacetamide (maleimido-mono-amide-DOTA) to produce the bioconjugate, DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907). (64)Cu labeled probe (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) displayed a moderate specific activity (5-8 MBq/nmol, 22-35 microCi/microg). Cell uptake assays by pre-incubating without or with 300 times excess unlabeled Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) showed high EGFR-specific uptake (20% applied activity at 0.5 h) in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cancer cells. The affinity (K(D)) of (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) as tested by cell saturation analysis was 20 nM. The serum stability test showed excellent stability of the probe with >95% intact after 4 h of incubation in mouse serum. In vivo small-animal PET imaging showed fast tumor targeting, high tumor accumulation (approximately 10% ID/g at 1 h p.i.), and good tumor-to-normal tissue contrast of (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) spiked with a wide dose range of Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907). Bio-distribution studies further demonstrated that the probe had high tumor, blood, liver, and kidney uptakes, while blood radioactivity concentration dropped dramatically at increased spiking doses. Co-injection of the probe with 500 microg of Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) for blocking significantly reduced the tumor uptake. Thus, (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) showed potential as a high tumor contrast EGFR PET imaging reagent. The probe spiked with 50 microg of Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) improved tumor imaging contrast which may have important clinical applications. PMID:20402512

  10. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devetter, Brent M.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this study, we report the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method to monitor the kinetics of gold-thiolate bond formation on colloidal gold nanoparticles. A theoretical model combining SERS enhancement with the Beer-Lambert law is proposed to explain ensemble scattering and absorption effects in colloids during chemisorption. In order to maximize biological relevance and signal reproducibility, experiments used to validate the model focused on maintaining nanoparticle stability after the addition of water-soluble aromatic thiolated molecules. Our results indicate that ligand exchange on gold nanoparticles follow a first-order Langmuir adsorption model with rate constants on the order of 0.01 min-1. This study demonstrates an experimental spectroscopic method and theoretical model for monitoring binding kinetics that may prove useful for designing novel probes.Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this

  11. An effective and effecient peptide binding prediction approach for a broad set of HLA-DR molecules based on ordered weighted averaging of binding pocket profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The immune system must detect a wide variety of microbial pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasitic worms, to protect the host against disease. Antigenic peptides displayed by MHC II (class II Major Histocompatibility Complex) molecules is a pivotal process to activate CD4+ TH cells (Helper T cells). The activated TH cells can differentiate into effector cells which assist various cells in activating against pathogen invasion. Each MHC locus encodes a great number of allele variants. Yet this limited number of MHC molecules are required to display enormous number of antigenic peptides. Since the peptide binding measurements of MHC molecules by biochemical experiments are expensive, only a few of the MHC molecules have suffecient measured peptides. To perform accurate binding prediction for those MHC alleles without suffecient measured peptides, a number of computational algorithms were proposed in the last decades. Results Here, we propose a new MHC II binding prediction approach, OWA-PSSM, which is a significantly extended version of a well known method called TEPITOPE. The TEPITOPE method is able to perform prediction for only 50 MHC alleles, while OWA-PSSM is able to perform prediction for much more, up to 879 HLA-DR molecules. We evaluate the method on five benchmark datasets. The method is demonstrated to be the best one in identifying binding cores compared with several other popular state-of-the-art approaches. Meanwhile, the method performs comparably to the TEPITOPE and NetMHCIIpan2.0 approaches in identifying HLA-DR epitopes and ligands, and it performs significantly better than TEPITOPEpan in the identification of HLA-DR ligands and MultiRTA in identifying HLA-DR T cell epitopes. Conclusions The proposed approach OWA-PSSM is fast and robust in identifying ligands, epitopes and binding cores for up to 879 MHC II molecules. PMID:24565049

  12. Terminal protection of small-molecule-linked DNA for sensitive electrochemical detection of protein binding via selective carbon nanotube assembly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhan; Zhen, Zhen; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2009-09-01

    Small-molecule-linked DNA has emerged as a versatile tool for the interaction assay between small organic molecules and their protein receptors. We report herein the proof-of-principle of a terminal protection assay of small-molecule-linked DNA. This assay is based on our new finding that single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) terminally tethered to a small molecule is protected from the degradation by exonuclease I (Exo I) when the small molecule moiety is bound to its protein target. This finding translates the binding of small molecules to proteins into the presence of a specific DNA sequence, which enables us to probe the interaction between small organic molecules and their protein targets using various DNA sequence amplification and detection technologies. On the basis of selective assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with surface-tethered small-molecule-linked ssDNA not protected by protein binding, a novel electrochemical strategy for terminal protection assay has been developed. Through detecting the redox signal mediated by SWNT assembly on a 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid-blocked electrode, this strategy is able to ensure substantial signal amplification and a low background current. This strategy is demonstrated for quantitative analysis of the interaction of folate with a tumor biomarker of folate receptor (FR), and a detection limit of 3 pM FR is readily achieved with desirable specificity and sensitivity, indicating that the terminal protection assay can offer a promising platform for small molecule-protein interaction studies. PMID:19655753

  13. An in solution assay for interrogation of affinity and rational minimer design for small molecule-binding aptamers.

    PubMed

    Frost, Nadine R; McKeague, Maureen; Falcioni, Darren; DeRosa, Maria C

    2015-10-01

    Aptamers are short single-stranded oligonucleotides that fold into unique three-dimensional structures, facilitating selective and high affinity binding to their cognate targets. It is not well understood how aptamer-target interactions affect regions of structure in an aptamer, particularly for small molecule targets where binding is often not accompanied by a dramatic change in structure. The DNase I footprinting assay is a classical molecular biology technique for studying DNA-protein interactions. The simplest application of this method permits identification of protein binding where DNase I digestion is inhibited. Here, we describe a novel variation of the classical DNase I assay to study aptamer-small molecule interactions. Given that DNase I preferentially cleaves duplex DNA over single-stranded DNA, we are able to identify regions of aptamer structure that are affected by small molecule target binding. Importantly, our method allows us to quantify these subtle effects, providing an in solution measurement of aptamer-target affinity. We applied this method to study aptamers that bind to the mycotoxin fumonisin B1, allowing the first identification of high affinity putative minimers for this important food contaminant. We confirmed the binding affinity of these minimers using a magnetic bead binding assay. PMID:26336657

  14. Detection of metal binding sites on functional S-layer nanoarrays using single molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jilin; Ebner, Andreas; Kraxberger, Bernhard; Leitner, Michael; Hykollari, Alba; Kepplinger, Christian; Grunwald, Christian; Gruber, Hermann J; Tampé, Robert; Sleytr, Uwe B; Ilk, Nicola; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) show the ability to recrystallize into highly regular pattern on solid supports. In this study, the genetically modified S-layer protein SbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177, carrying a hexa-histidine tag (His(6)-tag) at the C-terminus, was used to generate functionalized two-dimensional nanoarrays on a silicon surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to explore the topography and the functionality of the fused His(6)-tags. The accessibility of the His(6)-tags was demonstrated by in-situ anti-His-tag antibody binding to the functional S-layer array. The metal binding properties of the His(6)-tag was investigated by single molecule force microscopy. For this purpose, newly developed tris-NTA was tethered to the AFM tips via a flexible polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker. The functionalized tips showed specific interactions with S-layer containing His(6)-tags in the presence of nickel ions. Thus the His(6)-tag is located at the outer surface of the S-layer and can be used for stable but reversible attachment of functional tris-NTA derivatives. PMID:19232541

  15. Members of the thrombospondin gene family bind stromal interaction molecule 1 and regulate calcium channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Mark; Nadler, Monica; Okuhara, Dayne; Thompson, Jill; Shuttleworth, Trevor; Lawler, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The thrombospondins (TSPs) are a family of matricellular proteins that regulate cellular phenotype through interactions with a myriad of other proteins and proteoglycans. We have identified a novel interaction of the members of the TSP gene family with stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). This association is robust since it is preserved in Triton X-100, can be detected with multiple anti-TSP-1 and anti-STIM1 antibodies, and is detected in a wide range of cell types. We have also found that STIM1 co-immunoprecipitates with TSP-4 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and that a recombinant version of the N-terminal domain of STIM1 binds to the signature domain of TSP-1 and COMP. The association of the TSPs with STIM1 is observed in both the presence and absence of calcium indicating that the calcium-dependent conformation of the signature domain of TSPs is not required for binding. Thus, this interaction could occur in the ER under conditions of normal or low calcium concentration. Furthermore, we observed that the expression of COMP in HEK 293 cells decreases STIM1-mediated calcium release activated calcium (CRAC) channel currents and increases arachidonic acid calcium (ARC) channel currents. These data indicate that the TSPs regulate STIM1 function and participate in the reciprocal regulation of two channels that mediate calcium entry into the cell. PMID:24845346

  16. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A; Chan, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5'-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras-/-). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras-/- mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras-/- mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras-/- mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras-/- T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras-/- T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras-/- T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  17. Small Molecule Inhibited Parathyroid Hormone Mediated cAMP Response by N–Terminal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Baumann, Monika; Balbach, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to certain classes of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) stimulates the rapid synthesis of cAMP through G protein. Human parathyroid hormone (PTH), a member of class B GPCRs, binds to its receptor via its N–terminal domain, thereby activating the pathway to this secondary messenger inside cells. Presently, GPCRs are the target of many pharmaceuticals however, these drugs target only a small fraction of structurally known GPCRs (about 10%). Coordination complexes are gaining interest due to their wide applications in the medicinal field. In the present studies we explored the potential of a coordination complex of Zn(II) and anthracenyl–terpyridine as a modulator of the parathyroid hormone response. Preferential interactions at the N–terminal domain of the peptide hormone were manifested by suppressed cAMP generation inside the cells. These observations contribute a regulatory component to the current GPCR–cAMP paradigm, where not the receptor itself, but the activating hormone is a target. To our knowledge, this is the first report about a coordination complex modulating GPCR activity at the level of deactivating its agonist. Developing such molecules might help in the control of pathogenic PTH function such as hyperparathyroidism, where control of excess hormonal activity is essentially required. PMID:26932583

  18. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    DeVetter, Brent M; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-05-21

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this study, we report the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method to monitor the kinetics of gold-thiolate bond formation on colloidal gold nanoparticles. A theoretical model combining SERS enhancement with the Beer-Lambert law is proposed to explain ensemble scattering and absorption effects in colloids during chemisorption. In order to maximize biological relevance and signal reproducibility, experiments used to validate the model focused on maintaining nanoparticle stability after the addition of water-soluble aromatic thiolated molecules. Our results indicate that ligand exchange on gold nanoparticles follow a first-order Langmuir adsorption model with rate constants on the order of 0.01 min(-1). This study demonstrates an experimental spectroscopic method and theoretical model for monitoring binding kinetics that may prove useful for designing novel probes. PMID:25905515

  19. Genome-wide characterisation of the binding repertoire of small molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Most, if not all, drugs interact with multiple proteins. One or more of these interactions are responsible for carrying out the primary therapeutic effects of the drug. Others are involved in the transport or metabolic processing of the drug or in the mediation of side effects. Still others may be responsible for activities that correspond to alternate therapeutic applications. The potential clinical impact of a drug and its cost of development are affected by the sum of all these interactions. The drug development process includes the identification and characterisation of a drug's clinically relevant interactions. This characterisation is presently accomplished by a combination of experimental laboratory techniques and clinical trials, with increasing numbers of patient participants. Efficient methods for the identification of all the molecular targets of a drug prior to clinical trials could greatly expedite the drug development process. Combinatorial peptide and cDNA phage display have the potential for achieving a complete characterisation of the binding repertoire of a small molecule. This paper will discuss the current state of phage display technology, as applied to the identification of novel receptors for small molecules, using a successful application with the drug Taxol™ as an example of the technical and theoretical benefits and pitfalls of this method. PMID:15601532

  20. Computational and functional analyses of a small-molecule binding site in ROMK.

    PubMed

    Swale, Daniel R; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Banerjee, Sreedatta; Husni, Afeef S; Nguyen, Thuy T; Meiler, Jens; Denton, Jerod S

    2015-03-10

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK, or Kir1.1, encoded by KCNJ1) critically regulates renal tubule electrolyte and water transport and hence blood volume and pressure. The discovery of loss-of-function mutations in KCNJ1 underlying renal salt and water wasting and lower blood pressure has sparked interest in developing new classes of antihypertensive diuretics targeting ROMK. The recent development of nanomolar-affinity small-molecule inhibitors of ROMK creates opportunities for exploring the chemical and physical basis of ligand-channel interactions required for selective ROMK inhibition. We previously reported that the bis-nitro-phenyl ROMK inhibitor VU591 exhibits voltage-dependent knock-off at hyperpolarizing potentials, suggesting that the binding site is located within the ion-conduction pore. In this study, comparative molecular modeling and in silico ligand docking were used to interrogate the full-length ROMK pore for energetically favorable VU591 binding sites. Cluster analysis of 2498 low-energy poses resulting from 9900 Monte Carlo docking trajectories on each of 10 conformationally distinct ROMK comparative homology models identified two putative binding sites in the transmembrane pore that were subsequently tested for a role in VU591-dependent inhibition using site-directed mutagenesis and patch-clamp electrophysiology. Introduction of mutations into the lower site had no effect on the sensitivity of the channel to VU591. In contrast, mutations of Val(168) or Asn(171) in the upper site, which are unique to ROMK within the Kir channel family, led to a dramatic reduction in VU591 sensitivity. This study highlights the utility of computational modeling for defining ligand-ROMK interactions and proposes a mechanism for inhibition of ROMK. PMID:25762321

  1. Computational and Functional Analyses of a Small-Molecule Binding Site in ROMK

    PubMed Central

    Swale, Daniel R.; Sheehan, Jonathan H.; Banerjee, Sreedatta; Husni, Afeef S.; Nguyen, Thuy T.; Meiler, Jens; Denton, Jerod S.

    2015-01-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK, or Kir1.1, encoded by KCNJ1) critically regulates renal tubule electrolyte and water transport and hence blood volume and pressure. The discovery of loss-of-function mutations in KCNJ1 underlying renal salt and water wasting and lower blood pressure has sparked interest in developing new classes of antihypertensive diuretics targeting ROMK. The recent development of nanomolar-affinity small-molecule inhibitors of ROMK creates opportunities for exploring the chemical and physical basis of ligand-channel interactions required for selective ROMK inhibition. We previously reported that the bis-nitro-phenyl ROMK inhibitor VU591 exhibits voltage-dependent knock-off at hyperpolarizing potentials, suggesting that the binding site is located within the ion-conduction pore. In this study, comparative molecular modeling and in silico ligand docking were used to interrogate the full-length ROMK pore for energetically favorable VU591 binding sites. Cluster analysis of 2498 low-energy poses resulting from 9900 Monte Carlo docking trajectories on each of 10 conformationally distinct ROMK comparative homology models identified two putative binding sites in the transmembrane pore that were subsequently tested for a role in VU591-dependent inhibition using site-directed mutagenesis and patch-clamp electrophysiology. Introduction of mutations into the lower site had no effect on the sensitivity of the channel to VU591. In contrast, mutations of Val168 or Asn171 in the upper site, which are unique to ROMK within the Kir channel family, led to a dramatic reduction in VU591 sensitivity. This study highlights the utility of computational modeling for defining ligand-ROMK interactions and proposes a mechanism for inhibition of ROMK. PMID:25762321

  2. Methidiumpropyl-EDTA.Fe(II) and DNase I footprinting report different small molecule binding site sizes on DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, M W; Dervan, P B

    1983-01-01

    DNase I and MPE.Fe (II) footprinting both employ partial cleavage of ligand-protected DNA restriction fragments and Maxam-Gilbert sequencing gel methods of analysis. One method utilizes the enzyme, DNase I, as the DNA cleaving agent while the other employs the synthetic molecule, methidium-propyl-EDTA (MPE). For actinomycin D, chromomycin A3 and distamycin A, DNase I footprinting reports larger binding site sizes than MPE.Fe (II). DNase I footprinting appears more sensitive for weakly bound sites. MPE.Fe (II) footprinting appears more accurate in determining the actual size and location of the binding sites for small molecules on DNA, especially in cases where several small molecules are closely spaced on the DNA. MPE.Fe (II) and DNase I report the same sequence and binding site size for lac repressor protein on operator DNA. Images PMID:6225070

  3. Screening the sequence selectivity of DNA-binding molecules using a gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric approach.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Sarah J; Han, Min Su; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K R; Mirkin, Chad A

    2007-09-15

    We have developed a novel competition assay that uses a gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-based, high-throughput colorimetric approach to screen the sequence selectivity of DNA-binding molecules. This assay hinges on the observation that the melting behavior of DNA-functionalized Au NP aggregates is sensitive to the concentration of the DNA-binding molecule in solution. When short, oligomeric hairpin DNA sequences were added to a reaction solution consisting of DNA-functionalized Au NP aggregates and DNA-binding molecules, these molecules may either bind to the Au NP aggregate interconnects or the hairpin stems based on their relative affinity for each. This relative affinity can be measured as a change in the melting temperature (Tm) of the DNA-modified Au NP aggregates in solution. As a proof of concept, we evaluated the selectivity of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindone (an AT-specific binder), ethidium bromide (a nonspecific binder), and chromomycin A (a GC-specific binder) for six sequences of hairpin DNA having different numbers of AT pairs in a five-base pair variable stem region. Our assay accurately and easily confirmed the known trends in selectivity for the DNA binders in question without the use of complicated instrumentation. This novel assay will be useful in assessing large libraries of potential drug candidates that work by binding DNA to form a drug/DNA complex. PMID:17696406

  4. The influence of intramolecular sulfur-lone pair interactions on small-molecule drug design and receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Hudson, B M; Nguyen, E; Tantillo, D J

    2016-04-28

    Sulfur-lone pair interactions are important conformational control elements in sulfur-containing heterocycles that abound in pharmaceuticals, natural products, agrochemicals, polymers and other important classes of organic molecules. Nonetheless, the role of intramolecular sulfur-lone pair interactions in the binding of small molecules to receptors is often overlooked. Here we analyze the magnitudes and origins of these interactions for a variety of biologically relevant small molecules using quantum chemical and automated docking calculations. In most cases examined in this study, the lowest energy conformation of the small molecule displays a sulfur-lone pair close contact. However, docking studies, both published and new, often predict that conformations without sulfur-lone pair contacts have the best binding affinity for their respective receptors. This is a serious problem. Since many of these predicted bound conformations are not actually energetically accessible, pursuing design (e.g., drug design) around these binding modes necessarily will lead, serendipity aside, to dead end designs. Our results constitute a caution that one best not neglect these interactions when predicting the binding affinities of potential ligands (drugs or not) for hosts (enzymes, receptors, DNA, RNA, synthetic hosts). Moreover, a better understanding and awareness of sulfur-lone pair interactions should facilitate the rational modulation of host-guest interactions involving sulfur-containing molecules. PMID:27049933

  5. Promoter binding, initiation, and elongation by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. A single-molecule view of the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Gary M; Baumann, Christoph G; Quinn, Diana M; Molloy, Justin E; Hoggett, James G

    2004-01-30

    A single-molecule transcription assay has been developed that allows, for the first time, the direct observation of promoter binding, initiation, and elongation by a single RNA polymerase (RNAP) molecule in real-time. To promote DNA binding and transcription initiation, a DNA molecule tethered between two optically trapped beads was held near a third immobile surface bead sparsely coated with RNAP. By driving the optical trap holding the upstream bead with a triangular oscillation while measuring the position of both trapped beads, we observed the onset of promoter binding, promoter escape (productive initiation), and processive elongation by individual RNAP molecules. After DNA template release, transcription re-initiation on the same DNA template is possible; thus, multiple enzymatic turnovers by an individual RNAP molecule can be observed. Using bacteriophage T7 RNAP, a commonly used RNAP paradigm, we observed the association and dissociation (k(off)= 2.9 s(-1)) of T7 RNAP and promoter DNA, the transition to the elongation mode (k(for) = 0.36 s(-1)), and the processive synthesis (k(pol) = 43 nt s(-1)) and release of a gene-length RNA transcript ( approximately 1200 nt). The transition from initiation to elongation is much longer than the mean lifetime of the binary T7 RNAP-promoter DNA complex (k(off) > k(for)), identifying a rate-limiting step between promoter DNA binding and promoter escape. PMID:14597619

  6. Electronic structure and binding geometry of tetraphenylporphyrin-derived molecules adsorbed on metal and metal oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coh, Senia

    Tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP)-derived molecules have been studied extensively as efficient photosensitizers when chemisorbed on the metal oxide substrates in dye-sensitized solar cells. Still, many fundamental electronic properties of the dye/oxide interface are not understood and need careful consideration. In this thesis we present a comprehensive study of the electronic structure, energy level alignment and the adsorption geometry of the TPP-derived dye molecules adsorbed on TiO2(110), ZnO(1120) and Ag(100) single crystal surfaces using ultra-high vacuum (UHV) based surface sensitive techniques. The alignment of the molecular energy levels with respect to the TiO 2 and ZnO band edges for all TPP-derived molecules we studied was found to be insensitive to either the nature of the functional groups located on the phenyl rings, presence of zinc as a central metal ion and different binding geometry of the molecules. Binding geometry, molecule-molecule interaction and the aggregation effects in the adsorbed layer, that were observed in the UV-visible spectra of the molecules adsorbed on ZnO substrate were not observed in the ultraviolet photoemission (UPS) and inverse photoemission (IPS) spectra of the occupied and unoccupied molecular states. Using near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), binding geometry of the two representative TPP-derivatives was directly determined to be upright, with the porphyrin ring under large angle with respect to the surface for the p-ZnTCPP molecules and with the porphyrin ring parallel to the surface for the m-ZnTCPP molecules. We observe that the energies and the energy level alignment of the ZnTPP molecular levels measured in UPS and IPS depend on the substrate on which the molecules are adsorbed (Ag(100) or TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces). The differences are attributed to different charge screening properties of these two materials. Image charges created in the substrates during

  7. A systematic investigation of differential effects of cell culture substrates on the extent of artifacts in single-molecule tracking.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L; Needham, Sarah R; Rolfe, Daniel J; Clarke, David T

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are being increasingly applied to biomedical investigation, notwithstanding the numerous challenges they pose in terms of signal-to-noise ratio issues. Non-specific binding of probes to glass substrates, in particular, can produce experimental artifacts due to spurious molecules on glass, which can be particularly deleterious in live-cell tracking experiments. In order to resolve the issue of non-specific probe binding to substrates, we performed systematic testing of a range of available surface coatings, using three different proteins, and then extended our assessment to the ability of these coatings to foster cell growth and retain non-adhesive properties. Linear PEG, a passivating agent commonly used both in immobilized-molecule single-molecule techniques and in tissue engineering, is able to both successfully repel non-specific adhesion of fluorescent probes and to foster cell growth when functionalized with appropriate adhesive peptides. Linear PEG treatment results in a significant reduction of tracking artifacts in EGFR tracking with Affibody ligands on a cell line expressing EGFR-eGFP. The findings reported herein could be beneficial to a large number of experimental situations where single-molecule or single-particle precision is required. PMID:23049831

  8. A Systematic Investigation of Differential Effects of Cell Culture Substrates on the Extent of Artifacts in Single-Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C.; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L.; Needham, Sarah R.; Rolfe, Daniel J.; Clarke, David T.

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are being increasingly applied to biomedical investigation, notwithstanding the numerous challenges they pose in terms of signal-to-noise ratio issues. Non-specific binding of probes to glass substrates, in particular, can produce experimental artifacts due to spurious molecules on glass, which can be particularly deleterious in live-cell tracking experiments. In order to resolve the issue of non-specific probe binding to substrates, we performed systematic testing of a range of available surface coatings, using three different proteins, and then extended our assessment to the ability of these coatings to foster cell growth and retain non-adhesive properties. Linear PEG, a passivating agent commonly used both in immobilized-molecule single-molecule techniques and in tissue engineering, is able to both successfully repel non-specific adhesion of fluorescent probes and to foster cell growth when functionalized with appropriate adhesive peptides. Linear PEG treatment results in a significant reduction of tracking artifacts in EGFR tracking with Affibody ligands on a cell line expressing EGFR-eGFP. The findings reported herein could be beneficial to a large number of experimental situations where single-molecule or single-particle precision is required. PMID:23049831

  9. The binding energies of one and two water molecules to the first transition-row metal positive ions. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosi, Marzio; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation of H2O's binding energy to transition-metal ions proceeds from the D(2h) structure and bends the two water molecules out of plane. The molecule is constrained to have C(2v) symmetry, so that each water molecule and metal ion lies on a plane. The ground states are bent only for Mn(H2O)2(+) and Zn(H2O)2(+), where only 4s4p hybridization is energetically favorable; 4s4p hybridization reduces repulsion.

  10. Adaptive-Partitioning QM/MM Dynamics Simulations: 3. Solvent Molecules Entering and Leaving Protein Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Soroosh; Davis, Christal; Heyden, Andreas; Lin, Hai

    2014-11-11

    The adaptive-partitioning (AP) schemes for combined quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) calculations allow on-the-fly reclassifications of atoms and molecules as QM or MM in dynamics simulations. The permuted-AP (PAP) scheme (J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 2231) introduces a thin layer of buffer zone between the QM subsystem (also called active zone) and the MM subsystem (also known as the environmental zone) to provide a continuous and smooth transition and expresses the potential energy in a many-body expansion manner. The PAP scheme has been successfully applied to study small molecules solvated in bulk solvent. Here, we propose two modifications to the original PAP scheme to treat solvent molecules entering and leaving protein binding sites. First, the center of the active zone is placed at a pseudoatom in the binding site, whose position is not affected by the movements of ligand or residues in the binding site. Second, the extra forces due to the smoothing functions are deleted. The modified PAP scheme no longer describes a Hamiltonian system, but it satisfies the conservation of momentum. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the modified PAP scheme is applied to the simulations under the canonical ensemble for two binding sites of the Escherichia coli CLC chloride ion transport protein, in particular, the intracellular binding site Sint discovered by crystallography and one putative additional binding site Sadd suggested by molecular modeling. The exchange of water molecules between the binding sites and bulk solvent is monitored. For comparison, simulations are also carried out using the same model system and setup with only one exception: the extra forces due to the smoothing functions are retained. The simulations are benchmarked against conventional QM/MM simulations with large QM subsystems. The results demonstrate that the active zone centered at the pseudo atom is a reasonable and convenient representation of the binding site. Moreover, the

  11. Coxsackievirus A21 binds to decay-accelerating factor but requires intercellular adhesion molecule 1 for cell entry.

    PubMed Central

    Shafren, D R; Dorahy, D J; Ingham, R A; Burns, G F; Barry, R D

    1997-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that many viruses employ multiple receptor molecules in their cell entry mechanisms. The human enterovirus coxsackievirus A21 (CAV21) has been reported to bind to the N-terminal domain of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and undergo limited replication in ICAM-1-expressing murine L cells. In this study, we show that in addition to binding to ICAM-1, CAV21 binds to the first short consensus repeat (SCR) of decay-accelerating factor (DAF). Dual antibody blockade using both anti-ICAM-1 (domain 1) and anti-DAF (SCR1) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is required to completely abolish binding and replication of high-titered CAV21. However, the binding of CAV21 to DAF, unlike that to ICAM-1, does not initiate a productive cell infection. The capacity of an anti-DAF (SCR3) MAb to block CAV21 infection but not binding, coupled with immunoprecipitation data from chemical cross-linking studies, indicates that DAF and ICAM-1 are closely associated on the cell surface. It is therefore suggested that DAF may function as a low-affinity attachment receptor either enhancing viral presentation or providing a viral sequestration site for subsequent high-affinity binding to ICAM-1. PMID:9151867

  12. R-Ras Regulates Murine T Cell Migration and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaocai; Yan, Mingfei; Guo, Yihe; Singh, Gobind; Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Wang, Demin; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Chan, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The trafficking of T-lymphocytes to peripheral draining lymph nodes is crucial for mounting an adaptive immune response. The role of chemokines in the activation of integrins via Ras-related small GTPases has been well established. R-Ras is a member of the Ras-subfamily of small guanosine-5’-triphosphate-binding proteins and its role in T cell trafficking has been investigated in R-Ras null mice (Rras−/−). An examination of the lymphoid organs of Rras−/− mice revealed a 40% reduction in the cellularity of the peripheral lymph nodes. Morphologically, the high endothelial venules of Rras−/− mice were more disorganized and less mature than those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from Rras−/− mice had approximately 42% lower surface expression of L-selectin/CD62L. These aberrant peripheral lymph node phenotypes were associated with proliferative and trafficking defects in Rras−/− T cells. Furthermore, R-Ras could be activated by the chemokine, CCL21. Indeed, Rras−/− T cells had approximately 14.5% attenuation in binding to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 upon CCL21 stimulation. Finally, in a graft-versus host disease model, recipient mice that were transfused with Rras−/− T cells showed a significant reduction in disease severity when compared with mice transplanted with wild-type T cells. These findings implicate a role for R-Ras in T cell trafficking in the high endothelial venules during an effective immune response. PMID:26710069

  13. Phenylphthalazines as small-molecule inhibitors of urea transporter UT-B and their binding model

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jian-hua; Li, Min; Tou, Weng-Ieong; Lei, Tian-luo; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian; Yang, Bao-xue

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Urea transporters (UT) are a family of transmembrane proteins that specifically transport urea. UT inhibitors exert diuretic activity without affecting electrolyte balance. The purpose of this study was to discover novel UT inhibitors and determine the inhibition mechanism. Methods: The primary screening urea transporter B (UT-B) inhibitory activity was conducted in a collection of 10 000 diverse small molecules using mouse erythrocyte lysis assay. After discovering a hit with a core structure of 1-phenylamino-4-phenylphthalazin, the UT-B inhibitory activity of 160 analogs were examined with a stopped-flow light scattering assay and their structure-activity relationship (SAR) was analyzed. The inhibition mechanism was further investigated using in silico assays. Results: A phenylphthalazine compound PU1424, chemically named 5-(4-((4-methoxyphenyl) amino) phthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylbenzene sulfonamide, showed potent UT-B inhibition activity, inhibited human and mouse UT-B-mediated urea transport with IC50 value of 0.02 and 0.69 μmol/L, respectively, and exerted 100% UT-B inhibition at higher concentrations. The compound PU1424 did not affect membrane urea transport in mouse erythrocytes lacking UT-B. Structure-activity analysis revealed that the analogs with methoxyl group at R4 and sulfonic amide at R2 position exhibited the highest potency inhibition activity on UT-B. Furthermore, in silico assays validated that the R4 and R2 positions of the analogs bound to the UT-B binding pocket and exerted inhibition activity on UT-B. Conclusion: The compound PU1424 is a novel inhibitor of both human and mouse UT-B with IC50 at submicromolar ranges. Its binding site is located at the So site of the UT-B structure. PMID:27238209

  14. RNA targeting by small molecule alkaloids: Studies on the binding of berberine and palmatine to polyribonucleotides and comparison to ethidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Maidul; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2008-03-01

    The binding affinity, energetics and conformational aspects of the interaction of isoquinoline alkaloids berberine and palmatine to four single stranded polyribonucleotides polyguanylic acid [poly(G)], polyinosinic acid [poly(I)], polycytidylic acid [poly(C)] and polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] were studied by absorption, fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy and compared with ethidium. Berberine, palmatine and ethidium binds strongly with poly(G) and poly(I) with affinity in the order 10 5 M -1 while their binding to poly(C) and poly(U) were very weak or practically nil. The same conclusions have also emerged from isothermal titration calorimetric studies. The binding of all the three compounds to poly(C) and poly(I) was exothermic and favored by both negative enthalpy change and positive entropy change. Conformational change in the polymer associated with the binding was observed in poly(I) with all the three molecules and poly(U) with ethidium but not in poly(G) and poly(C) revealing differences in the orientation of the bound molecules in the hitherto different helical organization of these polymers. These fundamental results may be useful and serve as database for the development of futuristic RNA based small molecule therapeutics.

  15. A Remote Arene-Binding Site on Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen Revealed by Antibody-Recruiting Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Andrew X.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Barinka, Cyril; Michel, Julien; Cocleaza, Alexandra; Jorgensen, William L.; Lubkowski, Jacek; Spiegel, David A.

    2010-09-27

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a membrane-bound glutamate carboxypeptidase overexpressed in many forms of prostate cancer. Our laboratory has recently disclosed a class of small molecules, called ARM-Ps (antibody-recruiting molecule targeting prostate cancer) that are capable of enhancing antibody-mediated immune recognition of prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, during the course of these studies, we found ARM-Ps to exhibit extraordinarily high potencies toward PSMA, compared to previously reported inhibitors. Here, we report in-depth biochemical, crystallographic, and computational investigations which elucidate the origin of the observed affinity enhancement. These studies reveal a previously unreported arene-binding site on PSMA, which we believe participates in an aromatic stacking interaction with ARMs. Although this site is composed of only a few amino acid residues, it drastically enhances small molecule binding affinity. These results provide critical insights into the design of PSMA-targeted small molecules for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment; more broadly, the presence of similar arene-binding sites throughout the proteome could prove widely enabling in the optimization of small molecule-protein interactions.

  16. Small-molecule inhibitor of p53 binding to mitochondria protects mice from gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Strom, Evguenia; Sathe, Swati; Komarov, Pavel G; Chernova, Olga B; Pavlovska, Ivanda; Shyshynova, Inna; Bosykh, Dmitry A; Burdelya, Lyudmila G; Macklis, Roger M; Skaliter, Rami; Komarova, Elena A; Gudkov, Andrei V

    2006-09-01

    p53-dependent apoptosis contributes to the side effects of cancer treatment, and genetic or pharmacological inhibition of p53 function can increase normal tissue resistance to genotoxic stress. It has recently been shown that p53 can induce apoptosis through a mechanism that does not depend on transactivation but instead involves translocation of p53 to mitochondria. To determine the impact of this p53 activity on normal tissue radiosensitivity, we isolated a small molecule named pifithrin-mu (PFTmu, 1) that inhibits p53 binding to mitochondria by reducing its affinity to antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 but has no effect on p53-dependent transactivation. PFTmu has a high specificity for p53 and does not protect cells from apoptosis induced by overexpression of proapoptotic protein Bax or by treatment with dexamethasone (2). PFTmu rescues primary mouse thymocytes from p53-mediated apoptosis caused by radiation and protects mice from doses of radiation that cause lethal hematopoietic syndrome. These results indicate that selective inhibition of the mitochondrial branch of the p53 pathway is sufficient for radioprotection in vivo. PMID:16862141

  17. Identification of small molecule compounds with higher binding affinity to guanine deaminase (cypin) than guanine.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José R; Sweet, Eric S; Welsh, William J; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2010-09-15

    Guanine deaminase (GDA; cypin) is an important metalloenzyme that processes the first step in purine catabolism, converting guanine to xanthine by hydrolytic deamination. In higher eukaryotes, GDA also plays an important role in the development of neuronal morphology by regulating dendritic arborization. In addition to its role in the maturing brain, GDA is thought to be involved in proper liver function since increased levels of GDA activity have been correlated with liver disease and transplant rejection. Although mammalian GDA is an attractive and potential drug target for treatment of both liver diseases and cognitive disorders, prospective novel inhibitors and/or activators of this enzyme have not been actively pursued. In this study, we employed the combination of protein structure analysis and experimental kinetic studies to seek novel potential ligands for human guanine deaminase. Using virtual screening and biochemical analysis, we identified common small molecule compounds that demonstrate a higher binding affinity to GDA than does guanine. In vitro analysis demonstrates that these compounds inhibit guanine deamination, and more surprisingly, affect GDA (cypin)-mediated microtubule assembly. The results in this study provide evidence that an in silico drug discovery strategy coupled with in vitro validation assays can be successfully implemented to discover compounds that may possess therapeutic value for the treatment of diseases and disorders where GDA activity is abnormal. PMID:20716488

  18. Dye-Binding Assays for Evaluation of the Effects of Small Molecule Inhibitors on Amyloid (Aβ) Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Dye-binding assays, such as those utilizing Congo red and thioflavin T, are among the most widely used tools to probe the aggregation of amyloidogenic biomolecules and for the evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of amyloid aggregation and fibrillization. A number of recent reports have indicated that these dye-binding assays could be prone to false positive effects when assessing inhibitors’ potential toward Aβ peptides, species involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Specifically, this review focuses on the application of thioflavin T for determining the efficiency of small molecule inhibitors of Aβ aggregation and addresses potential reasons that might be associated with the false positive effects in an effort to increase reliability of dye-binding assays. PMID:23173064

  19. Identification of novel small molecules that bind to two different sites on the surface of tetanus toxin C fragment.

    PubMed

    Cosman, Monique; Lightstone, Felice C; Krishnan, V V; Zeller, Loreen; Prieto, Maria C; Roe, Diana C; Balhorn, Rod

    2002-10-01

    A combination of computational methods, electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS), and NMR spectroscopy has been used to identify novel small molecules that bind to two adjacent sites on the surface of the C fragment of tetanus toxin (TetC). One of these sites, Site-1, binds gangliosides present on the surface of motor neurons, while Site-2 is a highly conserved deep cleft in the structures of the tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) neurotoxins. ESI-MS was used to experimentally determine which of the top 11 computationally predicted Site-2 candidates bind to TetC. Each of the six molecules that tested positive was further screened, individually and as mixtures, for binding to TetC in aqueous solutions by NMR. A trNOESY competition assay was developed that used doxorubicin as a marker for Site-1 to provide insight into whether the predicted Site-2 ligands bound to a different site. Of the six predicted Site-2 ligands tested, only four were observed to bind. Naphthofluorescein-di-beta-galactopyranoside was insoluble under conditions compatible with TetC. Sarcosine-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro did not appear to bind, but its binding affinity may have been outside the range detectable by the trNOESY experiment. Of the remaining four, three [3-(N-maleimidopropionyl)biocytin, lavendustin A, and Try-Glu-Try] bind in the same site, presumably the predicted Site-2. The fourth ligand, Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Val, binds in a third site that differs from Site-1 or predicted Site-2. The results provide a rational, cost- and time-effective strategy for the selection of an optimal set of Site-1 binders and predicted Site-2 binders for use in synthesizing novel bidendate antidotes or detection reagents for clostridial neurotoxins, such as TeNT and BoNT. PMID:12387617

  20. Small-molecule inhibitors of NMO-IgG binding to aquaporin-4 reduce astrocyte cytotoxicity in neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Zhang, Hua; Anderson, Marc O.; Saadoun, Samira; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Papadopoulos, Marios C.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Verkman, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of spinal cord and optic nerve caused by pathogenic autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) against astrocyte aquaporin-4 (AQP4). We developed a high-throughput screen to identify blockers of NMO-IgG binding to human AQP4 using a human recombinant monoclonal NMO-IgG and transfected Fisher rat thyroid cells stably expressing human M23-AQP4. Screening of ∼60,000 compounds yielded the antiviral arbidol, the flavonoid tamarixetin, and several plant-derived berbamine alkaloids, each of which blocked NMO-IgG binding to AQP4 without affecting AQP4 expression, array assembly, or water permeability. The compounds inhibited NMO-IgG binding to AQP4 in NMO patient sera and blocked NMO-IgG-dependent complement- and cell-mediated cytotoxicity with IC50 down to ∼5 μM. Docking computations identified putative sites of blocker binding at the extracellular surface of AQP4. The blockers did not affect complement-dependent cytotoxicity caused by anti-GD3 antibody binding to ganglioside GD3. The blockers reduced by >80% the severity of NMO lesions in an ex vivo spinal cord slice culture model of NMO and in mice in vivo. Our results provide proof of concept for a small-molecule blocker strategy to reduce NMO pathology. Small-molecule blockers may also be useful for other autoimmune diseases caused by binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to defined targets.—Tradtrantip, L., Zhang, H., Anderson, M. O., Saadoun, S., Phuan, P.-W., Papadopoulos, M. C., Bennett, J. L., Verkman, A. S. Small-molecule inhibitors of NMO-IgG binding to aquaporin-4 reduce astrocyte cytotoxicity in neuromyelitis optica. PMID:22319008

  1. Interactions of DNA binding proteins with G-Quadruplex structures at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sujay

    Guanine-rich nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences can form non-canonical secondary structures, known as G-quadruplex (GQ). Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated formation of these structures in telomeric and non-telomeric regions of the genome. Telomeric GQs protect the chromosome ends whereas non-telomeric GQs either act as road blocks or recognition sites for DNA metabolic machinery. These observations suggest the significance of these structures in regulation of different metabolic processes, such as replication and repair. GQs are typically thermodynamically more stable than the corresponding Watson-Crick base pairing formed by G-rich and C-rich strands, making protein activity a crucial factor for their destabilization. Inside the cell, GQs interact with different proteins and their enzymatic activity is the determining factor for their stability. We studied interactions of several proteins with GQs to understand the underlying principles of protein-GQ interactions using single-molecule FRET and other biophysical techniques. Replication Protein-A (RPA), a single stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is known to posses GQ unfolding activity. First, we compared the thermal stability of three potentially GQ-forming DNA sequences (PQS) to their stability against RPA-mediated unfolding. One of these sequences is the human telomeric repeat and the other two, located in the promoter region of tyrosine hydroxylase gene, are highly heterogeneous sequences that better represent PQS in the genome. The thermal stability of these structures do not necessarily correlate with their stability against protein-mediated unfolding. We conclude that thermal stability is not necessarily an adequate criterion for predicting the physiological viability of GQ structures. To determine the critical structural factors that influence protein-GQ interactions we studied two groups of GQ structures that have systematically varying loop lengths and number of G-tetrad layers. We

  2. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    PubMed

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:27491650

  3. Screening of the Binding of Small Molecules to Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with Protein Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins.

  4. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  5. A Small-molecule Screen Yields Idiotype-specific Blockers of Neuromyelitis Optica Immunoglobulin G Binding to Aquaporin-4*

    PubMed Central

    Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O.; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Zhang, Hua; Tan, Joseph; Lam, Chiwah; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Verkman, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by binding of anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) to AQP4 on astrocytes. A screen was developed to identify inhibitors of NMO-IgG-dependent, complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Screening of 50,000 synthetic small molecules was done using CHO cells expressing human AQP4 and a human NMO recombinant monoclonal antibody (rAb-53). The screen yielded pyrano[2,3-c]pyrazoles that blocked rAb-53 binding to AQP4 and prevented cytotoxicity in cell culture and spinal cord slice models of NMO. Structure-activity analysis of 82 analogs yielded a blocker with IC50 ∼ 6 μm. Analysis of the blocker mechanism indicated idiotype specificity, as (i) pyrano[2,3-c]pyrazoles did not prevent AQP4 binding or cytotoxicity of other NMO-IgGs, and (ii) surface plasmon resonance showed specific rAb-53 binding. Antibody structure modeling and docking suggested a putative binding site near the complementarity-determining regions. Small molecules with idiotype-specific antibody targeting may be useful as research tools and therapeutics. PMID:22989877

  6. Single Molecule Hydrodynamic Separation Allows Sensitive and Quantitative Analysis of DNA Conformation and Binding Interactions in Free Solution

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Sarah M.; Liu, Kelvin J.; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Limited tools exist that are capable of monitoring nucleic acid conformations, fluctuations, and distributions in free solution environments. Single molecule free solution hydrodynamic separation enables the unique ability to quantitatively analyze nucleic acid biophysics in free solution. Single molecule fluorescent burst data and separation chromatograms can give layered insight into global DNA conformation, binding interactions, and molecular distributions. First, we show that global conformation of individual DNA molecules can be directly visualized by examining single molecule fluorescent burst shapes and that DNA exists in a dynamic equilibrium of fluctuating conformations as it is driven by Poiseuille flow through micron-sized channels. We then show that this dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations is reflected as shifts in hydrodynamic mobility that can be perturbed using salt and ionic strength to affect packing density. Next, we demonstrate that these shifts in hydrodynamic mobility can be used to investigate hybridization thermodynamics and binding interactions. We distinguish and classify multiple interactions within a single sample, and demonstrate quantification amidst large concentration differences for the detection of rare species. Finally, we demonstrate that these differences can resolve perfect complement, 2bp mismatched, and 3bp mismatched sequences. Such a system can be used to garner diverse information about DNA conformation and structure, and potentially be extended to other molecules and mixed-species interactions, such as between nucleic acids and proteins or synthetic polymers. PMID:26684193

  7. Respiratory complexes III and IV can each bind two molecules of cytochrome c at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Guerra-Castellano, Alejandra; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2015-02-13

    The transient interactions of respiratory cytochrome c with complexes III and IV is herein investigated by using heterologous proteins, namely human cytochrome c, the soluble domain of plant cytochrome c1 and bovine cytochrome c oxidase. The binding molecular mechanisms of the resulting cross-complexes have been analyzed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry. Our data reveal that the two cytochrome c-involving adducts possess a 2:1 stoichiometry - that is, two cytochrome c molecules per adduct - at low ionic strength. We conclude that such extra binding sites at the surfaces of complexes III and IV can facilitate the turnover and sliding of cytochrome c molecules and, therefore, the electron transfer within respiratory supercomplexes. PMID:25595453

  8. Small Molecule Binding, Docking, and Characterization of the Interaction between Pth1 and Peptidyl-tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hames, Mary C; McFeeters, Hana; Holloway, W Blake; Stanley, Christopher B; Urban, Volker S; McFeeters, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial Pth1 is essential for viability. Pth1 cleaves the ester bond between the peptide and nucleotide of peptidyl-tRNA generated from aborted translation, expression of mini-genes, and short ORFs. We have determined the shape of the Pth1:peptidyl-tRNA complex using small angle neutron scattering. Binding of piperonylpiperazine, a small molecule constituent of a combinatorial synthetic library common to most compounds with inhibitory activity, was mapped to Pth1 via NMR spectroscopy. We also report computational docking results, modeling piperonylpiperazine binding based on chemical shift perturbation mapping. Overall these studies promote Pth1 as a novel antibiotic target, contributing to understanding how Pth1 interacts with its substrate, advancing the current model for cleavage, and demonstrating feasibility of small molecule inhibition.

  9. Snyder-Robinson Syndrome: Rescuing the Disease-Causing Effect of G56S mutant by Small Molecule Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Martiny, Virginie; Lagorce, David; Alexov, Emil; Miteva, Maria; Clemson University Team; Université Paris Diderot Team

    2013-03-01

    Snyder-Robinson Syndrome (SRS) is an X-linked mental retardation disorder, which is caused by defects in a particular gene coding for the spermine synthase (SMS) protein. Among the missense mutations known to be disease-causing is the G56S, which is positioned at the interface of the SMS homo-dimer. Previous computational and experimental investigations have shown that G56S mutation destabilizes the homo-dimer and thus greatly reduces the SMS enzymatic activity. In this study, we explore the possibility of mitigating the effect of G56S mutation by binding small molecules to suitable pockets around the mutation site. It is done by combined efforts of molecular dynamics simulations and in silico screening. The binding of selected molecules was calculated to fully compensate the effect of the mutation and rescue the wild type dimer affinity. This work was supported by NIH, NLM grant. No. 1R03LM009748

  10. Molecular Probing of the HPV-16 E6 Protein Alpha Helix Binding Groove with Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rietz, Anne; Petrov, Dino P.; Bartolowits, Matthew; DeSmet, Marsha; Davisson, V. Jo; Androphy, Elliot J.

    2016-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) HPV E6 protein has emerged as a central oncoprotein in HPV-associated cancers in which sustained expression is required for tumor progression. A majority of the E6 protein interactions within the human proteome use an alpha-helix groove interface for binding. The UBE3A/E6AP HECT domain ubiquitin ligase binds E6 at this helix-groove interface. This enables formation of a trimeric complex with p53, resulting in destruction of this tumor suppressor. While recent x-ray crystal structures are useful, examples of small molecule probes that can modulate protein interactions at this interface are limited. To develop insights useful for potential structure-based design of ligands for HPV E6, a series of 2,6-disubstituted benzopyranones were prepared and tested as competitive antagonists of E6-E6AP helix-groove interactions. These small molecule probes were used in both binding and functional assays to evaluate recognition features of the E6 protein. Evidence for an ionic functional group interaction within the helix groove was implicated by the structure-activity among the highest affinity ligands. The molecular topographies of these protein-ligand interactions were evaluated by comparing the binding and activities of single amino acid E6 mutants with the results of molecular dynamic simulations. A group of arginine residues that form a rim-cap over the E6 helix groove offer compensatory roles in binding and recognition of the small molecule probes. The flexibility and impact on the overall helix-groove shape dictated by these residues offer new insights for structure-based targeting of HPV E6. PMID:26915086

  11. Molecular Probing of the HPV-16 E6 Protein Alpha Helix Binding Groove with Small Molecule Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rietz, Anne; Petrov, Dino P; Bartolowits, Matthew; DeSmet, Marsha; Davisson, V Jo; Androphy, Elliot J

    2016-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) HPV E6 protein has emerged as a central oncoprotein in HPV-associated cancers in which sustained expression is required for tumor progression. A majority of the E6 protein interactions within the human proteome use an alpha-helix groove interface for binding. The UBE3A/E6AP HECT domain ubiquitin ligase binds E6 at this helix-groove interface. This enables formation of a trimeric complex with p53, resulting in destruction of this tumor suppressor. While recent x-ray crystal structures are useful, examples of small molecule probes that can modulate protein interactions at this interface are limited. To develop insights useful for potential structure-based design of ligands for HPV E6, a series of 2,6-disubstituted benzopyranones were prepared and tested as competitive antagonists of E6-E6AP helix-groove interactions. These small molecule probes were used in both binding and functional assays to evaluate recognition features of the E6 protein. Evidence for an ionic functional group interaction within the helix groove was implicated by the structure-activity among the highest affinity ligands. The molecular topographies of these protein-ligand interactions were evaluated by comparing the binding and activities of single amino acid E6 mutants with the results of molecular dynamic simulations. A group of arginine residues that form a rim-cap over the E6 helix groove offer compensatory roles in binding and recognition of the small molecule probes. The flexibility and impact on the overall helix-groove shape dictated by these residues offer new insights for structure-based targeting of HPV E6. PMID:26915086

  12. Measurement of the binding energy of ultracold 87Rb133Cs molecules using an offset-free optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molony, Peter K.; Kumar, Avinash; Gregory, Philip D.; Kliese, Russell; Puppe, Thomas; Le Sueur, C. Ruth; Aldegunde, Jesus; Hutson, Jeremy M.; Cornish, Simon L.

    2016-08-01

    We report the binding energy of 87Rb133Cs molecules in their rovibrational ground state measured using an offset-free optical frequency comb based on difference frequency generation technology. We create molecules in the absolute ground state using stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) with a transfer efficiency of 88%. By measuring the absolute frequencies of our STIRAP lasers, we find the energy-level difference from an initial weakly bound Feshbach state to the rovibrational ground state with a resolution of ˜5 kHz over an energy-level difference of more than 114 T Hz ; this lets us discern the hyperfine splitting of the ground state. Combined with theoretical models of the Feshbach-state binding energies and ground-state hyperfine structure, we determine a zero-field binding energy of h ×114 268 135.24 (4 )(3 )M Hz . To our knowledge, this is the most accurate determination to date of the dissociation energy of a molecule.

  13. Comparison of Ensemble and Single Molecule Methods for Particle Characterization and Binding Analysis of a PEGylated Single-Domain Antibody.

    PubMed

    Schneeweis, Lumelle A; Obenauer-Kutner, Linda; Kaur, Parminder; Yamniuk, Aaron P; Tamura, James; Jaffe, Neil; O'Mara, Brian W; Lindsay, Stuart; Doyle, Michael; Bryson, James

    2015-12-01

    Domain antibodies (dAbs) are single immunoglobulin domains that form the smallest functional unit of an antibody. This study investigates the behavior of these small proteins when covalently attached to the polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety that is necessary for extending the half-life of a dAb. The effect of the 40 kDa PEG on hydrodynamic properties, particle behavior, and receptor binding of the dAb has been compared by both ensemble solution and surface methods [light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), surface Plasmon resonance (SPR)] and single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods (topography, recognition imaging, and force microscopy). The large PEG dominates the properties of the dAb-PEG conjugate such as a hydrodynamic radius that corresponds to a globular protein over four times its size and a much reduced association rate. We have used AFM single-molecule studies to determine the mechanism of PEG-dependent reductions in the effectiveness of the dAb observed by SPR kinetic studies. Recognition imaging showed that all of the PEGylated dAb molecules are active, suggesting that some may transiently become inactive if PEG sterically blocks binding. This helps explain the disconnect between the SPR, determined kinetically, and the force microscopy and ITC results that demonstrated that PEG does not change the binding energy. PMID:26343417

  14. STAT1:DNA sequence-dependent binding modulation by phosphorylation, protein:protein interactions and small-molecule inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bonham, Andrew J.; Wenta, Nikola; Osslund, Leah M.; Prussin, Aaron J.; Vinkemeier, Uwe; Reich, Norbert O.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA-binding specificity and affinity of the dimeric human transcription factor (TF) STAT1, were assessed by total internal reflectance fluorescence protein-binding microarrays (TIRF-PBM) to evaluate the effects of protein phosphorylation, higher-order polymerization and small-molecule inhibition. Active, phosphorylated STAT1 showed binding preferences consistent with prior characterization, whereas unphosphorylated STAT1 showed a weak-binding preference for one-half of the GAS consensus site, consistent with recent models of STAT1 structure and function in response to phosphorylation. This altered-binding preference was further tested by use of the inhibitor LLL3, which we show to disrupt STAT1 binding in a sequence-dependent fashion. To determine if this sequence-dependence is specific to STAT1 and not a general feature of human TF biology, the TF Myc/Max was analysed and tested with the inhibitor Mycro3. Myc/Max inhibition by Mycro3 is sequence independent, suggesting that the sequence-dependent inhibition of STAT1 may be specific to this system and a useful target for future inhibitor design. PMID:23180800

  15. The Reaction of Glucagon with Its Receptor: Evidence for Discrete Regions of Activity and Binding in the Glucagon Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Rodbell, Martin; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Pohl, Stephen L.; Sundby, F.

    1971-01-01

    Des-histidine-glucagon (DH-glucagon, glucagon2-29) does not activate the glucagon-sensitive adenylate cyclase system present in either liver plasma membranes or in fat-cell “ghosts”, but inhibits the response of these systems to submaximal concentrations of glucagon. DH-glucagon also inhibits, competitively, the binding of [125I]glucagon to its receptor in liver plasma membranes. Amino-terminal fragments of glucagon (glucagon1-21, glucagon1-23) and carboxy-terminal fragments (glucagon20-29, glucagon22-29) failed to activate adenylate cyclase, to inhibit the response of the enzyme to glucagon, or to compete with labeled glucagon at its receptor. It is concluded that the amino-terminal histidine residue of glucagon is essential for biological activity and that a hydrophobic near-carboxy-terminal region (residues 22-27) is essential for binding of glucagon to its receptor. Amino-terminal histidine may also contribute to the binding of glucagon, since the apparent affinity of DH-glucagon for the receptor is only about one-sixth that of glucagon. Thus, essentially the entire molecule of glucagon must be considered to be the biologically active species. Because, as shown elsewhere, the binding of glucagon to its receptor shows characteristics of hydrophobic bonding, and because certain detergents induce conformational changes in the carboxy-terminal binding region of glucagon, the binding is probably of a lipophilic type. PMID:5280527

  16. Using the binding site to control the magnetic and spintronic properties of a single magnetic molecule in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prueser, Henning; Gill, Tobias G.; Sharp, John; Fisher, Andrew J.; Persson, Mats; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    2015-03-01

    Many proposals outline the use of single magnetic molecules in new applications in information technology and spintronics, with the intention of creating new devices based on phenomena that only manifest at the atomic scale. To create these devices it will be necessary to engineer the required properties, whether through controlling the molecule's chemical makeup or its interaction with the external surroundings. The latter may involve using interactions with the supporting substrate surface, which have been shown to not only modify the molecule properties but also create effects such as chirality. Here we utilize the surface interaction to modify the properties of FePc on copper nitride, a thin insulator, above bulk Cu(001). Using scanning tunneling microscopy we show that the interaction with the surface is defined by the binding site of the central Fe atom in the molecule. By performing elastic and inelastic tunneling spectroscopy and comparing the results to DFT modeling, we explore how coupling to the surface can be used to control the molecular orbitals and the accessibility of the spin excitations. This demonstrates the importance of controlling molecule-substrate coupling down to the atomic scale for the development of single molecule devices.

  17. Screening Mixtures of Small Molecules for Binding to Multiple Sites on the Surface Tetanus Toxin C Fragment by Bioaffinity NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Cosman, M; Zeller, L; Lightstone, F C; Krishnan, V V; Balhorn, R

    2002-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins include the closely related tetanus (TeNT) and botulinum (BoNT) toxins. Botulinum toxin is used to treat severe muscle disorders and as a cosmetic wrinkle reducer. Large quantities of botulinum toxin have also been produced by terrorists for use as a biological weapon. Because there are no known antidotes for these toxins, they thus pose a potential threat to human health whether by an accidental overdose or by a hostile deployment. Thus, the discovery of high specificity and affinity compounds that can inhibit their binding to neural cells can be used as antidotes or in the design of chemical detectors. Using the crystal structure of the C fragment of the tetanus toxin (TetC), which is the cell recognition and cell surface binding domain, and the computational program DOCK, sets of small molecules have been predicted to bind to two different sites located on the surface of this protein. While Site-1 is common to the TeNT and BoNTs, Site-2 is unique to TeNT. Pairs of these molecules from each site can then be linked together synthetically to thereby increase the specificity and affinity for this toxin. Electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy was used to experimentally screen each compound for binding. Mixtures containing binders were further screened for activity under biologically relevant conditions using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. The screening of mixtures of compounds offers increased efficiency and throughput as compared to testing single compounds and can also evaluate how possible structural changes induced by the binding of one ligand can influence the binding of the second ligand. In addition, competitive binding experiments with mixtures containing ligands predicted to bind the same site could identify the best binder for that site. NMR transfer nuclear Overhauser effect (trNOE) confirm that TetC binds doxorubicin but that this molecule is displaced by N-acetylneuraminic acid (sialic acid) in a mixture that

  18. Single-molecule imaging of Hedgehog pathway protein Smoothened in primary cilia reveals binding events regulated by Patched1

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Weiss, Lucien E.; Yoon, Joshua; Roth, Theodore L.; Su, YouRong S.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Scott, Matthew P.; Moerner, W. E.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of the signaling protein Smoothened (Smo) in the membrane of primary cilia is an essential step in Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction, yet the molecular mechanisms of Smo movement and localization are poorly understood. Using ultrasensitive single-molecule tracking with high spatial/temporal precision (30 nm/10 ms), we discovered that binding events disrupt the primarily diffusive movement of Smo in cilia at an array of sites near the base. The affinity of Smo for these binding sites was modulated by the Hh pathway activation state. Activation, by either a ligand or genetic loss of the negatively acting Hh receptor Patched-1 (Ptch), reduced the affinity and frequency of Smo binding at the base. Our findings quantify activation-dependent changes in Smo dynamics in cilia and highlight a previously unknown step in Hh pathway activation. PMID:26100903

  19. Limited Proteolysis Combined with Stable Isotope Labeling Reveals Conformational Changes in Protein (Pseudo)kinases upon Binding Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Di Michele, Michela; Stes, Elisabeth; Vandermarliere, Elien; Arora, Rohit; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; van Heerde, Erika; Zubarev, Roman; Bonnet, Pascal; Linders, Joannes T M; Jacoby, Edgar; Brehmer, Dirk; Martens, Lennart; Gevaert, Kris

    2015-10-01

    Likely due to conformational rearrangements, small molecule inhibitors may stabilize the active conformation of protein kinases and paradoxically promote tumorigenesis. We combined limited proteolysis with stable isotope labeling MS to monitor protein conformational changes upon binding of small molecules. Applying this method to the human serine/threonine kinase B-Raf, frequently mutated in cancer, we found that binding of ATP or its nonhydrolyzable analogue AMP-PNP, but not ADP, stabilized the structure of both B-Raf(WT) and B-Raf(V600E). The ATP-competitive type I B-Raf inhibitor vemurafenib and the type II inhibitor sorafenib stabilized the kinase domain (KD) but had distinct effects on the Ras-binding domain. Stabilization of the B-Raf(WT) KD was confirmed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results are further supported by cellular assays in which we assessed cell viability and phosphorylation profiles in cells expressing B-Raf(WT) or B-Raf(V600E) in response to vemurafenib or sorafenib. Our data indicate that an overall stabilization of the B-Raf structure by specific inhibitors activates MAPK signaling and increases cell survival, helping to explain clinical treatment failure. We also applied our method to monitor conformational changes upon nucleotide binding of the pseudokinase KSR1, which holds high potential for inhibition in human diseases. PMID:26293246

  20. Comparison of the binding of the therapeutically active nucleosides to DNA molecules with different level of lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglova, E. B.; Gladkovskaya, N. A.

    2002-12-01

    Recently we have shown that DNA molecules extracted from epididymis of the Wistar male rats exposed to low doses of gamma radiation interact with some pyrimidine nucleosides. The bindign affinities of NUC to control DNA molecules are unessential. Comparing the UV melting curves for the various DNA sammples we show that observed differences are related to conformational chagnes in the DNA double helix. The samples of the damaged DNA have been obtained by partial denaturation of the calf thymus DNA in the salt-free aqueous solutions. The level of DNA damages in the model DNA smplase depends on the DNA concentration. It was shown that damages in the DNA molecules lead to changes of the melting curves of DNA-NUC mixtures that are similar to those for the DNA samples extracted from irradiated tissues. ALso it has been found that the binding mechanisms to cytosine arabinoside and 6-azacytosine to DNA molecuels having modifeid secondary structures are different.

  1. A small molecule directly inhibits the p53 transactivation domain from binding to replication protein A

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Carnes, Katie A.; Soto, Patricia; Liu, Shengqin; Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Oakley, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), essential for DNA replication, repair and DNA damage signalling, possesses six ssDNA-binding domains (DBDs), including DBD-F on the N-terminus of the largest subunit, RPA70. This domain functions as a binding site for p53 and other DNA damage and repair proteins that contain amphipathic alpha helical domains. Here, we demonstrate direct binding of both ssDNA and the transactivation domain 2 of p53 (p53TAD2) to DBD-F, as well as DBD-F-directed dsDNA strand separation by RPA, all of which are inhibited by fumaropimaric acid (FPA). FPA binds directly to RPA, resulting in a conformational shift as determined through quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in full length RPA. Structural analogues of FPA provide insight on chemical properties that are required for inhibition. Finally, we confirm the inability of RPA possessing R41E and R43E mutations to bind to p53, destabilize dsDNA and quench tryptophan fluorescence by FPA, suggesting that protein binding, DNA modulation and inhibitor binding all occur within the same site on DBD-F. The disruption of p53–RPA interactions by FPA may disturb the regulatory functions of p53 and RPA, thereby inhibiting cellular pathways that control the cell cycle and maintain the integrity of the human genome. PMID:23267009

  2. Quantifying the Entropy of Binding for Water Molecules in Protein Cavities by Computing Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein structural analysis demonstrates that water molecules are commonly found in the internal cavities of proteins. Analysis of experimental data on the entropies of inorganic crystals suggests that the entropic cost of transferring such a water molecule to a protein cavity will not typically be greater than 7.0 cal/mol/K per water molecule, corresponding to a contribution of approximately +2.0 kcal/mol to the free energy. In this study, we employ the statistical mechanical method of inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory to quantify the enthalpic and entropic contributions of individual water molecules in 19 protein cavities across five different proteins. We utilize information theory to develop a rigorous estimate of the total two-particle entropy, yielding a complete framework to calculate hydration free energies. We show that predictions from inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory are in excellent agreement with predictions from free energy perturbation (FEP) and that these predictions are consistent with experimental estimates. However, the results suggest that water molecules in protein cavities containing charged residues may be subject to entropy changes that contribute more than +2.0 kcal/mol to the free energy. In all cases, these unfavorable entropy changes are predicted to be dominated by highly favorable enthalpy changes. These findings are relevant to the study of bridging water molecules at protein-protein interfaces as well as in complexes with cognate ligands and small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:25692597

  3. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  4. Implication of crystal water molecules in inhibitor binding at ALR2 active site.

    PubMed

    Hymavati; Kumar, Vivek; Sobhia, M Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding. PMID:22649481

  5. Basic fibroblast growth factor binds to subendothelial extracellular matrix and is released by heparitinase and heparin-like molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkin, P.; Doctrow, S.; Klagsbrun, M.; Svahn, C.M.; Folkman, J.; Vlodavsky, I. )

    1989-02-21

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exhibits specific binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by cultured endothelial cells. Binding was saturable as a function both of time and of concentration of {sup 125}I-bFGF. Scatchard analysis of FGF binding revealed the presence of about 1.5 x 10{sup 12} binding sites/mm{sup 2} ECM with an apparent k{sub D} of 610 nM. FGF binds to heparan sulfate (HS) in ECM as evidenced by (i) inhibition of binding in the presence of heparin or HS at 0.1-1 {mu}g/mL, but not by chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or hyaluronic acid at 10 {mu}g/mL, (ii) lack of binding to ECM pretreated with heparitinase, but not with chondroitinase ABC, and (iii) rapid release of up to 90% of ECM-bound FGF by exposure to heparin, HS, or heparitinase, but not to chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, hyaluronic acid, or chondroitinase ABC. Oligosaccharides derived from depolymerized heparin, and as small as the tetrasaccharide, released the ECM-bound FGF, but there was little or no release of FGF by modified nonanticoagulant heparins such as totally desulfated heparin, N-desulfated heparin, and N-acetylated heparin. FGF released from ECM was biologically active, as indicated by its stimulation of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis in vascular endothelial cells and 3T3 fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained in studies on release of endogenous FGF-like mitogenic activity from Descement's membranes of bovine corneas. It is suggested that ECM storage and release of bFGF provide a novel mechanism for regulation of capillary blood vessel growth. Whereas ECM-bound FGF may be prevented from acting on endothelial cells, its displacement by heparin-like molecules and/or HS-degrading enzymes may elicit a neovascular response.

  6. Binding Energy of Molecules on Water Ice: Laboratory Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiao; Acharyya, Kinsuk; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2016-07-01

    We measured the binding energy of N2, CO, O2, CH4, and CO2 on non-porous (compact) amorphous solid water (np-ASW), of N2 and CO on porous ASW, and of NH3 on crystalline water ice. We were able to measure binding energies down to a fraction of 1% of a layer, thus making these measurements more appropriate for astrochemistry than the existing values. We found that CO2 forms clusters on the np-ASW surface even at very low coverages. The binding energies of N2, CO, O2, and CH4 decrease with coverage in the submonolayer regime. Their values at the low coverage limit are much higher than what is commonly used in gas-grain models. An empirical formula was used to describe the coverage dependence of the binding energies. We used the newly determined binding energy distributions in a simulation of gas-grain chemistry for cold cloud and hot-core models. We found that owing to the higher value of binding energy in the submonolayer regime, a fraction of all these ices remains for much longer and up to higher temperatures on the grain surface compared to the single value energies currently used in the astrochemical models.

  7. Mechanism of Mcl-1 Conformational Regulation Upon Small Molecule Binding Revealed by Molecular Dynamic Simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anhui; Song, Ting; Wang, Ziqian; Liu, Yubo; Fan, Yudan; Zhang, Yahui; Zhang, Zhichao

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of interactions between Mcl-1 and proapoptotic proteins is considered to be a therapeutic strategy to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Here, we adopted molecular dynamics simulation with molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann/surface area method (MM-PB/SA) to study the inhibition mechanism of three Mcl-1 inhibitors, compounds 1, 2 and 3. Analysis of energy components shows that the better binding free energy of compound 3 than compounds 1 and 2 is attributable to the van der Waals energy (ΔEvdw ) and non-polar solvation energy (ΔGnp ) upon binding. In addition to the excellent agreement with previous experimentally determined affinities, our simulation results further show a bend of helix 4 on Mcl-1 upon compound 3 binding, which is driven by hydrophobic interaction with residue Val(253) , leading to a narrowed BH3-binding groove to impede Puma(BH) (3) binding. The computational result is consistent with our competitive isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assays, which shows that the competitive ability of compound 3 toward Mcl-1/Puma(BH) (3) complex is improved beyond its direct binding affinity toward Mcl-1 itself, and compound 3 exhibits much more efficiency to compete with Puma(BH) (3) than compound 2. Our study provides a new strategy to improve inhibitory activity on Mcl-1 based on the conformational dynamic change. PMID:26518611

  8. Hot spots and transient pockets: predicting the determinants of small-molecule binding to a protein-protein interface.

    PubMed

    Metz, Alexander; Pfleger, Christopher; Kopitz, Hannes; Pfeiffer-Marek, Stefania; Baringhaus, Karl-Heinz; Gohlke, Holger

    2012-01-23

    Protein-protein interfaces are considered difficult targets for small-molecule protein-protein interaction modulators (PPIMs ). Here, we present for the first time a computational strategy that simultaneously considers aspects of energetics and plasticity in the context of PPIM binding to a protein interface. The strategy aims at identifying the determinants of small-molecule binding, hot spots, and transient pockets, in a protein-protein interface in order to make use of this knowledge for predicting binding modes of and ranking PPIMs with respect to their affinity. When applied to interleukin-2 (IL-2), the computationally inexpensive constrained geometric simulation method FRODA outperforms molecular dynamics simulations in sampling hydrophobic transient pockets. We introduce the PPIAnalyzer approach for identifying transient pockets on the basis of geometrical criteria only. A sequence of docking to identified transient pockets, starting structure selection based on hot spot information, RMSD clustering and intermolecular docking energies, and MM-PBSA calculations allows one to enrich IL-2 PPIMs from a set of decoys and to discriminate between subgroups of IL-2 PPIMs with low and high affinity. Our strategy will be applicable in a prospective manner where nothing else than a protein-protein complex structure is known; hence, it can well be the first step in a structure-based endeavor to identify PPIMs. PMID:22087639

  9. Substrate Pathways in the Nitrogenase MoFe Protein by Experimental Identification of Small Molecule Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the nitrogenase molybdenum-iron (MoFe) protein, we have identified five potential substrate access pathways from the protein surface to the FeMo-cofactor (the active site) or the P-cluster using experimental structures of Xe pressurized into MoFe protein crystals from Azotobacter vinelandii and Clostridium pasteurianum. Additionally, all published structures of the MoFe protein, including those from Klebsiella pneumoniae, were analyzed for the presence of nonwater, small molecules bound to the protein interior. Each pathway is based on identification of plausible routes from buried small molecule binding sites to both the protein surface and a metallocluster. Of these five pathways, two have been previously suggested as substrate access pathways. While the small molecule binding sites are not conserved among the three species of MoFe protein, residues lining the pathways are generally conserved, indicating that the proposed pathways may be accessible in all three species. These observations imply that there is unlikely a unique pathway utilized for substrate access from the protein surface to the active site; however, there may be preferred pathways such as those described here. PMID:25710326

  10. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for the analysis of small-molecule inhibitor binding to human and parasitic phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Marco; Shanmugham, Anitha; England, Paul; van der Meer, Tiffany; Bebelman, Jan Paul; Blaazer, Antoni R; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob

    2016-06-15

    In the past decade, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based technology has been exploited more and more to characterize the interaction between drug targets and small-molecule modulators. Here, we report the successful application of SPR methodology for the analysis of small-molecule binding to two therapeutically relevant cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs), Trypanosoma brucei PDEB1 which is implicated in African sleeping sickness and human PDE4D which is implicated in a plethora of disease conditions including inflammatory pulmonary disorders such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and central nervous system (CNS) disorders. A protocol combining the use of directed capture using His-tagged PDE_CDs with covalent attachment to the SPR surface was developed. This methodology allows the determination of the binding kinetics of small-molecule PDE inhibitors and also allows testing their specificity for the two PDEs. The SPR-based assay could serve as a technology platform for the development of highly specific and high-affinity PDE inhibitors, accelerating drug discovery processes. PMID:27033007

  11. A comparative study of affibody, panitumumab, and EGF for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of EGFR- and EGFRvIII-expressing tumors.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibiao; Kovar, Joy L; Cheung, Lael; Rosenthal, Eben L; Olive, D Michael

    2014-02-01

    Aberrant overexpression and/or activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with many types of cancers. EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII) is a common in-frame deletion mutant, which lacks a large part of the extracellular portion (exons 2-7), including components of the ligand-binding domain. Although EGFR has been extensively studied as a molecular imaging target, information about EGFRvIII-targeted molecular imaging is lacking. In this study, the EGFR-specific affibody, therapeutic antibody panitumumab, and ligand EGF were labeled with IRDye 800CW (Ex/Em: 774/789 nm), yielding Aff800, Pan800, and EGF800, respectively. The binding affinities of the labeled agents were compared in cell-based assays using a rat glioma cell line F98 parental (F98-p) lacking EGFR expression, and 2 F98-derived transgenic cell lines expressing EGFR or EGFRvIII (designated as F98-EGFR and F98-vIII, respectively). Results showed that all agents could bind to F98-EGFR, with Pan800 having the highest binding affinity, followed by Aff800 and EGF800. Pan800 and Aff800, but not EGF800, also bound to F98-vIII. In vivo animal imaging demonstrated that compared with F98-p tumors, F98-EGFR tumors generated higher signals with all three agents. However, in the case of F98-vIII, only Pan800 and Aff800 signals were higher. Analysis of tissue lysates showed that a large portion of Pan800 was degraded into small fragments in F98-EGFR and F98-vIII tumors, possibly due to proteolytic digestion after its specific binding and internalization. In conclusion, Pan800 and Aff800 could be used as imaging agents for both wild-type EGFR and EGFRvIII, whereas EGF800 only targets wild-type EGFR. PMID:24100437

  12. Dissecting EB1-microtubule interactions from every direction: using single-molecule visualization and static and dynamic binding measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    EB1 is an important microtubule associating protein (MAP) that acts as a master coordinator of protein activity at the growing plus-end of the microtubule. We can recapitulate the plus-end binding behavior of EB1 along the entire length of a static microtubule using microtubules polymerized in the presence of the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs GMPCPP and GTP γS instead of GTP. Through the use of single-molecule TIRF imaging we find that EB1 is highly dynamic (with a sub-second characteristic binding lifetime) and continuously diffusive while bound to the microtubule. We measure the diffusion coefficient, D, through linear fitting to mean-squared displacement of individually labeled proteins, and the binding lifetime, τ, by fitting a single exponential decay to the probability distribution of trajectory lifetimes. In agreement with measurements of other diffusive MAPs, we find that D increases and τ decreases with increasing ionic strength. We also find that D is sensitive to the choice of GTP analog: EB1 proteins bound to GTP γS polymerized microtubules have a D half of that found with GMPCPP polymerized microtubules. To compare these single-molecule measurements to the bulk binding behavior of EB1, we use TIRF imaging to measure the intensity of microtubules coated with EB1-GFP as a function of EB1 concentration. We find that EB1 binding is cooperative and both the quantity of EB1 bound and the dissociation constant are sensitive to GTP analog and ionic concentration. The correlation between binding affinity and D and the cooperative nature of EB1-microtubule binding leads to a decrease in D with increasing EB1 concentration. Interestingly, we also find an increase in τ at high EB1 concentrations, consistent with attractive EB1-microtubule interactions driving the cooperativity. To further understand the nature of the cooperativity we estimate the interaction energy by measuring the association and dissociation rates (kon and koff respectively) at different

  13. Localization of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxin-binding molecules in gypsy moth larval gut sections using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Valaitis, Algimantas P

    2011-10-01

    The microbial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces Cry toxins, proteins that bind to the brush border membranes of gut epithelial cells of insects that ingest it, disrupting the integrity of the membranes, and leading to cell lysis and insect death. In gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, two toxin-binding molecules for the Cry1A class of Bt toxins have been identified: an aminopeptidase N (APN-1) and a 270kDa anionic glycoconjugate (BTR-270). Studies have shown that APN-1 has a relatively weak affinity and a very narrow specificity to Cry1Ac, the only Cry1A toxin that it binds. In contrast, BTR-270 binds all toxins that are active against L. dispar larvae, and the affinities for these toxins to BTR-270 correlate positively with their respective toxicities. In this study, an immunohistochemical approach was coupled with fluorescence microscopy to localize APN-1 and BTR-270 in paraffin embedded midgut sections of L. dispar larvae. The distribution of cadherin and alkaline phosphatase in the gut tissue was also examined. A strong reaction indicative of polyanionic material was detected with alcian blue staining over the entire epithelial brush border, suggesting the presence of acidic glycoconjugates in the microvillar matrix. The Cry1A toxin-binding sites were confined to the apical surface of the gut epithelial cells with intense labeling of the apical tips of the microvilli. APN-1, BTR-270, and alkaline phosphatase were found to be present exclusively along the brush border microvilli along the entire gut epithelium. In contrast, cadherin, detected only in older gypsy moth larvae, was present both in the apical brush border and in the basement membrane anchoring the midgut epithelial cells. The topographical relationship between the Bt Cry toxin-binding molecules BTR-270 and APN-1 and the Cry1A toxin-binding sites that were confined to the apical brush border of the midgut cells is consistent with findings implicating their involvement in the mechanism of the

  14. Structure and thermodynamics of effector molecule binding to the nitrogen signal transduction PII protein GlnZ from Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Truan, Daphné; Bjelić, Saša; Li, Xiao-Dan; Winkler, Fritz K

    2014-07-29

    The trimeric PII signal transduction proteins regulate the function of a variety of target proteins predominantly involved in nitrogen metabolism. ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) are key effector molecules influencing PII binding to targets. Studies of PII proteins have established that the 20-residue T-loop plays a central role in effector sensing and target binding. However, the specific effects of effector binding on T-loop conformation have remained poorly documented. We present eight crystal structures of the Azospirillum brasilense PII protein GlnZ, six of which are cocrystallized and liganded with ADP or ATP. We find that interaction with the diphosphate moiety of bound ADP constrains the N-terminal part of the T-loop in a characteristic way that is maintained in ADP-promoted complexes with target proteins. In contrast, the interactions with the triphosphate moiety in ATP complexes are much more variable and no single predominant interaction mode is apparent except for the ternary MgATP/2-OG complex. These conclusions can be extended to most investigated PII proteins of the GlnB/GlnK subfamily. Unlike reported for other PII proteins, microcalorimetry reveals no cooperativity between the three binding sites of GlnZ trimers for any of the three effectors under carefully controlled experimental conditions. PMID:24846646

  15. The Small Molecule R-(-)-β-O-Methylsynephrine Binds to Nucleoporin 153 kDa and Inhibits Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Hee; Pham, Ngoc Bich; Quinn, Ronald J.; Shim, Joong Sup; Cho, Hee; Cho, Sung Min; Park, Sung Wook; Kim, Jeong Hun; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Oh, Jong-Won; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2015-01-01

    R-(-)-β-O-methylsynephrine (OMe-Syn) is a naturally occurring small molecule that was identified in a previous screen as an inhibitor of angiogenesis. In this study, we conducted two animal model experiments to investigate the in vivo antiangiogenic activity of OMe-Syn. OMe-Syn significantly inhibited angiogenesis in a transgenic zebrafish model as well as in a mouse retinopathy model. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the antiangiogenic activity of OMe-Syn, we used phage display cloning to isolate potential OMe-Syn binding proteins from human cDNA libraries and identified nucleoporin 153 kDa (NUP153) as a primary binding partner of OMe-Syn. OMe-Syn competitively inhibited mRNA binding to the RNA-binding domain of NUP153. Furthermore, depletion of NUP153 in human cells or zebrafish embryos led to an inhibition of angiogenesis, in a manner similar to that seen in response to OMe-Syn treatment. These data suggest that OMe-Syn is a promising candidate for the development of a novel antiangiogenic agent and that inhibition of NUP153 is possibly responsible for the antiangiogenic activity of OMe-Syn. PMID:26221075

  16. Screening of the binding of small molecules to proteins by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26174365

  17. New hydrogen-bond potentials for use in determining energetically favorable binding sites on molecules of known structure.

    PubMed

    Boobbyer, D N; Goodford, P J; McWhinnie, P M; Wade, R C

    1989-05-01

    An empirical energy function designed to calculate the interaction energy of a chemical probe group, such as a carbonyl oxygen or an amine nitrogen atom, with a target molecule has been developed. This function is used to determine the sites where ligands, such as drugs, may bind to a chosen target molecule which may be a protein, a nucleic acid, a polysaccharide, or a small organic molecule. The energy function is composed of a Lennard-Jones, an electrostatic and a hydrogen-bonding term. The latter is dependent on the length and orientation of the hydrogen bond and also on the chemical nature of the hydrogen-bonding atoms. These terms have been formulated by fitting to experimental observations of hydrogen bonds in crystal structures. In the calculations, thermal motion of the hydrogen-bonding hydrogen atoms and lone-pair electrons may be taken into account. For example, in a alcoholic hydroxyl group, the hydrogen may rotate around the C-O bond at the observed tetrahedral angle. In a histidine residue, a hydrogen atom may be bonded to either of the two imidazole nitrogens and movement of this hydrogen will cause a redistribution of charge which is dependent on the nature of the probe group and the surrounding environment. The shape of some of the energy functions is demonstrated on molecules of pharmacological interest. PMID:2709375

  18. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, which are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs). The polymorp...

  19. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Pot1 Binding to Telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Sarah E.; Croy, Johnny E.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome ends are complex structures, consisting of repetitive DNA sequence terminating in an ssDNA overhang with many associated proteins. Because alteration of these ends is a hallmark of cancer, telomeres and telomere maintenance have been prime drug targets. The universally conserved ssDNA overhang is sequence-specifically bound and regulated by Pot1 (protection of telomeres), and perturbation of Pot1 function has deleterious effects for proliferating cells. The specificity of the Pot1/ssDNA interaction and the key involvement of this protein in telomere maintenance have suggested directed inhibition of Pot1/ssDNA binding as an efficient means of disrupting telomere function. To explore this idea, we developed a high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) screen for inhibitors of Pot1/ssDNA interaction. We conducted this screen with the DNA-binding subdomain of S. pombe Pot1 (Pot1pN), which confers the vast majority of Pot1 sequence-specificity and is highly similar to the first domain of human Pot1 (hPOT1). Screening a library of ~20,000 compounds yielded a single inhibitor, which we found interacted tightly with submicromolar affinity. Furthermore, this compound, subsequently identified as the bis-azo dye Congo red, was able to competitively inhibit hPOT1 binding to telomeric DNA. ITC and NMR chemical shift analysis suggest that CR interacts specifically with the ssDNA-binding cleft of Pot1, and that alteration of this surface disrupts CR binding. The identification of a specific inhibitor of ssDNA interaction establishes a new pathway for targeted telomere disruption. PMID:22978652

  20. L1 adhesion molecule on mouse leukocytes: regulation and involvement in endothelial cell binding.

    PubMed

    Hubbe, M; Kowitz, A; Schirrmacher, V; Schachner, M; Altevogt, P

    1993-11-01

    L1 is a cell surface glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily which was initially shown to mediate adhesion between neural cells. Recently we have reported that L1 is expressed by bone marrow cells and the majority of mature lymphocytes (Kowitz et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 1992. 22: 1199-1205). To analyze the function of L1 on leukocytes we studied its regulation following cell activation. In vitro activation of B lymphocytes with lipopolysaccharide or T lymphocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/Ca2+ ionophore, concanavalin A or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody as well as in vivo activation of V beta 8+ T cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) revealed a down-regulation of L1 within 48 h. A rapid loss of L1 expression was seen when mouse neutrophils were activated with PMA alone. This rapid loss paralleled the shedding of L-selectin. We also studied a possible role of L1 in the binding of leukocytes to endothelial cells. ESb-MP lymphoma cells with a high expression of L1 (L1hi) could bind to bend3 endothelioma cells without prior activation with inflammatory cytokines. The interaction was inhibited by anti-L1 antibodies. In contrast, ESb-MP cells with low L1 expression (L1lo) were only marginally bound. Latex beads coated with affinity-isolated L1 antigen were also able to bind to the endothelioma cells in a specific fashion. The binding of ESb-MP lymphoma cells required Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions and was sensitive to cold temperature. Since the endothelioma cells did not express L1 the binding mechanism studied here is distinct from the established L1-L1 homotypic interaction. It is possible that the novel L1-mediated adhesion pathway involves an unidentified ligand and could play a role in leukocyte migration. PMID:8223869

  1. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materialsmore » science, chemistry, and biology.« less

  2. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology.

  3. Modeling the binding of fulvic acid by goethite: the speciation of adsorbed FA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filius, Jeroen D.; Meeussen, Johannes C. L.; Lumsdon, David G.; Hiemstra, Tjisse; van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2003-04-01

    Under natural conditions, the adsorption of ions at the solid-water interface may be strongly influenced by the adsorption of organic matter. In this paper, we describe the adsorption of fulvic acid (FA) by metal(hydr)oxide surfaces with a heterogeneous surface complexation model, the ligand and charge distribution (LCD) model. The model is a self-consistent combination of the nonideal competitive adsorption (NICA) equation and the CD-MUSIC model. The LCD model can describe simultaneously the concentration, pH, and salt dependency of the adsorption with a minimum of only three adjustable parameters. Furthermore, the model predicts the coadsorption of protons accurately for an extended range of conditions. Surface speciation calculations show that almost all hydroxyl groups of the adsorbed FA molecules are involved in outer sphere complexation reactions. The carboxylic groups of the adsorbed FA molecule form inner and outer sphere complexes. Furthermore, part of the carboxylate groups remain noncoordinated and deprotonated.

  4. Binding site identification and role of permanent water molecule of PIM-3 kinase: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Gul, Sana; Usmani, Saman; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-11-01

    The kinome is a protein kinase complement of the human genome, categorized as serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. These kinases catalyze phosphorylation reaction by using ATP as phosphoryl donor. Proviral Integration Site for Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (PIM) kinase encodes serine/threonine protein kinases that recognized as proto-oncogene, responsible for rapid growth of cancerous cells. It is implicated in cell survival and function via cell cycle progression and its metabolism. PIM-3, sub-member of PIM kinases is a proto-oncogene, its overexpression inhibits apoptosis, and results in progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. PIM-3 is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop its specific inhibitors is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure by any experimental technique. In silico techniques generally facilitate scientist to explore hidden structural features in order to improve drug discovery. In the present study, homology modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation techniques were utilized to explore the structure and dynamics of PIM-3 kinase. Induction of water molecules during molecular docking simulation explored differences in the hinge region between PIM-1 and PIM-3 kinases that may be responsible for specificity. Furthermore, role of water molecules in the active site was also explored via radial distribution function (RDF) after a 10 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Generated RDF plots exhibited the importance of water for inhibitor binding through their bridging capability that links the ligand with binding site residues. PMID:26529487

  5. Binding and movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases on crystalline cellulose surfaces revealed by single-molecule fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaemyeong; Sethi, Anurag; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Han, Jason J; Jeoh, Tina; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Goodwin, Peter M

    2013-08-16

    The efficient catalytic conversion of biomass to bioenergy would meet a large portion of energy requirements in the near future. A crucial step in this process is the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose that is then converted into fuel such as ethanol by fermentation. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to directly monitor the movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) on the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils to elucidate molecular level details of cellulase activity. The motion of multiple, individual TrCel7A cellobiohydrolases was simultaneously recorded with ∼15-nm spatial resolution. Time-resolved localization microscopy provides insights on the activity of TrCel7A on cellulose and informs on nonproductive binding and diffusion. We measured single-molecule residency time distributions of TrCel7A bound to cellulose both in the presence of and absence of cellobiose the major product and a potent inhibitor of Cel7A activity. Combining these results with a kinetic model of TrCel7A binding provides microscopic insight into interactions between TrCel7A and the cellulose substrate. PMID:23818525

  6. Synthesis of Zn-MOF incorporating titanium-hydrides as active sites binding H{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jongsik; Ok Kim, Dong; Wook Kim, Dong; Sagong, Kil

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes the synthetic effort for a Zn-MOF imparting Ti-H as a preferential binding site potentially capturing H{sub 2} molecules via Kubas-type interaction. The formation mechanism of Ti-H innate to the final material was potentially demonstrated to follow a radical dissociation rather than a β-hydrogen elimination and a C-H reductive elimination. - Graphical abstract: This study details the synthesis and the formation mechanism of Zn-MOF adsorbent site-isolating TiH{sub 3} that can potentially capture H{sub 2} molecules via Kubas-binding mechanism. - Highlights: • OH-functionalized Zn-MOF was employed as a reactive template to site-isolate TiH{sub 3}. • This MOF was post-synthetically modified using a tetracyclohexyl titanium (IV). • This intermediate was hydrogenolyzed to change ligand from cyclohexyl to hydride. • Formation mechanism of TiH{sub 3} was investigated via two control GC–MS experiments. • Final Zn-MOF potentially site-isolating TiH{sub 3} species was used as a H{sub 2} adsorbent.

  7. Acyl-coenzyme A binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3; PAP7; GCP60): an emerging signaling molecule

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jinjiang; Liu, Jun; Culty, Martine; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-01-01

    Golgi body-mediated signaling has been linked to its fragmentation and regeneration during the mitotic cycle of the cell. During this process, Golgi-resident proteins are released to the cytosol and interact with other signaling molecules to regulate various cellular processes. Acyl-coenzyme A binding domain containing 3 protein (ACBD3) is a Golgi protein involved in several signaling events. ACBD3 protein was previously known as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor and cAMP-dependent protein kinase associated protein 7 (PAP7), Golgi complex-associated protein of 60 kDa (GCP60), Golgi complex-associated protein 1 (GOCAP1), and Golgi phosphoprotein 1 (GOLPH1). In this review, we present the gene ontology of ACBD3, its relations to other Acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) domain containing proteins, and its biological function in steroidogenesis, apoptosis, neurogenesis, and embryogenesis. We also discuss the role of ACBD3 in asymmetric cell division and cancer. New findings about ACBD3 may help understand this newly characterized signaling molecule and stimulate further research into its role in molecular endocrinology, neurology, and stem cell biology. PMID:20043945

  8. Binding and Movement of Individual Cel7A Cellobiohydrolases on Crystalline Cellulose Surfaces Revealed by Single-molecule Fluorescence Imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaemyeong; Sethi, Anurag; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Han, Jason J.; Jeoh, Tina; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Goodwin, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The efficient catalytic conversion of biomass to bioenergy would meet a large portion of energy requirements in the near future. A crucial step in this process is the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose that is then converted into fuel such as ethanol by fermentation. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to directly monitor the movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) on the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils to elucidate molecular level details of cellulase activity. The motion of multiple, individual TrCel7A cellobiohydrolases was simultaneously recorded with ∼15-nm spatial resolution. Time-resolved localization microscopy provides insights on the activity of TrCel7A on cellulose and informs on nonproductive binding and diffusion. We measured single-molecule residency time distributions of TrCel7A bound to cellulose both in the presence of and absence of cellobiose the major product and a potent inhibitor of Cel7A activity. Combining these results with a kinetic model of TrCel7A binding provides microscopic insight into interactions between TrCel7A and the cellulose substrate. PMID:23818525

  9. Efficient Computation of Small-Molecule Configurational Binding Entropy and Free Energy Changes by Ensemble Enumeration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a novel, end-point method using the dead-end-elimination and A* algorithms to efficiently and accurately calculate the change in free energy, enthalpy, and configurational entropy of binding for ligand–receptor association reactions. We apply the new approach to the binding of a series of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) protease inhibitors to examine the effect ensemble reranking has on relative accuracy as well as to evaluate the role of the absolute and relative ligand configurational entropy losses upon binding in affinity differences for structurally related inhibitors. Our results suggest that most thermodynamic parameters can be estimated using only a small fraction of the full configurational space, and we see significant improvement in relative accuracy when using an ensemble versus single-conformer approach to ligand ranking. We also find that using approximate metrics based on the single-conformation enthalpy differences between the global minimum energy configuration in the bound as well as unbound states also correlates well with experiment. Using a novel, additive entropy expansion based on conditional mutual information, we also analyze the source of ligand configurational entropy loss upon binding in terms of both uncoupled per degree of freedom losses as well as changes in coupling between inhibitor degrees of freedom. We estimate entropic free energy losses of approximately +24 kcal/mol, 12 kcal/mol of which stems from loss of translational and rotational entropy. Coupling effects contribute only a small fraction to the overall entropy change (1–2 kcal/mol) but suggest differences in how inhibitor dihedral angles couple to each other in the bound versus unbound states. The importance of accounting for flexibility in drug optimization and design is also discussed. PMID:24250277

  10. The elongation factor Tu.kirromycin complex has two binding sites for tRNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    van Noort, J M; Duisterwinkel, F J; Jonák, J; Sedlácek, J; Kraal, B; Bosch, L

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of the polypeptide chain elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) with the antibiotic kirromycin and tRNA has been studied by measuring the extent of protein modification with N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethylketone (TPCK) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). Kirromycin protects both EF-Tu.GDP and EF-Tu.GTP against modification with TPCK. Binding of aminoacyl-tRNA added at increasing concentrations to a solution of 40 microM EF-Tu.GDP.kirromycin complex re-exposes the TPCK target site on the protein. However, when the aminoacyl-tRNA concentration is raised beyond 20 microM, TPCK labeling drops again and is blocked completely at approximately 300 microM aminoacyl-tRNA. By contrast, addition of uncharged tRNA or N- acetylaminoacyl -tRNA enhances TPCK labeling of the protein over the entire tRNA concentration range studied. These data strongly suggest that kirromycin induces in EF-Tu.GDP an additional tRNA binding site that can bind uncharged tRNA, aminoacyl-tRNA, and N- acetylaminoacyl -tRNA. Support for this assumption is provided by measuring the modification of EF-Tu.GDP with the sulfhydryl reagent NEM. Moreover, NEM modification also indicates an additional tRNA binding site on EF-Tu.GTP.kirromycin, which could not be detected with TPCK. Mapping of the tryptic peptides of EF-Tu.GDP labeled with [14C]TPCK revealed only one target site for this agent, i.e., cysteine-81. Modification occurred at the same site in the presence and in the absence of kirromycin and uncharged tRNA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6765192

  11. Role of ICAM-1 polymorphisms (G241R, K469E) in mediating its single-molecule binding ability: Atomic force microscopy measurements on living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Rui; Yi, Shaoqiong; Zhang, Xuejie; Liu, Huiliang; Fang, Xiaohong

    2014-06-13

    Highlights: • We evaluated both single molecule binding ability and expression level of 4 ICAM-1 mutations. • AFM was used to measure single-molecule binding ability on living cells. • The SNP of ICAM-1 may induce changes in expressions rather than single-molecule binding ability. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis (As) is characterized by chronic inflammation and is a major cause of human mortality. ICAM-1-mediated adhesion of leukocytes in vessel walls plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), G241R and K469E, are associated with a number of inflammatory diseases. SNP induced changes in ICAM-1 function rely not only on the expression level but also on the single-molecule binding ability which may be affected by single molecule conformation variations such as protein splicing and folding. Previous studies have shown associations between G241R/K469E polymorphisms and ICAM-1 gene expression. Nevertheless, few studies have been done that focus on the single-molecule forces of the above SNPs and their ligands. In the current study, we evaluated both single molecule binding ability and expression level of 4 ICAM-1 mutations – GK (G241/K469), GE (G241/E469), RK (R241/K469) and RE (R241/E469). No difference in adhesion ability was observed via cell adhesion assay or atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement when comparing the GK, GE, RK, or RE genotypes of ICAM-1 to each other. On the other hand, flow cytometry suggested that there was significantly higher expression of GE genotype of ICAM-1 on transfected CHO cells. Thus, we concluded that genetic susceptibility to diseases related to ICAM-1 polymorphisms, G241R or K469E, might be due to the different expressions of ICAM-1 variants rather than to the single-molecule binding ability of ICAM-1.

  12. Unraveling complex small-molecule binding mechanisms by using simple NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quinternet, Marc; Starck, Jean-Philippe; Delsuc, Marc-André; Kieffer, Bruno

    2012-03-26

    Heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy provides a unique way to obtain site-specific information about protein-ligand interactions. Usually, such studies rely on the availability of isotopically labeled proteins, thereby allowing both editing of the spectra and ligand signals to be filtered out. Herein, we report that the use of the methyl SOFAST correlation experiment enables the determination of site-specific equilibrium binding constants by using unlabeled proteins. By using the binding of L- and D-tryptophan to serum albumin as a test case, we determined very accurate dissociation constants for both the high- and low-affinity sites present at the protein surface. The values of site-specific dissociation constants were closer to those obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry than those obtained from ligand-observed methods, such as saturation transfer difference. The possibility of measuring ligand binding to serum albumin at physiological concentrations with unlabeled proteins may open up new perspectives in the field of drug discovery. PMID:22336999

  13. Pocketome: an encyclopedia of small-molecule binding sites in 4D

    PubMed Central

    Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    The importance of binding site plasticity in protein–ligand interactions is well-recognized, and so are the difficulties in predicting the nature and the degree of this plasticity by computational means. To assist in understanding the flexible protein–ligand interactions, we constructed the Pocketome, an encyclopedia of about one thousand experimentally solved conformational ensembles of druggable binding sites in proteins, grouped by location and consistent chain/cofactor composition. The multiplicity of pockets within the ensembles adds an extra, fourth dimension to the Pocketome entry data. Within each ensemble, the pockets were carefully classified by the degree of their pairwise similarity and compatibility with different ligands. The core of the Pocketome is derived regularly and automatically from the current releases of the Protein Data Bank and the Uniprot Knowledgebase; this core is complemented by entries built from manually provided seed ligand locations. The Pocketome website (www.pocketome.org) allows searching for the sites of interest, analysis of conformational clusters, important residues, binding compatibility matrices and interactive visualization of the ensembles using the ActiveICM web browser plugin. The Pocketome collection can be used to build multi-conformational docking and 3D activity models as well as to design cross-docking and virtual ligand screening benchmarks. PMID:22080553

  14. Single-molecule imaging reveals the mechanism of Exo1 regulation by single-stranded DNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Ignacio F.; Zhou, Yi; Gong, Fade; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wold, Marc S.; Miller, Kyle M.; Paull, Tanya T.

    2016-01-01

    Exonuclease 1 (Exo1) is a 5′→3′ exonuclease and 5′-flap endonuclease that plays a critical role in multiple eukaryotic DNA repair pathways. Exo1 processing at DNA nicks and double-strand breaks creates long stretches of single-stranded DNA, which are rapidly bound by replication protein A (RPA) and other single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs). Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging and quantitative cell biology approaches to reveal the interplay between Exo1 and SSBs. Both human and yeast Exo1 are processive nucleases on their own. RPA rapidly strips Exo1 from DNA, and this activity is dependent on at least three RPA-encoded single-stranded DNA binding domains. Furthermore, we show that ablation of RPA in human cells increases Exo1 recruitment to damage sites. In contrast, the sensor of single-stranded DNA complex 1—a recently identified human SSB that promotes DNA resection during homologous recombination—supports processive resection by Exo1. Although RPA rapidly turns over Exo1, multiple cycles of nuclease rebinding at the same DNA site can still support limited DNA processing. These results reveal the role of single-stranded DNA binding proteins in controlling Exo1-catalyzed resection with implications for how Exo1 is regulated during DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26884156

  15. Zinc Induces Dimerization of the Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecule That Leads to Cooperative Binding to a Superantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Li,H.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Z.; Eislele, L.; Mourad, W.

    2007-01-01

    Dimerization of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in the MHC biological function. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing specific T cell receptor V{beta} elements. Here we have used structural, sedimentation, and surface plasmon resonance detection approaches to investigate the molecular interactions between MAM and the class II MHC molecule HLA-DR1 in the context of a hemagglutinin peptide-(306-318) (HA). Our results revealed that zinc ion can efficiently induce the dimerization of the HLA-DR1/HA complex. Because the crystal structure of the MAM/HLA-DR1/hemagglutinin complex in the presence of EDTA is nearly identical to the structure of the complex crystallized in the presence of zinc ion, Zn{sup 2+} is evidently not directly involved in the binding between MAM and HLA-DR1. Sedimentation and surface plasmon resonance studies further revealed that MAM binds the HLA-DR1/HA complex with high affinity in a 1:1 stoichiometry, in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. However, in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, a dimerized MAM/HLA-DR1/HA complex can arise through the Zn{sup 2+}-induced DR1 dimer. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, cooperative binding of MAM to the DR1 dimer was also observed.

  16. Nucleic acid-binding molecules with high affinity and base sequence specificity: intercalating agents covalently linked to oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Asseline, U; Delarue, M; Lancelot, G; Toulmé, F; Thuong, N T; Montenay-Garestier, T; Hélène, C

    1984-01-01

    Oligodeoxyribonucleotides covalently linked to an intercalating agent via a polymethylene linker were synthesized. Oligothymidylates attached to an acridine dye (Acr) through the 3'-phosphate group [(Tp)n(CH2) mAcr ] specifically interact with the complementary sequence. The interaction is strongly stabilized by the intercalating agent. By using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies, it is shown that complex formation between (Tp)n(CH2) mAcr and poly(rA) involves the formation of n A X T base pairs, where n is the number of thymines in the oligonucleotide. The acridine ring intercalates between A X T base pairs. Fluorescence excitation spectra reveal the existence of two environments for the acridine ring, whose relative contributions depend on the linker length (m). The binding of (Tp)4(CH2) mAcr to poly(rA) is analyzed in terms of site binding and cooperative interactions between oligonucleotides along the polynucleotide lattice. Thermodynamic parameters show that the covalent attachment of the acridine ring strongly stabilizes the binding of the oligonucleotide to its complementary sequence. The stabilization depends on the linker length; the compound with m = 5 gives a more stable complex than that with m = 3. These results open the way to the synthesis of a family of molecules exhibiting both high-affinity and high-specificity for a nucleic acid base sequence. PMID:6587350

  17. Identification of a Fragment-like Small Molecule Ligand for the Methyl-lysine Binding Protein, 53BP1

    PubMed Central

    Perfetti, Michael T.; Baughma, Brandi M.; Dickson, Bradley M.; Mu, Yunxiang; Cui, Gaofeng; Mader, Pavel; Dong, Aiping; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Rothbart, Scott B.; Strahl, Brian D.; Brown, Peter J.; Janzen, William P.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Mer, Georges; McBride, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Improving our understanding of the role of chromatin regulators in the initiation, development, and suppression of cancer and other devastating diseases is critical, as they are integral players in regulating DNA integrity and gene expression. Developing small molecule inhibitors for this target class with cellular activity is a crucial step toward elucidating their specific functions. We specifically targeted the DNA damage response protein, 53BP1, which uses its tandem tudor domain to recognize histone H4 dimethylated on lysine 20 (H4K20me2), a modification induced by double-strand DNA breaks. Through a cross-screening approach we identified UNC2170 (1) as a micromolar ligand of 53BP1, which demonstrates at least 17-fold selectivity for 53BP1 as compared to other methyl-lysine (Kme) binding proteins tested. Structural studies revealed that the tert-butyl amine of UNC2170 anchors the compound in the methyl-lysine (Kme) binding pocket of 53BP1, making it competitive with endogenous Kme substrates. X-ray crystallography also demonstrated that UNC2170 binds at the interface of two tudor domains of a 53BP1 dimer. Importantly, this compound functions as a 53BP1 antagonist in cellular lysates and shows cellular activity by suppressing class switch recombination, a process which requires a functional 53BP1 tudor domain. These results demonstrate that UNC2170 is a functionally active, fragment-like ligand for 53BP1. PMID:25590533

  18. Improved Estimation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy by Using the Ligand-Entropy and Mobility of Water Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    We previously developed the direct interaction approximation (DIA) method to estimate the protein-ligand binding free energy (ΔG). The DIA method estimates the ΔG value based on the direct van der Waals and electrostatic interaction energies between the protein and the ligand. In the current study, the effect of the entropy of the ligand was introduced with protein dynamic properties by molecular dynamics simulations, and the interaction between each residue of the protein and the ligand was also weighted considering the hydration of each residue. The molecular dynamics simulation of the apo target protein gave the hydration effect of each residue, under the assumption that the residues, which strongly bind the water molecules, are important in the protein-ligand binding. These two effects improved the reliability of the DIA method. In fact, the parameters used in the DIA became independent of the target protein. The averaged error of ΔG estimation was 1.3 kcal/mol and the correlation coefficient between the experimental ΔG value and the calculated ΔG value was 0.75. PMID:24276169

  19. Identification of small-molecule binding pockets in the soluble monomeric form of the Aβ42 peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Maximillian; Simone, Alfonso De; Schenk, Dale; Toth, Gergely; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of intrinsically disordered peptides and proteins is associated with a wide range of highly debilitating neurological and systemic disorders. In this work we explored the potential of a structure-based drug discovery procedure to target one such system, the soluble monomeric form of the Aβ42 peptide. We utilised for this purpose a set of structures of the Aβ42 peptide selected from clusters of conformations within an ensemble generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Using these structures we carried out fragment mapping calculations to identify binding ‘hot spots’ on the monomeric form of the Aβ42 peptide. This procedure provided a set of hot spots with ligand efficiencies comparable to those observed for structured proteins, and that are clustered into binding pockets. We verified that such pockets exhibit a propensity to bind small molecules known to interact with the Aβ42 peptide. Taken together these results provide an initial indication that fragment-based drug discovery may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases associated with the aggregation of intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:23883055

  20. Single-Molecule Observation of the Induction of k-Turn RNA Structure on Binding L7Ae Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Fessl, Tomáš; Schroeder, Kersten T.; Ouellet, Jonathan; Liu, Yijin; Freeman, Alasdair D.J.; Lilley, David M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The k-turn is a commonly occurring structural motif that introduces a tight kink into duplex RNA. In free solution, it can exist in an extended form, or by folding into the kinked structure. Binding of proteins including the L7Ae family can induce the formation of the kinked geometry, raising the question of whether this occurs by passive selection of the kinked structure, or a more active process in which the protein manipulates the RNA structure. We have devised a single-molecule experiment whereby immobilized L7Ae protein binds Cy3-Cy5-labeled RNA from free solution. We find that all bound RNA is in the kinked geometry, with no evidence for transitions to an extended form at the millisecond timescale of the camera. Furthermore, real-time binding experiments provide no evidence for a more extended intermediate even at the earliest times, at a time resolution of 16 ms. The data support a passive conformational selection model by which the protein selects a fraction of RNA that is already in the kinked conformation, thereby drawing the equilibrium into this form. PMID:23260056

  1. Cross-Linked Hyperbranched Polyglycerols as Hosts for Selective Binding of Guest Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Burakowska, Ewelina; Quinn, Jordan R.; Zimmerman, Steven C.; Haag, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    The ring-closing metathesis reaction of dendrimers containing allyl ether end groups is known to rigidify them significantly. Herein we report that polyallylated hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) 1 complexes the sodium salt of rose Bengal in chloroform solution but releases it readily to water. In contrast, extensively cross-linking 1 with Grubbs catalyst provides 2 which similarly complexes rose Bengal, but does not release it despite 12 h of shaking with water. Both 1 and 2 also complex thymol blue and exhibit the same differential complex stability when extracted with water. Neither 1 nor 2 complex Congo red sodium salt and more weakly solubilize the cesium salt of rose Bengal and thymol blue. Larger loop size cross-linked analogs HPG 5 and 6 also bind rose Bengal (RB) and thymol blue and are able to bind Congo red, but both release the dye more readily when extracted with water. In addition, a bathochromic shift is observed in the UV spectra for complex 6·RB, suggesting a changed microenvironment for the dye due to a tighter binding of the counter anion. Dihydroxylation of the alkene groups in 1, 2, 5, and 6 produced HPGs 3, 4, 7, and 8, respectively. HPGs 3 and 4 are both water-soluble, but 7 and 8 were not and could not be studied further. In water, HPG 4 solubilized less than one nonpolar guest (Nimodipine, pyrene, or Nile red) per polymer at least in part because it forms very large aggregates. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) indicate aggregates with diameters of ca. 100 nm in pure water. The aggregates dissociated in high salt concentrations suggesting applications in stimuli responsive materials. PMID:19722631

  2. A Bifurcated Proteoglycan Binding Small Molecule Carrier for siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Matt; Adigbli, Derick; Edith Chan, A W; Melander, Roberta J; MacRobert, Alexander J; Selwood, David L

    2014-01-01

    A wider application of siRNA- and miRNA- based therapeutics is restricted by the currently available delivery systems. We have designed a new type of small molecule carrier (SMoC) system for siRNA modeled to interact with cell surface proteoglycans. This bifurcated SMoC has similar affinity for the model proteoglycan heparin to an equivalent polyarginine peptide and exhibits significant mRNA knockdown of protein levels comparable to lipofectamine and the previously reported linear SMoC. PMID:24472581

  3. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-31

    Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

  4. FRET Enabled Real Time Detection of RNA-Small Molecule Binding

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yun; Dix, Andrew V.; Tor, Yitzhak

    2011-01-01

    A robust analysis and discovery platform for antibiotics targeting the bacterial rRNA A-site has been developed by incorporating a new emissive U surrogate into the RNA and labeling the aminoglycosides with an appropriate fluorescence acceptor. Specifically, a 5-methoxyquinazoline-2,4(1H,3H)-dione-based emissive uracil analogue was identified to be an ideal donor for 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carboxylic acid. This donor/acceptor pair displays a critical Förster radius (R0) of 27 Å, a value suitable for an A-site-aminoglycoside assembly. Titrating the coumarin labeled aminoglycosides into the emissive A-site construct, labeled at position U1406, shows a decrease in donor emission (at 395 nm) and concurrent increase of the acceptor emission (at 473 nm). Titration curves, obtained by fitting the donor’s emission quenching or the augmentation of the acceptor’s sensitized emission, faithfully generate EC50 values. Titration of unlabeled ligands into the preformed FRET complex showed a continuous increase of the donor emission, with a concurrent decrease of the acceptor emission, yielding valuable data regarding competitive displacement of aminoglycosides by A-site binders. Detection of antibiotic binding is therefore not dependent on changes in the environment of a single fluorophore, but rather on the responsive interaction between two chromophores acting as a FRET pair, facilitating the determination of direct binding and competitive displacement events with FRET accuracy. PMID:19908830

  5. Structure Based Modeling of Small Molecules Binding to the TLR7 by Atomistic Level Simulations.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Deriu, Marco A; Licandro, Ginevra; Prunotto, Alessio; Danani, Andrea; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) are a large family of proteins involved in the immune system response. Both the activation and the inhibition of these receptors can have positive effects on several diseases, including viral pathologies and cancer, therefore prompting the development of new compounds. In order to provide new indications for the design of Toll-Like Receptor 7 (TLR7)-targeting drugs, the mechanism of interaction between the TLR7 and two important classes of agonists (imidazoquinoline and adenine derivatives) was investigated through docking and Molecular Dynamics simulations. To perform the computational analysis, a new model for the dimeric form of the receptors was necessary and therefore created. Qualitative and quantitative differences between agonists and inactive compounds were determined. The in silico results were compared with previous experimental observations and employed to define the ligand binding mechanism of TLR7. PMID:26007168

  6. [Calculation of mobility and entropy of the binding of molecules by crystals].

    PubMed

    Garbuzynskiy, S O; Finkelstein, A V

    2016-01-01

    A simple method for evaluating a range of molecular movements in crystals has been developed. This estimate is needed to calculate the entropy of binding, in particular in protein-ligand complexes. The estimate is based on experimental data concerning the enthalpy of sublimation and saturated vapor pressure obtained for 15 organic crystals with melting temperatures of 25-80°С. For this set, we calculated the values of the average range and the corresponding average amplitude of molecular movements in crystals that constituted 0.75 ± 0.14 Å and 0.18 ± 0.03 Å, respectively. The entropy of sublimation calculated based on the average range of molecular movements in crystals was well consistent with the experimental data. PMID:27414791

  7. More powerful virus inhibitors from structure-based analysis of HEV71 capsid-binding molecules

    PubMed Central

    Spyrou, John A. B.; Kelly, James; Ren, Jingshan; Grimes, Jonathan; Puerstinger, Gerhard; Stonehouse, Nicola; Walter, Thomas S.; Hu, Zhongyu; Wang, Junzhi; Li, Xuemei; Peng, Wei; Rowlands, David; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Rao, Zihe; Stuart, David I.

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (HEV71) epidemics amongst children and infants result mainly in mild symptoms, however, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, infection can be fatal. At present no therapies are available. We have used structural analysis of the complete virus to guide the design of HEV71 inhibitors. Analysis of complexes with four 3-(-4-pyridyl)-2-imidazolidinone derivatives with varying anti-HEV71 activities, pinpointed key structure-activity correlates. We then identified additional potentially beneficial substitutions, developed methods to reliably triage compounds by quantum mechanics-enhanced ligand docking, and synthesized two candidates. Structural analysis and in vitro assays confirmed the predicted binding modes and their ability to block viral infection. One ligand (IC50 = 25 pM) is an order of magnitude more potent than the best previously reported inhibitor, and is also more soluble. Our approach may be useful in the design of effective drugs for enterovirus infections. PMID:24509833

  8. Characterization of small molecule binding. I. Accurate identification of strong inhibitors in virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bo; Wang, Jian; Li, Nan; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-28

    Accurately ranking docking poses remains a great challenge in computer-aided drug design. In this study, we present an integrated approach called MIEC-SVM that combines structure modeling and statistical learning to characterize protein-ligand binding based on the complex structure generated from docking. Using the HIV-1 protease as a model system, we showed that MIEC-SVM can successfully rank the docking poses and consistently outperformed the state-of-art scoring functions when the true positives only account for 1% or 0.5% of all the compounds under consideration. More excitingly, we found that MIEC-SVM can achieve a significant enrichment in virtual screening even when trained on a set of known inhibitors as small as 50, especially when enhanced by a model average approach. Given these features of MIEC-SVM, we believe it provides a powerful tool for searching for and designing new drugs. PMID:23259763

  9. New hopes from old drugs: revisiting DNA-binding small molecules as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Gurova, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    Most of the anticancer chemotherapeutic drugs that are broadly and successfully used today are DNA-damaging agents. Targeting of DNA has been proven to cause relatively potent and selective destruction of tumor cells. However, the clinical potential of DNA-damaging agents is limited by the adverse side effects and increased risk of secondary cancers that are consequences of the agents' genotoxicity. In this review, we present evidence that those agents capable of targeting DNA without inducing DNA damage would not be limited in these ways, and may be as potent as DNA-damaging agents in the killing of tumor cells. We use as an example literature data and our own research of the well-known antimalarial drug quinacrine, which binds to DNA without inducing DNA damage, yet modulates a number of cellular pathways that impact tumor cell survival. PMID:20001804

  10. A tight-binding study of logic gate circuits for adding numbers inside a molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, R.; Ami, S.; Forshaw, M.; Joachim, C.

    2002-06-01

    The possibilities for the design of larger diode logic circuits such as a one-bit half-adder inside a molecule are investigated, based on a recent extension of the elastic scattering quantum chemistry technique. Since any diode logic circuit for an adder needs OR-gates and AND-gates as basic components and the properties of OR-gates have already been discussed in the ballistic and tunnelling electron transport regime, we focus on the more complicated AND-gates in the present work. For this case the output current, calculated from the transmission coefficients by using the Landauer-Büttiker formula, shows four different logical levels instead of two. The origin of this level variety is analysed in detail. The concept of programmable gate logic arrays is also addressed, where for intra-molecular circuits distinct deviations from earlier macroscopic or mesoscopic implementations of this scheme are found.