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Sample records for binds viral dna

  1. Nbs1-dependent binding of Mre11 to adenovirus E4 mutant viral DNA is important for inhibiting DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shomita S.; Bridge, Eileen

    2008-04-25

    Adenovirus (Ad) infections stimulate the activation of cellular DNA damage response and repair pathways. Ad early regulatory proteins prevent activation of DNA damage responses by targeting the MRN complex, composed of the Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 proteins, for relocalization and degradation. In the absence of these viral proteins, Mre11 colocalizes with viral DNA replication foci. Mre11 foci formation at DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation depends on the Nbs1 component of the MRN complex and is stabilized by the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (Mdc1). We find that Nbs1 is required for Mre11 localization at DNA replication foci in Ad E4 mutant infections. Mre11 is important for Mdc1 foci formation in infected cells, consistent with its role as a sensor of DNA damage. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that both Mre11 and Mdc1 are physically bound to viral DNA, which could account for their localization in viral DNA containing foci. Efficient binding of Mre11 to E4 mutant DNA depends on the presence of Nbs1, and is correlated with a significant E4 mutant DNA replication defect. Our results are consistent with a model in which physical interaction of Mre11 with viral DNA is mediated by Nbs1, and interferes with viral DNA replication.

  2. Disentangling Viral Membrane Fusion from Receptor Binding Using Synthetic DNA-Lipid Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Rawle, Robert J; Boxer, Steven G; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-07-12

    Enveloped viruses must bind to a receptor on the host membrane to initiate infection. Membrane fusion is subsequently initiated by a conformational change in the viral fusion protein, triggered by receptor binding, an environmental change, or both. Here, we present a strategy to disentangle the two processes of receptor binding and fusion using synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates to bind enveloped viruses to target membranes in the absence of receptor. This permits direct testing of whether receptor engagement affects the fusion mechanism as well as a comparison of fusion behavior across viruses with different receptor binding specificities. We demonstrate this approach by binding X-31 influenza virus to target vesicles and measuring the rates of individual pH-triggered lipid mixing events using fluorescence microscopy. Influenza lipid mixing kinetics are found to be independent of receptor binding, supporting the common yet previously unproven assumption that receptor binding does not produce any clustering or spatial rearrangement of viral hemagglutinin, which affects the rate-limiting step of pH-triggered fusion. This DNA-lipid tethering strategy should also allow the study of viruses where challenging receptor reconstitution has previously prevented single-virus fusion experiments. PMID:27410740

  3. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Shi, Yanghui; Quan, Yanping; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (DBP) [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05), indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (p<0.01). The transcriptional level of dbp-ko-Bacmid early gene lef-3, ie-1, dnapol, late gene vp39 and very late gene p10 were statistically significantly lower than dbp-re-Bacmid and wtBacmid (p<0.01). The results presented are based on Western blot analysis, which indicated that the lack of dbp gene would lead to low expressions of lef3, vp39, and p10. In conclusion, dbp was not only essential for early viral replication, but also a viral gene that has a significant impact on transcription and expression during all periods of baculovirus life cycle. PMID:27414795

  4. Pre-organized structure of viral DNA at the binding-processing site of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Renisio, Jean-Guillaume; Cosquer, Sylvain; Cherrak, Ilham; Antri, Saïd El; Mauffret, Olivier; Fermandjian, Serge

    2005-01-01

    The integration of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA into the host cell genome is catalysed by the viral integrase (IN). The reaction consists of a 3′-processing [dinucleotide released from each 3′ end of the viral long terminal repeat (LTR)] followed by a strand transfer (insertion of the viral genome into the human chromosome). A 17 base pair oligonucleotide d(GGAAAATCTCTAGCAGT), d(ACTGCTAGAGATTTTCC) reproducing the U5-LTR extremity of viral DNA that contains the IN attachment site was analysed by NMR using the classical NOEs and scalar coupling constants in conjunction with a small set of residual dipolar coupling constants (RDCs) measured at the 13C/15N natural abundance. The combination of these two types of parameters in calculations significantly improved the DNA structure determination. The well-known features of A-tracts were clearly identified by RDCs in the first part of the molecule. The binding/cleavage site at the viral DNA end is distinguishable by a loss of regular base stacking and a distorted minor groove that can aid its specific recognition by IN. PMID:15814814

  5. KSHV but not MHV-68 LANA induces a strong bend upon binding to terminal repeat viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Correia, Bruno; Custodio, Tania F.; Juillard, Franceline; Tan, Min; Pires de Miranda, Marta; Carrondo, Maria A.; Simas, J. Pedro; Kaye, Kenneth M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; McVey, Colin E.

    2015-01-01

    Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is central to episomal tethering, replication and transcriptional regulation of γ2-herpesviruses. LANA binds cooperatively to the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral episome via adjacent LANA binding sites (LBS), but the molecular mechanism by which LANA assembles on the TR remains elusive. We show that KSHV LANA and MHV-68 LANA proteins bind LBS DNA using strikingly different modes. Solution structure of LANA complexes revealed that while kLANA tetramer is intrinsically bent both in the free and bound state to LBS1–2 DNA, mLANA oligomers instead adopt a rigid linear conformation. In addition, we report a novel non-ring kLANA structure that displays more flexibility at its assembly interface than previously demonstrated. We identified a hydrophobic pivot point located at the dimer–dimer assembly interface, which gives rotational freedom for kLANA to adopt variable conformations to accommodate both LBS1–2 and LBS2–1–3 DNA. Alterations in the arrangement of LBS within TR or at the tetramer assembly interface have a drastic effect on the ability of kLANA binding. We also show kLANA and mLANA DNA binding functions can be reciprocated. Although KSHV and MHV-68 are closely related, the findings provide new insights into how the structure, oligomerization, and DNA binding of LANA have evolved differently to assemble on the TR DNA. PMID:26424851

  6. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs.

    PubMed

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D; Stroud, Robert M

    2009-05-19

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN-DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5'-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors. PMID:19416821

  7. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L.; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN–DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5′-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors. PMID:19416821

  8. Human polyoma JC virus minor capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, enhance large T antigen binding to the origin of viral DNA replication: Evidence for their involvement in regulation of the viral DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Saribas, A. Sami; Mun, Sarah; Johnson, Jaslyn; El-Hajmoussa, Mohammad; White, Martyn K.; Safak, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    JC virus (JCV) lytically infects the oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system in a subset of immunocompromized patients and causes the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. JCV replicates and assembles into infectious virions in the nucleus. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms of its virion biogenesis remains elusive. In this report, we have attempted to shed more light on this process by investigating molecular interactions between large T antigen (LT-Ag), Hsp70 and minor capsid proteins, VP2/VP3. We demonstrated that Hsp70 interacts with VP2/VP3 and LT-Ag; and accumulates heavily in the nucleus of the infected cells. We also showed that VP2/VP3 associates with LT-Ag through their DNA binding domains resulting in enhancement in LT-Ag DNA binding to Ori and induction in viral DNA replication. Altogether, our results suggest that VP2/VP3 and Hsp70 actively participate in JCV DNA replication and may play critical roles in coupling of viral DNA replication to virion encapsidation. PMID:24418532

  9. The capsid protein of beak and feather disease virus binds to the viral DNA and is responsible for transporting the replication-associated protein into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Heath, Livio; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Rybicki, Edward P

    2006-07-01

    Circoviruses lack an autonomous DNA polymerase and are dependent on the replication machinery of the host cell for de novo DNA synthesis. Accordingly, the viral DNA needs to cross both the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope before replication can occur. Here we report on the subcellular distribution of the beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid protein (CP) and replication-associated protein (Rep) expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in an insect cell system and test the hypothesis that the CP is responsible for transporting the viral genome, as well as Rep, across the nuclear envelope. The intracellular localization of the BFDV CP was found to be directed by three partially overlapping bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated between residues 16 and 56 at the N terminus of the protein. Moreover, a DNA binding region was also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and falls within the region containing the three putative NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome. Interestingly, whereas Rep expressed on its own in insect cells is restricted to the cytoplasm, coexpression with CP alters the subcellular localization of Rep to the nucleus, strongly suggesting that an interaction with CP facilitates movement of Rep into the nucleus. PMID:16809327

  10. The Capsid Protein of Beak and Feather Disease Virus Binds to the Viral DNA and Is Responsible for Transporting the Replication-Associated Protein into the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Livio; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Rybicki, Edward P.

    2006-01-01

    Circoviruses lack an autonomous DNA polymerase and are dependent on the replication machinery of the host cell for de novo DNA synthesis. Accordingly, the viral DNA needs to cross both the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope before replication can occur. Here we report on the subcellular distribution of the beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid protein (CP) and replication-associated protein (Rep) expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in an insect cell system and test the hypothesis that the CP is responsible for transporting the viral genome, as well as Rep, across the nuclear envelope. The intracellular localization of the BFDV CP was found to be directed by three partially overlapping bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated between residues 16 and 56 at the N terminus of the protein. Moreover, a DNA binding region was also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and falls within the region containing the three putative NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome. Interestingly, whereas Rep expressed on its own in insect cells is restricted to the cytoplasm, coexpression with CP alters the subcellular localization of Rep to the nucleus, strongly suggesting that an interaction with CP facilitates movement of Rep into the nucleus. PMID:16809327

  11. A point mutation in the DNA-binding domain of HPV-2 E2 protein increases its DNA-binding capacity and reverses its transcriptional regulatory activity on the viral early promoter

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein. The transcriptional activity of HPV E2 is mediated by binding to its specific binding sites in the upstream regulatory region of the HPV genomes. Previously we reported a HPV-2 variant from a verrucae vulgaris patient with huge extensive clustered cutaneous, which have five point mutations in its E2 ORF, L118S, S235P, Y287H, S293R and A338V. Under the control of HPV-2 LCR, co-expression of the mutated HPV E2 induced an increased activity on the viral early promoter. In the present study, a series of mammalian expression plasmids encoding E2 proteins with one to five amino acid (aa) substitutions for these mutations were constructed and transfected into HeLa, C33A and SiHa cells. Results CAT expression assays indicated that the enhanced promoter activity was due to the co-expressions of the E2 constructs containing A338V mutation within the DNA-binding domain. Western blots analysis demonstrated that the transiently transfected E2 expressing plasmids, regardless of prototype or the A338V mutant, were continuously expressed in the cells. To study the effect of E2 mutations on its DNA-binding activity, a serial of recombinant E2 proteins with various lengths were expressed and purified. Electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed that the binding affinity of E2 protein with A338V mutation to both an artificial probe with two E2 binding sites or HPV-2 and HPV-16 promoter-proximal LCR sequences were significantly stronger than that of the HPV-2 prototype E2. Furthermore, co-expression of the construct containing A338V mutant exhibited increased activities on heterologous HPV-16 early promoter P97 than that of prototype E2. Conclusions These results suggest that the mutation from Ala to Val at aa 338 is critical for E2 DNA-binding and its transcriptional regulation. PMID:22333459

  12. Genome-Wide Mapping of the Binding Sites and Structural Analysis of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 2 Reveal that It Is a DNA-Binding Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haidai; Dong, Jiazhen; Liang, Deguang; Gao, Zengqiang; Bai, Lei; Sun, Rui; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oncogenic herpesvirus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is known to encode four viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRF1 to -4) to subvert the host antiviral immune response, but their detailed DNA-binding profiles as transcription factors in the host remain uncharacterized. Here, we first performed genome-wide vIRF2-binding site mapping in the human genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq). vIRF2 was capable of binding to the promoter regions of 100 putative target genes. Importantly, we confirmed that vIRF2 can specifically interact with the promoters of the genes encoding PIK3C3, HMGCR, and HMGCL, which are associated with autophagosome formation or tumor progression and metastasis, and regulate their transcription in vivo. The crystal structure of the vIRF2 DNA-binding domain (DBD) (referred to here as vIRF2DBD) showed variable loop conformations and positive-charge distributions different from those of vIRF1 and cellular IRFs that are associated with DNA-binding specificities. Structure-based mutagenesis revealed that Arg82 and Arg85 are required for the in vitro DNA-binding activity of vIRF2DBD and can abolish the transcription regulation function of vIRF2 on the promoter reporter activity of PIK3C3, HMGCR, and HMGCL. Collectively, our study provided unique insights into the DNA-binding potency of vIRF2 and suggested that vIRF2 could act as a transcription factor of its target genes in the host antiviral immune response. IMPORTANCE The oncogenic herpesvirus KSHV is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV has developed a unique mechanism to subvert the host antiviral immune responses by encoding four homologues of cellular interferon regulatory factors (vIRF1 to -4). However, none of their DNA-binding profiles in the human genome have been characterized until now, and the structural basis for their diverse

  13. An intact sequence-specific DNA-binding domain is required for human cytomegalovirus-mediated sequestration of p53 and may promote in vivo binding to the viral genome during infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenke, Kyle; Samuel, Melanie A.; McDowell, Eric T.; Toerne, Melissa A.; Fortunato, Elizabeth A. . E-mail: lfort@uidaho.edu

    2006-04-25

    The p53 protein is stabilized during infection of primary human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). However, the p53 in HCMV-infected cells is unable to activate its downstream targets. HCMV accomplishes this inactivation, at least in part, by sequestering p53 into viral replication centers within the cell's nucleus soon after they are established. In order to better understand the interplay between HCMV and p53 and the mechanism of sequestration, we constructed a panel of mutant p53-GFP fusion constructs for use in transfection/infection experiments. These mutants affected several post-translational modification sites and several sites within the central sequence-specific DNA-binding domain of the protein. Two categories of p53 sequestration were observed when the mutant constructs were transfected into primary fibroblasts and then infected at either high or low multiplicity. The first category, including all of the post-translational modification mutants, showed sequestration comparable to a wild-type (wt) control, while the second category, mutants affecting the DNA-binding core, were not specifically sequestered above control GFP levels. This suggested that the DNA-binding ability of the protein was required for sequestration. When the HCMV genome was analyzed for p53 consensus binding sites, 21 matches were found, which localized either to the promoters or the coding regions of viral proteins involved in DNA replication and processing as well as structural proteins. An analysis of in vivo binding to these identified sites via chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed differential binding to several of the sites over the course of infection.

  14. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a plasma membrane-associated, uronide binding phosphoprotein with physical properties similar to viral movement proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Reymond, P; Kunz, B; Paul-Pletzer, K; Grimm, R; Eckerskorn, C; Farmer, E E

    1996-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides are structural and regulatory homopolymers from the extracellular pectic matrix of plants. In vitro micromolar concentrations of oligogalacturonates and polygalacturonates were shown previously to stimulate the phosphorylation of a small plasma membrane-associated protein in potato. Immunologically cross-reactive proteins were detected in plasma membrane-enriched fractions from all angiosperm subclasses in the Cronquist system. Polygalacturonate-enhanced phosphorylation of the protein was observed in four of the six dicotyledon subclasses but not in any of the five monocotyledon subclasses. A cDNA for the protein was cloned from potato. The deduced protein is extremely hydrophilic and has a proline-rich N terminus. The C-terminal half of the protein was predicted to be a coiled coil, suggesting that the protein interacts with other macromolecules. The recombinant protein was found to bind both simple and complex galacturonides. The behavior of the protein suggests several parallels with viral proteins involved in intercellular communication. PMID:8989883

  15. A Proteomics Perspective on Viral DNA Sensors in Host Defense and Viral Immune Evasion Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Marni S.; Javitt, Aaron; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2015-01-01

    The sensing of viral DNA is an essential step of cellular immune response to infections with DNA viruses. These human pathogens are spread worldwide, triggering a wide range of virus-induced diseases, and are associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Despite similarities between DNA molecules, mammalian cells have the remarkable ability to distinguish viral DNA from their own DNA. This detection is carried out by specialized antiviral proteins, called DNA sensors. These sensors bind to foreign DNA to activate downstream immune signaling pathways and alert neighboring cells by eliciting the expression of antiviral cytokines. The sensing of viral DNA was shown to occur both in the cytoplasm and nucleus of infected cells, disproving the notion that sensing occurred by simple spatial separation of viral and host DNA. A number of omic approaches, in particular mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods, have significantly contributed to the constantly evolving field of viral DNA sensing. Here, we review the impact of omic methods on the identification of viral DNA sensors, as well as on the characterization of mechanisms involved in host defense or viral immune evasion. PMID:25728651

  16. Multivalent counterions inhibit DNA ejection from viral capsid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Toan

    2008-03-01

    Viral DNA packaged inside a bacteriophage is tighly bent. This stored bending energy of DNA is believed to be the main driving force to eject viral DNA into host cell upon capsid binding. One can control the amount of ejected DNA by subjecting the virus to a solution of PEG8000 molecules. The molecules cannot penetrate the viral capsid, therefore, they exert an osmotic pressure on the virus preventing DNA ejection. Experiments showed that for a given osmotic pressure, the degree of ejection also depends on the concentration of small ions in solution. Interestingly, for multivalent ions (such as Mg2+, Spd3+ or HexCo3+), this dependence is non-monotonic. We propose a simple electrostatic theory to explain this non-monotonic behavior. This is based on the fact that DNA molecules can invert its net charge at high enough multivalent counterion concentration. In other words, as multivalent counterion concentration is increased from zero, charge of DNA molecules change from negative to positive. At the concentration where DNA net charge is zero, the DNA molecules experience an attraction between different segments and DNA ejected amount is reduced. At low or high counterion concentration, DNA segments are charged (negatively or positively), repel each other and DNA ejected amount is increased. Fitting the result of the theory to experimental data, we obtain a numerical value for Mg2+ mediated DNA - DNA attraction energy to be -0.008kT per base.

  17. Nuclear targeting of viral and non-viral DNA.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, E H

    2009-07-01

    The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery and expression using a non-viral vector. Virus is capable of overcoming the barrier to deliver their genetic materials efficiently into the nucleus by virtue of the specialized protein components with the unique amino acid sequences recognizing cellular nuclear transport machinery. However, considering the safety issues in the clinical gene therapy for treating critical human diseases, non-viral systems are highly promising compared with their viral counterparts. This review summarizes the progress on exploring the nuclear traffic mechanisms for the prominent viral vectors and the technological innovations for the nuclear delivery of non-viral DNA by mimicking those natural processes evolved for the viruses as well as for many cellular proteins. PMID:19552613

  18. Two distinct modes of metal ion binding in the nuclease active site of a viral DNA-packaging terminase: insight into the two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiyan; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Anna Y.; Varnado, Brittany; Beutler, John A.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Many dsDNA viruses encode DNA-packaging terminases, each containing a nuclease domain that resolves concatemeric DNA into genome-length units. Terminase nucleases resemble the RNase H-superfamily nucleotidyltransferases in folds, and share a two-metal-ion catalytic mechanism. Here we show that residue K428 of a bacteriophage terminase gp2 nuclease domain mediates binding of the metal cofactor Mg2+. A K428A mutation allows visualization, at high resolution, of a metal ion binding mode with a coupled-octahedral configuration at the active site, exhibiting an unusually short metal-metal distance of 2.42 Å. Such proximity of the two metal ions may play an essential role in catalysis by generating a highly positive electrostatic niche to enable formation of the negatively charged pentacovalent phosphate transition state, and provides the structural basis for distinguishing Mg2+ from Ca2+. Using a metal ion chelator β-thujaplicinol as a molecular probe, we observed a second mode of metal ion binding at the active site, mimicking the DNA binding state. Arrangement of the active site residues differs drastically from those in RNase H-like nucleases, suggesting a drifting of the active site configuration during evolution. The two distinct metal ion binding modes unveiled mechanistic details of the two-metal-ion catalysis at atomic resolution. PMID:26450964

  19. HIV-1 Integrase Binds the Viral RNA Genome and Is Essential during Virion Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Kutluay, Sebla B; Townsend, Dana; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Slaughter, Alison; Larue, Ross C; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Bakouche, Nordine; Fuchs, James R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-08-25

    While an essential role of HIV-1 integrase (IN) for integration of viral cDNA into human chromosome is established, studies with IN mutants and allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) have suggested that IN can also influence viral particle maturation. However, it has remained enigmatic as to how IN contributes to virion morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IN directly binds the viral RNA genome in virions. These interactions have specificity, as IN exhibits distinct preference for select viral RNA structural elements. We show that IN substitutions that selectively impair its binding to viral RNA result in eccentric, non-infectious virions without affecting nucleocapsid-RNA interactions. Likewise, ALLINIs impair IN binding to viral RNA in virions of wild-type, but not escape mutant, virus. These results reveal an unexpected biological role of IN binding to the viral RNA genome during virion morphogenesis and elucidate the mode of action of ALLINIs. PMID:27565348

  20. Formation of a stable complex between the human immunodeficiency virus integrase protein and viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Vink, C; Lutzke, R A; Plasterk, R H

    1994-01-01

    The integrase (IN) protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediates two distinct reactions: (i) specific removal of two nucleotides from the 3' ends of the viral DNA and (ii) integration of the viral DNA into target DNA. Although IN discriminates between specific (viral) DNA and nonspecific DNA in physical in vitro assays, a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain could not be identified in the protein. A nonspecific DNA-binding domain, however, was found at the C terminus of the protein. We examined the DNA-binding characteristics of HIV-1 IN, and found that a stable complex of IN and viral DNA is formed in the presence of Mn2+. The IN-viral DNA complex is resistant to challenge by an excess of competitor DNA. Stable binding of IN to the viral DNA requires that the protein contains an intact N-terminal domain and active site (in the central region of the protein), in addition to the C-terminal DNA-binding domain. Images PMID:7937134

  1. Stretching DNA to quantify nonspecific protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sachin; Fountain, Chandler; Dunlap, David; Family, Fereydoon; Finzi, Laura

    2012-07-01

    Nonspecific binding of regulatory proteins to DNA can be an important mechanism for target search and storage. This seems to be the case for the lambda repressor protein (CI), which maintains lysogeny after infection of E. coli. CI binds specifically at two distant regions along the viral genome and induces the formation of a repressive DNA loop. However, single-molecule imaging as well as thermodynamic and kinetic measurements of CI-mediated looping show that CI also binds to DNA nonspecifically and that this mode of binding may play an important role in maintaining lysogeny. This paper presents a robust phenomenological approach using a recently developed method based on the partition function, which allows calculation of the number of proteins bound nonspecific to DNA from measurements of the DNA extension as a function of applied force. This approach was used to analyze several cycles of extension and relaxation of λ DNA performed at several CI concentrations to measure the dissociation constant for nonspecific binding of CI (˜100 nM), and to obtain a measurement of the induced DNA compaction (˜10%) by CI.

  2. Dynamics of Viral Packaging of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakowitz, Andrew; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2003-03-01

    We study the DNA packaging into the viral capsid using Brownian Dynamics simulations with an emphasis on the coupled effects of translocation force and torque applied by the portal motor. We find that the application of torque during the packaging process allows the virus to package 5 to 10 alone. The twist generated by torque leads to writhed configuration of the DNA, which results in more compact packing and higher degrees of order. The twist energy of the DNA strand during the packaging process is comparable to its bending energy, thus making it a significant contributor to the energetics and dynamics of packaging. Our simulations suggest that viscous resistance to rotation plays an essential role in optimizing the packing efficiency of the viral genome.

  3. HMGB1 Protein Binds to Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein and Promotes Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Moisy, Dorothée; Avilov, Sergiy V.; Jacob, Yves; Laoide, Brid M.; Ge, Xingyi; Baudin, Florence; Jestin, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus has evolved replication strategies that hijack host cell pathways. To uncover interactions between viral macromolecules and host proteins, we applied a phage display strategy. A library of human cDNA expression products displayed on filamentous phages was submitted to affinity selection for influenza viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). High-mobility-group box (HMGB) proteins were found to bind to the nucleoprotein (NP) component of vRNPs. HMGB1 and HMGB2 bind directly to the purified NP in the absence of viral RNA, and the HMG box A domain is sufficient to bind the NP. We show that HMGB1 associates with the viral NP in the nuclei of infected cells, promotes viral growth, and enhances the activity of the viral polymerase. The presence of a functional HMGB1 DNA-binding site is required to enhance influenza virus replication. Glycyrrhizin, which reduces HMGB1 binding to DNA, inhibits influenza virus polymerase activity. Our data show that the HMGB1 protein can play a significant role in intranuclear replication of influenza viruses, thus extending previous findings on the bornavirus and on a number of DNA viruses. PMID:22696656

  4. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  5. Unusual monoclonal DNA binding immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sawada, S; Iijima, S; Kuwana, K; Nishinarita, S; Takeuchi, J; Shida, M; Karasaki, M; Amaki, I

    1983-03-01

    The monoclonal antibodies directed against DNA were produced by somatic cell hybridization with parental cells (SP-2) and spleen cells from nonimmunized autoimmune MRL/lpr mice. The immunoglobulins were recovered from the culture supernatant from hybridoma by a solid immunoadsorbent and antibody immunoprecipitation. The results from the specificities of DNA binding monoclonal immunoglobulins suggest that the antibodies to DNA have the antibody combining sites for both epitope of double stranded helix and base of DNA and support the concept of the multiple antigen binding potentials of the hybridoma autoantibodies. PMID:6857646

  6. DNA-Binding Proteins Essential for Protein-Primed Bacteriophage Φ29 DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Margarita; Holguera, Isabel; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5′ ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP), is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP) that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3′–5′ exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding and

  7. DNA-Binding Proteins Essential for Protein-Primed Bacteriophage Φ29 DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margarita; Holguera, Isabel; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5' ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP), is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP) that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3'-5' exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding and localization of the

  8. CK2 Phosphorylation Inactivates DNA Binding by the Papillomavirus E1 and E2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Stephen; Ruse, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have complex life cycles that are understood only superficially. Although it is well established that the viral E1 and E2 proteins play key roles in controlling viral transcription and DNA replication, how these factors are regulated is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation by the protein kinase CK2 controls the biochemical activities of the bovine papillomavirus E1 and E2 proteins by modifying their DNA binding activity. Phosphorylation at multiple sites in the N-terminal domain in E1 results in the loss of sequence-specific DNA binding activity, a feature that is also conserved in human papillomavirus (HPV) E1 proteins. The bovine papillomavirus (BPV) E2 protein, when phosphorylated by CK2 on two specific sites in the hinge, also loses its site-specific DNA binding activity. Mutation of these sites in E2 results in greatly increased levels of latent viral DNA replication, indicating that CK2 phosphorylation of E2 is a negative regulator of viral DNA replication during latent viral replication. In contrast, mutation of the N-terminal phosphorylation sites in E1 has no effect on latent viral DNA replication. We propose that the phosphorylation of the N terminus of E1 plays a role only in vegetative viral DNA replication, and consistent with such a role, caspase 3 cleavage of E1, which has been shown to be necessary for vegetative viral DNA replication, restores the DNA binding activity to phosphorylated E1. PMID:23637413

  9. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling. PMID:27362237

  10. Herpes simplex virus origin-binding protein (UL9) loops and distorts the viral replication origin.

    PubMed Central

    Koff, A; Schwedes, J F; Tegtmeyer, P

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the role of the herpes simplex virus origin-binding protein (UL9) in the initiation of DNA replication, we have examined the effect of UL9 binding on the structure of the viral origin of replication. UL9 loops and alters the DNA helix of the origin regardless of the phasing of the binding sites. DNase I and micrococcal nuclease footprinting show that UL9 binds two sites in the origin and loops the AT-rich DNA between them independent of the topology of the DNA. KMnO4 and dimethyl sulfate footprinting further show that UL9 alters the DNA helix in the AT region. In contrast to the looping reaction, however, helical distortion requires the free energy of supercoiled DNA. UL9 also loops and distorts the origin DNA of a replication-defective mutant with a 6-bp insertion in the AT region. Because the helical distortion of this mutant DNA is different from that of functional origins, we conclude that an imperfect tertiary structure of the mutant DNA may contribute to its loss of replication function. Images PMID:1851878

  11. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA. PMID:22125376

  12. Identification of the catalytic and DNA-binding region of the human immunodeficiency virus type I integrase protein.

    PubMed

    Vink, C; Oude Groeneger, A M; Plasterk, R H

    1993-03-25

    The integrase (IN) protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is required for specific cleavage of the viral DNA termini, and subsequent integration of the viral DNA into target DNA. To identify the various domains of the IN protein we generated a series of IN deletion mutants as fusions to maltose-binding protein (MBP). The deletion mutants were tested for their ability to bind DNA, to mediate site-specific cleavage of the viral DNA ends, and to carry out integration and disintegration reactions. We found that the DNA-binding region resides between amino acids 200 and 270 of the 288-residues HIV-1 IN protein. The catalytic domain of the protein was mapped between amino acids 50 and 194. For the specific activities of IN, cleavage of the viral DNA and integration, both the DNA-binding domain and the conserved amino-terminal region of IN are required. These regions are dispensable however, for disintegration activity. PMID:8464733

  13. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  14. Non-viral gene delivery for local and controlled DNA release.

    PubMed

    Trentin, Diana; Hubbell, Jeffrey; Hall, Heike

    2005-01-20

    Non-viral DNA delivery systems show important advantages vs. viral systems that are usually associated with an immunological response and safety risks. In this study, disulfide cross-linked peptide-DNA condensates were investigated for local gene delivery. Two different 21 amino acid peptides were designed to have a DNA binding sequence in combination with a transglutaminase substrate site or a nuclear localization site. The peptides were used in different ratios to each other to form stable cross-linked DNA-peptide condensates with a mean diameter of 164 nm and a size distribution from 43 to 204 nm. Such aggregates showed similar stability compared to condensates formed between DNA and high molecular weight poly-L-lysine (PLL). Peptide-DNA condensates were covalently immobilized into fibrin matrices by the activity of factor XIII and were used for gene delivery in vitro. After internalization, reduction of the cross-linked peptide-DNA condensates yielded increased transfection efficiencies into different cell types cultured in 2D sandwich assays, and comparable values for HUVECs cultured in a 3D fibrin matrix, as compared to PLL-DNA condensates. Cell viability 24 h after transfection remained above 95%. The target was to develop a transfection system based on small peptides that can be covalently cross-linked into fibrin-matrices where DNA-release takes place upon cellular degradation of the matrix. This approach provides an interesting tool in non-viral gene delivery. PMID:15653151

  15. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  16. Cholesterol-binding viral proteins in virus entry and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Up to now less than a handful of viral cholesterol-binding proteins have been characterized, in HIV, influenza virus and Semliki Forest virus. These are proteins with roles in virus entry or morphogenesis. In the case of the HIV fusion protein gp41 cholesterol binding is attributed to a cholesterol recognition consensus (CRAC) motif in a flexible domain of the ectodomain preceding the trans-membrane segment. This specific CRAC sequence mediates gp41 binding to a cholesterol affinity column. Mutations in this motif arrest virus fusion at the hemifusion stage and modify the ability of the isolated CRAC peptide to induce segregation of cholesterol in artificial membranes.Influenza A virus M2 protein co-purifies with cholesterol. Its proton translocation activity, responsible for virus uncoating, is not cholesterol-dependent, and the transmembrane channel appears too short for integral raft insertion. Cholesterol binding may be mediated by CRAC motifs in the flexible post-TM domain, which harbours three determinants of binding to membrane rafts. Mutation of the CRAC motif of the WSN strain attenuates virulence for mice. Its affinity to the raft-non-raft interface is predicted to target M2 protein to the periphery of lipid raft microdomains, the sites of virus assembly. Its influence on the morphology of budding virus implicates M2 as factor in virus fission at the raft boundary. Moreover, M2 is an essential factor in sorting the segmented genome into virus particles, indicating that M2 also has a role in priming the outgrowth of virus buds.SFV E1 protein is the first viral type-II fusion protein demonstrated to directly bind cholesterol when the fusion peptide loop locks into the target membrane. Cholesterol binding is modulated by another, proximal loop, which is also important during virus budding and as a host range determinant, as shown by mutational studies. PMID:20213541

  17. DNA Binding to the Silica Surface.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bobo; Shin, Yun Kyung; Hassanali, Ali A; Singer, Sherwin J

    2015-08-27

    We investigate the DNA-silica binding mechanism using molecular dynamics simulations. This system is of technological importance, and also of interest to explore how negatively charged DNA can bind to a silica surface, which is also negatively charged at pH values above its isoelectric point near pH 3. We find that the two major binding mechanisms are attractive interactions between DNA phosphate and surface silanol groups and hydrophobic bonding between DNA base and silica hydrophobic region. Umbrella sampling and the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) are used to calculate the free energy surface for detachment of DNA from a binding configuration to a location far from the silica surface. Several factors explain why single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) has been observed to be more strongly attracted to silica than double-stranded (dsDNA): (1) ssDNA is more flexible and therefore able to maximize the number of binding interactions. (2) ssDNA has free unpaired bases to form hydrophobic attachment to silica while dsDNA has to break hydrogen bonds with base partners to get free bases. (3) The linear charge density of dsDNA is twice that of ssDNA. We devise a procedure to approximate the atomic forces between biomolecules and amorphous silica to enable large-scale biomolecule-silica simulations as reported here. PMID:25966319

  18. The Sunscreen Octyl Methoxycinnamate Binds to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrell, Johannes; Vohra, Shikhar; Nordlund, T. M.

    2000-03-01

    Sunscreens are designed to prevent skin cancer by absorbing ultraviolet radiation from the sun before it gets to the DNA in skin cells. The purpose of this work is to determine whether or not octyl methoxycinnamate, an active ingredient in many sunscreens, will bind to DNA. If so, the sunscreen could transfer the energy it absorbed from the sun to the DNA and cause damage. To determine this, we prepared samples with varying concentrations of cinnamate added to herring sperm DNA, sonicating the mixture to disperse the hydrophobic sunscreen into solution. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of the mixtures showed (i) much more sunscreen was dispersed into solution when DNA was present, and (ii) the spectra of both DNA and sunscreen differed from those of the separate solutions. We conclude that the octyl methoxycinnamate can indeed bind to DNA in aqueous solution. Energy transfer experiments from DNA to sunscreen and from sunscreen to 2-aminopurine- (a fluorescent DNA base) labeled DNA will be presented.

  19. IFI16 Preferentially Binds to DNA with Quadruplex Structure and Enhances DNA Quadruplex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hároníková, Lucia; Coufal, Jan; Kejnovská, Iva; Jagelská, Eva B.; Fojta, Miroslav; Dvořáková, Petra; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Brázda, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) is a member of the HIN-200 protein family, containing two HIN domains and one PYRIN domain. IFI16 acts as a sensor of viral and bacterial DNA and is important for innate immune responses. IFI16 binds DNA and binding has been described to be DNA length-dependent, but a preference for supercoiled DNA has also been demonstrated. Here we report a specific preference of IFI16 for binding to quadruplex DNA compared to other DNA structures. IFI16 binds to quadruplex DNA with significantly higher affinity than to the same sequence in double stranded DNA. By circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy we also demonstrated the ability of IFI16 to stabilize quadruplex structures with quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides derived from human telomere (HTEL) sequences and the MYC promotor. A novel H/D exchange mass spectrometry approach was developed to assess protein interactions with quadruplex DNA. Quadruplex DNA changed the IFI16 deuteration profile in parts of the PYRIN domain (aa 0–80) and in structurally identical parts of both HIN domains (aa 271–302 and aa 586–617) compared to single stranded or double stranded DNAs, supporting the preferential affinity of IFI16 for structured DNA. Our results reveal the importance of quadruplex DNA structure in IFI16 binding and improve our understanding of how IFI16 senses DNA. IFI16 selectivity for quadruplex structure provides a mechanistic framework for IFI16 in immunity and cellular processes including DNA damage responses and cell proliferation. PMID:27280708

  20. IFI16 Preferentially Binds to DNA with Quadruplex Structure and Enhances DNA Quadruplex Formation.

    PubMed

    Hároníková, Lucia; Coufal, Jan; Kejnovská, Iva; Jagelská, Eva B; Fojta, Miroslav; Dvořáková, Petra; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Brázda, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) is a member of the HIN-200 protein family, containing two HIN domains and one PYRIN domain. IFI16 acts as a sensor of viral and bacterial DNA and is important for innate immune responses. IFI16 binds DNA and binding has been described to be DNA length-dependent, but a preference for supercoiled DNA has also been demonstrated. Here we report a specific preference of IFI16 for binding to quadruplex DNA compared to other DNA structures. IFI16 binds to quadruplex DNA with significantly higher affinity than to the same sequence in double stranded DNA. By circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy we also demonstrated the ability of IFI16 to stabilize quadruplex structures with quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides derived from human telomere (HTEL) sequences and the MYC promotor. A novel H/D exchange mass spectrometry approach was developed to assess protein interactions with quadruplex DNA. Quadruplex DNA changed the IFI16 deuteration profile in parts of the PYRIN domain (aa 0-80) and in structurally identical parts of both HIN domains (aa 271-302 and aa 586-617) compared to single stranded or double stranded DNAs, supporting the preferential affinity of IFI16 for structured DNA. Our results reveal the importance of quadruplex DNA structure in IFI16 binding and improve our understanding of how IFI16 senses DNA. IFI16 selectivity for quadruplex structure provides a mechanistic framework for IFI16 in immunity and cellular processes including DNA damage responses and cell proliferation. PMID:27280708

  1. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Williams, Vonetta; Filippova, Maria; Filippov, Valery; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer. PMID:25340830

  2. Chemokine binding proteins: An immunomodulatory strategy going viral.

    PubMed

    González-Motos, Víctor; Kropp, Kai A; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel

    2016-08-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines whose main function is to direct cell migration. The chemokine network is highly complex and its deregulation is linked to several diseases including immunopathology, cancer and chronic pain. Chemokines also play essential roles in the antiviral immune response. Viruses have therefore developed several counter strategies to modulate chemokine activity. One of these is the expression of type I transmembrane or secreted proteins with the ability to bind chemokines and modulate their activity. These proteins, termed viral chemokine binding proteins (vCKBP), do not share sequence homology with host proteins and are immunomodulatory in vivo. In this review we describe the discovery and characterization of vCKBP, explain their role in the context of infection in vivo and discuss relevant novel findings. PMID:26987612

  3. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12242.001 PMID:26974343

  4. A Low Protein Binding Cationic Poly(2-oxazoline) as Non-Viral Vector

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhijian; Miao, Lei; Jordan, Rainer; S-Manickam, Devika; Luxenhofer, Robert; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    Developing safe and efficient non-viral gene delivery systems remains a major challenge. We present a new cationic poly(2-oxazoline) (CPOx) block copolymer for gene therapy that was synthesized by sequential polymerization of non-ionic 2-methyl-2-oxazoline and a new 2-oxazoline monomer, 2-(N-methyl, N-Boc-amino)-methyl-2-oxazoline, followed by deprotection of the pendant secondary amine groups. Upon mixing with plasmid DNA (pDNA), CPOx forms small (diameter ≈ 80 nm) and narrowly dispersed polyplexes (PDI < 0.2), which are stable upon dilution in saline and against thermal challenge. These polyplexes exhibited low plasma protein binding and very low cytotoxicity in vitro compared to the polyplexes of pDNA and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lysine) (PEG-b-PLL). CPOx/pDNA polyplexes at N/P = 5 bound considerably less plasma protein compared to polyplexes of PEG-b-PLL at the same N/P ratio. This is a unique aspect of the developed polyplexes emphasizing their potential for systemic delivery in vivo. The transfection efficiency of the polyplexes in B16 murine melanoma cells was low after 4 h but increased significantly for 10 h exposure time, indicative of slow internalization of polyplexes. Addition of Pluronic P85 boosted the transfection using CPOx/pDNA polyplexes considerably. The low protein binding of CPOx/pDNA polyplexes is particularly interesting for the future development of targeted gene delivery. PMID:25846127

  5. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  6. Viral evasion of intracellular DNA and RNA sensing.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ying Kai; Gack, Michaela U

    2016-06-01

    The co-evolution of viruses with their hosts has led to the emergence of viral pathogens that are adept at evading or actively suppressing host immunity. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are key components of antiviral immunity that detect conserved molecular features of viral pathogens and initiate signalling that results in the expression of antiviral genes. In this Review, we discuss the strategies that viruses use to escape immune surveillance by key intracellular sensors of viral RNA or DNA, with a focus on RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) and interferon-γ (IFNγ)-inducible protein 16 (IFI16). Such viral strategies include the sequestration or modification of viral nucleic acids, interference with specific post-translational modifications of PRRs or their adaptor proteins, the degradation or cleavage of PRRs or their adaptors, and the sequestration or relocalization of PRRs. An understanding of viral immune-evasion mechanisms at the molecular level may guide the development of vaccines and antivirals. PMID:27174148

  7. Free-radical-mediated DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J

    1985-01-01

    Free-radical metabolites can be generated metabolically by a one-electron reductase-catalyzed reaction or a "peroxidase" catalyzed oxidation or by photoactivation of a wide variety of aromatic xenobiotics. Radicals may also be generated during lipid peroxidation. Some radicals can react with DNA or bind covalently or noncovalently as a dismutation product or as a dimer, trimer or polymeric product. Modification to the DNA can result in single-strand breaks, loss of template activity, and crosslinking. The binding can prevent enzymic digestion. In some cases, the radicals react with oxygen, resulting before conversion to DNA reactive oxygen species. Most radicals probably do not interact with DNA. PMID:3007090

  8. The Viral DNA Packaging Motor of Bacteriophage Lambda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Carlos E.

    2007-03-01

    Terminase enzymes are common to both eukaryotic and prokaryotic double-stranded DNA viruses. These enzymes, which serve as molecular motors that selectively ``package'' viral DNA into a pre-formed procapsid structure, are among the most powerful biological motors characterized to date. Bacteriophage lambda terminase is a heteroligomer composed of gpA and gpNu1 subunits. The smaller gpNu1 subunit is required for specific recognition of viral DNA, a process that is modulated by ATP. The gpA subunit possesses site-specific nuclease and helicase activities that ``mature'' the viral genome prior to packaging. The subunit further possesses a DNA translocase activity that is central to the packaging motor complex. Discrete ATPase sites in gpA modulate the DNA maturation reactions and fuel the DNA packaging reaction. Kinetic characterization of lambda terminase indicates significant interaction between the multiple catalytic sites of the enzyme and has led to a minimal kinetic model describing the assembly of a catalytically-competent packaging motor complex. Biophysical studies demonstrate that purified lambda terminase forms a homogenous, heterotrimeric structure consisting of one gpA subunit in association with two gpNu1 proteins. Four heterotrimers further assemble into a ring-like structure of sufficient size to encircle duplex DNA. The ensemble of data suggests that the ring tetramer represents the biologically relevant, catalytically-competent motor complex responsible for genome processing and packaging reactions. We present a model for the functional DNA packaging motor complex that finds general utility in our global understanding of the enzymology of virus assembly.

  9. DNA Scrunching in the Packaging of Viral Genomes.

    PubMed

    Waters, James T; Kim, Harold D; Gumbart, James C; Lu, Xiang-Jun; Harvey, Stephen C

    2016-07-01

    The motors that drive double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes into viral capsids are among the strongest of all biological motors for which forces have been measured, but it is not known how they generate force. We previously proposed that the DNA is not a passive substrate but that it plays an active role in force generation. This "scrunchworm hypothesis" holds that the motor proteins repeatedly dehydrate and rehydrate the DNA, which then undergoes cyclic shortening and lengthening motions. These are captured by a coupled protein-DNA grip-and-release cycle to rectify the motion and translocate the DNA into the capsid. In this study, we examined the interactions of dsDNA with the dodecameric connector protein of bacteriophage ϕ29, using molecular dynamics simulations on four different DNA sequences, starting from two different conformations (A-DNA and B-DNA). In all four simulations starting with the protein equilibrated with A-DNA in the channel, we observed transitions to a common, metastable, highly scrunched conformation, designated A*. This conformation is very similar to one recently reported by Kumar and Grubmüller in much longer MD simulations on B-DNA docked into the ϕ29 connector. These results are significant for four reasons. First, the scrunched conformations occur spontaneously, without requiring lever-like protein motions often believed to be necessary for DNA translocation. Second, the transition takes place within the connector, providing the location of the putative "dehydrator". Third, the protein has more contacts with one strand of the DNA than with the other; the former was identified in single-molecule laser tweezer experiments as the "load-bearing strand". Finally, the spontaneity of the DNA-protein interaction suggests that it may play a role in the initial docking of DNA in motors like that of T4 that can load and package any sequence. PMID:27214211

  10. DNA Bending is Induced in an Enhancer by the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus E2 Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskaluk, Christopher; Bastia, Deepak

    1988-03-01

    The E2 gene of bovine papillomavirus type 1 has been shown to encode a DNA-binding protein and to trans-activate the viral enhancer. We have localized the DNA-binding domain of the E2 protein to the carboxyl-terminal 126 amino acids of the E2 open reading frame. The DNA-binding domain has been expressed in Escherichia coli and partially purified. Gel retardation and DNase I ``footprinting'' on the bovine papillomavirus type 1 enhancer identify the sequence motif ACCN6GGT (in which N = any nucleotide) as the E2 binding site. Using electrophoretic methods we have shown that the DNA-binding domain changes conformation of the enhancer by inducing significant DNA bending.

  11. N-ethylmaleimide inhibition of the DNA-binding activity of the herpes simplex virus type 1 major DNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyechan, W.T. )

    1988-03-01

    The major herpes simplex virus DNA-binding protein, designated ICP8, binds tightly to single-stranded DNA and is required for replication of viral DNA. The sensitivity of the DNA-binding activity of ICP8 to the action of the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide has been examined by using nitrocellulose filter-binding and agarose gel electrophoresis assays. Incubation of ICP8 with N-ethylmaleimide results in a rapid loss of DNA-binding activity. Preincubation of ICP8 with single-stranded DNA markedly inhibits this loss of binding activity. These results imply that a free sulfhydryl group is involved in the interaction of ICP8 with single-stranded DNA and that this sulfhydryl group becomes less accessible to the environment upon binding. Agarose gel electrophoretic analysis of the binding interaction in the presence and absence of N-ethylmaleimide indicates that the cooperative binding exhibited by ICP8 is lost upon treatment with this reagent but that some residual noncooperative binding may remain. This last result was confirmed by equilibrium dialysis experiments with the {sup 32}P-labeled oligonucleotide dT{sub 10} and native and N-ethylmaleimide-treated ICP8.

  12. An RNA Domain Imparts Specificity and Selectivity to a Viral DNA Packaging Motor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Jardine, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    molecular motor that translocates the viral DNA into a preformed viral shell. A key event in DNA packaging is recognition of the viral DNA among other nucleic acids in the host cell. Commonly, a DNA-binding protein mediates the interaction of viral DNA with the motor/head shell. Here we show that for the bacteriophage ϕ29, this essential step of genome recognition is mediated by a viral genome-encoded RNA rather than a protein. A domain of the prohead RNA (pRNA) imparts specificity and stringency to the motor by ensuring the correct orientation of DNA packaging and restricting initiation to a single event. Since this assembly step is unique to the virus, DNA packaging is a novel target for the development of antiviral drugs. PMID:26423956

  13. Viral receptor-binding site antibodies with diverse germline origins

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Aaron G.; Therkelsen, Matthew D.; Stewart, Shaun; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Haynes, Barton F.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines for rapidly evolving pathogens will confer lasting immunity if they elicit antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes, such as a receptor-binding site (RBS). From characteristics of an influenza-virus RBS-directed antibody, we devised a signature motif to search for similar antibodies. We identified, from three vaccinees, over 100 candidates encoded by eleven different VH genes. Crystal structures show that antibodies in this class engage the hemagglutinin RBS and mimic binding of the receptor, sialic acid, by supplying a critical dipeptide on their projecting, heavy-chain third complementarity determining region. They share contacts with conserved, receptor-binding residues but contact different residues on the RBS periphery, limiting the likelihood of viral escape when several such antibodies are present. These data show that related modes of RBS recognition can arise from different germline origins and mature through diverse affinity maturation pathways. Immunogens focused on an RBS-directed response will thus have a broad range of B-cell targets. PMID:25959776

  14. Viral receptor-binding site antibodies with diverse germline origins.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Aaron G; Therkelsen, Matthew D; Stewart, Shaun; Kepler, Thomas B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Haynes, Barton F; Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-21

    Vaccines for rapidly evolving pathogens will confer lasting immunity if they elicit antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes, such as a receptor-binding site (RBS). From characteristics of an influenza-virus RBS-directed antibody, we devised a signature motif to search for similar antibodies. We identified, from three vaccinees, over 100 candidates encoded by 11 different VH genes. Crystal structures show that antibodies in this class engage the hemagglutinin RBS and mimic binding of the receptor, sialic acid, by supplying a critical dipeptide on their projecting, heavy-chain third complementarity determining region. They share contacts with conserved, receptor-binding residues but contact different residues on the RBS periphery, limiting the likelihood of viral escape when several such antibodies are present. These data show that related modes of RBS recognition can arise from different germline origins and mature through diverse affinity maturation pathways. Immunogens focused on an RBS-directed response will thus have a broad range of B cell targets. PMID:25959776

  15. Pin1 Interacts with the Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Polymerase Catalytic Subunit and Regulates Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Yohei; Ryo, Akihide; Kawashima, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Kanda, Teru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (Pin1) protein is known as a regulator which recognizes phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and increases the rate of cis and trans amide isomer interconversion, thereby altering the conformation of its substrates. We found that Pin1 knockdown using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology resulted in strong suppression of productive Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA replication. We further identified the EBV DNA polymerase catalytic subunit, BALF5, as a Pin1 substrate in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays. Lambda protein phosphatase treatment abolished the binding of BALF5 to Pin1, and mutation analysis of BALF5 revealed that replacement of the Thr178 residue by Ala (BALF5 T178A) disrupted the interaction with Pin1. To further test the effects of Pin1 in the context of virus infection, we constructed a BALF5-deficient recombinant virus. Exogenous supply of wild-type BALF5 in HEK293 cells with knockout recombinant EBV allowed efficient synthesis of viral genome DNA, but BALF5 T178A could not provide support as efficiently as wild-type BALF5. In conclusion, we found that EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 subunit interacts with Pin1 through BALF5 Thr178 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Pin1 might modulate EBV DNA polymerase conformation for efficient, productive viral DNA replication. PMID:23221557

  16. Cytomegalovirus in urine: detection of viral DNA by sandwich hybridization.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, M; Syvänen, A C; Oram, J; Söderlund, H; Ranki, M

    1984-12-01

    A cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific sandwich hybridization test was constructed by using two adjacent BamHI DNA fragments of CMV DNA as reagents. The fragments were cloned into two different vectors. One of the recombinants was attached to the filter, and the other was the labeled probe. When present in the sample, CMV DNA mediated labeling of the filter by hybridizing to both the filter-bound DNA and the probe. The sandwich hybridization test was applied for the detection of CMV DNA from urine. DNA was released from virus by 2% Sarkosyl, concentrated by 2-butanol extraction and isopropanol precipitation, denatured, and finally subjected to the sandwich hybridization test. As a result, 70 to 90% of the original viral DNA could be recovered and demonstrated by the quantitative hybridization reaction. Urine could be stored at room temperature in Sarkosyl for at least 2 days without affecting the detectability of CMV. The clinical applicability of the test was evaluated by studying urine samples from four infants excreting CMV. Sandwich hybridization demonstrated the presence of CMV DNA in all of the specimens. These contained originally 10(5) to 10(8) CMV DNA molecules per ml. PMID:6097598

  17. Competitive binding of viral E2 protein and mammalian core-binding factor to transcriptional control sequences of human papillomavirus type 8 and bovine papillomavirus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, H M; Steger, G; Pfister, H

    1997-01-01

    The promoter P7535 of human papillomavirus type 8 and the promoter P7185 of bovine papillomavirus type 1 are negatively regulated by viral E2 proteins via the promoter proximal binding sites P2 and BS1, respectively. Mutations of these E2 binding sites can reduce basal promoter activity. This suggests binding of a transcription-stimulating factor and may indicate that repression by E2 is due to competitive binding of viral and cellular proteins. A computer search revealed putative binding sites for core-binding factor (CBF; also referred to as PEA2, PEBP2, or AML), overlapping with P2 and BS1. Binding of recombinant CBF proteins to these sites was confirmed by band shift analysis. Competition of CBF and E2 protein for DNA binding was shown for both human papillomavirus type 8 and bovine papillomavirus type 1. The importance of CBF-E2 competition in E2-mediated repression could be demonstrated by comparing the E2 effect on P7185 activity in two cell lines containing different amounts of endogenous CBF. In cells with large amounts of CBF, E2 repressed P7185 wild-type constructs to the basal promoter activity of a mutant (50%) that could not bind this protein any more. In contrast, in a cell line containing small amounts of CBF, the promoter activities of constructs with wild-type and mutated CBF binding sites hardly differed and specific repression by E2 was not detectable. PMID:9311900

  18. Aminoglycoside binding to Oxytricha Nova Telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Nihar; Andreasen, Katrine F.; Kumar, Sunil; Hyde-volpe, David; Arya, Dev P.

    2012-01-01

    Telomeric DNA sequences have been at the center stage of drug design for cancer treatment in recent years. The ability of these DNA structures to form four stranded nucleic acid structures, called G-quadruplexes, has been perceived as target for inhibiting telomerase activity vital for the longevity of cancer cells. Being highly diverse in structural forms, these G-quadruplexes are subjects of detailed studies of ligand–DNA interactions of different classes, which will pave the way for logical design of more potent ligands in future. The binding of aminoglycosides were investigated with Oxytricha Nova quadruplex forming DNA sequence (GGGGTTTTGGGG)2. Isothermal Titration calorimetry (ITC) determined ligand to quadruplex binding ratio shows 1:1 neomycin:quadruplex binding with association constants (Ka ) ~ 105M−1 while paromomycin was found to have a two-fold weaker affinity than neomycin. The CD titration experiments with neomycin resulted in minimal changes in the CD signal. FID assays, performed to determine the minimum concentration required to displace half of the fluorescent probe bound, showed neomycin as the best of the all aminoglycosides studied for quadruplex binding. Initial NMR footprint suggests that ligand-DNA interactions occur in the wide groove of the quadruplex. Computational docking studies also indicate that aminoglycosides bind in the wide groove of the quadruplex. PMID:20886815

  19. A conserved binding site within the Tomato golden mosaic virus AL-1629 promoter is necessary for expression of viral genes important for pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu Jun; Sunter, Garry

    2007-10-10

    We have identified a nine base pair sequence in Tomato golden mosaic virus that is required for binding of nuclear proteins from tobacco and Arabidopsis to viral DNA. The sequence is located within the promoter for a 0.7 kb complementary sense mRNA (AL-1629). Mutation of the binding site results in a two- to six-fold reduction in the accumulation of AL-1629 mRNA, leading to reduced AL2 and AL3 gene expression. Viral sequences located immediately adjacent to the core binding site appear to influence AL2 and AL3 expression, but retain some binding affinity to a soluble host protein(s). The ability of a nuclear protein(s) to bind sequences within the AL-1629 promoter correlates with efficient viral DNA replication, as mutation of these sequences results in reduced viral DNA levels. Analysis of begomo- and curtoviruses indicates extensive conservation of this binding site, which suggests a common mechanism regulating expression of two viral genes involved in replication and suppression of host defense responses.

  20. DNA Origami Seesaws as Comparative Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Philipp C; Høiberg, Hans C; Simmel, Stephanie S; Holzmeister, Phil; Tinnefeld, Philip; Liedl, Tim

    2016-06-16

    The application of commonly used force spectroscopy in biological systems is often limited by the need for an invasive tether connecting the molecules of interest to a bead or cantilever tip. Here we present a DNA origami-based prototype in a comparative binding assay. It has the advantage of in situ readout without any physical connection to the macroscopic world. The seesaw-like structure has a lever that is able to move freely relative to its base. Binding partners on each side force the structure into discrete and distinguishable conformations. Model experiments with competing DNA hybridisation reactions yielded a drastic shift towards the conformation with the stronger binding interaction. With reference DNA duplexes of tuneable length on one side, this device can be used to measure ligand interactions in comparative assays. PMID:27038073

  1. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    PubMed Central

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-01-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2–24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:10823919

  2. The functional interactome of PYHIN immune regulators reveals IFIX is a sensor of viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Diner, Benjamin A; Li, Tuo; Greco, Todd M; Crow, Marni S; Fuesler, John A; Wang, Jennifer; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-01-01

    The human PYHIN proteins, AIM2, IFI16, IFIX, and MNDA, are critical regulators of immune response, transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle. However, their protein interactions and underlying mechanisms remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we provide the interaction network for all PYHIN proteins and define a function in sensing of viral DNA for the previously uncharacterized IFIX protein. By designing a cell-based inducible system and integrating microscopy, immunoaffinity capture, quantitative mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics, we identify over 300 PYHIN interactions reflective of diverse functions, including DNA damage response, transcription regulation, intracellular signaling, and antiviral response. In view of the IFIX interaction with antiviral factors, including nuclear PML bodies, we further characterize IFIX and demonstrate its function in restricting herpesvirus replication. We discover that IFIX detects viral DNA in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, binding foreign DNA via its HIN domain in a sequence-non-specific manner. Furthermore, IFIX contributes to the induction of interferon response. Our results highlight the value of integrative proteomics in deducing protein function and establish IFIX as an antiviral DNA sensor important for mounting immune responses. PMID:25665578

  3. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  4. Viral terminal protein directs early organization of phage DNA replication at the bacterial nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Holguera, Isabel; Ballesteros-Plaza, David; Carballido-López, Rut; Salas, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism leading to protein-primed DNA replication has been studied extensively in vitro. However, little is known about the in vivo organization of the proteins involved in this fundamental process. Here we show that the terminal proteins (TPs) of phages ϕ29 and PRD1, infecting the distantly related bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, respectively, associate with the host bacterial nucleoid independently of other viral-encoded proteins. Analyses of phage ϕ29 revealed that the TP N-terminal domain (residues 1–73) possesses sequence-independent DNA-binding capacity and is responsible for its nucleoid association. Importantly, we show that in the absence of the TP N-terminal domain the efficiency of ϕ29 DNA replication is severely affected. Moreover, the TP recruits the phage DNA polymerase to the bacterial nucleoid, and both proteins later are redistributed to enlarged helix-like structures in an MreB cytoskeleton-dependent way. These data disclose a key function for the TP in vivo: organizing the early viral DNA replication machinery at the cell nucleoid. PMID:20823229

  5. C60 fullerene binding to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes have attracted considerable attention in various areas of science and technology. Owing to their exceptional physical, chemical, and biological properties, they have many applications, particularly in cosmetic and medical products. Using the Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function and the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic surface densities, we determine the binding energies of a C60 fullerene with respect to both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules. We assume that all configurations are in a vacuum and that the C60 fullerene is initially at rest. Double integrals are performed to determine the interaction energy of the system. We find that the C60 fullerene binds to the double-strand DNA molecule, at either the major or minor grooves, with binding energies of -4.7 eV or -2.3 eV, respectively, and that the C60 molecule binds to the single-strand DNA molecule with a binding energy of -1.6 eV. Our results suggest that the C60 molecule is most likely to be linked to the major groove of the dsDNA molecule.

  6. Novel enzyme immunoassay and optimized DNA extraction for the detection of polymerase-chain-reaction-amplified viral DNA from paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Merkelbach, S.; Gehlen, J.; Handt, S.; Füzesi, L.

    1997-01-01

    Four different DNA extraction methods were compared to determine their ability to provide DNA for amplification of viral sequences from paraffin-embedded human tissue samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The suitability of extraction methods was assessed using parameters like DNA yield, length of recovered DNA fragments, and duration. Furthermore, the efficiency of amplifying a human single-copy gene, the beta-globin gene, from DNA samples was tested. The best preservation of DNA molecules could be achieved by binding the DNA onto a silica column before further purification. Viral DNA sequences could be amplified by PCR in DNA extracted from routinely processed paraffin blocks from cases with clinically or morphologically suspected cytomegalovirus or Epstein-Barr virus infections. The PCR products were specified by a novel liquid hybridization assay called PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Using this assay, the time-consuming Southern hybridization could be replaced and the time requirement for the detection of PCR products could be reduced from 1 day to 4 hours. The assay system described here represents a reliable, sensitive, and specific method for the detection of viral DNA from paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9137080

  7. DNA Triplexes That Bind Several Cofactor Molecules.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Sven; Richert, Clemens

    2015-12-14

    Cofactors are critical for energy-consuming processes in the cell. Harnessing such processes for practical applications requires control over the concentration of cofactors. We have recently shown that DNA triplex motifs with a designed binding site can be used to capture and release nucleotides with low micromolar dissociation constants. In order to increase the storage capacity of such triplex motifs, we have explored the limits of ligand binding through designed cavities in the oligopurine tract. Oligonucleotides with up to six non-nucleotide bridges between purines were synthesized and their ability to bind ATP, cAMP or FAD was measured. Triplex motifs with several single-nucleotide binding sites were found to bind purines more tightly than triplexes with one large binding site. The optimized triplex consists of 59 residues and four C3-bridges. It can bind up to four equivalents of ligand with apparent Kd values of 52 µM for ATP, 9 µM for FAD, and 2 µM for cAMP. An immobilized version fuels bioluminescence via release of ATP at body temperature. These results show that motifs for high-density capture, storage and release of energy-rich biomolecules can be constructed from synthetic DNA. PMID:26561335

  8. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA. PMID:27599637

  9. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA. PMID:27599637

  10. Evolution of Protein-binding DNA Sequences through Competitive Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weiqun; Gerland, Ulrich; Hwa, Terence; Levine, Herbert

    2002-03-01

    The dynamics of in vitro DNA evolution controlled via competitive binding of DNA sequences to proteins has been explored in a recent serial transfer experiment footnote B. Dubertret, S.Liu, Q. Ouyang, A. Libchaber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 6022 (2001).. Motivated by the experiment, we investigate a continuum model for this evolution process in various parameter regimes. We establish a self-consistent mean-field evolution equation, determine its dynamical properties and finite population size corrections. In addition, we discuss the experimental implications of our results.

  11. Gel mobility shift assays for RNA binding viral RNAi suppressors.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Tibor; Burgyán, József

    2011-01-01

    The host-virus interaction is a continuous coevolutionary race involving both host defence strategies and virus escape mechanisms. RNA silencing is one of the main processes employed by eukaryotic organisms to fight viruses. However, viruses encode suppressor proteins to counteract this antiviral mechanism. Virtually all plant viruses encode at least one suppressor. In spite of being highly diverse at the protein level, a large group of these proteins inhibit RNA silencing very similarly, by sequestration of double-stranded RNA or small-interfering RNA molecules, the central players of the pathway. The RNA binding capacity of virus suppressor proteins can be studied by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay method. Also known as gel retardation assay, gel mobility assay, gel shift assay or band shift assay, EMSA is an in vitro technique used to characterize protein:DNA or protein:RNA interactions. The method had been developed based on the observation that protein: nucleic acid complexes migrate slower through a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel than the free nucleic acid fragments. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the analysis of crucifer-infecting Tobacco mosaic tobamovirus (cr-TMV) silencing suppressor protein p122 RNA binding capacity. PMID:21431690

  12. CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage of viral DNA efficiently suppresses hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Ramanan, Vyas; Shlomai, Amir; Cox, David B.T.; Schwartz, Robert E.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Bhatta, Ankit; Scott, David A.; Zhang, Feng; Rice, Charles M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent, deadly, and seldom cured due to the persistence of viral episomal DNA (cccDNA) in infected cells. Newly developed genome engineering tools may offer the ability to directly cleave viral DNA, thereby promoting viral clearance. Here, we show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can specifically target and cleave conserved regions in the HBV genome, resulting in robust suppression of viral gene expression and replication. Upon sustained expression of Cas9 and appropriately chosen guide RNAs, we demonstrate cleavage of cccDNA by Cas9 and a dramatic reduction in both cccDNA and other parameters of viral gene expression and replication. Thus, we show that directly targeting viral episomal DNA is a novel therapeutic approach to control the virus and possibly cure patients. PMID:26035283

  13. Targeted transfection and expression of hepatitis B viral DNA in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, T J; Makdisi, W J; Sun, S; Hasegawa, K; Zhang, Y; Wands, J R; Wu, C H; Wu, G Y

    1993-01-01

    A soluble DNA carrier system consisting of an asialoglycoprotein covalently linked to poly-L-lysine was used to bind DNA and deliver hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA constructs to asialoglycoprotein receptor-positive human hepatoma cells. 4 d after transfection with surface or core gene expression constructs, HBsAg and HBeAg in the media were measured to be 16 ng/ml and 32 U/ml per 10(7) cells, respectively. Antigen production was completely inhibited by the addition of an excess of asialoorosomucoid. On the other hand, asialoglycoprotein receptor-negative human hepatoma cells, SK-Hep1, did not produce any viral antigens under identical conditions after incubation with HBV DNA complexed to a conjugate composed of asialoorosomucoid and poly-L-lysine. Using a complete HBV genome construct, HBsAg and HBeAg levels reached 16 ng/ml and 16 U/ml per 10(7) cells, respectively. Northern blots revealed characteristic HBV RNA transcripts including 3.5-, 2.4-, and 2.1-kb fragments. Intracellular and extracellular HBV DNA sequences including relaxed circular, linear and single stranded forms were detected by Southern blot hybridization. Finally, 42-nm Dane particles purified from the spent cultures medium were visualized by electron microscopy. This study demonstrates that a targetable DNA carrier system can transfect HBV DNA in vitro resulting in the production of complete HBV virions. Images PMID:8383700

  14. Synthetic DNA vaccine strategies against persistent viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Talbott, Kendra T; Choo, Daniel K; Shedlock, Devon J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    The human body has developed an elaborate defense system against microbial pathogens and foreign antigens. However, particular microbes have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to evade immune surveillance, allowing persistence within the human host. In an effort to combat such infections, intensive research has focused on the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic countermeasures to suppress or clear persistent viral infections. To date, popular therapeutic strategies have included the use of live-attenuated microbes, viral vectors and dendritic-cell vaccines aiming to help suppress or clear infection. In recent years, improved DNA vaccines have now re-emerged as a promising candidate for therapeutic intervention due to the development of advanced optimization and delivery technologies. For instance, genetic optimization of synthetic plasmid constructs and their encoded antigens, in vivo electroporation-mediated vaccine delivery, as well as codelivery with molecular adjuvants have collectively enhanced both transgene expression and the elicitation of vaccine-induced immunity. In addition, the development of potent heterologous prime–boost regimens has also provided significant contributions to DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Herein, the authors will focus on these recent improvements to this synthetic platform in relation to their application in combating persistent virus infection. PMID:23659301

  15. Nucleotides in the polyomavirus enhancer that control viral transcription and DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W J; Berger, S L; Triezenberg, S J; Folk, W R

    1987-01-01

    The polyomavirus enhancer is required in cis for high-level expression of the viral early region and for replication of the viral genome. We introduced multiple mutations in the enhancer which reduced transcription and DNA replication. Polyomaviruses with these mutant enhancers formed very small plaques in whole mouse embryo cells. Revertants of the viral mutants were isolated and characterized. Reversion occurred by any of the following events: restoration of guanosines at nucleotide (nt) 5134 and nt 5140 within the adenovirus 5 E1A enhancer core AGGAAGTGACT; acquisition of an A----G mutation at nt 5258, which is the same mutation that enables polyomavirus to grow in embryonal carcinoma F9 cells; duplication of mutated sequences between nt 5146 and 5292 (including sequences homologous with immunoglobulin G, simian virus 40, and bovine papillomavirus enhancer elements). Reversion restored both the replicative and transcriptional functions of the viruses. Revertants that acquired the F9 mutation at nt 5258 grew at least 20-fold better than the original mutant in whole mouse embryo cells, but replicated only marginally better than the original mutant in 3T6 cells. Viruses with a reversion of the mutation at nt 5140 replicated equally well in both types of cells. Since individual nucleotides in the polyomavirus enhancer simultaneously altered DNA replication and transcription in specific cell types, it is likely that these processes rely upon a common element, such as an enhancer-binding protein. Images PMID:3037332

  16. Human Papilloma Viral DNA Replicates as a Stable Episome in Cultured Epidermal Keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, Robert F.; Taichman, Lorne B.

    1982-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is poorly understood because systems for its growth in tissue culture have not been developed. We report here that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes could be infected with HPV from plantar warts and that the viral DNA persisted and replicated as a stable episome. There were 50-200 copies of viral DNA per cell and there was no evidence to indicate integration of viral DNA into the cellular genome. There was also no evidence to suggest that viral DNA underwent productive replication. We conclude that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes may be a model for the study of certain aspects of HPV biology.

  17. Asymmetric Assembly of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T-Antigen Origin Binding Domains at the Viral Origin

    SciTech Connect

    C Harrison; G Meinke; H Kwun; H Rogalin; P Phelan; P Bullock; Y Chang; P Moore; A Bohm

    2011-12-31

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be {approx} 740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  18. Sequence requirement for specific interaction of an enhancer binding protein (EBP1) with DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, L; Hay, R T

    1989-01-01

    Short DNA sequence motifs have been identified in viral and cellular enhancers which represent the binding sites for a variety of trans- acting factors. One such HeLa cell factor, EBP1, has been purified and shown to bind to sequences in the SV40 enhancer. The PRDII element in the human beta-interferon gene regulatory element (IRE) shows strong sequence similarity to the EBP1 binding site in the SV40 enhancer. We demonstrate here that EBP1 binds to its sites in the SV40 enhancer and IRE in a similar manner, making base specific contacts over one complete turn of the DNA double helix. Mutational analysis of the EBP1 sites in the IRE and SV40 enhancer has identified the DNA sequence requirements necessary for specific EBP1/DNA complex formation. In addition, 34 DNA sequences related to the EBP1 binding site were analysed for their ability to bind EBP1. Sequences constituting high affinity binding sites possess the sequence 5'-GG(N)6CC-3'. Single base pair changes in the region between the conserved Gs and Cs can generally be tolerated although it is clear that these intervening bases contribute to binding affinity. Mutations in the recognition site which could lead to gross structural changes in the DNA abolish EBP1 binding. Images PMID:2536920

  19. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  20. AbdB-like Hox proteins stabilize DNA binding by the Meis1 homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W F; Montgomery, J C; Rozenfeld, S; Moskow, J J; Lawrence, H J; Buchberg, A M; Largman, C

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies show that Hox homeodomain proteins from paralog groups 1 to 10 gain DNA binding specificity and affinity through cooperative binding with the divergent homeodomain protein Pbx1. However, the AbdB-like Hox proteins from paralogs 11, 12, and 13 do not interact with Pbx1a, raising the possibility of different protein partners. The Meis1 homeobox gene has 44% identity to Pbx within the homeodomain and was identified as a common site of viral integration in myeloid leukemias arising in BXH-2 mice. These integrations result in constitutive activation of Meis1. Furthermore, the Hoxa-9 gene is frequently activated by viral integration in the same BXH-2 leukemias, suggesting a biological synergy between these two distinct classes of homeodomain proteins in causing malignant transformation. We now show that the Hoxa-9 protein physically interacts with Meis1 proteins by forming heterodimeric binding complexes on a DNA target containing a Meis1 site (TGACAG) and an AbdB-like Hox site (TTTTACGAC). Hox proteins from the other AbdB-like paralogs, Hoxa-10, Hoxa-11, Hoxd-12, and Hoxb-13, also form DNA binding complexes with Meis1b, while Hox proteins from other paralogs do not appear to interact with Meis1 proteins. DNA binding complexes formed by Meis1 with Hox proteins dissociate much more slowly than DNA complexes with Meis1 alone, suggesting that Hox proteins stabilize the interactions of Meis1 proteins with their DNA targets. PMID:9343407

  1. AbdB-like Hox proteins stabilize DNA binding by the Meis1 homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, W F; Montgomery, J C; Rozenfeld, S; Moskow, J J; Lawrence, H J; Buchberg, A M; Largman, C

    1997-11-01

    Recent studies show that Hox homeodomain proteins from paralog groups 1 to 10 gain DNA binding specificity and affinity through cooperative binding with the divergent homeodomain protein Pbx1. However, the AbdB-like Hox proteins from paralogs 11, 12, and 13 do not interact with Pbx1a, raising the possibility of different protein partners. The Meis1 homeobox gene has 44% identity to Pbx within the homeodomain and was identified as a common site of viral integration in myeloid leukemias arising in BXH-2 mice. These integrations result in constitutive activation of Meis1. Furthermore, the Hoxa-9 gene is frequently activated by viral integration in the same BXH-2 leukemias, suggesting a biological synergy between these two distinct classes of homeodomain proteins in causing malignant transformation. We now show that the Hoxa-9 protein physically interacts with Meis1 proteins by forming heterodimeric binding complexes on a DNA target containing a Meis1 site (TGACAG) and an AbdB-like Hox site (TTTTACGAC). Hox proteins from the other AbdB-like paralogs, Hoxa-10, Hoxa-11, Hoxd-12, and Hoxb-13, also form DNA binding complexes with Meis1b, while Hox proteins from other paralogs do not appear to interact with Meis1 proteins. DNA binding complexes formed by Meis1 with Hox proteins dissociate much more slowly than DNA complexes with Meis1 alone, suggesting that Hox proteins stabilize the interactions of Meis1 proteins with their DNA targets. PMID:9343407

  2. Programmable DNA-binding Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Meghan S.; Melander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant gene expression is responsible for a myriad of human diseases from infectious diseases to cancer. Precise regulation of these genes via specific interactions with the DNA double helix could pave the way for novel therapeutics. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamides are small molecules capable of binding to pre-determined DNA sequences up to 16 base pairs with affinity and specificity comparable to natural transcription factors. In the three decades since their development, great strides have been made relating to synthetic accessibility and improved sequence specificity and binding affinity. This perspective presents a brief history of early seminal developments in the field and highlights recent reports of the utility of polyamides as both genetic modulators and molecular probes. PMID:23665141

  3. Characterization of a baculovirus lacking the DBP (DNA-binding protein) gene

    PubMed Central

    Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Mikhailov, Victor S.; Rohrmann, George F.

    2009-01-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes two proteins that possess properties typical of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs), late expression factor-3 (LEF-3), and a protein referred to as DNA-binding protein (DBP). Whereas LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein essential for viral DNA replication, transporting helicase into the nucleus, and forms a stable complex with the baculovirus alkaline nuclease, the role for DBP in baculovirus replication remains unclear. Therefore, to better understand the functional role of DBP in viral replication, a DBP knockout virus was generated from an AcMNPV bacmid and analyzed. The results of a growth curve analysis indicated that the dbp knockout construct was unable to produce budded virus indicating that dbp is essential. The lack of DBP does not cause a general shutdown of the expression of viral genes, as was revealed by accumulation of early (LEF-3), late (VP39), and very late (P10) proteins in cells transfected with the dbp knockout construct. To investigate the role of DBP in DNA replication, a real-time PCR-based assay was employed and showed that, although viral DNA synthesis occurred in cells transfected with the dbp knockout, the levels were less than that of the control virus suggesting that DBP is required for normal levels of DNA synthesis or for stability of nascent viral DNA. In addition, analysis of the viral DNA replicated by the dbp knockout by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis failed to detect the presence of genome-length DNA. Furthermore, analysis of DBP from infected cells indicated that similar to LEF-3, DBP was tightly bound to viral chromatin. Assessment of the cellular localization of DBP relative to replicated viral DNA by immunoelectron microscopy indicated that, at 24 hours post-infection, DBP co-localized with replicated DNA at distinct electron-dense regions within the nucleus. Finally, immunoelectron microscopic analysis of cells transfected with the dbp

  4. Characterization of a baculovirus lacking the DBP (DNA-binding protein) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Mikhailov, Victor S.; Rohrmann, George F. . E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-08-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes two proteins that possess properties typical of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs), late expression factor-3 (LEF-3), and a protein referred to as DNA-binding protein (DBP). Whereas LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein essential for viral DNA replication, transporting helicase into the nucleus, and forms a stable complex with the baculovirus alkaline nuclease, the role for DBP in baculovirus replication remains unclear. Therefore, to better understand the functional role of DBP in viral replication, a DBP knockout virus was generated from an AcMNPV bacmid and analyzed. The results of a growth curve analysis indicated that the dbp knockout construct was unable to produce budded virus indicating that dbp is essential. The lack of DBP does not cause a general shutdown of the expression of viral genes, as was revealed by accumulation of early (LEF-3), late (VP39), and very late (P10) proteins in cells transfected with the dbp knockout construct. To investigate the role of DBP in DNA replication, a real-time PCR-based assay was employed and showed that, although viral DNA synthesis occurred in cells transfected with the dbp knockout, the levels were less than that of the control virus suggesting that DBP is required for normal levels of DNA synthesis or for stability of nascent viral DNA. In addition, analysis of the viral DNA replicated by the dbp knockout by using field inversion gel electrophoresis failed to detect the presence of genome-length DNA. Furthermore, analysis of DBP from infected cells indicated that similar to LEF-3, DBP was tightly bound to viral chromatin. Assessment of the cellular localization of DBP relative to replicated viral DNA by immunoelectron microscopy indicated that, at 24 h post-infection, DBP co-localized with nascent DNA at distinct electron-dense regions within the nucleus. Finally, immunoelectron microscopic analysis of cells transfected with the dbp knockout

  5. DNA Triplexes That Bind Several Cofactor Molecules.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Sven; Richert, Clemens

    2015-12-14

    Invited for the cover of this issue are Sven Vollmer and Clemens Richert of the University of Stuttgart. The cover image hints at the analogy between a honey comb, as a macroscopic storage device, and DNA triplexes with designed binding sites, as molecular storage motifs that can release ATP to fuel a bioluminescence reaction. Read the full text of the article at 10.1002/chem.201503220. PMID:26534779

  6. DNA-aptamers binding aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Nadia; Strehlitz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given. PMID:24566637

  7. Epigenetic control of viral life-cycle by a DNA-methylation dependent transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Flower, Kirsty; Thomas, David; Heather, James; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Jones, Susan; Sinclair, Alison J

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded transcription factor Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1) is the prototype of a class of transcription factor (including C/EBPalpha) that interact with CpG-containing DNA response elements in a methylation-dependent manner. The EBV genome undergoes a biphasic methylation cycle; it is extensively methylated during viral latency but is reset to an unmethylated state following viral lytic replication. Zta is expressed transiently following infection and again during the switch between latency and lytic replication. The requirement for CpG-methylation at critical Zta response elements (ZREs) has been proposed to regulate EBV replication, specifically it could aid the activation of viral lytic gene expression from silenced promoters on the methylated genome during latency in addition to preventing full lytic reactivation from the non-methylated EBV genome immediately following infection. We developed a computational approach to predict the location of ZREs which we experimentally assessed using in vitro and in vivo DNA association assays. A remarkably different binding motif is apparent for the CpG and non-CpG ZREs. Computational prediction of the location of these binding motifs in EBV revealed that the majority of lytic cycle genes have at least one and many have multiple copies of methylation-dependent CpG ZREs within their promoters. This suggests that the abundance of Zta protein coupled with the methylation status of the EBV genome act together to co-ordinate the expression of lytic cycle genes at the majority of EBV promoters. PMID:22022468

  8. Viral binding-induced signaling drives a unique and extended intracellular trafficking pattern during infection of primary monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Heon; Collins-McMillen, Donna; Caposio, Patrizia; Yurochko, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    We initiated experiments to examine the infection of monocytes postentry. New data show that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA is detected in the nucleus beginning only at 3 d postinfection in monocytes, compared with 30 min postinfection in fibroblasts and endothelial cells, suggesting that HCMV nuclear translocation in monocytes is distinct from that seen in other cell types. We now show that HCMV is initially retained in early endosomes and then moves sequentially to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling endosomes before nuclear translocation. HCMV is retained initially as a mature particle before deenvelopment in recycling endosomes. Disruption of the TGN significantly reduced nuclear translocation of viral DNA, and HCMV nuclear translocation in infected monocytes was observed only when correct gH/gL/UL128-131/integrin/c-Src signaling occurred. Taken together, our findings show that viral binding of the gH/gL/UL128-131 complex to integrins and the ensuing c-Src signaling drive a unique nuclear translocation pattern that promotes productive infection and avoids viral degradation, suggesting that it represents an additional viral evasion/survival strategy. PMID:27432979

  9. DNA Shape versus Sequence Variations in the Protein Binding Process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanying; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2016-02-01

    The binding process of a protein with a DNA involves three stages: approach, encounter, and association. It has been known that the complexation of protein and DNA involves mutual conformational changes, especially for a specific sequence association. However, it is still unclear how the conformation and the information in the DNA sequences affects the binding process. What is the extent to which the DNA structure adopted in the complex is induced by protein binding, or is instead intrinsic to the DNA sequence? In this study, we used the multiscale simulation method to explore the binding process of a protein with DNA in terms of DNA sequence, conformation, and interactions. We found that in the approach stage the protein can bind both the major and minor groove of the DNA, but uses different features to locate the binding site. The intrinsic conformational properties of the DNA play a significant role in this binding stage. By comparing the specific DNA with the nonspecific in unbound, intermediate, and associated states, we found that for a specific DNA sequence, ∼40% of the bending in the association forms is intrinsic and that ∼60% is induced by the protein. The protein does not induce appreciable bending of nonspecific DNA. In addition, we proposed that the DNA shape variations induced by protein binding are required in the early stage of the binding process, so that the protein is able to approach, encounter, and form an intermediate at the correct site on DNA. PMID:26840719

  10. Direct transfection of viral and plasmid DNA into the liver or spleen of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dubensky, T W; Campbell, B A; Villarreal, L P

    1984-01-01

    A method for the direct transfection of polyoma viral DNA and polyoma-plasmid recombinant DNA into the liver or spleen of newborn or adult mice was developed. Calcium phosphate-precipitated DNA was injected directly into mouse organs in combination with hyaluronidase and collagenase. Transfected DNA was shown to replicate at moderate efficiency, relative to direct infection of organs with virus. Transfection with viral DNA rapidly led to an acute infection. A polyoma-bacterial plasmid recombinant DNA also was shown to replicate when transfected into mice. With this plasmid, however, genomic-length polyoma DNA rapidly recombined away from the bacterial component and replicated as viral DNA. This method should allow the direct determination of the biological activity of a cloned DNA within a mouse organ. Images PMID:6095303

  11. Computational Design of DNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer; Song, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the outcome of engineered and naturally occurring sequence perturbations to protein-DNA interfaces requires accurate computational modeling technologies. It has been well established that computational design to accommodate small numbers of DNA target site substitutions is possible. This chapter details the basic method of design used in the Rosetta macromolecular modeling program that has been successfully used to modulate the specificity of DNA-binding proteins. More recently, combining computational design and directed evolution has become a common approach for increasing the success rate of protein engineering projects. The power of such high-throughput screening depends on computational methods producing multiple potential solutions. Therefore, this chapter describes several protocols for increasing the diversity of designed output. Lastly, we describe an approach for building comparative models of protein-DNA complexes in order to utilize information from homologous sequences. These models can be used to explore how nature modulates specificity of protein-DNA interfaces and potentially can even be used as starting templates for further engineering. PMID:27094297

  12. Viral DNA Packaging: One Step at a Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Carlos; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    During its life-cycle the bacteriophage φ29 actively packages its dsDNA genome into a proteinacious capsid, compressing its genome to near crystalline densities against large electrostatic, elastic, and entropic forces. This remarkable process is accomplished by a nano-scale, molecular DNA pump - a complex assembly of three protein and nucleic acid rings which utilizes the free energy released in ATP hydrolysis to perform the mechanical work necessary to overcome these large energetic barriers. We have developed a single molecule optical tweezers assay which has allowed us to probe the detailed mechanism of this packaging motor. By following the rate of packaging of a single bacteriophage as the capsid is filled with genome and as a function of optically applied load, we find that the compression of the genome results in the build-up of an internal force, on the order of ˜ 55 pN, due to the compressed genome. The ability to work against such large forces makes the packaging motor one of the strongest known molecular motors. By titrating the concentration of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate at different opposing load, we are able to determine features of the mechanochemistry of this motor - the coupling between the mechanical and chemical cycles. We find that force is generated not upon binding of ATP, but rather upon release of hydrolysis products. Finally, by improving the resolution of the optical tweezers assay, we are able to observe the discrete increments of DNA encapsidated each cycle of the packaging motor. We find that DNA is packaged in 10-bp increments preceded by the binding of multiple ATPs. The application of large external forces slows the packaging rate of the motor, revealing that the 10-bp steps are actually composed of four 2.5-bp steps which occur in rapid succession. These data show that the individual subunits of the pentameric ring-ATPase at the core of the packaging motor are highly coordinated, with the binding of ATP and the

  13. RNA and DNA binding properties of HIV-1 Vif protein: a fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Henriet, Simon; Dumas, Philippe; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2007-09-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is a small basic protein essential for viral fitness and pathogenicity. Some "non-permissive" cell lines cannot sustain replication of Vif(-) HIV-1 virions. In these cells, Vif counteracts the natural antiretroviral activity of the DNA-editing enzymes APOBEC3G/3F. Moreover, Vif is packaged into viral particles through a strong interaction with genomic RNA in viral nucleoprotein complexes. To gain insights into determinants of this binding process, we performed the first characterization of Vif/nucleic acid interactions using Vif intrinsic fluorescence. We determined the affinity of Vif for RNA fragments corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. Our results demonstrated preferential and moderately cooperative binding for RNAs corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of HIV-1 (5'-untranslated region) and gag (cooperativity parameter omega approximately 65-80, and K(d) = 45-55 nM). In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy allowed us to point out the TAR apical loop and a short region in gag as primary strong affinity binding sites (K(d) = 9.5-14 nM). Interestingly, beside its RNA binding properties, the Vif protein can also bind the corresponding DNA oligonucleotides and their complementary counterparts with an affinity similar to the one observed for the RNA sequences, while other DNA sequences displayed reduced affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that Vif binding to RNA and DNA offers several non-exclusive ways to counteract APOBEC3G/3F factors, in addition to the well documented Vif-induced degradation by the proteasome and to the Vif-mediated repression of translation of these antiviral factors. PMID:17609216

  14. DNA binding studies of Vinca alkaloids: experimental and computational evidence.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Prateek; Gupta, Surendra P; Pandav, Kumud; Barthwal, Ritu; Jayaram, B; Kumar, Surat

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence studies on the indole alkaloids vinblastine sulfate, vincristine sulfate, vincamine and catharanthine have demonstrated the DNA binding ability of these molecules. The binding mode of these molecules in the minor groove of DNA is non-specific. A new parameter of the purine-pyrimidine base sequence specificty was observed in order to define the non-specific DNA binding of ligands. Catharanthine had shown 'same' pattern of 'Pu-Py' specificity while evaluating its DNA binding profile. The proton resonances of a DNA decamer duplex were assigned. The models of the drug:DNA complexes were analyzed for DNA binding features. The effect of temperature on the DNA binding was also evaluated. PMID:22545401

  15. Human DNA polymerase. alpha. : Predicted functional domains and relationships with viral DNA polymerases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Wong, S.W.; Korn, D. )

    1989-01-01

    The primary sequence of human DNA polymerase {alpha} deduced from the full-length cDNA contains regions of striking similarity to sequences in replicative DNA polymerases from Escherichia coli phages PRD1 and T4, Bacillus phage {phi}19, yeast DNA polymerase I, yeast linear plasmid pGKL1, maize S1 mitochondrial DNA, herpes family viruses, vaccinia virus, and adenovirus. The conservation of these homologous regions across this vast phylogenetic expanse indicates that these prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases may all have evolved from a common primordial gene. Based on the sequence analysis and genetic results from yeast and herpes simplex virus studies, these consensus sequences are suggested to define potential sites that subserve essential roles in the DNA polymerase reaction. Two of these conserved regions appear to participate directly in the active site required for substrate deoxynucleotide interaction. One region toward the carboxyl-terminus has the potential to be the DNA interacting domain is predicted toward the amino-terminus. The provisional assignment of these domains can be used to identify unique or dissimilar features of functionally homologous catalytic sites in viral DBA polymerases of pathogenetic significance and thereby serve to guide more rational antiviral drug design.

  16. Characterization of novel hepadnaviral RNA species accumulated in hepatoma cells treated with viral DNA polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pinghu; Liu, Fei; Guo, Fang; Zhao, Qiong; Chang, Jinhong; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2016-07-01

    Inhibitors of hepadnaviral DNA polymerases are predicted to inhibit both minus and plus strand of viral DNA synthesis and arrest viral DNA replication at the stage of pregenomic (pg) RNA-containing nucleocapsids. However, analyses of the RNA species of human and duck hepatitis B viruses (HBV and DHBV, respectively) in hepatoma cells treated with viral DNA polymerase inhibitors revealed the genesis of novel RNA species migrating slightly faster than the full-length pgRNA. The DNA polymerase inhibitor-induced accumulation of these RNA species were abolished in the presence of alpha-interferon or HBV nucleocapsid assembly inhibitors. Moreover, they were protected from microccocal nuclease digestion and devoid of a poly-A tail. These characteristics suggest that the novel RNA species are most likely generated from RNase H cleavage of encapsidated pgRNA, after primer translocation and synthesis of the 5' terminal portion of minus strand DNA. In support of this hypothesis, DNA polymerase inhibitor treatment of chicken hepatoma cells transfected with a DHBV genome encoding an RNase H inactive DNA polymerase (E696H) failed to produce such RNA species. Our results thus suggest that the currently available DNA polymerase inhibitors do not efficiently arrest minus strand DNA synthesis at the early stage in hepatocytes. Hence, development of novel antiviral agents that more potently suppress viral DNA synthesis or viral nucleocapsid assembly inhibitors that are mechanistically complementary to the currently available DNA polymerase inhibitors are warranted. PMID:27083116

  17. Helicase binding to DnaI exposes a cryptic DNA-binding site during helicase loading in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Charikleia; Schaeffer, Patrick M.; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Soultanas, Panos

    2006-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis DnaI, DnaB and DnaD proteins load the replicative ring helicase DnaC onto DNA during priming of DNA replication. Here we show that DnaI consists of a C-terminal domain (Cd) with ATPase and DNA-binding activities and an N-terminal domain (Nd) that interacts with the replicative ring helicase. A Zn2+-binding module mediates the interaction with the helicase and C67, C70 and H84 are involved in the coordination of the Zn2+. DnaI binds ATP and exhibits ATPase activity that is not stimulated by ssDNA, because the DNA-binding site on Cd is masked by Nd. The ATPase activity resides on the Cd domain and when detached from the Nd domain, it becomes sensitive to stimulation by ssDNA because its cryptic DNA-binding site is exposed. Therefore, Nd acts as a molecular ‘switch’ regulating access to the ssDNA binding site on Cd, in response to binding of the helicase. DnaI is sufficient to load the replicative helicase from a complex with six DnaI molecules, so there is no requirement for a dual helicase loader system. PMID:17003052

  18. Helicase binding to DnaI exposes a cryptic DNA-binding site during helicase loading in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Charikleia; Schaeffer, Patrick M; Dixon, Nicholas E; Soultanas, Panos

    2006-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis DnaI, DnaB and DnaD proteins load the replicative ring helicase DnaC onto DNA during priming of DNA replication. Here we show that DnaI consists of a C-terminal domain (Cd) with ATPase and DNA-binding activities and an N-terminal domain (Nd) that interacts with the replicative ring helicase. A Zn2+-binding module mediates the interaction with the helicase and C67, C70 and H84 are involved in the coordination of the Zn2+. DnaI binds ATP and exhibits ATPase activity that is not stimulated by ssDNA, because the DNA-binding site on Cd is masked by Nd. The ATPase activity resides on the Cd domain and when detached from the Nd domain, it becomes sensitive to stimulation by ssDNA because its cryptic DNA-binding site is exposed. Therefore, Nd acts as a molecular 'switch' regulating access to the ssDNA binding site on Cd, in response to binding of the helicase. DnaI is sufficient to load the replicative helicase from a complex with six DnaI molecules, so there is no requirement for a dual helicase loader system. PMID:17003052

  19. A thermodynamic signature for drug-DNA binding mode.

    PubMed

    Chaires, Jonathan B

    2006-09-01

    A number of small molecules bind directly and selectively to DNA, acting as chemotherapeutic agents by inhibiting replication, transcription or topoisomerase activity. Two common binding modes for these small molecules are intercalation or groove-binding. Intercalation results from insertion of a planar aromatic substituent between DNA base pairs, with concomitant unwinding and lengthening of the DNA helix. Groove binding, in contrast, does not perturb the duplex structure to any great extent. Groove-binders are typically crescent-shaped, and fit snugly into the minor groove with little distortion of the DNA structure. Recent calorimetric studies have determined the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the DNA binding of representative DNA binding compounds. Analysis of such thermodynamic data culled from the literature reveals distinctive thermodynamic signatures for groove-binding and intercalating compounds. Plots of the binding enthalpy (DeltaH) against binding entropy (-TDeltaS) for 26 drug-DNA interactions reveal that groove-binding interactions are clustered in a region of the graph with favorable entropy contributions to the free energy, while intercalators are clustered in a region with unfavorable entropy but favorable enthalpy contributions. Groove-binding is predominantly entropically driven, while intercalation in enthalpically driven. The molecular basis of the contrasting thermodynamic signatures for the two binding modes is by no means clear, but the pattern should be of use in categorizing new DNA binding agents. PMID:16730635

  20. DNA cleavage enzymes for treatment of persistent viral infections: Recent advances and the pathway forward

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Nicholas D.; Aubert, Martine; Dang, Chung H.; Stone, Daniel; Jerome, Keith R.

    2014-04-15

    Treatment for most persistent viral infections consists of palliative drug options rather than curative approaches. This is often because long-lasting viral DNA in infected cells is not affected by current antivirals, providing a source for viral persistence and reactivation. Targeting latent viral DNA itself could therefore provide a basis for novel curative strategies. DNA cleavage enzymes can be used to induce targeted mutagenesis of specific genes, including those of exogenous viruses. Although initial in vitro and even in vivo studies have been carried out using DNA cleavage enzymes targeting various viruses, many questions still remain concerning the feasibility of these strategies as they transition into preclinical research. Here, we review the most recent findings on DNA cleavage enzymes for human viral infections, consider the most relevant animal models for several human viral infections, and address issues regarding safety and enzyme delivery. Results from well-designed in vivo studies will ideally provide answers to the most urgent remaining questions, and allow continued progress toward clinical application. - Highlights: • Recent in vitro and in vivo results for DNA cleavage enzymes targeting persistent viral infections. • Analysis of the best animal models for testing enzymes for HBV, HSV, HIV and HPV. • Challenges facing in vivo delivery of therapeutic enzymes for persistent viral infections. • Safety issues to be addressed with proper animal studies.

  1. DNA binding and recognition by binuclear transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changlin; Yan, Rui; Xu, Yan; Yu, Siwang; Liao, Zhanru; Li, Dongfeng; Xu, Hui-Bie F.

    2001-09-01

    The development of small molecules that can bind and recognize DNA with sequence- or stereo-specificity under physiological conditions has been attracting a great interest in chemistry and biochemistry. Here, spectroscopic characterization and gel electrophoresis methods have been utilized to investigate the DNA binding and recognition by a variety of binuclear transition metal complexes. The result indicate that the structures and charges of binuclear transition metal complexes, compositions of coordination spheres, central metal ions and their coordination unsaturation, and separations between two central metal atoms can exert significant effects on the DNA binding and recognition. If there are not intercalative ligands into DNA base pairs or kinetically substitutable ligands by DNA phosphate groups within coordination sphere, the coordination saturation and compact binuclear transition metal complexes weaker bind to DNA than the coordination unsaturation and extended ones to DNA. Since the different transtiometal ions exhibit different affinities to DNA phosphate oxygen atoms, the binding interactions between their binuclear complexes and DNA are controlled by the affinity. He binuclear complexes with one or more negative charges lead to a consequence that they can not efficient associate with DNA, because DNA phosphodiester backbone is negatively charged. Whenthe separations between two central transition metal atoms is more than the distance between two DNA base pairs, the binuclear complexes could bind and recognize the DNA sequence with two or more base pairs. The protonated and positively charged ligands can strengthen the DNA binding and recognition by these binuclear metal complexes. Based on such DNA binding and recognition principles, the binuclear zinc complex designed in the study preferentially bind and recognize the following DNA sequence on pBR322 DNA with binding constant K.

  2. Distinct Z-DNA binding mode of a PKR-like protein kinase containing a Z-DNA binding domain (PKZ)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doyoun; Hur, Jeonghwan; Park, Kwangsoo; Bae, Sangsu; Shin, Donghyuk; Ha, Sung Chul; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Hohng, Sungchul; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded ribonucleic acid-activated protein kinase (PKR) downregulates translation as a defense mechanism against viral infection. In fish species, PKZ, a PKR-like protein kinase containing left-handed deoxyribonucleic acid (Z-DNA) binding domains, performs a similar role in the antiviral response. To understand the role of PKZ in Z-DNA recognition and innate immune response, we performed structural and functional studies of the Z-DNA binding domain (Zα) of PKZ from Carassius auratus (caZαPKZ). The 1.7-Å resolution crystal structure of caZαPKZ:Z-DNA revealed that caZαPKZ shares the overall fold with other Zα, but has discrete structural features that differentiate its DNA binding mode from others. Functional analyses of caZαPKZ and its mutants revealed that caZαPKZ mediates the fastest B-to-Z transition of DNA among Zα, and the minimal interaction for Z-DNA recognition is mediated by three backbone phosphates and six residues of caZαPKZ. Structure-based mutagenesis and B-to-Z transition assays confirmed that Lys56 located in the β-wing contributes to its fast B-to-Z transition kinetics. Investigation of the DNA binding kinetics of caZαPKZ further revealed that the B-to-Z transition rate is positively correlated with the association rate constant. Taking these results together, we conclude that the positive charge in the β-wing largely affects fast B-to-Z transition activity by enhancing the DNA binding rate. PMID:24682817

  3. Properties of the DNA-binding domain of the simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    McVey, D; Strauss, M; Gluzman, Y

    1989-01-01

    T antigen (Tag) from simian virus 40 binds specifically to two distinct sites in the viral origin of replication and to single-stranded DNA. Analysis of the protein domain responsible for these activities revealed the following. (i) The C-terminal boundary of the origin-specific and single-strand-specific DNA-binding domain is at or near amino acid 246; furthermore, the maximum of these DNA-binding activities coincides with a narrow C-terminal boundary, spanning 4 amino acids (246 to 249) and declines sharply in proteins with C termini which differ by a few (4 to 10) amino acids; (ii) a polypeptide spanning residues 132 to 246 of Tag is an independent domain responsible for origin-specific DNA binding and presumably for single-stranded DNA binding; and (iii) a comparison of identical N-terminal fragments of Tag purified from mammalian and bacterial cells revealed differential specificity and levels of activity between the two sources of protein. A role for posttranslational modification (phosphorylation) in controlling the DNA-binding activity of Tag is discussed. Images PMID:2555700

  4. A viral satellite DNA vector-induced transcriptional gene silencing via DNA methylation of gene promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zheng; Wang, Lei; Cao, Dongyan; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been widely used for plant functional genomics study at the post-transcriptional level using various DNA or RNA viral vectors. However, while virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) via DNA methylation of gene promoter was achieved using several plant RNA viral vectors, it has not yet been done using a satellite DNA viral vector. In this study, a viral satellite DNA associated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which has been modified as a VIGS vector in previous research, was developed as a VITGS vector. Firstly, the viral satellite DNA VIGS vector was further optimized to a more convenient p1.7A+2mβ vector with high silencing efficiency of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Secondly, the constructed VITGS vector (TYLCCNV:35S), which carried a portion of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, could successfully induce heritable transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in the 35S-GFP transgenic N. benthamiana line 16c plants. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing results revealed higher methylated cytosine residues at CG, CHG and CHH sites of the 35S promoter sequence in TYLCCNV:35S-inoculated plants than in TYLCCNV-inoculated line 16c plants (control). Overall, these results demonstrated that the viral satellite DNA vector could be used as an effective VITGS vector to study DNA methylation in plant genomes. PMID:27422476

  5. Effects of nucleoside analog incorporation on DNA binding to the DNA binding domain of the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Omichinski, J G; Stahl, S; Maloney, D; West, J; Schweitzer, B I

    1999-02-01

    We investigate here the effects of the incorporation of the nucleoside analogs araC (1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine) and ganciclovir (9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl] guanine) into the DNA binding recognition sequence for the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor. A 10-fold decrease in binding affinity was observed for the ganciclovir-substituted DNA complex in comparison to an unmodified DNA of the same sequence composition. AraC substitution did not result in any changes in binding affinity. 1H-15N HSQC and NOESY NMR experiments revealed a number of chemical shift changes in both DNA and protein in the ganciclovir-modified DNA-protein complex when compared to the unmodified DNA-protein complex. These changes in chemical shift and binding affinity suggest a change in the binding mode of the complex when ganciclovir is incorporated into the GATA DNA binding site. PMID:10037146

  6. Autoantibodies define a family of proteins with conserved double-stranded RNA-binding domains as well as DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Shaheen, V M; Kao, P N; Okano, T; Shaw, M; Yoshida, H; Richards, H B; Reeves, W H

    1999-12-01

    Cellular responses to viral infection are signaled by double-stranded (ds) RNA, which is not found in substantial amounts in uninfected cells. Although cellular dsRNA-binding proteins have been described, their characterization is incomplete. We show that dsRNA-binding proteins are prominent autoantigens. Sera from B6 and B10.S mice with pristane-induced lupus and human autoimmune sera immunoprecipitated a novel set of 130-, 110-, 90-, 80-, and 45-kDa proteins. The proteins were all major cellular poly(IC)-binding factors. N-terminal amino acid sequences of p110 and p90 were identical and matched nuclear factor (NF) 90 and M phase phosphoprotein 4. p45 and p90 were identified as the NF45.NF90 complex, which binds the interleukin-2 promoter as well as certain highly structured viral RNAs. NF90.NF45 and M phase phosphoprotein 4 belong to a large group of proteins with conserved dsRNA-binding motifs. Besides binding dsRNA, NF90.NF45, p110, and p130 had single-stranded and dsDNA binding activity. Some sera contained autoantibodies whose binding was inhibited by poly(IC) but not single-stranded DNA or vice versa, suggesting that the DNA- and RNA-binding sites are different. These autoantibodies will be useful probes of the function of dsRNA-binding proteins. Their interaction with dsRNA, an immunological adjuvant, also could promote autoimmunity. PMID:10574923

  7. DNA and RNA Quadruplex-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brázda, Václav; Hároníková, Lucia; Liao, Jack C. C.; Fojta, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc.), the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGG)n, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2) and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development. PMID:25268620

  8. DNA and RNA quadruplex-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Brázda, Václav; Hároníková, Lucia; Liao, Jack C C; Fojta, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc.), the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGG)n, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2) and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development. PMID:25268620

  9. Uracil DNA Glycosylase BKRF3 Contributes to Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Replication through Physical Interactions with Proteins in Viral DNA Replication Complex

    PubMed Central

    Su, Mei-Tzu; Liu, I-Hua; Wu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Shu-Ming; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Yang, Pei-Wen; Chuang, Yu-Chia; Lee, Chung-Pei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BKRF3 shares sequence homology with members of the uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) protein family and has DNA glycosylase activity. Here, we explored how BKRF3 participates in the DNA replication complex and contributes to viral DNA replication. Exogenously expressed Flag-BKRF3 was distributed mostly in the cytoplasm, whereas BKRF3 was translocated into the nucleus and colocalized with the EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 in the replication compartment during EBV lytic replication. The expression level of BKRF3 increased gradually during viral replication, coupled with a decrease of cellular UNG2, suggesting BKRF3 enzyme activity compensates for UNG2 and ensures the fidelity of viral DNA replication. In immunoprecipitation-Western blotting, BKRF3 was coimmunoprecipitated with BALF5, the polymerase processivity factor BMRF1, and the immediate-early transactivator Rta. Coexpression of BMRF1 appeared to facilitate the nuclear targeting of BKRF3 in immunofluorescence staining. Residues 164 to 255 of BKRF3 were required for interaction with Rta and BALF5, whereas residues 81 to 166 of BKRF3 were critical for BMRF1 interaction in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown experiments. Viral DNA replication was defective in cells harboring BKRF3 knockout EBV bacmids. In complementation assays, the catalytic mutant BKRF3(Q90L,D91N) restored viral DNA replication, whereas the leucine loop mutant BKRF3(H213L) only partially rescued viral DNA replication, coupled with a reduced ability to interact with the viral DNA polymerase and Rta. Our data suggest that BKRF3 plays a critical role in viral DNA synthesis predominantly through its interactions with viral proteins in the DNA replication compartment, while its enzymatic activity may be supplementary for uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) function during virus replication. IMPORTANCE Catalytic activities of both cellular UDG UNG2 and viral UDGs contribute to herpesviral DNA replication. To ensure that the enzyme

  10. Development of Viral Capsid DNA Aptamer Conjugates as Cell-Targeted Delivery Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Gary Jen-Wei

    The ability to generate semi-synthetic DNA-protein conjugates has become increasingly important in the fields of chemical biology and nanobiotechnology. As applications in these fields become more complex, there is also an increased need for methods of attaching synthetic DNA to protein substrates in a well-defined manner. This work outlines the development of new methods for site-specific DNA-protein bioconjugation, as well as the development of novel viral capsid DNA aptamer conjugates for cell-targeting purposes. In order to generate DNA-protein conjugates in a site-specific manner, chemistries orthogonal to native functional groups present on DNA and proteins were exploited. In one method, the attachment of DNA to proteins was achieved via oxime formation. This strategy involved the in situ deprotection of an allyloxycarbonyl-protected alkoxyamine-bearing DNA in the presence of a protein containing a single ketone group. The utility of this approach was demonstrated in the synthesis of a DNA-GFP conjugate. In addition to the oxime formation route, two oxidative coupling methods were also developed for DNA-protein bioconjugation. The first reaction coupled phenylenediamine-containing DNA to anilines, which had been site-specifically incorporated into proteins, in the presence of NaIO4. These reaction conditions were demonstrated on the proteins bacteriophage MS2 and GFP, and were mild enough for the components to retain both protein structure and DNA base-pairing capabilities. The second oxidative coupling reaction conjugated aniline-containing proteins to DNA bearing an o-aminophenol moiety. This reaction occurred under similarly mild conditions; however, higher coupling yields were achieved on MS2 at shorter reaction times by using this strategy. In all three of these methods, the generation of a singly-modified product was achieved. Using one of our oxidative coupling strategies, MS2-DNA aptamer conjugates were synthesized for the development of multivalent

  11. Wanderings of a DNA enzymologist: from DNA polymerase to viral latency.

    PubMed

    Lehman, I Robert

    2006-01-01

    I am a member of what has been called, perhaps too grandiosely, "The Greatest Generation." I grew up during the Great Depression and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Because of my military service and the benefits of the GI Bill, I was able to attend college and, later, graduate school. Early in my graduate studies, I became fascinated with enzymes and the biochemical reactions that they catalyze. This fascination has never left me during the 50 years I have been a "DNA enzymologist." I was fortunate to have had as a mentor Arthur Kornberg, one of the great biochemists of the twentieth century, and a splendid group of postdocs and graduate students. I have studied DNA polymerases, DNA nucleases, DNA ligases, and DNA recombinases, enzymes that are critical to our understanding of DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Most recently, I have been studying herpes virus replication and inadvertently wandered into an entirely new area-viral latency. PMID:16756482

  12. NMR Solution Structure and DNA Binding Model of the DNA Binding Domain of Competence Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Carey A.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Thompson, Richele J.; Perego, Marta; Cavanagh, John

    2010-01-01

    Competence protein A (ComA) is a response regulator protein involved in the development of genetic competence in the Gram-positive spore forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, as well as the regulation of the production of degradative enzymes and antibiotic synthesis. ComA belongs to the NarL family of proteins which are characterized by a C-terminal transcriptional activator domain that consists of a bundle of four helices, where the second and third helices (α8 and α9) form a helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, the high resolution three-dimensional solution structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of ComA (ComAC) has been determined. In addition, surface plasmon resonance and NMR protein-DNA titration experiments allowed for the analysis of the interaction of ComAC with its target DNA sequences. Combining the solution structure and biochemical data, a model of ComAC bound to the ComA recognition sequences on the srfA promoter has been developed. The model shows that for DNA binding, ComA uses the conserved helix-turn-helix motif present in other NarL family members. However, the model also reveals that ComA may use a slightly different part of the helix-turn-helix motif and there appears to be some associated domain re-orientation. These observations suggest a basis for DNA binding specificity within the NarL family. PMID:20302877

  13. Loss of DNA-binding and new transcriptional trans-activation function in polyomavirus large T-antigen with mutation of zinc finger motif.

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, A; Nilsson, M; Bondeson, K; Magnusson, G

    1990-01-01

    A putative zinc finger in polyomavirus large T-antigen was investigated. We were unable to demonstrate unequivocally a requirement for zinc in specific DNA-binding using the chelating agent 1, 10-phenanthroline. An involvement of the putative zinc finger in specific DNA-binding was nevertheless suggested by the properties of a mutant protein with a cys----ser replacement in the finger motif. Probably as a result of the defective DNA-binding, the mutant protein had lost its activity in initiation of viral DNA-replication and in negative regulation of viral early transcription. However, the trans-activation of the viral late promoter was normal. The analysis also revealed a previously unrecognized activity of large T-antigen. The mutant protein trans-activated the viral early promoter. In the wild-type protein this activity is probably concealed by the separate, negative regulatory function. Images PMID:2160069

  14. CAP binding to B and Z forms of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, M G; Wu, H M; Crothers, D M

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the interaction between the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CAP) and a small DNA fragment containing its specific recognition sequence by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The binding of CAP to this fragment induces a B to "C-like" change in the CD spectrum, which is different from that observed for non-specific binding. A one-to-one (CAP dimer to DNA) binding stoichiometry was deduced from spectroscopic titration data, as was a non-specific binding site size of 17 bp/dimer. In addition, we have compared the non-specific binding affinity of CAP for the B and Z forms of synthetic DNA copolymers. A slight preference for the B form was found. These results do not support the recent specific suggestion that CAP binds to a left-handed form of DNA (1), but indicate more generally that an optically detectable conformational change takes place in DNA on binding CAP. Images PMID:6344018

  15. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  16. Direct Assessment of Viral Diversity in Soils by Random PCR Amplification of Polymorphic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasiah, Sharath; Lovett, Jacqueline; Polson, Shawn; Bhavsar, Jaysheel; Ghosh, Dhritiman; Roy, Krishnakali; Fuhrmann, Jeffry J.; Radosevich, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant and diverse biological entities within soils, yet their ecological impact is largely unknown. Defining how soil viral communities change with perturbation or across environments will contribute to understanding the larger ecological significance of soil viruses. A new approach to examining the composition of soil viral communities based on random PCR amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR) was developed. A key methodological improvement was the use of viral metagenomic sequence data for the design of RAPD-PCR primers. This metagenomically informed approach to primer design enabled the optimization of RAPD-PCR sensitivity for examining changes in soil viral communities. Initial application of RAPD-PCR viral fingerprinting to soil viral communities demonstrated that the composition of autochthonous soil viral assemblages noticeably changed over a distance of meters along a transect of Antarctic soils and across soils subjected to different land uses. For Antarctic soils, viral assemblages segregated upslope from the edge of dry valley lakes. In the case of temperate soils at the Kellogg Biological Station, viral communities clustered according to land use treatment. In both environments, soil viral communities changed along with environmental factors known to shape the composition of bacterial host communities. Overall, this work demonstrates that RAPD-PCR fingerprinting is an inexpensive, high-throughput means for addressing first-order questions of viral community dynamics within environmental samples and thus fills a methodological gap between narrow single-gene approaches and comprehensive shotgun metagenomic sequencing for the analysis of viral community diversity. PMID:23793630

  17. Changing the ubiquitin landscape during viral manipulation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, Matthew D.; Lilley, Caroline E.; Chaurushiya, Mira S.

    2011-01-01

    Viruses often induce signaling through the same cellular cascades that are activated by damage to the cellular genome. Signaling triggered by viral proteins or exogenous DNA delivered by viruses can be beneficial or detrimental to viral infection. Viruses have therefore evolved to dissect the cellular DNA damage response pathway during infection, often marking key cellular regulators with ubiquitin to induce their degradation or change their function. Signaling controlled by ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like proteins has recently emerged as key regulator of the cellular DNA damage response. Situated at the interface between DNA damage signaling and the ubiquitin system, viruses can reveal key convergence points in this important cellular pathway. In this review, we examine how viruses harness the diversity of the cellular ubiquitin system to modulate the DNA damage signaling pathway. We discuss the implications of viral infiltration of this pathway for both the transcriptional program of the virus and for the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:21549706

  18. Herpesvirus-dependent amplification and inversion of cell-associated viral thymidine kinase gene flanked by viral a sequences and linked to an origin of viral DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Mocarski, E S; Roizman, B

    1982-01-01

    The genome of herpes simplex virus 1 or 2 consists of two components, L and S, which invert relative to each other during infection. As a result, viral DNA consists of four equimolar populations of molecules differing solely in the relative orientations of the L and S components. Previous studies have shown that the a sequences, located in the same orientation at the genomic termini and in inverted orientation at the L-S junction, play a key role in the inversion of L and S components. In this report we describe a virus-dependent system designed to allow identification of the viral genes capable of acting in trans to invert DNA flanked by inverted copies of a sequences. In this system, cells are converted to the thymidine kinase-positive phenotype with a chimeric plasmid carrying the thymidine kinase gene flanked by inverted copies of the a sequence and linked to an origin of viral DNA replication derived from the S component. The DNA introduced into the cells is retained and propagated in its original sequence arrangement as head-to-tail concatemers. Infection of these cells with herpes simplex virus 1 or 2 results in as much as 100-fold amplification of the plasmid sequences and inversion of the DNA flanked by copies of the a sequence. In infected cells, the amplified resident DNA accumulates in head-to-tail concatemers and no rearrangement other than the inversions could be detected. These results suggest that the a sequence-dependent inversions required trans-acting viral gene products. Images PMID:6291055

  19. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    PubMed

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  20. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  1. A non-invasive method for studying viral DNA delivery to bacteria reveals key requirements for phage SPP1 DNA entry in Bacillus subtilis cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sofia; Labarde, Audrey; Baptista, Catarina; Jakutytè, Lina; Tavares, Paulo; São-José, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Bacteriophages use most frequently a tail apparatus to create a channel across the entire bacterial cell envelope to transfer the viral genome to the host cell cytoplasm, initiating infection. Characterization of this critical step remains a major challenge due to the difficulty to monitor DNA entry in the bacterium and its requirements. In this work we developed a new method to study phage DNA entry that has the potential to be extended to many tailed phages. Its application to study genome delivery of bacteriophage SPP1 into Bacillus subtilis disclosed a key role of the host cell membrane potential in the DNA entry process. An energized B. subtilis membrane and a millimolar concentration of calcium ions are shown to be major requirements for SPP1 DNA entry following the irreversible binding of phage particles to the receptor YueB. PMID:27179995

  2. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. PMID:25916847

  3. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. PMID:25916847

  4. Antiviral and Anticancer Optimization Studies of the DNA-binding Marine Natural Product Aaptamine

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, John J.; Pennaka, Hari K.; Ivey, Kelly; Wahyuono, Subagus; Kelly, Michelle; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Graves, David E.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Aaptamine has potent cytotoxicity that may be explained by its ability to intercalate DNA. Aaptamine was evaluated for its ability to bind to DNA to validate DNA binding as the primary mechanism of cytotoxicity. Based on UV–vis absorbance titration data, the Kobs for aaptamine was 4.0 (±0.2) × 103 which was essentially equivalent to the known DNA intercalator N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-9-aminoacridine-4-carboxamide. Semi-synthetic core modifications were performed to improve the general structural diversity of known aaptamine analogs and vary its absorption characteristics. Overall, 26 aaptamine derivatives were synthesized which consisted of a simple homologous range of mono and di-N-alkylations as well as some 9-O-sulfonylation and bis-O-isoaaptamine dimer products. Each product was evaluated for activity in a variety of whole cell and viral assays including a unique solid tumor disk diffusion assay. Details of aaptamine's DNA-binding activity and its derivatives’ whole cell and viral assay results are discussed. PMID:18251774

  5. Structural Basis for Viral Late-Domain Binding to Alix

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,S.; Joshi, A.; Nagashima, K.; Freed, E.; Hurley, J.

    2007-01-01

    The modular protein Alix is a central node in endosomal-lysosomal trafficking and the budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. The Gag p6 protein of HIV-1 contains a LYPx{sub n}LxxL motif that is required for Alix-mediated budding and binds a region of Alix spanning residues 360-702. The structure of this fragment of Alix has the shape of the letter 'V' and is termed the V domain. The V domain has a topologically complex arrangement of 11 {alpha}-helices, with connecting loops that cross three times between the two arms of the V. The conserved residue Phe676 is at the center of a large hydrophobic pocket and is crucial for binding to a peptide model of HIV-1 p6. Overexpression of the V domain inhibits HIV-1 release from cells. This inhibition of release is reversed by mutations that block binding of the Alix V domain to p6.

  6. Flavonoid-DNA binding studies and thermodynamic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjua, Naveed Kausar; Shaheen, Amber; Yaqub, Azra; Perveen, Fouzia; Sabahat, Sana; Mumtaz, Misbah; Jacob, Claus; Ba, Lalla Aicha; Mohammed, Hamdoon A.

    2011-09-01

    Interactional studies of new flavonoid derivatives (Fl) with chicken blood ds.DNA were investigated spectrophotometrically in DMSO-H 2O (9:1 v/v) at various temperatures. Spectral parameters suggest considerable binding between the flavonoid derivatives studied and ds.DNA. The binding constant values lie in the enhanced-binding range. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from UV studies also point to strong spontaneous binding of Fl with ds.DNA. Viscometric studies complimented the UV results where a small linear increase in relative viscosity of the DNA solution was observed with added optimal flavonoid concentration. An overall mixed mode of interaction (intercalative plus groove binding) is proposed between DNA and flavonoids. Conclusively, investigated flavonoid derivatives are found to be strong DNA binders and seem to be promising drug candidates like their natural analogues.

  7. The detection of DNA-binding proteins by protein blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, B; Steinberg, J; Laemmli, U K; Weintraub, H

    1980-01-01

    A method, called "protein blotting," for the detection of DNA-binding proteins is described. Proteins are separated on an SDA-polyacrylamide gel. The gel is sandwiched between 2 nitrocellulose filters and the proteins allowed to diffuse out of the gel and onto the filters. The proteins are tightly bound to each filter, producing a replica of the original gel pattern. The replica is used to detect DNA-binding proteins, RNA-binding proteins or histone-binding proteins by incubation of the filter with [32P]DNA, [125I]RNA, or [125I] histone. Evidence is also presented that specific protein-DNA interactions may be detected by this technique; under appropriate conditions, the lac repressor binds only to DNA containing the lac operator. Strategies for the detection of specific protein-DNA interactions are discussed. Images PMID:6243775

  8. Cell-penetrating DNA-binding protein as a safe and efficient naked DNA delivery carrier in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Sung; Yang, Seung-Woo; Hong, Dong-Ki; Kim, Woo-Taek; Kim, Ho-Guen; Lee, Sang-Kyou

    2010-01-29

    Non-viral gene delivery is a safe and suitable alternative to viral vector-mediated delivery to overcome the immunogenicity and tumorigenesis associated with viral vectors. Using the novel, human-origin Hph-1 protein transduction domain that can facilitate the transduction of protein into cells, we developed a new strategy to deliver naked DNA in vitro and in vivo. The new DNA delivery system contains Hph-1-GAL4 DNA-binding domain (DBD) fusion protein and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter plasmid that includes the five repeats of GAL4 upstream activating sequence (UAS). Hph-1-GAL4-DBD protein formed complex with plasmid DNA through the specific interaction between GAL4-DBD and UAS, and delivered into the cells via the Hph-1-PTD. The pEGFP DNA was successfully delivered by the Hph-1-GAL4 system, and the EGFP was effectively expressed in mammalian cells such as HeLa and Jurkat, as well as in Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) plant cells. When 10 {mu}g of pEGFP DNA was intranasally administered to mice using Hph-1-GAL4 protein, a high level of EGFP expression was detected throughout the lung tissue for 7 days. These results suggest that an Hph-1-PTD-mediated DNA delivery strategy may be an useful non-viral DNA delivery system for gene therapy and DNA vaccines.

  9. Gene expression regulation in retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by viral RNA and viral/bacterial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Brosig, Anton; Kuhrt, Heidrun; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon; Bringmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with systemic and local inflammation. Various studies suggested that viral or bacterial infection may aggravate retinal inflammation in the aged retina. We compared the effects of synthetic viral RNA (poly(I:C)) and viral/bacterial DNA (CpG-ODN) on the expression of genes known to be involved in the development of AMD in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methods Cultured human RPE cells were stimulated with poly(I:C; 500 µg/ml) or CpG-ODN (500 nM). Alterations in gene expression and protein secretion were determined with real-time RT–PCR and ELISA, respectively. Phosphorylation of signal transduction molecules was revealed by western blotting. Results Poly(I:C) induced gene expression of the pattern recognition receptor TLR3, transcription factors (HIF-1α, p65/NF-κB), the angiogenic factor bFGF, inflammatory factors (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, MCP-1, MIP-2), and complement factors (C5, C9, CFB). Poly(I:C) also induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK proteins, and the secretion of bFGF and TNFα from the cells. CpG-ODN induced moderate gene expression of transcription factors (p65/NF-κB, NFAT5) and complement factors (C5, C9), while it had no effect on the expression of various TLR, angiogenic factor, and inflammatory factor genes. The activities of various signal transduction pathways and transcription factors were differentially involved in mediating the poly(I:C)-induced transcriptional activation of distinct genes. Conclusions The widespread effects of viral RNA, and the restricted effects of viral/bacterial DNA, on the gene expression pattern of RPE cells may suggest that viral RNA rather than viral/bacterial DNA induces physiologic alterations of RPE cells, which may aggravate inflammation in the aged retina. The data also suggest that selective inhibition of distinct signal transduction pathways or individual transcription factors may not be effective to inhibit

  10. Pentoxifylline affects idarubicin binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Gołuński, Grzegorz; Borowik, Agnieszka; Lipińska, Andrea; Romanik, Monika; Derewońko, Natalia; Woziwodzka, Anna; Piosik, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    Anticancer drug idarubicin - derivative of doxorubicin - is commonly used in treatment of numerous cancer types. However, in contrast to doxorubicin, its biophysical properties are not well established yet. Additionally, potential direct interactions of idarubicin with other biologically active aromatic compounds, such as pentoxifylline - representative of methylxanthines - were not studied at all. Potential formation of such hetero-aggregates may result in sequestration of the anticancer drug and, in consequence, reduction of its biological activity. This work provide description of the idarubicin biophysical properties as well as assess influence of pentoxifylline on idarubicin interactions with DNA. To achieve these goals we employed spectrophotometric methods coupled with analysis with the appropriate mathematical models as well as flow cytometry and Ames test. Obtained results show influence of pentoxifylline on idarubicin binding to DNA and are well in agreement with the data previously published for other aromatic ligands. Additionally it may be hypothesized that direct interactions between idarubicin and pentoxifylline may influence the anticancer drug biological activity. PMID:26921593

  11. Tuning Genetic Clocks Employing DNA Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Jayanthi, Shridhar; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2012-01-01

    Periodic oscillations play a key role in cell physiology from the cell cycle to circadian clocks. The interplay of positive and negative feedback loops among genes and proteins is ubiquitous in these networks. Often, delays in a negative feedback loop and/or degradation rates are a crucial mechanism to obtain sustained oscillations. How does nature control delays and kinetic rates in feedback networks? Known mechanisms include proper selection of the number of steps composing a feedback loop and alteration of protease activity, respectively. Here, we show that a remarkably simple means to control both delays and effective kinetic rates is the employment of DNA binding sites. We illustrate this design principle on a widely studied activator-repressor clock motif, which is ubiquitous in natural systems. By suitably employing DNA target sites for the activator and/or the repressor, one can switch the clock “on” and “off” and precisely tune its period to a desired value. Our study reveals a design principle to engineer dynamic behavior in biomolecular networks, which may be largely exploited by natural systems and employed for the rational design of synthetic circuits. PMID:22859962

  12. Forces from the Portal Govern the Late-Stage DNA Transport in a Viral DNA Packaging Nanomotor.

    PubMed

    Jing, Peng; Burris, Benjamin; Zhang, Rong

    2016-07-12

    In the Phi29 bacteriophage, the DNA packaging nanomotor packs its double-stranded DNA genome into the virus capsid. At the late stage of DNA packaging, the negatively charged genome is increasingly compacted at a higher density in the capsid with a higher internal pressure. During the process, two Donnan effects, osmotic pressure and Donnan equilibrium potentials, are significantly amplified, which, in turn, affect the channel activity of the portal protein, GP10, embedded in the semipermeable capsid shell. In the research, planar lipid bilayer experiments were used to study the channel activities of the viral protein. The Donnan effect on the conformational changes of the viral protein was discovered, indicating GP10 may not be a static channel at the late stage of DNA packaging. Due to the conformational changes, GP10 may generate electrostatic forces that govern the DNA transport. For the section of the genome DNA that remains outside of the connector channel, a strong repulsive force from the viral protein would be generated against the DNA entry; however, for the section of the genome DNA within the channel, the portal protein would become a Brownian motor, which adopts the flash Brownian ratchet mechanism to pump the DNA against the increasingly built-up internal pressure (up to 20 atm) in the capsid. Therefore, the DNA transport in the nanoscale viral channel at the late stage of DNA packaging could be a consequence of Brownian movement of the genomic DNA, which would be rectified and harnessed by the forces from the interior wall of the viral channel under the influence of the Donnan effect. PMID:27410744

  13. Structural Investigation of a Viral Ortholog of Human NEIL2/3 DNA Glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Eckenroth, Brian E.; Averill, April M.; Imamura, Kayo; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Assault to DNA that leads to oxidative base damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway with specialized enzymes called DNA glycosylases catalyzing the first step of this pathway. These glycosylases can be categorized into two families: the HhH superfamily, which includes endonuclease III (or Nth), and the Fpg/Nei family, which comprises formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (or Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (or Nei). In humans there are three Nei-like (NEIL) glycosylases: NEIL1, 2, and 3. Here we present the first crystal structure of a viral ortholog of the human NEIL2/NEIL3 proteins, Mimivirus Nei2 (MvNei2), determined at 2.04 Å resolution. The C-terminal region of the MvNei2 enzyme comprises two conserved DNA binding motifs: the helix-two-turns-helix (H2TH) motif and a C-H-C-C type zinc-finger similar to that of human NEIL2. The N-terminal region of MvNei2 is most closely related to NEIL3. Like NEIL3, MvNei2 bears a valine at position 2 instead of the usual proline and it lacks two of the three conserved void-filling residues present in other members of the Fpg/Nei family. Mutational analysis of the only conserved void-filling residue methionine 72 to alanine yields an MvNei2 variant with impaired glycosylase activity. Mutation of the adjacent His73 causes the enzyme to be more productive thereby suggesting a plausible role for this residue in the DNA lesion search process. PMID:24120312

  14. The DNA-binding network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Minch, Kyle J.; Rustad, Tige R.; Peterson, Eliza J. R.; Winkler, Jessica; Reiss, David J.; Ma, Shuyi; Hickey, Mark; Brabant, William; Morrison, Bob; Turkarslan, Serdar; Mawhinney, Chris; Galagan, James E.; Price, Nathan D.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Sherman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infects 30% of all humans and kills someone every 20–30 s. Here we report genome-wide binding for ~80% of all predicted MTB transcription factors (TFs), and assayed global expression following induction of each TF. The MTB DNA-binding network consists of ~16,000 binding events from 154 TFs. We identify >50 TF-DNA consensus motifs and >1,150 promoter-binding events directly associated with proximal gene regulation. An additional ~4,200 binding events are in promoter windows and represent strong candidates for direct transcriptional regulation under appropriate environmental conditions. However, we also identify >10,000 ‘dormant’ DNA-binding events that cannot be linked directly with proximal transcriptional control, suggesting that widespread DNA binding may be a common feature that should be considered when developing global models of coordinated gene expression. PMID:25581030

  15. Protein p56 from the Bacillus subtilis phage ϕ29 inhibits DNA-binding ability of uracil-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Ruiz-Masó, José A.; del Solar, Gloria; Espinosa, Manuel; Bravo, Alicia; Salas, Margarita

    2007-01-01

    Protein p56 (56 amino acids) from the Bacillus subtilis phage ϕ29 inactivates the host uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG), an enzyme involved in the base excision repair pathway. At present, p56 is the only known example of a UDG inhibitor encoded by a non-uracil containing viral DNA. Using analytical ultracentrifugation methods, we found that protein p56 formed dimers at physiological concentrations. In addition, circular dichroism spectroscopic analyses revealed that protein p56 had a high content of β-strands (around 40%). To understand the mechanism underlying UDG inhibition by p56, we carried out in vitro experiments using the Escherichia coli UDG enzyme. The highly acidic protein p56 was able to compete with DNA for binding to UDG. Moreover, the interaction between p56 and UDG blocked DNA binding by UDG. We also demonstrated that Ugi, a protein that interacts with the DNA-binding domain of UDG, was able to replace protein p56 previously bound to the UDG enzyme. These results suggest that protein p56 could be a novel naturally occurring DNA mimicry. PMID:17698500

  16. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus DNA Polymerase C Terminus Is Required for Nuclear Localization and Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guozhong

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The DNA polymerase (DNApol) of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is essential for viral DNA replication. The DNApol exonuclease and polymerase domains are highly conserved and are considered functional in DNA replication. However, the role of the DNApol C terminus has not yet been characterized. To identify whether only the exonuclease and polymerase domains are sufficient for viral DNA replication, several DNApol C-terminal truncations were cloned into a dnapol-null AcMNPV bacmid with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. Surprisingly, most of the truncation constructs, despite containing both exonuclease and polymerase domains, could not rescue viral DNA replication and viral production in bacmid-transfected Sf21 cells. Moreover, GFP fusions of these same truncations failed to localize to the nucleus. Truncation of the C-terminal amino acids 950 to 984 showed nuclear localization but allowed for only limited and delayed viral spread. The C terminus contains a typical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) motif at residues 804 to 827 and a monopartite NLS motif at residues 939 to 948. Each NLS, as a GFP fusion peptide, localized to the nucleus, but both NLSs were required for nuclear localization of DNApol. Alanine substitutions in a highly conserved baculovirus DNApol sequence at AcMNPV DNApol amino acids 972 to 981 demonstrated its importance for virus production and DNA replication. Collectively, the data indicated that the C terminus of AcMNPV DNApol contains two NLSs and a conserved motif, all of which are required for nuclear localization of DNApol, viral DNA synthesis, and virus production. IMPORTANCE The baculovirus DNA polymerase (DNApol) is a highly specific polymerase that allows viral DNA synthesis and hence virus replication in infected insect cells. We demonstrated that the exonuclease and polymerase domains of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) alone are

  17. MCM ring hexamerization is a prerequisite for DNA-binding

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Froelich, Clifford A.; Nourse, Amanda; Enemark, Eric J.

    2015-09-13

    The hexameric Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) protein complex forms a ring that unwinds DNA at the replication fork in eukaryotes and archaea. Our recent crystal structure of an archaeal MCM N-terminal domain bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) revealed ssDNA associating across tight subunit interfaces but not at the loose interfaces, indicating that DNA-binding is governed not only by the DNA-binding residues of the subunits (MCM ssDNA-binding motif, MSSB) but also by the relative orientation of the subunits. We now extend these findings to show that DNA-binding by the MCM N-terminal domain of the archaeal organism Pyrococcus furiosus occurs specifically in themore » hexameric oligomeric form. We show that mutants defective for hexamerization are defective in binding ssDNA despite retaining all the residues observed to interact with ssDNA in the crystal structure. One mutation that exhibits severely defective hexamerization and ssDNA-binding is at a conserved phenylalanine that aligns with the mouse Mcm4(Chaos3) mutation associated with chromosomal instability, cancer, and decreased intersubunit association.« less

  18. MCM ring hexamerization is a prerequisite for DNA-binding

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, Clifford A.; Nourse, Amanda; Enemark, Eric J.

    2015-09-13

    The hexameric Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) protein complex forms a ring that unwinds DNA at the replication fork in eukaryotes and archaea. Our recent crystal structure of an archaeal MCM N-terminal domain bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) revealed ssDNA associating across tight subunit interfaces but not at the loose interfaces, indicating that DNA-binding is governed not only by the DNA-binding residues of the subunits (MCM ssDNA-binding motif, MSSB) but also by the relative orientation of the subunits. We now extend these findings to show that DNA-binding by the MCM N-terminal domain of the archaeal organism Pyrococcus furiosus occurs specifically in the hexameric oligomeric form. We show that mutants defective for hexamerization are defective in binding ssDNA despite retaining all the residues observed to interact with ssDNA in the crystal structure. One mutation that exhibits severely defective hexamerization and ssDNA-binding is at a conserved phenylalanine that aligns with the mouse Mcm4(Chaos3) mutation associated with chromosomal instability, cancer, and decreased intersubunit association.

  19. Nuclear Sensing of Viral DNA, Epigenetic Regulation of Herpes Simplex Virus Infection, and Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. Herpes viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. PMID:25742715

  20. Crystal Structure of the Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 1 (Chd1) DNA-binding Domain in Complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma A.; Heroux A.; Jenkins K. R.; Bowman G. D.

    2011-12-09

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-dependent machines that dynamically alter the chromatin packaging of eukaryotic genomes by assembling, sliding, and displacing nucleosomes. The Chd1 chromatin remodeler possesses a C-terminal DNA-binding domain that is required for efficient nucleosome sliding and believed to be essential for sensing the length of DNA flanking the nucleosome core. The structure of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain was recently shown to consist of a SANT and SLIDE domain, analogous to the DNA-binding domain of the ISWI family, yet the details of how Chd1 recognized DNA were not known. Here we present the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chd1 DNA-binding domain in complex with a DNA duplex. The bound DNA duplex is straight, consistent with the preference exhibited by the Chd1 DNA-binding domain for extranucleosomal DNA. Comparison of this structure with the recently solved ISW1a DNA-binding domain bound to DNA reveals that DNA lays across each protein at a distinct angle, yet contacts similar surfaces on the SANT and SLIDE domains. In contrast to the minor groove binding seen for Isw1 and predicted for Chd1, the SLIDE domain of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain contacts the DNA major groove. The majority of direct contacts with the phosphate backbone occur only on one DNA strand, suggesting that Chd1 may not strongly discriminate between major and minor grooves.

  1. DNA binding proteins that alter nucleic acid flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Micah; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Maher, L. J., III; Williams, Mark C.

    2007-09-01

    Dual - beam optical tweezers experiments subject single molecules of DNA to high forces (~ 300 pN) with 0.1 pN accuracy, probing the energy and specificity of nucleic acid - ligand structures. Stretching phage λ-DNA reveals an increase in the applied force up to a critical force known as the overstretching transition. In this region, base pairing and stacking are disrupted as double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is melted. Proteins that bind to the double strand will tend to stabilize dsDNA, and melting will occur at higher forces. Proteins that bind to single stranded DNA (ssDNA) destabilize melting, provided that the rate of association is comparable to the pulling rate of the experiment. Many proteins, however, exhibit some affinity for both dsDNA and ssDNA. We describe experiments upon DNA + HMGB2 (box A), a nuclear protein that is believed to facilitate transcription. By characterizing changes in the structure of dsDNA with a polymer model of elasticity, we have determined the equilibrium association constant for HMGB2 to be K ds = 0.15 +/- 0.7 10 9 M -1 for dsDNA binding. Analysis of the melting transition reveals an equilibrium association constant for HMGB2 to ssDNA to be K ss = 0.039 +/- 0.019 10 9 M -1 for ssDNA binding.

  2. Defective viral DNA ameliorates symptoms of geminivirus infection in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Stanley, J; Frischmuth, T; Ellwood, S

    1990-08-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana was transformed with a single copy of a tandem repeat of subgenomic DNA B isolated from plants infected with a Kenyan isolate of the bipartite geminivirus African cassava mosaic virus. Symptoms in transformed plants were less severe than in nontransformed controls when challenged with virus or cloned DNA of Kenyan or Nigerian isolates. Symptom amelioration was associated with the mobilization and amplification of the subgenomic DNA, producing a comparable reduction in the amount of DNA specific to each genomic component. The disproportionate reduction in the levels of full-length components (DNA A, 20%; DNA B, 70%) indicates that the episomally replicating subgenomic DNA has been amplified at the expense of full-length DNA B to three times the level of the latter. Serial infection of transformants resulted in a further decrease in symptom severity and viral DNA levels. No differences were observed in the severity of symptoms or levels of viral DNA when transformants and controls were challenged with the related geminiviruses beet curly top virus and tomato golden mosaic virus, demonstrating the specific nature of the interaction. Analysis of infected tissue showed that tomato golden mosaic virus was unable to amplify the subgenomic DNA. However, since the production of subgenomic DNA is possibly a common feature of the bipartite geminiviruses, this approach might contribute to the production of plants showing increased tolerance to a number of economically important viral diseases. PMID:2385593

  3. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-05-15

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  4. MicroRNA-binding viral protein interferes with Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Chellappan, Padmanabhan; Vanitharani, Ramachandran; Fauquet, Claude M

    2005-07-19

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (approximately 21 nt), noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate target mRNAs at the posttranscriptional level that are involved in development. In plants, virus-induced disease symptoms often result in developmental abnormalities resembling perturbation of miRNA-mediated function. Here, we report that expression in transgenic plants of a geminivirus-encoded AC4 protein from African cassava mosaic virus Cameroon Strain (ACMV), a suppressor of posttranscriptional gene silencing, was correlated with decreased accumulation of host miRNAs and increased development abnormalities in Arabidopsis. Down-regulation of miRNA correlated with an up-regulation of target mRNA level. In vitro binding assays revealed the ability of AC4 of ACMV (A-AC4) but not East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus AC2 to bind single-stranded forms of miRNAs and short interfering RNAs but not double-stranded RNA forms. Normally, a labile intermediate during the miRNA biogenesis/RNA-induced silencing complex assembly, miRNA*, was below the level of detection, indicating that AC4 might interfere at a point downstream of the miRNA duplex unwinding process. The association of AC4 with miRNA was demonstrated by the association of A-AC4-GFP fusion protein, extracted from Arabidopsis protoplasts, with 2'-O-methyloligonucleotide complementary to miR159 (miR159*) and by the presence of miRNA with the A-AC4-GFP fusion protein after immunoprecipitation with antibody against GFP. In both assays, A-AC4 protein and miRNA complexes were copurified. These results provide direct evidence that AC4 is a unique virus-encoded posttranscriptional gene-silencing suppressor protein that binds to and presumably inactivates mature miRNAs and thus blocks the normal miRNA-mediated regulation of target mRNAs, resulting in developmental defects in Arabidopsis. PMID:16006510

  5. Efficient DNA Transfection Mediated by the C-Terminal Domain of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Viral Protein R

    PubMed Central

    Kichler, Antoine; Pages, Jean-Christophe; Leborgne, Christian; Druillennec, Sabine; Lenoir, Christine; Coulaud, Dominique; Delain, Etienne; Le Cam, Eric; Roques, Bernard P.; Danos, Olivier

    2000-01-01

    Viral protein R (Vpr) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is produced late in the virus life cycle and is assembled into the virion through binding to the Gag protein. It is known to play a significant role early in the viral life cycle by facilitating the nuclear import of the preintegration complex in nondividing cells. Vpr is also able to interact with nucleic acids, and we show here that it induces condensation of plasmid DNA. We have explored the possibility of using these properties in DNA transfection experiments. We report that the C-terminal half of the protein (Vpr52–96) mediates DNA transfection in a variety of human and nonhuman cell lines with efficiencies comparable to those of the best-known transfection agents. Compared with polylysine, a standard polycationic transfection reagent, Vpr52–96 was 10- to 1,000-fold more active. Vpr52–96-DNA complexes were able to reach the cell nucleus through a pH-independent mechanism. These observations possibly identify an alternate pathway for DNA transfection. PMID:10823846

  6. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding

    SciTech Connect

    Tewary, Sunil K.; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie; Cotmore, Susan F.; Tattersall, Peter; Zhao, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2015-02-15

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45 Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. - Highlights: • The structure of a parvovirus replication initiator protein has been determined; • The structure sheds light on mechanisms of ssDNA binding and cleavage; • The nickase active site is preconfigured for versatile metal ligand binding; • The binding site for the double-stranded replication origin DNA is identified; • A single domain integrates multiple functions in virus replication.

  7. Timed interactions between viral and cellular replication factors during the initiation of SV40 in vitro DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Poonam; Nasheuer, Heinz-Peter; Hartmann, Hella; Grosse, Frank; Fanning, Ellen; Weisshart, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    The initiation of SV40 (simian virus 40) DNA replication requires the co-operative interactions between the viral Tag (large T-antigen), RPA (replication protein A) and Pol (DNA polymerase α-primase) on the template DNA. Binding interfaces mapped on these enzymes and expressed as peptides competed with the mutual interactions of the native proteins. Prevention of the genuine interactions was accomplished only prior to the primer synthesis step and blocked the assembly of a productive initiation complex. Once the complex was engaged in the synthesis of an RNA primer and its extension, the interfering effects of the peptides ceased, suggesting a stable association of the replication factors during the initiation phase. Specific antibodies were still able to disrupt preformed interactions and inhibited primer synthesis and extension activities, underlining the crucial role of specific protein–protein contacts during the entire initiation process. PMID:17666013

  8. Development of Potent Antiviral Drugs Inspired by Viral Hexameric DNA-Packaging Motors with Revolving Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pi, Fengmei; Zhao, Zhengyi; Chelikani, Venkata; Yoder, Kristine; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Guo, Peixuan

    2016-09-15

    The intracellular parasitic nature of viruses and the emergence of antiviral drug resistance necessitate the development of new potent antiviral drugs. Recently, a method for developing potent inhibitory drugs by targeting biological machines with high stoichiometry and a sequential-action mechanism was described. Inspired by this finding, we reviewed the development of antiviral drugs targeting viral DNA-packaging motors. Inhibiting multisubunit targets with sequential actions resembles breaking one bulb in a series of Christmas lights, which turns off the entire string. Indeed, studies on viral DNA packaging might lead to the development of new antiviral drugs. Recent elucidation of the mechanism of the viral double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-packaging motor with sequential one-way revolving motion will promote the development of potent antiviral drugs with high specificity and efficiency. Traditionally, biomotors have been classified into two categories: linear and rotation motors. Recently discovered was a third type of biomotor, including the viral DNA-packaging motor, beside the bacterial DNA translocases, that uses a revolving mechanism without rotation. By analogy, rotation resembles the Earth's rotation on its own axis, while revolving resembles the Earth's revolving around the Sun (see animations at http://rnanano.osu.edu/movie.html). Herein, we review the structures of viral dsDNA-packaging motors, the stoichiometries of motor components, and the motion mechanisms of the motors. All viral dsDNA-packaging motors, including those of dsDNA/dsRNA bacteriophages, adenoviruses, poxviruses, herpesviruses, mimiviruses, megaviruses, pandoraviruses, and pithoviruses, contain a high-stoichiometry machine composed of multiple components that work cooperatively and sequentially. Thus, it is an ideal target for potent drug development based on the power function of the stoichiometries of target complexes that work sequentially. PMID:27356896

  9. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-05-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression.

  10. Comparing binding site information to binding affinity reveals that Crp/DNA complexes have several distinct binding conformers

    PubMed Central

    Holmquist, Peter C.; Holmquist, Gerald P.; Summers, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    We show that the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) binds to DNA as several different conformers. This situation has precluded discovering a high correlation between any sequence property and binding affinity for proteins that bend DNA. Experimentally quantified affinities of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cAMP receptor protein (SyCrp1), the Escherichia coli Crp (EcCrp, also CAP) and DNA were analyzed to mathematically describe, and make human-readable, the relationship of DNA sequence and binding affinity in a given system. Here, sequence logos and weight matrices were built to model SyCrp1 binding sequences. Comparing the weight matrix model to binding affinity revealed several distinct binding conformations. These Crp/DNA conformations were asymmetrical (non-palindromic). PMID:21586590

  11. DNA linking number change induced by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Xiao, Yazhong; Liu, Chang; Li, Chenzhong; Leng, Fenfei

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins play a key role in many fundamental biological processes, such as transcription, DNA replication and recombination. Very often, these DNA-binding proteins introduce structural changes to the target DNA-binding sites including DNA bending, twisting or untwisting and wrapping, which in many cases induce a linking number change (ΔLk) to the DNA-binding site. Due to the lack of a feasible approach, ΔLk induced by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins has not been fully explored. In this paper we successfully constructed a series of DNA plasmids that carry many tandem copies of a DNA-binding site for one sequence-specific DNA-binding protein, such as λ O, LacI, GalR, CRP and AraC. In this case, the protein-induced ΔLk was greatly amplified and can be measured experimentally. Indeed, not only were we able to simultaneously determine the protein-induced ΔLk and the DNA-binding constant for λ O and GalR, but also we demonstrated that the protein-induced ΔLk is an intrinsic property for these sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. Our results also showed that protein-mediated DNA looping by AraC and LacI can induce a ΔLk to the plasmid DNA templates. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the protein-induced ΔLk does not correlate with the protein-induced DNA bending by the DNA-binding proteins. PMID:20185570

  12. High-throughput analysis of protein-DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions mediate most regulatory processes underlying gene expression, such as transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) or chromatin organization. Current knowledge about DNA-binding specificities of TFs is based mostly on low- to medium-throughput methodologies that are time-consuming and often fail to identify DNA motifs recognized by a TF with lower affinity but retaining biological relevance. The use of protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) offers a high-throughput alternative for the identification of protein-DNA specificities. PBM consists in an array of pseudorandomized DNA sequences that are optimized to include all the possible 10- or 11-mer DNA sequences, allowing the determination of binding specificities of most eukaryotic TFs. PBMs that can be synthesized by several manufacturing companies as single-stranded DNA are converted into double-stranded in a simple primer extension reaction. The protein of interest fused to an epitope tag is then incubated onto the PBM, and specific DNA-protein complexes are revealed in a series of immunological reactions coupled to a fluorophore. After scanning and quantifying PBMs, specific DNA motifs recognized by the protein are identified with ready-to-use scripts, generating comprehensive but accessible information about the DNA-binding specificity of the protein. This chapter describes detailed procedures for preparation of double-stranded PBMs, incubation with recombinant protein, and detection of protein-DNA complexes. Finally, we outline some cues for evaluating the biological role of DNA motifs obtained in vitro. PMID:24057393

  13. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This also represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.

  14. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This alsomore » represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.« less

  15. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-01-01

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. PMID:27112572

  16. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-01

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. PMID:27112572

  17. Molecular cloning of viral DNA from human genital warts.

    PubMed Central

    de Villiers, E M; Gissmann, L; zur Hausen, H

    1981-01-01

    The DNA of human papilloma virus type 6 (HPV 6) has been cloned in Escherichia coli K-12 by using pBR322 as vector. The DNA was cloned at the BamHI and EcoRI cleavage sites. This DNA was mapped by employing further restriction endonucleases and by terminal labeling. No major differences were noted as compared to HPV 6 DNA originating directly from a genital wart. The existence of at least two DNA subtypes (HPV 6a and 6b) became apparent. Images PMID:6275126

  18. Self-entanglement of long linear DNA vectors using transient non-B-DNA attachment points: a new concept for improvement of non-viral therapeutic gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2012-05-01

    The cell-specific and long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes often requires a full array of native gene control elements including distal enhancers, regulatory introns and chromatin organisation sequences. The delivery of such extended gene expression modules to human cells can be accomplished with non-viral high-molecular-weight DNA vectors, in particular with several classes of linear DNA vectors. All high-molecular-weight DNA vectors are susceptible to damage by shear stress, and while for some of the vectors the harmful impact of shear stress can be minimised through the transformation of the vectors to compact topological configurations by supercoiling and/or knotting, linear DNA vectors with terminal loops or covalently attached terminal proteins cannot be self-compacted in this way. In this case, the only available self-compacting option is self-entangling, which can be defined as the folding of single DNA molecules into a configuration with mutual restriction of molecular motion by the individual segments of bent DNA. A negatively charged phosphate backbone makes DNA self-repulsive, so it is reasonable to assume that a certain number of 'sticky points' dispersed within DNA could facilitate the entangling by bringing DNA segments into proximity and by interfering with the DNA slipping away from the entanglement. I propose that the spontaneous entanglement of vector DNA can be enhanced by the interlacing of the DNA with sites capable of mutual transient attachment through the formation of non-B-DNA forms, such as interacting cruciform structures, inter-segment triplexes, slipped-strand DNA, left-handed duplexes (Z-forms) or G-quadruplexes. It is expected that the non-B-DNA based entanglement of the linear DNA vectors would consist of the initial transient and co-operative non-B-DNA mediated binding events followed by tight self-ensnarement of the vector DNA. Once in the nucleoplasm of the target human cells, the DNA can be disentangled by type II

  19. Evidence for and Localization of Vegetative Viral DNA Replication by Autoradiographic Detection of RNA·DNA Hybrids in Sections of Tumors Induced by Shope Papilloma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Gérard; Jeanteur, Philippe; Croissant, Odile

    1971-01-01

    The occurrence and localization of vegetative viral DNA replication was studied in sections of tumors induced by the rabbit Shope papilloma virus, in cottontail and domestic rabbit papillomas, in primary domestic rabbit carcinoma, and in transplantable VX2 carcinoma, by in situ hybridization of radioactive RNA complementary to viral DNA. Vegetative viral DNA replication and viral protein synthesis were compared by means of cytological hybridization and immunofluorescence techniques on adjacent frozen sections. Vegetative viral DNA replication is completely repressed in the proliferating cellular layers of these tumors, which suggests a provirus state of the viral genome, as in other cells transformed by oncogenic DNA viruses. Vegetative viral DNA replication is induced, after initiation of the keratinization, in cells of cottonail rabbit papillomas, where it is usually followed by viral protein synthesis; this illustrates the influence of the physiological state of the host cell on the control of viral functions. Vegetative viral DNA replication is deteced only in a few cells of domestic rabbit papillomas, at the end of the keratinization process; this observation provides indirect evidence that the DNA synthesis specifically induced in these tumors after the onset of keratinization reflects mostly the induction of cellular DNA synthesis. Images PMID:4331563

  20. Computational predictions suggest that structural similarity in viral polymerases may lead to comparable allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jodian A; Espiritu, Marie V; Abraham, Joel; Thorpe, Ian F

    2016-08-15

    The identification of ligand-binding sites is often the first step in drug targeting and design. To date there are numerous computational tools available to predict ligand binding sites. These tools can guide or mitigate the need for experimental methods to identify binding sites, which often require significant resources and time. Here, we evaluate four ligand-binding site predictor (LBSP) tools for their ability to predict allosteric sites within the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) polymerase. Our results show that the LISE LBSP is able to identify all three target allosteric sites within the HCV polymerase as well as a known allosteric site in the Coxsackievirus polymerase. LISE was then employed to identify novel binding sites within the polymerases of the Dengue, West Nile, and Foot-and-mouth Disease viruses. Our results suggest that all three viral polymerases have putative sites that share structural or chemical similarities with allosteric pockets of the HCV polymerase. Thus, these binding locations may represent an evolutionarily conserved structural feature of several viral polymerases that could be exploited for the development of small molecule therapeutics. PMID:27262620

  1. Hydroxyapatite-mediated separation of double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA genomes from natural viral assemblages.

    PubMed

    Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Fadrosh, Douglas W; Thorpe, Joyce; Williamson, Shannon J

    2010-08-01

    Metagenomics can be used to determine the diversity of complex, often unculturable, viral communities with various nucleic acid compositions. Here, we report the use of hydroxyapatite chromatography to efficiently fractionate double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), dsRNA, and ssRNA genomes from known bacteriophages. Linker-amplified shotgun libraries were constructed to generate sequencing reads from each hydroxyapatite fraction. Greater than 90% of the reads displayed significant similarity to the expected genomes at the nucleotide level. These methods were applied to marine viruses collected from the Chesapeake Bay and the Dry Tortugas National Park. Isolated nucleic acids were fractionated using hydroxyapatite chromatography followed by linker-amplified shotgun library construction and sequencing. Taxonomic analysis demonstrated that the majority of environmental sequences, regardless of their source nucleic acid, were most similar to dsDNA viruses, reflecting the bias of viral metagenomic sequence databases. PMID:20543058

  2. DNA-Based Nanostructures: Changes of Mechanical Properties of DNA upon Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, Yury; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Gursky, Georgy; Nechipurenko, Dmitry; Polozov, Robert

    The formation of DNA-based nanostructures involves the binding of different kinds of ligands to DNA as well as the interaction of DNA molecules with each other. Complex formation between ligand and DNA can alter physicochemical properties of the DNA molecule. In the present work, the accessibility of DNA-ligand complexes to cleavage by DNase I are considered, and the exact algorithms for analysis of diagrams of DNase I footprinting for ligand-DNA complexes are obtained. Changes of mechanical properties of the DNA upon ligand binding are also demonstrated by the cleavage patterns generated upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes. Propagation of the mechanical perturbations along DNA in the presence of bound ligands is considered in terms of a string model with a heterogeneity corresponding to the position of a bound ligand on DNA. This model can reproduce qualitatively the cleavage patterns obtained upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes.

  3. Quantitative modeling of transcription factor binding specificities using DNA shape.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyin; Shen, Ning; Yang, Lin; Abe, Namiko; Horton, John; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2015-04-14

    DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) are a key component of gene regulatory processes. Underlying mechanisms that explain the highly specific binding of TFs to their genomic target sites are poorly understood. A better understanding of TF-DNA binding requires the ability to quantitatively model TF binding to accessible DNA as its basic step, before additional in vivo components can be considered. Traditionally, these models were built based on nucleotide sequence. Here, we integrated 3D DNA shape information derived with a high-throughput approach into the modeling of TF binding specificities. Using support vector regression, we trained quantitative models of TF binding specificity based on protein binding microarray (PBM) data for 68 mammalian TFs. The evaluation of our models included cross-validation on specific PBM array designs, testing across different PBM array designs, and using PBM-trained models to predict relative binding affinities derived from in vitro selection combined with deep sequencing (SELEX-seq). Our results showed that shape-augmented models compared favorably to sequence-based models. Although both k-mer and DNA shape features can encode interdependencies between nucleotide positions of the binding site, using DNA shape features reduced the dimensionality of the feature space. In addition, analyzing the feature weights of DNA shape-augmented models uncovered TF family-specific structural readout mechanisms that were not revealed by the DNA sequence. As such, this work combines knowledge from structural biology and genomics, and suggests a new path toward understanding TF binding and genome function. PMID:25775564

  4. NMR structural analysis of Sleeping Beauty transposase binding to DNA

    PubMed Central

    E Carpentier, Claire; Schreifels, Jeffrey M; Aronovich, Elena L; Carlson, Daniel F; Hackett, Perry B; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2014-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is the most widely used DNA transposon in genetic applications and is the only DNA transposon thus far in clinical trials for human gene therapy. In the absence of atomic level structural information, the development of SB transposon relied primarily on the biochemical and genetic homology data. While these studies were successful and have yielded hyperactive transposases, structural information is needed to gain a mechanistic understanding of transposase activity and guides to further improvement. We have initiated a structural study of SB transposase using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to investigate the properties of the DNA-binding domain of SB transposase in solution. We show that at physiologic salt concentrations, the SB DNA-binding domain remains mostly unstructured but its N-terminal PAI subdomain forms a compact, three-helical structure with a helix-turn-helix motif at higher concentrations of NaCl. Furthermore, we show that the full-length SB DNA-binding domain associates differently with inner and outer binding sites of the transposon DNA. We also show that the PAI subdomain of SB DNA-binding domain has a dominant role in transposase's attachment to the inverted terminal repeats of the transposon DNA. Overall, our data validate several earlier predictions and provide new insights on how SB transposase recognizes transposon DNA. PMID:24243759

  5. Modeling and simulation of the mechanical response from nanoindentation test of DNA-filled viral capsids.

    PubMed

    Ahadi, Aylin; Johansson, Dan; Evilevitch, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Viruses can be described as biological objects composed mainly of two parts: a stiff protein shell called a capsid, and a core inside the capsid containing the nucleic acid and liquid. In many double-stranded DNA bacterial viruses (aka phage), the volume ratio between the liquid and the encapsidated DNA is approximately 1:1. Due to the dominant DNA hydration force, water strongly mediates the interaction between the packaged DNA strands. Therefore, water that hydrates the DNA plays an important role in nanoindentation experiments of DNA-filled viral capsids. Nanoindentation measurements allow us to gain further insight into the nature of the hydration and electrostatic interactions between the DNA strands. With this motivation, a continuum-based numerical model for simulating the nanoindentation response of DNA-filled viral capsids is proposed here. The viral capsid is modeled as large- strain isotropic hyper-elastic material, whereas porous elasticity is adopted to capture the mechanical response of the filled viral capsid. The voids inside the viral capsid are assumed to be filled with liquid, which is modeled as a homogenous incompressible fluid. The motion of a fluid flowing through the porous medium upon capsid indentation is modeled using Darcy's law, describing the flow of fluid through a porous medium. The nanoindentation response is simulated using three-dimensional finite element analysis and the simulations are performed using the finite element code Abaqus. Force-indentation curves for empty, partially and completely DNA-filled capsids are directly compared to the experimental data for bacteriophage λ. Material parameters such as Young's modulus, shear modulus, and bulk modulus are determined by comparing computed force-indentation curves to the data from the atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. Predictions are made for pressure distribution inside the capsid, as well as the fluid volume ratio variation during the indentation test. PMID:23860868

  6. EMSA Analysis of DNA Binding By Rgg Proteins

    PubMed Central

    LaSarre, Breah; Federle, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, interaction of various proteins with DNA is essential for the regulation of specific target gene expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) is an in vitro approach allowing for the visualization of these protein-DNA interactions. Rgg proteins comprise a family of transcriptional regulators widespread among the Firmicutes. Some of these proteins function independently to regulate target gene expression, while others have now been demonstrated to function as effectors of cell-to-cell communication, having regulatory activities that are modulated via direct interaction with small signaling peptides. EMSA analysis can be used to assess DNA binding of either type of Rgg protein. EMSA analysis of Rgg protein activity has facilitated in vitro confirmation of regulatory targets, identification of precise DNA binding sites via DNA probe mutagenesis, and characterization of the mechanism by which some cognate signaling peptides modulate Rgg protein function (e.g. interruption of DNA-binding in some cases).

  7. Tissue myeloid cells in SIV-infected primates acquire viral DNA through phagocytosis of infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Calantone, Nina; Wu, Fan; Klase, Zachary; Deleage, Claire; Perkins, Molly; Matsuda, Kenta; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Ortiz, Alexandra M; Vinton, Carol L; Ourmanov, Ilnour; Loré, Karin; Douek, Daniel C; Estes, Jacob D; Hirsch, Vanessa M; Brenchley, Jason M

    2014-09-18

    The viral accessory protein Vpx, expressed by certain simian and human immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs and HIVs), is thought to improve viral infectivity of myeloid cells. We infected 35 Asian macaques and African green monkeys with viruses that do or do not express Vpx and examined viral targeting of cells in vivo. While lack of Vpx expression affected viral dynamics in vivo, with decreased viral loads and infection of CD4⁺ T cells, Vpx expression had no detectable effect on infectivity of myeloid cells. Moreover, viral DNA was observed only within myeloid cells in tissues not massively depleted of CD4⁺ T cells. Myeloid cells containing viral DNA also showed evidence of T cell phagocytosis in vivo, suggesting that their viral DNA may be attributed to phagocytosis of SIV-infected T cells. These data suggest that myeloid cells are not a major source of SIV in vivo, irrespective of Vpx expression. PMID:25238099

  8. The DNA-bending protein HMG-1 enhances progesterone receptor binding to its target DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Oñate, S A; Prendergast, P; Wagner, J P; Nissen, M; Reeves, R; Pettijohn, D E; Edwards, D P

    1994-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are ligand-dependent transcriptional activators that exert their effects by binding as dimers to cis-acting DNA sequences termed hormone response elements. When human progesterone receptor (PR), expressed as a full-length protein in a baculovirus system, was purified to homogeneity, it retained its ability to bind hormonal ligand and to dimerize but exhibited a dramatic loss in DNA binding activity for specific progesterone response elements (PREs). Addition of nuclear extracts from several cellular sources restored DNA binding activity, suggesting that PR requires a ubiquitous accessory protein for efficient interaction with specific DNA sequences. Here we have demonstrated that the high-mobility-group chromatin protein HMG-1, as a highly purified protein, dramatically enhanced binding of purified PR to PREs in gel mobility shift assays. This effect appeared to be highly selective for HMG-1, since a number of other nonspecific proteins failed to enhance PRE binding. Moreover, HMG-1 was effective when added in stoichiometric amounts with receptor, and it was capable of enhancing the DNA binding of both the A and B amino-terminal variants of PR. The presence of HMG-1 measurably increased the binding affinity of purified PR by 10-fold when a synthetic palindromic PRE was the target DNA. The increase in binding affinity for a partial palindromic PRE present in natural target genes was greater than 10-fold. Coimmunoprecipitation assays using anti-PR or anti-HMG-1 antibodies demonstrated that both PR and HMG-1 are present in the enhanced complex with PRE. HMG-1 protein has two conserved DNA binding domains (A and B), which recognize DNA structure rather than specific sequences. The A- or B-box domain expressed and purified from Escherichia coli independently stimulated the binding of PR to PRE, and the B box was able to functionally substitute for HMG-1 in enhancing PR binding. DNA ligase-mediated ring closure assays demonstrated that both the

  9. Viral DNA-Dependent Induction of Innate Immune Response to Hepatitis B Virus in Immortalized Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiuji; Clark, Daniel N.; Liu, Kuancheng; Xu, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and causes acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV is an enveloped virus with a relaxed circular (RC) DNA genome. In the nuclei of infected human hepatocytes, conversion of RC DNA from the incoming virion or cytoplasmic mature nucleocapsid (NC) to the covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, which serves as the template for producing all viral transcripts, is essential to establish and sustain viral replication. A prerequisite for CCC DNA formation is the uncoating (disassembly) of NCs to expose their RC DNA content for conversion to CCC DNA. We report here that in an immortalized mouse hepatocyte cell line, AML12HBV10, in which RC DNA exposure is enhanced, the exposed viral DNA could trigger an innate immune response that was able to modulate viral gene expression and replication. When viral gene expression and replication were low, the innate response initially stimulated these processes but subsequently acted to shut off viral gene expression and replication after they reached peak levels. Inhibition of viral DNA synthesis or cellular DNA sensing and innate immune signaling diminished the innate response. These results indicate that HBV DNA, when exposed in the host cell cytoplasm, can function to trigger an innate immune response that, in turn, modulates viral gene expression and replication. IMPORTANCE Chronic infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) afflicts hundreds of millions worldwide and is sustained by the episomal covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA in the nuclei of infected hepatocytes. Release of viral genomic DNA from cytoplasmic nucleocapsids (NCs) (NC disassembly or uncoating) is a prerequisite for its conversion to CCC DNA, which can also potentially expose the viral DNA to host DNA sensors and trigger an innate immune response. We have found that in an immortalized mouse hepatocyte cell line in which efficient CCC DNA formation was

  10. Binding-activated localization microscopy of DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Ingmar; Ries, Jonas; Klotzsch, Enrico; Ewers, Helge; Vogel, Viola

    2011-09-14

    Many nucleic acid stains show a strong fluorescence enhancement upon binding to double-stranded DNA. Here we exploit this property to perform superresolution microscopy based on the localization of individual binding events. The dynamic labeling scheme and the optimization of fluorophore brightness yielded a resolution of ∼14 nm (fwhm) and a spatial sampling of 1/nm. We illustrate our approach with two different DNA-binding dyes and apply it to visualize the organization of the bacterial chromosome in fixed Escherichia coli cells. In general, the principle of binding-activated localization microscopy (BALM) can be extended to other dyes and targets such as protein structures. PMID:21838238

  11. Identification of novel DNA binding proteins using DNA affinity chromatography-pulldown

    PubMed Central

    Jutras, Brandon L; Verma, Ashutosh

    2012-01-01

    Methods are presented through which one may isolate and identify novel bacterial DNA-binding proteins. Briefly, the DNA sequence of interest is affixed to beads, then incubated with bacterial cytoplasmic extract. Washes with buffers containing non-specific DNA and low salt concentrations will remove non-adhering and low-specificity DNA-binding proteins, while subsequent washes with higher salt concentrations will elute more specific DNA-binding proteins. Eluted proteins may then be identified by standard proteomic techniques. PMID:22307548

  12. A conserved amphipathic helix in the N-terminal regulatory region of the papillomavirus E1 helicase is required for efficient viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Morin, Geneviève; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Di Lello, Paola; Bergeron-Labrecque, Fanny; Omichinski, James G; Archambault, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase, with the help of E2, assembles at the viral origin into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. The N-terminal region (NTR) of E1 is essential for DNA replication in vivo but dispensable in vitro, suggesting that it has a regulatory function. By deletion analysis, we identified a conserved region of the E1 NTR needed for efficient replication of viral DNA. This region is predicted to form an amphipathic α-helix (AH) and shows sequence similarity to portions of the p53 and herpes simplex virus (HSV) VP16 transactivation domains known as transactivation domain 2 (TAD2) and VP16C, which fold into α-helices upon binding their target proteins, including the Tfb1/p62 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae/human) subunit of general transcription factor TFIIH. By nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we found that a peptide spanning the E1 AH binds Tfb1 on the same surface as TAD2/VP16C and with a comparable affinity, suggesting that it does bind as an α-helix. Furthermore, the E1 NTRs from several human papillomavirus (HPV) types could activate transcription in yeast, and to a lesser extent in mammalian cells, when fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain. Mutation of the three conserved hydrophobic residues in the E1 AH, analogous to those in TAD2/VP16C that directly contact their target proteins, decreased transactivation activity and, importantly, also reduced by 50% the ability of E1 to support transient replication of DNA in C33A cells, at a step following assembly of the E1-E2-ori preinitiation complex. These results demonstrate the existence of a conserved TAD2/VP16C-like AH in E1 that is required for efficient replication of viral DNA. PMID:21450828

  13. A Conserved Amphipathic Helix in the N-Terminal Regulatory Region of the Papillomavirus E1 Helicase Is Required for Efficient Viral DNA Replication▿†

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Geneviève; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Di Lello, Paola; Bergeron-Labrecque, Fanny; Omichinski, James G.; Archambault, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase, with the help of E2, assembles at the viral origin into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. The N-terminal region (NTR) of E1 is essential for DNA replication in vivo but dispensable in vitro, suggesting that it has a regulatory function. By deletion analysis, we identified a conserved region of the E1 NTR needed for efficient replication of viral DNA. This region is predicted to form an amphipathic α-helix (AH) and shows sequence similarity to portions of the p53 and herpes simplex virus (HSV) VP16 transactivation domains known as transactivation domain 2 (TAD2) and VP16C, which fold into α-helices upon binding their target proteins, including the Tfb1/p62 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae/human) subunit of general transcription factor TFIIH. By nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we found that a peptide spanning the E1 AH binds Tfb1 on the same surface as TAD2/VP16C and with a comparable affinity, suggesting that it does bind as an α-helix. Furthermore, the E1 NTRs from several human papillomavirus (HPV) types could activate transcription in yeast, and to a lesser extent in mammalian cells, when fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain. Mutation of the three conserved hydrophobic residues in the E1 AH, analogous to those in TAD2/VP16C that directly contact their target proteins, decreased transactivation activity and, importantly, also reduced by 50% the ability of E1 to support transient replication of DNA in C33A cells, at a step following assembly of the E1-E2-ori preinitiation complex. These results demonstrate the existence of a conserved TAD2/VP16C-like AH in E1 that is required for efficient replication of viral DNA. PMID:21450828

  14. Molecular forces for the binding and condensation of DNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xian-E; Yang, Jie

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to investigate the binding between a double-stranded DNA and bilayers of cationic lipids and zwitterionic lipids in low ionic-strength solutions. The binding of a DNA molecule to freshly cleaved mica surface in solution has also been measured. The binding of DNA molecules to cationic lipid bilayers has a minimal strength of approximately 45 pN. On zwitterionic lipid bilayers and mica surface, the minimal binding strength is approximately twice that value. The binding also has a dynamic nature, with only a certain percentage of recorded force curves containing the binding characteristics. Divalent Mg(2+) ions enhance the binding by increasing that percentage without any effect on the binding strength. We have also observed a long-range attraction between DNA molecules and cationic lipid bilayers with a strength much larger than the minimum force and a range well over 50 nm, possibly related to the driving force responsible for the two-dimensional condensation of DNA. PMID:11751322

  15. MHF complex senses branched DNA via binding a pair of crossover DNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Saro, Dorina; Sachpatzidis, Aristidis; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Schlingman, Daniel; Zheng, Xiao-Feng; Mack, Andrew; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Mochrie, Simon; Regan, Lynne; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Sung, Patrick; Xiong, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The conserved MHF1-MHF2 (MHF) complex functions in the activation of the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway of DNA damage response, in regulating homologous recombination, and in DNA replication fork maintenance. MHF facilitates the processing of multiple types of branched DNAs by the FA DNA translocase FANCM. Here we report the crystal structure of a human MHF-DNA complex that reveals the DNA binding mode of MHF. The structure suggests an MHF preference for branched DNA over double stranded DNA through engaging two duplex arms, which is supported by single molecule studies. Biochemical analyses verify that MHF preferentially engage DNA forks or various four-way junctions independent of the junction-site structure. Genetic experiments provide evidence that the observed DNA-binding interface of MHF is important for cellular resistance to DNA damage. These results provide insights into how the MHF complex recognizes branched DNA and stimulates FANCM activity at such a structure to promote genome maintenance. PMID:24390579

  16. Oligomerization of Baculovirus LEF-11 Is Involved in Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhan-Qi; Hu, Nan; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ting-Ting; Cao, Ming-Ya; Li, Hai-Qing; Lei, Xue-Jiao; Chen, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Pan, Min-Hui

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that baculovirus Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) late expression factor 11 (lef-11) is associated with viral DNA replication and have demonstrated that it potentially interacts with itself; however, whether LEF-11 forms oligomers and the impact of LEF-11 oligomerization on viral function have not been substantiated. In this study, we first demonstrated that LEF-11 is capable of forming oligomers. Additionally, a series of analyses using BmNPV LEF-11 truncation mutants indicated that two distinct domains control LEF-11 oligomerization (aa 42–61 and aa 72–101). LEF-11 truncation constructs were inserted into a lef-11-knockout BmNPV bacmid, which was used to demonstrate that truncated LEF-11 lacking either oligomerization domain abrogates viral DNA replication. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine that the conserved hydrophobic residues Y58&I59 (representing Y58 and I59), I85 and L88&L89 (representing L88 and L89) are required for LEF-11 oligomerization and viral DNA replication. Collectively, these data indicate that BmNPV LEF-11 oligomerization influences viral DNA replication. PMID:26660313

  17. Oligomerization of Baculovirus LEF-11 Is Involved in Viral DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhan-Qi; Hu, Nan; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ting-Ting; Cao, Ming-Ya; Li, Hai-Qing; Lei, Xue-Jiao; Chen, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Pan, Min-Hui

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that baculovirus Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) late expression factor 11 (lef-11) is associated with viral DNA replication and have demonstrated that it potentially interacts with itself; however, whether LEF-11 forms oligomers and the impact of LEF-11 oligomerization on viral function have not been substantiated. In this study, we first demonstrated that LEF-11 is capable of forming oligomers. Additionally, a series of analyses using BmNPV LEF-11 truncation mutants indicated that two distinct domains control LEF-11 oligomerization (aa 42-61 and aa 72-101). LEF-11 truncation constructs were inserted into a lef-11-knockout BmNPV bacmid, which was used to demonstrate that truncated LEF-11 lacking either oligomerization domain abrogates viral DNA replication. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine that the conserved hydrophobic residues Y58&I59 (representing Y58 and I59), I85 and L88&L89 (representing L88 and L89) are required for LEF-11 oligomerization and viral DNA replication. Collectively, these data indicate that BmNPV LEF-11 oligomerization influences viral DNA replication. PMID:26660313

  18. Mechanochemical regulations of RPA's binding to ssDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin; Le, Shimin; Basu, Anindita; Chazin, Walter J.; Yan, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein that serves to protect ssDNA from degradation and annealing, and as a template for recruitment of many downstream factors in virtually all DNA transactions in cell. During many of these transactions, DNA is tethered and is likely subject to force. Previous studies of RPA's binding behavior on ssDNA were conducted in the absence of force; therefore the RPA-ssDNA conformations regulated by force remain unclear. Here, using a combination of atomic force microscopy imaging and mechanical manipulation of single ssDNA tethers, we show that force mediates a switch of the RPA bound ssDNA from amorphous aggregation to a much more regular extended conformation. Further, we found an interesting non-monotonic dependence of the binding affinity on monovalent salt concentration in the presence of force. In addition, we discovered that zinc in micromolar concentrations drives ssDNA to a unique, highly stiff and more compact state. These results provide new mechanochemical insights into the influences and the mechanisms of action of RPA on large single ssDNA.

  19. Mechanochemical regulations of RPA's binding to ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Le, Shimin; Basu, Anindita; Chazin, Walter J; Yan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein that serves to protect ssDNA from degradation and annealing, and as a template for recruitment of many downstream factors in virtually all DNA transactions in cell. During many of these transactions, DNA is tethered and is likely subject to force. Previous studies of RPA's binding behavior on ssDNA were conducted in the absence of force; therefore the RPA-ssDNA conformations regulated by force remain unclear. Here, using a combination of atomic force microscopy imaging and mechanical manipulation of single ssDNA tethers, we show that force mediates a switch of the RPA bound ssDNA from amorphous aggregation to a much more regular extended conformation. Further, we found an interesting non-monotonic dependence of the binding affinity on monovalent salt concentration in the presence of force. In addition, we discovered that zinc in micromolar concentrations drives ssDNA to a unique, highly stiff and more compact state. These results provide new mechanochemical insights into the influences and the mechanisms of action of RPA on large single ssDNA. PMID:25787788

  20. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.

    1997-03-25

    A modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase is disclosed. The modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase. 6 figs.

  1. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase wherein the modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase.

  2. Fused protein domains inhibit DNA binding by LexA.

    PubMed Central

    Golemis, E A; Brent, R

    1992-01-01

    Many studies of transcription activation employ fusions of activation domains to DNA binding domains derived from the bacterial repressor LexA and the yeast activator GAL4. Such studies often implicitly assume that DNA binding by the chimeric proteins is equivalent to that of the protein donating the DNA binding moiety. To directly investigate this issue, we compared operator binding by a series of LexA-derivative proteins to operator binding by native LexA, by using both in vivo and in vitro assays. We show that operator binding by many proteins such as LexA-Myc, LexA-Fos, and LexA-Bicoid is severely impaired, while binding of other LexA-derivative proteins, such as those that carry bacterially encoded acidic sequences ("acid blobs"), is not. Our results also show that DNA binding by LexA derivatives that contain the LexA carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (amino acids 88 to 202) is considerably stronger than binding by fusions that lack it and that heterologous dimerization motifs cannot substitute for the LexA88-202 function. These results suggest the need to reevaluate some previous studies of activation that employed LexA derivatives and modifications to recent experimental approaches that use LexA and GAL4 derivatives to detect and study protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:1620111

  3. DNA binding and transcription activation by chicken interferon regulatory factor-3 (chIRF-3)

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Caroline E.; May, Donna L.; Deeley, Roger G.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors involved in the cellular response to interferons and viral infection. Previously we isolated an IRF from a chicken embryonic liver cDNA library. Using a PCR-based binding site selection assay, we have characterised the binding specificity of chIRF-3. The optimal binding site (OBS) fits within the consensus interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) but the specificity of chIRF-3 binding allows less variation in nucleotides outside the core IRF-binding sequence. A comparison of IRF-1 and chIRF-3 binding to ISREs in electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that the binding specificity of chIRF-3 was clearly distinguishable from IRF-1. The selection assay also showed that chIRF-3 is capable of binding an inverted repeat of two half OBSs separated by 10–13 nt. ChIRF-3 appears to bind both the OBS and inverted repeat sites as a dimer with the protein–protein interaction requiring a domain between amino acids 117 and 311. In transfection experiments expression of chIRF-3 strongly activated a promoter containing the OBS. The activation domain was mapped to between amino acids 138 and 221 and a domain inhibitory to activation was also mapped to the C-terminal portion of chIRF-3. PMID:11095692

  4. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  5. Sequence-specific binding of luzopeptin to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, K R; Davies, H; Adams, G R; Portugal, J; Waring, M J

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the binding of luzopeptin, an antitumor antibiotic, to five DNA fragments of varying base composition. The drug forms a tight, possibly covalent, complex with the DNA causing a reduction in mobility on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels and some smearing of the bands consistent with intramolecular cross-linking of DNA duplexes. DNAase I and micrococcal nuclease footprinting experiments suggest that the drug binds best to regions containing alternating A and T residues, although no consensus di- or trinucleotide sequence emerges. Binding to other sites is not excluded and at moderate ligand concentrations the DNA is almost totally protected from enzyme attack. Ligand-induced enhancement of DNAase I cleavage is observed at both AT and GC-rich regions. The sequence selectivity and characteristics of luzopeptin binding are quite different from those of echinomycin, a bifunctional intercalator of related structure. Images PMID:3362673

  6. Quantitative Determination of DNA-Ligand Binding Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of fluorescence spectroscopy for determining the binding of the intercalcating agent crhidium bromide to DNA is being described. The analysis used simple measurement techniques and hence can be easily adopted by the students for a better understanding.

  7. Structure-Based Mutational Analysis of the Bovine Papillomavirus E1 Helicase Domain Identifies Residues Involved in the Nonspecific DNA Binding Activity Required for Double Trimer Formation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofei; Schuck, Stephen; Stenlund, Arne

    2010-01-01

    The papillomavirus E1 protein is a multifunctional initiator protein responsible for preparing the viral DNA template for initiation of DNA replication. The E1 protein encodes two DNA binding activities that are required for initiation of DNA replication. A well-characterized sequence-specific DNA binding activity resides in the E1 DBD and is used to tether E1 to the papillomavirus ori. A non-sequence-specific DNA binding activity is also required for formation of the E1 double trimer (DT) complex, which is responsible for the local template melting that precedes loading of the E1 helicase. This DNA binding activity is very poorly understood. We use a structure-based mutagenesis approach to identify residues in the E1 helicase domain that are required for the non-sequence-specific DNA binding and DT formation. We found that three groups of residues are involved in nonspecific DNA binding: the E1 β-hairpin structure containing R505, K506, and H507; a hydrophobic loop containing F464; and a charged loop containing K461 together generate the binding surface involved in nonspecific DNA binding. These residues are well conserved in the T antigens from the polyomaviruses, indicating that the polyomaviruses share this nonspecific DNA binding activity. PMID:20147403

  8. Structural basis for DNA binding by replication initiator Mcm10

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Eric M.; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Haworth, Justin; Greer, Briana; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin; Chazin, Walter J.; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2009-06-30

    Mcm10 is an essential eukaryotic DNA replication protein required for assembly and progression of the replication fork. The highly conserved internal domain (Mcm10-ID) has been shown to physically interact with single-stranded (ss) DNA, DNA polymerase alpha, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The crystal structure of Xenopus laevis Mcm10-ID presented here reveals a DNA binding architecture composed of an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-fold followed in tandem by a variant and highly basic zinc finger. NMR chemical shift perturbation and mutational studies of DNA binding activity in vitro reveal how Mcm10 uses this unique surface to engage ssDNA. Corresponding mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae result in increased sensitivity to replication stress, demonstrating the functional importance of DNA binding by this region of Mcm10 to replication. In addition, mapping Mcm10 mutations known to disrupt PCNA, polymerase alpha, and DNA interactions onto the crystal structure provides insight into how Mcm10 might coordinate protein and DNA binding within the replisome.

  9. Host Tissue and Glycan Binding Specificities of Avian Viral Attachment Proteins Using Novel Avian Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Vries, Robert P.; Eggert, Amber M.; Wandee, Nantaporn; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, Monique H.

    2015-01-01

    The initial interaction between viral attachment proteins and the host cell is a critical determinant for the susceptibility of a host for a particular virus. To increase our understanding of avian pathogens and the susceptibility of poultry species, we developed novel avian tissue microarrays (TMAs). Tissue binding profiles of avian viral attachment proteins were studied by performing histochemistry on multi-species TMA, comprising of selected tissues from ten avian species, and single-species TMAs, grouping organ systems of each species together. The attachment pattern of the hemagglutinin protein was in line with the reported tropism of influenza virus H5N1, confirming the validity of TMAs in profiling the initial virus-host interaction. The previously believed chicken-specific coronavirus (CoV) M41 spike (S1) protein displayed a broad attachment pattern to respiratory tissues of various avian species, albeit with lower affinity than hemagglutinin, suggesting that other avian species might be susceptible for chicken CoV. When comparing tissue-specific binding patterns of various avian coronaviral S1 proteins on the single-species TMAs, chicken and partridge CoV S1 had predominant affinity for the trachea, while pigeon CoV S1 showed marked preference for lung of their respective hosts. Binding of all coronaviral S1 proteins was dependent on sialic acids; however, while chicken CoV S1 preferred sialic acids type I lactosamine (Gal(1-3)GlcNAc) over type II (Gal(1-4)GlcNAc), the fine glycan specificities of pigeon and partridge CoVs were different, as chicken CoV S1-specific sialylglycopolymers could not block their binding to tissues. Taken together, TMAs provide a novel platform in the field of infectious diseases to allow identification of binding specificities of viral attachment proteins and are helpful to gain insight into the susceptibility of host and organ for avian pathogens. PMID:26035584

  10. The bacterial DnaA-trio replication origin element specifies single-stranded DNA initiator binding.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Tomas T; Harran, Omar; Murray, Heath

    2016-06-16

    DNA replication is tightly controlled to ensure accurate inheritance of genetic information. In all organisms, initiator proteins possessing AAA+ (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) domains bind replication origins to license new rounds of DNA synthesis. In bacteria the master initiator protein, DnaA, is highly conserved and has two crucial DNA binding activities. DnaA monomers recognize the replication origin (oriC) by binding double-stranded DNA sequences (DnaA-boxes); subsequently, DnaA filaments assemble and promote duplex unwinding by engaging and stretching a single DNA strand. While the specificity for duplex DnaA-boxes by DnaA has been appreciated for over 30 years, the sequence specificity for single-strand DNA binding has remained unknown. Here we identify a new indispensable bacterial replication origin element composed of a repeating trinucleotide motif that we term the DnaA-trio. We show that the function of the DnaA-trio is to stabilize DnaA filaments on a single DNA strand, thus providing essential precision to this binding mechanism. Bioinformatic analysis detects DnaA-trios in replication origins throughout the bacterial kingdom, indicating that this element is part of the core oriC structure. The discovery and characterization of the novel DnaA-trio extends our fundamental understanding of bacterial DNA replication initiation, and because of the conserved structure of AAA+ initiator proteins these findings raise the possibility of specific recognition motifs within replication origins of higher organisms. PMID:27281207

  11. An Electrostatically Self-Assembled Ternary Nanocomplex as a Non-Viral Vector for the Delivery of Plasmid DNA into Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun-Hee; Noh, Young-Woock; Cho, Mi Young; Lim, Yong Taik

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed electrostatically self-assembled ternary nanocomplexes as a safe and effective non-viral vector for the delivery of plasmid DNA (pDNA) into human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). Although polyethylenimine (PEI) polymers initially showed excellent performance as gene delivery carriers, their broad use has been limited by cytotoxicity resulting from their strong positive charge. To reduce the cytotoxicity, we utilized anionic hyaluronic acid (HA) as a corona layer material for pDNA/PEI binary nanocomplexes. HA was also introduced to increase the targeting efficiency of pDNA/PEI nanocomplexes because HA has can bind CD44 that is highly expressed on the surface of hASCs. We confirmed that the addition of HA changed the surface charge of pDNA/PEI nanocomplexes from positive to negative. The pDNA/PEI/HA ternary nanocomplexes showed high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity compared with commercially available products. When hASCs were pretreated with HA to passivate CD44, the transfection efficiency of pDNA/PEI/HA nanocomplexes was significantly reduced. These results suggest that HA that can act as a targeting ligand to CD44 contributed to the improved transfection of pDNA into hASCs. Our novel pDNA/PEI/HA nanocomplexes may be used as an effective non-viral pDNA delivery system for hASCs. PMID:27136523

  12. Structural determinants of HIV-1 Vif susceptibility and DNA binding in APOBEC3F

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Karen K.; Sultana, Azmiri; Azimi, Farshad C.; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 family of DNA cytosine deaminases serves as a front-line intrinsic immune response to inhibit the replication of diverse retroviruses. APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are the most potent factors against HIV-1. As a countermeasure, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) targets APOBEC3s for proteasomal degradation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Vif-binding domain in APOBEC3F and a novel assay to assess Vif-APOBEC3 binding. Our results point to an amphipathic surface that is conserved in APOBEC3s as critical for Vif susceptibility in APOBEC3F. Electrostatic interactions likely mediate Vif binding. Moreover, structure-guided mutagenesis reveals a straight ssDNA-binding groove distinct from the Vif-binding site, and a novel ‘aromatic switch’ is proposed to explain DNA substrate specificities across the APOBEC3 family. This study opens new lines of inquiry that will further our understanding of APOBEC3-mediated retroviral restriction and provides an accurate template for structure-guided development of inhibitors targeting the APOBEC3-Vif axis. PMID:24185281

  13. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat. PMID:12750370

  14. The DNA-Binding Domain of Yeast Rap1 Interacts with Double-Stranded DNA in Multiple Binding Modes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae repressor-activator protein 1 (Rap1) is an essential protein involved in multiple steps of DNA regulation, as an activator in transcription, as a repressor at silencer elements, and as a major component of the shelterin-like complex at telomeres. All the known functions of Rap1 require the known high-affinity and specific interaction of the DNA-binding domain with its recognition sequences. In this work, we focus on the interaction of the DNA-binding domain of Rap1 (Rap1DBD) with double-stranded DNA substrates. Unexpectedly, we found that while Rap1DBD forms a high-affinity 1:1 complex with its DNA recognition site, it can also form lower-affinity complexes with higher stoichiometries on DNA. These lower-affinity interactions are independent of the presence of the recognition sequence, and we propose they originate from the ability of Rap1DBD to bind to DNA in two different binding modes. In one high-affinity binding mode, Rap1DBD likely binds in the conformation observed in the available crystal structures. In the other alternative lower-affinity binding mode, we propose that a single Myb-like domain of the Rap1DBD makes interactions with DNA, allowing for more than one protein molecule to bind to the DNA substrates. Our findings suggest that the Rap1DBD does not simply target the protein to its recognition sequence but rather it might be a possible point of regulation. PMID:25382181

  15. Total HIV-1 DNA, a Marker of Viral Reservoir Dynamics with Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Avettand-Fènoël, Véronique; Hocqueloux, Laurent; Ghosn, Jade; Cheret, Antoine; Frange, Pierre; Melard, Adeline; Viard, Jean-Paul; Rouzioux, Christine

    2016-10-01

    HIV-1 DNA persists in infected cells despite combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), forming viral reservoirs. Recent trials of strategies targeting latent HIV reservoirs have rekindled hopes of curing HIV infection, and reliable markers are thus needed to evaluate viral reservoirs. Total HIV DNA quantification is simple, standardized, sensitive, and reproducible. Total HIV DNA load influences the course of the infection and is therefore clinically relevant. In particular, it is predictive of progression to AIDS and death, independently of HIV RNA load and the CD4 cell count. Baseline total HIV DNA load is predictive of the response to cART. It declines during cART but remains quantifiable, at a level that reflects both the history of infection (HIV RNA zenith, CD4 cell count nadir) and treatment efficacy (residual viremia, cumulative viremia, immune restoration, immune cell activation). Total HIV DNA load in blood is also predictive of the presence and severity of some HIV-1-associated end-organ disorders. It can be useful to guide individual treatment, notably, therapeutic de-escalation. Although it does not distinguish between replication-competent and -defective latent viruses, the total HIV DNA load in blood, tissues, and cells provides insights into HIV pathogenesis, probably because all viral forms participate in host cell activation and HIV pathogenesis. Total HIV DNA is thus a biomarker of HIV reservoirs, which can be defined as all infected cells and tissues containing all forms of HIV persistence that participate in pathogenesis. This participation may occur through the production of new virions, creating new cycles of infection and disseminating infected cells; maintenance or amplification of reservoirs by homeostatic cell proliferation; and viral transcription and synthesis of viral proteins without new virion production. These proteins can induce immune activation, thus participating in the vicious circle of HIV pathogenesis. PMID:27559075

  16. Structural Characterization of Novel Gemini Non-viral DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Foldvari,M.; Badea, I.; Wettig, S.; Verrall, R.; Bagonluri, M.

    2006-01-01

    The structural and physicochemical properties of novel cationic lipid-based DNA complexes have been investigated for the purpose of designing micro/nano-scale self-assembling delivery systems for cutaneous gene therapy. DNA/gemini surfactant (spacer n = 3-16; chain m = 12 or 16) complexes (1 : 10 charge ratio), with or without dioleoylphosphatidyl-ethanolamine (DOPE), designed for cellular transfection, were generally in the range of 100-200 nm as demonstrated by atomic force microscopy and particle size analysis. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements indicated that the DNA/gemini complexes lacked long-range order, whereas DNA/gemini/DOPE complexes exhibited lamellar and polymorphic phases other than hexagonal. Correlation studies using transfection efficiency data in PAM 212 keratinocytes and in vitro skin absorption indicated that formulations containing gemini surfactants having the ability to induce structures other than lamellar in the resulting complexes, generally exhibited greater transfection activity and cutaneous absorption.

  17. Subgenomic viral DNA species synthesized in simian cells by human and simian adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, E

    1981-01-01

    DNA synthesized after infection of simian tissue culture cells (BSC-1 or CV-1) with human adenovirus type 2 or 5 or with simian adenovirus 7 was characterized. It was demonstrated that as much as 40% of the virus-specific DNA in nuclei of infected monkey cells consists of subgenomic pieces. No subgenomic viral DNA species were detected in the nuclei of human (HeLa) cells infected with these adenovirus types. Restriction analysis showed that these short viral DNA molecules contain normal amounts of the sequences from the ends of the viral genome, whereas internal regions are underrepresented. The production of subgenomic DNAs is not correlated with semipermissive infection. Although adenovirus types 2 and 5 are restricted in monkey cells, these cells are fully permissive for simian adenovirus 7. HR404, an adenovirus type 5 mutant which is not restricted in monkey cells, produced the same percentage of subgenomic DNAs as did its wild type (restricted) parent, and coinfection of monkey cells with adenovirus type 5 DNAs. The array of predominant size classes among the heterogeneously sized short DNAs is serotype specific. Extensive plaque purification and comparison of wild-type adenovirus type 5 with several viral mutants indicated that the distribution of aberrant sizes of DNA is characteristic of the virus and not a result of random replicative errors and then enrichment of particular species. Images PMID:6261009

  18. Isohelical DNA-Binding Oligomers: Antiviral Activity and Application for the Design of Nanostructured Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gursky, Georgy; Nikitin, Alexei; Surovaya, Anna; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Andronova, Valeria; Galegov, Georgy

    We performed a systematic search for new structural motifs isohelical to double-stranded DNA and found five motifs that can be used for the design and synthesis of new DNA-binding oligomers. Some of the DNA-binding oligomers can be equipped with fluorescence chromophores and metal-chelating groups and may serve as conductive wires in nano-scaled electric circuits. A series of new DNA-binding ligands were synthesized by a modular assembly of pyrrole carboxamides and novel pseudopeptides of the form (XY)n. Here, Y is a glycine residue; n is the degree of polymerization. X is an unusual amino acid residue containing a five-membered aromatic ring. Antiviral activity of bis-linked netropsin derivatives is studied. Bis-netropsins containing 15 and 31 lysine residues at the N-termini inhibit most effectively reproduction of the herpes virus type 1 in the Vero cell culture, including virus variants resistant to acyclovir and its analogues. Antiviral activity of bis-linked netropsin derivatives is correlated with their ability to interact with long clusters of AT-base pairs in the origin of replication of the viral DNA.

  19. Increment of DNA topoisomerases in chemically and virally transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Crespi, M.D.; Mladovan, A.G.; Baldi, A. )

    1988-03-01

    The activities of topoisomerases I and II were assayed in subcellular extracts obtained from nontumorigenic BALB/c 3T3 A31 and normal rat kidney (NRK) cell lines and from the same cells transformed by benzo(a)pyrene (BP-A31), Moloney (M-MSV-A31) and Kirsten (K-A31) sarcoma viruses, and simian virus 40 (SV-NRK). The enzymatic activity of topoisomerase I was monitored by the relaxation of negatively supercoiled pBR322 DNA and by the formation of covalent complexes between {sup 32}P-labeled DNA and topoisomerase I. Topoisomerase II activity was determined by decatenation of kinetoplast DNA (k-DNA). It was found that nuclear and cytoplasmic type I topoisomerase specific activities were higher in every transformed cell line than in the normal counterparts. These differences cannot be attributed to an inhibitory factor present in A31 cells. When chromatin was treated at increasing ionic strengths, the 0.4 M NaCl extract showed the highest topoisomerase I specific activity. Spontaneously transformed A31 cells showed topoisomerase I activity similar to that of extracts of cells transformed by benzo(a)pyrene. Topoisomerase II specific activity was also increased in SV-NRK cells, as judged by the assay for decatenation of k-DNA to yield minicircle DNA.

  20. Four major sequence elements of simian virus 40 large T antigen coordinate its specific and nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, D T; Loeber, G; Tegtmeyer, P

    1990-01-01

    By mutational analysis, we have identified a motif critical to the proper recognition and binding of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T antigen) to virus DNA sequences at the origin of DNA replication. This motif is tripartite and consists of two elements (termed A1 and B2) that are necessary for sequence-specific binding of the origin and a central element (B1) which is required for nonspecific DNA-binding activity. Certain amino acids in elements A1 (residues 152 to 155) and B2 (203 to 207) may make direct contact with the GAGGC pentanucleotide sequences in binding sites I and II on the DNA. Alternatively, these two elements could determine the proper structure of the DNA-binding domain, although for a number of reasons we favor the first possibility. In contrast, element B1 (183 to 187) is most likely important for recognizing a general structural feature of DNA. Elements A1 and B2 are nearly identical in all known papovavirus T antigens, whereas B1 is identical only in the closely related papovaviruses simian virus 40, BK virus, and JC virus. In addition to these three elements, a fourth (B3; residues 215 to 219) is necessary for the binding of T antigen to site II but not to site I. We propose that additional contact sites on T antigen are involved in the interaction with site II to initiate the replication of the viral DNA. PMID:2157865

  1. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  2. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-05-01

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  3. Human cytomegalovirus RL13 protein interacts with host NUDT14 protein affecting viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanping; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between the host and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is important in determining the outcome of a viral infection. The HCMV RL13 gene product exerts independent, inhibitory effects on viral growth in fibroblasts and epithelial cells. At present, there are few reports on the interactions between the HCMV RL13 protein and human host proteins. The present study provided direct evidence for the specific interaction between HCMV RL13 and host nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X (nudix)‑type motif 14 (NUDT14), a UDP‑glucose pyrophosphatase, using two‑hybrid screening, an in vitro glutathione S‑transferase pull‑down assay, and co‑immunoprecipitation in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Additionally, the RL13 protein was shown to co‑localize with the NUDT14 protein in the HEK293 cell membrane and cytoplasm, demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Decreasing the expression level of NUDT14 via NUDT14‑specific small interfering RNAs increased the number of viral DNA copies in the HCMV‑infected cells. However, the overexpression of NUDT14 in a stably expressing cell line did not affect viral DNA levels significantly in the HCMV infected cells. Based on the known functions of NUDT14, the results of the present study suggested that the interaction between the RL13 protein and NUDT14 protein may be involved in HCMV DNA replication, and that NUDT14 may offer potential in the modulation of viral infection. PMID:26781650

  4. Multispectroscopic studies of the interaction of calf thymus DNA with the anti-viral drug, valacyclovir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Fatahi, Navid; Mahdavi, Maryam; Nejad, Zahra Kiani; Pourfoulad, Mehdi

    2011-12-01

    The present study investigated the binding interaction between an antiviral drug, valacyclovir and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) using emission, absorption, circular dichroism, viscosity and DNA melting studies. In fluorimetric studies, thermodynamic enhancement constant ( KD) and bimolecular enhancement constant ( KB) were calculated at different temperatures and demonstrated that fluorescence enhancement is not initiated by a dynamic process, but instead by a static process that involves complex DNA formation in the ground state. Further, the enthalpy and entropy of the reaction between the drug and CT-DNA showed that the reaction is exothermic and enthalpy-favored. In addition, detectable changes in the circular dichroism spectrum of CT-DNA in the presence of valacyclovir indicated conformational changes in the DNA double helix following interaction with the drug. All these results prove that this antiviral drug interacts with CT-DNA via an intercalative mode of binding.

  5. dimerization and DNA binding alter phosphorylation of Fos and Jun

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, C.; Baker, S.J.; Curran, T. ); Lees-Miller, S.P.; Anderson, C.W. ); Marshak, D.R. )

    1993-07-15

    Fos and Jun form dimeric complexes that bind to activator protein 1 (AP-1) DNA sequences and regulate gene expression. The levels of expression and activities of these proteins are regulated by a variety of extracellular stimuli. They are thought to function in nuclear signal transduction processes in many different cell types. The role of Fos and Jun in gene transcription is complex and may be regulated in several ways including association with different dimerization partners, interactions with other transcription factors, effects on DNA topology, and reduction/oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue in the DNA-binding domain. In addition, phosphorylation has been suggested to control the activity of Fos and Jun. Here the authors show that phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by several protein kinases is affected by dimerization and binding to DNA. Jun homodimers are phosphorylated efficiently by casein kinase II, whereas Fos-Jun heterodimers are not. DNA binding also reduces phosphorylation of Jun by casein kinase II, p34[sup cdc2] (cdc2) kinase, and protein kinase C. Phosphorylation of Fos by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and cdc2 is relatively insensitive to dimerization and DNA binding, whereas phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by DNA-dependent protein kinase is dramatically stimulated by binding to the AP-1 site. These results imply that different protein kinases can distinguish among Fos and Jun proteins in the form of monomers, homodimers, and heterodimers and between DNA-bound and non-DNA-bound proteins. Thus, potentially, these different states of Fos and Jun can be recognized and regulated independently by phosphorylation. 44 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Defining a minimal estrogen receptor DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Mader, S; Chambon, P; White, J H

    1993-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a transcriptional regulator which binds to cognate palindromic DNA sequences known as estrogen response elements (EREs). A 66 amino acid core region which contains two zinc fingers and is highly conserved among the nuclear receptors is essential for site specific DNA recognition. However, it remains unclear how many flanking amino acids in addition to the zinc finger core are required for DNA binding. Here, we have characterized the minimal DNA binding region of the human ER by analysing the DNA binding properties of a series of deletion mutants expressed in bacteria. We find that the 66 amino acid zinc finger core of the DBD fails to bind DNA, and that the C-terminal end of the minimal ER DBD required for binding to perfectly palindromic EREs corresponds to the limit of 100% amino acid homology between the chicken and human receptors, which represents the boundary between regions C and D in the ER. Moreover, amino acids of region D up to 30 residues C-terminal to the zinc fingers greatly stabilize DNA binding by the DBD to perfectly palindromic EREs and are absolutely required for formation of gel retardation complexes by the DBD on certain physiological imperfectly palindromic EREs. These results indicate that in addition to the zinc finger core, amino acids C-terminal to the core in regions C and D play a key role in DNA binding by the ER, particularly to imperfectly palindromic response elements. The ER DBD expressed in E. coli binds as a dimer to ERE palindromes in a highly cooperative manner and forms only low levels of monomeric protein-DNA complexes on either palindromic or half-palindromic response elements. Conversion of ER amino acids 222 to 226, which lie within region C, to the corresponding residues of the human RAR alpha abolishes formation of dimeric protein-DNA complexes. Conversely, replacement of the same region of RAR alpha with ER residues 222 to 226 creates a derivative that, unlike the RAR alpha DBD, binds

  7. The primary structure of Plasmodium falciparum DNA polymerase delta is similar to drug sensitive delta-like viral DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Fox, B A; Bzik, D J

    1991-12-01

    We report the isolation and sequencing of genomic DNA clones that encode the 1094-amino acid catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase delta from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Protein sequence comparison to other DNA polymerases revealed the presence of six highly conserved regions found in alpha-like DNA polymerases from different prokaryotic, viral, and eukaryotic sources. Five additional regions of amino acid sequence similarity that are only conserved in delta and delta-like DNA polymerases, so far, were present in P. falciparum DNA polymerase delta. P. falciparum DNA polymerase delta was highly similar to both Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase delta (DNA polymerase III; CDC2) and Epstein-Barr virus DNA polymerase at the amino acid sequence, and the predicted protein secondary structure levels. The gene that encodes DNA polymerase delta resides as a single copy on chromosome 10, and is expressed as a 4.5-kb mRNA during the trophozoite and schizont stages when parasite chromosomal DNA synthesis is active. PMID:1775172

  8. Pax-3-DNA interaction: flexibility in the DNA binding and induction of DNA conformational changes by paired domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chalepakis, G; Wijnholds, J; Gruss, P

    1994-01-01

    The mouse Pax-3 gene encodes a protein that is a member of the Pax family of DNA binding proteins. Pax-3 contains two DNA binding domains: a paired domain (PD) and a paired type homeodomain (HD). Both domains are separated by 53 amino acids and interact synergistically with a sequence harboring an ATTA motif (binding to the HD) and a GTTCC site (binding to the PD) separated by 5 base pairs. Here we show that the interaction of Pax-3 with these two binding sites is independent of their angular orientation. In addition, the protein spacer region between the HD and the PD can be shortened without changing the spatial flexibility of the two DNA binding domains which interact with DNA. Furthermore, by using circular permutation analysis we determined that binding of Pax-3 to a DNA fragment containing a specific binding site causes conformational changes in the DNA, as indicated by the different mobilities of the Pax-3-DNA complexes. The ability to change the conformation of the DNA was found to be an intrinsic property of the Pax-3 PD and of all Pax proteins that we tested so far. These in vitro studies suggest that interaction of Pax proteins with their specific sequences in vivo may result in an altered DNA conformation. Images PMID:8065927

  9. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  10. Viral nanomotors for packaging of dsDNA and dsRNA

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peixuan; Lee, Tae Jin

    2007-01-01

    While capsid proteins are assembled around single-stranded genomic DNA or RNA in rod-shaped viruses, the lengthy double-stranded genome of other viruses is packaged forcefully within a preformed protein shell. This entropically unfavourable DNA or RNA packaging is accomplished by an ATP-driven viral nanomotor, which is mainly composed of two components, the oligomerized channel and the packaging enzymes. This intriguing DNA or RNA packaging process has provoked interest among virologists, bacteriologists, biochemists, biophysicists, chemists, structural biologists and computational scientists alike, especially those interested in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, AAA+ family proteins, energy conversion, cell membrane transport, DNA or RNA replication and antiviral therapy. This review mainly focuses on the motors of double-stranded DNA viruses, but double-stranded RNA viral motors are also discussed due to interesting similarities. The novel and ingenious configuration of these nanomotors has inspired the development of biomimetics for nanodevices. Advances in structural and functional studies have increased our understanding of the molecular basis of biological movement to the point where we can begin thinking about possible applications of the viral DNA packaging motor in nanotechnology and medical applications. PMID:17501915

  11. Comparison of DNA Extraction Methods from Small Samples of Newborn Screening Cards Suitable for Retrospective Perinatal Viral Research

    PubMed Central

    McMichael, Gai L.; Highet, Amanda R.; Gibson, Catherine S.; Goldwater, Paul N.; O'Callaghan, Michael E.; Alvino, Emily R.; MacLennan, Alastair H.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable detection of viral DNA in stored newborn screening cards (NSC) would give important insight into possible silent infection during pregnancy and around birth. We sought a DNA extraction method with sufficient sensitivity to detect low copy numbers of viral DNA from small punch samples of NSC. Blank NSC were spotted with seronegative EDTA-blood and seropositive EBV EDTA-blood. DNA was extracted with commercial and noncommercial DNA extraction methods and quantified on a spectrofluorometer using a PicoGreen dsDNA quantification kit. Serial dilutions of purified viral DNA controls determined the sensitivity of the amplification protocol, and seropositive EBV EDTA-blood amplified by nested PCR (nPCR) validated the DNA extraction methods. There were considerable differences between the commercial and noncommercial DNA extraction methods (P=0.014; P=0.016). Commercial kits compared favorably, but the QIamp DNA micro kit with an added forensic filter step was marginally more sensitive. The mean DNA yield from this method was 3 ng/μl. The limit of detection was 10 viral genome copies in a 50-μl reaction. EBV nPCR detection in neat and 1:10 diluted DNA extracts could be replicated reliably. We conclude that the QIamp Micro DNA extraction method with the added forensic spin-filter step was suitable for retrospective DNA viral assays from NSC. PMID:21455476

  12. [Binding of ions of trivalent iron with DNA].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, V A; Gladchenko, G O; Valeev, V A

    1983-01-01

    The DNA helix-coil transition in nonbuffer solutions of Fe(NO3)3 was studied. Calculation of the ionic equilibrium indicated that in these solutions iron exists in the form of mono-, bi- or trivalent hydroxide, the formation of which decreases pH. A component of the DNA thermal stability variation associated with DNA binding to iron ions was calculated. An increase in the iron contents produces an increase in the melting range which was determined by a rise in the melting end temperature when binding the ions with phosphates and a drop in the melting beginning temperature when binding to DNA bases. A main contribution to the former effect is made by [Fe2(OH)3]3+ ions and to the latter effect by [FeOH]2+ ions. The constants of ion binding are higher for bases than for phosphates. Differential UV spectra of native and denatured DNA due to iron ions were measured. Calculations of conformation and coordination components of these spectra show that G-C pairs are one of the possible sites of iron ion binding with DNA. PMID:6621527

  13. De novo reconstruction of plant RNA and DNA virus genomes from viral siRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In antiviral defense, plants produce massive quantities of 21-24 nucleotide siRNAs. Here we demonstrate that the complete genomes of DNA and RNA viruses and viroids can be reconstructed by deep sequencing and de novo assembly of viral/viroid siRNAs from experimentally- and naturally-infected plants....

  14. Viral hemorrhagic fevers of animals caused by DNA viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we outline serious diseases of food and fiber animals that cause damaging economic effect on products all over the world. The only vector-borne DNA virus is included here, such as African swine fever virus, and the herpes viruses discussed have a complex epidemiology characterized by outbreak...

  15. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  16. DNA-binding proteins in plant mitochondria: implications for transcription.

    PubMed

    Gualberto, José M; Kühn, Kristina

    2014-11-01

    The structural complexity of plant mitochondrial genomes correlates with the variety of single-strand DNA-binding proteins found in plant mitochondria. Most of these are plant-specific and have roles in homologous recombination and genome maintenance. Mitochondrial nucleoids thus differ fundamentally between plants and yeast or animals, where the principal nucleoid protein is a DNA-packaging protein that binds double-stranded DNA. Major transcriptional cofactors identified in mitochondria of non-plant species are also seemingly absent from plants. This article reviews current knowledge on plant mitochondrial DNA-binding proteins and discusses that those may affect the accessibility and conformation of transcription start sites, thus functioning as transcriptional modulators without being dedicated transcription factors. PMID:24561574

  17. Competition for DNA binding sites using Promega DNA IQ™ paramagnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, Chantal J; De Moors, Anick

    2012-09-01

    The Promega DNA IQ™ system is easily amenable to automation and has been an integral part of standard operating procedures for many forensic laboratories including those of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) since 2004. Due to some failure to extract DNA from samples that should have produced DNA using our validated automated DNA IQ™-based protocol, the competition for binding sites on the DNA IQ™ magnetic beads was more closely examined. Heme from heavily blooded samples interfered slightly with DNA binding. Increasing the concentration of Proteinase K during lysis of these samples did not enhance DNA recovery. However, diluting the sample lysate following lysis prior to DNA extraction overcame the reduction in DNA yield and preserved portions of the lysates for subsequent manual or automated extraction. Dye/chemicals from black denim lysates competed for binding sites on the DNA IQ™ beads and significantly reduced DNA recovery. Increasing the size or number of black denim cuttings during lysis had a direct adverse effect on DNA yield from various blood volumes. The dilution approach was successful on these samples and permitted the extraction of high DNA yields. Alternatively, shortening the incubation time for cell lysis to 30 min instead of the usual overnight at 56 °C prevented competition from black denim dye/chemicals and increased DNA yields. PMID:22264505

  18. SA1 and TRF1 synergistically bind to telomeric DNA and promote DNA-DNA pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Jiangguo; Countryman, Preston; Pan, Hai; Parminder Kaur Team; Robert Riehn Team; Patricia Opresko Team; Jane Tao Team; Susan Smith Team

    Impaired telomere cohesion leads to increased aneuploidy and early onset of tumorigenesis. Cohesion is thought to occur through the entrapment of two DNA strands within tripartite cohesin ring(s), along with a fourth subunit (SA1/SA2). Surprisingly, cohesion rings are not essential for telomere cohesion, which instead requires SA1 and shelterin proteins including TRF1. However, neither this unique cohesion mechanism at telomeres or DNA-binding properties of SA1 is understood. Here, using single-molecule fluorescence imaging of quantum dot-labeled proteins on DNA we discover that while SA1 diffuses across multiple telomeric and non-telomeric regions, the diffusion mediated through its N-terminal domain is slower at telomeric regions. However, addition of TRF1 traps SA1 within telomeric regions, which form longer DNA-DNA pairing tracts than with TRF1 alone, as revealed by atomic force microscopy. Together, these experimental results and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations suggest that TRF1 and SA1 synergistically interact with DNA to support telomere cohesion without cohesin rings.

  19. DNA binding fluorescent proteins for the direct visualization of large DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonghyun; Oh, Yeeun; Lee, Jungyoon; Choe, Sojeong; Lim, Sangyong; Lee, Hyun Soo; Jo, Kyubong; Schwartz, David C

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that also bind DNA molecules are useful reagents for a broad range of biological applications because they can be optically localized and tracked within cells, or provide versatile labels for in vitro experiments. We report a novel design for a fluorescent, DNA-binding protein (FP-DBP) that completely 'paints' entire DNA molecules, whereby sequence-independent DNA binding is accomplished by linking a fluorescent protein to two small peptides (KWKWKKA) using lysine for binding to the DNA phosphates, and tryptophan for intercalating between DNA bases. Importantly, this ubiquitous binding motif enables fluorescent proteins (Kd = 14.7 μM) to confluently stain DNA molecules and such binding is reversible via pH shifts. These proteins offer useful robust advantages for single DNA molecule studies: lack of fluorophore mediated photocleavage and staining that does not perturb polymer contour lengths. Accordingly, we demonstrate confluent staining of naked DNA molecules presented within microfluidic devices, or localized within live bacterial cells. PMID:26264666

  20. DNA binding fluorescent proteins for the direct visualization of large DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonghyun; Oh, Yeeun; Lee, Jungyoon; Choe, Sojeong; Lim, Sangyong; Lee, Hyun Soo; Jo, Kyubong; Schwartz, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins that also bind DNA molecules are useful reagents for a broad range of biological applications because they can be optically localized and tracked within cells, or provide versatile labels for in vitro experiments. We report a novel design for a fluorescent, DNA-binding protein (FP-DBP) that completely ‘paints’ entire DNA molecules, whereby sequence-independent DNA binding is accomplished by linking a fluorescent protein to two small peptides (KWKWKKA) using lysine for binding to the DNA phosphates, and tryptophan for intercalating between DNA bases. Importantly, this ubiquitous binding motif enables fluorescent proteins (Kd = 14.7 μM) to confluently stain DNA molecules and such binding is reversible via pH shifts. These proteins offer useful robust advantages for single DNA molecule studies: lack of fluorophore mediated photocleavage and staining that does not perturb polymer contour lengths. Accordingly, we demonstrate confluent staining of naked DNA molecules presented within microfluidic devices, or localized within live bacterial cells. PMID:26264666

  1. Viral infection controlled by a calcium-dependent lipid-binding module in ALIX.

    PubMed

    Bissig, Christin; Lenoir, Marc; Velluz, Marie-Claire; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael; Gruenberg, Jean

    2013-05-28

    ALIX plays a role in nucleocapsid release during viral infection, as does lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). However, the mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that LBPA is recognized within an exposed site in ALIX Bro1 domain predicted by MODA, an algorithm for discovering membrane-docking areas in proteins. LBPA interactions revealed a strict requirement for a structural calcium tightly bound near the lipid interaction site. Unlike other calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins, the all-helical triangle-shaped fold of the Bro1 domain confers selectivity for LBPA via a pair of hydrophobic residues in a flexible loop, which undergoes a conformational change upon membrane association. Both LBPA and calcium binding are necessary for endosome association and virus infection, as are ALIX ESCRT binding and dimerization capacity. We conclude that LBPA recruits ALIX onto late endosomes via the calcium-bound Bro1 domain, triggering a conformational change in ALIX to mediate the delivery of viral nucleocapsids to the cytosol during infection. PMID:23664863

  2. Cytotoxic activity and DNA-binding properties of isoeuxanthone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui Fang; Yan, Hong; Gao, Xianghua; Niu, Baolong; Guo, Ruijie; Wei, Liqiao; Xu, Bingshe; Tang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the interactions of different groups substituted isoeuxanthone derivatives with calf thymus DNA (ct DNA) were investigated by spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that the xanthone derivatives could intercalate into the DNA base pairs by the plane of xanthone ring and the various substituents may influence the binding affinity with DNA according to the calculated quenching constant values. Furthermore, two tumor cell lines including the human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) were used to evaluate the cytotoxic activities of xanthone derivatives by acid phosphatase assay. Analyses showed that the oxiranylmethoxy substituted xanthone exhibited more effective cytotoxic activity against the cancer cells than the other substituted xanthones. The effects on the inhibition of tumor cells in vitro agreed with the studies of DNA-binding. PMID:24583780

  3. Signatures of Protein-DNA Recognition in Free DNA Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Locasale, J.; Napoli, A; Chen, S; Berman, H; Lawson, C

    2009-01-01

    One obstacle to achieving complete understanding of the principles underlying sequence-dependent recognition of DNA is the paucity of structural data for DNA recognition sequences in their free (unbound) state. Here, we carried out crystallization screening of 50 DNA duplexes containing cognate protein binding sites and obtained new crystal structures of free DNA binding sites for three distinct modes of DNA recognition: anti-parallel ? strands (MetR), helix-turn-helix motif + hinge helices (PurR), and zinc fingers (Zif268). Structural changes between free and protein-bound DNA are manifested differently in each case. The new DNA structures reveal that distinctive sequence-dependent DNA geometry dominates recognition by MetR, protein-induced bending of DNA dictates recognition by PurR, and deformability of DNA along the A-B continuum is important in recognition by Zif268. Together, our findings show that crystal structures of free DNA binding sites provide new information about the nature of protein-DNA interactions and thus lend insights towards a structural code for DNA recognition.

  4. enDNA-Prot: Identification of DNA-Binding Proteins by Applying Ensemble Learning

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruifeng; Zhou, Jiyun; Liu, Bin; Yao, Lin; He, Yulan; Zou, Quan; Wang, Xiaolong

    2014-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins are crucial for various cellular processes, such as recognition of specific nucleotide, regulation of transcription, and regulation of gene expression. Developing an effective model for identifying DNA-binding proteins is an urgent research problem. Up to now, many methods have been proposed, but most of them focus on only one classifier and cannot make full use of the large number of negative samples to improve predicting performance. This study proposed a predictor called enDNA-Prot for DNA-binding protein identification by employing the ensemble learning technique. Experiential results showed that enDNA-Prot was comparable with DNA-Prot and outperformed DNAbinder and iDNA-Prot with performance improvement in the range of 3.97–9.52% in ACC and 0.08–0.19 in MCC. Furthermore, when the benchmark dataset was expanded with negative samples, the performance of enDNA-Prot outperformed the three existing methods by 2.83–16.63% in terms of ACC and 0.02–0.16 in terms of MCC. It indicated that enDNA-Prot is an effective method for DNA-binding protein identification and expanding training dataset with negative samples can improve its performance. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, we developed a user-friendly web-server for enDNA-Prot which is freely accessible to the public. PMID:24977146

  5. DnaT is a PriC-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Chih; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2016-09-01

    DnaT and PriC are replication restart primosomal proteins required for re-initiating chromosomal DNA replication. DnaT is a component of the PriA-dependent primosome, while PriC belongs to the PriC-dependent primosome. Whether DnaT can interact with PriC is still unknown. In this study, we define a direct interaction between PriC, a key initiator protein in PriC-mediated DNA replication restart, and DnaT, a DnaB/C complex loader protein, from Klebsiella pneumoniae. In fluorescence titrations, PriC bound to single-stranded DNA with a binding-site size of approximately 9 nt. Gold nanoparticle assay showed that the solution of DnaT-PriC changed from red to purple, which indicated the protein-protein interactions due to gold nanoparticle aggregate. In addition, this DnaT-PriC complex could be co-purified by the heparin HP column. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that the Kd value of DnaT bound to PriC was 2.9 × 10(-8) M. These results constitute a pioneering study of the DnaT-PriC interaction and present a putative link between the two independent replication restart pathways, namely, PriA- and PriC-dependent primosome assemblies. Further research can directly focus on determining how DnaT binds to the PriC-SSB-DNA tricomplex and regulates the PriC-dependent replication restart. PMID:27387236

  6. Expression of Epstein-Barr virus genes in different cell types after microinjection of viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Graessmann, A; Wolf, H; Bornkamm, G W

    1980-01-01

    Gene expression of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was studied after microinjection of viral DNA into different types of cells. Raji TK- cells, known to express viral gene functions after superinfection with the EBV-P3HR-1 virus strain, were attached to plastic dishes by using anti-lymphocyte IgG, phytohemagglutinin, or concanavalin A as a ligand. It was difficult to inject DNA into the small and fragile Raji cells. After formation of polykaryons by cell fusion, microinjection became more efficient. At 24 hr after injection of P3HR-1 virus DNA, 90-100% of the injected cells expressed the early antigen complex as observed by immunofluorescence staining; 70-80% of the cells simultaneously incorported [3H]thymidine, indicating that thymidine kinase is expressed after injection of viral DNA. Additionally, synthesis of the virus capsid antigen was demonstrated in 20-30% of the recipient Raji cells. Human diploid fibroblasts, African green monkey kidney cells, and rat fibroblasts, which do not represent natural target cells for EBV, could also be induced to synthesis of early antigen complex by injection of P3HR-1 virus DNA. Images PMID:6244558

  7. Tight-binding approach to strain-dependent DNA electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakooti, Sadeq; Hedin, Eric; Joe, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Small mechanical strain perturbations are considered in calculations of the poly(G)-poly(C) DNA molecular electronic structure, using a tight-binding framework in conjunction with the theories of Slater-Koster and linear elasticity. Results reveal a strain-induced band gap for DNA which is linearly dependent on the induced strain. Local density of states calculations expose that the contribution of the guanine-cytosine base pairs in the charge transport mechanism is significantly enhanced relative to the backbones when DNA is compressed. Transport investigations also disclose a strain-induced metal-semiconductor transition for the DNA molecule, which suggests possible potential uses for sensing applications.

  8. pH-dependent specific binding and combing of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, J F; Bensimon, D; Jullien, L; Bensimon, A; Croquette, V

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in the rapid sequencing, mapping, and analysis of DNA rely on the specific binding of DNA to specially treated surfaces. We show here that specific binding of DNA via its unmodified extremities can be achieved on a great variety of surfaces by a judicious choice of the pH. On hydrophobic surfaces the best binding efficiency is reached at a pH of approximately 5.5. At that pH a approximately 40-kbp DNA is 10 times more likely to bind by an extremity than by a midsegment. A model is proposed to account for the differential adsorption of the molecule extremities and midsection as a function of pH. The pH-dependent specific binding can be used to align anchored DNA molecules by a receding meniscus, a process called molecular combing. The resulting properties of the combed molecules will be discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:9336201

  9. A statistical approach to close packing of elastic rods and to DNA packaging in viral capsids

    PubMed Central

    Katzav, E.; Adda-Bedia, M.; Boudaoud, A.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a statistical approach for studying the close packing of elastic rods. This phenomenon belongs to the class of problems of confinement of low dimensional objects, such as DNA packaging in viral capsids. The method developed is based on Edwards' approach, which was successfully applied to polymer physics and to granular matter. We show that the confinement induces a configurational phase transition from a disordered (isotropic) phase to an ordered (nematic) phase. In each phase, we derive the pressure exerted by the rod (DNA) on the container (capsid) and the force necessary to inject (eject) the rod into (out of) the container. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the present results with respect to physical and biological problems. Regarding DNA packaging in viral capsids, these results establish the existence of ordered configurations, a hypothesis upon which previous calculations were built. They also show that such ordering can result from simple mechanical constraints. PMID:17146049

  10. Presence of free viral DNA in simian virus 40-transformed nonproducer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Daya-Grosjean, L; Monier, R

    1978-01-01

    Extracts from several simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed nonproducer cells were prepared by the hot-phenol procedure normally used to extract cellular RNA. These extracts contained SV40 infectious units. Part of the infectious units were identified as SV40 form I DNA molecules. The results of reconstruction experiments suggest that SV40 form I DNA is extractable by the hot-phenol procedure because of its fast renaturation rate. The significance of the presence of free viral DNA in nonproducer transformed cells is discussed. PMID:211262

  11. Folic acid binds DNA and RNA at different locations.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-03-01

    We located multiple binding sites for folic acid on DNA and tRNA at physiological conditions, using FTIR, CD, fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling. Structural analysis revealed that folic acid binds DNA and tRNA at multiple sites via hydrophilic, hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of Kfolic acid-DNA=1.1 (±0.3)×10(4) M(-1) and Kfolic acid-tRNA=6.4 (±0.5)×10(3) M(-1). Molecular modeling showed the participation of several nucleobases in folic acid complexes with DNA and tRNA, stabilized by H-bonding network. Two types of complexes were located for folic acid-tRNA adducts, one at the major groove and the other with TΨC loop, while acid binding occurs at major and minor grooves of DNA duplex. Folic acid complexation induced more alterations of DNA structure than tRNA. PMID:25555838

  12. The crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of vIRF-1 from the oncogenic KSHV reveals a conserved fold for DNA binding and reinforces its role as a transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Hew, Kelly; Venkatachalam, Rajakannan; Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Lim, Bee Ting; Cornvik, Tobias; Nordlund, Pär

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes four viral homologues to cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), where the most studied is vIRF-1. Even though vIRF-1 shows sequence homology to the N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD) of human IRFs, a specific role for this domain in vIRF-1’s function has remained uncertain. To provide insights into the function of the vIRF-1 DBD, we have determined the crystal structure of it in complex with DNA and in its apo-form. Using a thermal stability shift assay (TSSA), we show that the vIRF-1 DBD binds DNA, whereas full-length vIRF-1 does not, suggesting a cis-acting regulatory mechanism in similarity to human IRFs. The complex structure of vIRF-1 DBD reveals interactions with the DNA backbone and the positioning of two arginines for specific recognition in the major grove. A superimposition with human IRF-3 reveals a similar positioning of the two specificity-determining arginines, and additional TSSAs indicate binding of vIRF-1 to an IRF-3 operator consensus sequence. The results from this study, therefore, provide support that vIRF-1 has evolved to bind DNA and plays a role in DNA binding in the context of transcriptional regulation and might act on some of the many operator sequences controlled by human IRF-3. PMID:23435230

  13. DnaJA1/Hsp40 Is Co-Opted by Influenza A Virus To Enhance Its Viral RNA Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mengmeng; Wei, Candong; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Jingfeng; Jia, Qiannan; Wang, Xue

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of influenza A virus is a heterotrimeric complex composed of the PB1, PB2, and PA subunits. The interplay between host factors and the three subunits of the RdRp is critical to enable viral RNA synthesis to occur in the nuclei of infected cells. In this study, we newly identified host factor DnaJA1, a member of the type I DnaJ/Hsp40 family, acting as a positive regulator for influenza virus replication. We found that DnaJA1 associates with the bPB2 and PA subunits and enhances viral RNA synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, DnaJA1 could be translocated from cytoplasm into the nucleus upon influenza virus infection. The translocation of DnaJA1 is specifically accompanied by PB1-PA nuclear import. Interestingly, we observed that the effect of DnaJA1 on viral RNA synthesis is mainly dependent on its C-terminal substrate-binding domain and not on its typical J domain, while the J domain normally mediates the Hsp70-DnaJ interaction required for regulating Hsp70 ATPase activity. Therefore, we propose that DnaJA1 is co-opted by the influenza A virus to enter the nucleus and to enhance its RNA polymerase activity in an Hsp70 cochaperone-independent manner. IMPORTANCE The interplay between host factors and influenza virus RNA polymerase plays a critical role in determining virus pathogenicity and host adaptation. In this study, we newly identified a host protein, DnaJA1/Hsp40, that is co-opted by influenza A virus RNA polymerase to enhance its viral RNA synthesis in the nuclei of infected cells. We found that DnaJA1 associates with both PB2 and PA subunits and translocates into the nucleus along with the nuclear import of the PB1-PA dimer during influenza virus replication. Interestingly, the effect of DnaJA1 is mainly dependent on its C-terminal substrate-binding domain and not on its typical J domain, which is required for its Hsp70 cochaperone function. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a member of the

  14. Mechanistic insight into ligand binding to G-quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Novellino, Ettore; Cavalli, Andrea; Parrinello, Michele; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Specific guanine-rich regions in human genome can form higher-order DNA structures called G-quadruplexes, which regulate many relevant biological processes. For instance, the formation of G-quadruplex at telomeres can alter cellular functions, inducing apoptosis. Thus, developing small molecules that are able to bind and stabilize the telomeric G-quadruplexes represents an attractive strategy for antitumor therapy. An example is 3-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-7-hydroxy-8-((4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl)methyl)-2H-chromen-2-one (compound 1), recently identified as potent ligand of the G-quadruplex [d(TGGGGT)]4 with promising in vitro antitumor activity. The experimental observations are suggestive of a complex binding mechanism that, despite efforts, has defied full characterization. Here, we provide through metadynamics simulations a comprehensive understanding of the binding mechanism of 1 to the G-quadruplex [d(TGGGGT)]4. In our calculations, the ligand explores all the available binding sites on the DNA structure and the free-energy landscape of the whole binding process is computed. We have thus disclosed a peculiar hopping binding mechanism whereas 1 is able to bind both to the groove and to the 3’ end of the G-quadruplex. Our results fully explain the available experimental data, rendering our approach of great value for further ligand/DNA studies. PMID:24753420

  15. Inhibition of DNA Methylation Suppresses Intestinal Tumor Organoids by Inducing an Anti-Viral Response

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yoshimasa; Nakaoka, Toshiaki; Sakai, Kasumi; Muramatsu, Toshihide; Toshimitsu, Kohta; Kimura, Masaki; Kanai, Takanori; Sato, Toshiro; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed that the major anti-tumor effect of DNA methylation inhibitors is induction of interferon-responsive genes via dsRNAs-containing endogenous retroviruses. Recently, a 3D culture system for stem cells known as organoid culture has been developed. Lgr5-positive stem cells form organoids that closely recapitulate the properties of original tissues. To investigate the effect of DNA demethylation on tumor organoids, we have established organoids from intestinal tumors of ApcMin/+ (Min) mice and subjected them to 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) treatment and Dnmt1 knockdown. DNA demethylation induced by 5-Aza-CdR treatment and Dnmt1 knockdown significantly reduced the cell proliferation of the tumor organoids. Microarray analyses of the tumor organoids after 5-Aza-CdR treatment and Dnmt1 knockdown revealed that interferon-responsive genes were activated by DNA demethylation. Gene ontology and pathway analyses clearly demonstrated that these genes activated by DNA demethylation are involved in the anti-viral response. These findings indicate that DNA demethylation suppresses the proliferation of intestinal tumor organoids by inducing an anti-viral response including activation of interferon-responsive genes. Treatment with DNA methylation inhibitors to activate a growth-inhibiting immune response may be an effective therapeutic approach for colon cancers. PMID:27143627

  16. Portal control of viral prohead expansion and DNA packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Krishanu; Oram, Mark; Ma, Jinxia; Black, Lindsay W.

    2009-08-15

    Bacteriophage T4 terminase packages DNA in vitro into empty small or large proheads (esps or elps). In vivo maturation of esps yields the more stable and voluminous elps required to contain the 170 kb T4 genome. Functional proheads can be assembled containing portal-GFP fusion proteins. In the absence of terminase activity these accumulated in esps in vivo, whereas wild-type portals were found in elps. By nuclease protection assay dsDNAs of lengths 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 5, 11, 20, 40 or 170 kb were efficiently packaged into wild-type elps in vitro, but less so into esps and gp20-GFP elps; particularly with DNAs shorter than 11 kb. However, 0.1 kb substrates were equally efficiently packaged into all types of proheads as judged by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. These data suggest the portal controls the expansion of the major capsid protein lattice during prohead maturation, and that this expansion is necessary for DNA protection but not for packaging.

  17. The Binding Process of a Nonspecific Enzyme with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuanying; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2011-09-07

    Protein-DNA recognition of a nonspecific complex is modeled to understand the nature of the transient encounter states. We consider the structural and energetic features and the role of water in the DNA grooves in the process of protein-DNA recognition. Here we have used the nuclease domain of colicin E7 (N-ColE7) from Escherichia coli in complex with a 12-bp DNA duplex as the model system to consider how a protein approaches, encounters, and associates with DNA. Multiscale simulation studies using Brownian dynamics and molecular-dynamics simulations were performed to provide the binding process on multiple length- and timescales. We define the encounter states and identified the spatial and orientational aspects. For the molecular length-scales, we used molecular-dynamics simulations. Several intermediate binding states were found, which have different positions and orientations of protein around DNA including major and minor groove orientations. The results show that the contact number and the hydrated interfacial area are measures that facilitate better understanding of sequence-independent protein-DNA binding landscapes and pathways.

  18. The Binding Process of a Nonspecific Enzyme with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuanying; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    Protein-DNA recognition of a nonspecific complex is modeled to understand the nature of the transient encounter states. We consider the structural and energetic features and the role of water in the DNA grooves in the process of protein-DNA recognition. Here we have used the nuclease domain of colicin E7 (N-ColE7) from Escherichia coli in complex with a 12-bp DNA duplex as the model system to consider how a protein approaches, encounters, and associates with DNA. Multiscale simulation studies using Brownian dynamics and molecular-dynamics simulations were performed to provide the binding process on multiple length- and timescales. We define the encounter states and identified the spatial and orientational aspects. For the molecular length-scales, we used molecular-dynamics simulations. Several intermediate binding states were found, which have different positions and orientations of protein around DNA including major and minor groove orientations. The results show that the contact number and the hydrated interfacial area are measures that facilitate better understanding of sequence-independent protein-DNA binding landscapes and pathways. PMID:21889451

  19. DNA binding activities of the Caenorhabditis elegans Tc3 transposase.

    PubMed Central

    Colloms, S D; van Luenen, H G; Plasterk, R H

    1994-01-01

    Tc3 is a member of the Tc1/mariner family of transposable elements. All these elements have terminal inverted repeats, encode related transposases and insert exclusively into TA dinucleotides. We have studied the DNA binding properties of Tc3 transposase and found that an N-terminal domain of 65 amino acids binds specifically to two regions within the 462 bp Tc3 inverted repeat; one region is located at the end of the inverted repeat, the other is located approximately 180 bp from the end. Methylation interference experiments indicate that this N-terminal DNA binding domain of the Tc3 transposase interacts with nucleotides on one face of the DNA helix over adjacent major and minor grooves. Images PMID:7838706

  20. Exploiting viral cell-targeting abilities in a single polypeptide, non-infectious, recombinant vehicle for integrin-mediated DNA delivery and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Arís, A; Feliu, J X; Knight, A; Coutelle, C; Villaverde, A

    2000-06-20

    A recombinant, multifunctional protein has been designed for optimized, cell-targeted DNA delivery and gene expression in mammalian cells. This hybrid construct comprises a viral peptide ligand for integrin alpha(V)beta(3) binding, a DNA-condensing poly-L-lysine domain, and a complete, functional beta-galactosidase protein that serves simultaneously as purification tag and DNA-shielding agent. This recombinant protein is stable; it has been produced successfully in Escherichia coli and can be purified in a single step by affinity chromatography. At optimal molar ratios, mixtures of this vector and a luciferase-reporter plasmid form stable complexes that transfect cultured cells. After exposure to these cell-targeted complexes, steady levels of gene expression are observed for more than 3 days after transfection, representing between 20 and 40% of those achieved with untargeted, lipid-based DNA-condensing agents. The principle to include viral motifs for cell infection in single polypeptide recombinant proteins represents a promising approach towards the design of non-viral modular DNA transfer vectors that conserve the cell-target- ing specificity of native viruses and that do not need further processing after bioproduction in a recombinant host. PMID:10799995

  1. Functional interplay between SA1 and TRF1 in telomeric DNA binding and DNA-DNA pairing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiangguo; Countryman, Preston; Chen, Haijiang; Pan, Hai; Fan, Yanlin; Jiang, Yunyun; Kaur, Parminder; Miao, Wang; Gurgel, Gisele; You, Changjiang; Piehler, Jacob; Kad, Neil M; Riehn, Robert; Opresko, Patricia L; Smith, Susan; Tao, Yizhi Jane; Wang, Hong

    2016-07-27

    Proper chromosome alignment and segregation during mitosis depend on cohesion between sister chromatids. Cohesion is thought to occur through the entrapment of DNA within the tripartite ring (Smc1, Smc3 and Rad21) with enforcement from a fourth subunit (SA1/SA2). Surprisingly, cohesin rings do not play a major role in sister telomere cohesion. Instead, this role is replaced by SA1 and telomere binding proteins (TRF1 and TIN2). Neither the DNA binding property of SA1 nor this unique telomere cohesion mechanism is understood. Here, using single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we discover that SA1 displays two-state binding on DNA: searching by one-dimensional (1D) free diffusion versus recognition through subdiffusive sliding at telomeric regions. The AT-hook motif in SA1 plays dual roles in modulating non-specific DNA binding and subdiffusive dynamics over telomeric regions. TRF1 tethers SA1 within telomeric regions that SA1 transiently interacts with. SA1 and TRF1 together form longer DNA-DNA pairing tracts than with TRF1 alone, as revealed by atomic force microscopy imaging. These results suggest that at telomeres cohesion relies on the molecular interplay between TRF1 and SA1 to promote DNA-DNA pairing, while along chromosomal arms the core cohesin assembly might also depend on SA1 1D diffusion on DNA and sequence-specific DNA binding. PMID:27298259

  2. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  3. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  4. Signals at the bacteriophage phi 29 DNA replication origins required for protein p6 binding and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, M; Gutiérrez, J; Prieto, I; Hermoso, J M; Salas, M

    1989-01-01

    Protein p6 of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 binds specifically to the ends of the viral DNA that contain the replication origins, giving rise to a nucleoprotein structure. DNA regions recognized by protein p6 have been mapped by deletion analysis and DNase I footprinting. Main protein p6-recognition signals have been located between nucleotides 62 and 125 at the right phi 29 DNA end and between nucleotides 46 and 68 at the left end. In addition, recognition signals are also present at other sites within 200-300 bp at each phi 29 DNA end. Protein p6 does not seem to recognize a specific sequence in the DNA, but rather a structural feature, which could be bendability. The formation of the protein p6-DNA nucleoprotein complex is likely to be the structural basis for the protein p6 activity in the initiation of replication. Images PMID:2767056

  5. Surface plasmon resonance imaging reveals multiple binding modes of Agrobacterium transformation mediator VirE2 to ssDNA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanghyun; Zbaida, David; Elbaum, Michael; Leh, Hervé; Nogues, Claude; Buckle, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    VirE2 is the major secreted protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in its genetic transformation of plant hosts. It is co-expressed with a small acidic chaperone VirE1, which prevents VirE2 oligomerization. After secretion into the host cell, VirE2 serves functions similar to a viral capsid in protecting the single-stranded transferred DNA en route to the nucleus. Binding of VirE2 to ssDNA is strongly cooperative and depends moreover on protein–protein interactions. In order to isolate the protein–DNA interactions, imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPRi) studies were conducted using surface-immobilized DNA substrates of length comparable to the protein-binding footprint. Binding curves revealed an important influence of substrate rigidity with a notable preference for poly-T sequences and absence of binding to both poly-A and double-stranded DNA fragments. Dissociation at high salt concentration confirmed the electrostatic nature of the interaction. VirE1–VirE2 heterodimers also bound to ssDNA, though by a different mechanism that was insensitive to high salt. Neither VirE2 nor VirE1–VirE2 followed the Langmuir isotherm expected for reversible monomeric binding. The differences reflect the cooperative self-interactions of VirE2 that are suppressed by VirE1. PMID:26044711

  6. Sendai virus-erythrocyte membrane interaction: quantitative and kinetic analysis of viral binding, dissociation, and fusion.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, D; Klappe, K

    1986-04-01

    A kinetic and quantitative analysis of the binding and fusion of Sendai virus with erythrocyte membranes was performed by using a membrane fusion assay based on the relief of fluorescence self-quenching. At 37 degrees C, the process of virus association displayed a half time of 2.5 min; at 4 degrees C, the half time was 3.0 min. The fraction of the viral dose which became cell associated was independent of the incubation temperature and increased with increasing target membrane concentration. On the average, one erythrocyte ghost can accommodate ca. 1,200 Sendai virus particles. The stability of viral attachment was sensitive to a shift in temperature: a fraction of the virions (ca. 30%), attached at 4 degrees C, rapidly (half time, ca. 2.5 min) eluted from the cell surface at 37 degrees C, irrespective of the presence of free virus in the medium. The elution can be attributed to a spontaneous, temperature-induced release, rather than to viral neuraminidase activity. Competition experiments with nonlabeled virus revealed that viruses destined to fuse do not exchange with free particles in the medium but rather bind in a rapid and irreversible manner. The fusion rate of Sendai virus was affected by the density of the virus particles on the cell surface and became restrained when more than 170 virus particles were attached per ghost. In principle, all virus particles added displayed fusion activity. However, at high virus-to-ghost ratios, only a fraction actually fused, indicating that a limited number of fusion sites exist on the erythrocyte membrane. We estimate that ca. 180 virus particles maximally can fuse with one erythrocyte ghost. PMID:3005662

  7. Preparation and DNA-binding properties of substituted triostin antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, A; Fox, K R; Waring, M J

    1983-01-01

    Novel derivatives of the triostin group of antibiotics were prepared by supplementing cultures of the producing organism Streptomyces triostinicus with a variety of aromatic carboxylic acids. Five new antibiotics, each having both the natural quinoxaline chromophores replaced by a substituted ring system, were purified to homogeneity and characterized by high-pressure liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Their antibacterial activities and DNA-binding properties were investigated. Addition of a halogen atom at position 6 of the quinoxaline ring or an amino group at position 3 had little effect on either the biological activity or the DNA-binding characteristics. The bis-3-amino derivative is fluorescent, and its fluorescence is strongly quenched by calf thymus DNA and polydeoxyguanylate-polydeoxycytidylate but not by polydeoxyadenylate-polydeoxythymidylate, suggesting that it binds preferentially to guanosine-cytosine-rich sequences in natural DNA. Binding constants for the bis-6-chloro and bis-3-amino derivatives do not differ greatly from those of unsubstituted triostin A. The analogs having two quinoline chromophores or a chlorine atom in position 7 of the quinoxaline ring display little or no detectable antibacterial activity, in marked contrast to the other congeners. Bis-7-chloro-triostin A binds conspicuously more tightly to polydeoxyadenylate-polydeoxythymidylate than to any other polynucleotide tested. PMID:6838186

  8. Sequence-selective binding of an ellipticine derivative to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, C; OhUigin, C; Rivalle, C; Bisagni, E; Hénichart, J P; Waring, M J

    1990-01-01

    The DNA sequence specificity of an ellipticine derivative bearing an aminoalkyl side chain has been determined by a variety of footprinting methods. The drug exhibits sequence selective binding and discriminates against runs of adenines or thymines. Binding is shown to occur at various sequences with a preference for GC rich regions of DNA. A large enhancement of DNAase I and of hydroxyl radical cleavage in regions rich in A's or T's is observed together with hyperreactivity of adenines towards diethylpyrocarbonate in the presence of drug. This indicates the occurrence of drug-induced changes in critical conformational features of DNA. The total absence of hyperreactivity of guanine residues towards diethylpyrocarbonate appears to be related to the sequence selectivity of drug binding. No alteration of the dimethyl sulphate and methylene blue-induced cleavage of DNA is observed. Irradiation of ellipticine derivative-DNA complexes with UV light followed by alkali treatment leads to selective photocleavage at guanine residues, consistent with the deduced degree of selectivity of the binding reaction. Images PMID:2173825

  9. Assembly Architecture and DNA Binding of the Bacteriophage P22 Terminase Small Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Němeček, Daniel; Lander, Gabriel C.; Johnson, John E.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Thomas, George J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Morphogenesis of bacteriophage P22 involves the packaging of double-stranded DNA into a preassembled procapsid. DNA is translocated by a powerful virally-encoded molecular motor called terminase, which comprises large (gp2, 499 residues) and small (gp3, 162 residues) subunits. While gp2 contains the phosphohydrolase and endonuclease activities of terminase, the function of gp3 may be to regulate specific and nonspecific modes of DNA recognition as well as the enzymatic activities of gp2. Electron microscopy shows that wildtype gp3 self-assembles into a stable and monodisperse nonameric ring. A three-dimensional reconstruction at 18 Å resolution provides the first glimpse of P22 terminase architecture and implies two distinct modes of interaction with DNA – involving a central channel of 20 Å diameter and radial spikes separated by 34 Å. Electromobility shift assays indicate that the gp3 ring binds dsDNA nonspecifically in vitro via electrostatic interactions between the positively charged C-terminus of gp3 (residues 143–152) and phosphates of the DNA backbone. Raman spectra show that nonameric rings formed by subunits truncated at residue 142 retain the subunit fold, despite the loss of DNA-binding activity. Difference density maps between gp3 rings containing full-length and C-terminally truncated subunits are consistent with localization of residues 143–152 along the central channel of the nonameric ring. The results suggest a plausible molecular mechanism for gp3 function in DNA recognition and translocation. PMID:18775728

  10. iDNA-Prot: identification of DNA binding proteins using random forest with grey model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Zhong; Fang, Jian-An; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Developing high throughput tools for rapidly and effectively identifying DNA-binding proteins is one of the major challenges in the field of genome annotation. Although many efforts have been made in this regard, further effort is needed to enhance the prediction power. By incorporating the features into the general form of pseudo amino acid composition that were extracted from protein sequences via the "grey model" and by adopting the random forest operation engine, we proposed a new predictor, called iDNA-Prot, for identifying uncharacterized proteins as DNA-binding proteins or non-DNA binding proteins based on their amino acid sequences information alone. The overall success rate by iDNA-Prot was 83.96% that was obtained via jackknife tests on a newly constructed stringent benchmark dataset in which none of the proteins included has ≥25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset. In addition to achieving high success rate, the computational time for iDNA-Prot is remarkably shorter in comparison with the relevant existing predictors. Hence it is anticipated that iDNA-Prot may become a useful high throughput tool for large-scale analysis of DNA-binding proteins. As a user-friendly web-server, iDNA-Prot is freely accessible to the public at the web-site on http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/iDNA-Prot or http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iDNA-Prot. Moreover, for the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results. PMID:21935457