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Sample records for bioceramic interfacial bonding

  1. Interfacial bonding stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerio, J.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial bonding stability by in situ ellipsometry was investigated. It is found that: (1) gamma MPS is an effective primer for bonding ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) to aluminum; (2) ellipsometry is an effective in situ technique for monitoring the stability of polymer/metal interfaces; (3) the aluminized back surface of silicon wafers contain significant amounts of silicon and may have glass like properties.

  2. Smart interfacial bonding alloys

    SciTech Connect

    R. Q. Hwang; J. C. Hamilton; J. E. Houston

    1999-04-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to explore the use of the newly discovered strain-stabilized 2-D interfacial alloys as smart interface bonding alloys (SIBA). These materials will be used as templates for the heteroepitaxial growth of metallic thin films. SIBA are formed by two metallic components which mix at an interface to relieve strain and prevent dislocations from forming in subsequent thin film growth. The composition of the SIBA is determined locally by the amount of strain, and therefore can react smartly to areas of the highest strain to relieve dislocations. In this way, SIBA can be used to tailor the dislocation structure of thin films. This project included growth, characterization and modeling of films grown using SIBA templates. Characterization will include atomic imaging of the dislocations structure, measurement of the mechanical properties of the film using interface force microscopy (IFM) and the nanoindenter, and measurement of the electronic structure of the SIBA with synchrotron photoemission. Resistance of films to sulfidation and oxidation will also be examined. The Paragon parallel processing computer will be used to calculate the structure of the SIBA and thin films in order to develop ability to predict and tailor SIBA and thin film behavior. This work will lead to the possible development of a new class of thin film materials with properties tailored by varying the composition of the SIBA, serving as a buffer layer to relieve the strain between the substrate and the thin film. Such films will have improved mechanical and corrosion resistance allowing application as protective barriers for weapons applications. They will also exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity and reduced electromigration making them particularly suitable for application as interconnects and other electronic needs.

  3. Flax Fiber - Interfacial Bonding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measured flax fiber physical and chemical properties potentially impact bonding and thus stress transfer between the matrix and fiber within composites. These first attempts at correlating flax fiber quality and biofiber composites contain the initial steps towards identifying key flax fiber charac...

  4. Push-Out Bond Strength of Bioceramic Materials in a Synthetic Tissue Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Razmi, Hasan; Nekoofar, Mohammad Hossein; Sajadi, Sepideh; Dummer, Paul MH.; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study compared the push-out bond strength of EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM) and Bioaggregate (BA), new bioceramic materials, to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after incubation in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), a synthetic tissue fluid, for either 1 week or 2 months. Materials and Methods: One-hundred and twenty root sections were filled with ProRoot MTA, BA, or ERRM. Each tested material was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n = 20): root sections were immersed in PBS for 1 week or 2 months. The bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. After that, the failure modes were examined with stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The push-out data and failure mode categories were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and chi-square tests, respectively. Results: The bond strength of ERRM was significantly higher than that of BA and MTA at both incubation periods. No significant difference was found between the bond strength of MTA and BA at either 1 week or 2 months. Increasing the incubation time to 2 months resulted in a significant increase in bond strength of all the materials. The failure mode was mainly mixed for MTA and BA, but cohesive for ERRM at both incubation periods. Conclusion: ERRM had significantly higher bond strength to root canal walls compared to MTA and BA. Increasing the incubation time significantly improved the bond strength and bioactive reaction products of all materials. PMID:24910665

  5. Investigation of the interfacial condition between bioceramic coatings and metallic substrates using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Nader; Ong, Chuon-Szen

    2001-04-01

    The work reported here is on the characterization of the interfacial properties between plasma-sprayed Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates as used in cement-less hip orthopaedic implants. The phase velocity dispersion for the first Rayleigh-type mode for the coating-substrate system has been shown to be sensitive to the interfacial stiffness. Different interfacial conditions between the coating and substrate have been obtained by cyclic loading of the specimens in a four-point bend fatigue machine. The measured interfacial stiffness is then correlated with the interfacial fracture strength obtained by standard destructive shear tests.

  6. Evidence for Interfacial Halogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Swords, Wesley B; Simon, Sarah J C; Parlane, Fraser G L; Dean, Rebecca K; Kellett, Cameron W; Hu, Ke; Meyer, Gerald J; Berlinguette, Curtis P

    2016-05-10

    A homologous series of donor-π-acceptor dyes was synthesized, differing only in the identity of the halogen substituents about the triphenylamine (TPA; donor) portion of each molecule. Each Dye-X (X=F, Cl, Br, and I) was immobilized on a TiO2 surface to investigate how the halogen substituents affect the reaction between the light-induced charge-separated state, TiO2 (e(-) )/Dye-X(+) , with iodide in solution. Transient absorption spectroscopy showed progressively faster reactivity towards nucleophilic iodide with more polarizable halogen substituents: Dye-F < Dye-Cl < Dye-Br < Dye-I. Given that all other structural and electronic properties for the series are held at parity, with the exception of an increasingly larger electropositive σ-hole on the heavier halogens, the differences in dye regeneration kinetics for Dye-Cl, Dye-Br, and Dye-I are ascribed to the extent of halogen bonding with the nucleophilic solution species. PMID:27060916

  7. Interfacial fracture between highly crosslinked polymer networks and a solid surface: Effect of interfacial bond density

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-03-23

    For highly crosslinked, polymer networks bonded to a solid surface, the effect of interfacial bond density as well as system size on interfacial fracture is studied molecular dynamics simulations. The correspondence between the stress-strain curve and the sequence of molecular deformations is obtained. The failure strain for a fully bonded surface is equal to the strain necessary to make taut the average minimal path through the network from the bottom solid surface to the top surface. At bond coverages less than full, nanometer scale cavities form at the surface yielding an inhomogeneous strain profile. The failure strain and stress are linearly proportional to the number of bonds at the interface unless the number of bonds is so few that van der Waals interactions dominate. The failure is always interfacial due to fewer bonds at the interface than in the bulk.

  8. Interfacial deformation and friction heating in ultrasonic Al ribbon bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo; Maeda, Masakatsu; Ando, Masaya; Yamaguchi, Eito

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial deformation and friction behavior between an Al ribbon and an electric pad (or substrate) during ultrasonic bonding is analyzed, based on numerical simulation and experimental results. The friction heating is estimated by the friction slip work at the bonding interface between the ribbon and pad. The temperature rise of the bonding interface is calculated by the numerical simulation and compared with the experimental results. It is suggested that the electric pad reduces the temperature rise, as compared to the bonding process without a pad. The shear stress at the bonding interface increases as the bonding progresses. The frictional slip due to adhesion increases stress and heats the bond interface.

  9. Toward smart implant synthesis: bonding bioceramics of different resorbability to match bone growth rates.

    PubMed

    Comesaña, Rafael; Lusquiños, Fernando; Del Val, Jesús; Quintero, Félix; Riveiro, Antonio; Boutinguiza, Mohamed; Jones, Julian R; Hill, Robert G; Pou, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial reconstructive surgery requires a bioactive bone implant capable to provide a gradual resorbability and to adjust to the kinetics of new bone formation during healing. Biomaterials made of calcium phosphate or bioactive glasses are currently available, mainly as bone defect fillers, but it is still required a versatile processing technique to fabricate composition-gradient bioceramics for application as controlled resorption implants. Here it is reported the application of rapid prototyping based on laser cladding to produce three-dimensional bioceramic implants comprising of a calcium phosphate inner core, with moderate in vitro degradation at physiological pH, surrounded by a bioactive glass outer layer of higher degradability. Each component of the implant is validated in terms of chemical and physical properties, and absence of toxicity. Pre-osteoblastic cell adhesion and proliferation assays reveal the adherence and growth of new bone cells on the material. This technique affords implants with gradual-resorbability for restoration of low-load-bearing bone. PMID:26032983

  10. Toward Smart Implant Synthesis: Bonding Bioceramics of Different Resorbability to Match Bone Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Comesaña, Rafael; Lusquiños, Fernando; del Val, Jesús; Quintero, Félix; Riveiro, Antonio; Boutinguiza, Mohamed; Jones, Julian R.; Hill, Robert G.; Pou, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial reconstructive surgery requires a bioactive bone implant capable to provide a gradual resorbability and to adjust to the kinetics of new bone formation during healing. Biomaterials made of calcium phosphate or bioactive glasses are currently available, mainly as bone defect fillers, but it is still required a versatile processing technique to fabricate composition-gradient bioceramics for application as controlled resorption implants. Here it is reported the application of rapid prototyping based on laser cladding to produce three-dimensional bioceramic implants comprising of a calcium phosphate inner core, with moderate in vitro degradation at physiological pH, surrounded by a bioactive glass outer layer of higher degradability. Each component of the implant is validated in terms of chemical and physical properties, and absence of toxicity. Pre–osteoblastic cell adhesion and proliferation assays reveal the adherence and growth of new bone cells on the material. This technique affords implants with gradual-resorbability for restoration of low-load-bearing bone. PMID:26032983

  11. Push-out bond strength of gutta-percha with a new bioceramic sealer in the presence or absence of smear layer.

    PubMed

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Gorjestani, Hedayat; Nasseh, Allen Ali; Hoseini, Atefeh; Mohammadi, Maryam; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strength of a new bioceramic sealer (EndoSequence BC Sealer) and AH Plus in the presence or absence of smear layer. Extracted single-rooted human teeth were prepared and randomly divided into four groups. In groups 1 and 3, the root canals were finally irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl and smear layer was not removed, but in groups 2 and 4, the root canals were finally irrigated with 17% EDTA followed by 5.25% NaOCl in order to remove the smear layer. In groups 1 and 2, the root canals were obturated with gutta-percha/AH Plus, but in groups 3 and 4, obturation was performed with gutta-percha/EndoSequence BC Sealer. Push-out bond strength and failure modes were evaluated. The bond strength of gutta-percha/AH Plus and gutta-percha/EndoSequence BC Sealer was not significantly different (P = 0.89). The presence or absence of smear layer did not significantly affect the bond strength of filling materials (P = 0.69). The mode of bond failure was mainly cohesive for all groups. In conclusion, the bond strength of the new bioceramic sealer was equal to that of AH Plus with or without the smear layer. PMID:24279654

  12. Anesthesia cutoff phenomenon: Interfacial hydrogen bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, J.S.; Ma, S.M.; Kamaya, H.; Ueda, I. )

    1990-05-04

    Anesthesia cutoff refers to the phenomenon of loss of anesthetic potency in a homologous series of alkanes and their derivatives when their sizes become too large. In this study, hydrogen bonding of 1-alkanol series (ethanol to eicosanol) to dipalmitoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in DPPC-D2O-in-CCl4 reversed micelles. The alkanols formed hydrogen bonds with the phosphate moiety of DPPC and released the DPPC-bound deuterated water, evidenced by increases in the bound O-H stretching signal of the alkanol-DPPC complex and also in the free O-D stretching band of unbound D2O. These effects increased according to the elongation of the carbon chain of 1-alkanols from ethanol (C2) to 1-decanol (C10), but suddenly almost disappeared at 1-tetradecanol (C14). Anesthetic potencies of these alkanols, estimated by the activity of brine shrimps, were linearly related to hydrogen bond-breaking activities below C10 and agreed with the FTIR data in the cutoff at C10.

  13. Design of novel plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite-bond coat bioceramic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, R. B.

    1999-12-01

    Bond coats based on bioinert ceramic materials such as titania and zirconia were developed to increase the adhesion strength of the coating system hydroxyapatite-bond coat to Ti-6Al-4V alloy surfaces used for hip endoprostheses and dental root implants. The bond coats improved the adhesion strength, measured by a modified ASTM D 3167-76 peel test, by up to 100% and also the resorption resistance as determined by in vitro leaching in simulated protein-free body fluid for up to 28 days.

  14. Covalent bonding modulated graphene-metal interfacial thermal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Xueqiang; Vishwanath, Suresh; Mu, Xin; Kanzyuba, Vasily; Sokolov, Denis A.; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Go, David B.; Xing, Huili Grace; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-05-01

    We report the covalent bonding enabled modulation of the interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and metals Cu, Al, and Pt by controlling the oxidation of graphene. By combining comprehensive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and time-domain thermoreflectance measurements, we quantify the effect of graphene oxidation on interfacial thermal conductance. It was found that thermal conductance increases with the degree of graphene oxidation until a peak value is obtained at an oxygen/carbon atom percentage of ~7.7%. The maximum enhancement in thermal conductance was measured to be 55%, 38%, and 49% for interfaces between oxidized graphene and Cu, Al, and Pt, respectively. In situ XPS measurements show that oxygen covalently binds to Cu and graphene simultaneously, forming a highly efficient bridge to enhance the thermal transport. Our molecular dynamics simulations verify that strong interfacial covalent bonds are the key to the thermal conductance enhancement. This work provides valuable insights into the mechanism of functionalization-induced thermal conductance enhancement and design guidelines for graphene-based devices.We report the covalent bonding enabled modulation of the interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and metals Cu, Al, and Pt by controlling the oxidation of graphene. By combining comprehensive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and time-domain thermoreflectance measurements, we quantify the effect of graphene oxidation on interfacial thermal conductance. It was found that thermal conductance increases with the degree of graphene oxidation until a peak value is obtained at an oxygen/carbon atom percentage of ~7.7%. The maximum enhancement in thermal conductance was measured to be 55%, 38%, and 49% for interfaces between oxidized graphene and Cu, Al, and Pt, respectively. In situ XPS measurements show that oxygen covalently binds to Cu and graphene simultaneously, forming a highly efficient bridge to enhance

  15. Chemical Bonding Technology: Direct Investigation of Interfacial Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. L.; Boerio, F. J.; Plueddemann, E. P.; Miller, J.; Willis, P. B.; Cuddihy, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    This is the third Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project document reporting on chemical bonding technology for terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) modules. The impetus for this work originated in the late 1970s when PV modules employing silicone encapsulation materials were undergoing delamination during outdoor exposure. At that time, manufacturers were not employing adhesion promoters and, hence, module interfaces in common with the silicone materials were only in physical contact and therefore easily prone to separation if, for example, water were to penetrate to the interfaces. Delamination with silicone materials virtually vanished when adhesion promoters, recommended by silicone manufacturers, were used. The activities related to the direct investigation of chemically bonded interfaces are described.

  16. Covalent bonding modulated graphene-metal interfacial thermal transport.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Xueqiang; Vishwanath, Suresh; Mu, Xin; Kanzyuba, Vasily; Sokolov, Denis A; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Go, David B; Xing, Huili Grace; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-06-01

    We report the covalent bonding enabled modulation of the interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and metals Cu, Al, and Pt by controlling the oxidation of graphene. By combining comprehensive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and time-domain thermoreflectance measurements, we quantify the effect of graphene oxidation on interfacial thermal conductance. It was found that thermal conductance increases with the degree of graphene oxidation until a peak value is obtained at an oxygen/carbon atom percentage of ∼7.7%. The maximum enhancement in thermal conductance was measured to be 55%, 38%, and 49% for interfaces between oxidized graphene and Cu, Al, and Pt, respectively. In situ XPS measurements show that oxygen covalently binds to Cu and graphene simultaneously, forming a highly efficient bridge to enhance the thermal transport. Our molecular dynamics simulations verify that strong interfacial covalent bonds are the key to the thermal conductance enhancement. This work provides valuable insights into the mechanism of functionalization-induced thermal conductance enhancement and design guidelines for graphene-based devices. PMID:27174416

  17. Bioceramics in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Baino, Francesco; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2014-08-01

    The benefits of ceramics in biomedical applications have been universally appreciated as they exhibit an extraordinarily broad set of physico-chemical, mechanical and biological properties which can be properly tailored by acting on their composition, porosity and surface texture to increase their versatility and suitability for targeted healthcare applications. Bioceramics have traditionally been used for the repair of hard tissues, such as bone and teeth, mainly due to their suitable strength for load-bearing applications, wear resistance (especially alumina, zirconia and composites thereof) and, in some cases, bone-bonding ability (calcium orthophosphates and bioactive glasses). Bioceramics have been also applied in other medical areas, like ophthalmic surgery; although their use in such a context has been scientifically documented since the late 1700s, the potential and importance of ceramic ocular implants still seem to be underestimated and an exhaustive, critical assessment is currently lacking in the relevant literature. The present review aims to fill this gap by giving a comprehensive picture of the ceramic-based materials and implants that are currently used in ophthalmology and pointing out the strengths and weaknesses of the existing devices. A prospect for future research is also provided, highlighting the potential of new, smart bioceramics able to carry specific added values which could have a significant impact on the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:24879312

  18. A technique to measure the interfacial bond strength

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, T.A.; Pagano, N.J.; Kerans, R.J.

    1989-08-01

    A technique to measure the bond strength of interfaces that simulate those in brittle matrix/brittle fiber composites is proposed. The technique uses a simple planar geometry for the interface. The Pyrex/SiC system was investigated and it was found that the average interfacial shear stress at failure could be rationalized using data from the fiber pull-out tests. Since the technique does not require composite fabrication before the test, it is suggested as a screening test for prospective composite systems. 11 refs.

  19. The Effect of Canal Dryness on Bond Strength of Bioceramic and Epoxy-resin Sealers after Irrigation with Sodium Hypochlorite or Chlorhexidine

    PubMed Central

    Razmi, Hasan; Bolhari, Behnam; Karamzadeh Dashti, Negar; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of canal dryness on the push-out bond strength of two resin sealers (AH-Plus and Adseal) and a bioceramic sealer (Endosequence BC sealer) after canal irrigation with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CHX). Methods and Materials: A total of 18 extracted human premolars were used. Canals were prepared and were divided to two groups based on irrigation solution (either NaOCl or CHX). The samples were again divided based on pre-obturation canal condition (wet, half-wet and dry). The samples were sub-divided into 3 groups based on the sealer type; the teeth were obturated with gutta-percha and test sealers (Adseal, AH-Plus or BC sealer). A total number of 18 groups were available to be cut into dentine disks (12 disks in each group). The type of bond failure was also assessed in each group. Data were analyzed using the 3-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey’s tests, t-test and the Fisher’s exact test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The bond strength of Adseal was not affected by the canal condition or irrigation with either NaOCl or CHX. Although the bond strength of AH-Plus was not affected by the irrigant type, the highest bond strength was seen in dry canals. For Endosequence BC sealer, the canal conditions did not affect the bond strength; however, CHX reduced the bond strength. Conclusion: Bond strength of resin sealers was not affected by irrigation solution; however, canal moisture negatively affected the bond strength of AH-Plus. CHX reduced the bond strength of BC sealer. PMID:27141222

  20. A novel in vivo method for quantifying the interfacial biochemical bond strength of bone implants

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Young-Taeg; Johansson, Carina; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the in vivo interfacial biochemical bond strength of bone implants is a biological challenge. We have developed a new and novel in vivo method to identify an interfacial biochemical bond in bone implants and to measure its bonding strength. This method, named biochemical bond measurement (BBM), involves a combination of the implant devices to measure true interfacial bond strength and surface property controls, and thus enables the contributions of mechanical interlocking and biochemical bonding to be distinguished from the measured strength values. We applied the BBM method to a rabbit model, and observed great differences in bone integration between the oxygen (control group) and magnesium (test group) plasma immersion ion-implanted titanium implants (0.046 versus 0.086 MPa, n=10, p=0.005). The biochemical bond in the test implants resulted in superior interfacial behaviour of the implants to bone: (i) close contact to approximately 2 μm thin amorphous interfacial tissue, (ii) pronounced mineralization of the interfacial tissue, (iii) rapid bone healing in contact, and (iv) strong integration to bone. The BBM method can be applied to in vivo experimental models not only to validate the presence of a biochemical bond at the bone–implant interface but also to measure the relative quantity of biochemical bond strength. The present study may provide new avenues for better understanding the role of a biochemical bond involved in the integration of bone implants. PMID:19369221

  1. Interfacial push-out measurements of fully-bonded SiC/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Steiner, D. ); Zinkle, S.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The direct measurement of interfacial bond strength and frictional resistance to sliding in a fully-bonded SiC/SiC composite is measured. It is shown that a fiber push-out technique can be utilized for small diameter fibers and very thin composite sections. Results are presented for a 22 micron thick section for which 37 out of 44 Nicalon fibers tested were pushed-out within the maximum nanoindentor load of 120 mN. Fiber interfacial yielding, push-out and sliding resistance were measured for each fiber. The distribution of interfacial strengths is treated as being Weibull in form. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

    2002-03-01

    Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

  3. Interfacial characterization of Al-Al thermocompression bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, N.; Carvalho, P. A.; Poppe, E.; Finstad, T. G.

    2016-05-01

    Interfaces formed by Al-Al thermocompression bonding were studied by the transmission electron microscopy. Si wafer pairs having patterned bonding frames were bonded using Al films deposited on Si or SiO2 as intermediate bonding media. A bond force of 36 or 60 kN at bonding temperatures ranging from 400-550 °C was applied for a duration of 60 min. Differences in the bonded interfaces of 200 μm wide sealing frames were investigated. It was observed that the interface had voids for bonding with 36 kN at 400 °C for Al deposited both on Si and on SiO2. However, the dicing yield was 33% for Al on Si and 98% for Al on SiO2, attesting for the higher quality of the latter bonds. Both a bond force of 60 kN applied at 400 °C and a bond force of 36 kN applied at 550 °C resulted in completely bonded frames with dicing yields of, respectively, 100% and 96%. A high density of long dislocations in the Al grains was observed for the 60 kN case, while the higher temperature resulted in grain boundary rotation away from the original Al-Al interface towards more stable configurations. Possible bonding mechanisms and reasons for the large difference in bonding quality of the Al films deposited on Si or SiO2 are discussed.

  4. Effect of interfacial variables on metal-porcelain bonding.

    PubMed

    Wagner, W C; Asgar, K; Bigelow, W C; Flinn, R A

    1993-04-01

    While ceramic-to-metal bonding has been used in many applications, the actual chemical and physical factors leading to optimum bond strength are not well understood. In this work, several variables affecting the bonding between dental porcelain and a palladium alloy (85% Pd, 10% Cu, and 5% Ga) were investigated: 1) precoating the metal by sputtering various oxides before porcelaining; 2) peroxidation of the metal base before porcelaining; 3) porcelaining under reducing atmosphere; and 4) surface roughening at controlled levels before porcelaining. Using a modification of the push doughnut shear bond strength test to measure bond strength the following results were obtained. 1) Compared with standard "control" samples, the aluminum oxide precoated specimens showed a bond strength improvement of 46%, while the copper, manganese, and tin oxide precoatings exhibited smaller effects. 2) Preoxidation of the metal base led to pronounced bond strengthening (152%) by surface roughening as well as oxide formation. 3) Porcelaining under a reducing atmosphere severely reduced bond strength (88% lower than the controls) indicating the role of oxidation during the standard firing cycle. 4) Mechanical roughening of the surface by controlled amounts gave pronounced improvements with greater notch depth. Coarse roughening produced the highest bond strength improvements (486%). PMID:8463354

  5. Potential Effect of Interfacial Bonding on Used Nuclear Fuel Vibration Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    This summary abstract describes the methodology used to evaluate the effect of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions with consideration of the interfacial bonding efficiency on UNF vibration integrity. This methodology provides a solid roadmap for further protocol development with respect to effective lifetime prediction of a UNF system under normal transportation vibration. The proposed methodology that couples FEA simulations and experimental exploration efforts is also under development. The current methodology is focused on assessing the influence of interfacial bonding at the pellet pellet and the pellet clad interfaces on UNF vibration integrity. The FEA simulation results were also calibrated and benchmarked with the fatigue aging data obtained from reversible bending fatigue testing.

  6. Crack problems involving nonhomogeneous interfacial regions in bonded materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to two classes of fracture-related solid mechanics problems in which the model leads to some physically anomalous results. The first is the interface crack problem associated with the debonding process in which the corresponding elasticity solution predicts severe oscillations of stresses and the crack surface displacements vary near the crack tip. The second deals with crack intersecting the interface. The nature of the solutions around the crack tips arising from these problems is reviewed. The rationale for introducing a new interfacial zone model is discussed, its analytical consequences within the context of the two crack-problem classes are described, and some examples are presented.

  7. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of interfacial water at single bond limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying

    Hydrogen bond is one of the most important weak interactions in nature and plays an essential role in a broad spectrum of physics, chemistry, biology, energy and material sciences. The conventional methods for studying hydrogen-bonding interaction are all based on spectroscopic or diffraction techniques. However, those techniques have poor spatial resolution and only measure the average properties of many hydrogen bonds, which are susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. The spatial variation and inter-bond coupling of the hydrogen bonds leads to significant spectral broadening, which prohibits the accurate understanding of the experimental data. In this talk, I will present our recent progress on the development of new-generation scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (SPM/S) with unprecedentedly high sensitivity and resolution, for addressing weak inter- and intra-molecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. Based on a qPlus sensor, we have succeeded to push the real-space study of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded system, i.e. water, down to single bond limit. Combined with state-of-the-arts quantum simulations, we have discovered exotic nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) in interfacial water and revealed the quantum nature of the hydrogen bond from a completely new perspective

  8. POTENTIAL IMPACT OF INTERFACIAL BONDING EFFICIENCY ON USED NUCLEAR FUEL VIBRATION INTEGRITY DURING NORMAL TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces on surrogate of used nuclear fuel (UNF) vibration integrity. The FEA simulation results were also validated and benchmarked with reversible bending fatigue test results on surrogate rods consisting of stainless steel (SS) tubes with alumina-pellet inserts. Bending moments (M) are applied to the FEA models to evaluate the system responses of the surrogate rods. From the induced curvature, , the flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI=M/ . The impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency include the moment carrying capacity distribution between pellets and clad and cohesion influence on the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod system. The result also indicates that the immediate consequences of interfacial de-bonding are a load carrying capacity shift from the fuel pellets to the clad and a reduction of the composite rod flexural rigidity. Therefore, the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod and the bending moment bearing capacity between the clad and fuel pellets are strongly dependent on the efficiency of interfacial bonding at the pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces. FEA models will be further used to study UNF vibration integrity.

  9. Time-dependent behavior of RC beams strengthened with externally bonded FRP plates: interfacial stresses analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyoucef, S.; Tounsi, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Adda Bedia, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    External bonding of fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites has becomes a popular technique for strengthening concrete structures all over the world. An important failure mode of such strengthened members is the debonding of the FRP plate from the concrete due to high interfacial stresses near the plate ends. For correctly installed FRP plate, failure will occur within the concrete. Accurate predictions of the interfacial stresses are prerequisite for designing against debonding failures. In particular, the interfacial stresses between a beam and soffit plate within the linear elastic range have been addressed by numerous analytical investigations. In this study, the time-dependent behavior of RC beams bonded with thin composite plate was investigated theoretically by including the effect of the adherend shear deformations. The time effects considered here are those that arise from shrinkage and creep deformations of the concrete. This paper presents an analytical model for the interfacial stresses between RC beam and a thin FRP plate bonded to its soffit. The influence of creep and shrinkage effect relative to the time of the casting and the time of the loading of the beams is taken into account. Numerical results from the present analysis are presented to illustrate the significance of time-dependent of adhesive stresses.

  10. Improved Interfacial Bonding in Magnesium/Aluminum Overcasting Systems by Aluminum Surface Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Chen, Yiqing; Luo, Alan A.

    2014-12-01

    "Overcasting" technique is used to produce bimetallic magnesium/aluminum (Mg/Al) structures where lightweight Mg can be cast onto solid Al substrates. An inherent difficulty in creating strong Mg/Al interfacial bonding is the natural oxide film on the solid Al surfaces, which reduces the wettability between molten Mg and Al substrates during the casting process. In the paper, an "electropolishing + anodizing" surface treatment has been developed to disrupt the oxide film on a dilute Al-0.08 wt pct Ga alloy, improving the metallurgical bonding between molten Mg and Al substrates in the bimetallic experiments carried out in a high-vacuum test apparatus. The test results provided valuable information of the interfacial phenomena of the Mg/Al bimetallic samples. The results show significantly improved metallurgical bonding in the bimetallic samples with "electropolishing + anodizing" surface treatment and Ga alloying. It is recommended to adjust the pre-heating temperature and time of the Al substrates and the Mg melt temperature to control the interfacial reactions for optimum interfacial properties in the actual overcasting processes.

  11. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-06-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

  12. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-01-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties. PMID:27245687

  13. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-01-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties. PMID:27245687

  14. Vibrational characteristics of FRP-bonded concrete interfacial defects in a low frequency regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tin Kei; Lau, Denvid

    2014-04-01

    As externally bonded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) is a critical load-bearing component of strengthened or retrofitted civil infrastructures, the betterment of structural health monitoring (SHM) methodology for such composites is imperative. Henceforth the vibrational characteristics of near surface interfacial defects involving delamination and trapped air pockets at the FRP-concrete interface are investigated in this study using a finite element approach. Intuitively, due to its lower interfacial stiffness compared with an intact interface, a damaged region is expected to have a set of resonance frequencies different from an intact region when excited by acoustic waves. It has been observed that, when excited acoustically, both the vibrational amplitudes and frequency peaks in the response spectrum of the defects demonstrate a significant deviation from an intact FRP-bonded region. For a thin sheet of FRP bonded to concrete with sizable interfacial defects, the fundamental mode under free vibration is shown to be relatively low, in the order of kHz. Due to the low resonance frequencies of the defects, the use of low-cost equipment for interfacial defect detection via response spectrum analysis is highly feasible.

  15. Interfacial bond strength of electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings on metals.

    PubMed

    Wei, M; Ruys, A J; Swain, M V; Kim, S H; Milthorpe, B K; Sorrell, C C

    1999-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were deposited onto substrates of metal biomaterials (Ti, Ti6Al4V, and 316L stainless steel) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Only ultra-high surface area HAp powder, prepared by the metathesis method 10Ca(NO3)2 + 6(NH4)2HPO4 + 8NH4OH), could produce dense coatings when sintered at 875-1000degreesC. Single EPD coatings cracked during sintering owing to the 15-18% sintering shrinkage, but the HAp did not decompose. The use of dual coatings (coat, sinter, coat, sinter) resolved the cracking problem. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) inspection revealed that the second coating filled in the "valleys" in the cracks of the first coating. The interfacial shear strength of the dual coatings was found, by ASTM F1044-87, to be approximately 12 MPa on a titanium substrate and approximately 22 MPa on 316L stainless steel, comparing quite favorably with the 34 MPa benchmark (the shear strength of bovine cortical bone was found to be 34 MPa). Stainless steel gave the better result since -316L (20.5 microm mK(-1)) > alpha-HAp (approximately 14 microm mK(-1)), resulting in residual compressive stresses in the coating, whereas alpha-titanium (approximately 10.3 microm mK(-1)) < alpha-HAp, resulting in residual tensile stresses in the coating. PMID:15348125

  16. Bioceramic Resonance Effect on Meridian Channels: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Chan, Wing P.; Tai, Chen-Jei; Cho, Ting-Pin; Yang, Jen-Chang; Lee, Po-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Bioceramic is a kind of material which emits nonionizing radiation and luminescence, induced by visible light. Bioceramic also facilitates the breakup of large clusters of water molecules by weakening hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen bond weakening, which allows water molecules to act in diverse ways under different conditions, is one of the key mechanisms underlying the effects of Bioceramic on biophysical and physical-chemical processes. Herein, we used sound to amplify the effect of Bioceramic and further developed an experimental device for use in humans. Thirteen patients who suffered from various chronic and acute illnesses that severely affected their sleep patterns and life quality were enrolled in a trial of Bioceramic resonance (i.e., rhythmic 100-dB sound waves with frequency set at 10 Hz) applied to the skin surface of the anterior chest. According to preliminary data, a “Propagated Sensation along Meridians” (PSM) was experienced in all Bioceramic resonance-treated patients but not in any of the nine control patients. The device was believed to enhance microcirculation through a series of biomolecular and physiological processes and to subject the specific meridian channels of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to coherent vibration. This noninvasive technique may offer an alternative to needle acupuncture and other traditional medical practices with clinical benefits. PMID:26236383

  17. Interfacial bonding characteristics between graphene and dielectric substrates.

    PubMed

    Das, Santanu; Lahiri, Debrupa; Agarwal, Arvind; Choi, Wonbong

    2014-01-31

    Achieving strong adhesion between graphene and SiO(x)/Si substrates is crucial to make reliable graphene based electronics and electro-optic devices. We report the enhanced adhesion energy by vacuum annealing and the quantification of graphene-SiO(x)/Si substrate adhesion energy by using the nano-scratch technique coupled with Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We found that the adhesion energy of as-transferred graphene on SiO(x)/Si substrates is ~2.978 J m(-2). By applying different annealing protocols of rapid thermal annealing and vacuum annealing, the adhesion energy of graphene-SiO(x)/Si is increased to 10.09 and 20.64 J m(-2), respectively. The increase in adhesion energy is due to the formation of chemical bonds between the graphene and SiO(x) at high temperatures. The XPS depth profiling confirms that C-O and C=O chemical bond formation occurs at the graphene/SiO(x) interface. These results could be adapted for graphene/Si nanoelectronics device fabrication and they open up a pathway towards producing reliable solid state devices. PMID:24399030

  18. The mode III crack problem in bonded materials with a nonhomogeneous interfacial zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Joseph, P. F.; Kaya, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The mode 3 crack problem for two bonded homogeneous half planes was considered. The interfacial zone was modelled by a nonhomogeneous strip in such a way that the shear modulus is a continuous function throughout the composite medium and has discontinuous derivatives along the boundaries of the interfacial zone. The problem was formulated for cracks perpendicular to the nominal interface and was solved for various crack locations in and around the interfacial region. The asymptotic stress field near the tip of a crack terminating at an interface was examined and it was shown that, unlike the corresponding stress field in piecewise homogeneous materials, in this case the stresses have the standard square root singularity and their angular variation was identical to that of a crack in a homogeneous medium. With application to the subcritical crack growth process in mind, the results given include mostly the stress intensity factors for some typical crack geometries and various material combinations.

  19. The mode 3 crack problem in bonded materials with a nonhomogeneous interfacial zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, Fazil; Kaya, A. C.; Joseph, P. F.

    1988-01-01

    The mode 3 crack problem for two bonded homogeneous half planes was considered. The interfacial zone was modelled by a nonhomogeneous strip in such a way that the shear modulus is a continuous function throughout the composite medium and has discontinuous derivatives along the boundaries of the interfacial zone. The problem was formulated for cracks perpendicular to the nominal interface and was solved for various crack locations in and around the interfacial region. The asymptotic stress field near the tip of a crack terminating at an interface was examined and it was shown that, unlike the corresponding stress field in piecewise homogeneous materials, in this case the stresses have the standard square root singularity and their angular variation was identical to that of a crack in a homogeneous medium. With application to the subcritical crack growth process in mind, the results given include mostly the stress intensity factors for some typical crack geometries and various material combinations.

  20. An investigation of the interfacial bond strength of polymeric laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Eby, R.K. )

    1991-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of an investigation of the bond strength of paper - polypropylene - paper (PPP) laminates. The strength has been measured with a peel test for the as--received laminates of different manufacturers, after thermal aging in air and nitrogen, after static thermal age in oil at room temperature and 90{degrees}C as well as after cyclic thermal aging in oil. Differential swelling of the paper and polypropylene at 90{degrees}C leads to a strong decrease in peel strength. Differential thermal expansion at 90{degrees}C is not as important. Cyclic thermal aging in oil leads to the greatest decrease in peel strength. The results further our knowledge of information that should be considered in preparing a PPP specification. 19 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. Evaluation of the interfacial bond properties between carbon phenolic and glass phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K.; Clinton, R.; Jeelani, S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of moisture and surface finish on the mechanical and physical properties of the interfacial bond between carbon/phenolic (C/P) and glass/phenolic (G/P) composite materials have been studied. Test results indicate that moisture substantially degrades the integrity of the interfacial bond between C/P and G/P materials. The apparent effect of the autoclave curing of the C/P material reduces the ultimate interlaminar shear length of the C/P material by 20 percent compared to the hydroclave curing of the C/P material. The variation in applied surface finishes is found to have no appreciable effect on the ultimate interlaminar shear strength of the interface in the wet laminate.

  2. Interfacial bonding in a CdS/PVA nanocomposite: A Raman scattering study.

    PubMed

    Rudko, Galyna Yu; Kovalchuk, Andrii O; Fediv, Volodymyr I; Chen, Weimin M; Buyanova, Irina A

    2015-08-15

    Raman spectroscopy is employed to characterize the bonding between CdS nanoparticles (NPs) and a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as well as structural changes in the polymeric matrix caused by incorporation of NPs. It is shown that after the formation of CdS NPs the vibrations of carbonyl groups in acetate residuals of PVA and of C-O groups at the macromolecules ends disappear. Formation of NPs also leads to an increased degree of hydrogen bonding and crystallinity of the hybrid material as compared with the unloaded polymer. The observed changes are ascribed to the formation of coordinative bonds and hydrogen between the CdS nanoparticles and polymeric macromolecules. The scheme of this interfacial bonding is also proposed. PMID:25910224

  3. Infiltration kinetics and interfacial bond strength of metal-matrix composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    The research accomplishments for this three-year metal matrix composite research program centered upon three areas: infiltration kinetics, wettability studies and predictions of interfacial properties. A pre-conditioning reaction model was hypothesized to explain the incubation period observed to precede the liquid metal infiltration of SiC particulate, and a rate equation for pre-conditioning was experimentally established for the infiltration of SiC particulate by liquid aluminum. Experimental wettability studies were completed for aluminum--silicon, aluminum--magnesium, and aluminum--lithium alloys in contact with SiC by utilizing a capillary rise apparatus. The oxide layers on the ceramic substrate and on the molten metal surface were observed to strongly influence wetting behavior. Differential optical reflectance was used to measure the optical transitions in aluminum and its alloys. Interfacial bond energies were estimated using a work of decohesion model. Punch shear tests then provided relative estimates of bond strengths for several aluminum alloys in contact with silicon carbide. Concepts from surface science and thermodynamics were coupled to theoretically predict wettability. Wetting was treated as a surface phenomenon, in which a surface reaction monolayer was sufficient to cause wetting. Aluminum matrix composite processing using the liquid metal route is complicated by the oxide barrier formed on the liquid metal. A transport model was used to explain the observed interfacial reaction behavior.

  4. The role of water and mineral-collagen interfacial bonding on microdamage progression in bone.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qing; Leng, Huijie; Wang, Xiaodu; Zhou, Yanheng; Rong, Qiguo

    2014-02-01

    Microdamage would be accumulated in bone due to high-intensity training or even normal daily activity, which may consequently cause fragility fracture or stress fracture. On the other hand, microdamage formation serves as a toughening mechanism in bone. However, the mechanisms that control microdamage initiation and accumulation in bone are still poorly understood. Our previous finite element model indicated that different interfacial properties between mineral and collagen in bone may lead to distinct patterns of microdamage accumulation. Therefore, the current study was designed to examine such prediction and to investigate the role of water and mineral-collagen interactions on microdamage accumulation in bone. To address these issues, 48 mice femurs were divided randomly into four groups. These groups were dehydrated or treated with perfluorotripropylamine (PFTA) or NaF solution to change water distribution and mineral-collagen interfacial bonding in bone. After three-point bending fatigue tests, the types of microdamage (i.e., linear microcracks or diffuse damage) formed in bone were compared between different groups. The results suggested that (1) bone tissues with strong mineral-collagen interfacial bonding facilitate the formation of linear microcraks, and (2) water has little contribution to the growth of microcracks. PMID:24122969

  5. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  6. Effect of Interfacial Bonding on Interphase Properties in SiO2/Epoxy Nanocomposite: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhikun; Lv, Qiang; Chen, Shenghui; Li, Chunling; Sun, Shuangqing; Hu, Songqing

    2016-03-23

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to explore the effect of interfacial bonding on the interphase properties of a nanocomposite system that consists of a silica nanoparticle and the highly cross-linked epoxy matrix. For the structural properties, results show that interfacial covalent bonding can broaden the interphase region by increasing the radial effect range of fluctuated mass density and oriented chains, as well as strengthen the interphase region by improving the thermal stability of interfacial van der Waals excluded volume and reducing the proportion of cis conformers of epoxy segments. The improved thermal stability of the interphase region in the covalently bonded model results in an increase of ∼21 K in the glass transition temperature (Tg) compared to that of the pure epoxy. It is also found that interfacial covalent bonding mainly restricts the volume thermal expansion of the model at temperatures near or larger than Tg. Furthermore, investigations from mean-square displacement and fraction of immobile atoms point out that interfacial covalent and noncovalent bonding induces lower and higher mobility of interphase atoms than that of the pure epoxy, respectively. The obtained critical interfacial bonding ratio when the interphase and matrix atoms have the same mobility is 5.8%. These results demonstrate that the glass transitions of the interphase and matrix will be asynchronous when the interfacial bonding ratio is not 5.8%. Specifically, the interphase region will trigger the glass transition of the matrix when the ratio is larger than 5.8%, whereas it restrains the glass transition of the matrix when the ratio is smaller than 5.8%. PMID:26927032

  7. Controlling Interfacial Dynamics: Covalent Bonding versus Physical Adsorption in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Holt, Adam P; Bocharova, Vera; Cheng, Shiwang; Kisliuk, Alexander M; White, B Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Uhrig, David; Mahalik, J P; Kumar, Rajeev; Imel, Adam E; Etampawala, Thusitha; Martin, Halie; Sikes, Nicole; Sumpter, Bobby G; Dadmun, Mark D; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2016-07-26

    It is generally believed that the strength of the polymer-nanoparticle interaction controls the modification of near-interface segmental mobility in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). However, little is known about the effect of covalent bonding on the segmental dynamics and glass transition of matrix-free polymer-grafted nanoparticles (PGNs), especially when compared to PNCs. In this article, we directly compare the static and dynamic properties of poly(2-vinylpyridine)/silica-based nanocomposites with polymer chains either physically adsorbed (PNCs) or covalently bonded (PGNs) to identical silica nanoparticles (RNP = 12.5 nm) for three different molecular weight (MW) systems. Interestingly, when the MW of the matrix is as low as 6 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 5.4) or as high as 140 kg/mol (RNP/Rg= 1.13), both small-angle X-ray scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy show similar static and dynamic properties for PNCs and PGNs. However, for the intermediate MW of 18 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 3.16), the difference between physical adsorption and covalent bonding can be clearly identified in the static and dynamic properties of the interfacial layer. We ascribe the differences in the interfacial properties of PNCs and PGNs to changes in chain stretching, as quantified by self-consistent field theory calculations. These results demonstrate that the dynamic suppression at the interface is affected by the chain stretching; that is, it depends on the anisotropy of the segmental conformations, more so than the strength of the interaction, which suggests that the interfacial dynamics can be effectively tuned by the degree of stretching-a parameter accessible from the MW or grafting density. PMID:27337392

  8. Controlling Interfacial Dynamics: Covalent Bonding versus Physical Adsorption in Polymer Nanocomposites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holt, Adam P.; Bocharova, Vera; Cheng, Shiwang; Kisliuk, Alexander M.; White, B. Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Uhrig, David; Mahalik, J. P.; Kumar, Rajeev; Imel, Adam E.; et al

    2016-06-23

    It is generally believed that the strength of the polymer nanoparticle interaction controls the modification of near-interface segmental mobility in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). However, little is known about the effect of covalent bonding on the segmental dynamics and glass transition of matrix-free polymer-grafted nanoparticles (PGNs), especially when compared to PNCs. In this article, we directly compare the static and dynamic properties of poly(2-vinylpyridine)/silica-based nanocomposites with polymer chains either physically adsorbed (PNCs) or covalently bonded (PGNs) to identical silica nanoparticles (RNP = 12.5 nm) for three different molecular weight (MW) systems. Interestingly, when the MW of the matrix is as lowmore » as 6 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 5.4) or as high as 140 kg/mol (RNP/Rg= 1.13), both small-angle X-ray scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy show similar static and dynamic properties for PNCs and PGNs. However, for the intermediate MW of 18 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 3.16), the difference between physical adsorption and covalent bonding can be clearly identified in the static and dynamic properties of the interfacial layer. We ascribe the differences in the interfacial properties of PNCs and PGNs to changes in chain stretching, as quantified by self-consistent field theory calculations. These results demonstrate that the dynamic suppression at the interface is affected by the chain stretching; that is, it depends on the anisotropy of the segmental conformations, more so than the strength of the interaction, which suggests that the interfacial dynamics can be effectively tuned by the degree of stretching a parameter accessible from the MW or grafting density.« less

  9. Effects of interfacial bonding in the Si-carbon nanotube nanocomposite: A molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Chung, Yong-Chae; Gunn Lee, June

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the effects of interfacial bonding on the mechanical properties in the Si-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite by a molecular dynamics approach. To describe the system appropriately, we used a hybrid potential that includes Tersoff, AIREBO (adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order), and Lennard-Jones potentials. With increasing bonding strength at the interface of Si matrix and CNT, toughness as well as Young's modulus and maximum strength increased steadily. CNT pull-out and load transfer on the strong CNT were identified as the main mechanisms for the enhanced properties. At optimum bonding, crack tip was deflected around CNT and the fracture proceeded in plastic mode through Si matrix owing to the strong reinforcement of CNT, and resulted in a further enhancement of toughness. At maximum bonding, however, only load transfer is operative and the fracture returned to brittle mode. We concluded that a strong interface as long as the CNT maintains its structural integrity is desirable to realize the optimum result.

  10. Cervical Interfacial Bonding Effectiveness of Class II Bulk Versus Incremental Fill Resin Composite Restorations.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, F; Kaisarly, D; Michna, A; ArRejaie, A; Bader, D; El Gezawi, M

    2015-01-01

    Cervical interfacial bonding quality has been a matter of deep concern. The purpose of this study was to analyze microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and cervical interfacial gap distance (IGD) of bulk-fill vs incremental-fill Class II composite restorations. Box-only Class II cavities were prepared in 91 maxillary premolars (n = 7) with gingival margin placement 1 mm above the cementoenamel junction at one side and 1 mm below it on the other side. Eighty-four maxillary premolars were divided into self-etch and total-etch groups and further subdivided into six restorative material subgroups used incrementally and with an open-sandwich technique: group 1, Tetric Ceram HB (TC) as a control; group 2, Tetric EvoFlow (EF); group 3, SDR Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR); group 4, SonicFill (SF); group 5, Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill (TN); and group 6, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TE). Groups 2-6 were bulk-fill restoratives. Tetric N-Bond Self-Etch (se) and Tetric N-Bond total-etch (te) adhesive were used in subgroups 1-5, whereas AdheSE (se) and ExciTE F (te) were used in subgroup 6. In an additional group, Filtek P90 Low Shrink Restorative (P90) was used only with its corresponding self-etch bond. The materials were manipulated, light-cured (1600 mW/cm(2)), artificially aged (thermal and occlusal load-cycling), and sectioned. Two microrods/restoration (n = 14/group) were tested for MTBS at a crosshead-speed of 0.5 mm/min (Instron testing machine). Fracture loads were recorded (Newtons), and MTSBs were calculated (Megapascals). Means were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test, Conover-Inman post hoc analysis for MTBS (multiple comparisons), and Mann-Whitney U test for IGD. The ends of the fractures were examined for failure mode. One microrod/restoration (n = 7/group) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (×1200) for IGD. MTBS values for SF/te, P90 in enamel, and TC+SDR/te in enamel and cementum were significantly higher compared with those for the control TC

  11. Analysis of interfacial structure and bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Watanabe, Larry G; Reis, Andre F; Powers, John M; Marshall, Sally J; Marshall, Grayson W

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the bond strength, nanoleakage and interfacial morphology of four self-etch adhesives bonded to superficial dentin. Methods Micro-tensile (MT, n=15) and single plane shear (SP, n=8) bond tests were performed using human dentin polished through 320-grit SiC paper. Clearfil Protect Bond (PB), Clearfil S3 Bond (S3), Prompt L-Pop (PLP) and G-BOND (GB) were used according to manufacturers’ instructions. Composite was applied as cylinders with a thickness of 4 mm with a 1-mm diameter and stored in water at 37° C for 24 hours. Specimens were debonded with a testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Means and standard deviations of bond strength were calculated. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Fisher’s PLSD intervals were calculated at the 0.05 level of significance. Failure modes were determined at 100X. The hybrid layer was revealed by treatment with 5N HCl/5% NaOCl or fractured perpendicular to the interface and sputter coated with gold. Specimens were viewed at 1000X, 2500X, and 5000X in a field emission SEM at 15 kV. Teeth (n=2) sectioned into 0.9-mm thick slabs were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, rinsed and immersed in photo-developing solution for 8h. Specimens were sectioned (90-nm thick) and observed under TEM. Results Means ranged from 25.0 to 73.1 MPa for MT and from 15.5 to 56.4 MPa for SP. MT values were greater than SP, but were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99, p= 0.003) and provided the same order for the systems studied. Fisher’s PLSD intervals (p<0.05) for bond strength techniques and adhesives results were 1.7 and 2.3 MPa, respectively. Failures sites were mixed. TEM showed that hybrid layers were ~0.5 µm for PB, GB and S3 and ~5 µm for PLP. SEM showed morphologic differences among adhesives. Silver nitrate deposits were observed within interfaces for all adhesive systems. Clinical significance Simplification of application procedures appears to induce loss of adhesion capabilities. In this

  12. Interfacial stress in a carbon-to-metal bond joint under thermal shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    You, J.H.

    1998-02-01

    The duplex bond joint consisting of a metallic substrate armored with carbon-base materials is a promising candidate configuration for application to high heat flux operations. When a bond joint is subjected to thermal loadings, significant thermal stresses may develop due to mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficients. Stress intensification occurs near the free surface edge of the interface, sometimes showing singularity. The singular stress fields are critical for understanding the loading nature of the bond interface in a joint system. In this paper, thermal stresses in the bond interface of a carbon-to-molybdenum joint element were investigated. A high heat flux (HHF) pulse was assumed as the reference load history to simulate the thermal shock condition. The thermomechanical behavior was described quantitatively in terms of the stress intensity factor. The stress solutions of the singular field computed by the theoretical approach showed a good agreement with the numerical results of the finite element analysis. The stress intensity factor of the singular stress fields near the free surface edge of the interface showed a time variation similar to that of the bulk stress. The temperature gradient induced by the transient HHF load affected the overall interfacial stress only slightly.

  13. Development of FRP composite structural biomaterials: ultimate strength of the fiber/matrix interfacial bond in in vivo simulated environments.

    PubMed

    Latour, R A; Black, J

    1992-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are being developed as alternatives to metals for structural orthopedic implant applications. FRP composite fracture behavior and environmental interactions are distinctly different from those which occur in metals. These differences must be accounted for in the design and evaluation of implant performance. Fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength in a FRP composite is known to strongly influence fracture behavior. The interfacial bond strength of four candidate fiber/matrix combinations (carbon fiber/polycarbonate, carbon fiber/polysulfone, polyaramid fiber/polycarbonate, polyaramid fiber/polysulfone) were investigated at 37 degrees C in dry and in vivo simulated (saline, exudate) environments. Ultimate bond strength was measured by a single fiber-microdroplet pull-out test. Dry bond strengths were significantly decreased following exposure to either saline or exudate with bond strength loss being approximately equal in both the saline and exudate. Bond strength loss is attributed to the diffusion of water and/or salt ions into the sample and their interaction with interfacial bonding. Because bond degradation is dependent upon diffusion, diffusional equilibrium must be obtained in composite test samples before the full effect of the test environment upon composite mechanical behavior can be determined. PMID:1512281

  14. Use of self-assembled monolayers to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-03-02

    The relationship between the nature and spatial distribution of fundamental interfacial interactions and fracture stress/fracture toughness of a glassy adhesive-inorganic solid joint is not understood. This relationship is important from the standpoint of designing interfacial chemistry sufficient to provide the level of mechanical strength required for a particular application. In addition, it is also important for understanding the effects of surface contamination. Different types of contamination, or different levels of contamination, likely impact joint strength in different ways. Furthermore, the relationship is also important from the standpoint of aging. If interfacial chemical bonds scission over time due to the presence of a contaminant such as water, or exposure to UV, etc, the relationship between joint strength/fracture toughness and interface strength is important for predicting reliability with time. A fundamental understanding of the relationship between joint strength and fundamental interfacial interactions will give insight into these issues.

  15. Potential Impact of Interfacial Bonding Efficiency on High-Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity during Normal Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity. The FEA simulation results were also validated and benchmarked with reverse bending fatigue test results on surrogate rods consisting of stainless steel (SS) tubes with alumina-pellet inserts. Bending moments (M) are applied to the FEA models to evaluate the system responses of the surrogate rods. From the induced curvature, , the flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI=M/ . The impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency on SNF vibration integrity include the moment carrying capacity distribution between pellets and clad and the impact of cohesion on the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod system. The result also indicates that the immediate consequences of interfacial de-bonding are a load carrying capacity shift from the fuel pellets to the clad and a reduction of the composite rod flexural rigidity. Therefore, the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod and the bending moment bearing capacity between the clad and fuel pellets are strongly dependent on the efficiency of interfacial bonding at the pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces. The above-noted phenomenon was calibrated and validated by reverse bending fatigue testing using a surrogate rod system.

  16. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian

    2015-04-07

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance.

  17. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Xie, Xinjian; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao

    2015-04-01

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance.

  18. Oxidation and temperature effects on the interfacial shear strength in SCS-6 fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Guermazi, M.

    1995-01-01

    The fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength of Textron SCS-6 SiC-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (RBSN) was studied as a function of temperature after oxidation for 24 h at 600 C. Fiber push-out experiments were conducted using a diamond indenter in a high-temperature microhardness tester under vacuum. The interfacial shear strength increased with temperature because of the relief of residual tensile stresses arising from the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the fiber and the matrix. Most of sublayer 2 of the fiber outer coating, which mainly consisted of carbon in the form of BSU (basic structure unit) aggregates, had disappeared after the heat treatment of the composite. Oxidation resulted in severe changes in the fiber outer coating and caused a lower interfacial shear strength with respect to that of the unoxidized composite.

  19. Dentin Bonding Testing Using a Mini-interfacial Fracture Toughness Approach.

    PubMed

    Pongprueksa, P; De Munck, J; Karunratanakul, K; Barreto, B C; Van Ende, A; Senawongse, P; Van Meerbeek, B

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of interfacial fracture toughness (iFT) is considered a more valid method to assess bonding effectiveness as compared with conventional bond strength testing. Common fracture toughness tests are, however, laborious and require a relatively bulky specimen size. This study aimed to evaluate a new simplified and miniaturized iFT (mini-iFT) test. Four dentin adhesives, representing the main adhesive classes, and 1 glass ionomer cement were applied onto flat dentin. Mini-iFT (1.5 × 2.0 × 16 to 18 mm) and microtensile bond strength (µTBS; 1.5 × 1.5 × 16 to 18 mm) specimens were prepared from the same tooth. For the mini-iFT specimens, a single notch was cut at the adhesive-dentin interface with a 150-µm diamond blade under water cooling; the specimens were loaded until failure in a 4-point bending test setup. Finite element analysis was used to analyze stress distribution during mini-iFT testing. The correlation between the mean mini-iFT and µTBS was examined and found to be significant; a strong positive correlation was found (r(2) = 0.94, P = 0.004). Weibull data analysis suggested the mini-iFT to vary less than the µTBS. Both the mini-iFT and the µTBS revealed the same performance order, with the 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive outperforming the 2-step self-etch and 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive, followed by the 1-step SE adhesive and, finally, the glass ionomer cement. Scanning electron microscopy failure analysis revealed the adhesive-dentin interface to fail more at the actual interface with the mini-iFT test, while µTBS specimens failed more within dentin and composite. This finding was corroborated by finite element analysis showing stress to concentrate at the interface during mini-iFT loading and crack propagation. In conclusion, the new mini-iFT test appeared more discriminative and valid than the µTBS to assess bonding effectiveness; the latter test nevertheless remains more versatile. Specimen size and workload were alike, making the

  20. Frictional ageing from interfacial bonding and the origins of rate and state friction.

    PubMed

    Li, Qunyang; Tullis, Terry E; Goldsby, David; Carpick, Robert W

    2011-12-01

    Earthquakes have long been recognized as being the result of stick-slip frictional instabilities. Over the past few decades, laboratory studies of rock friction have elucidated many aspects of tectonic fault zone processes and earthquake phenomena. Typically, the static friction of rocks grows logarithmically with time when they are held in stationary contact, but the mechanism responsible for this strengthening is not understood. This time-dependent increase of frictional strength, or frictional ageing, is one manifestation of the 'evolution effect' in rate and state friction theory. A prevailing view is that the time dependence of rock friction results from increases in contact area caused by creep of contacting asperities. Here we present the results of atomic force microscopy experiments that instead show that frictional ageing arises from the formation of interfacial chemical bonds, and the large magnitude of ageing at the nanometre scale is quantitatively consistent with what is required to explain observations in macroscopic rock friction experiments. The relative magnitude of the evolution effect compared with that of the 'direct effect'--the dependence of friction on instantaneous changes in slip velocity--determine whether unstable slip, leading to earthquakes, is possible. Understanding the mechanism underlying the evolution effect would enable us to formulate physically based frictional constitutive laws, rather than the current empirically based 'laws', allowing more confident extrapolation to natural faults. PMID:22139421

  1. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2015-03-15

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes K{sub N} of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The K{sub N} calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67) ×10{sup 17} N m{sup −3}. The average ratio K{sub N}/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043) × 10{sup 10} m{sup −1} for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of K{sub N} via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  2. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2015-03-01

    The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The KN calculations fall in the range (2.01 - 4.67) ×1017 N m-3. The average ratio KN/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043) × 1010 m-1 for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of KN via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  3. An evaluation of the interfacial bond properties between carbon phenolic and glass phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kelvin; Clinton, Raymond; Jeelani, Shaik

    1989-01-01

    The effects of moisture and surface finish on the mechanical and physical properties of the interfacial bond between the carbon/phenolic (C/P) and glass/phenolic (G/P) composite materials are presented. Four flat panel laminates were fabricated using the C/P and G/P materials. Of the four laminates, one panel was fabricated in which the C/P and G/P materials were cured simultaneously. It was identified as the cocure. The remaining laminates were processed with an initial simultaneous cure of the three C/P billets. Two surface finishes, one on each half, were applied to the top surface. Prior to the application and cure of the G/P material to the machined surface of the three C/P panels, each was subjected to the specific environmental conditioning. Types of conditioning included: (1) nominal fabrication environment, (2) a prescribed drying cycle, and (3) a total immersion in water at 160 F. Physical property tests were performed on specimens removed from the C/P materials of each laminate for determination of the specific gravity, residual volatiles and and resin content. Comparisons of results with shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) nozzle material specifications verified that the materials used in fabricating the laminates met acceptance criteria and were representative of SRM nozzle materials. Mechanical property tests were performed at room temperature on specimens removed from the G/P, the C/P and the interface between the two materials for each laminate. The double-notched shear strength test was used to determine the ultimate interlaminar shear strength. Results indicate no appreciable difference in the C/P material of the four laminates with the exception of the cocure laminate, where 20 percent reduction in the strength was observed. The most significant effect and the ultimate strength was significantly reduced in the wet material. No appreciable variation was noted between the surface finishes in the wet laminate.

  4. Interfacial Microstructure and Bonding Strength of Copper Cladding Aluminum Rods Fabricated by Horizontal Core-Filling Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ya-Jun; Liu, Xin-Hua; Huang, Hai-You; Liu, Xue-Feng; Xie, Jian-Xin

    2011-12-01

    Copper cladding aluminum (CCA) rods with a diameter of 30 mm and a sheath thickness of 3 mm were fabricated by horizontal core-filling continuous casting (HCFC) technology. The microstructure and morphology, distribution of chemical components, and phase composition of the interface between Cu and Al were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The formation mechanism of the interface and the effects of key processing parameters, e.g., aluminum casting temperature, secondary cooling intensity, and mean withdrawing speed on the interfacial microstructure and bonding strength were investigated. The results show that the CCA rod has a multilayered interface, which is composed of three sublayers—sublayer I is Cu9Al4 layer, sublayer II is CuAl2 layer, and sublayer III is composed of α-Al/CuAl2 pseudo eutectic. The thickness of sublayer III, which occupies 92 to 99 pct of the total thickness of the interface, is much larger than the thicknesses of sublayers I and II. However, the interfacial bonding strength is dominated by the thicknesses of sublayers I and II; i.e., the bonding strength decreases with the rise of the thicknesses of sublayers I and II. When raising the aluminum casting temperature, the total thickness of the interface increases while the thicknesses of sublayers I and II decrease and the bonding strength increases. Either augmenting the secondary cooling intensity or increasing the mean withdrawing speed results in the decrease in both total thickness of the interface and the thicknesses of sublayers I and II, and an increase in the interfacial bonding strength. The CCA rod with the largest interfacial bonding strength of 67.9 ± 0.5 MPa was fabricated under such processing parameters as copper casting temperature 1503 K (1230 °C), aluminum casting temperature 1063 K (790 °C), primary cooling water flux 600 L/h, secondary cooling water flux 700 L/h, and

  5. Tensile properties and interfacial bonding of multi-layered, high-purity titanium strips fabricated by ARB process.

    PubMed

    Ghafari-Gousheh, Soroush; Nedjad, Syamak Hossein; Khalil-Allafi, Jafar

    2015-11-01

    Severe plastic deformation (SPD) processing has shown very effective in promotion of mechanical properties of metals and alloys. In this study, the results of investigating mechanical properties and also inter-layer bond performance of accumulative roll bonded high purity titanium (HP-Ti) strips are presented. High purity titanium plates were severely deformed by use of a combination of cold rolling (CR) to a thickness reduction of approximately 87% and then accumulative roll bonding (ARB) for three cycles (N=3) at ambient temperature. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing, and hardness measurements were conducted. The ARB strips exhibited lower tensile strength and ductility in comparison to cold rolled one which can basically be attributed to the poor function of the latest bonds established in the centerlines of the strips. Fractographic examinations revealed the interfacial de-bonding along the centerline between the layers having undergone roll bonding for just one cycle. It was while the interfaces having experienced roll bonding for more cycles showed much higher resistance against delaminating. PMID:26253205

  6. Compound pendant drop tensiometry for interfacial tension measurement at zero bond number.

    PubMed

    Neeson, Michael J; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2014-12-30

    A widely used method to determine the interfacial tension between fluids is to quantify the pendant drop shape that is determined by gravity and interfacial tension forces. Failure of this method for small drops or small fluid density differences is a critical limitation in microfluidic applications and when only small fluid samples are available. By adding a small spherical particle to the interface to apply an axisymmetric deformation, both the particle density and the interfacial tension can be simultaneously and precisely determined, providing an accurate and elegant solution to a long-standing problem. PMID:25494530

  7. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives. PMID:26954878

  8. Interfacial Rheology of Hydrogen-Bonded Polymer Multilayers Assembled at Liquid Interfaces: Influence of Anchoring Energy and Hydrophobic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Le Tirilly, Sandrine; Tregouët, Corentin; Reyssat, Mathilde; Bône, Stéphane; Geffroy, Cédric; Fuller, Gerald; Pantoustier, Nadège; Perrin, Patrick; Monteux, Cécile

    2016-06-21

    We study the 2D rheological properties of hydrogen-bonded polymer multilayers assembled directly at dodecane-water and air-water interfaces using pendant drop/bubble dilation and the double-wall ring method for interfacial shear. We use poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) as a proton acceptor and a series of polyacrylic acids as proton donors. The PAA series of chains with varying hydrophobicity was fashioned from poly(acrylic acid), (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMAA), and a homemade hydrophobically modified polymer. The latter consisted of a PAA backbone covalently grafted with C12 moieties at 1% mol (referred to as PAA-1C12). Replacing PAA with the more hydrophobic PMAA provides a route for combining hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions to increase the strength and/or the number of links connecting the polyacid chains to PVP. This systematic replacement allows for control of the ability of the monomer units inside the absorbed polymer layer to reorganize as the interface is sheared or compressed. Consequently, the interplay of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions leads to control of the resistance of the polymer multilayers to both shear and dilation. Using PAA-1C12 as the first layer improves the anchoring energy of a few monomers of the chain without changing the strength of the monomer-monomer contact in the complex layer. In this way, the layer does not resist shear but resists compression. This strategy provides the means for using hydrophobicity to control the interfacial dynamics of the complexes adsorbed at the interface of the bubbles and droplets that either elongate or buckle upon compression. Moreover, we demonstrate the pH responsiveness of these interfacial multilayers by adding aliquots of NaOH to the acidic water subphase surrounding the bubbles and droplets. Subsequent pH changes can eventually break the polymer complex, providing opportunities for encapsulation/release applications. PMID:27176147

  9. Interfacial Structure, Bonding and Composition of InAs and GaSb Thin Films Determined Using COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionca, Codrin; Walko, Donald Alan; Yacoby, Yizhak; Dorin, Catalina; Mirecki Millunchick, Joanna; Clarke, Roy

    2007-03-01

    We have used Bragg rod x-ray diffraction and Coherent Bragg Rod Analysis (COBRA) direct phase retrieval method to extract atomic resolution electron density maps of a complementary series of heteroepitaxial III-V semiconductor samples. From the 3D electron density maps we derived the spacing between monolayers, the chemical composition and the distribution of bond lengths for all atomic planes in the film and across the interface with the substrate. InAs films grown on GaSb (001) using different As species (dimer or tetramer form) both showed conformal roughness and mixed GaSb/InSb interfacial bonding character. The tetramer conditions favored InSb bonding at the heterointerface; the percentages corresponding to InSb and GaAs bonding were equal in the case of the dimer. The GaAs film grown on InAs (001) displayed significant In and As interdiffusion and had a significant percentage of GaAs-like bonds at the heterointerface.

  10. The importance of a thick cement mantle depends on stem geometry and stem-cement interfacial bonding.

    PubMed

    Caruana, J; Janssen, D; Verdonschot, N; Blunn, G W

    2009-04-01

    The thickness of the cement mantle around the femoral component of total hip replacements is a contributing factor to aseptic loosening and revision. Nevertheless, various designs of stems and surgical tooling lead to cement mantles of different thicknesses. Opinion is divided on whether a thick mantle enhances implant longevity. This study investigates the effect of cement mantle thickness on accumulated damage in the cement, and how this is influenced by the presence or absence of a proximal collar and on whether the stem-cement interface remains bonded. Three-dimensional finite element simulations incorporating creep and non-linear damage accumulation were performed to investigate cracking in the cement mantles around Stanmore Hips under physiologically informed stair-climbing and gait loads. Cement mantle thickness, stem-cement interfacial bonding, and collar design were varied to assess the interactive effects of these parameters. In all cases, damage levels were three to six times higher when the stem-cement interface remained bonded. Cement mantle thickness had little effect on cement damage accumulation around debonded collared stems but was critical in both bonded and collarless cases, where a thicker mantle reduced cement cracking. Damage around a smooth debonded stem with a collar is thus much less sensitive to cement thickness than around bonded or collarless stems. PMID:19405437

  11. Adhesive force measurement between HOPG and zinc oxide as an indicator for interfacial bonding of carbon fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Brendan A; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-07-22

    Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires have recently been utilized as an interphase to increase the interfacial strength of carbon fiber composites. It was shown that the interaction between the carbon fiber and the ZnO nanowires was a critical parameter in adhesion; however, fiber based testing techniques are dominated by local defects and cannot be used to effectively study the bonding interaction directly. Here, the strength of the interface between ZnO and graphitic carbon is directly measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using oxygen plasma treated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and an AFM tip coated with ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is used to compare the surface chemistry of HOPG and carbon fiber and to quantify the presence of various oxygen functional groups. An indirect measurement of the interfacial strength is then performed through single fiber fragmentation testing (SFF) on functionalized carbon fibers coated with ZnO nanowires to validate the AFM measurements. The SFF and AFM methods showed the same correlation, demonstrating the capacity of the AFM method to study the interfacial properties in composite materials. Additionally, the chemical interactions between oxygen functional groups and the ionic structure of ZnO suggest that intermolecular forces at the interface are responsible for the strong interface. PMID:26107931

  12. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF{sub 2}/hydrogen-terminated diamond heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Imura, M.; Koide, Y.

    2013-03-28

    CaF{sub 2} films are deposited on hydrogen-terminated diamond (H-diamond) by a radio-frequency sputter-deposition technique at room temperature. Interfacial chemical bonding state and band alignment of CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunction are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is confirmed that there are only C-Ca bonds at the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterointerface. Valence and conductance band offsets of the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunciton are determined to be 3.7 {+-} 0.2 and 0.3 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively. It shows a type I straddling band configuration. The large valence band offset suggests advantage of the CaF{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunciton for the development of high power and high frequency field effect transistors.

  13. SiC-Si interfacial thermal and mechanical properties of reaction bonded SiC/Si ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chun-Yen; Deng, Fei; Karandikar, Prashant; Ni, Chaoying

    Reaction bonded SiC/Si (RBSC) ceramic composites are broadly utilized in military, semiconductor and aerospace industries. RBSC affords advanced specific stiffness, hardness and thermal. Interface is a key region that has to be considered when working with any composites. Both thermal and mechanical behaviors of the RBSC are highly dependent on the SiC-Si interface. The SiC-Si interface had been found to act as a thermal barrier in restricting heat transferring at room temperature and to govern the energy absorption ability of the RBSC. However, up to present, the role of the SiC-Si interface to transport heat at higher temperatures and the interfacial properties in the nanoscale have not been established. This study focuses on these critically important subjects to explore scientific phenomena and underlying mechanisms. The RBSC thermal conductivity with volume percentages of SiC at 80 and 90 vol% was measured up to 1,200 °C, and was found to decrease for both samples with increasing environmental temperature. The RBSC with 90 vol% SiC has a higher thermal conductivity than that of the 80 vol%; however, is still significantly lower than that of the SiC. The interfacial thermal barrier effect was found to decrease at higher temperatures close 1200 °C. A custom-made in-situ tensile testing device which can be accommodated inside a ZEISS Auriga 60 FIB/SEM has been setup successfully. The SiC-Si interfacial bonding strength was measured at 98 MPa. The observation and analysis of crack propagation along the SiC-Si interface was achieved with in-situ TEM.

  14. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Fiber-Matrix Interfacial Bond in Aerospace Composites

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, D. G.; Kleitsa, D.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element is the “interphase” model material with varying stiffness. The study is an example of how computational methods enhance the understanding of delicate features concerning the nondestructive evaluation of materials used in advanced structures. PMID:23935408

  15. Ultrasonic characterization of the fiber-matrix interfacial bond in aerospace composites.

    PubMed

    Aggelis, D G; Kleitsa, D; Matikas, T E

    2013-01-01

    The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element is the "interphase" model material with varying stiffness. The study is an example of how computational methods enhance the understanding of delicate features concerning the nondestructive evaluation of materials used in advanced structures. PMID:23935408

  16. Non-silicon substrate bonding mediated by poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfacial coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hainan; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a simple and robust strategy for bonding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with various thermoplastic substrates to fabricate a thermoplastic-based closed microfluidic device and examine the feasibility of using the proposed method for realizing plastic-plastic bonding. The proposed bonding strategy was realized by first coating amine functionality on an oxidized thermoplastic surface. Next, the amine-functionalized surface was reacted with a monolayer of low-molecular-weight PDMS, terminated with epoxy functionality, by forming a robust amine-epoxy bond. Both the PDMS-coated thermoplastic and PDMS were then oxidized and permanently assembled at 25 °C under a pressure of 0.1 MPa for 15 min, resulting in PDMS-like surfaces on all four inner walls of the microchannel. Surface characterizations were conducted, including water contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and fluorescence measurement, to confirm the successful coating of the thin PDMS layer on the plastic surface, and the bond strength was analyzed by conducting a peel test, burst test, and leakage test. Using the proposed method, we could successfully bond various thermoplastics such as poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), polystyrene (PS), and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) with PDMS without the collapse or deformation of the microchannel, and the proposed method was successfully extended to the bonding of two thermoplastics, PMMA, and PC.

  17. A Study of Influencing Factors on the Tensile Response of a Titanium Matrix Composite With Weak Interfacial Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    The generalized method of cells micromechanics model is utilized to analyze the tensile stress-strain response of a representative titanium matrix composite with weak interfacial bonding. The fiber/matrix interface is modeled through application of a displacement discontinuity between the fiber and matrix once a critical debonding stress has been exceeded. Unidirectional composites with loading parallel and perpendicular to the fibers are examined, as well as a cross-ply laminate. For each of the laminates studied, analytically obtained results are compared to experimental data. The application of residual stresses through a cool-down process was found to have a significant effect on the tensile response. For the unidirectional laminate with loading applied perpendicular to the fibers, fiber packing and fiber shape were shown to have a significant effect on the predicted tensile response. Furthermore, the interface was characterized through the use of semi-emperical parameters including an interfacial compliance and a "debond stress;" defined as the stress level across the interface which activates fiber/matrix debonding. The results in this paper demonstrate that if architectural factors are correctly accounted for and the interface is appropriately characterized, the macro-level composite behavior can be correctly predicted without modifying any of the fiber or matrix constituent properties.

  18. Strong Coupling between Nanofluidic Transport and Interfacial Chemistry: How Defect Reactivity Controls Liquid-Solid Friction through Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Joly, Laurent; Tocci, Gabriele; Merabia, Samy; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-04-01

    Defects are inevitably present in nanofluidic systems, yet the role they play in nanofluidic transport remains poorly understood. Here, we report ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of the friction of liquid water on defective graphene and boron nitride sheets. We show that water dissociates at certain defects and that these "reactive" defects lead to much larger friction than the "nonreactive" defects at which water molecules remain intact. Furthermore, we find that friction is extremely sensitive to the chemical structure of reactive defects and to the number of hydrogen bonds they can partake in with the liquid. Finally, we discuss how the insight obtained from AIMD can be used to quantify the influence of defects on friction in nanofluidic devices for water treatment and sustainable energy harvesting. Overall, we provide new insight into the role of interfacial chemistry on nanofluidic transport in real, defective systems. PMID:27012818

  19. Researching the silicon direct wafer bonding with interfacial SiO2 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoqing, Wang; Yude, Yu; Jin, Ning

    2016-05-01

    A silicon wafer direct bonding with a thin SiO2 layer at the interface was investigated. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was employed to characterize the surface roughness and a shearing test was carried out to evaluate the bonding strength. Experiments were performed to analyze the relations of surface roughness and bonding strength with the thickness of SiO2 which was grown by thermal oxidation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) respectively. The bonding strength can reach up to 18 MPa for thermal oxidation and 8 MPa for PECVD after a 2-h 400 °C annealing. Results indicate that the bonding strength is negatively correlated to the thickness of SiO2 at the interface, which is important in designing the MEMS-based devices and other devices built with wafer direct bonding. Project supported by the Key Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61334008) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61376072).

  20. Durable ultrathin silicon nitride/carbon bilayer overcoats for magnetic heads: The role of enhanced interfacial bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Reuben J.; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, S.; Lim, Christina Y. H.

    2015-01-28

    Pole tip recession (PTR) is one of the major issues faced in magnetic tape storage technology, which causes an increase in the magnetic spacing and hence signal loss during data readback. Despite efforts to reduce the magnetic spacing, PTR, and surface wear on the heads by using protective overcoats, most of them either employ complex fabrication processes and approaches do not provide adequate protection to the head or are too thick (∼10–20 nm), especially for future high density tape storage. In this work, we discuss an approach to reduce the PTR and surface wear at the head by developing an ultrathin ∼7 nm bilayer overcoat of silicon/silicon nitride (Si/SiN{sub x}) and carbon (C), which is totally fabricated by a cost-effective and industrial-friendly magnetron sputtering process. When compared with a monolithic C overcoat of similar thickness, the electrically insulating Si/SiN{sub x}/C bilayer overcoat was found to provide better wear protection for commercial tape heads, as demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopic analyses after wear tests with commercial tape media. Although the microstructures of carbon in the monolithic and bilayer overcoats were similar, the improved wear durability of the bilayer overcoat was attributed to the creation of extensive interfacial bonding of Si and N with the C overcoat and the alumina-titanium carbide composite head substrate, as predicted by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and confirmed by in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. This study highlights the pivotal role of enhanced interfaces and interfacial bonding in developing ultrathin yet wear-durable overcoats for tape heads.

  1. Effectively Exerting the Reinforcement of Dopamine Reduced Graphene Oxide on Epoxy-Based Composites via Strengthened Interfacial Bonding.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbin; Shang, Tinghua; Yang, Wengang; Yang, Huichuan; Lin, Song; Jia, Xiaolong; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-25

    The effects of dopamine reduced graphene oxide (pDop-rGO) on the curing activity and mechanical properties of epoxy-based composites were evaluated. Taking advantage of self-polymerization of mussel-inspired dopamine, pDop-rGO was prepared through simultaneous functionalization and reduction of graphene oxide (GO) via polydopamine coating. Benefiting from the universal binding ability of polydopamine, good dispersion of pDop-rGO in epoxy matrix was able to be achieved as the content of pDop-rGO being below 0.2 wt %. Curing kinetics of epoxy composites with pDop-rGO were systematically studied by nonisothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Compared to the systems of neat epoxy or epoxy composites containing GO, epoxy composites loaded with pDop-rGO showed lower activation energy (Eα) over the range of cure (α). It revealed that the amino-bearing pDop-rGO was able to react with epoxy matrix and enhance the curing reactions as an amine-type curing agent. The nature of the interactions at GO-epoxy interface was further evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, confirming the occurrence of chemical bonding. The strengthened interfacial adhesion between pDop-rGO and epoxy matrix thus enhanced the effective stress transfer in the composites. Accordingly, the tensile and flexural properties of EP/pDop-rGO composites were enhanced due to both the well dispersion and strong interfacial bonding of pDop-rGO in epoxy matrix. PMID:27159233

  2. Durable ultrathin silicon nitride/carbon bilayer overcoats for magnetic heads: The role of enhanced interfacial bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Reuben J.; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Zheng; Lim, Christina Y. H.; Tripathy, S.; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2015-01-01

    Pole tip recession (PTR) is one of the major issues faced in magnetic tape storage technology, which causes an increase in the magnetic spacing and hence signal loss during data readback. Despite efforts to reduce the magnetic spacing, PTR, and surface wear on the heads by using protective overcoats, most of them either employ complex fabrication processes and approaches do not provide adequate protection to the head or are too thick (˜10-20 nm), especially for future high density tape storage. In this work, we discuss an approach to reduce the PTR and surface wear at the head by developing an ultrathin ˜7 nm bilayer overcoat of silicon/silicon nitride (Si/SiNx) and carbon (C), which is totally fabricated by a cost-effective and industrial-friendly magnetron sputtering process. When compared with a monolithic C overcoat of similar thickness, the electrically insulating Si/SiNx/C bilayer overcoat was found to provide better wear protection for commercial tape heads, as demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopic analyses after wear tests with commercial tape media. Although the microstructures of carbon in the monolithic and bilayer overcoats were similar, the improved wear durability of the bilayer overcoat was attributed to the creation of extensive interfacial bonding of Si and N with the C overcoat and the alumina-titanium carbide composite head substrate, as predicted by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and confirmed by in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. This study highlights the pivotal role of enhanced interfaces and interfacial bonding in developing ultrathin yet wear-durable overcoats for tape heads.

  3. A review of protein adsorption on bioceramics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kefeng; Zhou, Changchun; Hong, Youliang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2012-01-01

    Bioceramics, because of its excellent biocompatible and mechanical properties, has always been considered as the most promising materials for hard tissue repair. It is well know that an appropriate cellular response to bioceramics surfaces is essential for tissue regeneration and integration. As the in vivo implants, the implanted bioceramics are immediately coated with proteins from blood and body fluids, and it is through this coated layer that cells sense and respond to foreign implants. Hence, the adsorption of proteins is critical within the sequence of biological activities. However, the biological mechanisms of the interactions of bioceramics and proteins are still not well understood. In this review, we will recapitulate the recent studies on the bioceramic–protein interactions. PMID:23741605

  4. Effect of interfacial chemical bonding and surface topography on adhesion in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.; Sugiura, N.; Hook, D. |

    1994-12-31

    A series of PAN-based IM6 carbon fibers having varying amounts of surface treatment were, pretreated with compounds representing the constituents encountered in epoxy composites to pre-react any groups on the fiber surface before composite fabrication in order to determine the effect of chemical bonding on fiber-matrix adhesion. Chemical bonding was quantified using XPS. Chemical bonding between reactive groups in amine cured epoxy matrices and the surface groups present on IN46 carbon fibers as a result of commercial surface treatments has been detected although the absolute amount of chemical bonding is low (1-3%). It was found that reaction with monofunctional epoxy groups having hydrocarbon functionalities blocked the surface from further reaction and reduced the adhesion that could be attained to its lowest value. Prereaction with difunctional amines had little effect on adhesion when compared to normal composite fabrication procedures. Prereaction with difunctional epoxy groups did enhance adhesion levels over the level attained in normal composite fabrication methods. These results showed that chemical bonding between epoxy and the carbon fiber surface could increases the adhesion between fiber and matrix about 25% while between the amino group and the carbon fiber surface about 15%. Quantitative measurements of the fiber surface microtopography were made with scanning tunneling microscopy. An increase in roughness was detected with increasing surface treatment. It was concluded that surface roughness also accounted for a significant increase in fiber-matrix adhesion.

  5. Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. Z.; Zhou, D. L.; Yin, G. F.; Li, G. D.

    2008-11-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP)/poly L-lactide (PLLA) biocomposite is proven to be a promising bone graft material or scaffold for bone tissue engineering. To improve the interfacial compatibility of BCP bioceramic with biopolymer-PLLA, BCP powders were surface-modified in different condition to graft polymer groups onto the surface of the BCP powders. L-lactide and L-lactic acid (LA) oligomer were used to modify the BCP surface with stannous octanoate (Sn(Oct) 2) and stannous chloride (SnCl 2) as catalyst, respectively. Results show that the surface modification effect is obvious and the amount of grafted organic group is above 6.5 wt.%. Sn(Oct) 2 and SnCl 2 are the optimal catalysts for the surface grafting reaction of L-lactide and L-LA oligomer, respectively. The surface grafting slightly increase the particle size of BCP powders and reduce the tendency for their agglomeration.

  6. Three-dimensional piezoelasticity solution for piezolaminated angle-ply cylindrical shells featuring imperfect interfacial bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapuria, S.; Kumar, Amit

    2010-04-01

    The work presents an analytical three-dimensional solution for simply supported angle-ply piezoelectric (hybrid) laminated cylindrical shells in cylindrical bending with interlaminar bonding imperfections, in an electro-thermomechanical loading environment. The jumps in displacements, electric potential and temperature at the imperfect interfaces are modeled using linear spring-layer model. The solution includes the case when, besides at inner and outer surfaces, electric potentials are prescribed at layer interfaces also for effective actuation/sensing. The entities for each layer are expanded in Fourier series in circumferential coordinate to satisfy the boundary conditions at the simply supported ends. The resulting ordinary differential equations in thickness coordinate with variable coefficients are solved by the modified Frobenius method. Numerical results are presented for hybrid composite and sandwich shells with varying imperfection compliance. The effect of location of imperfect interface on the response is studied for cross-ply panels while the effect of ply angle on the sensitivity towards imperfection is studied for angle-ply panels. The effect of weak bonding at actuator/sensor interface on the actuation/sensing authority is investigated. The presented results would also help assessing 2D shell theories that incorporate interlaminar bonding imperfections.

  7. Diverse interface effects on ferroelectricity and magnetoelectric coupling in asymmetric multiferroic tunnel junctions: the role of the interfacial bonding structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, X T; Chen, W J; Jiang, G L; Wang, B; Zheng, Yue

    2016-01-28

    Interface and size effects on electric/magnetic orders and magnetoelectric coupling are vital in the modern application of quantum-size functional devices based on multiferroic tunnel junctions. In order to give a comprehensive study of the interface and size effects, the properties of a typical asymmetric multiferroic tunnel junction, i.e., Fe/BaTiO3/Co, have been calculated using the first-principles simulations. Most importantly, all of the eight possible structures with four combinations of electrode/ferroelectric interfaces (i.e., Fe/BaO, Fe/TiO2, Co/BaO and Co/TiO2) and a series of barrier thicknesses have been taken into account. In this work, the equilibrium configurations, polarization, charge density, spin density and magnetic moments, etc., have been completely simulated and comprehensively analyzed. It is found that the ferroelectric stability is determined as a competition outcome of the strength of short-range chemical bondings and long-range depolarization/built-in fields. M/BaO (M = magnetic metal) terminations show an extraordinary enhancement of local polarization near the interface and increase the critical thickness of ferroelectricity. The bistability of polarization is well kept at the M/TiO2 interface. At the same time, the induced magnetic moment on atoms at the interfaces is rather localized and dominated by the local interfacial configuration. Reversing electric polarization can switch the induced magnetic moments, wherein atoms in M-O-Ti and M-Ti-O chains show preference for being magnetized. In addition, the difference between the sum of the interfacial magnetic moments is also enlarged with the increase of the barrier thickness. Our study provides a comprehensive and detailed reference to the manipulation and utilization of the interface, size and magnetoelectric effects in asymmetric multiferroic tunnel junctions. PMID:26732894

  8. Role of interfacial thermal barrier in the transverse thermal conductivity of uniaxial SiC fiber-reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, H.; Donaldson, K. Y.; Hasselman, D. P. H.; Bhatt, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    The transverse thermal conductivity of reaction-bonded Si3N4 is significantly affected by an interfacial barrier at the interface formed with SiC reinforcing fibers. A comparative study of composites with and without reinforcing-fiber carbon coatings found the coating to reduce effective thermal conductivity by a factor of about 2; this, however, is partially due to a thermal expansion-mismatch gap between fiber and matrix. HIPing of composites with coated fibers led to an enhancement of thermal conductivity via improved interfacial thermal contact and greater grain size and crystallinity of the fibers.

  9. Tuning and probing interfacial bonding channels for a functionalized organic molecule by surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, G.; Bauer, O.; Willenbockel, M.; Fiedler, B.; Sueyoshi, T.; Weiss, C.; Temirov, R.; Soubatch, S.; Sokolowski, M.; Tautz, F. S.

    2013-03-01

    The potassium-induced missing row reconstruction of Ag(110) is used to selectively modify the local chemical interaction between the functional anhydride groups of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) and Ag(110). We find a significant upward shift of the anhydride groups, while the adsorption height of the perylene core is essentially preserved. This demonstrates an attractive perylene/substrate interaction for PTCDA/K:Ag(110), elucidating also the bonding situation for the potassium-free system.

  10. The Role of Interfacial Molecular Structure and Hydrogen-Bonding in Gas-Surface Energy Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Scott; Fergusion, Melinda; Morris, John

    2004-03-01

    Atomic-beam scattering experiments using n-alkanethiol and w-functionalized alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold are employed to explore the dynamics of gas-surface energy exchange in collisions with model organic surfaces. The studies are performed by directing a nearly monoenergetic beam of 80 kJ/mol Ar atoms onto a particular SAM at an incident angle of 30° with respect to the surface normal and recording the time-of-flight distributions for the atoms as they scatter from the surface at a final angle of 30°. Among the monolayers studied, long-chain methyl-terminated SAMs are found to be the most effective at dissipating the translational energy of impinging atoms. For alkanethiols with greater than seven total carbon atoms, we find that, for specular scattering conditions, over 80the incident energy is transferred to the surface and that over 60with the surface before scattering back into the gas phase. In contrast to methyl-terminated monolayers, SAMs constructed from hydrogen-bonding alkanethiols exhibit characteristics of more rigid collision partners. The Ar atoms transfer about 77with only 43equilibrium before recoiling. Further comparisons of mixed hydroxyl- and methyl-terminated SAMs and alkene-terminated SAMs suggest that intramonolayer hydrogen bonding of terminal functional groups may play an important role in determining the extent of energy transfer and thermalization.

  11. Laser Cladding of Composite Bioceramic Coatings on Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Han, Jiege; Wang, Chunming; Huang, Anguo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, silicon nitride (Si3N4) and calcium phosphate tribasic (TCP) composite bioceramic coatings were fabricated on a Ti6Al4V (TC4) alloy using Nd:YAG pulsed laser, CO2 CW laser, and Semiconductor CW laser. The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, mechanical properties, and biological behavior were carefully investigated. These investigations were conducted employing scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and other methodologies. The results showed that both Si3N4 and Si3N4/TCP composite coatings were able to form a compact bonding interface between the coating and the substrate by using appropriate laser parameters. The coating layers were dense, demonstrating a good surface appearance. The bioceramic coatings produced by laser cladding have good mechanical properties. Compared with that of the bulk material, microhardness of composite ceramic coatings on the surface significantly increased. In addition, good biological activity could be obtained by adding TCP into the composite coating.

  12. Structure of misfit dislocations in niobium-sapphire interfaces and strength of interfacial bonding: An atomistic study

    SciTech Connect

    Levay, A.; Moebus, G.; Vitek, V.; Ruehle, M.; Tichy, G.

    1999-11-12

    The formation of networks of misfit dislocations is investigated at the (0001){sub Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}}{parallel}(111){sub Nb} interface using a recently proposed approach which employs a very simple pair-potential to describe interaction between the metal and the substrate that contains the strength of interfacial adhesion as a parameter. The calculations demonstrate how the strength of bonding between the two materials decides both the form of the network and the atomic structure of the cores of these dislocations. At the same time it reveals that diffusion is essential for the formation of the observed triangular network of 1/2{l{underscore}angle}111{r{underscore}angle} dislocations. The calculated structures are then used to investigate related high resolution electron microscope (HREM) images using a multislice technique. In these simulations translational symmetry along the electron beam was not assumed but for each slice of material along the beam different sub-structures were used. This allowed us to investigate fully the effect of the dislocation intersections upon the images of the dislocation cores. Their effect is, indeed, considerable if an intersection is in the region producing the image but if not, the images of the cores of misfit dislocations are affected only marginally and HREM can capture fine details of the core structure. A direct comparison of an experimental observation in Mayer and co-workers with the present simulations demonstrates this ability.

  13. Bioceramic Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2003-11-02

    During the past century, man-made materials and devices have been developed to the point at which they have been used successfully to replace and/or restore function to diseased or damaged tissues. In the field of orthopaedics, the use of metal implants has significantly improved the quality of life for countless individuals. Critical factors for implant success include proper design, material selection, and biocompatibility. While early research focused on the understanding biomechanical properties of the metal device, recent work has turned toward improving the biological properties of these devices. This has lead to the introduction of calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics as a bioactive interface between the bulk metal impart and the surrounding tissue. The first calcium phosphate coatings where produced via vapor phase routes but more recently, there has been the emergence of solution based and biomimetic methods. While each approach has its own intrinsic materials and biological properties, in general CaP coatings have the promise to improve implant biocompatibility and ultimately implant longevity.

  14. Influence of interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of fiber/matrix interface microstructure and interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of a fiber-reinforced ceramic composite was evaluated. The composite consisted of approximately 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 microns diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix (SiC/RBSN). The interface microstructure was varied by controlling the composite fabrication conditions and by heat treating the composite in an oxidizing environment. Interfacial shear strength was determined by the matrix crack spacing method. The results of microstructural examination indicate that the carbon-rich coating provided with the as-produced SiC fibers was stable in composites fabricated at 1200 C in a nitrogen or in a nitrogen plus 4 percent hydrogen mixture for 40 hr. However this coating degraded in composites fabricated at 1350 C in N2 + 4 percent H2 for 40 and 72 hr and also in composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment at 600 C for 100 hr after fabrication at 1200 C in a nitrogen. It was determined that degradation occurred by carbon removal which in turn had a strong influence on interfacial shear strength and other mechanical properties. Specifically, as the carbon coating was removed, the composite interfacial shear strength, primary elastic modulus, first matrix cracking stress, and ultimate tensile strength decreased, but the first matrix cracking strain remained nearly the same.

  15. An ab initio molecular dynamics study of the liquid-vapor interface of an aqueous NaCl solution: inhomogeneous density, polarity, hydrogen bonds, and frequency fluctuations of interfacial molecules.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Jyoti Roy; Chandra, Amalendu

    2014-11-21

    We have presented a first principles simulation study of the structural and dynamical properties of a liquid-vapor interfacial system of a concentrated (5.3 M) aqueous NaCl solution. We have used ab initio molecular dynamics to examine the structural and dynamical properties of the bulk and interfacial regions. The structural aspects of the system that have been considered here include the inhomogeneous density profiles of ions and water molecules, hydrogen bond distributions, orientational profiles, and also vibrational frequency distributions in the bulk and interfacial regions. It is found that the sodium ions are mostly located in the interior, while the chloride anions occupy a significant portion of the interface of the slab. The water dipoles at the interface prefer to orient parallel to the surface. The dynamical aspects of the interfaces are investigated in terms of diffusion, orientational relaxation, hydrogen bond dynamics, and vibrational spectral diffusion. The results of the interfacial dynamics are compared with those of the corresponding bulk region. It is observed that the interfacial molecules exhibit faster diffusion and orientational relaxation with respect to the bulk. However, the interfacial molecules are found to have longer hydrogen bond lifetimes than those of the bulk. We have also investigated the correlations of hydrogen bond relaxation with the vibrational frequency fluctuations of interfacial water molecules. PMID:25416903

  16. Bioceramic-Based Root Canal Sealers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Che Ab Aziz, Zeti A.

    2016-01-01

    Bioceramic-based root canal sealers are considered to be an advantageous technology in endodontics. The aim of this review was to consider laboratory experiments and clinical studies of these sealers. An extensive search of the endodontic literature was made to identify publications related to bioceramic-based root canal sealers. The outcome of laboratory and clinical studies on the biological and physical properties of bioceramic-based sealers along with comparative studies with other sealers was assessed. Several studies were evaluated covering different properties of bioceramic-based sealers including physical properties, biocompatibility, sealing ability, adhesion, solubility, and antibacterial efficacy. Bioceramic-based sealers were found to be biocompatible and comparable to other commercial sealers. The clinical outcomes associated with the use of bioceramic-based root canal sealers are not established in the literature. PMID:27242904

  17. Role of interfacial carbon layer in the thermal diffusivity/conductivity of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Hemanshu; Donaldson, Kimberly Y.; Hasselman, D. P. H.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on samples of reaction-bonded silicon nitride uniaxially reinforced by SiC monofilaments with and without a 3-micron-thick carbon-rich coating. It is found that a combination of a carbon coatings on the fibers and an interfacial gap due to the thermal expansion mismatch in the composite can significantly (by a factor of 2) lower the effective thermal diffusivity in the direction transverse to the fiber. At atmospheric pressure, gaseous conduction across the interfacial gap makes a significant contribution to the heat transfer across the interface, indicated by significantly lower values of the effective thermal diffusivity under vacuum than in nitrogen or helium at atmospheric pressure.

  18. Effect of active hydroxyl groups on the interfacial bond strength of titanium with segmented polyurethane through gamma-mercapto propyl trimethoxysilane.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Harumi; Hirohashi, Yohei; Saito, Haruka; Doi, Hisashi; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Noda, Kazuhiko; Hanawa, Takao

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of active hydroxyl groups on a titanium (Ti) surface on the bond strength between Ti and segmented polyurethane (SPU) composite through gamma-mercapto propyl trimethoxysilane (gamma-MPS). Active hydroxyl groups on Ti surface oxide were controlled by immersion in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with different lengths of immersion time, and the resulting concentrations of active hydroxyl groups were evaluated using a zinc-complex substitution technique. For the H2O2-treated Ti, it was characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron spectroscopy. For the bond strength of Ti/ gamma-MPS/SPU interface, it was determined using a shear bond test. Results showed that the bond strength increased with increase in the concentration of active hydroxyl groups. In terms of durability after immersion in water at 310 K for 30 days, it was found that bond strength was improved with increase in active hydroxyl groups. Based on the results obtained, active hydroxyl groups on the surface oxide film were clearly one of the causes governing the interfacial bond strength. PMID:18309616

  19. Role of the interfacial thermal barrier in the effective thermal diffusivity/conductivity of SiC-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Hemanshu; Donaldson, Kimberly Y.; Hasselman, D. P. H.; Bhatt, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental thermal diffusivity data transverse to the fiber direction for composites composed of a reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix reinforced with uniaxially aligned carbon-coated silicon carbide fibers indicate the existence of a significant thermal barrier at the matrix-fiber interface. Calculations of the interfacial thermal conductances indicate that at 300 C and 1-atm N2, more than 90 percent of the heat conduction across the interface occurs by gaseous conduction. Good agreement is obtained between thermal conductance values for the oxidized composite at 1 atm calculated from the thermal conductivity of the N2 gas and those inferred from the data for the effective composite thermal conductivity.

  20. Enhancing Interfacial Bonding of a Biodegradable Calcium Polyphosphate/ Polyvinyl-urethane Carbonate Interpenetrating Phase Composite for Load Bearing Fracture Fixation Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yi

    This thesis describe methods to improve the interfacial stability of an interpenetrating phase composite (IPC) (comprised of porous calcium polyphosphate and polyvinylurethanecarbonate), and to increase the hydrophobicity of the polymer phase. The current IPCs introduce covalent bonding between the two phases via silanizing agents to enhance the interfacial stability. Incorporation of the silanizing agents was also intended to reduce the IPC's sensitivity to interfacial hydration, thereby further enhancing the IPC's resistance to rapid degradation during aqueous solution aging. Lysine diisocyanate was used to increase the hydrophobic character in the polyvinylurethanecarbonate infiltrating resin. The polymer resins were infiltrated into porous CPP blocks with 25 volume % interconnected porosity and polymerized to produce the IPCs. After mechanical testing following a 28-day aging study it was found that the silanizing agents contributed to long-term stability of the mechanical properties under aqueous conditions. It was concluded that the mechanical properties and long-term stability were comparable to available nonmetallic and biodegradable composites, as well as being biocompatible to a preosteoblast model cell line.

  1. Bioactivity of calcium phosphate bioceramic coating fabricated by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizhi; Liu, Qibin; Xu, Peng; Li, Long; Jiang, Haibing; Bai, Yang

    2016-05-01

    There were always strong expectations for suitable biomaterials used for bone regeneration. In this study, to improve the biocompatiblity of titanium alloy, calcium phosphate bioceramic coating was obtained by laser cladding technology. The microstructure, phases, bioactivity, cell differentiation, morphology and resorption lacunae were investigated by optical microscope (OM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and scanning electronic microscope (SEM), respectively. The results show that bioceramic coating consists of three layers, which are a substrate, an alloyed layer and a ceramic layer. Bioactive phases of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were found in ceramic coating. Osteoclast precursors have excellent proliferation on the bioceramic surface. The bioceramics coating could be digested by osteoclasts, which led to the resorption lacunae formed on its surface. It revealed that the gradient bioceramic coating has an excellent bioactivity.

  2. Preparation of Laponite Bioceramics for Potential Bone Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Ju, Yaping; Li, Jipeng; Zhang, Yongxing; Li, Jinhua; Liu, Xuanyong; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    We report a facile approach to preparing laponite (LAP) bioceramics via sintering LAP powder compacts for bone tissue engineering applications. The sintering behavior and mechanical properties of LAP compacts under different temperatures, heating rates, and soaking times were investigated. We show that LAP bioceramic with a smooth and porous surface can be formed at 800°C with a heating rate of 5°C/h for 6 h under air. The formed LAP bioceramic was systematically characterized via different methods. Our results reveal that the LAP bioceramic possesses an excellent surface hydrophilicity and serum absorption capacity, and good cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility as demonstrated by resazurin reduction assay of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) and hemolytic assay of pig red blood cells, respectively. The potential bone tissue engineering applicability of LAP bioceramic was explored by studying the surface mineralization behavior via soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF), as well as the surface cellular response of rMSCs. Our results suggest that LAP bioceramic is able to induce hydroxyapatite deposition on its surface when soaked in SBF and rMSCs can proliferate well on the LAP bioceramic surface. Most strikingly, alkaline phosphatase activity together with alizarin red staining results reveal that the produced LAP bioceramic is able to induce osteoblast differentiation of rMSCs in growth medium without any inducing factors. Finally, in vivo animal implantation, acute systemic toxicity test and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-staining data demonstrate that the prepared LAP bioceramic displays an excellent biosafety and is able to heal the bone defect. Findings from this study suggest that the developed LAP bioceramic holds a great promise for treating bone defects in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24955961

  3. Wave-Induced Flow in Meridians Demonstrated Using Photoluminescent Bioceramic Material on Acupuncture Points

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C. Will; Choy, Cheuk-Sing; Hsu, Chau-Yun; Lin, Shoei-Loong; Chan, Wing P.; Chiang, Han-Sun; Chen, Chang-An; Leung, Ting-Kai

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of acupuncture remain poorly understood, but it is generally assumed that measuring the electrical conductivity at various meridians provides data representing various meridian energies. In the past, noninvasive methods have been used to stimulate the acupuncture points at meridians, such as heat, electricity, magnets, and lasers. Photoluminescent bioceramic (PLB) material has been proven to weaken hydrogen bonds and alter the characteristics of liquid water. In this study, we applied the noninvasive PLB technique to acupuncture point irradiation, attempting to detect its effects by using electrical conductivity measurements. We reviewed relevant literature, searching for information on meridians including their wave-induced flow characteristics. PMID:24307911

  4. Enhancing Interfacial Bonding between Anisotropically Oriented Grains Using a Glue-Nanofiller for Advanced Li-Ion Battery Cathode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejung; Lee, Sanghan; Cho, Hyeon; Kim, Junhyeok; Lee, Jieun; Park, Suhyeon; Joo, Se Hun; Kim, Su Hwan; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Song, Hyun-Kon; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Cho, Jaephil

    2016-06-01

    Formation of a glue-nanofiller layer between grains, consisting of a middle-temperature spinel-like Lix CoO2 phase, reinforces the strength of the incoherent interfacial binding between anisotropically oriented grains by enhancing the face-to-face adhesion strength. The cathode treated with the glue-layer exhibits steady cycling performance at both room-temperature and 60 °C. These results represent a step forward in advanced lithium-ion batteries via simple cathode coating. PMID:27074141

  5. Voltage sharing effect and interface state calculation of a wafer-bonding Ge/Si avalanche photodiode with an interfacial GeO2 insulator layer.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shaoying; Lin, Shaoming; Li, Xin; Li, Jun; Xu, Jianfang; Li, Cheng; Chen, Songyan

    2016-02-01

    The tunneling effect and interface state in the p-Ge/GeO2p-Si structure of a wafer-bonding Ge/Si avalanche photodiode (APD) are investigated. It is found that the thin interfacial GeO2 layer (1-2 nm) formed by the hydrophilic reaction at the wafer-bonding interface significantly affects the performance of the Ge/Si APD. With the increase of the GeO2 thickness, the dark current of the Ge/Si APD decreases enormously due to the blocking effect of this GeO2 layer. Owing to the carrier accumulation in Ge layer under illumination condition, the voltage sharing effect of the GeO2 layer (thicker) becomes serious, leading to the absence of the electric field in Ge layer. The photon-generated electrons at Ge/GeO2 interface can be captured and released by the interface states at certain reverse bias. This can adjust the avalanche current of the Ge/Si APD. The stronger interface recombination induced by the larger interface state density (ISD) results in the decrease of the electric field in Ge layer. This increases the transit time of carriers, which in turn decreases the 3dB-bandwidth. Due to the drastic increase of the dark current (larger ISD), the gain of the Ge/Si APD decreases. PMID:26906771

  6. Amino-Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Lead to Successful Ring-Opening Polymerization of Poly(ε-caprolactone): Enhanced Interfacial Bonding and Optimized Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Roumeli, Eleftheria; Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G; Tsanaktsis, Vasilios; Terzopoulou, Zoe; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the synthesis, structural characteristics, interfacial bonding, and mechanical properties of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocomposites with small amounts (0.5, 1.0, and 2.5 wt %) of amino-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) prepared by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) are reported. This method allows the creation of a covalent-bonding zone on the surface of nanotubes, which leads to efficient debundling and therefore satisfactory dispersion and effective load transfer in the nanocomposites. The high covalent grafting extent combined with the higher crystallinity provide the basis for a significant enhancement of the mechanical properties, which was detected in the composites with up to 1 wt % f-MWCNTs. Increasing filler concentration encourages intrinsic aggregation forces, which allow only minor grafting efficiency and poorer dispersion and hence inferior mechanical performance. f-MWCNTs also cause a significant improvement on the polymerization reaction of PCL. Indeed, the in situ polymerization kinetics studies reveal a significant decrease in the reaction temperature, by a factor of 30-40 °C, combined with accelerated the reaction kinetics during initiation and propagation and a drastically reduced effective activation energy. PMID:25950403

  7. Influence of Monomer Mixing Ratio on Membrane Nanostructure in Interfacial Polycondensation: Application of Hybrid MC/MD Reaction Method with Minimum Bond Convention.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuichi; Koyano, Yoshiyuki; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2015-06-01

    FT-30, a typical aromatic polyamide membrane, is formed by interfacial polycondensation (IP) reaction between m-phenylenediamine (MPD) and benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid chloride (TMC) monomers. To investigate its microscopic characteristics, we performed an atomistic molecular simulation using the hybrid MC/MD reaction method modified to allow intercellular chemical bonds stretching over the periodic boundaries. Starting with appropriate monomer model systems, we succeeded in making membrane models by simulating a succession of condensation reactions. Through an analysis comparing our calculation results for the degrees of polymer cross-linking (DPC) and the composition ratios to the experimental results, we clarified the MPD/TMC mixing ratios in the near-surface active (NSA) and interior active (IA) regions associated with the reaction mechanism of IP. Further, we executed water diffusion simulations using the membrane model of the IA region and showed the calculated values of the total mass density of the hydrated membrane and the partition coefficient K to be in good agreement with the experimental ones. In conclusion, the present computationally modeled polyamide membrane has sufficient fidelity to the actual membrane and should be considered a stable spatial structure in the local equilibrium state under a nonequilibrium stationary state of permeation. PMID:25973839

  8. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-09-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO{sub 2} on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO{sub 2} and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications.

  9. Calcium Orthophosphates as Bioceramics: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1960s, much interest was raised in regard to biomedical applications of various ceramic materials. A little bit later, such materials were named bioceramics. This review is limited to bioceramics prepared from calcium orthophosphates only, which belong to the categories of bioactive and bioresorbable compounds. There have been a number of important advances in this field during the past 30–40 years. Namely, by structural and compositional control, it became possible to choose whether calcium orthophosphate bioceramics were biologically stable once incorporated within the skeletal structure or whether they were resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics—which is able to promote regeneration of bones—was developed. Presently, calcium orthophosphate bioceramics are available in the form of particulates, blocks, cements, coatings, customized designs for specific applications and as injectable composites in a polymer carrier. Current biomedical applications include artificial replacements for hips, knees, teeth, tendons and ligaments, as well as repair for periodontal disease, maxillofacial reconstruction, augmentation and stabilization of the jawbone, spinal fusion and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Exploratory studies demonstrate potential applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics as scaffolds, drug delivery systems, as well as carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and/or various types of cells for tissue engineering purposes. PMID:24955932

  10. Corrosion studies and interfacial bonding of urea/poly(dimethylsiloxane) sol/gel hydrophobic coatings on AA 2024 aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Fir, Mojca; Orel, Boris; Vuk, Angela Surca; Vilcnik, Aljaz; Jese, Robi; Francetic, Vojmir

    2007-05-01

    Bis[(ureapropyl)triethoxysilane] bis(propyl)-terminated-polydimethylsiloxane 1000 (PDMSU), an organic-inorganic hybrid, diluted in either EtOH or a mixture of EtOH-PrOH, was used in thin film form (<200 nm) to inhibit the corrosion of AA 2024 alloy. Potentiodynamic, time-dependent cyclovoltammetric measurements and salt spray tests showed that the corrosion inhibition of the latter was 10 times higher than that of the former films. This was correlated with the higher degree of hydrolysis and the formation of more open polyhedral silsesquioxane species (T2) in the bulk heat-treated PDMSU/EtOH-PrOH xerogels (29Si NMR spectra). The structure of the coatings deposited on AA 2024 Al alloy was deduced from the infrared reflection-absorption (IR RA) spectra, which revealed more extensive urea-urea interactions and more efficient silane-Al interface bonding for the PDMSU/EtOH-PrOH coatings with higher corrosion inhibition. Ex situ IR RA potentiodynamic spectroelectrochemical measurements of PDMSU coatings revealed that their degradation did not proceed via the formation of silanol groups and consequent hydration of the coatings but that they decomposed above E(corr) by forming fragments composed of -CH2- segments in an all-trans conformation. PMID:17429986

  11. Interfacial bonding distribution and energy band structure of (Gd 2O 3) 1 - x(SiO 2) x ( x = 0.5)/GaAs (0 0 1) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun-Kyu; Kang, Min-Gu; Kim, Woo Sik; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2004-10-01

    A (Gd 2O 3) 1 - x(SiO 2) x ( x = 0.5) gate dielectric film was deposited on an n-GaAs (0 0 1) substrate at various substrate temperatures. Bonding distribution of interfacial Ga and As was characterized by comparing the 3d and 3p photoelectron lines. Surface passivation using (NH 4) 2S was employed to preserve a stable interface. Interfacial GaAs oxide was not formed after the deposition, since bonding transition from AsS to GaS bonds provides thermal stability and protective effect against oxidation. While, without the passivation, interfacial GaAs-oxides were continuously grown as the substrate temperature was increased. The energy band gap of (Gd 2O 3) 0.5(SiO 2) 0.5 was defined as 6.8 eV using energy loss spectra of O 1s photoelectrons. The valence band maximum energy ( EVBM) of (Gd 2O 3) 0.5(SiO 2) 0.5 was determined to be 3.7 eV. By arrangement of the measured energy bandgap and EVBM, the energy band structure of (Gd 2O 3) 0.5(SiO 2) 0.5/GaAs system was demonstrated and an enhanced conduction band offset was observed.

  12. Interfacial bond-breaking electron transfer in mixed water-ethylene glycol solutions: reorganization energy and interplay between different solvent modes.

    PubMed

    Ismailova, Oksana; Berezin, Alexander S; Probst, Michael; Nazmutdinov, Renat R

    2013-07-25

    We explore solvent dynamics effects in interfacial bond breaking electron transfer in terms of a multimode approach and make an attempt to interpret challenging recent experimental results (the nonmonotonous behavior of the rate constant of electroreduction of S2O8(2-) from mixed water-EG solutions when increasing the EG fraction; see Zagrebin, P.A. et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 311). The exact expansion of the solvent correlation function (calculated using experimental dielectric spectra) in a series predicts the splitting of solvent coordinate in three independent modes characterized by different relaxation times. This makes it possible to construct a 5D free-energy surface along three solvent coordinates and one intramolecular degree of freedom describing first electron transfer at the reduction of a peroxodisulphate anion. Classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the solvation of a peroxodisulphate anion (S2O8(2-)) in oxidized and reduced states in pure water and ethylene glycol (EG) as well as mixed H2O-EG solutions. The solvent reorganization energy of the first electron-transfer step at the reduction of S2O8(2-) was calculated for several compositions of the mixed solution. This quantity was found to be significantly asymmetric. (The reorganization energies of reduction and oxidation differ from each other.) The averaged reorganization energy slightly increases with increasing the EG content in solution. This finding clearly indicates that for the reaction under study the static solvent effect no longer competes with solvent dynamics. Brownian dynamics simulations were performed to calculate the electron-transfer rate constants as a function of the solvent composition. The results of the simulations explain the experimental data, at least qualitatively. PMID:23768162

  13. Investigation of fabrication and environmental effects on bioceramic bone scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivanco Morales, Juan Francisco

    2011-12-01

    Bioactive ceramic materials like tricalcium phosphates (TCP) have been emerging as viable material alternatives to the current therapies of bone scaffolding to target fracture healing and osteoporosis. Once scaffolds are implanted at the defect site they should provide mechanical and biological functions, ultimately serving to facilitate with surrounding native tissue. Optimal osteogenic signal expression and subsequent differentiation of cells seeded on the scaffold in both in vivo and in vitro conditions is known to be influenced by scaffold properties and biomechanical environmental conditions. Thus, the objective of this research was to investigate the effect of fabrication and environmental variables on the properties of bioceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. Specifically, the effect of sintering temperature in the range of 950°C -1150°C of a cost-effective on a large scale manufacturing process, on the physical and mechanical properties of bioceramic bone scaffolds, was investigated. In addition, the effect of a controlled environment was investigated by implementing a bioreactor and bone loading system to study the response of ex vivo trabecular bone to compressive load while perfused with culture medium. Collectively, this thesis demonstrates that: (1) the sintering temperature to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds can be tuned to structural properties, and (2) the use of a controlled mechanical and biochemical environment can enhance bone tissue development. These findings support the development of clinically successful bioceramic scaffolds that may stimulate bone regeneration and scaffold integration while providing structural integrity.

  14. Materials processing and in-vivo animal studies of nitrided hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Nancy Elizabeth

    2000-10-01

    Calcium phosphate bioceramics are currently being used in medicine and dentistry, for reconstruction or repair of diseased or injured bone, but with limited success. Incorporating nitrogen into phosphate glasses has resulted in improved properties, and it is proposed that similar benefits may be gained from nitriding calcium phosphate bioceramics for bone implants as well. This work focuses on processing of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate bioceramics nitrided by using solid, liquid, gas and ion sources. These materials were characterized by chemical, structural, mechanical, and biological methods to determine both the material structure and their suitability as implant materials. Calcium nitride and NaPON glass were unsatisfactory sources of nitrogen for hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramics. Calcium nitride, Ca3N2, is reacts with water vapor in the air, releasing ammonia, and leaving behind crystals of calcium oxide, CaO. The calcium oxide byproduct decreases the chemical stability of hydroxyapatite and HA/TCP composites in simulated body fluid. Sodium phosphorus oxynitride (NaPON) glass, in the form of a liquid sintering aid for HA, produces an inhomogeneous, composite as well. Hydroxyapatite heated at 800C in an ammonia atmosphere produces a homogeneous material with up to 2 wt% N. Infrared spectroscopy indicates cyanamide ions, CN22-, are formed by the incorporated nitrogen and impurity carbon. The use of 15N-doped ammonia results in an 15N NMR peak at 83.2 ppm, indicating P--N bonding. Raman spectroscopy may also indicate P--N bonding, but it is inconclusive. In a limited study, nitrogen may decrease the hardness and fracture toughness of the phosphate ceramic, hydroxyapatite, contrary to results expected for nitrogen in phosphate glasses. Nitrogen ions are incorporated in hydroxyapatite by ion implantation, with lower energies producing higher nitrogen contents. The highest concentration achieved was 3.55 wt% N, as determined

  15. Atomic structure and bonding of the interfacial bilayer between Au nanoparticles and epitaxially regrown MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Guo-zhen; Majdi, Tahereh; Preston, John S.; Shao, Yang; Bugnet, Matthieu; Botton, Gianluigi A.

    2014-12-08

    A unique metal/oxide interfacial bilayer formed between Au nanoparticles and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} substrates following thermal treatment is reported. Associated with the formation of the bilayer was the onset of an abnormal epitaxial growth of the substrate under the nanoparticle. According to the redistribution of atoms and the changes of their electronic structure probed across the interface by a transmission electron microscopy, we suggest two possible atomic models of the interfacial bilayer.

  16. Atomic structure and bonding of the interfacial bilayer between Au nanoparticles and epitaxially regrown MgAl2O4 substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guo-zhen; Majdi, Tahereh; Shao, Yang; Bugnet, Matthieu; Preston, John S.; Botton, Gianluigi A.

    2014-12-01

    A unique metal/oxide interfacial bilayer formed between Au nanoparticles and MgAl2O4 substrates following thermal treatment is reported. Associated with the formation of the bilayer was the onset of an abnormal epitaxial growth of the substrate under the nanoparticle. According to the redistribution of atoms and the changes of their electronic structure probed across the interface by a transmission electron microscopy, we suggest two possible atomic models of the interfacial bilayer.

  17. Study the bonding mechanism of binders on hydroxyapatite surface and mechanical properties for 3DP fabrication bone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qinghua; Wang, Yanen; Li, Xinpei; Yang, Mingming; Chai, Weihong; Wang, Kai; zhang, Yingfeng

    2016-04-01

    In 3DP fabricating artificial bone scaffolds process, the interaction mechanism between binder and bioceramics power determines the microstructure and macro mechanical properties of Hydroxyapatite (HA) bone scaffold. In this study, we applied Molecular Dynamics (MD) methods to investigating the bonding mechanism and essence of binders on the HA crystallographic planes for 3DP fabrication bone scaffolds. The cohesive energy densities of binders and the binding energies, PCFs g(r), mechanical properties of binder/HA interaction models were analyzed through the MD simulation. Additionally, we prepared the HA bone scaffold specimens with different glues by 3DP additive manufacturing, and tested their mechanical properties by the electronic universal testing machine. The simulation results revealed that the relationship of the binding energies between binders and HA surface is consistent with the cohesive energy densities of binders, which is PAM/HA>PVA/HA>PVP/HA. The PCFs g(r) indicated that their interfacial interactions mainly attribute to the ionic bonds and hydrogen bonds which formed between the polar atoms, functional groups in binder polymer and the Ca, -OH in HA. The results of mechanical experiments verified the relationship of Young׳s modulus for three interaction models in simulation, which is PVA/HA>PAM/HA>PVP/HA. But the trend of compressive strength is PAM/HA>PVA/HA>PVP/HA, this is consistent with the binding energies of simulation. Therefore, the Young׳s modulus of bone scaffolds are limited by the Young׳s modulus of binders, and the compressive strength is mainly decided by the viscosity of binder. Finally, the major reasons for differences in mechanical properties between simulation and experiment were found, the space among HA pellets and the incomplete infiltration of glue were the main reasons influencing the mechanical properties of 3DP fabrication HA bone scaffolds. These results provide useful information in choosing binder for 3DP fabrication

  18. Bioceramic fabrics improve quiet standing posture and handstand stability in expert gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Cian, C; Gianocca, V; Barraud, P A; Guerraz, M; Bresciani, J P

    2015-10-01

    Bioceramic fabrics have been claimed to improve blood circulation, thermoregulation and muscle relaxation, thereby also improving muscular activity. Here we tested whether bioceramic fabrics have an effect on postural control and contribute to improve postural stability. In Experiment 1, we tested whether bioceramic fabrics contribute to reduce body-sway when maintaining standard standing posture. In Experiment 2, we measured the effect of bioceramic fabrics on body-sway when maintaining a more instable posture, namely a handstand hold. For both experiments, postural oscillations were measured using a force platform with four strain gauges that recorded the displacements of the center of pressure (CoP) in the horizontal plane. In half of the trials, the participants wore a full-body second skin suit containing a bioceramic layer. In the other half of the trials, they wore a 'placebo' second skin suit that had the same cut, appearance and elasticity as the bioceramic suit but did not contain the bioceramic layer. In both experiments, the surface of displacement of the CoP was significantly smaller when participants were wearing the bioceramic suit than when they were wearing the placebo suit. The results suggest that bioceramic fabrics do have an effect on postural control and improve postural stability. PMID:26234473

  19. Pre-treatments applied to oxidized aluminum surfaces to modify the interfacial bonding with bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTSE). Part I. High-purity Al with native oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, M.; Kim, J.; Wong, P. C.; Wong, K. C.; Mitchell, K. A. R.

    2005-12-01

    A remote microwave-generated H 2 plasma and heating to 250 °C were separately used to modify high-purity oxidized aluminum surfaces and to assess whether these treatments can help enhance adhesion with bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTSE) coatings. Different initial oxide surfaces were considered, corresponding to the native oxide and to surfaces formed by the Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) treatment applied for either 15 or 60 min. BTSE is applied from solution at pH 4, and competing processes of etching, protonation (to form OH groups) and coupling (to form Al sbnd O sbnd Si interfacial bonds) occur at the solid-liquid interface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine how the topographies of the modified Al surfaces changed with the different pre-treatments and with exposure to a buffer solution of pH 4. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to determine the direct amount of Al sbnd O sbnd Si interfacial bonds by measuring the ratio of peak intensities 71-70 amu, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the overall strength of the silane coating adhesion by measuring the Si 2p signals before and after application of an ultrasonic rinse to the coated sample. Measured Al 2p and O 1s spectra helped assess how the different pre-treatments modified the various Al oxidized surfaces prior to BTSE coating. Pre-treated samples that showed increased Al sbnd O sbnd Si bonding after BTSE coating corresponded to surfaces, which did not show evidence of significant etching after exposure to a pH 4 environment. This suggests that such surfaces are more receptive to the coupling reaction during exposure to the BTSE coating solution. These surfaces include all H 2 plasma-treated samples, the heated native oxide and the sample that only received the 15 min FPL treatment. In contrast, other surfaces that show evidence of etching in pH 4 environments are samples that received lower amounts of Al sbnd O sbnd Si interfacial

  20. Bioceramic Materials and the Changing Concepts in Vital Pulp Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yangpei; Bogen, George; Lim, Jung; Shon, Won-Jun; Kang, Mo K

    2016-05-01

    Vital pulp therapy (VPT) is devised to preserve and maintain vitality of pulpally involved teeth challenged by a variety of intraoral conditions. Notable progress has been made in this field due to a better understanding of pulp physiology, improved clinical protocols and advanced bioceramic materials paired with adhesive technology. With focused case selection, conservative VPT can provide reliable treatment options for permanent teeth diagnosed with normal pulps or reversible pulpitis. PMID:27290822

  1. Bioceramics and Scaffolds: A Winning Combination for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Baino, Francesco; Novajra, Giorgia; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, we have assisted to a general increase of elder population worldwide associated with age-related pathologies. Therefore, there is the need for new biomaterials that can substitute damaged tissues, stimulate the body’s own regenerative mechanisms, and promote tissue healing. Porous templates referred to as “scaffolds” are thought to be required for three-dimensional tissue growth. Bioceramics, a special set of fully, partially, or non-crystalline ceramics (e.g., calcium phosphates, bioactive glasses, and glass–ceramics) that are designed for the repair and reconstruction of diseased parts of the body, have high potential as scaffold materials. Traditionally, bioceramics have been used to fill and restore bone and dental defects (repair of hard tissues). More recently, this category of biomaterials has also revealed promising applications in the field of soft-tissue engineering. Starting with an overview of the fundamental requirements for tissue engineering scaffolds, this article provides a detailed picture on recent developments of porous bioceramics and composites, including a summary of common fabrication technologies and a critical analysis of structure–property and structure–function relationships. Areas of future research are highlighted at the end of this review, with special attention to the development of multifunctional scaffolds exploiting therapeutic ion/drug release and emerging applications beyond hard tissue repair. PMID:26734605

  2. Engineering bioceramic microstructure for customized drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco Gomez, Hernando Jose

    One of the most efficient approaches to treat cancer and infection is to use biomaterials as a drug delivery system (DDS). The goal is for the material to provide a sustained release of therapeutic drug dose locally to target the ill tissue without affecting other organs. Silica Calcium Phosphate nano composite (SCPC) is a drug delivery platform that successfully demonstrated the ability to bind and release several therapeutics including antibiotics, anticancer drugs, and growth factors. The aim of the present work is to analyze the role of SCPC microstructure on drug binding and release kinetics. The main crystalline phases of SCPC are alpha-cristobalite (SiO2, Cris) and beta-rhenanite (NaCaPO4, Rhe); therefore, these two phases were prepared and characterized separately. Structural and compositional features of Cris, Rhe and SCPC bioceramics demonstrated a significant influence on the loading capacity and release kinetics profile of Vancomycin (Vanc) and Cisplatin (Cis). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the P-O functional group in Rhe and SCPC has high affinity to the (C=O and N-H) of Vanc and (N-H and O-H) of Cis. By contrast, a weak chemical interaction between the Si-O functional group in Cris and SCPC and the two drugs was observed. Vanc loading per unit surface area increased in the order 8.00 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe > 4.49 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC>3.01 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris (p<0.05). Cis loading capacity increased in the order 8.59 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris, 17.8 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe and 6.03 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC (p<0.05). Drug release kinetics was dependent on the carrier as well as on the kind of drug. Different burst release and sustained release rates were measured for Vanc and Cis from the same carrier. The percentages of drug amount released from Cris, Rhe and SCPC during the burst stage (the first 2h) were: 50%, 50%, and 46% of Vanc; and 53.4%, 36.6%, and 30.6 % of Cis, respectively. Burst release was

  3. Engineering bioceramic microstructure for customized drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco Gomez, Hernando Jose

    One of the most efficient approaches to treat cancer and infection is to use biomaterials as a drug delivery system (DDS). The goal is for the material to provide a sustained release of therapeutic drug dose locally to target the ill tissue without affecting other organs. Silica Calcium Phosphate nano composite (SCPC) is a drug delivery platform that successfully demonstrated the ability to bind and release several therapeutics including antibiotics, anticancer drugs, and growth factors. The aim of the present work is to analyze the role of SCPC microstructure on drug binding and release kinetics. The main crystalline phases of SCPC are alpha-cristobalite (SiO2, Cris) and beta-rhenanite (NaCaPO4, Rhe); therefore, these two phases were prepared and characterized separately. Structural and compositional features of Cris, Rhe and SCPC bioceramics demonstrated a significant influence on the loading capacity and release kinetics profile of Vancomycin (Vanc) and Cisplatin (Cis). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the P-O functional group in Rhe and SCPC has high affinity to the (C=O and N-H) of Vanc and (N-H and O-H) of Cis. By contrast, a weak chemical interaction between the Si-O functional group in Cris and SCPC and the two drugs was observed. Vanc loading per unit surface area increased in the order 8.00 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe > 4.49 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC>3.01 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris (p<0.05). Cis loading capacity increased in the order 8.59 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris, 17.8 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe and 6.03 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC (p<0.05). Drug release kinetics was dependent on the carrier as well as on the kind of drug. Different burst release and sustained release rates were measured for Vanc and Cis from the same carrier. The percentages of drug amount released from Cris, Rhe and SCPC during the burst stage (the first 2h) were: 50%, 50%, and 46% of Vanc; and 53.4%, 36.6%, and 30.6 % of Cis, respectively. Burst release was

  4. Cyclic silicate active site and stereochemical match for apatite nucleation on pseudowollastonite bioceramic-bone interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sahai, Nita; Anseau, Michel

    2005-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca5(PO4)3(OH)) forms on pseudowollastonite (psW) (alpha-CaSiO3) in vitro in simulated body fluid, human parotid saliva and cell-culture medium, and in vivo in implanted rat tibias. We used crystallographic constraints with ab initio molecular orbital calculations to identify the active site and reaction mechanism for heterogeneous nucleation of the earliest calcium phosphate oligomer/phase. The active site is the planar, cyclic, silicate trimer (Si3O9) on the (001) face of psW. The trimer has three silanol groups (>SiOH) arranged at 60 degrees from each other, providing a stereochemical match for O atoms bonded to Ca2+ on the (001) face of hydroxyapatite. Calcium phosphate nucleation is modeled in steps as hydrolysis of surface Ca-O bonds with leaching of Ca2+ into solution, protonation of the surface Si-O groups to form silanols, calcium sorption as an inner-sphere surface complex and, attachment of HPO4(2-). Our model explains the experimental solution and high resolution transmission electron microscopy data for epitaxial hydroxyapatite growth on psW in vitro and in vivo. We propose that the cyclic silicate trimer is the universal active site for heterogeneous, stereochemically promoted nucleation on silicate-based bioactive ceramics. A critical active site-density and a point of zero charge of the bioceramic less than physiological pH are required for bioactivity. PMID:15949543

  5. Successful commercialisation of locally fabricated bioceramics for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Fazan, F; Besar, I; Osman, A; Samsudin, A R; Khalid, K A

    2008-07-01

    This paper chronicled the development of a locally produced bone graft substitute based on calcium phosphate bioceramics called "GranuMaS--from concepts to clinics, and finally to its successful commercialization all within 5-year duration. It was a Prioritized Research (PR) collaborative project of 5 institutions namely SIRIM, ANM, USM, UKM and IIUM, funded by MOSTI to the amount of approximately RM2.5 millions under RM8. This paper also highlighted the requirements needed in terms of technical expertise/manpower, facilities and infrastructure, and government/institutional supports, as well as the challenge faced in developing and commercializing such product. PMID:19024978

  6. Influences of the steam sterilization on the properties of calcium phosphate porous bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangfeng; Guo, Bo; Xiao, Yumei; Yuan, Tun; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2016-01-01

    The influences of steam sterilization on the physicochemical properties of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) porous bioceramics, including β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) are investigated. After being steam sterilized in an autoclave (121 °C for 40 min), the porous bioceramics are dried and characterized. The steam sterilization has no obvious effects on the phase composition, thermal stability, pH value and dissolubility of β-TCP porous bioceramic, but changes its morphology and mechanical strength. Meanwhile, the steam sterilization leads to the significant changes of the morphology, phase composition, pH value and dissolubility of BCP porous bioceramic. The increase of dissolubility and mechanical strength, the decrease of pH value of the immersed solution and partial oriented growth of crystals are also observed in HA porous bioceramic after steam sterilization. These results indicate that the steam sterilization can result in different influences on the physicochemical properties of β-TCP, BCP and HA porous bioceramics, thus the application of the steam sterilization on the three kinds of Ca-P porous bioceramics should be considered carefully based on the above changed properties. PMID:26610928

  7. Silicon Nitride Bioceramics Induce Chemically Driven Lysis in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Bock, Ryan M; McEntire, Bryan J; Jones, Erin; Boffelli, Marco; Zhu, Wenliang; Baggio, Greta; Boschetto, Francesco; Puppulin, Leonardo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kanamura, Narisato; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Bal, B Sonny

    2016-03-29

    Organisms of Gram-negative phylum bacteroidetes, Porphyromonas gingivalis, underwent lysis on polished surfaces of silicon nitride (Si3N4) bioceramics. The antibacterial activity of Si3N4 was mainly the result of chemically driven principles. The lytic activity, although not osmotic in nature, was related to the peculiar pH-dependent surface chemistry of Si3N4. A buffering effect via the formation of ammonium ions (NH4(+)) (and their modifications) was experimentally observed by pH microscopy. Lysis was confirmed by conventional fluorescence spectroscopy, and the bacteria's metabolism was traced with the aid of in situ Raman microprobe spectroscopy. This latter technique revealed the formation of peroxynitrite within the bacterium itself. Degradation of the bacteria's nucleic acid, drastic reduction in phenilalanine, and reduction of lipid concentration were observed due to short-term exposure (6 days) to Si3N4. Altering the surface chemistry of Si3N4 by either chemical etching or thermal oxidation influenced peroxynitrite formation and affected bacteria metabolism in different ways. Exploiting the peculiar surface chemistry of Si3N4 bioceramics could be helpful in counteracting Porphyromonas gingivalis in an alkaline pH environment. PMID:26948186

  8. Mechanical characterization of dense calcium phosphate bioceramics with interconnected porosity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y H; Turner, I G; Miles, A W

    2007-12-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) bioceramics were fabricated by a novel technique of vacuum impregnation of reticulated polymeric foams with ceramic slip. The samples had approximately 5-10% interconnected porosity and controlled pore sizes appropriate to allow bone ingrowth, combined with good mechanical properties. A range of polyurethane foams with 20, 30 and 45 pores per inch (ppi) were used as templates to produce samples for testing. The foams were inpregnated with solid loadings in the range of 60-140 wt%. The results indicated that the average apparent density of the HA/TCP samples was 2.48 g/cm(3), the four-point bending strength averaged 16.98 MPa, the work of fracture averaged 15.46 J/m(2) and the average compressive strength was 105.56 MPa. A range of mechanical properties resulted from the various combinations of different grades of PU foam and the solid loading of slips. The results indicated that it is possible to manufacture open pore HA/TCP bioceramics, with compressive strengths comparable to human bone, which could be of significant clinical interest. PMID:17569009

  9. Osseointegration of alumina bioceramic granules: A comparative experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerikh, V. V.; Avetisyan, A. R.; Zaydman, A. M.; Anikin, K. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Aronov, A. M.; Semantsova, E. S.

    2016-08-01

    To perform a comparative analysis of osseointegration of bioceramic alumina-based granules, hydroxyapatite-based granules, and deproteinized bone granules. The experiment was conducted on 52 adult male Kyoto-Wistar rats weighing 350 to 520 g. The animals were divided into five matched groups that differed only in the type of an implanted material. The granules were implanted in the lumbar vertebral bodies and in the distal right femur of each laboratory animal. Two months after surgery, the animals were euthanized, followed by tissue sampling for morphological studies. An examination of specimens from the groups with implanted alumina granules revealed the newly formed trabecular bone with remodeling signs. The bone tissue filled the intragranular space, tightly adhering to the granule surface. There was no connective tissue capsule on the border between bone tissue and alumina granules. Cylindrical bioceramic alumina-based granules with an open internal channel have a higher strength surpassing than that of analogs and the osseointegration ability close to that of hydroxyapatite and deproteinized bone granules.

  10. Preparation and characterization of laser cladding wollastonite derived bioceramic coating on titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-cai; Wang, Dian-gang; Chen, Chuan-zhong; Weng, Fei; Shi, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The bioceramic coating is fabricated on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) by laser cladding the preplaced wollastonite (CaSiO3) powders. The coating on Ti6Al4V is characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared. The interface bonding strength is measured using the stretching method using an RGD-5-type electronic tensile machine. The microhardness distribution of the cross-section is determined using an indentation test. The in vitro bioactivity of the coating on Ti6Al4V is evaluated using the in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion test. The microstructure of the laser cladding sample is affected by the process parameters. The coating surface is coarse, accidented, and microporous. The cross-section microstructure of the ceramic layer from the bottom to the top gradually changes from cellular crystal, fine cellular-dendrite structure to underdeveloped dendrite crystal. The coating on Ti6Al4V is composed of CaTiO3, CaO, α-Ca2SiO4, SiO2, and TiO2. After soaking in the SBF solution, the calcium phosphate layer is formed on the coating surface. PMID:26307502

  11. Induction heat treatment and technique of bioceramic coatings production on medical titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Fomina, Marina A.; Poshivalova, Elena Y.; Krasnikov, Aleksandr V.; Petrova, Natalia N.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.; Skaptsov, Alexander A.; Gribov, Andrey N.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2015-03-01

    Prospective composite bioceramic titania coatings were obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from medical titanium alloy VT16 (Ti-2.5Al-5Mo-5V). Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, physico-mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by oxidation during induction heat treatment are defined. Technological recommendations for obtaining bioceramic coatings with extremely high strength on titanium items surface are given.

  12. Impact of post-deposition annealing on interfacial chemical bonding states between AlGaN and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-03-02

    The effect of post-deposition annealing on chemical bonding states at interface between Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that both of Al-O/Al 2p and Ga-O/Ga 3d area ratio decrease at annealing temperatures lower than 500 °C, which could be attributed to “clean up” effect of ALD-ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN. Compared to Ga spectra, a much larger decrease in Al-O/Al 2p ratio at a smaller take-off angle θ is observed, which indicates higher effectiveness of the passivation of Al-O bond than Ga-O bond through “clean up” effect near the interface. However, degradation of ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface quality due to re-oxidation at higher annealing temperature (>500 °C) is also found. The XPS spectra clearly reveal that Al atoms at ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface are easier to get oxidized as compared with Ga atoms.

  13. Use of self assembled monolayers at variable coverage to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture: Pure shear loading

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; NELSON,GERALD C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-05-16

    The relationships between fundamental interfacial interactions, energy dissipation mechanisms, and fracture stress or fracture toughness in a glassy thermoset/inorganic solid joint are not well understood. This subject is addressed with a model system involving an epoxy adhesive on a polished silicon wafer containing its native oxide. The proportions of physical and chemical interactions at the interface, and the in-plane distribution, are varied using self-assembling monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS). The epoxy interacts strongly with the bare silicon oxide surface, but forms only a very weak interface with the methylated tails of the ODTS monolayer. The fracture stress is examined as a function of ODTS coverage in the napkin-ring (pure shear) loading geometry. The relationship between fracture stress and ODTS coverage is catastrophic, with a large change in fracture stress occurring over a narrow range of ODTS coverage. This transition in fracture stress does not correspond to a wetting transition of the epoxy. Rather, the transition in fracture stress corresponds to the onset of deformation in the epoxy, or the transition from brittle to ductile fracture. The authors postulate that the transition in fracture stress occurs when the local stress that the interface can support becomes comparable to the yield stress of the epoxy. The fracture results are independent of whether the ODTS deposition occurs by island growth (T{sub dep} = 10 C) or by homogeneous growth (T{sub dep} = 24 C).

  14. Thermoseeds for interstitial magnetic hyperthermia: from bioceramics to nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza, A.; Arcos, D.; Vallet-Regí, M.

    2013-12-01

    The development of magnetic materials for interstitial hyperthermia treatment of cancer is an ever evolving research field which provides new alternatives to antitumoral therapies. The development of biocompatible magnetic materials has resulted in new biomaterials with multifunctional properties, which are able to adapt to the complex scenario of tumoral processes. Once implanted or injected in the body, magnetic materials can behave as thermoseeds under the effect of AC magnetic fields. Magnetic bioceramics aimed to treat bone tumors and magnetic nanoparticles are among the most studied thermoseeds, and supply different solutions for the different scenarios in cancerous processes. This paper reviews some of the biomaterials used for bone cancer treatment and skeletal reinforcing, as well as the more complex topic of magnetic nanoparticles for intracellular targeting and hyperthermia.

  15. Resorption Rate Tunable Bioceramic: Si, Zn-Modified Tricalcium Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Wei

    2006-08-09

    This dissertation is organized in an alternate format. Several manuscripts which have already been published or are to be submitted for publication have been included as separate chapters. Chapter 1 is a general introduction which describes the dissertation organization and introduces the human bone and ceramic materials as bone substitute. Chapter 2 is the background and literature review on dissolution behavior of calcium phosphate, and discussion of motivation for this research. Chapter 3 is a manuscript entitled ''Si,Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate: a phase composition and crystal structure study'', which was published in ''Key Engineering Materials'' [1]. Chapter 4 gives more crystal structure details by neutron powder diffraction, which identifies the position for Si and Zn substitution and explains the stabilization mechanism of the structure. A manuscript entitled ''Crystal structure analysis of Si, Zn-modified Tricalcium phosphate by Neutron Powder Diffraction'' will be submitted to Biomaterials [2]. Chapter 5 is a manuscript, entitled ''Dissolution behavior and cytotoxicity test of Si, Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate'', which is to be submitted to Biomaterials [3]. This paper discusses the additives effect on the dissolution behavior of TCP, and cytotoxicity test result is also included. Chapter 6 is the study of hydrolysis process of {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate in the simulated body fluid, and the phase development during drying process is discussed. A manuscript entitled ''Hydrolysis of {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate in simulated body fluid and phase transformation during drying process'' is to be submitted to Biomaterials [4]. Ozan Ugurlu is included as co-authors in these two papers due to his TEM contributions. Appendix A is the general introduction of the materials synthesis, crystal structure and preliminary dissolution result. A manuscript entitled ''Resorption rate tunable bioceramic: Si and Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate'' was published in

  16. In vitro characterization of a zinc based bioceramic.

    PubMed

    Billotte, W G; Reynolds, D B; Mehrotra, G M; Srinivasan, R; Bajpai, P K

    1997-01-01

    Six different blends of zinc calcium phosphorous oxide ceramics (ZCAP) were prepared by mixing and calcining powders (ZnO:CaO:P2O5) of weight percent ratio: 50:30:20, 48:32:20, 44:20:26, 40:40:20, 30:40:30, and 30:30:40. ZCAP is a resorbable bioceramic and has been used to repair bone defects and deliver drugs in a continuous manner. The chemical composition, porosity, and elements released on exposure to buffered Tris HCl were measured for each blend of ZCAP. The products of mixing and thermal reaction were beta-Ca3(PO4)2, alpha-CaZn2(PO4)2, and 2CaO.P2O5. Free calcium and/or zinc oxide was present in several blends. The components of ZCAP and their volume percentages influenced the interconnected porosity of ZCAP bioceramics. The interconnected porosity for all blends of ZCAP ranged from 35 to 38%. Pore sizes from these six blends of ZCAP ranged from less 1 micron to greater than 100 microns. Results of the 12 hour dissolution study showed that more calcium was released than zinc or phosphorous from all blends of ZCAP. Zinc was released in trace amounts from all blends of ZCAP. Release of phosphorous from the different blends of ZCAP was not detected by the procedures used to detect phosphorous in this investigation. These blends of ZCAP have the potential to be used as bone substitutes and probably long term treatment of zinc deficiency in humans. PMID:9731347

  17. Effect of Bonding Temperature on Interfacial Reaction and Mechanical Properties of Diffusion-Bonded Joint Between Ti-6Al-4V and 304 Stainless Steel Using Nickel as an Intermediate Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Mishra, Brajendra; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2014-04-01

    An investigation was carried out on the solid-state diffusion bonding between Ti-6Al-4V (TiA) and 304 stainless steel (SS) using pure nickel (Ni) of 200- μm thickness as an intermediate material prepared in vacuum in the temperature range from 973 K to 1073 K (700 °C to 800 °C) in steps of 298 K (25 °C) using uniaxial compressive pressure of 3 MPa and 60 minutes as bonding time. Scanning electron microscopy images, in backscattered electron mode, had revealed existence of layerwise Ti-Ni-based intermetallics such as either Ni3Ti or both Ni3Ti and NiTi at titanium alloy-nickel (TiA/Ni) interface, whereas nickel-stainless steel (Ni/SS) diffusion zone was free from intermetallic phases for all joints processed. Chemical composition of the reaction layers was determined in atomic percentage by energy dispersive spectroscopy and confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. Room-temperature properties of the bonded joints were characterized using microhardness evaluation and tensile testing. The maximum hardness value of ~800 HV was observed at TiA/Ni interface for the bond processed at 1073 K (800 °C). The hardness value at Ni/SS interface for all the bonds was found to be ~330 HV. Maximum tensile strength of ~206 MPa along with ~2.9 pct ductility was obtained for the joint processed at 1023 K (750 °C). It was observed from the activation study that the diffusion rate at TiA/Ni interface is lesser than that at the Ni/SS interface. From microhardness profile, fractured surfaces and fracture path, it was demonstrated that failure of the joints was initiated and propagated apparently at the TiA/Ni interface near Ni3Ti intermetallic phase.

  18. Crystal structures of CaSiO3 polymorphs control growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on bioceramic surfaces†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nianli; Molenda, James A.; Mankoci, Steven; Zhou, Xianfeng; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    The repair and replacement of damaged or diseased human bone tissue requires a stable interface between the orthopedic implant and living tissue. The ideal material should be both osteoconductive (promote bonding to bone) and osteoinductive (induce osteogenic differentiation of cells and generate new bone). Partially resorbable bioceramic materials with both properties are developed by expensive trial-and-error methods. Structure–reactivity relationships for predicting the osteoinductive properties of ceramics would significantly increase the efficiency of developing materials for bone tissue engineering. Here we propose the novel hypothesis that the crystal structure of a bioceramic controls the release rates, subsequent surface modifications due to precipitation of new phases, and thus, the concentrations of soluble factors, and ultimately, the attachment, viability and osteogenic differentiation of human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs). To illustrate our hypothesis, we used two CaSiO3 polymorphs, pseudo-wollastonite (psw, β-CaSiO3) and wollastonite (wol, α-CaSiO3) as scaffolds for hMSC culture. Polymorphs are materials which have identical chemical composition and stoichiometry, but different crystal structures. We combined the results of detailed surface characterizations, including environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) back-scattered imaging, and spot-analysis and 2D elemental mapping by SEM-Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and surface roughness analysis; culture medium solution analyses; and molecular/genetic assays from cell culture. Our results confirmed the hypothesis that the psw polymorph, which has a strained silicate ring structure, is more osteoinductive than the wol polymorph, which has a more stable, open silicate chain structure. The observations could be attributed to easier dissolution (resorption) of psw compared to wol, which resulted in concentration profiles that were

  19. Numerical Analysis of Interfacial Bonding of Al-Si Particle and Mild Steel Substrate by Cold Spray Technique Using the SPH Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manap, Abreeza; Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Okabe, Tomonaga

    The deposition mechanism of the cold spray (CS) technique is investigated numerically using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The CS process is simulated by modeling the impact of a spherical Al-Si powder particle on a mild steel substrate. In this work, the adhesive interaction between the contacting surfaces is described by intersurface forces using the cohesive zone model. Simulation results show that successful bonding is achieved above the critical velocity, but rebound was observed at high velocities. This indicates that optimum deposition is achieved only within a certain range of particle velocities. The simulated deformed particle shape evolution and estimated critical velocity from other sources were compared and good agreement was obtained. The analyses demonstrate the feasibility of the presented SPH methodology and the adhesive interaction model for simulating the deformation behavior of CS particles.

  20. Preparation, characterization and in vitro dissolution behavior of porous biphasic α/β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lu; Yu, Haiyang; Deng, Yi; Yang, Weizhong; Liao, Li; Long, Qin

    2016-02-01

    The ideal bone tissue engineering scaffolds are long-cherished with the properties of interconnected macroporous structures, adjustable degradation and excellent biocompatibility. Here, a series of porous α/β-tricalcium phosphate (α/β-TCP) biphasic bioceramics with different phase ratios of α-TCP and β-TCP were successfully synthesized by heating an amorphous calcium phosphate precursor. The chemical and morphological characterization showed that α- and β-TCP phases co-existed in the α/β-TCP bioceramics and they had interconnected pore structures with size between 200 and 500μm. The in vitro dissolution behavior and bioactivity of the dual α/β-TCP were also probed in static and dynamic SBF for the first time. The results revealed that α/β-TCP scaffolds had good in vitro bioactivity, as the formation of bone-like apatite layers was induced on the scaffolds after mineralization in SBF. Moreover, dissolution rate of α/β-TCP bioceramics in dynamic environment was higher than that under static condition. Compared with monophasic TCP ceramics, these porous α/β-TCP bioceramics displayed a tailored dissolution rate proportionate to the TCP content (α and β) in the materials. Further, the degradation profile of porous α/β-TCP was well-described by Avrami equation. The porous dual α/β-TCP bioceramics with controllable degradation behavior hold great potential to be applied in bone tissue engineering as bone substitutes. PMID:26652459

  1. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  2. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  3. Chemical bonding technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plueddemann, E.

    1986-01-01

    Primers employed in bonding together the various material interfaces in a photovoltaic module are being developed. The approach develops interfacial adhesion by generating actual chemical bonds between the various materials bonded together. The current status of the program is described along with the progress toward developing two general purpose primers for ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), one for glass and metals, and another for plastic films.

  4. Surface toughness of silicon nitride bioceramics: I, Raman spectroscopy-assisted micromechanics.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Enomoto, Yuto; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Marin, Elia; McEntire, Bryan J

    2016-02-01

    Indentation micro-fracture is revisited as a tool for evaluating the surface toughness of silicon nitride (Si3N4) bioceramics for artificial joint applications. Despite being unique and practical from an experimental perspective, a quantitative assessment of surface fracture toughness using this method is challenging. An improved method has been developed, consisting of coupling indentation with confocal (spatially resolved) Raman piezo-spectroscopy. Empowered by the Raman microprobe, the indentation micro-fracture method was found to be capable of providing reliable surface toughness measurements in silicon nitride biomaterials. In designing the microstructures of bioceramic bearing couples for improved tribological performance, surface toughness must be considered as a fundamentally different and distinct parameter from bulk toughness. The coupling of indention crack opening displacements (COD) with local stress field assessments by spectroscopy paves the way to reliably compare the structural properties of bioceramics and to quantitatively monitor their evolution during environmental exposure. PMID:26522613

  5. A Periosteum-Inspired 3D Hydrogel-Bioceramic Composite for Enhanced Bone Regeneration .

    PubMed

    Chun, Yong Yao; Wang, Jun Kit; Tan, Nguan Soon; Chan, Peggy Puk Yik; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Choong, Cleo

    2016-02-01

    A 3D injectable hydrogel-bioceramic composite consisting of gelatin-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid (Gtn-HPA) and carboxymethyl cellulose-tyramine (CMC-Tyr), incorporated with fish scale-derived calcium phosphate (CaP), is developed for bone applications. The hydrogel-bioceramic composite has significantly improved the elastic modulus compared to the non-filled hydrogel, of which the addition of 10 w/v% CaP showed zero order fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran release profile and a significantly higher proliferation rate of encapsulated cells. All the samples promote the nucleation and growth of CaP minerals when exposed to 1× SBF. Overall, the hydrogel-bioceramic composite with 10 w/v% CaP can potentially be used as a periosteum-mimicking membrane to facilitate bone regeneration. PMID:26445013

  6. Fabrication of Bioceramic Bone Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fwu-Hsing

    2014-10-01

    In this study, microhydroxyapatite and nanosilica sol were used as the raw materials for fabrication of bioceramic bone scaffold using selective laser sintering technology in a self-developed 3D Printing apparatus. When the fluidity of ceramic slurry is matched with suitable laser processing parameters, a controlled pore size of porous bone scaffold can be fabricated under a lower laser energy. Results shown that the fabricated scaffolds have a bending strength of 14.1 MPa, a compressive strength of 24 MPa, a surface roughness of 725 nm, a pore size of 750 μm, an apparent porosity of 32%, and a optical density of 1.8. Results indicate that the mechanical strength of the scaffold can be improved after heat treatment at 1200 °C for 2 h, while simultaneously increasing surface roughness conducive to osteoprogenitor cell adhesion. MTT method and SEM observations confirmed that bone scaffolds fabricated under the optimal manufacturing process possess suitable biocompatibility and mechanical properties, allowing smooth adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast-like cells. Therefore, they have great potential for development in the field of tissue engineering.

  7. Structural analysis of bioceramic materials for denture application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Nurlaela; Tahir, Dahlang; Arbiansyah, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Structural analysis has been performed on bioceramic materials for denture application by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRF is using for analysis chemical composition of raw materials. XRF shows the ratio 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 between feldspar, quartz, kaolin and eggshell, respectively, resulting composition CaO content of 56.78 %, which is similar with natural tooth. Sample preparation was carried out on temperature of 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C. X-ray diffraction result showed that the structure is crystalline with trigonal crystal system for SiO2 (a=b=4.9134 Å and c=5.4051 Å) and CaH2O2 (a=b=3.5925 Å and c=4.9082 Å). Based on the Scherrer's equation showed the crystallite size of the highest peak (SiO2) increase with increasing the temperature preparation. The highest hardness value (87 kg/mm2) and match with the standards of dentin hardness. The surface structure was observed by using SEM also discussed.

  8. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Fwu-Hsing; Chen, Mark Hung-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity. PMID:26618362

  9. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Fwu-Hsing; Chen, Mark Hung-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity. PMID:26618362

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of bioceramics for orthopedics and tissue culture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirkiran, Hande

    Hydroxyapatite is the most well known phosphate in the biologically active phosphate ceramic family by virtue of its similarity to natural bone mineral. Among all bioglass compositions BioglassRTM45S5 is one of the most bioactive glasses. This study initially started by adding different amounts (1, 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 wt.%) of BioglassRTM45S5 to synthetic hydroxyapatite in order to improve the bioactivity of these bioceramics. The chemistries formed by sintering and their effect on different material properties including bioactivity were identified by using various techniques, such as powder and thin film x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, compression test, and nano indentation. All the results demonstrated that 10 and 25 wt.% BioglassRTM45S5 addition to hydroxyapatite and sintering at 1200°C for 4 hours yield new compositions with main Ca 5(PO4)2SiO4 and Na3Ca 6(PO4)5 crystalline phases dispersed in silicate glassy matrices, respectively. In addition, in vitro bioactivity tests such as bone like apatite formation in simulated body fluid and bone marrow stromal cell culture have shown that the crystalline and amorphous phases have an important role on improving bioactivity of these bioceramic compositions. Besides, compression test and nano indentation has given important information on compression strength and nano structure properties of these newly composed bioceramic materials and the bone like apatite layers formed on them, respectively. Finally, the effect of silicate addition on both formation and bioactivity of Na3Ca6(PO4)5 bioceramics were shown. These findings and different techniques used assisted to develop a phenomenological approach to demonstrate how the novel bioceramic compositions were composed and aid improving bioactivity of known bioceramic materials.

  11. Structure and dynamics of H2O vis-á-vis phenylalanine recognition at a DPPC lipid membrane via interfacial H-bond types: insights from polarized FT-IRRAS and ADMP simulations.

    PubMed

    Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; Ramesh, Nivarthi; Patnaik, Archita

    2015-01-14

    Preferential and enantioselective interactions of L-/D-Phenylalanine (L-Phe and D-Phe) and butoxycarbonyl-protected L-/D-Phenylalanine (LPA and DPA) as guest with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (L-DPPC) as host were tapped by using real time Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). Polarization-modulated FT-IRRAS of DPPC monolayers above the phenylalanine modified subphases depicted fine structure/conformation differences under considerations of controlled 2D surface pressure. Selective molecular recognition of D-enantiomer over L-enantiomer driven by the DPPC head group via H-bonding and electrostatic interactions was evident spectroscopically. Accordingly, binding constants (K) of 145, 346, 28, and 56 M(-1) for LPA, DPA, L-Phe, and D-Phe, respectively, were estimated. The real time FT-IRRAS water bands were strictly conformation sensitive. The effect of micro-solvation on the structure and stability of the 1:1 diastereomeric L-lipid⋯, LPA/DPA and L-lipid⋯, (L/D)-Phe adducts was investigated with the aid of Atom-centered Density Matrix Propagation (ADMP), a first principle quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach. The phosphodiester fragment was the primary site of hydration where specific solvent interactions were simulated through single- and triple- "water-phosphate" interactions, as water cluster's "tetrahedral dice" to a "trimeric motif" transformation as a partial de-clusterization was evident. Under all the hydration patterns considered in both static and dynamic descriptions of density functional theory, L-lipid/D-amino acid enantiomer adducts continued to be stable structures while in dynamic systems, water rearranged without getting "squeezed-out" in the process of recognition. In spite of the challenging computational realm of this multiscale problem, the ADMP simulated molecular interactions complying with polarized vibrational spectroscopy unraveled a novel route to chiral recognition and

  12. Structure and dynamics of H2O vis-á-vis phenylalanine recognition at a DPPC lipid membrane via interfacial H-bond types: Insights from polarized FT-IRRAS and ADMP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; Ramesh, Nivarthi; Patnaik, Archita

    2015-01-01

    Preferential and enantioselective interactions of l-/d-Phenylalanine (l-Phe and d-Phe) and butoxycarbonyl-protected l-/d-Phenylalanine (LPA and DPA) as guest with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (l-DPPC) as host were tapped by using real time Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). Polarization-modulated FT-IRRAS of DPPC monolayers above the phenylalanine modified subphases depicted fine structure/conformation differences under considerations of controlled 2D surface pressure. Selective molecular recognition of d-enantiomer over l-enantiomer driven by the DPPC head group via H-bonding and electrostatic interactions was evident spectroscopically. Accordingly, binding constants (K) of 145, 346, 28, and 56 M-1 for LPA, DPA, l-Phe, and d-Phe, respectively, were estimated. The real time FT-IRRAS water bands were strictly conformation sensitive. The effect of micro-solvation on the structure and stability of the 1:1 diastereomeric l-lipid⋯, LPA/DPA and l-lipid⋯, (l/d)-Phe adducts was investigated with the aid of Atom-centered Density Matrix Propagation (ADMP), a first principle quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach. The phosphodiester fragment was the primary site of hydration where specific solvent interactions were simulated through single- and triple- "water-phosphate" interactions, as water cluster's "tetrahedral dice" to a "trimeric motif" transformation as a partial de-clusterization was evident. Under all the hydration patterns considered in both static and dynamic descriptions of density functional theory, l-lipid/d-amino acid enantiomer adducts continued to be stable structures while in dynamic systems, water rearranged without getting "squeezed-out" in the process of recognition. In spite of the challenging computational realm of this multiscale problem, the ADMP simulated molecular interactions complying with polarized vibrational spectroscopy unraveled a novel route to chiral recognition and

  13. Structure and dynamics of H{sub 2}O vis-á-vis phenylalanine recognition at a DPPC lipid membrane via interfacial H-bond types: Insights from polarized FT-IRRAS and ADMP simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; Ramesh, Nivarthi; Patnaik, Archita

    2015-01-14

    Preferential and enantioselective interactions of L-/D-Phenylalanine (L-Phe and D-Phe) and butoxycarbonyl-protected L-/D-Phenylalanine (LPA and DPA) as guest with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (L-DPPC) as host were tapped by using real time Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). Polarization-modulated FT-IRRAS of DPPC monolayers above the phenylalanine modified subphases depicted fine structure/conformation differences under considerations of controlled 2D surface pressure. Selective molecular recognition of D-enantiomer over L-enantiomer driven by the DPPC head group via H-bonding and electrostatic interactions was evident spectroscopically. Accordingly, binding constants (K) of 145, 346, 28, and 56 M{sup −1} for LPA, DPA, L-Phe, and D-Phe, respectively, were estimated. The real time FT-IRRAS water bands were strictly conformation sensitive. The effect of micro-solvation on the structure and stability of the 1:1 diastereomeric L-lipid⋯, LPA/DPA and L-lipid⋯, (L/D)-Phe adducts was investigated with the aid of Atom-centered Density Matrix Propagation (ADMP), a first principle quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach. The phosphodiester fragment was the primary site of hydration where specific solvent interactions were simulated through single- and triple- “water-phosphate” interactions, as water cluster’s “tetrahedral dice” to a “trimeric motif” transformation as a partial de-clusterization was evident. Under all the hydration patterns considered in both static and dynamic descriptions of density functional theory, L-lipid/D-amino acid enantiomer adducts continued to be stable structures while in dynamic systems, water rearranged without getting “squeezed-out” in the process of recognition. In spite of the challenging computational realm of this multiscale problem, the ADMP simulated molecular interactions complying with polarized vibrational spectroscopy unraveled a novel route to chiral

  14. 3D-printed silicate porous bioceramics using a non-sacrificial preceramic polymer binder.

    PubMed

    Zocca, A; Elsayed, H; Bernardo, E; Gomes, C M; Lopez-Heredia, M A; Knabe, C; Colombo, P; Günster, J

    2015-06-01

    Silicate bioceramics possess an excellent bioactivity; however, shaping them into complex geometries is still challenging. Therefore, this paper aims to present a new strategy for the shaping of a bioglass-ceramic with controlled geometry and properties starting from a glass powder combined with a preceramic polymer, i.e. a silicon resin, and reactive fillers. The powder-based three-dimensional (3D)-printing of wollastonite (CaSiO3)-based silicate bioceramic parts was demonstrated in this work. The resin plays a dual role, as it not only acts as a non-sacrificial binder for the filler powders in the printing process but it also reacts with the fillers to generate the desired bioceramic phases. The mechanical and physical properties, i.e. ball-on-three-balls test, density, porosity and morphology, were evaluated in 3D-printed discs. These samples possessed a total porosity around 64 vol% and a biaxial flexural strength around 6 MPa. The raw materials used in this work also enabled the 3D-printing of scaffolds possessing a designed multi-scale porosity, suitable bioceramic phase assemblage and a compressive strength of 1 MPa (for cylindrical scaffolds with total porosity ~80 vol%). Solubility in TRIS/HCl and in vitro assays, i.e. viability, cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays, were also performed. In vitro tests indicated good cell viability and no cytotoxicity effect on the cells. PMID:26000907

  15. Surface modification of titanium by nano-TiO 2/HA bioceramic coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, G.; Hu, J.; Wei, S. C.; Li, J. H.; Liang, X. H.; Luo, E.

    2008-11-01

    A nano-TiO 2/hydroxyapatite composite bioceramic coating was developed and applied to the surfaces of pure titanium discs by the sol-gel method. A TiO 2 anatase bioceramic coating was utilized in the inner layer, which could adhere tightly to the titanium substrate. A porous hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic coating was utilized in the outer layer, which has higher solubility and better short-term bioactivity. Conventional HA coatings and commercially pure titanium were used as controls. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to characterize the crystallization, surface morphology, and thickness of the coatings. The bioactivities of the coatings were evaluated by in vitro osteoblast cultures. Results showed that the nano-TiO 2/HA composite bioceramic coating exhibited good crystallization and homogeneous, nano-scale surface morphology. In addition, the nano-TiO 2/HA coating adhered tightly to the substrate, and the in vitro osteoblast cultures exhibited satisfactory bioactivity.

  16. Surface analysis in composite bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messick, D. L.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The role of the interfacial region in determining the bond strength and durability of composite bonds is discussed. The characterization of a variety of carbon fibers including Celion 6000 using both scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is discussed. The emphasis is on composite bonding, that is, the adhesive bonding between composites in contrast to fiber-matrix interaction. The primary objective of the research is the characterization of composite surfaces before adhesive bonding and after fracture of bonded specimens. Work done on the analysis of composite samples pretreated in a number of ways prior to bonding is detailed.

  17. Oxide-bioceramic coatings obtained on titanium items by the induction heat treatment and modified with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Fomina, Marina A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Koshuro, Vladimir A.; Petrova, Natalia V.; Skaptsov, Aleksandr A.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2015-06-01

    Prospective composite bioceramic titania coatings were obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from cp-titanium and medical titanium alloy VT16 (Ti-2.5Al-5Mo-5V). Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by oxidation during induction heat treatment are defined. Technological recommendations for obtaining bioceramic coatings with extremely high strength on titanium items surface are given.

  18. Poly-cyclodextrin functionalized porous bioceramics for local chemotherapy and anticancer bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chai, Feng; Abdelkarim, Mohamed; Laurent, Thomas; Tabary, Nicolas; Degoutin, Stephanie; Simon, Nicolas; Peters, Fabian; Blanchemain, Nicolas; Martel, Bernard; Hildebrand, Hartmut F

    2014-08-01

    The progress in bone cancer surgery and multimodal treatment concept achieve only modest improvement in the overall survival, due to failure in clearing out residual cancer cells at the surgical margin and extreme side-effects of adjuvant postoperative treatments. Our study aims to propose a new method based on cyclodextrin polymer (polyCD) functionalized hydroxyapatite (HA) for achieving a high local drug concentration with a sustained release profile and a better control of residual malignant cells via local drug delivery and promotion of the reconstruction of bone defects. PolyCD, a versatile carrier for therapeutic molecules, can be incorporated into HA (bone regeneration scaffold) through thermal treatment. The parameters of polyCD treatment on the macroporous HA (porosity 65%) were characterized via thermogravimetric analysis. Good cytocompatibility of polyCD functionalized bioceramics was demonstrated on osteoblast cells by cell vitality assay. An antibiotic (gentamicin) and an anticancer agent (cisplatin) were respectively loaded on polyCD functionalized bioceramics for drug release test. The results show that polyCD functionalization leads to significantly improved drug loading quantity (30% more concerning gentamicin and twice more for cisplatin) and drug release duration (7 days longer concerning gentamicin and 3 days longer for cisplatin). Conclusively, this study offers a safe and reliable drug delivery system for bioceramic matrices, which can load anticancer agents (or/and antibiotics) to reduce local recurrence (or/and infection). PMID:24347296

  19. Three-Dimensional Printing of Hollow-Struts-Packed Bioceramic Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongxiang; Zhai, Dong; Huan, Zhiguang; Zhu, Haibo; Xia, Lunguo; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional printing technologies have shown distinct advantages to create porous scaffolds with designed macropores for application in bone tissue engineering. However, until now, 3D-printed bioceramic scaffolds only possessing a single type of macropore have been reported. Generally, those scaffolds with a single type of macropore have relatively low porosity and pore surfaces, limited delivery of oxygen and nutrition to surviving cells, and new bone tissue formation in the center of the scaffolds. Therefore, in this work, we present a useful and facile method for preparing hollow-struts-packed (HSP) bioceramic scaffolds with designed macropores and multioriented hollow channels via a modified coaxial 3D printing strategy. The prepared HSP scaffolds combined high porosity and surface area with impressive mechanical strength. The unique hollow-struts structures of bioceramic scaffolds significantly improved cell attachment and proliferation and further promoted formation of new bone tissue in the center of the scaffolds, indicating that HSP ceramic scaffolds can be used for regeneration of large bone defects. In addition, the strategy can be used to prepare other HSP ceramic scaffolds, indicating a universal application for tissue engineering, mechanical engineering, catalysis, and environmental materials. PMID:26479454

  20. Akermanite bioceramics promote osteogenesis, angiogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis for osteoporotic bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lunguo; Yin, Zhilan; Mao, Lixia; Wang, Xiuhui; Liu, Jiaqiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Fang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    It is a big challenge for bone healing under osteoporotic pathological condition with impaired angiogenesis, osteogenesis and remodeling. In the present study, the effect of Ca, Mg, Si containing akermanite bioceramics (Ca2MgSi2O7) extract on cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and angiogenic factor expression of BMSCs derived from ovariectomized rats (BMSCs-OVX) as well as the expression of osteoclastogenic factors was evaluated. The results showed that akermanite could enhance cell proliferation, ALP activity, expression of Runx2, BMP-2, BSP, OPN, OCN, OPG and angiogenic factors including VEGF and ANG-1. Meanwhile, akermanite could repress expression of osteoclastogenic factors including RANKL and TNF-α. Moreover, akermanite could activate ERK, P38, AKT and STAT3 signaling pathways, while crosstalk among these signaling pathways was evident. More importantly, the effect of akermanite extract on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis was evaluated by TRAP staining and real-time PCR assay. The results showed that akermanite could suppress osteoclast formation and expression of TRAP, cathepsin K and NFATc1. The in vivo experiments revealed that akermanite bioceramics dramatically stimulated osteogenesis and angiogenesis in an OVX rat critical-sized calvarial defect model. All these results suggest that akermanite bioceramics with the effects of Mg and Si ions on osteogenesis, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis are promising biomaterials for osteoporotic bone regeneration. PMID:26911441

  1. Akermanite bioceramics promote osteogenesis, angiogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis for osteoporotic bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lunguo; Yin, Zhilan; Mao, Lixia; Wang, Xiuhui; Liu, Jiaqiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Lin, Kaili; Chang, Jiang; Fang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    It is a big challenge for bone healing under osteoporotic pathological condition with impaired angiogenesis, osteogenesis and remodeling. In the present study, the effect of Ca, Mg, Si containing akermanite bioceramics (Ca2MgSi2O7) extract on cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and angiogenic factor expression of BMSCs derived from ovariectomized rats (BMSCs-OVX) as well as the expression of osteoclastogenic factors was evaluated. The results showed that akermanite could enhance cell proliferation, ALP activity, expression of Runx2, BMP-2, BSP, OPN, OCN, OPG and angiogenic factors including VEGF and ANG-1. Meanwhile, akermanite could repress expression of osteoclastogenic factors including RANKL and TNF-α. Moreover, akermanite could activate ERK, P38, AKT and STAT3 signaling pathways, while crosstalk among these signaling pathways was evident. More importantly, the effect of akermanite extract on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis was evaluated by TRAP staining and real-time PCR assay. The results showed that akermanite could suppress osteoclast formation and expression of TRAP, cathepsin K and NFATc1. The in vivo experiments revealed that akermanite bioceramics dramatically stimulated osteogenesis and angiogenesis in an OVX rat critical-sized calvarial defect model. All these results suggest that akermanite bioceramics with the effects of Mg and Si ions on osteogenesis, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis are promising biomaterials for osteoporotic bone regeneration. PMID:26911441

  2. Processing-microstructure-property relations in HVOF sprayed calcium phosphate based bioceramic coatings.

    PubMed

    Khor, K A; Li, H; Cheang, P

    2003-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) based bioceramic coatings were deposited onto titanium alloy substrates using the high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray technique. This study aimed to reveal the relations among processing parameters, microstructure, and properties of the bioceramic coatings. The processing conditions were altered through changing the starting HA powder size, content of bioinert ceramic additives or composite powder preparation techniques. Coating structure was characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM); and the mechanical properties, Young's modulus and fracture toughness, of the coatings were evaluated through indentation techniques. Results demonstrated dominant influence of the melt state of HA powders on the phase composition of resultant coatings, and it was found that the HVOF HA coatings possess competitive mechanical properties. Furthermore, addition of titania or zirconia, as secondary phase in HA, showed promising effect on improving the mechanical properties of the HVOF HA-based coatings. Chemical reactions between HA and titania; and, HA and zirconia during coating deposition were revealed and characterized. Incorporation modes of the additives into HA and their reinforcing mechanisms were elucidated. The relationship among the processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties of the HVOF sprayed bioceramic coatings was summarily examined. PMID:12699659

  3. A comparative biomechanical study of bone ingrowth in two porous hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Li-Mei; Todo, Mitsugu; Arahira, Takaaki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Myoui, Akira

    2012-12-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bioceramics have been widely used as artificial bone substitute materials because of their superior biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. In the present study, mechanical properties changes of two hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics induced by bone ingrowth were tested and evaluated in a rabbit model. Both materials (NEOBONE®, Apaceram-AX®) have highly interconnected pores with a porosity of 75-85%. The major structural difference between them lies in that Apaceram-AX® has micropores smaller than 10 micrometers in diameter, whereas NEOBONE® does not contain such micropores. Both materials were implanted into the femoral condyles of rabbits for the specified observation period (1, 5, 12, 24, and 48 weeks) and then evaluated by experimental approach in combination with finite element method (FEM). Results indicate that two porous bioceramics exhibit different degradability in vivo, and remarkably different variation of total stiffness, elastic modulus distribution, as well as strain energy density distribution calculated by FE simulation. These results demonstrate how the internal microstructures affect the progress of bone regeneration and mechanical properties with the duration of implantation, emphasizing the importance of biomaterial design tailored to various clinic applications. Additionally, this study showed a potential for applying the computational method to monitor the time-dependent biomechanical changes of implanted porous bioceramics.

  4. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  5. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  6. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  7. Three-Dimensional Molding Based on Microstereolithography Using Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Slurry for the Production of Bioceramic Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Takashi; Inada, Makoto; Maruo, Shoji

    2011-06-01

    We report on a three-dimensional (3D) molding technique of fabricating bioceramic scaffolds. In this method, ceramic slurry is cast into a 3D polymer master mold, which is fabricated via microstereolithography, by a centrifugal casting method. The polymer master mold is thermally decomposed, so that a complex 3D bioceramic scaffold can be produced. In experiments, the decomposition process of the polymer model was optimized by the master decomposition curve theory to reduce harmful cracks in a green body. As a result, we could produce not only precise lattice models but also a sophisticated porous scaffold using beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) slurry. This bioceramic 3D molding technique based on microstereolithography will be useful for tailor-made tissue engineering and regeneration medicine.

  8. Li-Ion Battery Cathodes: Enhancing Interfacial Bonding between Anisotropically Oriented Grains Using a Glue-Nanofiller for Advanced Li-Ion Battery Cathode (Adv. Mater. 23/2016).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejung; Lee, Sanghan; Cho, Hyeon; Kim, Junhyeok; Lee, Jieun; Park, Suhyeon; Joo, Se Hun; Kim, Su Hwan; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Song, Hyun-Kon; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Cho, Jaephil

    2016-06-01

    The formation of a spinel Lix CoO2 layer in a Ni-rich secondary particle for lithium-ion batteries is reported by S. K. Kwak, J. Cho, and co-workers on page 4705, who find that the spinel-like Lix CoO2 layer, between layered primary particles, can enhance the mechanical strength of secondary particles by enhancing the interfacial binding energy among the grains. Moreover, the layer can effectively protect the unstable surface of the primary particles and offers a fast electron-ion pathway, resulting in overall enhancements of stability and kinetics in battery performance. PMID:27281047

  9. Bioactive glass-reinforced bioceramic ink writing scaffolds: sintering, microstructure and mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Shao, Huifeng; Yang, Xianyan; He, Yong; Fu, Jianzhong; Liu, Limin; Ma, Liang; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Guojing; Gao, Changyou; Gou, Zhongru

    2015-09-01

    The densification of pore struts in bioceramic scaffolds is important for structure stability and strength reliability. An advantage of ceramic ink writing is the precise control over the microstructure and macroarchitecture. However, the use of organic binder in such ink writing process would heavily affect the densification of ceramic struts and sacrifice the mechanical strength of porous scaffolds after sintering. This study presents a low-melt-point bioactive glass (BG)-assisted sintering strategy to overcome the main limitations of direct ink writing (extrusion-based three-dimensional printing) and to produce high-strength calcium silicate (CSi) bioceramic scaffolds. The 1% BG-added CSi (CSi-BG1) scaffolds with rectangular pore morphology sintered at 1080 °C have a very small BG content, readily induce apatite formation, and show appreciable linear shrinkage (∼21%), which is consistent with the composite scaffolds with less or more BG contents sintered at either the same or a higher temperature. These CSi-BG1 scaffolds also possess a high elastic modulus (∼350 MPa) and appreciable compressive strength (∼48 MPa), and show significant strength enhancement after exposure to simulated body fluid-a performance markedly superior to those of pure CSi scaffolds. Particularly, the honeycomb-pore CSi-BG1 scaffolds show markedly higher compressive strength (∼88 MPa) than the scaffolds with rectangular, parallelogram, and Archimedean chord pore structures. It is suggested that this approach can potentially facilitate the translation of ceramic ink writing and BG-assisted sintering of bioceramic scaffold technologies to the in situ bone repair. PMID:26355654

  10. The affect of densification and dehydroxylation on the mechanical properties of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Laasri, S.; Taha, M.; Laghzizil, A.; Hlil, E.K.; Chevalier, J.

    2010-10-15

    This paper reports the effects of processing densification on the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite bioceramics. Densification of synthetic hydroxyapatite is conducted in the range 1000-1300 {sup o}C. X-ray diffraction and SEM microscopy are used to check the microstructure transformations. Vickers hardness, toughness and Young's modulus are analyzed versus the density and grain size. The sintering temperature and the particle size influence strongly the densification and the resulting mechanical properties. In addition, the critical sintering temperature appears around 1200 {sup o}C and the declined strength at the temperature up to 1200 {sup o}C is found sensitive to the dehydroxylation process of hydroxyapatite.

  11. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  12. Wear and interfacial transport of material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Bonding across the interface for two solids in contact and the subsequent transfer of material from one surface to another is a direct result of the interfacial bonds being stronger than the cohesive bonds in either of the two solids. Surface tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe are used to examine adhesive contacts and to determine the direction, nature, quantity of material transfer and properties of the solids which effect transfer and wear. The electronic nature, cohesive binding energies, surface structure, lattice disregistry and distribution of species in surface layers are all found to effect adhesion and transfer or transport for clean surfaces in solid state contact. The influence of adsorbed and reacted surface films from fractions of a monolayer to multilayer reactive films are considered. It is shown that even fractions of a monolayer of surface active species such as oxygen and sulfur can markedly inhibit adhesion and transport.

  13. In vitro and in vivo degradation evaluation of novel iron-bioceramic composites for bone implant applications.

    PubMed

    Ulum, M F; Arafat, A; Noviana, D; Yusop, A H; Nasution, A K; Abdul Kadir, M R; Hermawan, H

    2014-03-01

    Biodegradable metals such as magnesium, iron and their alloys have been known as potential materials for temporary medical implants. However, most of the studies on biodegradable metals have been focusing on optimizing their mechanical properties and degradation behavior with no emphasis on improving their bioactivity behavior. We therefore investigated the possibility of improving iron biodegradation rate and bioactivity by incorporating various bioactive bioceramics. The iron-based bioceramic (hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate and biphasic calcium phosphate) composites were prepared by mechanical mixing and sintering process. Degradation studies indicated that the addition of bioceramics lowered the corrosion potential of the composites and slightly increased their corrosion rate compared to that of pure iron. In vitro cytotoxicity results showed an increase of cellular activity when rat smooth muscle cells interacted with the degrading composites compared to pure iron. X-ray radiogram analysis showed a consistent degradation progress with that found in vivo and positive tissue response up to 70 days implantation in sheep animal model. Therefore, the iron-based bioceramic composites have the potential to be used for biodegradable bone implant applications. PMID:24433920

  14. Effects of h-BN addition on microstructures and mechanical properties of β-CaSiO3 bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying; Yao, Dongxu; Zuo, Kaihui; Xia, Yongfeng; Yin, Jinwei; Liang, Hanqin; Zeng, Yuping

    2016-09-01

    The main purpose of this study consists in investigating the effects of h-BN addition on the sinterability of β-CaSiO3 (β-CS) bioceramics. β-CS bioceramics with different contents of h-BN were prepared at the sintering temperature ranging from 800°C to 1100°C. The results showed that h-BN can be successfully used as sintering additive by being oxidized to form low melting point B2O3 related glassy phase and enhanced the flexural strength by the formation of rod-like β-CS grains. β-CS bioceramics with 1wt% h-BN sintered at 1000°C revealed flexural strength and fracture toughness of 182.2MPa and 2.4MPam(1/2) respectively, which were much higher than that of pure β-CS bioceramics (30.2MPa, 0.53MPam(1/2)) fabricated in the same processing condition. PMID:27227289

  15. Surface toughness of silicon nitride bioceramics: II, Comparison with commercial oxide materials.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Bryan J; Enomoto, Yuto; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Marin, Elia; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Raman microprobe-assisted indentation, a micromechanics method validated in a companion paper, was used to compare the surface toughening behaviors of silicon nitride (Si3N4) and alumina-based bioceramics employed in joint arthroplasty (i.e., monolithic alumina, Al2O3, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2)-toughened alumina, ZTA). Quantitative assessments of microscopic stress fields both ahead and behind the tip of Vickers indentation cracks propagated under increasing indentation loads were systematically made using a Raman microprobe with spatial resolution on the order of a single micrometer. Concurrently, crack opening displacement (COD) profiles were monitored on the same microcracks screened by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman eye clearly visualized different mechanisms operative in toughening Si3N4 and ZTA bioceramics (i.e., crack-face bridging and ZrO2 polymorphic transformation, respectively) as compared to the brittle behavior of monolithic Al2O3. Moreover, emphasis was placed on assessing not only the effectiveness but also the durability of such toughening effects when the biomaterials were aged in a hydrothermal environment. A significant degree of embrittlement at the biomaterial surface was recorded in the transformation-toughened ZTA, with the surface toughness reduced by exposure to the hydrothermal environment. Conversely, the Si3N4 biomaterial experienced a surface toughness value independent of hydrothermal attack. Crack-face bridging thus appears to be a durable surface toughening mechanism for biomaterials in joint arthroplasty. PMID:26437609

  16. The Effect of Photoluminescence of Bioceramic Irradiation on Middle Cerebral Arterial Occlusion in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chan, Paul; Liu, Zhong-Min; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Kuo-Chi; Chan, Wing P; Leung, Ting-Kai; Choy, Cheuk Sing

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the possible effect of photoluminescence of bioceramic (PLB) on ischemic cerebral infarction (stroke), by using an animal model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Sprague-Dawley rats were used to induce MCAO to block the origin of the left MCAO; three months later, the positive chronic stroke rats were selected by running tunnel maze; the MCAO rats with significant chronic stroke and neurological defects were used for treadmill experiments with varying speed settings to test their capability for restoration after muscular fatigue under conditions of with and without PLB irradiation. As a result, PLB irradiation could improve exercise completion rate and average running speed during slow and fast treadmill settings. After PLB irradiation, the selected MCAO rats successfully completed all the second-round treadmill exercises at the maximum speed setting, and they had better restoration from muscular fatigue. An in vitro cell study on astrocytes of rats by bioceramic irradiation further demonstrated increased intracellular nitric oxide. To explain these results, we suggest that cortical brain stimulation of microcirculation and enhancement of peripheral muscular activity are the main causes of the improved exercise performance in MCAO rats by PLB. PMID:27375765

  17. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition. PMID:22105226

  18. The Effect of Photoluminescence of Bioceramic Irradiation on Middle Cerebral Arterial Occlusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Chan, Paul; Liu, Zhong-Min; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Kuo-Chi; Chan, Wing P.; Leung, Ting-Kai; Choy, Cheuk Sing

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the possible effect of photoluminescence of bioceramic (PLB) on ischemic cerebral infarction (stroke), by using an animal model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Sprague-Dawley rats were used to induce MCAO to block the origin of the left MCAO; three months later, the positive chronic stroke rats were selected by running tunnel maze; the MCAO rats with significant chronic stroke and neurological defects were used for treadmill experiments with varying speed settings to test their capability for restoration after muscular fatigue under conditions of with and without PLB irradiation. As a result, PLB irradiation could improve exercise completion rate and average running speed during slow and fast treadmill settings. After PLB irradiation, the selected MCAO rats successfully completed all the second-round treadmill exercises at the maximum speed setting, and they had better restoration from muscular fatigue. An in vitro cell study on astrocytes of rats by bioceramic irradiation further demonstrated increased intracellular nitric oxide. To explain these results, we suggest that cortical brain stimulation of microcirculation and enhancement of peripheral muscular activity are the main causes of the improved exercise performance in MCAO rats by PLB. PMID:27375765

  19. Interfacial behaviours of smart composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Chi-Kin

    The success of conventional fiber reinforced composites (FRC) relies on the quality of bonding between fibers and matrix. A review of literatures shows that there is a lack of theoretical models and experimental findings on the interfacial behaviours of the SMA-composites. In the past, the operation limit as well as the ideal actuation condition of SMA inclusions could not be predicted accurately during the design stage and the SMA-composite structures may therefore suffer a potential risk of sudden failure due to overloading or over-actuation. The theoretical models developed in this research provide a study basis for the prediction of internal stresses and interfacial strength of the SMA-composites. Martensite volume fraction is considered as a critical parameter which determines the material properties and shape memory effect (SME) of the SMA inclusions. The proposed model reproduce the SMA behaviour inside a substrate, evolutions of martensite volume fraction and elastic modulus of SMA, and the internal stresses along the embedded length in different loading and actuation scenarios. The concepts of 'constant martensite volume fraction region (CMR)' and 'constant axial stress region (CASR)' are proposed to justify the desired SMA actuation. In addition, substantial improvement of the initial debond stress is predicted with the increase of the actuation temperature. The 'Optimum Actuation Condition (OAC)' that ensures the reinforcement of SMA composite but avoids the failure of composite interface due to over-actuation is also defined to optimize the application of SME in the composite structure within a safety actuation limit. A simplified OAC (SOAC) is also developed to provide an analytical solution of OAC and thus the ideal actuation temperature for achieving such specific actuation condition can be estimated more easily. Single fiber pullout test and finite element analysis (FEA) are employed to evaluate the interfacial behaviours and analyze the stress

  20. Effect of metal-ion-to-fuel ratio on the phase formation of bioceramic phosphates synthesized by self-propagating combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Swamiappan; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2008-07-01

    Synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca10 (PO4)6 (OH)2) is a well-known bioceramic material used in orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent biocompatibility and bone-bonding ability due to its structural and compositional similarity to human bone. Here we report, for the first time, the synthesis of HAP by combustion employing tartaric acid as a fuel. Calcium nitrate is used as the source of calcium and diammonium hydrogen phosphate serves as the source of phosphate ions. Reaction processing parameters such as the pH, fuel-oxidant ratio and autoignition temperature are controlled and monitored. The products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, which revealed the formation of a hexagonal hydroxyapatite phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra showed that the substitution of a carbonate ion occurs at the phosphate site. The morphology of the particles was imaged by scanning electron microscopy, which also revealed that the particles are of submicron size. Thermal analysis showed that the phase formation takes place at the time of combustion. Surface area and porosity analysis showed that the surface area is high and that the pores are of nanometer size. The mean grain size of the HAP powder, determined by the Debye-Scherrer formula, is in the range 20-30 nm. Chemical analyses to determine the Ca : P atomic ratio in synthesized ceramics were performed, and it was found to be 1 : 1.66.

  1. Interfacial welding of dynamic covalent network polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Shi, Qian; Li, Hao; Jabour, John; Yang, Hua; Dunn, Martin L.; Wang, Tiejun; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic covalent network (or covalent adaptable network) polymers can rearrange their macromolecular chain network by bond exchange reactions (BERs) where an active unit replaces a unit in an existing bond to form a new bond. Such macromolecular events, when they occur in large amounts, can attribute to unusual properties that are not seen in conventional covalent network polymers, such as shape reforming and surface welding; the latter further enables the important attributes of material malleability and powder-based reprocessing. In this paper, a multiscale modeling framework is developed to study the surface welding of thermally induced dynamic covalent network polymers. At the macromolecular network level, a lattice model is developed to describe the chain density evolution across the interface and its connection to bulk stress relaxation due to BERs. The chain density evolution rule is then fed into a continuum level interfacial model that takes into account surface roughness and applied pressure to predict the effective elastic modulus and interfacial fracture energy of welded polymers. The model yields particularly accessible results where the moduli and interfacial strength of the welded samples as a function of temperature and pressure can be predicted with four parameters, three of which can be measured directly. The model identifies the dependency of surface welding efficiency on the applied thermal and mechanical fields: the pressure will affect the real contact area under the consideration of surface roughness of dynamic covalent network polymers; the chain density increment on the real contact area of interface is only dependent on the welding time and temperature. The modeling approach shows good agreement with experiments and can be extended to other types of dynamic covalent network polymers using different stimuli for BERs, such as light and moisture etc.

  2. Interfacial phase-change memory.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Fons, P; Kolobov, A V; Fukaya, T; Krbal, M; Yagi, T; Tominaga, J

    2011-08-01

    Phase-change memory technology relies on the electrical and optical properties of certain materials changing substantially when the atomic structure of the material is altered by heating or some other excitation process. For example, switching the composite Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) alloy from its covalently bonded amorphous phase to its resonantly bonded metastable cubic crystalline phase decreases the resistivity by three orders of magnitude, and also increases reflectivity across the visible spectrum. Moreover, phase-change memory based on GST is scalable, and is therefore a candidate to replace Flash memory for non-volatile data storage applications. The energy needed to switch between the two phases depends on the intrinsic properties of the phase-change material and the device architecture; this energy is usually supplied by laser or electrical pulses. The switching energy for GST can be reduced by limiting the movement of the atoms to a single dimension, thus substantially reducing the entropic losses associated with the phase-change process. In particular, aligning the c-axis of a hexagonal Sb(2)Te(3) layer and the 〈111〉 direction of a cubic GeTe layer in a superlattice structure creates a material in which Ge atoms can switch between octahedral sites and lower-coordination sites at the interface of the superlattice layers. Here we demonstrate GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) interfacial phase-change memory (IPCM) data storage devices with reduced switching energies, improved write-erase cycle lifetimes and faster switching speeds. PMID:21725305

  3. Interfacial behavior of asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Dominique; Argillier, Jean-François

    2016-07-01

    We review the existing literature on asphaltenes at various types of interfaces: oil-water, air-water, gas-oil and solid-liquid, with more emphasis on the oil-water interfaces. We address the role of asphaltene aggregation, recently clarified for asphaltenes in bulk by the Yen-Mullins model. We discuss the questions of adsorption reversibility and interfacial rheology, especially in connection with emulsion stability. PMID:26498501

  4. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  5. Influence of sintering temperatures on hardness and Young's modulus of tricalcium phosphate bioceramic by nanoindentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.X. . E-mail: c.wang@bham.ac.uk; Zhou, X.; Wang, M.

    2004-07-15

    Nanoindentation experiments on tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bioceramic sintered at different temperatures were performed with a Berkovich indenter for determining hardness and elastic modulus from load and displacement data. The hardness and Young's modulus increased with the increase of sintering temperature up to 1300 deg. C, but the Young's modulus decreased with the further increase of sintering temperatures at 1400 and 1500 deg. C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that the transformation {beta}{yields}{alpha}-TCP happened when the sintering temperature reached around 1400 deg. C, which contributed to the decreases of modulus at 1400 and 1500 deg. C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that the sintering effect was improved with the increase in sintering temperature.

  6. Standard Enucleation with Aluminium Oxide Implant (Bioceramic) Covered with Patient's Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zigiotti, Gian Luigi; Cavarretta, Sonia; Morara, Mariachiara; Nam, Sang Min; Ranno, Stefano; Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Lupo, Stefano; Nucci, Paolo; Meduri, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We describe in our study a modified standard enucleation, using sclera harvested from the enucleated eye to cover the prosthesis in order to insert a large porous implant and to reduce postoperative complication rates in a phthisis globe. Methods. We perform initially a standard enucleation. The porous implant (Bioceramic) is then covered only partially by the patient's sclera. The implant is inserted in the posterior Tenon's space with the scleral covering looking at front. All patients were followed at least for twelve months (average followup 16 months). Results. We performed nineteen primary procedures (19 patients, 19 eyes, x M; x F) and secondary, to fill the orbital cavity in patients already operated by standard evisceration (7 patients, 7 eyes). There were no cases of implant extrusion. The orbital volume was well reintegrated. Conclusion. Our procedure was safe and effective. All patients had a good cosmetic result after final prosthetic fitting and we also achieved good prothesis mobility. PMID:22654614

  7. Ion-Doped Silicate Bioceramic Coating of Ti-Based Implant.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Sepantafar, Mohammadmajid

    2016-09-01

    Titanium and its alloy are known as important load-bearing biomaterials. The major drawbacks of these metals are fibrous formation and low corrosion rate after implantation. The surface modification of biomedical implants through various methods such as plasma spray improves their osseointegration and clinical lifetime. Different materials have been already used as coatings on biomedical implant, including calcium phosphates and bioglass. However, these materials have been reported to have limited clinical success. The excellent bioactivity of calcium silicate (Ca-Si) has been also regarded as coating material. However, their high degradation rate and low mechanical strength limit their further coating application. Trace element modification of (Ca-Si) bioceramics is a promising method, which improves their mechanical strength and chemical stability. In this review, the potential of trace element-modified silicate coatings on better bone formation of titanium implant is investigated. PMID:26979401

  8. Response of stem cells from different origins to biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Sonja E; Glickman, Robert; da Silva, Wagner N; Arinzeh, Treena L; Kerkis, Irina

    2015-08-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) bioceramics have been successfully applied in a broad variety of presentation forms and with different ratios of hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). BCPs have been loaded with stem cells from different origins for bone tissue engineering purposes, but evidence of stem cell behavior on different compositions (various HA/β-TCP ratios) and physical features of BCPs is limited. We compared the adhesion, proliferation, viability and osteogenic potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on granular BCPs with equal HA/β-TCP ratio of diverse particle sizes and on porous blocks which had different chemical compositions. In addition, the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs was compared to adipose-derived (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC) stem cells, as well as to pre-osteoblasts on a particulate BCP. MSCs growing on granular BCPs demonstrated increased number as compared to MSCs growing on blocks. Cells proliferated to a greater extent on small granular BCPs, while large granular BCPs and blocks promoted cell differentiation. Surprisingly, the expression of genes involved in osteogenesis was upregulated in MSCs on bioceramics in basal medium which indicates that BCPs may have osteoinductive potential. This was confirmed with the upregulation of osteochondrogenic markers, at different time points, when stem cells from various tissues were grown on the BCP. This study demonstrates that BCPs, depending on their physical features and chemical composition, modulate stem cell behavior, and that stem cells from different origins are inherently distinct in their gene expression profile and can be triggered toward osteochondrogenic fate by BCPs. PMID:25676006

  9. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  10. Mullite/Mo interfaces formed by Intrusion bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolome, Jose F.; Diaz, Marcos; Moya, Jose S.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-04-30

    The microstructure and strength of Mo/mullite interfaces formed by diffusion bonding at 1650 C has been analyzed. Interfacial metal-ceramic interlocking contributes to flexural strength of approx. 140 MPa as measured by 3 point bending. Saturation of mullite with MoO2 does not affect the interfacial strength.

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Trend report on international and Japanese standardization activities for bioceramics and tissue engineered medical products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Sadami

    2010-02-01

    Since porous and injectable bioceramics have recently been utilized often as scaffolds for bone regenerative medicine, the need for their standardization has increased. One of the standard proposals in ISO/TC150 and JIS has been a draft for characterization of the porous bioceramic scaffolds in both micro- and macro-scopic aspects. ISO/TC150/SC7 (Tissue engineered medical products) has been co-chaired by Professor J E Lemons, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Dr R Nakaoka, Division of Medical Devices, National Institute of Health Sciences, Japan. The scope of SC7 has been specified as 'Standardization for the general requirements and performance of tissue engineered medical products with the exclusion of gene therapy, transplantation and transfusion'.

  12. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-19

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies. PMID:27545849

  13. The effect of grain size on the biocompatibility, cell-materials interface, and mechanical properties of microwave-sintered bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Veljović, Djordje; Colić, Miodrag; Kojić, Vesna; Bogdanović, Gordana; Kojić, Zvezdana; Banjac, Andrijana; Palcevskis, Eriks; Petrović, Rada; Janaćković, Djordje

    2012-11-01

    The effect of decreasing the grain size on the biocompatibility, cell-material interface, and mechanical properties of microwave-sintered monophase hydroxyapatite bioceramics was investigated in this study. A nanosized stoichiometric hydroxyapatite powder was isostatically pressed at high pressure and sintered in a microwave furnace in order to obtain fine grained dense bioceramics. The samples sintered at 1200°C, with a density near the theoretical one, were composed of micron-sized grains, while the grain size decreased to 130 nm on decreasing the sintering temperature to 900°C. This decrease in the grain size certainly led to increases in the fracture toughness by much as 54%. An in vitro investigation of biocompatibility with L929 and human MRC-5 fibroblast cells showed noncytotoxic effects for both types of bioceramics, while the relative cell proliferation rate, cell attachment and metabolic activity of the fibroblasts were improved with decreasing of grain size. An initial in vivo investigation of biocompatibility by the primary cutaneous irritation test showed that both materials exhibited no irritation properties. PMID:22733649

  14. Current perspectives of bio-ceramic technology in endodontics: calcium enriched mixture cement - review of its composition, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Utneja, Shivani; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2015-02-01

    Advancements in bio-ceramic technology has revolutionised endodontic material science by enhancing the treatment outcome for patients. This class of dental materials conciliates excellent biocompatibility with high osseoconductivity that render them ideal for endodontic care. Few recently introduced bio-ceramic materials have shown considerable clinical success over their early generations in terms of good handling characteristics. Calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, Endosequence sealer, and root repair materials, Biodentine and BioAggregate are the new classes of bio-ceramic materials. The aim of this literature review is to present investigations regarding properties and applications of CEM cement in endodontics. A review of the existing literature was performed by using electronic and hand searching methods for CEM cement from January 2006 to December 2013. CEM cement has a different chemical composition from that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) but has similar clinical applications. It combines the biocompatibility of MTA with more efficient characteristics, such as significantly shorter setting time, good handling characteristics, no staining of tooth and effective seal against bacterial leakage. PMID:25671207

  15. Electrochemical and morphological investigation of silver and zinc modified calcium phosphate bioceramic coatings on metallic implant materials.

    PubMed

    Furko, M; Jiang, Y; Wilkins, T A; Balázsi, C

    2016-05-01

    In our research nanostructured silver and zinc doped calcium-phosphate (CaP) bioceramic coatings were prepared on commonly used orthopaedic implant materials (Ti6Al4V). The deposition process was carried out by the pulse current technique at 70 °C from electrolyte containing the appropriate amount of Ca(NO3)2 and NH4H2PO4 components. During the electrochemical deposition Ag(+) and Zn(2+) ions were introduced into the solution. The electrochemical behaviour and corrosion rate of the bioceramic coatings were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in conventional Ringer's solution in a three electrode open cell. The coating came into contact with the electrolyte and corrosion occurred during immersion. In order to achieve antimicrobial properties, it is important to maintain a continuous release of silver ions into physiological media, while the bioactive CaP layer enhances the biocompatibility properties of the layer by fostering the bone cell growth. The role of Zn(2+) is to shorten wound healing time. Morphology and composition of coatings were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Differential thermal analyses (DTA) were performed to determine the thermal stability of the pure and modified CaP bioceramic coatings while the structure and phases of the layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. PMID:26952421

  16. Current perspectives of bio-ceramic technology in endodontics: calcium enriched mixture cement - review of its composition, properties and applications

    PubMed Central

    Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in bio-ceramic technology has revolutionised endodontic material science by enhancing the treatment outcome for patients. This class of dental materials conciliates excellent biocompatibility with high osseoconductivity that render them ideal for endodontic care. Few recently introduced bio-ceramic materials have shown considerable clinical success over their early generations in terms of good handling characteristics. Calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, Endosequence sealer, and root repair materials, Biodentine and BioAggregate are the new classes of bio-ceramic materials. The aim of this literature review is to present investigations regarding properties and applications of CEM cement in endodontics. A review of the existing literature was performed by using electronic and hand searching methods for CEM cement from January 2006 to December 2013. CEM cement has a different chemical composition from that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) but has similar clinical applications. It combines the biocompatibility of MTA with more efficient characteristics, such as significantly shorter setting time, good handling characteristics, no staining of tooth and effective seal against bacterial leakage. PMID:25671207

  17. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  18. Solid/liquid interfacial free energies in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nason, D.; Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a semiquantitative technique for predicting the segregation characteristics of smooth interfaces between binary solid and liquid solutions in terms of readily available thermodynamic parameters of the bulk solutions. A lattice-liquid interfacial model and a pair-bonded regular solution model are employed in the treatment with an accommodation for liquid interfacial entropy. The method is used to calculate the interfacial segregation and the free energy of segregation for solid-liquid interfaces between binary solutions for the (111) boundary of fcc crystals. The zone of compositional transition across the interface is shown to be on the order of a few atomic layers in width, being moderately narrower for ideal solutions. The free energy of the segregated interface depends primarily upon the solid composition and the heats of fusion of the component atoms, the composition difference of the solutions, and the difference of the heats of mixing of the solutions.

  19. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  20. Interfacial insert for electrical connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macavay, D.

    1975-01-01

    The development of interfacial inserts for improved electric connectors is discussed. The inserts were manufactured from epoxy resins. The design features of the inserts and the manufacturing equipment are described. The reliability test program is reported. Drawings of the interfacial inserts are provided.

  1. More About Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Del Signore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional discussion of technique for measuring interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Technique described in "Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids" (LEW-15855).

  2. Mechanobiology of interfacial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Preziosi, L.; Maugin, G. A.

    2013-03-01

    A multiscale analysis integrating biomechanics and mechanobiology is today required for deciphering the crosstalk between biochemistry, geometry and elasticity in living materials. In this paper we derive a unified thermomechanical theory coupling growth processes with mass transport phenomena across boundaries and/or material interfaces. Inside a living system made by two contiguous bodies with varying volumes, an interfacial growth mechanism is considered to force fast but continuous variations of the physical fields inside a narrow volume across the material interface. Such a phenomenon is modelled deriving homogenized surface fields on a growing non-material discontinuity, possibly including a singular edge line. A number of balance laws is derived for imposing the conservation of the thermomechanical properties of the biological system. From thermodynamical arguments we find that the normal displacement of the non-material interface is governed by the jump of a new form of material mechanical-energy flux, also involving the kinetic energies and the mass fluxes. Furthermore, the configurational balance indicates that the surface Eshelby tensor is the tangential stress measure driving the material inhomogeneities on the non-material interface. Accordingly, stress-dependent evolution laws for bulk and interfacial growth processes are derived for both volume and surface fields. The proposed thermomechanical theory is finally applied to three biological system models. The first two examples are focused on stress-free growth problems, concerning the morphogenesis of animal horns and of seashells. The third application finally deals with the stress-driven surface evolution of avascular tumours with heterogeneous structures. The results demonstrate that the proposed theory can successfully model those biological systems where growth and mass transport phenomena interact at different length-scales. Coupling biological, mechanical and geometrical factors, the proposed

  3. Effect of sputter deposited YSZ thin films on the fracture behavior of dental bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira

    The fracture behavior of dental bioceramic materials was evaluated under physiologic conditions when modified by yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin film deposition. It was hypothesized that changing the YSZ thin film properties will produce a significant enhancement in the strength of bioceramic materials, ultimately promoting a more fatigue resistant construct. Porcelain, alumina, and zirconia were evaluated in terms of dynamic fatigue for an initial characterization of their fracture behavior. Data showed that strength degradation occurred in all three materials, most drastically in porcelain. Initial strength measurements, focused on depositing YSZ thin films on three unique substrates; porcelain, alumina, and zirconia, were carried out. A significant increase in strength was observed for alumina and porcelain. Since strength alone is not enough to characterize the fracture behavior of brittle materials, coated specimens of porcelain and zirconia were subjected to dynamic fatigue and Weibull analysis. Coated YSZ porcelain specimens showed a significant increase in strength at all tested stressing rates. YSZ coated zirconia specimens showed similar strength values at all stressing rates. The effect of film thickness on porcelain was also evaluated. Data demonstrated that film thickness alone does not appear to control increases in the flexural strength of a modified substrate. It is expected that deposition induced stress in YSZ sputtered films does not change with film thickness. However, a thicker film will generate a larger force at the film/substrate interface, contributing to delamination of the film. It was clear that in order to have a significant improvement in the fracture behavior of porcelain, changing the thickness of the film is not enough. The columnar structure of the YSZ films developed seems to favor an easy path for crack propagation limiting the benefits expected by the coating. The effect of a multilayered film, composed by brittle

  4. International Symposium on Interfacial Joining and Surface Technology (IJST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial joining (bonding) is a widely accepted welding process and one of the environmentally benign technologies used in industrial production. As the bonding temperature is lower than the melting point of the parent materials, melting of the latter is kept to a minimum. The process can be based on diffusion bonding, pressure welding, friction welding, ultrasonic bonding, or brazing-soldering, all of which offer many advantages over fusion welding. In addition, surface technologies such as surface modification, spraying, coating, plating, and thin-film formation are necessary for advanced manufacturing, fabrication, and electronics packaging. Together, interfacial joining and surface technology (IJST) will continue to be used in various industrial fields because IJST is a very significant form of environmentally conscious materials processing. The international symposium of IJST 2013 was held at Icho Kaikan, Osaka University, Japan from 27-29 November, 2013. A total of 138 participants came from around the world to attend 56 oral presentations and 36 posters presented at the symposium, and to discuss the latest research and developments on interfacial joining and surface technologies. This symposium was also held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Technical Commission on Interfacial Joining of the Japan Welding Society. On behalf of the chair of the symposium, it is my great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Among the presentations, 43 papers are published here, and I believe all of the papers have provided the welding community with much useful information. I would like to thank the authors for their enthusiastic and excellent contributions. Finally, I would like to thank all members of the committees, secretariats, participants, and everyone who contributed to this symposium through their support and invaluable effort for the success of IJST 2013. Yasuo Takahashi Chair of IJST 2013

  5. Interfacial Design for Joining Technologies: An Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janczak-Rusch, J.; Kaptay, G.; Jeurgens, L. P. H.

    2014-05-01

    This paper gives an historic perspective of the concept of "Interfacial Design" in joined (e.g. soldered, brazed, diffusion bonded) assemblies. During the course of history, the awareness grew that the interface in a material joint can be perceived at different length scales. With the continuing development of joining materials and technologies, it became evident that the performance of assemblies is critically dependent on the structure and composition of the multiple internal interfaces in the material joints. Resulting trends in the microstructural design of soldering, brazing, and other bonding materials by smart engineering of internal interfaces, as driven by increasingly complex technological requirements, are briefly addressed.

  6. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  7. Functional atomic force microscopy investigation of osteopontin affinity for silicon stabilized tricalcium phosphate bioceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pietak, Alexis M; Sayer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Resorbable silicon stabilized tricalcium phosphate (Si-TCP)-based bioceramics are characterized from a biological perspective by measuring the intermolecular interaction force between osteopontin (OPN) protein and the material surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM). OPN protein was covalently bound to silicon nitride AFM tips and adsorption and adhesion forces were measured in an electrolyte with a composition similar to that of physiological fluids. A strong relationship exists between the adhesion force of OPN on the material surface, the number of adherent osteoclasts (OC) and the resorption of the material. OPN adhesion is strongest on hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces, or in samples that induce a HA-like surface through a precipitation reaction in electrolytic media. It is proposed that the increased biological response of the Si-TCP phase can be attributed in part to its reactivity in a physiological electrolyte, which involves a rapid conversion to a calcium deficient HA phase with a corresponding increase in the adhesion strength of OPN to the material, with a consequentially higher OC resorption response. PMID:16011845

  8. Characterization of fabricated three dimensional scaffolds of bioceramic-polymer composite via microstereolithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Marina; Covington, James A.; Bolarinwa, Aminat

    2014-02-01

    Microstereolithography is a method used for rapid prototyping of polymeric and ceramic components. This technique converts a computer-aided design (CAD) to a three dimensional (3D) model, and enables layer per layer fabrication curing a liquid resin with UV-light or laser source. The aim of this project was to formulate photocurable polymer reinforced with synthesized calcium pyrophosphate (CPP), and to fabricate a 3D scaffolds with optimum mechanical properties for specific tissue engineering applications. The photocurable ceramic suspension was prepared with acrylate polyester, multifunctional acrylate monomer with the addition of 50-70wt% of CPP, photoinitiators and photoinhibitors. The 3D structure of disc (5 mm height × 4 mm diameter) was successfully fabricated using Envisiontec Perfactory3® . They were then sintered at high temperature for polymer removal, to obtain a ceramic of the desired porosity. The density increased to more than 35% and the dimensional shrinkage after sintering were 33%. The discs were then subjected compressive measurement, biodegradation and bioactivity test. Morphology and CPP content of the sintered polymer was investigated with SEM and XRD, respectively. The addition of CPP coupled with high temperature sintering, had a significant effect on the compressive strength exhibited by the bioceramic. The values are in the range of cancellous bone (2-4 MPa). In biodegradation and bioactivity test, the synthesized CPP induced the formation of apatite layer and its nucleation onto the composite surface.

  9. Low temperature direct 3D printed bioceramics and biocomposites as drug release matrices.

    PubMed

    Gbureck, Uwe; Vorndran, Elke; Müller, Frank A; Barralet, Jake E

    2007-09-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adsorption and desorption kinetics of antibiotics to microporous bioceramics fabricated by a novel low temperature 3D powder direct printing process. The adsorption of vancomycin, ofloxacin and tetracycline onto hydroxyapatite, brushite and monetite showed a linear correlation with the drug concentration in the immersion solution, whereas a non-linear relationship was found between the immersion time and the amount of adsorbed drug. Differences in the total amount of adsorbed drugs were correlated to the specific surface areas of the matrices, which varied between 2.4-13.1 m(2)/g. Normalised drug loadings were found to be in the range of 1.5-1.8 mg/m(2) for vancomycin and ofloxacin, whereas higher loads of up to 5-7 mg/m(2) were obtained for tetracycline. Vancomycin and ofloxacin were rapidly released into PBS buffer within 1-2 days, while tetracycline showed a much slower release rate of approximately 25% after 5 days of immersion. Additional polymer impregnation of the drug loaded matrix with PLA/PGA polymer solutions enabled the release kinetics to be delayed such that sustained release was achieved in polymer ceramic biocomposites. PMID:17655962

  10. Simultaneous mechanical property and biodegradation improvement of wollastonite bioceramic through magnesium dilute doping.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiajun; Yang, Xianyan; Shao, Huifeng; Ye, Juan; He, Yong; Fu, Jianzhong; Gao, Changyou; Gou, Zhongru

    2016-02-01

    The large-area bone defects in head (including calvarial, orbital, and maxillofacial bone) and segmental bone are attracting increased attention in a wide range of clinical departments. A key requirement for the clinical success of the bioactive ceramics is the match of the mechanical behavior of the implants with the specific bone tissue to be filled. This raises the question as to what design strategy might be the best indicators for the balance between mechanical properties and biological performances. Here we go beyond the traditional approaches that use phase conversion or biphasic hybrid; instead, we achieved a simultaneous enhancement of several mechanical parameters and optimalization of biodegradability by using a dilute doping of Mg in a single-phase wollastonite bioceramic. We show that the wollastonite ceramic can be rationally tuned in phase (α or β), mechanical strength (in compression and bending mode), elastic modulus (18-23GPa), and fracture toughness (>3.2MPam(1/2)) through the usage of Mg dopant introduced at precisely defined dilute concentrations (Mg/Ca molar ratio: 1.2-2.1%). Meanwhile, the dilute Mg-doped wollastonite ceramics are shown to exhibit good bioactivity in vitro in SBF but biodegradation in Tris is inversely proportional to Mg content. Consequently, such new highly bioactive ceramics with appreciable strength and toughness are promising for making specific porous scaffolds for enhancing large segmental bone defect and thin-wall bone defect repair. PMID:26426432

  11. AE Monitoring of Microdamages in Bioceramics for Artificial Joints under Simulated Body Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Shuichi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Oshima, Toyokatsu; Kobayashi, Satoshi

    Microfracture process of 3mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) for artificial joints was evaluated using the acoustic emission technique. In order to investigate the effects of environment and strain rate on the microfracture process, four point bending tests were carried out in air and physiological saline (P.S.) at various loading rates. From the results of AE behavior, rapid AE increasing point was observed before the final unstable fracture. It was suggested from the previous work that the AE increasing point corresponds to the maincrack formation. The critical stress for maincrack formation, σC, was determined from the bending stress at the AE increasing point. The critical stress as well as bending strength, σB, decreased in physiological saline. In particular, the decrease in critical stress was remarkable. It was then understood that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) by water in physiological saline affected maincrack formation rather than the final fracture. Consequently, it was suggested that the evaluation of σC is essential for the reliability assessment of bioceramics.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Oda, Yasuaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  13. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm-3 respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm-1, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  14. Evaluation of the apical sealing ability of bioceramic sealer, AH plus & epiphany: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Suprit Sudhir; Pujar, Madhu Ajay; Makandar, Saleem Dadapeer

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study evaluated and compared the microleakage of three sealers; Endosequence bioceramic (BC) sealer, AH Plus and Epiphany. Materials and Methods: Study was done on 75 extracted human single rooted permanent teeth, which were decoronated and the root canals were instrumented. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 25) and obturated by continuous wave condensation technique. Group A: using Endosequence BC, Group B: using AH Plus sealer, Group C: using Resilon Epiphany system. Microleakage was evaluated using dye penetration method. Teeth were split longitudinally and then horizontally markings were made at 2, 4 and 6 mm from the apex. Dye penetration evaluation was done under stereomicroscope (30X magnification). Results: The dye penetration in Group B was more than in Group A and C in both vertical and horizontal directions, suggesting that newly introduced BC sealer and Epiphany sealer sealed the root canal better compared to AH Plus Sealer. Conclusion: Newer root canal sealers seal the root canal better but cannot totally eliminate leakage. PMID:25506149

  15. Reinforcing bioceramic scaffolds with in situ synthesized ε-polycaprolactone coatings.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Miranda, Pedro; Guiberteau, Fernando; Pajares, Antonia

    2013-12-01

    In situ ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) was performed to coat β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds fabricated by robocasting in order to enhance their mechanical performance while preserving the predesigned macropore architecture. Concentrated colloidal inks prepared from β-TCP commercial powders were used to fabricate porous structures consisting of a three-dimensional mesh of interpenetrating rods. Then, ε-CL was in situ polymerized within the ceramic structure using a lipase as catalyst and toluene as solvent, to obtain a highly homogeneous coating and full impregnation of in-rod microporosity. The strength and toughness of scaffolds coated by ε-polycaprolactone (ε-PCL) were significantly increased (twofold and fivefold increase, respectively) over those of the bare structures. Enhancement of both properties is associated to the healing of preexisting microdefects in the bioceramic rods. These enhancements are compared to results from previous work on fully impregnated structures. The implications of the results for the optimization of the mechanical and biological performance of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications are discussed. PMID:23629876

  16. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the Si

  17. Ultrasonic characterization of interfaces in composite bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, N.; Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Cantrell, J. H.

    2011-06-23

    The inverse determination of imperfect interfaces from reflection spectra of normal and oblique incident ultrasonic waves in adhesive bonds of multidirectional composites is investigated. The oblique measurements are complicated by the highly dispersed nature of oblique wave spectra at frequencies above 3MHz. Different strategies for bond property reconstruction, including a modulation method, are discussed. The relation of measured interfacial spring density to the physico-chemical model of a composite interface described by polymer molecular bonds to emulate loss of molecular strength on an adhesive composite interface is discussed. This potentially relates the interfacial (adhesion) strength (number of bonds at the adhesive substrate interface) to the spring constant (stiffness) area density (flux), which is an ultrasonically measurable parameter.

  18. Ultrasonic Characterization of Interfaces in Composite Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Cantrell, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The inverse determination of imperfect interfaces from reflection spectra of normal and oblique incident ultrasonic waves in adhesive bonds of multidirectional composites is investigated. The oblique measurements are complicated by the highly dispersed nature of oblique wave spectra at frequencies above 3MHz. Different strategies for bond property reconstruction, including a modulation method, are discussed. The relation of measured interfacial spring density to the physico-chemical model of a composite interface described by polymer molecular bonds to emulate loss of molecular strength on an adhesive composite interface is discussed. This potentially relates the interfacial (adhesion) strength (number of bonds at the adhesive substrate interface) to the spring constant (stiffness) area density (flux), which is an ultrasonically measurable parameter.

  19. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  20. Visualizing interfacial charge transfer in dye sensitized nanoparticles using x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. Y.; Smolentsev, G.; Guo, J.; Attenkofer, K.; Kurtz, C.; Jennings, G.; Lockard, J. V.; Stickrath, A. B.; Chen, L. X.

    2011-01-01

    A molecular level understanding of the structural reorganization accompanying interfacial electron transfer is important for rational design of solar cells. Here we have applied XTA (X-ray transient absorption) spectroscopy to study transient structures in a heterogeneous interfacial system mimicking the charge separation process in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with Ru(dcbpy){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (RuN3) dye adsorbed to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle surfaces. The results show that the average Ru-NCS bond length reduces by 0.06 {angstrom}, whereas the average Ru-N(dcbpy) bond length remains nearly unchanged after the electron injection. The differences in bond-order change and steric hindrance between two types of ligands are attributed to their structural response in the charge separation. This study extends the application of XTA into optically opaque hybrid interfacial systems relevant to the solar energy conversion.

  1. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  2. Interfacial fracture toughness between bovine cortical bone and cements.

    PubMed

    Lucksanasombool, P; Higgs, W A J; Higgs, R J E D; Swain, M V

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the bonding strength of the interfaces within the cemented arthroplasty system, various mechanical tests have been used. Conventional push-out and pull-out tests cannot reveal the actual bonding property of the interface because of the significant influence of surface roughness on the measured adhesion and the failure to account for the mismatch of elastic modulus across the interface. An alternative fracture mechanics approach, which considers the mix of opening and shear modes of the crack tip loading associated with the testing system and the elastic mismatch of materials across the interface, was used to evaluate the bonding ability of various cements. The four-point bend interfacial delamination test by Charalambides et al. (J. Appl. Mech. 56 (1989) 77; Mech. Mater. 8 (1990) 269) was used to quantify the bonding ability of cements. This method is arguably more suitable since the applied loading mode is comparable to the nature of loading within the prosthetic system, which is primarily bending. The bovine bone specimens were polished to mirror finish to eliminate bonding by mechanical interlocking. The results revealed minimal bonding for the conventional bone cement (PMMA) whereas substantial bonding was evident for the glass-ionomer cements tested. However, only the conventional glass-ionomer cements showed evidence of bonding on testing, while the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (poly-HEMA) did not. The latter appeared to debond before testing because of excessive expansion stresses associated with swelling in water. PMID:12527256

  3. Hierarchical bioceramic scaffolds with 3D-plotted macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers for stimulating osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mengchi; Zhai, Dong; Xia, Lunguo; Li, Hong; Chen, Shiyi; Fang, Bing; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2016-07-14

    The hierarchical structure of biomaterials plays an important role in the process of tissue reconstruction and regeneration. 3D-plotted scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering due to their controlled macropore structure and mechanical properties. However, the lack of micro- or nano-structures on the strut surface of 3D-plotted scaffolds, especially for bioceramic scaffolds, limits their biological activity. Inspired by the adhesive versatility of mussels and the active ion-chelating capacity of polydopamine, we set out to prepare a hierarchical bioceramic scaffold with controlled macropores and mussel-inspired surface nanolayers by combining the 3D-plotting technique with the polydopamine/apatite hybrid strategy in order to synergistically accelerate the osteogenesis and angiogenesis. β-Tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds were firstly 3D-plotted and then treated in dopamine-Tris/HCl and dopamine-SBF solutions to obtain TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds, respectively. It was found that polydopamine/apatite hybrid nanolayers were formed on the surface of both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds induced apatite mineralization for the second time during the cell culture. As compared to TCP scaffolds, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly promoted the osteogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as the angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and the TCP-DOPA-SBF group presented the highest in vitro osteogenic/angiogenic activity among the three groups. Furthermore, both TCP-DOPA-Tris and TCP-DOPA-SBF scaffolds significantly improved the formation of new bone in vivo as compared to TCP scaffolds without a nanostructured surface. Our results suggest that the utilization of a mussel-inspired Ca, P-chelated polydopamine nanolayer on 3D-plotted bioceramic scaffolds is a viable and effective strategy to construct a hierarchical structure for synergistically

  4. Processing and Characterization of Novel Biomimetic Nanoporous Bioceramic Surface on β-Ti Implant by Powder Mixed Electric Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Chander; Kansal, H. K.; Pabla, B. S.; Puri, Sanjeev

    2015-09-01

    Herein, a β-Ti-based implant was subjected to powder mixed electric discharge machining (PMEDM) for surface modification to produce a novel biomimetic nanoporous bioceramic surface. The microstructure, surface topography, and phase composition of the non-machined and machined (PMEDMed) surfaces were investigated using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The microhardness of the surfaces was measured on a Vickers hardness tester. The corrosion resistance of the surfaces was evaluated via potentiodynamic polarization measurements in simulated body fluid. The application of PMEDM not only altered the surface chemistry, but also imparted the surface with a nanoporous topography or a natural bone-like surface structure. The characterization results confirmed that the alloyed layer mainly comprised bioceramic oxides and carbide phases (TiO2, Nb2O5, ZrO2, SiO2, TiC, NbC, SiC). The microhardness of PMEDMed surface was twofold higher than that of the base material (β-Ti alloy), primarily because of the formation of the hard carbide phases on the machined layer. Electrochemical analysis revealed that PMEDMed surface featured insulative and protective properties and thus displayed higher corrosion resistance ability when compared with the non-machined surface. This result was attributed to the formation of the bioceramic oxides on the machined surface. Additionally, the in vitro biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated using human osteoblastic cell line MG-63. PMEDMed surface with a micro-, sub-micro-, and nano-structured topography exhibited bioactivity and improved biocompatibility relative to β-Ti surface. Furthermore, PMEDMed surface enabled better adhesion and growth of MG-63 when compared with the non-machined substrate.

  5. Interfacial thermodynamics of confined water near molecularly rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Jeetain; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of nanoscopic roughness on the interfacial free energy of water confined between solid surfaces. SPC/E water is simulated in confinement between two infinite planar surfaces that differ in their physical topology: one is smooth and the other one is physically rough on a nanometer length scale. The two thermodynamic ensembles considered, with constant pressure either normal or parallel to the walls, correspond to different experimental conditions. We find that molecular-scale surface roughness significantly increases the solid-liquid interfacial free energy compared to the smooth surface. For our surfaces with a water-wall interaction energy minimum of −1.2 kcal/mol, we observe a transition from a hydrophilic surface to a hydrophobic surface at a roughness amplitude of about 3 Å and a wave length of 11.6 Å, with the interfacial free energy changing sign from negative to positive. In agreement with previous studies of water near hydrophobic surfaces, we find an increase in the isothermal compressibility of water with increasing surface roughness. Interestingly, average measures of the water density and hydrogen-bond number do not contain distinct signatures of increased hydrophobicity. In contrast, a local analysis indicates transient dewetting of water in the valleys of the rough surface, together with a significant loss of hydrogen bonds, and a change in the dipole orientation toward the surface. These microscopic changes in the density, hydrogen bonding, and water orientation contribute to the large increase in the interfacial free energy, and the change from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic character of the surface. PMID:21043431

  6. Control of interfacial chemistry and mechanical properties in metal/ceramic composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin-Fu

    1994-12-31

    Evaluation of the mechanical properties of metal/ceramic interfaces (Ti/AI2O3) was accomplished by using four-point bending tests, nanoindentation tests and fiber pushout tests. At first, the interfacial fracture energy of composites with different applied bonding temperatures from 700 C to 1000 C and thickness of the metal interlayers were measured by four-point bending tests. The mixed mode interfacial fracture energy of the Ti/Al2O3 interface was found to increase with increasing bonding temperatures up to 950 C. There is increasing interdiffusion of the constituent atoms across the interfaces with increasing temperature as verified by X-ray mapping. Thus, a stronger chemical bond forms between the Ti and the Al2O3. Above this temperature, the interfacial fracture energy drops due to the formation of a continuous brittle intermetallic compound (Ti3Al) at the Ti/Al2O3 interface. Modification of the interface was achieved with a diffusion barrier consisting of a refractory metal and Y2O3 duplex coating prepared by r.f. sputtering methods. The diffusion barrier significantly reduces the diffusion of the constituent atoms and prevents the formation of a continuous Ti3Al reaction layer, thus maintaining the chemical integrity and stability at the Ti/Al2O3 interface. The interfacial fracture energy can be further reduced by providing thinner Ti interlayers. The contribution of the energy dissipation process to the interfacial fracture energy is due to plastic energy absorption in the Ti interlayer during the fracture process. The interfacial shear strength, interfacial frictional stress and mode II interfacial fracture energy of the fiber composites were obtained by performing the fiber pushout tests. Using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), the surface roughness and texture of the three different Al2O3 fibers were evaluated. Incorporation of the experimental data and the theory gives the calculated frictional coefficient to be 0.35.

  7. Controlled intermittent interfacial bond concept for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, T. U.; Atkins, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Concept will enhance fracture resistance of high-strength filamentary composite without degrading its tensile strength or elastic modulus. Concept provides more economical composite systems, tailored for specific applications, and composite materials with mechanical properties, such as tensile strength, fracture strain, and fracture toughness, that can be optimized.

  8. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Interfacial Bonding Efficiency Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Jiang, Hao

    2015-04-30

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of spent nuclear fuel (SNF, also known as “used nuclear fuel” [UNF]) integrity under simulated transportation environments using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot-cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in August 2013. Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmark tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. The clad of the HBR fuels was made of Zircaloy-4. Testing was continued in fiscal year (FY) 2014 using Department of Energy (DOE) funds. Additional CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods; two specimens failed, and one specimen was tested to over 2.23 × 107 cycles without failing. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of the SNF rods in terms of (1) the curvature amplitude and (2) the maximum absolute of curvature extremes. The maximum extremes are significant because they signify the maximum tensile stress for the outer fiber of the bending rod. CIRFT testing has also addressed a large variation in hydrogen content on the HBR rods. While the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods, the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained at each load range tested. In FY 15, eleven SNF rod segments from the Limerick BWR were tested using the ORNL CIRFT equipment; one test under static conditions and ten tests under dynamic loading conditions. Under static unidirectional loading, a moment of 85 N·m was obtained at a maximum curvature of 4.0 m-1. The specimen did not show any sign of failure during three repeated loading cycles to a similar maximum curvature. Ten cyclic tests were conducted with amplitudes varying from 15.2 to 7.1 N·m. Failure was observed in nine of the tested rod specimens. The cycles-to-failure ranged from 1.22 × 105 to 4.70 × 106, and the amplitudes varied from 15.2 to 7.6 N·m. The measurements at the interrupts indicated a range of flexural rigidity from 30 to 50 N·m2. Online monitoring revealed that the flexural rigidity was slightly lower due to the higher loading, from 25 to 42 N·m2. Generally, no substantial change of rigidity was observed based on the online monitoring during the cyclic fatigue testing process. Overall, the decreasing trend of sample lifetime with increasing amplitude is well defined.

  9. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  10. Modeling and characterization of interfacial adhesion and fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qizhou

    2000-09-01

    The loss of interfacial adhesion is mostly seen in the failure of polymer adhesive joints. In addition to the intrinsic physical attraction across the interface, the interfacial adhesion strength is believed to highly depend on a number of factors, such as adhesive chemistry/structure, surface topology, fracture pattern, thermal and elastic mismatch across the interface. The fracture failure of an adhesive joint involves basically three aspects, namely, the intrinsic interfacial strength, the driving force for fracture and other energy dissipation. One may define the intrinsic interfacial strength as the maximum value of the intrinsic interfacial adhesion. The total work done by external forces to the component that contains the interface is partitioned into two parts. The first part is consumed by all other energy dissipation mechanisms (plasticity, heat generation, viscosity, etc.). The second part is used to debond the interface. This amount should equal to the intrinsic adhesion of the interface according to the laws of conservation of energy. It is clear that in order to understand the fundamental physics of adhesive joint failure, one must be able to characterize the intrinsic interfacial adhesion and be able to identify all the major energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the debonding process. In this study, both physical and chemical adhesion mechanisms were investigated for an aluminum-epoxy interface. The physical bonding energy was estimated by computing the Van de Waals forces across the interface. A hydration model was proposed and the associated chemical bonding energy was calculated through molecular simulations. Other energy dissipation mechanisms such as plasticity and thermal residual stresses were also identified and investigated for several four-point bend specimens. In particular, a micromechanics based model was developed to estimate the adhesion enhancement due to surface roughness. It is found that for this Al-epoxy system the major

  11. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-10-24

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm{sup −3} respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm{sup −1}, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  12. Bifunctional bioceramics stimulating osteogenic differentiation of a gingival fibroblast and inhibiting plaque biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ya; Wang, Zhejun; Wang, Jiao; Zhou, Yinghong; Chen, Hui; Wu, Chengtie; Haapasalo, Markus

    2016-04-22

    Gingival recession is a common clinical problem that results in esthetic deficiencies and poor plaque control and predominantly occurs in aged patients. In order to restore the cervical region, ideal biomaterials should possess the ability to stimulate proliferation and osteogenesis/cementogenesis of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and have a strong antibiofilm effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactions of HGF and oral multispecies biofilms with Ca, Mg and Si-containing bredigite (BRT, Ca7MgSi4O16) bioceramics. BRT extract induced osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation of HGF and its inhibition of plaque biofilm formation were systematically studied. BRT extract in concentrations lower than <200 mg mL(-1) presented high biocompatibility to HGF cells in 3 days. Ion extracts from BRT also stimulated a series of bone-related gene and protein expressions in HGF cells. Furthermore, BRT extract significantly inhibited oral multispecies plaque biofilm growth on its surface and contributed to over 30% bacterial cell death without additional antibacterial agents in two weeks. A planktonic killing test showed that BRT suppressed 98% plaque bacterial growth compared to blank control in 3 days. The results also revealed that BRT extract has an osteostimulation effect on HGF. The suppression effect on plaque biofilms suggested that BRT might be used as a bioactive material for cervical restoration and that the synergistic effect of bioactive ions, such as Ca, Mg and Si ions, played an important role in the design and construction of bifunctional biomaterials in combination with tissue regeneration and antibiofilm activity. PMID:26806408

  13. Marginal Adaptation of New Bioceramic Materials and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Nekoofar, Mohmmad Hossein; Ashoftehyazdi, Kazem; Zahraee, Shohreh; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the marginal adaptation of new bioceramic materials, EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM putty and ERRM paste), to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and AH-26 sealer. The roots were resected 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities were then prepared with an ultrasonic retrotip. The specimens were divided into three groups (n=12) and filled with MTA, ERRM putty or ERRM paste. Epoxy resin replicas from the resected root-end surfaces and longitudinally sectioned roots were fabricated. The gaps at the material/dentin interface were measured using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transversal, longitudinal, and overall gap sizes were measured for each specimen. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: In transversal sections, no significant difference was found between MTA, ERRM putty and ERRM paste (P=0.31). However, in longitudinal sections, larger gaps were evident between ERRM paste and dentinal walls compared to MTA and ERRM putty (P=0.002 and P=0.033, respectively). Considering the overall gap size values, the difference between three tested materials was not statistically significant (P=0.17). Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, the marginal adaptation of ERRM paste and putty was comparable to that of MTA. However, ERRM putty might be more suitable for filling the root-end cavities because of its superior adaptation compared to ERRM paste in longitudinal sections. PMID:24688585

  14. Measurement of surface and interfacial tension using pendant drop tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joseph D; Neeson, Michael J; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2015-09-15

    Pendant drop tensiometry offers a simple and elegant solution to determining surface and interfacial tension - a central parameter in many colloidal systems including emulsions, foams and wetting phenomena. The technique involves the acquisition of a silhouette of an axisymmetric fluid droplet, and iterative fitting of the Young-Laplace equation that balances gravitational deformation of the drop with the restorative interfacial tension. Since the advent of high-quality digital cameras and desktop computers, this process has been automated with high speed and precision. However, despite its beguiling simplicity, there are complications and limitations that accompany pendant drop tensiometry connected with both Bond number (the balance between interfacial tension and gravitational forces) and drop volume. Here, we discuss the process involved with going from a captured experimental image to a fitted interfacial tension value, highlighting pertinent features and limitations along the way. We introduce a new parameter, the Worthington number, Wo, to characterise the measurement precision. A fully functional, open-source acquisition and fitting software is provided to enable the reader to test and develop the technique further. PMID:26037272

  15. Identifying Mechanisms of Interfacial Dynamics Using Single-Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    The “soft” (i.e. non-covalent) interactions between molecules and surfaces are complex and highly-varied (e.g. hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, ionic) often leading to heterogeneous interfacial behavior. Heterogeneity can arise either from spatial variation of the surface/interface itself or from molecular configurations (i.e. conformation, orientation, aggregation state, etc.). By observing adsorption, diffusion, and desorption of individual fluorescent molecules, single-molecule tracking can characterize these types of heterogeneous interfacial behavior in ways that are inaccessible to traditional ensemble-averaged methods. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity or emission wavelength (in resonance energy transfer experiments) can be used to simultaneously track molecular configuration and directly relate this to the resulting interfacial mobility or affinity. In this feature article, we review recent advances involving the use of single-molecule tracking to characterize heterogeneous molecule-surface interactions including: multiple modes of diffusion and desorption associated with both internal and external molecular configuration, Arrhenius activated interfacial transport, spatially dependent interactions, and many more. PMID:22716995

  16. Effect of bioceramic functional groups on drug binding and release kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Christopher

    Bioceramics have been studied extensively as drug delivery systems (DDS). Those studies have aimed to tailor the drug binding and release kinetics to successfully treat infections and other diseases. This research suggests that the drug binding and release kinetics are predominantly driven by the functional groups available on the surface of a bioceramic. The goal of the present study is to explain the role of silicate and phosphate functional groups in drug binding to and release kinetics from bioceramics. alpha-cristobalite (Cris; SiO2) particles (90-150 microm) were prepared and doped with 0 microg (P-0), 39.1 microg (P-39.1), 78.2 microg (P-78.2), 165.5 microg (P-165.5) or 331 microg (P-331) of P 2O5 per gram Cris, using 85% orthophosphoric (H3PO 4) acid and thermal treatment. The material structure was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Rietveld Refinement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with Gaussian fitting. XRD demonstrated an increase from sample P-0 (170.5373 A3) to P-331 (170.6466 A 3) in the unit cell volume as the P2O5 concentration increased in the material confirming phosphate silicate substitution in Cris. Moreover, FTIR showed the characteristic bands of phosphate functional groups of nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending, P-O-P stretching, P-O-P bending, P=O stretching, and P-O-H bending in doped Cris indicating phosphate incorporation in the silicate structure. Furthermore, FTIR showed that the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band around 557.6 cm-1 and P=O stretching band around 1343.9 cm-1 increased in area for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 3.5 to 10.5 and from 10.1 to 22.4, respectively due to phosphate doping. In conjunction with the increase of the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band and P=O stretching band, a decrease in area of the O-Si-O bending bands around 488.1 and 629.8 cm-1 was noticed for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 5 to 2 and from 11.8 to 5.4, respectively. Furthermore, Cris samples (200 mg, n=5 for each sample) were immersed separately in

  17. Effect of bioceramic functional groups on drug binding and release kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Christopher

    Bioceramics have been studied extensively as drug delivery systems (DDS). Those studies have aimed to tailor the drug binding and release kinetics to successfully treat infections and other diseases. This research suggests that the drug binding and release kinetics are predominantly driven by the functional groups available on the surface of a bioceramic. The goal of the present study is to explain the role of silicate and phosphate functional groups in drug binding to and release kinetics from bioceramics. alpha-cristobalite (Cris; SiO2) particles (90-150 microm) were prepared and doped with 0 microg (P-0), 39.1 microg (P-39.1), 78.2 microg (P-78.2), 165.5 microg (P-165.5) or 331 microg (P-331) of P 2O5 per gram Cris, using 85% orthophosphoric (H3PO 4) acid and thermal treatment. The material structure was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Rietveld Refinement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with Gaussian fitting. XRD demonstrated an increase from sample P-0 (170.5373 A3) to P-331 (170.6466 A 3) in the unit cell volume as the P2O5 concentration increased in the material confirming phosphate silicate substitution in Cris. Moreover, FTIR showed the characteristic bands of phosphate functional groups of nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending, P-O-P stretching, P-O-P bending, P=O stretching, and P-O-H bending in doped Cris indicating phosphate incorporation in the silicate structure. Furthermore, FTIR showed that the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band around 557.6 cm-1 and P=O stretching band around 1343.9 cm-1 increased in area for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 3.5 to 10.5 and from 10.1 to 22.4, respectively due to phosphate doping. In conjunction with the increase of the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band and P=O stretching band, a decrease in area of the O-Si-O bending bands around 488.1 and 629.8 cm-1 was noticed for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 5 to 2 and from 11.8 to 5.4, respectively. Furthermore, Cris samples (200 mg, n=5 for each sample) were immersed separately in

  18. Partial Pulpotomy of Immature Teeth with Apical Periodontitis using Bioceramics and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Cheng Fei

    2016-06-01

    Pulpal necrosis of an immature permanent tooth with an open apex poses a challenge for the clinician. The conventional apexification technique using calcium hydroxide has yielded short-term success, but this technique has inevitable shortcomings. Hence, this case series aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using bioceramics (iRoot BP) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) for partial pulpotomies. Three boys aged 9 to 11 years old presented with partial pulp necrosis and symptomatic apical periodontitis of the mandibular right and left second premolar. The involved teeth were treated with a partial pulpotomy using either iRoot BP (case 1 and 2) or MTA (case 3). At the 8-month follow-up, no abnormal clinical signs or symptoms were observed. Periapical radiographs revealed a significant reduction in periapical radiolucency, a marked increase in the root canal wall thickness and ongoing closure of the apical opening. The bioceramic material (iRoot BP) and MTA both produced successful outcomes in the partial pulpotomy of immature teeth with partial pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis. However, iRoot BP was superior in terms of ease of clinical application, and would therefore be a better treatment alternative than MTA. PMID:27379350

  19. Application of nanoindentation testing to study of the interfacial transition zone in steel fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaohui Jacobsen, Stefan; He Jianying; Zhang Zhiliang; Lee, Siaw Foon; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2009-08-15

    The characteristics of the profiles of elastic modulus and hardness of the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zones in steel fiber reinforced mortars have been investigated by using nanoindentation and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), where two sets of parameters, i.e. water/binder ratio and content of silica fume were considered. Different interfacial bond conditions in the interfacial transition zones (ITZ) are discussed. For sample without silica fume, efficient interfacial bonds across the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfaces are shown in low water/binder ratio mortar; while in high water/binder ratio mortar, due to the discontinuous bleeding voids underneath the fiber, the fiber-matrix bond is not very good. On the other hand, for sample with silica fume, the addition of 10% silica fume leads to no distinct presence of weak ITZ in the steel fiber-matrix interface; but the effect of the silica fume on the steel fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zone is not obvious due to voids in the vicinity of steel fiber.

  20. Bioactive bredigite coating with improved bonding strength, rapid apatite mineralization and excellent cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Yi, Deliang; Wu, Chengtie; Ma, Bing; Ji, Heng; Zheng, Xuebin; Chang, Jiang

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that bredigite (Ca7MgSi4O16) bioceramics possessed excellent biocompatibility, apatite-mineralization ability and mechanical properties. In this paper, the bredigite coating on Ti-6Al-4 V substrate was prepared by plasma spraying technique. The main compositions of the coating were bredigite crystal phase with small parts of amorphous phases. The bonding strength of the coating to Ti-6Al-4 V substrate reached 49.8 MPa, which was significantly higher than that of hydroxyapatite coating and other silicate-based bioceramic coatings prepared by same method. After immersed in simulated body fluid for 2 days, a distinct apatite layer was deposited on the surface of bredigite coating, indicating that the prepared bredigite coating has excellent apatite-mineralization ability. The prepared bredigite coating supported the attachment and proliferation of rabbit bone marrow stem cells. The proliferation level of bone marrow stem cells was significantly higher than that on the hydroxyapatite coating. Our further study showed that the released SiO4 (4-) and Mg(2+) ions from bredigite coating as well as the formed nano-apatite layer on the coating surface might mainly contribute to the improvement of cell proliferation. The results indicated that the bredigite coating may be applied on orthopedic implants due to its excellent bonding strength, apatite mineralization and cytocompatibility. PMID:24131918

  1. Fiber reinforced solids possessing great fracture toughness: The role of interfacial strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, A. G.

    1974-01-01

    The high tensile strength characteristic of strong interfacial filament/matrix bonding can be combined with the high fracture toughness of weak interfacial bonding, when the filaments are arranged to have alternate sections of high and low shear stress (and low and high toughness). Such weak and strong areas can be achieved by appropriate intermittent coating of the fibers. An analysis is presented for toughness and strength which demonstrates, in broad terms, the effects of varying the coating parameters of concern. Results show that the toughness of interfaces is an important parameter, differences in which may not be shown up in terms of interfacial strength. Some observations are made upon methods of measuring the components of toughness in composites.

  2. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  3. Institutional Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, M. June

    Institutional bonding was examined at a public, urban commuter college with exceptionally high attrition and visibly low morale. Changes in bonding and attrition were measured 6 years after a 2-year effort to develop school identity and student feelings of membership. It was found that a simple index of campus morale is provided by level of…

  4. Promotion of Dental Pulp Cell Migration and Pulp Repair by a Bioceramic Putty Involving FGFR-mediated Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Zhu, L X; Cheng, X; Lin, Y; Yan, P; Peng, B

    2015-06-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate is the currently recommended material of choice for clinical pulp repair despite several disadvantages, including handling inconvenience. Little is known about the signaling mechanisms involved in bioceramic-mediated dental pulp repair-particularly, dental pulp cell (DPC) migration. This study evaluated the effects of iRoot BP Plus, a novel ready-to-use nanoparticulate bioceramic putty, on DPC migration in vitro and pulp repair in vivo, focusing on possible involvement of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-related signaling, including mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt pathways. Treatment with iRoot BP Plus extracts enhanced horizontal and vertical migration of DPCs, which was comparable with the effects induced by mineral trioxide aggregate extracts. The DPCs exposed to iRoot BP Plus extracts demonstrated no evident apoptosis. Importantly, treatment with iRoot BP Plus extracts resulted in rapid activation of FGFR, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Akt signaling in DPCs. Confocal immunofluorescence staining revealed that iRoot BP Plus stimulated focal adhesion formation and stress fiber assembly in DPCs, in addition to upregulating the expression of focal adhesion molecules, including p-focal adhesion kinase, p-paxillin, and vinculin. Moreover, activation of FGFR, ERK, JNK, and Akt were found to mediate the upregulated expression of focal adhesion molecules, stress fiber assembly, and enhanced DPC migration induced by iRoot BP Plus. Consistent with the in vitro results, we observed induction of homogeneous dentin bridge formation and expression of p-focal adhesion kinase, p-FGFR, p-ERK 1/2, p-JNK, and p-Akt near injury sites by iRoot BP Plus in an in vivo pulp repair model. These data demonstrate that iRoot BP Plus can promote DPC migration and pulp repair involving the FGFR-mediated ERK 1/2, JNK, and Akt pathways. These findings provide

  5. Investigation of interfacial fracture behavior on injection molded parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Matthieu; Ausias, Gilles; Kuehnert, Ines

    2016-03-01

    In this study the interfacial morphology of different polymers joined by various assembly injection molding (AIM) technologies were discussed. Melt streams were injected successively using tools with core-back or rotation techniques. To compare bulk specimen strength and weld line strength, the fracture behavior of different specimen scales and thin sections were investigated. An in-situ SEM tensile test and a new thin section testing device which is used in polarized (transmitted) light microscopy were used to observe specimen failure. The effects of processing on spherulitic structures were linked to bonding strength and mechanical properties.

  6. Fiber pushout and interfacial shear in metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, Donald A.; Hellmann, John R.; Kallas, M. N.

    1993-01-01

    Recent thin-slice pushout tests have suggested that MMC matrix-fiber interface failure processes depend not only on such intrinsic factors as bond strength and toughness, and matrix plasticity, but such extrinsic factors as specimen configuration, thermally-induced residual stresses, and the mechanics associated with a given test. After detailing the contrasts in fiber-pullout and fiber-pushout mechanics, attention is given to selected aspects of thin-slice fiber pushout behavior illustrative of the physical nature of interfacial shear response and its dependence on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

  7. Mechanical and biological properties of the micro-/nano-grain functionally graded hydroxyapatite bioceramics for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changchun; Deng, Congying; Chen, Xuening; Zhao, Xiufen; Chen, Ying; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) open the promising approach for bone tissue repair. In this study, a novel functionally graded hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic with micrograin and nanograin structure was fabricated. Its mechanical properties were tailored by composition of micrograin and nanograin. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that the graded HA ceramics had similar mechanical property compared to natural bones. Their cytocompatibility was evaluated via fluorescent microscopy and MTT colorimetric assay. The viability and proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on ceramics indicated that this functionally graded HA ceramic had better cytocompatibility than conventional HA ceramic. This study demonstrated that functionally graded HA ceramics create suitable structures to satisfy both the mechanical and biological requirements of bone tissues. PMID:25910818

  8. New Bio-Ceramization Processes Applied to Vegetable Hierarchical Structures for Bone Regeneration: An Experimental Model in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Tampieri, Anna; Cabezas-Rodríguez, Rafael; Di Martino, Alessandro; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Lelli, Marco; Martínez-Fernández, Julian; Martini, Lucia; Ramírez-Rico, Joaquin; Salamanna, Francesca; Sandri, Monica; Sprio, Simone; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    Bone loss is still a major problem in orthopedics. The purpose of this experimental study is to evaluate the safety and regenerative potential of a new scaffold based on a bio-ceramization process for bone regeneration in long diaphyseal defects in a sheep model. The scaffold was obtained by transformation of wood pieces into porous biomorphic silicon carbide (BioSiC®). The process enabled the maintenance of the original wood microstructure, thus exhibiting hierarchically organized porosity and high mechanical strength. To improve cell adhesion and osseointegration, the external surface of the hollow cylinder was made more bioactive by electrodeposition of a uniform layer of collagen fibers that were mineralized with biomimetic hydroxyapatite, whereas the internal part was filled with a bio-hybrid HA/collagen composite. The final scaffold was then implanted in the metatarsus of 15 crossbred (Merinos-Sarda) adult sheep, divided into 3 groups: scaffold alone, scaffold with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) augmentation, and scaffold with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) added during implantation. Radiological analysis was performed at 4, 8, 12 weeks, and 4 months, when animals were sacrificed for the final radiological, histological, and histomorphometric evaluation. In all tested treatments, these analyses highlighted the presence of newly formed bone at the bone scaffolds' interface. Although a lack of substantial effect of PRP was demonstrated, the scaffold+BMSC augmentation showed the highest value of bone-to-implant contact and new bone growth inside the scaffold. The findings of this study suggest the potential of bio-ceramization processes applied to vegetable hierarchical structures for the production of wood-derived bone scaffolds, and document a suitable augmentation procedure in enhancing bone regeneration, particularly when combined with BMSCs. PMID:24099033

  9. Silicate bioceramics enhanced vascularization and osteogenesis through stimulating interactions between endothelia cells and bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Xue, Ke; Kong, Ni; Liu, Kai; Chang, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    The facts that biomaterials affect the behavior of single type of cells have been widely accepted. However, the effects of biomaterials on cell-cell interactions have rarely been reported. Bone tissue engineering involves osteoblastic cells (OCs), endothelial cells (ECs) and the interactions between OCs and ECs. It has been reported that silicate biomaterials can stimulate osteogenic differentiation of OCs and vascularization of ECs. However, the effects of silicate biomaterials on the interactions between ECs and OCs during vascularization and osteogenesis have not been reported, which are critical for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) bioceramics on interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and on stimulation of vascularization and osteogenesis in vivo through combining co-cultures with CS containing scaffolds. Specifically, the effects of CS on the angiogenic growth factor VEGF, osteogenic growth factor BMP-2 and the cross-talks between VEGF and BMP-2 in the co-culture system were elucidated. Results showed that CS stimulated co-cultured HBMSCs (co-HBMSCs) to express VEGF and the VEGF activated its receptor KDR on co-cultured HUVECs (co-HUVECs), which was also up-regulated by CS. Then, BMP-2 and nitric oxide expression from the co-HUVECs were stimulated by CS and the former stimulated osteogenic differentiation of co-HBMSCs while the latter stimulated vascularization of co-HVUECs. Finally, the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/CS composite scaffolds with the co-cultured HBMSCs and HUVECs significantly enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, which indicates that it is a promising way to enhance bone regeneration by combining scaffolds containing silicate bioceramics and co-cultures of ECs and OCs. PMID:24486216

  10. Elastocapillary-mediated interfacial assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Particles confined to an interface are present in a large number of industrial applications and ubiquitous in cellular biophysics. Interactions mediated by the interface, such as capillary effects in the presence of surface tension, give rise to rafts and aggregates whose structure is ultimately determined by geometric characteristics of these adsorbed particles. A common strategy for assembling interfacial structures relies on exploiting these interactions by tuning particle anisotropy, either by constructing rigid particles with heterogeneous wetting properties or fabricating particles that have a naturally anisotropic shape. Less explored, however, is the scenario where the interface causes the particles to deform. In this talk I will discuss the implications for interfacial assembly using elastocapillary-mediated interactions. The competition between surface energy and elasticity can wrinkle and buckle adsorbed soft particles, leading to complicated (but programmable) aggregates.