Sample records for biofilms microbial life

  1. Biofilms: Microbial Life on Surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodney M. Donlan

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms attach to surfaces and develop biofilms. Biofilm-associated cells can be differentiated from their suspended counterparts by generation of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix, reduced growth rates, and the up- and down-regulation of specific genes. Attachment is a complex pro- cess regulated by diverse characteristics of the growth medium, substratum, and cell surface. An estab- lished biofilm structure comprises

  2. Life after death: the critical role of extracellular DNA in microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Jakubovics, N S; Shields, R C; Rajarajan, N; Burgess, J G

    2013-12-01

    The death and lysis of microbial cells leads to the release of cytoplasmic contents, many of which are rapidly degraded by enzymes. However, some macromolecules survive intact and find new functions in the extracellular environment. There is now strong evidence that DNA released from cells during lysis, or sometimes by active secretion, becomes a key component of the macromolecular scaffold in many different biofilms. Enzymatic degradation of extracellular DNA can weaken the biofilm structure and release microbial cells from the surface. Many bacteria produce extracellular deoxyribonuclease (DNase) enzymes that are apparently tightly regulated to avoid excessive degradation of the biofilm matrix. Interfering with these control mechanisms, or adding exogenous DNases, could prove a potent strategy for controlling biofilm growth. PMID:23848166

  3. Microbial biofilms on building stone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Hoppert; A. Kemmling; M. Kämper

    2003-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are ubiquitous in aquatic and terrestric ecosystems as well as on man-made material. The organisms take part in biogenic weathering on natural rocks as well as on building stone [1]. Though the presence of biofilms on stone monuments exposed to the outdoor environment is obvious, thin films also occur on monuments under controllable indoor environment conditions. Numerous biofilm

  4. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  5. Manipulatiaon of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Palmer, R.J.; Smith, C.A.; Whitaker, K.W.; White, D.C.; Zinn, M.; kirkegaard, R.

    1998-08-09

    The Biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms by generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desquamation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in the distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  6. Posttranslational modification and sequence variation of redox-active proteins correlate with biofilm life cycle in natural microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley

    2010-01-01

    Characterizing proteins recovered from natural microbial communities affords the opportunity to correlate protein expression and modification with environmental factors, including species composition and successional stage. Proteogenomic and biochemical studies of pellicle biofilms from subsurface acid mine drainage streams have shown abundant cytochromes from the dominant organism, Leptospirillum Group II. These cytochromes are proposed to be key proteins in aerobic Fe(II) oxidation, the dominant mode of cellular energy generation by the biofilms. In this study, we determined that posttranslational modification and expression of amino-acid sequence variants change as a function of biofilm maturation. For Cytochrome579 (Cyt579), the most abundant cytochrome in the biofilms, late developmental-stage biofilms differed from early-stage biofilms in N-terminal truncations and decreased redox potentials. Expression of sequence variants of two monoheme c-type cytochromes also depended on biofilm development. For Cyt572, an abundant membrane-bound cytochrome, the expression of multiple sequence variants was observed in both early and late developmental-stage biofilms; however, redox potentials of Cyt572 from these different sources did not vary significantly. These cytochrome analyses show a complex response of the Leptospirillum Group II electron transport chain to growth within a microbial community and illustrate the power of multiple proteomics techniques to define biochemistry in natural systems.

  7. Microbial biofilms and gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    von Rosenvinge, Erik C.; O’May, Graeme A.; Macfarlane, Sandra; Macfarlane, George T.; Shirtliff, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of bacteria live not planktonically, but as residents of sessile biofilm communities. Such populations have been defined as ‘matrix-enclosed microbial accretions, which adhere to both biological and nonbiological surfaces’. Bacterial formation of biofilm is implicated in many chronic disease states. Growth in this mode promotes survival by increasing community recalcitrance to clearance by host immune effectors and therapeutic antimicrobials. The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract encompasses a plethora of nutritional and physicochemical environments, many of which are ideal for biofilm formation and survival. However, little is known of the nature, function, and clinical relevance of these communities. This review summarizes current knowledge of the composition and association with health and disease of biofilm communities in the GI tract. PMID:23620117

  8. Voice prostheses, microbial colonization and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Matthias; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

    2015-01-01

    Total laryngectomy is performed in advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer stages and results in reduced quality of life due to the loss of voice and smell, permanent tracheostoma and occasionally dysphagia. Therefore, successful voice rehabilitation is highly beneficial for the patients' quality of life after surgery. Over the past decades, voice prostheses have evolved to the gold standard in rehabilitation and allow faster and superior voicing results after laryngectomy compared to esophageal speech. Polyspecies biofilm formation has become the limiting factor for device lifetimes and causes prosthesis dysfunction, leakage and in consequence pneumonia, if not replaced immediately. Although major improvements in prosthesis design have been made and scientific insight in the complexity of biofilm evolution and material interaction progresses, the microbial colonization continues to restrict device lifetimes, causing patient discomfort and elevated health costs. However, present scientific findings and advances in technology yield promising future approaches to improve the situation for laryngectomized patients. PMID:25366225

  9. Molecular Survey of Concrete Biofilm Microbial Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although several studies have shown that bacteria can deteriorate concrete structures, there is very little information on the composition of concrete microbial communities. To this end, we studied different microbial communities associated with concrete biofilms using 16S rRNA g...

  10. Microbial biofilms in intertidal systems: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decho, Alan W.

    2000-07-01

    Intertidal marine systems are highly dynamic systems which are characterized by periodic fluctuations in environmental parameters. Microbial processes play critical roles in the remineralization of nutrients and primary production in intertidal systems. Many of the geochemical and biological processes which are mediated by microorganisms occur within microenvironments which can be measured over micrometer spatial scales. These processes are localized by cells within a matrix of extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), collectively called a "microbial biofilm". Recent examinations of intertidal systems by a range of investigators using new approaches show an abundance of biofilm communities. The purpose of this overview is to examine recent information concerning the roles of microbial biofilms in intertidal systems. The microbial biofilm is a common adaptation of natural bacteria and other microorganisms. In the fluctuating environments of intertidal systems, biofilms form protective microenvironments and may structure a range of microbial processes. The EPS matrix of biofilm forms sticky coatings on individual sediment particles and detrital surfaces, which act as a stabilizing anchor to buffer cells and their extracellular processes during the frequent physical stresses (e.g., changes in salinity and temperature, UV irradiation, dessication). EPS is an operational definition designed to encompass a range of large microbially-secreted molecules having widely varying physical and chemical properties, and a range of biological roles. Examinations of EPS using Raman and Fourier-transform infared spectroscopy, and atomic-force microscopy suggest that some EPS gels possess physical and chemical properties which may hasten the development of sharp geochemical gradients, and contribute a protective effect to cells. Biofilm polymers act as a sorptive sponge which binds and concentrates organic molecules and ions close to cells. Concurrently, the EPS appear to localize extracellular enzyme activities of bacteria, and hence contribute to the efficient biomineralization of organics. At larger spatial scales, the copious secretion of specific types of EPS by diatoms on the surfaces of intertidal mudflats may stabilize sediments against resuspension. Biofilms exert important roles in environmental- and public health processes occurring within intertidal systems. The sorptive properties of EPS effectively chelate toxic metals and other contaminants, which then act as an efficient trophic-transfer vehicle for the entry of contaminants into food webs. In the water column, biofilm microenvironments in suspended flocs may form a stabilizing refugia that enhances the survival and propagation of pathogenic (i.e., disease-causing) bacteria entering coastal waters from terrestrial and freshwater sources. The EPS matrix affords microbial cells a tremendous potential for resiliency during periods of stress, and may enhance the overall physiological activities of bacteria. It is emphasized here that the influences of small-scale microbial biofilms must be addressed in understanding larger-scale processes within intertidal systems.

  11. Microbial biofilms in endodontic infections: an update review.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Palazzi, Flavio; Giardino, Luciano; Shalavi, Sousan

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms and microbial aggregates are the common mechanisms for the survival of bacteria in nature. In other words, the ability to form biofilms has been regarded as a virulence factor. Microbial biofilms play an essential role in several infectious diseases such as pulp and periradicular pathosis. The aim of this article was to review the adaptation mechanisms of biofilms, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, factors influencing biofilm formation, mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, models developed to create biofilms, observation techniques of endodontic biofilms, and the effects of root canal irrigants and medicaments as well as lasers on endodontic biofilms. The search was performed from 1982 to December 2010, and was limited to papers in English language. The keywords searched on Medline were "biofilms and endodontics," "biofilms and root canal irrigation," "biofilms and intra-canal medicament," and "biofilms and lasers." The reference section of each article was manually searched to find other suitable sources of information. PMID:23644234

  12. Community Proteomics of a Natural Microbial Biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Rachna J. [University of California, Berkeley; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley; Tyson, Gene W. [University of California, Berkeley; Baker, Brett J. [University of California, Berkeley; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; BlakeII, Robert C. [Xavier University; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley

    2005-06-01

    Using genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods, we evaluated gene expression, identified key activities, and examined partitioning of metabolic functions in a natural acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial biofilm community. We detected 2033 proteins from the five most abundant species in the biofilm, including 48% of the predicted proteins from the dominant biofilm organism, Leptospirillum group II. Proteins involved in protein refolding and response to oxidative stress appeared to be highly expressed, which suggests that damage to biomolecules is a key challenge for survival. We validated and estimated the relative abundance and cellular localization of 357 unique and 215 conserved novel proteins and determined that one abundant novel protein is a cytochrome central to iron oxidation and AMD formation.

  13. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals – clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human) studies, abstracts, review articles. PMID:23633764

  14. Microbial biofilm formation and its consequences for the CELSS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R.

    1994-01-01

    A major goal of the Controlled Ecology Life Support System (CELSS) program is to provide reliable and efficient life support systems for long-duration space flights. A principal focus of the program is on the growth of higher plants in growth chambers. These crops should be grown without the risk of damage from microbial contamination. While it is unlikely that plant pathogens will pose a risk, there are serious hazards associated with microorganisms carried in the nutrient delivery systems and in the atmosphere of the growth chamber. Our experience in surface microbiology showed that colonization of surfaces with microorganisms is extremely rapid even when the inoculum is small. After initial colonization extensive biofilms accumulate on moist surfaces. These microbial films metabolize actively and slough off continuously to the air and water. During plant growth in the CELSS program, microbial biofilms have the potential to foul sensors and to plug nutrient delivery systems. In addition both metabolic products of microbial growth and degradation products of materials being considered for use as nutrient reservoirs and for delivery are likely sources of chemicals known to adversly affect plant growth.

  15. Proteogenomic studies of natural microbial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, R. J.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Thelen, M. P.; Tyson, G. W.; Baker, B. J.; Shah, M.; Blake, R. C.; Hettich, R. L.; Banfield, J. F.

    2005-05-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) forms when rocks rich in pyrite, FeS2, are oxidized upon exposure to air and water. Iron-oxidizing microorganisms accelerate pyrite dissolution by generating ferric iron, an especially effective sulfide oxidant. We have used cultivation-independent methods to study the gene (Tyson et al., 2004) and protein (Ram et al., in review) complements of microbial biofilms from an AMD environment in Richmond, CA. The genomes of the biofilm organisms indicated potential proteins and other small molecules that each organism type can produce. We then used this genome data in combination with 2D LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry to identify proteins within extracellular/periplasmic, soluble, and membrane fractions of the biofilm. This method enabled us to infer the most abundant proteins in each fraction and their general location. In particular, it led us to identify an extracellular/periplasmic cytochrome central to iron oxidation and acid mine drainage, as well as to analyze hypothetical proteins (proteins predicted from the genome with no significant homology to known proteins), some of which are likely to be adaptations by the biofilm organisms for thriving in this unique metal-rich acidic environment.

  16. OpinionMicrobial landscapes: new paths to biofilm research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William T. Sloan; Staffan Kjelleberg; Holger Daims; Ian M. Head; Tom P. Curtis; Leo Eberl; Tom J. Battin

    2007-01-01

    It is the best of times for biofilm research. Systems biology approaches are providing new insights into the genetic regulation of microbial functions, and sophisticated modelling techniques are enabling the prediction of microbial community structures. Yet it is also clear that there is a need for ecological theory to contribute to our understanding of biofilms. Here, we suggest a concept

  17. Spatial & Temporal Geophysical Monitoring of Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have examined the effect of biogenic gases and biomineralization on the acoustic properties of porous media. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves and complex conductivity in sand...

  18. Dynamic Remodeling of Microbial Biofilms by Functionally Distinct Exopolysaccharides

    E-print Network

    Chew, Su Chuen

    Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence ...

  19. A computational model for biofilm-based microbial fuel cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristian Picioreanu; Ian M. Head; Krishna P. Katuri; Mark C. M. van Loosdrecht; Keith Scott

    2007-01-01

    This study describes and evaluates a computational model for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) based on redox mediators with several populations of suspended and attached biofilm microorganisms, and multiple dissolved chemical species. A number of biological, chemical and electrochemical reactions can occur in the bulk liquid, in the biofilm and at the electrode surface. The evolution in time of important MFC

  20. The biofilm ecology of microbial biofouling, biocide resistance and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Science Div.; Kirkegaard, R.D.; Palmer, R.J. Jr.; Flemming, C.A.; Chen, G.; Leung, K.T.; Phiefer, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology; Arrage, A.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology]|[Microbial Insights, Inc., Rockford, TN (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In biotechnological or bioremediation processes it is often the aim to promote biofilm formation, and maintain active, high density biomass. In other situations, biofouling can seriously restrict effective heat transport, membrane processes, and potentate macrofouling with loss of transportation efficiency. In biotechnological or bioremediation processes it is often the aim to promote biofilm formation, and maintain active, high density biomass. In other situations, biofouling can seriously restrict effective heat transport, membrane processes, and potentate macrofouling with loss of transportation efficiency. Heterogeneous distribution of microbes and/or their metabolic activity can promote microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) which is a multibillion dollar problem. Consequently, it is important that biofilm microbial ecology be understood so it can be manipulated rationally. It is usually simple to select organisms that form biofilms by flowing a considerably dilute media over a substratum, and propagating the organisms that attach. To examine the biofilm most expeditiously, the biomass accumulation, desquamation, and metabolic activities need to be monitored on-line and non-destructively. This on-line monitoring becomes even more valuable if the activities can be locally mapped in time and space within the biofilm. Herein the authors describe quantitative measures of microbial biofouling, the ecology of pathogens in drinking water distributions systems, and localization of microbial biofilms and activities with localized MIC.

  1. The biofilm matrix – an immobilized but dynamic microbial environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian W Sutherland

    2001-01-01

    The biofilm matrix is a dynamic environment in which the component microbial cells appear to reach homeostasis and are optimally organized to make use of all available nutrients. The major matrix components are microbial cells, polysaccharides and water, together with excreted cellular products. The matrix therefore shows great microheterogeneity, within which numerous microenvironments can exist. Although exopolysaccharides provide the matrix

  2. Evidence for Microbial Biofilms in Cholesteatomas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Chole; Brian T. Faddis

    2002-01-01

    Background: Sessile bacteria within biofilms are highly resistant to eradication by antimicrobial agents. Previ- ously, we have shown that the most common organisms cultured from experimentally induced cholesteatomas are biofilm formers. Additionally, the keratin \\

  3. A mucosal model to study microbial biofilm development and anti-biofilm therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michele J.; Parks, Patrick J.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are a sessile colony of bacteria which adhere to and persist on surfaces. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms is considered a virulence factor, and in fact is central to the pathogenesis of some organisms. Biofilms are inherently resistant to chemotherapy and host immune responses. Clinically, biofilms are considered a primary cause of a majority of infections, such as otitis media, pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients and endocarditis. However, the vast majority of the data on biofilm formation comes from traditional microtiter-based or flow displacement assays with no consideration given to host factors. These assays, which have been a valuable tool in high-throughput screening for biofilm-related factors, do not mimic a host-pathogen interaction and may contribute to an inappropriate estimation of the role of some factors in clinical biofilm formation. We describe the development of a novel ex vivo model of biofilm formation on a mucosal surface by an important mucosal pathogen, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). This model is being used for the identification of microbial virulence factors important in mucosal biofilm formation and novel anti-biofilm therapies. PMID:23246911

  4. The role of microbial biofilms in prosthetic joint infections.

    PubMed

    Gbejuade, Herbert O; Lovering, Andrew M; Webb, Jason C

    2015-04-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) still remains a significant problem. In line with the forecasted rise in joint replacement procedures, the number of cases of PJI is also anticipated to rise. The formation of biofilm by causative pathogens is central to the occurrence and the recalcitrance of PJI. The subject of microbial biofilms is receiving increasing attention, probably as a result of the wide acknowledgement of the ubiquity of biofilms in the natural, industrial, and clinical contexts, as well as the notorious difficulty in eradicating them. In this review, we discuss the pertinent issues surrounding PJI and the challenges posed by biofilms regarding diagnosis and treatment. In addition, we discuss novel strategies of prevention and treatment of biofilm-related PJI. PMID:25238433

  5. Spatial Organization of Microbial Biofilm Communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Tolker-Nielsen; S. Molin

    2000-01-01

    The application of advanced microscopy and molecular and electrochemical high-resolution methods has provided insights into\\u000a the structural organization and function of biofilm communities. It appears that cellular properties such as growth differentiation,\\u000a chemotaxis, and cell-to-cell signaling enable biofilm communities to organize structurally in response to the external conditions\\u000a and the activities of the different biofilm members. Thereby resource utilization becomes

  6. Conduction-based modeling of the biofilm anode of a microbial fuel cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Kato Marcus; César I. Torres; Bruce E. Rittmann

    2007-01-01

    The biofilm of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) experiences biofilm-related (growth and mass transport) and electrochemical (electron conduction and charger- transfer) processes. We developed a dynamic, one-dimen- sional, multi-species model for the biofilm in three steps. First, we formulated the biofilm on the anode as a ''biofilm anode'' with the following two properties: (1) The biofilm has a conductive solid

  7. Dynamic Remodeling of Microbial Biofilms by Functionally Distinct Exopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A.; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. PMID:25096883

  8. Molecular Survey of Concrete Sewer Biofilm Microbial Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although bacteria are implicated in deteriorating concrete structures, there is very little information on the composition of concrete microbial communities. To this end, we studied different concrete biofilms by performing sequence analysis of 16S rDNA concrete clone libraries. ...

  9. Theoretical Aspects of Antibiotic Diffusion into Microbial Biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PHILIP S. STEWART

    1996-01-01

    Antibiotic penetration into microbial biofilm was investigated theoretically by the solution of mathematical equations describing various combinations of the processes of diffusion, sorption, and reaction. Unsteady material balances on the antibiotic and on a reactive or sorptive biomass constituent, along with associated boundaryandinitialconditions,constitutethemathematicalformulations.Fivecaseswereexamined:diffusion of a noninteracting solute; diffusion of a reversibly sorbing, nonreacting solute; diffusion of an irreversibly sorbing, nonreacting

  10. ORAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES: Biofilms, Interactions, and Genetic Systems1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul E. Kolenbrander

    2000-01-01

    ? Abstract Oral microbial-plaque communities are biofilms composed of numer- ous genetically distinct types of bacteria that live in close juxtaposition on host surfaces. These bacteria communicate through physical interactions called coaggregation and coadhesion, as well as other physiological and metabolic interactions. Streptococci and actinomyces are the major initial colonizers of the tooth surface, and the inter- actions between them

  11. Modelling mechanical characteristics of microbial biofilms by network theory

    PubMed Central

    Ehret, Alexander E.; Böl, Markus

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, we present a constitutive model to describe the mechanical behaviour of microbial biofilms based on classical approaches in the continuum theory of polymer networks. Although the model is particularly developed for the well-studied biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, it could easily be adapted to other biofilms. The basic assumption behind the model is that the network of extracellular polymeric substances can be described as a superposition of worm-like chain networks, each connected by transient junctions of a certain lifetime. Several models that were applied to biofilms previously are included in the presented approach as special cases, and for small shear strains, the governing equations are those of four parallel Maxwell elements. Rheological data given in the literature are very adequately captured by the proposed model, and the simulated response for a series of compression tests at large strains is in good qualitative agreement with reported experimental behaviour. PMID:23034354

  12. A unifying hypothesis for the structure of microbial biofilms based on cellular automaton models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian W. T. Wimpenny; Ric Colasanti

    1997-01-01

    A review of the basic structure of microbial biofilm reveals that at least three conceptual models exist: (i) heterogeneous mosaic biofilm, (ii) penetrated water-channel biofilm and (iii) dense confluent biofilm. When consideration is given to the effects of growth resource, it may be that all three variants are correct but form at widely different substrate concentrations. Experimental research with bacterial

  13. Physicochemical characteristics and microbial community evolution of biofilms during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Huang, Hui; Ding, Li-Li

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate biofilm properties evolution coupled with different ages during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor system. Physicochemical characteristics including adhesion force, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), morphology as well as volatile solid and microbial community were studied. Results showed that the formation and development of biofilms exhibited four stages, including (I) initial attachment and young biofilm formation, (II) biofilms accumulation, (III) biofilm sloughing and updating, and (IV) biofilm maturation. During the whole start-up period, adhesion force was positively and significantly correlated with the contents of EPS, especially the content of polysaccharide. In addition, increased adhesion force and EPS were beneficial for biofilm retention. Gram-negative bacteria mainly including Sphaerotilus, Zoogloea and Haliscomenobacter were predominant in the initial stage. Actinobacteria was beneficial to resist sloughing. Furthermore, filamentous bacteria were dominant in maturation biofilm. PMID:25636169

  14. The spatial organization and microbial community structure of an epilithic biofilm

    E-print Network

    Cutler, Nick A.; Chaput, Dominique L.; Oliver, Anna E.; Viles, Heather A.

    2014-12-15

    Microbial biofilms are common on lithic surfaces, including stone buildings. However, the ecology of these communities is poorly understood. Few studies have focused on the spatial characteristics of lithobiontic biofilms, despite the fact...

  15. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

  16. Life Support Systems Microbial Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monserrate C.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the current microbial challenges of environmental control and life support systems. The contents include: 1) Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) What is it?; 2) A Look Inside the International Space Station (ISS); 3) The Complexity of a Water Recycling System; 4) ISS Microbiology Acceptability Limits; 5) Overview of Current Microbial Challenges; 6) In a Perfect World What we Would like to Have; and 7) The Future.

  17. Microbial genomes: Blueprints for life

    SciTech Connect

    Relman, David A.; Strauss, Evelyn

    2000-12-31

    Complete microbial genome sequences hold the promise of profound new insights into microbial pathogenesis, evolution, diagnostics, and therapeutics. From these insights will come a new foundation for understanding the evolution of single-celled life, as well as the evolution of more complex life forms. This report is an in-depth analysis of scientific issues that provides recommendations and will be widely disseminated to the scientific community, federal agencies, industry and the public.

  18. Microbial Biofilm Growth on Irradiated, Spent Nuclear Fuel Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Frank

    2009-02-01

    A fundamental criticism regarding the potential for microbial influenced corrosion in spent nuclear fuel cladding or storage containers concerns whether the required microorganisms can, in fact, survive radiation fields inherent in these materials. This study was performed to unequivocally answer this critique by addressing the potential for biofilm formation, the precursor to microbial-influenced corrosion, in radiation fields representative of spent nuclear fuel storage environments. This study involved the formation of a microbial biofilm on irradiated spent nuclear fuel cladding within a hot cell environment. This was accomplished by introducing 22 species of bacteria, in nutrient-rich media, to test vessels containing irradiated cladding sections and that was then surrounded by radioactive source material. The overall dose rate exceeded 2 Gy/h gamma/beta radiation with the total dose received by some of the bacteria reaching 5 × 103 Gy. This study provides evidence for the formation of biofilms on spent-fuel materials, and the implication of microbial influenced corrosion in the storage and permanent deposition of spent nuclear fuel in repository environments.

  19. Molecular survey of concrete sewer biofilm microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Santo Domingo, Jorge W; Revetta, Randy P; Iker, Brandon; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Garcia, Jarissa; Sullivan, John; Weast, James

    2011-10-01

    The microbial composition of concrete biofilms within wastewater collection systems was studied using molecular assays. SSU rDNA clone libraries were generated from 16 concrete surfaces of manholes, a combined sewer overflow, and sections of a corroded sewer pipe. Of the 2457 sequences analyzed, ?-, ?-, ?-, and ?-Proteobacteria represented 15%, 22%, 11%, and 4% of the clones, respectively. ?-Proteobacteria (47%) sequences were more abundant in the pipe crown than any of the other concrete surfaces. While 178 to 493 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) were associated with the different concrete samples, only four sequences were shared among the different clone libraries. Bacteria implicated in concrete corrosion were found in the clone libraries while archaea, fungi, and several bacterial groups were also detected using group-specific assays. The results showed that concrete sewer biofilms are more diverse than previously reported. A more comprehensive molecular database will be needed to better study the dynamics of concrete biofilms. PMID:21981064

  20. Spatial & Temporal Geophysical Monitoring of Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. A.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Atekwana, E. A.; Werkema, D. D.; Haugen, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Previous studies have examined the effect of biogenic gases and biomineralization on the acoustic properties of porous media. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves and complex conductivity in sand columns. A control column (non-biostimulated) and a biostimulated column were studied in a 2D acoustic scanning apparatus, and a second set of columns were constructed with Ag-AgCl electrodes for complex conductivity measurements. At the completion of the 29-day experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times for the control column were observed to be relatively uniform over the scanned 2D region. However, the biostimulated sample exhibited a high degree of spatial variability within the column for both the amplitude and arrival times. Furthermore, portions of the sample exhibited increased attenuation (~ 80%) concurrent with an increase in the arrival times, while other portions exhibited decreased attenuation (~ 45%) and decreased arrival time. The acoustic amplitude and arrival times changed significantly in the biostimulated column between Days 5 and 7 of the experiment and are consistent with a peak in the imaginary conductivity (?”) values. The ?” response corresponds to different stages of biofilm development. That is, we interpret the peak ?” with the maximum biofilm thickness and decreasing ?” due to cell death or detachment. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) imaging confirmed microbial cell attachment to sand surfaces in the biostimulated columns, showed apparent differences in the morphology of attached biomass between regions of increased and decreased attenuation, and indicated no mineral precipitation or biomineralization. The heterogeneity in the elastic properties arises from the differences in the morphology and structure of attached biofilms. These results suggest that combining acoustic imaging and complex conductivity techniques can provide a powerful tool for assessing microbial growth or biofilm formation and the associated changes in porous media, such as those that occur during bioremediation and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Furthermore, this study suggests microbial growth and biofilm development can yield a detectable geophysical response without biomineralization effects. Acknowledgments: This material is based in part on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. OCE-0729642, EAR 0722410 (MRI), EAR 0525316, and REU Award # 0552918, and EPA Student Services Contract EP07D000660. LJPN would like to acknowledge support from Geosciences Research Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy (DEFG02-97ER14785 08).

  1. Advances in Microbial Biofilm Prevention on Indwelling Medical Devices with Emphasis on Usage of Acoustic Energy

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Naama; Mandel, Mathilda; Hazan, Zadik; Lavie, Gad

    2009-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are a major impediment to the use of indwelling medical devices, generating device-related infections with high morbidity and mortality. Major efforts directed towards preventing and eradicating the biofilm problem face difficulties because biofilms protect themselves very effectively by producing a polysaccharide coating, reducing biofilm sensitivity to antimicrobial agents. Techniques applied to combating biofilms have been primarily chemical. These have met with partial and limited success rates, leading to current trends of eradicating biofilms through physico-mechanical strategies. Here we review the different approaches that have been developed to control biofilm formation and removal, focusing on the utilization of acoustic energy to achieve these objectives. PMID:22574031

  2. Life Support Systems Microbial Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi C.

    2010-01-01

    Many microbiological studies were performed during the development of the Space Station Water Recovery and Management System from1990-2009. Studies include assessments of: (1) bulk phase (planktonic) microbial population (2) biofilms, (3) microbially influenced corrosion (4) biofouling treatments. This slide presentation summarizes the studies performed to assess the bulk phase microbial community during the Space Station Water Recovery Tests (WRT) from 1990 to 1998. This report provides an overview of some of the microbiological analyses performed during the Space Station WRT program. These tests not only integrated several technologies with the goal of producing water that met NASA s potable water specifications, but also integrated humans, and therefore human flora into the protocols. At the time these tests were performed, not much was known (or published) about the microbial composition of these types of wastewater. It is important to note that design changes to the WRS have been implemented over the years and results discussed in this report might be directly related to test configurations that were not chosen for the final flight configuration. Results microbiological analyses performed Conclusion from the during the WRT showed that it was possible to recycle water from different sources, including urine, and produce water that can exceed the quality of municipally produced water.

  3. Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

  4. INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF MICROBIAL GROWTH AND BIOFILM FORMATION ON SEISMIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous laboratory investigations have demonstrated that the seismic methods are sensitive to microbially-induced changes in porous media through the generation of biogenic gases and biomineralization. The seismic signatures associated with microbial growth and biofilm formation...

  5. Engineered bidirectional communication mediates a consensus in a microbial biofilm consortium

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Frances H.

    Engineered bidirectional communication mediates a consensus in a microbial biofilm consortium Katie, including in a biofilm, where it sustains its response for several days. biological engineering cellular biofilms, and vast reaches of the earth are coated in these living films. In many cases, the microorganisms

  6. Impact of Initial Biofilm Growth on the Anode Impedance of Microbial Fuel Cells

    E-print Network

    Mench, Matthew M.

    ARTICLE Impact of Initial Biofilm Growth on the Anode Impedance of Microbial Fuel Cells Ramaraja P initial biofilm growth in an acetate-fed, two-chamber MFC system with ferricyanide in the cathode. EIS of the anode biofilm, the anode polar- ization resistance was found to decrease by over 70% at open circuit

  7. Microbial biofilms: impact on the pathogenesis of periodontitis, cystic fibrosis, chronic wounds and medical device-related infections.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Mara Madalina; Holban, Alina Maria; Giurcaneanu, Calin; Popa, Liliana Gabriela; Oanea, Raluca Mihaela; Lazar, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Popa, Marcela; Popa, Mircea Ioan

    2015-01-01

    The majority of chronic infections are associated with mono- or polymicrobial biofilms, having a significant impact on the patients' quality of life and survival rates. Although the use of medical devices revolutionized health care services and significantly improved patient outcomes, it also led to complications associated with biofilms and to the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria. Immunocompromised patients, institutionalized or hospitalized individuals, elderly people are at greater risk due to life-threatening septic complications, but immunocompetent individuals with predisposing genetic or acquired diseases can also be affected, almost any body part being able to shelter persistent biofilms. Moreover, chronic biofilm-related infections can lead to the occurrence of systemic diseases, as in the case of chronic periodontitis, linked to atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The more researchers discover, new unknown issues add up to the complexity of biofilm infections, in which microbial species establish relationships of cooperation and competition, and elaborate phenotypic differentiation into functional, adapted communities. Their interaction with the host's immune system or with therapeutic agents contributes to the complex puzzle that still misses a lot of pieces. In this comprehensive review we aimed to highlight the microbial composition, developmental stages, architecture and properties of medical biofilms, as well as the diagnostic tools used in the management of biofilm related infections. Also, we present recently acquired knowledge on the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of four chronic diseases associated with biofilm development in tissues (chronic periodontitis, chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis, chronic wounds) and artificial substrata (medical devices-related infections). PMID:25877092

  8. Cathodic and anodic biofilms in Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Cristiani, P; Carvalho, M L; Guerrini, E; Daghio, M; Santoro, C; Li, B

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen reduction due to microaerophilic biofilms grown on graphite cathodes (biocathodes) in Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells (SCMFCs) is proved and analysed in this paper. Pt-free cathode performances are compared with those of different platinum-loaded cathodes, before and after the biofilm growth. Membraneless SCMFCs were operating in batch-mode, filled with wastewater. A substrate (fuel) of sodium acetate (0.03 M) was periodically added and the experiment lasted more than six months. A maximum of power densities, up to 0.5 W m(-2), were reached when biofilms developed on the electrodes and the cathodic potential decreased (open circuit potential of 50-200 mV vs. SHE). The power output was almost constant with an acetate concentration of 0.01-0.05 M and it fell down when the pH of the media exceeded 9.5, independently of the Pt-free/Pt-loading at the cathodes. Current densities varied in the range of 1-5 Am(-2) (cathode area of 5 cm(2)). Quasi-stationary polarization curves performed with a three-electrode configuration on cathodic and anodic electrodes showed that the anodic overpotential, more than the cathodic one, may limit the current density in the SCMFCs for a long-term operation. PMID:23474690

  9. Potential microbial bioinvasions via ships' ballast water, sediment, and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Drake, Lisa A; Doblin, Martina A; Dobbs, Fred C

    2007-01-01

    A prominent vector of aquatic invasive species to coastal regions is the discharge of water, sediments, and biofilm from ships' ballast-water tanks. During eight years of studying ships arriving to the lower Chesapeake Bay, we developed an understanding of the mechanisms by which invasive microorganisms might arrive to the region via ships. Within a given ship, habitats included ballast water, unpumpable water and sediment (collectively known as residuals), and biofilms formed on internal surfaces of ballast-water tanks. We sampled 69 vessels arriving from foreign and domestic ports, largely from Western Europe, the Mediterranean region, and the US East and Gulf coasts. All habitats contained bacteria and viruses. By extrapolating the measured concentration of a microbial metric to the estimated volume of ballast water, biofilm, or residual sediment and water within an average vessel, we calculated the potential total number of microorganisms contained by each habitat, thus creating a hierarchy of risk of delivery. The estimated concentration of microorganisms was greatest in ballast water>sediment and water residuals>biofilms. From these results, it is clear microorganisms may be transported within ships in a variety of ways. Using temperature tolerance as a measure of survivability and the temperature difference between ballast-water samples and the water into which the ballast water was discharged, we estimated 56% of microorganisms could survive in the lower Bay. Extrapolated delivery and survival of microorganisms to the Port of Hampton Roads in lower Chesapeake Bay shows on the order of 10(20) microorganisms (6.8 x 10(19) viruses and 3.9 x 10(18) bacteria cells) are discharged annually to the region. PMID:17215010

  10. BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers

    E-print Network

    BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers of higher: 15 July 2010 # Springer-Verlag 2010 Abstract Microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode communities often reveal for specific substrates. Keywords Microbial fuel cell . Paracoccus denitrificans . Formic acid . Community

  11. Detection of microbial Life in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Lotter, H.; Fendrihan, S.; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Legat, A.; Gruber, C.; Weidler, G.; Gerbl, F.

    2007-08-01

    In recent years microbial communities were detected, which dwell in rocks, soil and caves deep below the surface of the Earth. This has led to a new view of the diversity of the terrestrial biosphere and of the physico-chemical boundaries for life. Two types of subterranean environments are Permo-Triassic salt sediments and thermal radioactive springs from igneous rocks in the Alps. Viable extremely halophilic archaea were isolated from ancient salt sediments which are estimated to be about 250 million years old (1). Chemotaxonomic and molecular characterization showed that they represent novel species, e. g. Halococcus salifodinae, Hcc. dombrowskiiand Halobacterium noricense. Simulation experiments with artificial halite suggested that these microorganisms probably survived while embedded in fluid inclusions. In the thermal springs, evidence for numerous novel microorganisms was found by 16S rDNA sequencing and probing for some metabolic genes; in addition, scanning electron microscopy of biofilms on the rock surfaces revealed great diversity of morphotypes (2). These communities appear to be active and growing, although their energy and carbon sources are entirely unknown. The characterization of subsurface inhabitants is of astrobiological relevance since extraterrestrial halite has been detected (3) and since microbial life on Mars, if existent, may have retreated into the subsurface. As a long-term goal, a thorough census of terrestrial microorganisms should be taken and their survival potential be determined in view of future missions for the search for extraterrestrial life, including planning precautions against possible forward contamination by space probes. (1) Fendrihan, S., Legat, A., Gruber, C., Pfaffenhuemer, M., Weidler, G., Gerbl, F., Stan-Lotter, H. (2006) Extremely halophilic archaea and the issue of long term microbial survival. Reviews in Environmental Science and Bio/technology 5, 1569-1605. (2) Weidler, G.W., Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M., Gerbl, F.W., Heinen, W., Stan- Lotter, H. (2007) Communities of Archaea and Bacteria in a subsurface radioactive thermal spring in the Austrian Central Alps and evidence for ammonia oxidizing Crenarchaeota. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 73, 259-270. (3) Stan-Lotter, H., Radax, C., McGenity, T.J., Legat, A., Pfaffenhuemer, M.,Wieland, H., Gruber, C., Denner, E.B.M. (2004) From Intraterrestrials to Extraterrestrials - Viable haloarchaea in ancient salt deposits. In: Halophilic Microorganisms. Ventosa A. (Ed.), Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, pp. 89-102.

  12. In situ environment rather than substrate type dictates microbial community structure of biofilms in a cold seep system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, On On; Wang, Yong; Tian, Renmao; Zhang, Weipeng; Shek, Chun Shum; Bougouffa, Salim; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Batang, Zenon B.; Xu, Wei; Wang, Guang Chao; Zhang, Xixiang; Lafi, Feras F.; Bajic, Vladmir B.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Using microscopic and molecular techniques combined with computational analysis, this study examined the structure and composition of microbial communities in biofilms that formed on different artificial substrates in a brine pool and on a seep vent of a cold seep in the Red Sea to test our hypothesis that initiation of the biofilm formation and spreading mode of microbial structures differs between the cold seep and the other aquatic environments. Biofilms on different substrates at two deployment sites differed morphologically, with the vent biofilms having higher microbial abundance and better structural features than the pool biofilms. Microbes in the pool biofilms were more taxonomically diverse and mainly composed of various sulfate-reducing bacteria whereas the vent biofilms were exclusively dominated by sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira. These results suggest that the redox environments at the deployment sites might have exerted a strong selection on microbes in the biofilms at two sites whereas the types of substrates had limited effects on the biofilm development.

  13. Microbial Community Analysis of Fresh and Old Microbial Biofilms on Bayon Temple Sandstone of Angkor Thom, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Wensheng; Li, Hui; Wang, Wei-Dong; Katayama, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    The temples of Angkor monuments including Angkor Thom and Bayon in Cambodia and surrounding countries were exclusively constructed using sandstone. They are severely threatened by biodeterioration caused by active growth of different microorganisms on the sandstone surfaces, but knowledge on the microbial community and composition of the biofilms on the sandstone is not available from this region. This study investigated the microbial community diversity by examining the fresh and old biofilms of the biodeteriorated bas-relief wall surfaces of the Bayon Temple by analysis of 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequences. The results showed that the retrieved sequences were clustered in 11 bacterial, 11 eukaryotic and two archaeal divisions with disparate communities (Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria; Alveolata, Fungi, Metazoa, Viridiplantae; Crenarchaeote, and Euyarchaeota). A comparison of the microbial communities between the fresh and old biofilms revealed that the bacterial community of old biofilm was very similar to the newly formed fresh biofilm in terms of bacterial composition, but the eukaryotic communities were distinctly different between these two. This information has important implications for understanding the formation process and development of the microbial diversity on the sandstone surfaces, and furthermore to the relationship between the extent of biodeterioration and succession of microbial communities on sandstone in tropic region. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00248-010-9707-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20593173

  14. Sunlight-Exposed Biofilm Microbial Communities Are Naturally Resistant to Chernobyl Ionizing-Radiation Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general diversity patterns, despite increased mutation levels at the single-OTU level. Therefore, biofilm communities growing in sunlight exposed substrates are capable of coping with increased mutation rates and appear pre-adapted to levels of ionizing radiation in Chernobyl due to their natural adaptation to periodical desiccation and ambient UV radiation. PMID:21765911

  15. Microbial communities, extracellular proteomics and polysaccharides: A comparative investigation on biofilm and suspended sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Guo, Jin-Song; Shen, Yu; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Wang, Han; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Fang, Fang; Li, Chun

    2015-08-01

    Biofilm and suspended sludge (S-sludge) floc exhibit distinct physicochemical properties and process performances in an integrated fixed-film and suspended growth sequencing batch reactor. However, the mechanisms of governing these differences between the two aggregates were unknown. Current work evaluated the diversity of morphologies, microbial communities, extracellular proteins and polysaccharides between the biofilm and S-sludge. Contrast to biofilm, the denitrification was much more extensive performed in S-sludge. Furthermore, many microbial cells in the biofilm acted as the backbone of aggregates and maintained the structure stability. An extracellular protein observed only in the biofilm can promote the cell adhesion. In contrast, more extracellular proteins related to catalytic activity in the S-sludge could decrease the compactness of floc. In addition, the monosaccharide compositions from the two aggregates were various. These results could elucidate how the diversities of architecture and biochemical process between the two aggregates occurred. PMID:25919933

  16. Microbial diversity in biofilm infections of the urinary tract with the use of sonication techniques.

    PubMed

    Holá, Veronika; Ruzicka, Filip; Horka, Marie

    2010-08-01

    Infections of the urinary tract account for >40% of nosocomial infections; most of these are infections in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only the particular infection but also a number of complications, for example blockage of catheters with crystallic deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. Infections of urinary catheters are only rarely single-species infections. The longer a patient is catheterized, the higher the diversity of biofilm microbial communities. The aims of this study were to investigate the microbial diversity on the catheters and to compare the ability to form biofilm among isolated microbial species. The next aim was to discriminate particular causative agents of infections of the urinary tract and their importance as biofilm formers in the microbial community on the urinary catheter. We examined catheters from 535 patients and isolated 1555 strains of microorganisms. Most of the catheters were infected by three or more microorganisms; only 12.5% showed monomicrobial infection. Among the microorganisms isolated from the urinary catheters, there were significant differences in biofilm-forming ability, and we therefore conclude that some microbial species have greater potential to cause a biofilm-based infection, whereas others can be only passive members of the biofilm community. PMID:20602639

  17. Conduction-based modeling of the biofilm anode of a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Kato Marcus, Andrew; Torres, César I; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2007-12-15

    The biofilm of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) experiences biofilm-related (growth and mass transport) and electrochemical (electron conduction and charger-transfer) processes. We developed a dynamic, one-dimensional, multi-species model for the biofilm in three steps. First, we formulated the biofilm on the anode as a "biofilm anode" with the following two properties: (1) The biofilm has a conductive solid matrix characterized by the biofilm conductivity (kappa(bio)). (2) The biofilm matrix accepts electrons from biofilm bacteria and conducts the electrons to the anode. Second, we derived the Nernst-Monod expression to describe the rate of electron-donor (ED) oxidation. Third, we linked these components using the principles of mass balance and Ohm's law. We then solved the model to study dual limitation in biofilm by the ED concentration and local potential. Our model illustrates that kappa(bio) strongly influences the ED and current fluxes, the type of limitation in biofilm, and the biomass distribution. A larger kappa(bio) increases the ED and current fluxes, and, consequently, the ED mass-transfer resistance becomes significant. A significant gradient in ED concentration, local potential, or both can develop in the biofilm anode, and the biomass actively respires only where ED concentration and local potential are high. When kappa(bio) is relatively large (i.e., > or =10(-3) mS cm(-1)), active biomass can persist up to tens of micrometers away from the anode. Increases in biofilm thickness and accumulation of inert biomass accentuate dual limitation and reduce the current density. These limitations can be alleviated with increases in the specific detachment rate and biofilm density. PMID:17570714

  18. Oral microbial biofilms and plaque-related diseases: microbial communities and their role in the shift from oral health to disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ludovico Sbordone; Claudia Bortolaia

    2003-01-01

    Many oral pathologies, such as dental caries, periodontal disease and peri-implantitis are plaque-related. Dental plaque is a microbial biofilm formed by organisms tightly bound to a solid substrate and each other by means of an exopolymer matrix. Bacteria exhibit different properties when contained within a biofilm. Knowing the mechanisms controlling the formation and development of biofilms can help to understand

  19. Microbial interactions in marine water amended by eroded benthic biofilm: A case study from an intertidal mudflat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanié, Hélène; Ory, Pascaline; Orvain, Francis; Delmas, Daniel; Dupuy, Christine; Hartmann, Hans J.

    2014-09-01

    In shallow macrotidal ecosystems with large intertidal mudflats, the sediment-water coupling plays a crucial role in structuring the pelagic microbial food web functioning, since inorganic and organic matter and microbial components (viruses and microbes) of the microphytobenthic biofilm can be suspended toward the water column. Two experimental bioassays were conducted in March and July 2008 to investigate the importance of biofilm input for the pelagic microbial and viral loops. Pelagic inocula (< 0.6 ?- and < 10 ? filtrates) were diluted either with < 30 kDa-ultrafiltered seawater or with this ultrafiltrate enriched with the respective size-fractionated benthic biofilm or with < 30 kDa-benthic compounds (BC). The kinetics of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF), bacteria and viruses were assessed together with bacterial and viral genomic fingerprints, bacterial enzymatic activities and viral life strategies. The experimental design allowed us to evaluate the effect of BC modulated by those of benthic size-fractionated microorganisms (virus + bacteria, + HNF). BC presented (1) in March, a positive effect on viruses and bacteria weakened by pelagic HNF. Benthic microorganisms consolidated this negative effect and sustained the viral production together with a relatively diverse and uneven bacterial assemblage structure; (2) in July, no direct impact on viruses but a positive effect on bacteria modulated by HNF, which indirectly enhanced viral multiplication. Both effects were intensified by benthic microorganisms and bacterial assemblage structure became more even. HNF indirectly profited from BC more in March than in July. The microbial loop would be stimulated by biofilm during periods of high resources (March) and the viral loop during periods of depleted resources (July).

  20. Microbial community in biofilm formed on reed surface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suguru Okunishi; Yuko Kawasaki; Aya Takeda; Shin Yoda; Hisao Morisaki

    2004-01-01

    Biofilms formed on the submerged part of reed and stone surface contained various types of microorganisms, such as eukaryotes, heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria. Culturable bacteria from biofilms of reed and stone surface were classified into wide range of phylogenetic groups. It was also found that light irradiation affect the mineralization activity of these biofilms.

  1. Microbial community in biofilm formed on reed surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunishi, Suguru; Kawasaki, Yuko; Takeda, Aya; Yoda, Shin; Morisaki, Hisao

    2004-08-01

    Biofilms formed on the submerged part of reed and stone surface contained various types of microorganisms, such as eukaryotes, heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria. Culturable bacteria from biofilms of reed and stone surface were classified into wide range of phylogenetic groups. It was also found that light irradiation affect the mineralization activity of these biofilms.

  2. Complex conductivity response to microbial growth and biofilm formation on phenanthrene spiked medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Remy; Gourry, Jean Christophe; Simonnot, Marie-Odile; Leyval, Corinne

    2011-11-01

    Several laboratory studies have recently demonstrated the utility of geophysical methods for the investigation of microbial-induced changes over contaminated sites. However, it remains difficult to distinguish the effects due to the new physical properties imparted by microbial processes, to bacterial growth, or to the development of bacterial biofilm. We chose to study the influence of biofilm formation on geophysical response using complex conductivity measurements (0.1-1000 Hz) in phenanthrene-contaminated media. Biotic assays were conducted with two phenanthrene (PHE) degrading bacterial strains: Burkholderia sp (NAH1), which produced biofilm and Stenophomonas maltophilia (MATE10), which did not, and an abiotic control. Results showed that bacterial densities for NAH1 and MATE10 strains continuously increased at the same rate during the experiment. However, the complex conductivity signature showed noticeable differences between the two bacteria, with a phase shift of 50 mrad at 4 Hz for NAH1, which produced biofilm. Biofilm volume was quantified by Scanning Confocal Laser Microscopy (SCLM). Significant correlations were established between phase shift decrease and biofilm volume for NAH1 assays. Results suggest that complex conductivity measurements, specifically phase shift, can be a useful indicator of biofilm formation inside the overall signal of microbial activity on contaminated sites.

  3. New methods for analysis of spatial distribution and coaggregation of microbial populations in complex biofilms.

    PubMed

    Almstrand, Robert; Daims, Holger; Persson, Frank; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

    2013-10-01

    In biofilms, microbial activities form gradients of substrates and electron acceptors, creating a complex landscape of microhabitats, often resulting in structured localization of the microbial populations present. To understand the dynamic interplay between and within these populations, quantitative measurements and statistical analysis of their localization patterns within the biofilms are necessary, and adequate automated tools for such analyses are needed. We have designed and applied new methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital image analysis of directionally dependent (anisotropic) multispecies biofilms. A sequential-FISH approach allowed multiple populations to be detected in a biofilm sample. This was combined with an automated tool for vertical-distribution analysis by generating in silico biofilm slices and the recently developed Inflate algorithm for coaggregation analysis of microbial populations in anisotropic biofilms. As a proof of principle, we show distinct stratification patterns of the ammonia oxidizers Nitrosomonas oligotropha subclusters I and II and the nitrite oxidizer Nitrospira sublineage I in three different types of wastewater biofilms, suggesting niche differentiation between the N. oligotropha subclusters, which could explain their coexistence in the same biofilms. Coaggregation analysis showed that N. oligotropha subcluster II aggregated closer to Nitrospira than did N. oligotropha subcluster I in a pilot plant nitrifying trickling filter (NTF) and a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), but not in a full-scale NTF, indicating important ecophysiological differences between these phylogenetically closely related subclusters. By using high-resolution quantitative methods applicable to any multispecies biofilm in general, the ecological interactions of these complex ecosystems can be understood in more detail. PMID:23892743

  4. New Methods for Analysis of Spatial Distribution and Coaggregation of Microbial Populations in Complex Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Almstrand, Robert; Daims, Holger; Persson, Frank; Sörensson, Fred

    2013-01-01

    In biofilms, microbial activities form gradients of substrates and electron acceptors, creating a complex landscape of microhabitats, often resulting in structured localization of the microbial populations present. To understand the dynamic interplay between and within these populations, quantitative measurements and statistical analysis of their localization patterns within the biofilms are necessary, and adequate automated tools for such analyses are needed. We have designed and applied new methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital image analysis of directionally dependent (anisotropic) multispecies biofilms. A sequential-FISH approach allowed multiple populations to be detected in a biofilm sample. This was combined with an automated tool for vertical-distribution analysis by generating in silico biofilm slices and the recently developed Inflate algorithm for coaggregation analysis of microbial populations in anisotropic biofilms. As a proof of principle, we show distinct stratification patterns of the ammonia oxidizers Nitrosomonas oligotropha subclusters I and II and the nitrite oxidizer Nitrospira sublineage I in three different types of wastewater biofilms, suggesting niche differentiation between the N. oligotropha subclusters, which could explain their coexistence in the same biofilms. Coaggregation analysis showed that N. oligotropha subcluster II aggregated closer to Nitrospira than did N. oligotropha subcluster I in a pilot plant nitrifying trickling filter (NTF) and a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), but not in a full-scale NTF, indicating important ecophysiological differences between these phylogenetically closely related subclusters. By using high-resolution quantitative methods applicable to any multispecies biofilm in general, the ecological interactions of these complex ecosystems can be understood in more detail. PMID:23892743

  5. Comparative sensitivity to the fungicide tebuconazole of biofilm and plankton microbial communities in freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Artigas, J; Pascault, N; Bouchez, A; Chastain, J; Debroas, D; Humbert, J F; Leloup, J; Tadonleke, R D; ter Halle, A; Pesce, S

    2014-01-15

    Stream and lake ecosystems in agricultural watersheds are exposed to fungicide inputs that can threaten the structure and functioning of aquatic microbial communities. This research analyzes the impact of the triazole fungicide tebuconazole (TBZ) on natural biofilm and plankton microbial communities from sites presenting different degrees of agricultural contamination. Biofilm and plankton communities from less-polluted (LP) and polluted (P) sites were exposed to nominal concentrations of 0 (control), 2 and 20 ?g TBZ L(-1) in 3-week microcosm experiments. Descriptors of microbial community structure (bacterial density and chlorophyll-a concentration) and function (bacterial respiration and production and photosynthesis) were analyzed to chart the effects of TBZ and the kinetics of TBZ attenuation in water during the experiments. The results showed TBZ-induced effects on biofilm function (inhibition of substrate-induced respiration and photosynthetic activity), especially in LP-site communities, whereas plankton communities experienced a transitory stimulation of bacterial densities in communities from both LP and P sites. TBZ attenuation was stronger in biofilm (60-75%) than plankton (15-18%) experiments, probably due to greater adsorption on biofilms. The differences between biofilm and plankton responses to TBZ were likely explained by differences in community structure (presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix) and microbial composition. Biofilm communities also exhibited different sensitivity levels according to their in-field pre-exposure to fungicide, with P-site communities demonstrating adaptation capacities to TBZ. This study indicates that TBZ toxicity to non-targeted aquatic microbial communities essentially composed by microalgae and bacteria was moderate, and that its effects varied between stream and lake microbial communities. PMID:24048021

  6. Biofilm ecology: On-line methods bring new insights into mic and microbial biofouling.

    PubMed

    White, D C; Arrage, A A; Nivens, D E; Palmer, R J; Rice, J F; Sayler, G S

    1996-01-01

    Microbial biofilms were formed on coupons with defined coatings in once-through laminar flow fields of controlled bulk-phase composition and shear. Dilute media were utilized to select for biofilm growth. The formation, succession, and stability of the biofilms were monitored with non-destructive on-line methods (fluorescence, bioluminescence, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectrometry [ATR-FTIR] and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and by high resolution destructive analysts (viable and direct counts and phospholipid fatty acid signature methods) at the termination of the experiments. Biofilms of reproducible composition can be formed and the order of inoculation of multi-component biofilms affects their composition at harvest. The corrosion rates of mild steel depended on the biofilm composition but not the attached biomass. Examination of biofilms with the scanning vibrating electrode in a microscope field showed effects of heterogeneity in biofilm structure which promoted localized anodic activity. Pseudomonas stains were engineered to contain the lux gene cassette as a "reporter"; and the formation of the exopolymer alginate was shown not to promote attachment of the strain or secondary colonization by Vibrio. Examination of mutants forming different alginate structures showed differential attachment and biofilm structure. Studies of mutants of lipopolysaccharide structure showed differential attachment to substrata. Specific antifouling and fouling-release coatings showed a wide range of attachment and release properties as well as sublethal toxicity. PMID:22115099

  7. A biofilm enhanced miniature microbial fuel cell using Shewanella oneidensis DSP10 and oxygen reduction cathodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Justin C. Biffinger; Jeremy Pietron; Ricky Ray; Brenda Little; Bradley R. Ringeisen

    2007-01-01

    A miniature-microbial fuel cell (mini-MFC, chamber volume: 1.2mL) was used to monitor biofilm development from a pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis DSP10 on graphite felt (GF) under minimal nutrient conditions. ESEM evidence of biofilm formation on GF is supported by substantial power density (per device cross-section) from the mini-MFC when using an acellular minimal media anolyte (1500mW\\/m2). These experiments demonstrate

  8. Microbial Life-Educational Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Marine Biology Laboratory of Woods Hole, Massachusetts and Montana State University are the collaborators on this easily navigable website of educational resources about microbial life. The goal of the site is to provide expert information about microorganisms for K-12 classrooms, university educators, and the general public. They effectively accomplish their goal here, with a host of resources, in formats appropriate for different knowledge levels, in a well-organized manner. For all of the topics covered, three levels of information are provided. Resources such as newspapers, websites, and magazine articles are provided for general learners; journal articles and academic reviews are provided for advanced learners; and activities, assignments, and readings are provided for educators. Interestingly, one of the activities found in the "Teaching Methods" tab on the left side of the homepage, is how to use the Socratic Method with students, with question suggestions, rules of participation, and what to expect from the students. An interesting part of the website is its focus on the microorganisms that live in extreme environments. Visitors can learn about the many types of extremes environments, the extremophiles, and how to teach about extreme environments in K-12 classrooms, by clicking on the "Extreme Environments" tab on the left side of the homepage. The photos of the extreme environments resemble abstract art with their close ups of the microorganisms in their environment. By clicking on the "Online Resources" tab on the left hand side of the homepage, visitors will be taken to a virtual index of their resources, where they can also narrow their view by resource type, subject, environment type, and grade-level. Each category that can be used to narrow results also shows how many entries are available for that category.

  9. Significance of microbial biofilms in food industry: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Ganesh Kumar; S. K Anand

    1998-01-01

    Biofilms have been of considerable interest in the context of food hygiene. Of special significance is the ability of microorganisms to attach and grow on food and food-contact surfaces under favourable conditions. Biofilm formation is a dynamic process and different mechanisms are involved in their attachment and growth. Extracellular polymeric substances play an important role in the attachment and colonization

  10. Microbial biofilms in seafood: a food-hygiene challenge.

    PubMed

    Mizan, Md Furkanur Rahaman; Jahid, Iqbal Kabir; Ha, Sang-Do

    2015-08-01

    Seafood forms a part of a healthy diet. However, seafood can be contaminated with foodborne pathogens, resulting in disease outbreaks. Because people consume large amounts of seafood, such disease outbreaks are increasing worldwide. Seafood contamination is largely due to the naturally occurring phenomenon of biofilm formation. The common seafood bacterial pathogens that form biofilms are Vibrio spp., Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes. As these organisms pose a global health threat, recent research has focused on elucidating methods to eliminate these biofilm-forming bacteria from seafood, thereby improving food hygiene. Therefore, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation, the factors that regulate biofilm development and the role of quorum sensing and biofilm formation in the virulence of foodborne pathogens. Currently, several novel methods have been successfully developed for controlling biofilms present in seafood. In this review, we also discuss the epidemiology of seafood-related diseases and the novel methods that could be used for future control of biofilm formation in seafood. PMID:25846914

  11. EPS in Environmental Microbial Biofilms as Examined by Advanced Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, T. R.; Lawrence, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Biofilm communities are highly structured associations of cellular and polymeric components which are involved in biogenic and geogenic environmental processes. Furthermore, biofilms are also important in medical (infection), industrial (biofouling) and technological (biofilm engineering) processes. The interfacial microbial communities in a specific habitat are highly dynamic and change according to the environmental parameters affecting not only the cellular but also the polymeric constituents of the system. Through their EPS biofilms interact with dissolved, colloidal and particulate compounds from the bulk water phase. For a long time the focus in biofilm research was on the cellular constituents in biofilms and the polymer matrix in biofilms has been rather neglected. The polymer matrix is produced not only by different bacteria and archaea but also by eukaryotic micro-organisms such as algae and fungi. The mostly unidentified mixture of EPS compounds is responsible for many biofilm properties and is involved in biofilm functionality. The chemistry of the EPS matrix represents a mixture of polymers including polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, neutral polymers, charged polymers, amphiphilic polymers and refractory microbial polymers. The analysis of the EPS may be done destructively by means of extraction and subsequent chemical analysis or in situ by means of specific probes in combination with advanced imaging. In the last 15 years laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has been established as an indispensable technique for studying microbial communities. LSM with 1-photon and 2-photon excitation in combination with fluorescence techniques allows 3-dimensional investigation of fully hydrated, living biofilm systems. This approach is able to reveal data on biofilm structural features as well as biofilm processes and interactions. The fluorescent probes available allow the quantitative assessment of cellular as well as polymer distribution. For this purpose lectin-binding- analysis has been suggested as a suitable approach to image glycoconjugates within the polymer matrix of biofilm communities. More recently synchrotron radiation is increasingly recognized as a powerful tool for studying biological samples. Hard X-ray excitation can be used to map elemental composition whereas IR imaging allows examination of biological macromolecules. A further technique called soft X-ray scanning transmission microscopy (STXM) has the advantage of both techniques and may be employed to detect elements as well as biomolecules. Using the appropriate spectra, near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) microscopy allows quantitative chemical mapping at 50 nm resolution. In this presentation the applicability of LSM and STXM will be demonstrated using several examples of different environmental biofilm systems. The techniques in combination provide a new view of complex microbial communities and their interaction with the environment. These advanced imaging techniques offer the possibility to study the spatial structure of cellular and polymeric compounds in biofilms as well as biofilm microhabitats, biofilm functionality and biofilm processes.

  12. Hypersaline Microbial Systems of Sabkhas: Examples of Life's Survival in "Extreme" Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumbein, Wolfgang Elisabeth; Gorbushina, Anna A.; Holtkamp-Tacken, Elisabeth

    2004-12-01

    Life and living systems need several important factors to establish themselves and to have a continued tradition. In this article the nature of the borderline situation for microbial life under heavy salt stress is analyzed and discussed using the example of biofilms and microbial mats of sabkha systems of the Red Sea. Important factors ruling such environments are described, and include the following: (1) Microbial life is better suited for survival in extremely changing and only sporadically water-supplied environments than are larger organisms (including humans). (2) Microbial life shows extremely poikilophilic adaptation patterns to conditions that deviate significantly from conditions normal for life processes on Earth today. (3) Microbial life adapts itself to such extremely changing and only ephemerally supportive conditions by the capacity of extreme changes (a) in morphology (pleomorphy), (b) in metabolic patterns (poikilotrophy), (c) in survival strategies (poikilophily), and (d) by trapping and enclosing all necessary sources of energy matter in an inwardly oriented diffusive cycle. All this is achieved without any serious attempt at escaping from the extreme and extremely changing conditions. Furthermore, these salt swamp systems are geophysiological generators of energy and material reservoirs recycled over a geological time scale. Neither energy nor material is wasted for propagation by spore formation. This capacity is summarized as poikilophilic and poikilotroph behavior of biofilm or microbial mat communities in salt and irradiationstressed environmental conditions of the sabkha or salt desert type. We use mainly cyanobacteria as an example, although other bacteria and even eukaryotic fungi may exhibit the same potential of living and surviving under conditions usually not suitable for life on Earth. It may, however, be postulated that such poikilophilic organisms are the true candidates for life support and survival under conditions never recorded on Planet Earth. Mars and some planets of other suns may be good candidates to search for life under conditions normally not thought to be favorable for the maintenance of life. Astrobiology 4, 450-459.

  13. Community-based interference against integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into human salivary microbial biofilm

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuesong; Hu, Wei; He, Jian; Guo, Lihong; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2012-01-01

    As part of the human gastrointestinal tract, the oral cavity represents a complex biological system and harbors diverse bacterial species. Unlike the gut microbiota which is often considered a health asset, studies of the oral commensal microbial flora have been largely limited to their implication in oral diseases such as dental caries and periodontal diseases; Little emphasis has been given to their potential beneficial roles, especially the protective effects against oral colonization by foreign/pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we used the salivary microbiota derived from healthy human subjects to investigate protective effects against the colonization and integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, into developing and pre-formed salivary biofilms. When co-cultivated in saliva medium, P. aeruginosa persisted in the planktonic phase, but failed to integrate into salivary microbial community during biofilm formation. Furthermore, in the saliva medium supplemented with 0.05% (w/v) sucrose, the oral flora inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa by producing lactic acid. More interestingly, while pre-formed salivary biofilms were able to prevent P. aeruginosa colonization, the same biofilms recovered from mild chlorhexidine gluconate treatment displayed a shift in microbial composition and showed a drastic reduction in protection. Our study indicates that normal oral communities with balanced microbial compositions could be important in effectively preventing the integration of foreign/pathogenic bacterial species, such as P. aeruginosa. PMID:22053962

  14. Homogeneity and Synchronous Dynamics of Microbial Communities in Particulate Biofilms: from Major Populations to Minor Groups

    PubMed Central

    Gévaudan, Gaëlle; Hamelin, Jérôme; Dabert, Patrick; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Bernet, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Natural or engineered microbial populations often show variations over time. These variations may be due to environmental fluctuations or intrinsic factors. Thus, studying the dynamics of microbial diversity for different communities living in a spatially homogeneous landscape is of interest. As a model ecosystem, nitrifying biofilm communities were grown in a two litre inverse turbulent bed reactor (ITBR) containing an estimated 200 million small particles (about 150 ?m in diameter). Each particulate biofilm is considered as a distinct community growing in the neighborhood of other similar particles, in a homogeneous and well-controlled environmental context. A molecular approach was adopted to test how microbial community structures might evolve: either in synchrony, converging or diverging. The shape of biofilm was observed by microscopy for each particle. The biomass content was evaluated by quantitative PCR and showed similar values for each particle. The microbial community structure was evaluated by Capillary Electrophoresis-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (CE-SSCP) fingerprinting and showed extraordinary homogeneity between particles, even though transitory community structures were observed when reactor operating conditions were modified. This homogeneity was observed for the Bacteria primer set but, more interestingly, was also observed when minor non-nitrifying bacteria making up the biofilm, representing about 5% and 10% of total cells, were targeted. PMID:22791046

  15. Microbial Biofilm Formation and Contamination of Dental-Unit Water Systems in General Dental Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JAMES T. WALKER; DAVID J. BRADSHAW; ALLAN M. BENNETT; MARTIN R. FULFORD; MICHAEL V. MARTIN; PHILIP D. MARSH

    2000-01-01

    Dental-unit water systems (DUWS) harbor bacterial biofilms, which may serve as a haven for pathogens. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbial load of water from DUWS in general dental practices and the biofouling of DUWS tubing. Water and tube samples were taken from 55 dental surgeries in southwestern England. Contamination was determined by viable counts on

  16. Ecological roles and biotechnological applications of marine and intertidal microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sayani; Sana, Barindra; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    This review is a retrospective of ecological effects of bioactivities produced by biofilms of surface-dwelling marine/intertidal microbes as well as of the industrial and environmental biotechnologies developed exploiting the knowledge of biofilm formation. Some examples of significant interest pertaining to the ecological aspects of biofilm-forming species belonging to the Roseobacter clade include autochthonous bacteria from turbot larvae-rearing units with potential application as a probiotic as well as production of tropodithietic acid and indigoidine. Species of the Pseudoalteromonas genus are important examples of successful surface colonizers through elaboration of the AlpP protein and antimicrobial agents possessing broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against medical and environmental isolates. Further examples of significance comprise antiprotozoan activity of Pseudoalteromonas tunicata elicited by violacein, inhibition of fungal colonization, antifouling activities, inhibition of algal spore germination, and 2-n-pentyl-4-quinolinol production. Nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse gas, emanates from surface-attached microbial activity of marine animals. Marine and intertidal biofilms have been applied in the biotechnological production of violacein, phenylnannolones, and exopolysaccharides from marine and tropical intertidal environments. More examples of importance encompass production of protease, cellulase, and xylanase, melanin, and riboflavin. Antifouling activity of Bacillus sp. and application of anammox bacterial biofilms in bioremediation are described. Marine biofilms have been used as anodes and cathodes in microbial fuel cells. Some of the reaction vessels for biofilm cultivation reviewed are roller bottle, rotating disc bioreactor, polymethylmethacrylate conico-cylindrical flask, fixed bed reactor, artificial microbial mats, packed-bed bioreactors, and the Tanaka photobioreactor. PMID:24817086

  17. Influence of Microbial Biofilms on the Preservation of Primary Soft Tissue in Fossil and Extant Archosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Joseph E.; Lenczewski, Melissa E.; Scherer, Reed P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mineralized and permineralized bone is the most common form of fossilization in the vertebrate record. Preservation of gross soft tissues is extremely rare, but recent studies have suggested that primary soft tissues and biomolecules are more commonly preserved within preserved bones than had been presumed. Some of these claims have been challenged, with presentation of evidence suggesting that some of the structures are microbial artifacts, not primary soft tissues. The identification of biomolecules in fossil vertebrate extracts from a specimen of Brachylophosaurus canadensis has shown the interpretation of preserved organic remains as microbial biofilm to be highly unlikely. These discussions also propose a variety of potential mechanisms that would permit the preservation of soft-tissues in vertebrate fossils over geologic time. Methodology/Principal Findings This study experimentally examines the role of microbial biofilms in soft-tissue preservation in vertebrate fossils by quantitatively establishing the growth and morphology of biofilms on extant archosaur bone. These results are microscopically and morphologically compared with soft-tissue extracts from vertebrate fossils from the Hell Creek Formation of southeastern Montana (Latest Maastrichtian) in order to investigate the potential role of microbial biofilms on the preservation of fossil bone and bound organic matter in a variety of taphonomic settings. Based on these analyses, we highlight a mechanism whereby this bound organic matter may be preserved. Conclusions/Significance Results of the study indicate that the crystallization of microbial biofilms on decomposing organic matter within vertebrate bone in early taphonomic stages may contribute to the preservation of primary soft tissues deeper in the bone structure. PMID:20967227

  18. Microbial Extremophiles in Aspect of Limits of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Tang, Jane

    2007-01-01

    During Earth's evolution accompanied by geophysical and climatic changes a number of ecosystems have been formed. These ecosystems differ by the broad variety of physicochemical and biological factors composing our environment. Traditionally, pH and salinity are considered as geochemical extremes, as opposed to the temperature, pressure and radiation that are referred to as physical extremes (Van den Burg, 2003). Life inhabits all possible places on Earth interacting with the environment and within itself (cross species relations). In nature it is very rare when an ecotope is inhabited by a single species. As a rule, most ecosystems contain the functionally related and evolutionarily adjusted communities (consortia and populations). In contrast to the multicellular structure of eukaryotes (tissues, organs, systems of organs, whole organism), the highest organized form of prokaryotic life in nature is the benthic colonization in biofilms and microbial mats. In these complex structures all microbial cells of different species are distributed in space and time according to their functions and to physicochemical gradients that allow more effective system support, self-protection, and energy distribution. In vitro, of course, the most primitive organized structure for bacterial and archaeal cultures is the colony, the size, shape, color, consistency, and other characteristics of which could carry varies specifics on species or subspecies levels. In table 1 all known types of microbial communities are shown (Pikuta et a]., 2005). In deep underground (lithospheric) and deep-sea ecosystems an additional factor - pressure, and irradiation - could also be included in the list of microbial communities. Currently the beststudied ecosystems are: human body (due to the medical importance), and fresh water and marine ecosystems (due to the reason of an environmental safety). For a long time, extremophiles were terra incognita, since the environments with aggressive parameters (compared to the human body temperature, pH, mineralization, and pressure) were considered a priori as a dead zone.

  19. Stratified microbial structure and activity in sulfide- and methane-producing anaerobic sewer biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Hu, Shihu; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-11-01

    Simultaneous production of sulfide and methane by anaerobic sewer biofilms has recently been observed, suggesting that sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic archaea (MA), microorganisms known to compete for the same substrates, can coexist in this environment. This study investigated the community structures and activities of SRB and MA in anaerobic sewer biofilms (average thickness of 800 ?m) using a combination of microelectrode measurements, molecular techniques, and mathematical modeling. It was seen that sulfide was mainly produced in the outer layer of the biofilm, between the depths of 0 and 300 ?m, which is in good agreement with the distribution of SRB population as revealed by cryosection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). SRB had a higher relative abundance of 20% on the surface layer, which decreased gradually to below 3% at a depth of 400 ?m. In contrast, MA mainly inhabited the inner layer of the biofilm. Their relative abundances increased from 10% to 75% at depths of 200 ?m and 700 ?m, respectively, from the biofilm surface layer. High-throughput pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons showed that SRB in the biofilm were mainly affiliated with five genera, Desulfobulbus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfovibrio, Desulfatiferula, and Desulforegula, while about 90% of the MA population belonged to the genus Methanosaeta. The spatial organizations of SRB and MA revealed by pyrosequencing were consistent with the FISH results. A biofilm model was constructed to simulate the SRB and MA distributions in the anaerobic sewer biofilm. The good fit between model predictions and the experimental data indicate that the coexistence and spatial structure of SRB and MA in the biofilm resulted from the microbial types and their metabolic transformations and interactions with substrates. PMID:25192994

  20. Establishment of New Genetic Traits in a Microbial Biofilm Community

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Bjarke B.; Sternberg, Claus; Andersen, Jens Bo; Eberl, Leo; Møller, Søren; Givskov, Michael; Molin, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Conjugational transfer of the TOL plasmid (pWWO) was analyzed in a flow chamber biofilm community engaged in benzyl alcohol degradation. The community consisted of three species, Pseudomonas putida RI, Acinetobacter sp. strain C6, and an unidentified isolate, D8. Only P. putida RI could act as a recipient for the TOL plasmid. Cells carrying a chromosomally integrated lacIq gene and a lacp-gfp-tagged version of the TOL plasmid were introduced as donor strains in the biofilm community after its formation. The occurrence of plasmid-carrying cells was analyzed by viable-count-based enumeration of donors and transconjugants. Upon transfer of the plasmids to the recipient cells, expression of green fluorescence was activated as a result of zygotic induction of the gfp gene. This allowed a direct in situ identification of cells receiving the gfp-tagged version of the TOL plasmid. Our data suggest that the frequency of horizontal plasmid transfer was low, and growth (vertical transfer) of the recipient strain was the major cause of plasmid establishment in the biofilm community. Employment of scanning confocal laser microscopy on fixed biofilms, combined with simultaneous identification of P. putida cells and transconjugants by 16S rRNA hybridization and expression of green fluorescence, showed that transconjugants were always associated with noninfected P. putida RI recipient microcolonies. Pure colonies of transconjugants were never observed, indicating that proliferation of transconjugant cells preferentially took place on preexisting P. putida RI microcolonies in the biofilm. PMID:9603843

  1. Microbial Community Analysis of Fresh and Old Microbial Biofilms on Bayon Temple Sandstone of Angkor Thom, Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wensheng Lan; Hui Li; Wei-Dong Wang; Yoko Katayama; Ji-Dong Gu

    2010-01-01

    The temples of Angkor monuments including Angkor Thom and Bayon in Cambodia and surrounding countries were exclusively constructed\\u000a using sandstone. They are severely threatened by biodeterioration caused by active growth of different microorganisms on the\\u000a sandstone surfaces, but knowledge on the microbial community and composition of the biofilms on the sandstone is not available\\u000a from this region. This study investigated

  2. The spatial organization and microbial community structure of an epilithic biofilm.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Nick A; Chaput, Dominique L; Oliver, Anna E; Viles, Heather A

    2015-03-01

    Microbial biofilms are common on lithic surfaces, including stone buildings. However, the ecology of these communities is poorly understood. Few studies have focused on the spatial characteristics of lithobiontic biofilms, despite the fact that spatial structure has been demonstrated to influence ecosystem function (and hence biodegradation) and community diversity. Furthermore, relatively few studies have utilized molecular techniques to characterize these communities, even though molecular methods have revealed unexpected microbial diversity in other habitats. This study investigated (1) the spatial structure and (2) the taxonomic composition of an epilithic biofilm using molecular techniques, namely amplicon pyrosequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Dispersion indices and Mantel correlograms were used to test for the presence of spatial structure in the biofilm. Diversity metrics and rank-abundance distributions (RADs) were also generated. The study revealed spatial structure on a centimetre scale in eukaryotic microbes (fungi and algae), but not the bacteria. Fungal and bacterial communities were highly diverse; algal communities much less so. The RADs were characterized by a distinctive 'hollow' (concave up) profile and long tails of rare taxa. These findings have implications for understanding the ecology of epilithic biofilms and the spatial heterogeneity of stone biodeterioration. PMID:25764559

  3. Microbial biofilm modulation by ultrasound: current concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Erriu, Matteo; Blus, Cornelio; Szmukler-Moncler, Serge; Buogo, Silvano; Levi, Raffaello; Barbato, Giulio; Madonnaripa, Daniele; Denotti, Gloria; Piras, Vincenzo; Orrù, Germano

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm elimination is often necessary during antimicrobial therapy or industrial medical manufacturing decontamination. In this context, ultrasound treatment has been frequently described in the literature for its antibiofilm effectiveness, but at the same time, various authors have described ultrasound as a formidable enhancer of bacterial viability. This discrepancy has found no solution in the current literature for around 9 years; some works have shown that every time bacteria are exposed to an ultrasonic field, both destruction and stimulation phenomena co-exist. This co-existence proves to have different final effects based on various factors such as: ultrasound frequency and intensity, the bacterial species involved, the material used for ultrasound diffusion, the presence of cavitation effects and the forms of bacterial planktonic or biofilm. The aim of this work is to analyze current concepts regarding ultrasound effect on prokaryotic cells, and in particular ultrasound activity on bacterial biofilm. PMID:23751458

  4. A comparative study of the major microbial biomass of biofilms on exteriors of buildings in Europe and Latin America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine C. Gaylarde; Peter M. Gaylarde

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms in biofilms on building surfaces include algae, bacteria and fungi and cause discolouration and degradation, but definitive information about preferences of microbial groups for given building substrates and how this is affected by environmental conditions is lacking. Major biomass in 230 biofilms from buildings in seven Latin American and six European countries was analysed. Substrates included composites (cement, mortar,

  5. Characterization of microbial community in an aerobic moving bed biofilm reactor applied for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo FuXiaoyi; Xiaoyi Liao; Lili Ding; Hongqiang Ren

    2010-01-01

    A continuous-flow moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) under aerobic conditions was established for simultaneous nitrification\\u000a and denitrification (SND), and microbial communities were investigated by a combination of denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis\\u000a (DGGE) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). DGGE analysis has revealed more similar microbial community structures\\u000a formed in the biofilms with more similar carbon nitrogen (C\\/N) ratios. FISH analysis

  6. Extraterrestrial Life in the Microbial Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronstal, Aaron L.

    Humankind has long been fascinated with the potential for alien civilizations within the Solar System and beyond (e.g., Crowe and Dowd 2013; Sullivan 2013). Despite the early optimism for life beyond Earth, humankind has yet to make first contact with an alien race. Historical discourse on the topic of alien life can provide some useful input into questions about how the people of Earth today might respond to contact with alien life (e.g., Dick 2013). However, this discourse is primarily devoted to understanding humankind's response to intelligent life. We must recognize that the search for life's potential beyond Earth has dramatically changed since the dawn of the Space Age. We now know that advanced civilizations are not common on planets in our solar system. The search for life on nearby worlds is now limited to non-intelligent, microbial life. Any chance we have of contacting intelligent life lies in receiving transmissions from distant worlds, and contact with such cultures would be greatly limited by the vast expanse of space. This chapter discusses the need for more attention paid to the possible social, economic, and legal ramifications that the discovery of non-intelligent, alien microbial life might bring.

  7. Detection of microbial biofilms on food processing surfaces: hyperspectral fluorescence imaging study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Won; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kaunglin; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Roberts, Michael S.; McNaughton, James L.

    2009-05-01

    We used a portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system to evaluate biofilm formations on four types of food processing surface materials including stainless steel, polypropylene used for cutting boards, and household counter top materials such as formica and granite. The objective of this investigation was to determine a minimal number of spectral bands suitable to differentiate microbial biofilm formation from the four background materials typically used during food processing. Ultimately, the resultant spectral information will be used in development of handheld portable imaging devices that can be used as visual aid tools for sanitation and safety inspection (microbial contamination) of the food processing surfaces. Pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella cells were grown in low strength M9 minimal medium on various surfaces at 22 +/- 2 °C for 2 days for biofilm formation. Biofilm autofluorescence under UV excitation (320 to 400 nm) obtained by hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system showed broad emissions in the blue-green regions of the spectrum with emission maxima at approximately 480 nm for both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella biofilms. Fluorescence images at 480 nm revealed that for background materials with near-uniform fluorescence responses such as stainless steel and formica cutting board, regardless of the background intensity, biofilm formation can be distinguished. This suggested that a broad spectral band in the blue-green regions can be used for handheld imaging devices for sanitation inspection of stainless, cutting board, and formica surfaces. The non-uniform fluorescence responses of granite make distinctions between biofilm and background difficult. To further investigate potential detection of the biofilm formations on granite surfaces with multispectral approaches, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using the hyperspectral fluorescence image data. The resultant PCA score images revealed distinct contrast between biofilms and granite surfaces. This investigation demonstrated that biofilm formations on food processing surfaces, even for background materials with heterogeneous fluorescence responses, can be detected. Furthermore, a multispectral approach in developing handheld inspection devices may be needed to inspect surface materials that exhibit non-uniform fluorescence.

  8. Microbial diversity in marine biofilms along a water quality gradient on the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Kriwy, Pascal; Uthicke, Sven

    2011-04-01

    Microbial communities are potential indicators for water quality as they respond rapidly to environmental changes. In the Whitsunday Islands, Australia, microbial biofilm communities from two offshore islands were compared to those from two inshore islands subjected to poor water quality. Biofilm community composition was characterized using three culture-independent molecular techniques. The clone libraries indicated high genetic diversity, with somewhat higher scores in the offshore sites (57%) compared to the inshore sites (41%). The majority of microbes in the biofilms were related to Alphaproteobacteria (39.8%), Gammaproteobacteria (14.1%), Bacteroidetes (13.2%), diatoms (8.3%) and Cyanobacteria (3.9%). Redundancy analysis (RDA) for the CARD-FISH data showed distinct microbial assemblages between offshore and inshore communities. Additionally, 5 out of 13 water quality parameters (DIN, Chla, POP, TSS and POC) explained a significant amount of variation in the microbial communities and high values of these were associated with inshore communities. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that Cyanobacteria (p=0.01), Bacteroidetes (p=0.04) and to some extent Alphaproteobacteria (p=0.07), were significantly more abundant in the offshore biofilm communities. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of DGGE data showed clear grouping of cyanobacterial communities into inshore and offshore communities. Reasons for community shifts in the bacterial lineages are currently not resolved. One possible causative factor may be that autotrophic primary producers are more dominant in offshore sites due to the higher light availability as well as the limitation by DIN. The trends found in this study are the bases for more detailed research on microbial indicator species for changes in water quality. PMID:21345635

  9. Growth dynamic of Naegleria fowleri in a microbial freshwater biofilm.

    PubMed

    Goudot, Sébastien; Herbelin, Pascaline; Mathieu, Laurence; Soreau, Sylvie; Banas, Sandrine; Jorand, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    The presence of pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA) such as Naegleria fowleri in freshwater environments is a potential public health risk. Although its occurrence in various water sources has been well reported, its presence and associated factors in biofilm remain unknown. In this study, the density of N. fowleri in biofilms spontaneously growing on glass slides fed by raw freshwater were followed at 32 °C and 42 °C for 45 days. The biofilms were collected with their substrata and characterized for their structure, numbered for their bacterial density, thermophilic free-living amoebae, and pathogenic N. fowleri. The cell density of N. fowleri within the biofilms was significantly affected both by the temperature and the nutrient level (bacteria/amoeba ratio). At 32 °C, the density remained constantly low (1-10 N. fowleri/cm(2)) indicating that the amoebae were in a survival state, whereas at 42 °C the density reached 30-900 N. fowleri/cm(2) indicating an active growth phase. The nutrient level, as well, strongly affected the apparent specific growth rate (?) of N. fowleri in the range of 0.03-0.23 h(-1). At 42 °C a hyperbolic relationship was found between ? and the bacteria/amoeba ratio. A ratio of 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria/amoeba was needed to approach the apparent ?(max) value (0.23 h(-1)). Data analysis also showed that a threshold for the nutrient level of close to 10(4) bacteria/amoeba is needed to detect the growth of N. fowleri in freshwater biofilm. This study emphasizes the important role of the temperature and bacteria as prey to promote not only the growth of N. fowleri, but also its survival. PMID:22695355

  10. Metabolic profiling of biofilm bacteria known to cause microbial influenced corrosion.

    PubMed

    Beale, D J; Morrison, P D; Key, C; Palombo, E A

    2014-01-01

    This study builds upon previous research that demonstrated the simplicity of obtaining metabolite profiles of bacteria in urban water networks, by using the metabolic profile of bacteria extracted from a reticulation pipe biofilm, which is known to cause microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). The extracellular metabolites of the isolated bacteria, and those bacteria in consortium, were analysed in isolation, and after exposure to low levels of copper. Applying chemometric analytical methodologies to the metabolomic data, we were able to better understand the profile of the isolated biofilm bacteria, which were differentiated according to their activity and copper exposure. It was found that the metabolic activity of the isolated bacteria and the bacteria in consortium varied according to the bacterium's ability to metabolise copper. This demonstrates the power of metabolomic techniques for the discrimination of water reticulation biofilms comprising similar bacteria in consortium, but undergoing different physico-chemical activities, such as corrosion and corrosion inhibition. PMID:24434961

  11. Microbial astronauts: assembling microbial communities for advanced life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. S.; Garland, J. L.; Mills, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    Extension of human habitation into space requires that humans carry with them many of the microorganisms with which they coexist on Earth. The ubiquity of microorganisms in close association with all living things and biogeochemical processes on Earth predicates that they must also play a critical role in maintaining the viability of human life in space. Even though bacterial populations exist as locally adapted ecotypes, the abundance of individuals in microbial species is so large that dispersal is unlikely to be limited by geographical barriers on Earth (i.e., for most environments "everything is everywhere" given enough time). This will not be true for microbial communities in space where local species richness will be relatively low because of sterilization protocols prior to launch and physical barriers between Earth and spacecraft after launch. Although community diversity will be sufficient to sustain ecosystem function at the onset, richness and evenness may decline over time such that biological systems either lose functional potential (e.g., bioreactors may fail to reduce BOD or nitrogen load) or become susceptible to invasion by human-associated microorganisms (pathogens) over time. Research at the John F. Kennedy Space Center has evaluated fundamental properties of microbial diversity and community assembly in prototype bioregenerative systems for NASA Advanced Life Support. Successional trends related to increased niche specialization, including an apparent increase in the proportion of nonculturable types of organisms, have been consistently observed. In addition, the stability of the microbial communities, as defined by their resistance to invasion by human-associated microorganisms, has been correlated to their diversity. Overall, these results reflect the significant challenges ahead for the assembly of stable, functional communities using gnotobiotic approaches, and the need to better define the basic biological principles that define ecosystem processes in the space environment. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Metagenome analyses of corroded concrete wastewater pipe biofilms reveal a complex microbial system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Concrete corrosion of wastewater collection systems is a significant cause of deterioration and premature collapse. Failure to adequately address the deteriorating infrastructure networks threatens our environment, public health, and safety. Analysis of whole-metagenome pyrosequencing data and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries was used to determine microbial composition and functional genes associated with biomass harvested from crown (top) and invert (bottom) sections of a corroded wastewater pipe. Results Taxonomic and functional analysis demonstrated that approximately 90% of the total diversity was associated with the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. The top (TP) and bottom pipe (BP) communities were different in composition, with some of the differences attributed to the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Additionally, human fecal bacteria were more abundant in the BP communities. Among the functional categories, proteins involved in sulfur and nitrogen metabolism showed the most significant differences between biofilms. There was also an enrichment of genes associated with heavy metal resistance, virulence (protein secretion systems) and stress response in the TP biofilm, while a higher number of genes related to motility and chemotaxis were identified in the BP biofilm. Both biofilms contain a high number of genes associated with resistance to antibiotics and toxic compounds subsystems. Conclusions The function potential of wastewater biofilms was highly diverse with level of COG diversity similar to that described for soil. On the basis of the metagenomic data, some factors that may contribute to niche differentiation were pH, aerobic conditions and availability of substrate, such as nitrogen and sulfur. The results from this study will help us better understand the genetic network and functional capability of microbial members of wastewater concrete biofilms. PMID:22727216

  13. Manganese\\/polymetallic nodules: Microstructural characterization of exolithobiontic- and endolithobiontic microbial biofilms by scanning electron microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaohong Wang; Heinz C. Schröder; Matthias Wiens; Ute Schloßmacher; Werner E. G. Müller

    2009-01-01

    Polymetallic\\/ferromanganese nodules (Mn-nodules) provide a rich source for manganese. It is not yet known if the nodules have a biogenic or an abiogenic origin. Here we applied the technique of high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopical (EDX) analysis, to trace the existence of microbial biofilms. Two spatially separated assemblies exist, the exolithobiontic- and endolithobiontic colonizations.

  14. Role of Cyanobacterial Exopolysaccharides in Phototrophic Biofilms and in Complex Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Federico; De Philippis, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) are an important class of biopolymers with great ecological importance. In natural environments, they are a common feature of microbial biofilms, where they play key protective and structural roles. As the primary colonizers of constrained environments, such as desert soils and lithic and exposed substrates, cyanobacteria are the first contributors to the synthesis of the EPSs constituting the extracellular polymeric matrix that favors the formation of microbial associations with varying levels of complexity called biofilms. Cyanobacterial colonization represents the first step for the formation of biofilms with different levels of complexity. In all of the possible systems in which cyanobacteria are involved, the synthesis of EPSs contributes a structurally-stable and hydrated microenvironment, as well as chemical/physical protection against biotic and abiotic stress factors. Notwithstanding the important roles of cyanobacterial EPSs, many aspects related to their roles and the relative elicited biotic and abiotic factors have still to be clarified. The aim of this survey is to outline the state-of-the-art of the importance of the cyanobacterial EPS excretion, both for the producing cells and for the microbial associations in which cyanobacteria are a key component. PMID:25837843

  15. Power output and columbic efficiencies from biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens comparable to mixed community microbial fuel cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. P. Nevin; H. Richter; S. F. Covalla; J. P. Johnson; T. L. Woodard; A. L. Orloff; H. Jia; M. Zhang; D. R. Lovley

    2008-01-01

    Summary It has been previously noted that mixed communities typically produce more power in microbial fuel cells than pure cultures. If true, this has important implica- tions for the design of microbial fuel cells and for studying the process of electron transfer on anode biofilms. To further evaluate this, Geobacter sulfurre- ducens was grown with acetate as fuel in a

  16. Initial development and structure of biofilms on microbial fuel cell anodes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) rely on electrochemically active bacteria to capture the chemical energy contained in organics and convert it to electrical energy. Bacteria develop biofilms on the MFC electrodes, allowing considerable conversion capacity and opportunities for extracellular electron transfer (EET). The present knowledge on EET is centred around two Gram-negative models, i.e. Shewanella and Geobacter species, as it is believed that Gram-positives cannot perform EET by themselves as the Gram-negatives can. To understand how bacteria form biofilms within MFCs and how their development, structure and viability affects electron transfer, we performed pure and co-culture experiments. Results Biofilm viability was maintained highest nearer the anode during closed circuit operation (current flowing), in contrast to when the anode was in open circuit (soluble electron acceptor) where viability was highest on top of the biofilm, furthest from the anode. Closed circuit anode Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were considerably thinner compared to the open circuit anode (30 ± 3 ?m and 42 ± 3 ?m respectively), which is likely due to the higher energetic gain of soluble electron acceptors used. The two Gram-positive bacteria used only provided a fraction of current produced by the Gram-negative organisms. Power output of co-cultures Gram-positive Enterococcus faecium and either Gram-negative organisms, increased by 30-70% relative to the single cultures. Over time the co-culture biofilms segregated, in particular, Pseudomonas aeruginosa creating towers piercing through a thin, uniform layer of Enterococcus faecium. P. aeruginosa and E. faecium together generated a current of 1.8 ± 0.4 mA while alone they produced 0.9 ± 0.01 and 0.2 ± 0.05 mA respectively. Conclusion We postulate that this segregation may be an essential difference in strategy for electron transfer and substrate capture between the Gram-negative and the Gram-positive bacteria used here. PMID:20356407

  17. Impact of flow conditions on ammonium uptake and microbial community structure in benthic biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shai; Yanuka, Keren; Nejidat, Ali

    2010-05-01

    Excess nitrogen in surface waters is widely recognized to be a major global problem that adversely affects ecosystems, human health, and the economy. Today, most efforts to understand and model nutrient dynamics at large scales relies on macro-scale parameterization, such as mean channel geometry and velocity with uniform flow assumptions, as well as gross averages of in-situ nutrient transformation rates. However, there is increasing evidence that nutrient transformations in hyporheic zone are regulated by coupling between physical, chemical, and microbiological processes. Ignoring this greatly hinders the estimation of average biochemical transformation rates under the variable flow conditions found in aquatic systems. We used a combination of macro- and micro-scale observations in laboratory flumes to show that interplay between hydrodynamic transport, redox gradients, and microbial metabolism controls ammonium utilization by hyporheic microbial communities. Biofilm structural characteristics were quantified using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real time PCR, while redox and pH gradients were measured using microelectrodes. We found that overlying velocities had profound effect on ammonium uptake due to mass transfer of ammonium from the bulk water to the benthic biofilms, but also due to the delivery of oxygen into the sediment bed. Under laminar flow conditions we didn't observe any change of ammonium uptake as a response to increase in overlying velocity. However, under non-laminar conditions we observe monotonic increase in ammonium uptake, with the greatest uptake under the fastest flow condition. We will discuss ammonium uptake rates results in the context of the different microbial communities and the micro-scale observations that were obtained using the microelectrodes. We anticipate that combined knowledge of the response of the microbial community and bulk nitrogen utilization rates to flow conditions will support the development of improved strategies that rely on biofilm growth to enhance nitrogen removal in natural and engineered systems.

  18. Assessment of Microbial Diversity in Biofilms Recovered from Endotracheal Tubes Using Culture Dependent and Independent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Vandecandelaere, Ilse; Matthijs, Nele; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Vosters, Peter; De Bus, Liesbet; Nelis, Hans J.; Depuydt, Pieter; Coenye, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common nosocomial infection in mechanically ventilated patients. Biofilm formation is one of the mechanisms through which the endotracheal tube (ET) facilitates bacterial contamination of the lower airways. In the present study, we analyzed the composition of the ET biofilm flora by means of culture dependent and culture independent (16 S rRNA gene clone libraries and pyrosequencing) approaches. Overall, the microbial diversity was high and members of different phylogenetic lineages were detected (Actinobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria, Candida spp., Clostridia, epsilon-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and gamma-Proteobacteria). Culture dependent analysis, based on the use of selective growth media and conventional microbiological tests, resulted in the identification of typical aerobic nosocomial pathogens which are known to play a role in the development of VAP, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Other opportunistic pathogens were also identified, including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Kocuria varians. In general, there was little correlation between the results obtained by sequencing 16 S rRNA gene clone libraries and by cultivation. Pyrosequencing of PCR amplified 16 S rRNA genes of four selected samples resulted in the identification of a much wider variety of bacteria. The results from the pyrosequencing analysis suggest that these four samples were dominated by members of the normal oral flora such as Prevotella spp., Peptostreptococcus spp. and lactic acid bacteria. A combination of methods is recommended to obtain a complete picture of the microbial diversity of the ET biofilm. PMID:22693635

  19. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stéphanie; Gülay, Arda; Ruscalleda, Maël; Terada, Akihiko; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Hansen, Martin Asser; Sørensen, Søren J; Smets, Barth F

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration can bring the rapid and long-term suppression of NOB and the onset of the activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses confirmed that such shift in performance was mirrored by a change in population densities, with a very drastic reduction of the NOB?Nitrospira and Nitrobacter and a 10-fold increase in AnAOB numbers. The study of biofilm sections with relevant 16S rRNA fluorescent probes revealed strongly stratified biofilm structures fostering aerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biofilm areas close to the membrane surface (rich in oxygen) and AnAOB in regions neighbouring the liquid phase. Both communities were separated by a transition region potentially populated by denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria. AOB and AnAOB bacterial groups were more abundant and diverse than NOB, and dominated by the r-strategists Nitrosomonas europaea and Ca. Brocadia anammoxidans, respectively. Taken together, the present work presents tools to better engineer, monitor and control the microbial communities that support robust, sustainable and efficient nitrogen removal. PMID:24112350

  20. Dynamic microbial response of sulfidogenic wastewater biofilm to nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janani Mohanakrishnan; Michael Vedel Wegener Kofoed; Jeremy Barr; Zhiguo Yuan; Andreas Schramm; Rikke Louise Meyer

    Nitrate is one of the chemicals often added to wastewater to control hydrogen sulfide production by sulfate-reducing bacteria\\u000a (SRB). While the effect of nitrate in various SRB pure cultures is well documented, the effect observed in mixed microbial\\u000a communities is not consistent. This study investigates the response of mixed SRB communities to nitrate, by examining the\\u000a changes in activity and

  1. Identification of Biofilm Matrix-Associated Proteins from an Acid Mine Drainage Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yongqin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); D'Haeseleer, Patrik M [ORNL; Dill, Brian [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley

    2011-01-01

    In microbial communities, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), also called the extracellular matrix, provide the spatial organization and structural stability during biofilm development. One of the major components of EPS is protein, but it is not clear what specific functions these proteins contribute to the extracellular matrix or to microbial physiology. To investigate this in biofilms from an extremely acidic environment, we used shotgun proteomics analyses to identify proteins associated with EPS in biofilms at two developmental stages, designated DS1 and DS2. The proteome composition of the EPS was significantly different from that of the cell fraction, with more than 80% of the cellular proteins underrepresented or undetectable in EPS. In contrast, predicted periplasmic, outer membrane, and extracellular proteins were overrepresented by 3- to 7-fold in EPS. Also, EPS proteins were more basic by 2 pH units on average and about half the length. When categorized by predicted function, proteins involved in motility, defense, cell envelope, and unknown functions were enriched in EPS. Chaperones, such as histone-like DNA binding protein and cold shock protein, were overrepresented in EPS. Enzymes, such as protein peptidases, disulfide-isomerases, and those associated with cell wall and polysaccharide metabolism, were also detected. Two of these enzymes, identified as -N-acetylhexosaminidase and cellulase, were confirmed in the EPS fraction by enzymatic activity assays. Compared to the differences between EPS and cellular fractions, the relative differences in the EPS proteomes between DS1 and DS2 were smaller and consistent with expected physiological changes during biofilm development.

  2. A Modern Perspective on Ancient Life: Microbial Mats in Sandy Marine Settings from the Archean Era to Today

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nora Noffke

    \\u000a Most valuable paleontological studies on the ancient life in the Archean era are on fossils of bacterial cells preserved in\\u000a chert, or on the famous stromatolites we find in the oldest carbonate or silica rocks. The past decade, a new window into\\u000a Earth’s most antique worlds opened: Modern sandy coastal areas and the biofilms and microbial mats therein! The interaction

  3. Role of bacterial adhesion in the microbial ecology of biofilms in cooling tower systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas; Warta, Richard; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Packman, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    The fate of the three heterotrophic biofilm forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. in pilot scale cooling towers was evaluated both by observing the persistence of each species in the recirculating water and the formation of biofilms on steel coupons placed in each cooling tower water reservoir. Two different cooling tower experiments were performed: a short-term study (6 days) to observe the initial bacterial colonization of the cooling tower, and a long-term study (3 months) to observe the ecological dynamics with repeated introduction of the test strains. An additional set of batch experiments (6 days) was carried out to evaluate the adhesion of each strain to steel surfaces under similar conditions to those found in the cooling tower experiments. Substantial differences were observed in the microbial communities that developed in the batch systems and cooling towers. P. aeruginosa showed a low degree of adherence to steel surfaces both in batch and in the cooling towers, but grew much faster than K. pneumoniae and Flavobacterium in mixed-species biofilms and ultimately became the dominant organism in the closed batch systems. However, the low degree of adherence caused P. aeruginosa to be rapidly washed out of the open cooling tower systems, and Flavobacterium became the dominant microorganism in the cooling towers in both the short-term and long-term experiments. These results indicate that adhesion, retention and growth on solid surfaces play important roles in the bacterial community that develops in cooling tower systems. PMID:19177226

  4. A biofilm enhanced miniature microbial fuel cell using Shewanella oneidensis DSP10 and oxygen reduction cathodes.

    PubMed

    Biffinger, Justin C; Pietron, Jeremy; Ray, Ricky; Little, Brenda; Ringeisen, Bradley R

    2007-03-15

    A miniature-microbial fuel cell (mini-MFC, chamber volume: 1.2 mL) was used to monitor biofilm development from a pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis DSP10 on graphite felt (GF) under minimal nutrient conditions. ESEM evidence of biofilm formation on GF is supported by substantial power density (per device cross-section) from the mini-MFC when using an acellular minimal media anolyte (1500 mW/m2). These experiments demonstrate that power density per volume for a biofilm flow reactor MFC should be calculated using the anode chamber volume alone (250W/m3), rather than with the full anolyte volume. Two oxygen reduction cathodes (uncoated GF or a Pt/vulcanized carbon coating on GF) were also compared to a cathode using uncoated GF and a 50mM ferricyanide catholyte solution. The Pt/C-GF (2-4% Pt by mass) electrodes with liquid cultures of DSP10 produced one order of magnitude larger power density (150W/m3) than bare graphite felt (12W/m3) in this design. These advances are some of the required modifications to enable the mini-MFC to be used in real-time, long-term environmental power generating situations. PMID:16939710

  5. Role of bacterial adhesion in the microbial ecology of biofilms in cooling tower systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas; Warta, Richard; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Packman, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    The fate of the three heterotrophic biofilm forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. in pilot scale cooling towers was evaluated both by observing the persistence of each species in the recirculating water and the formation of biofilms on steel coupons placed in each cooling tower water reservoir. Two different cooling tower experiments were performed: a short-term study (6 days) to observe the initial bacterial colonization of the cooling tower, and a long-term study (3 months) to observe the ecological dynamics with repeated introduction of the test strains. An additional set of batch experiments (6 days) was carried out to evaluate the adhesion of each strain to steel surfaces under similar conditions to those found in the cooling tower experiments. Substantial differences were observed in the microbial communities that developed in the batch systems and cooling towers. P. aeruginosa showed a low degree of adherence to steel surfaces both in batch and in the cooling towers, but grew much faster than K. pneumoniae and Flavobacterium in mixed-species biofilms and ultimately became the dominant organism in the closed batch systems. However, the low degree of adherence caused P. aeruginosa to be rapidly washed out of the open cooling tower systems, and Flavobacterium became the dominant microorganism in the cooling towers in both the short-term and long-term experiments. These results indicate that adhesion, retention and growth on solid surfaces play important roles in the bacterial community that develops in cooling tower systems. PMID:19177226

  6. Community structure of microbial biofilms associated with membrane-based water purification processes as revealed using a polyphasic approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C.-L. Chen; W.-T. Liu; M.-L. Chong; M.-T. Wong; S. L. Ong; H. Seah; W. J. Ng

    2004-01-01

    The microbial communities of membrane biofilms occurring in two full-scale water purification processes employing microfiltration (MF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were characterized using a polyphasic approach that employed bacterial cultivation, 16S rDNA clone library and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. All methods showed that the a-Proteobacteria was the largest microbial fraction in the samples, followed by the ?-Proteobacteria. This

  7. Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2014-04-07

    Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

  8. Seasonal variations of the composition of microbial biofilms in sandy tidal flats: Focus of fatty acids, pigments and exopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passarelli, Claire; Meziane, Tarik; Thiney, Najet; Boeuf, Dominique; Jesus, Bruno; Ruivo, Mickael; Jeanthon, Christian; Hubas, Cédric

    2015-02-01

    Biofilms, or microbial mats, are common associations of microorganisms in tidal flats; they generally consist of a large diversity of organisms embedded in a matrix of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS). These molecules are mainly composed of carbohydrates and proteins, but their detailed monomer compositions and seasonal variations are currently unknown. Yet this composition determines the numerous roles of biofilms in these systems. This study investigated the changes in composition of carbohydrates in intertidal microbial mats over a year to decipher seasonal variations in biofilms and in varying hydrodynamic conditions. This work also aimed to assess how these compositions are related to microbial assemblages. In this context, natural biofilms whose development was influenced or not by artificial structures mimicking polychaete tubes were sampled monthly for over a year in intertidal flats of the Chausey archipelago. Biofilms were compared through the analysis of their fatty acid and pigment contents, and the monosaccharide composition of their EPS carbohydrates. Carbohydrates from both colloidal and bound EPS contained mainly glucose and, to a lower extent, galactose and mannose but they showed significant differences in their detailed monosaccharide compositions. These two fractions displayed different seasonal evolution, even if glucose accumulated in both fractions in summer; bound EPS only were affected by artificial biogenic structures. Sediment composition in fatty acids and pigments showed that microbial communities were dominated by diatoms and heterotrophic bacteria. Their relative proportions, as well as those of other groups like cryptophytes, changed between times and treatments. The changes in EPS composition were not fully explained by modifications of microbial assemblages but also depended on the processes taking place in sediments and on environmental conditions. These variations of EPS compositions are likely to alter different ecosystem processes such as biostabilisation or pollutants trapping.

  9. [Analysis of structure changes of microbial community in medium biofilm by ERIC-PCR fingerprinting].

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-zhi; Li, Xiu-yan; Zhao, Ya-ping; Huang, Min-sheng; Yu, Xue-zhen; Jin, Cheng-xiang; Xu, Ya-tong

    2006-12-01

    A new technique, with medium biofilms and hydrophytes as main components, with microbes, plankton, hydrophytes and aquatic animals as basic ecological elements, was adopted to deal with eutrophication water in Shanghai. A pilot-scale test was carried on, with influent as 6 m(3)/d, 7 ponds parallelly connected, and with continuous influent and effluent. Water qualities were analyzed and ERIC-PCR fingerprinting method was used to study the natures of biofilm microbes. The results show that, the device has obvious affection on eutrophication water pollution removal, COD, TN, NH4+-N and TP removal efficiencies are respectively 20.7% - 48.5%, 20.1% - 49.7%, 39.8% - 66.2 % and 60.0% - 73.9% higher than those of control experiment. Water plants contribute for N and P absorption and removal, the three ponds with plants have higher TN and TP removal efficiency than the tree ones without hydrophytes, the enhanced TN removal efficiencies are 30.1%, 24.9% and 17.6% respectively. ERIC-PCR fingerprinting indicate that the three ponds with water plants have more similar microbial community structure to each other than no hydrophyte ponds, and that mean pairwise similarity coefficient value are 71.8% , 86.9% and 91.0% respectively on 2nd, 15th and 30th day, and at the same time the population diversity indexes rang from 1.89 to 2.22, 2.17 to 2.43 and 2.28 to 2.68, respectively. The above discussions conclude that the systemic population diversity indexes and structure similarity increase, biofilm microbes have gradually abundant population and stable structure, which are in accord with pollution removal efficiencies. PMID:17304855

  10. Biofilms: Online Manual

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Lennox

    This on-line collection of exercises can be conducted to illustrate the formation and properties of microbial biofilms. Activities include: A Biofilm Primer, An Interesting Paradox, Build a Biofilm Reactor, Bring 'em Back Alive, Buccal Epithelial Cells & Bacterial Cells: Negative Staining, Buried Slide Technique, Dental Biofilms, Flow Through Gram Stain, Microbial Fishing, Pellicle Formation in a Hay Infusion, Rhizosphere Visualization, Microbial Leaching of Copper Ore, Build a Winogradsky Column, Growth of Dental Plaque in vitro, Biofilms from Soil Crumbs, Vinegar Production and Acetic Acid Titration, Isolation of Azospirillum, Observation of the Formation of Biofilms in a Flowing Environment, Measuring Biofilm Depth.

  11. Monitoring of microbial souring in chemically treated, produced-water biofilm systems using molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Kjellerup, B V; Veeh, R H; Sumithraratne, P; Thomsen, T R; Buckingham-Meyer, K; Frølund, B; Sturman, P

    2005-04-01

    The identification of bacteria in oil production facilities has previously been based on culture techniques. However, cultivation of bacteria from these often-extreme environments can lead to errors in identifying the microbial community members. In this study, molecular techniques including fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and sequencing were used to track changes in bacterial biofilm populations treated with nitrate, nitrite, or nitrate+molybdate as agents for the control of sulfide production. Results indicated that nitrite and nitrate+molybdate reduced sulfide production, while nitrate alone had no effect on sulfide generation. No long-term effect on sulfide production was observed. Initial sulfate-reducing bacterial numbers were not influenced by the chemical treatments, although a significant increase in sulfate-reducing bacteria was observed after termination of the treatments. Molecular analysis showed a diverse bacterial population, but no major shifts in the population due to treatment effects were observed. PMID:15843975

  12. Microbial Life beneath a High Arctic Glacier†

    PubMed Central

    Skidmore, Mark L.; Foght, Julia M.; Sharp, Martin J.

    2000-01-01

    The debris-rich basal ice layers of a high Arctic glacier were shown to contain metabolically diverse microbes that could be cultured oligotrophically at low temperatures (0.3 to 4°C). These organisms included aerobic chemoheterotrophs and anaerobic nitrate reducers, sulfate reducers, and methanogens. Colonies purified from subglacial samples at 4°C appeared to be predominantly psychrophilic. Aerobic chemoheterotrophs were metabolically active in unfrozen basal sediments when they were cultured at 0.3°C in the dark (to simulate nearly in situ conditions), producing 14CO2 from radiolabeled sodium acetate with minimal organic amendment (?38 ?M C). In contrast, no activity was observed when samples were cultured at subfreezing temperatures (??1.8°C) for 66 days. Electron microscopy of thawed basal ice samples revealed various cell morphologies, including dividing cells. This suggests that the subglacial environment beneath a polythermal glacier provides a viable habitat for life and that microbes may be widespread where the basal ice is temperate and water is present at the base of the glacier and where organic carbon from glacially overridden soils is present. Our observations raise the possibility that in situ microbial production of CO2 and CH4 beneath ice masses (e.g., the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets) is an important factor in carbon cycling during glacial periods. Moreover, this terrestrial environment may provide a model for viable habitats for life on Mars, since similar conditions may exist or may have existed in the basal sediments beneath the Martian north polar ice cap. PMID:10919772

  13. Next-generation pyrosequencing analysis of microbial biofilm communities on granular activated carbon in treatment of oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Shahinoor; Zhang, Yanyan; McPhedran, Kerry N; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2015-06-15

    The development of biodegradation treatment processes for oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) has been progressing in recent years with the promising potential of biofilm reactors. Previously, the granular activated carbon (GAC) biofilm process was successfully employed for treatment of a large variety of recalcitrant organic compounds in domestic and industrial wastewaters. In this study, GAC biofilm microbial development and degradation efficiency were investigated for OSPW treatment by monitoring the biofilm growth on the GAC surface in raw and ozonated OSPW in batch bioreactors. The GAC biofilm community was characterized using a next-generation 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing technique that revealed that the phylum Proteobacteria was dominant in both OSPW and biofilms, with further in-depth analysis showing higher abundances of Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria sequences. Interestingly, many known polyaromatic hydrocarbon degraders, namely, Burkholderiales, Pseudomonadales, Bdellovibrionales, and Sphingomonadales, were observed in the GAC biofilm. Ozonation decreased the microbial diversity in planktonic OSPW but increased the microbial diversity in the GAC biofilms. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed similar bacterial gene copy numbers (>10(9) gene copies/g of GAC) for both raw and ozonated OSPW GAC biofilms. The observed rates of removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) over the 2-day experiments for the GAC biofilm treatments of raw and ozonated OSPW were 31% and 66%, respectively. Overall, a relatively low ozone dose (30 mg of O3/liter utilized) combined with GAC biofilm treatment significantly increased NA removal rates. The treatment of OSPW in bioreactors using GAC biofilms is a promising technology for the reduction of recalcitrant OSPW organic compounds. PMID:25841014

  14. Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers of higher-power-producing bacteria than abundant genera.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Patrick D; Call, Douglas F; Yates, Matthew D; Regan, John M; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-09-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode communities often reveal just a few genera, but it is not known to what extent less abundant bacteria could be important for improving performance. We examined the microbial community in an MFC fed with formic acid for more than 1 year and determined using 16S rRNA gene cloning and fluorescent in situ hybridization that members of the Paracoccus genus comprised most (approximately 30%) of the anode community. A Paracoccus isolate obtained from this biofilm (Paracoccus denitrificans strain PS-1) produced only 5.6 mW/m(2), whereas the original mixed culture produced up to 10 mW/m(2). Despite the absence of any Shewanella species in the clone library, we isolated a strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (strain PS-2) from the same biofilm capable of producing a higher-power density (17.4 mW/m(2)) than the mixed culture, although voltage generation was variable. Our results suggest that the numerical abundance of microorganisms in biofilms cannot be assumed a priori to correlate to capacities of these predominant species for high-power production. Detailed screening of bacterial biofilms may therefore be needed to identify important strains capable of high-power generation for specific substrates. PMID:20632002

  15. COD removal from expanded granular sludge bed effluent using a moving bed biofilm reactor and their microbial community analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo Fu; Xiaoyi Liao; Rui Liang; Lili Ding; Ke Xu; Hongqiang Ren

    2011-01-01

    The bioreactor performance of a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) as post-treatment of expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB)\\u000a effluent was investigated. Moreover, the microbial communities of the two bioreactors during different operation periods were\\u000a studied. The MBBR was efficient for COD removal with the mean efficiency of 82.4%, and produced an effluent with high and\\u000a stable quality against shock loading

  16. Nitrogen removal in a single-chamber microbial fuel cell with nitrifying biofilm enriched at the air cathode.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hengjing; Saito, Tomonori; Regan, John M

    2012-05-01

    Nitrogen removal is needed in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for the treatment of most waste streams. Current designs couple biological denitrification with side-stream or combined nitrification sustained by upstream or direct aeration, which negates some of the energy-saving benefits of MFC technology. To achieve simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, without extra energy input for aeration, the air cathode of a single-chamber MFC was pre-enriched with a nitrifying biofilm. Diethylamine-functionalized polymer (DEA) was used as the Pt catalyst binder on the cathode to improve the differential nitrifying biofilm establishment. With pre-enriched nitrifying biofilm, MFCs with the DEA binder had an ammonia removal efficiency of up to 96.8% and a maximum power density of 900 ± 25 mW/m(2), compared to 90.7% and 945 ± 42 mW/m(2) with a Nafion binder. A control with Nafion that lacked nitrifier pre-enrichment removed less ammonia and had lower power production (54.5% initially, 750 mW/m(2)). The nitrifying biofilm MFCs had lower Coulombic efficiencies (up to 27%) than the control reactor (up to 36%). The maximum total nitrogen removal efficiency reached 93.9% for MFCs with the DEA binder. The DEA binder accelerated nitrifier biofilm enrichment on the cathode, and enhanced system stability. These results demonstrated that with proper cathode pre-enrichment it is possible to simultaneously remove organics and ammonia in a single-chamber MFC without supplemental aeration. PMID:22386083

  17. In situ microbial ecology for quantitative appraisal, monitoring, and risk assessment of pollution remediation in soils, the subsurface, the rhizosphere and in biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David C White; Cecily A Flemming; Kam T Leung; Sarah J Macnaughton

    1998-01-01

    Numerous studies have established a relationship between soil, sediment, surface biofilm and subsurface contaminant pollution and a marked impact on the in situ microbial community in both microcosms and in the field. The impact of pollution on the in situ microbial community can now be quantitatively measured by molecular `fingerprinting' using `signature' biomarkers. Such molecular fingerprinting methods can replace classical

  18. A Novel Strategy for Control of Microbial Biofilms through Generation of Biocide at the Biofilm-Surface Interface

    PubMed Central

    Wood, P.; Jones, M.; Bhakoo, M.; Gilbert, P.

    1996-01-01

    Biofilms of a mucoid clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (24 h; ca. 10(sup6) CFU/cm(sup2)) were established by immersion of polymer discs in nutrient broth cultures at 37(deg)C. Biofilms exposed for 30 min to various concentrations (0 to 3 mg/ml) of hydrogen peroxide or potassium monopersulfate were rinsed and shaken vigorously in sterile saline to detach loosely associated cells, and the residual viable attached population was quantified by a blot succession method on agar plates. Incorporation of copper and cobalt phthalocyanine catalysts within the polymers significantly enhanced the activity of these oxidizing biocides towards biofilm bacteria by several orders of magnitude. Biofilms established on the control discs resisted treatment with concentrations of either agent of up to 3 mg/ml. Enhancement through incorporation of a catalyst was such that concentrations of potassium monopersulfate of as low as 20 (mu)g/ml gave no recoverable survivors either on the discs or within the washings. Catalysts such as these will promote the formation of active oxygen species from a number of oxidizing agents such as peroxides and persulfates, and it is thought that generation of these at the surface-biofilm interface concentrates the antimicrobial effect to the interfacial cells and generates a diffusion pump which further provides active species to the biofilm matrix. The survivors of low-concentration treatments with these agents were more readily removed from the catalyst-containing discs than from the control discs. This indicated advantages gained in hygienic cleansing of such modified surfaces. PMID:16535366

  19. Continuous nondestructive monitoring of microbial biofilms: A review of analytical techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D E Nivens; RJ Palmer Jr; D C White

    1995-01-01

    A fundamental requirement for the understanding and control of biofilms is the continuous nondestructive monitoring of biofilm processes. This paper reviews research analytical techniques that monitor biofilm processes in a continuous nondestructive manner and that could also be modified for industrial applications. To be considered ‘continuous’ and ‘nondestructive’ for the purpose of this review a technique must: (a) function in

  20. Intermittent contact of fluidized anode particles containing exoelectrogenic biofilms for continuous power generation in microbial

    E-print Network

    for biofilm formation, and slow substrate degradation kinetics. Increasing the anode surface area can increase the amount of biofilm, but performance will improve only if the anode material is located near the cathode of flowable electrode reactors, where anode biofilms can be electrically charged in a separate storage tank

  1. Biofilms in food processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Hood; E. A. Zottola

    1995-01-01

    Microbial colonization of surfaces (biofilms) have been documented in many environments. Recently, researchers have suggested that biofilms may be a source of contamination in food processing environments. This review will discuss some historical aspects of biofilms, possible mechanisms for the adherence of bacteria to surfaces, methods for studying biofilms and problems adherent microorganisms may cause in food processing.

  2. Microbial life in a liquid asphalt desert.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Haque, Shirin; de Sousa Antonio, Marina Resendes; Ali, Denzil; Hosein, Riad; Song, Young C; Yang, Jinshu; Zaikova, Elena; Beckles, Denise M; Guinan, Edward; Lehto, Harry J; Hallam, Steven J

    2011-04-01

    Pitch Lake in Trinidad and Tobago is a natural asphalt reservoir nourished by pitch seepage, a form of petroleum that consists of mostly asphaltines, from the surrounding oil-rich region. During upward seepage, pitch mixes with mud and gases under high pressure, and the lighter portion evaporates or is volatilized, which produces a liquid asphalt residue characterized by low water activity, recalcitrant carbon substrates, and noxious chemical compounds. An active microbial community of archaea and bacteria, many of them novel strains (particularly from the new Tar ARC groups), totaling a biomass of up to 10(7) cells per gram, was found to inhabit the liquid hydrocarbon matrix of Pitch Lake. Geochemical and molecular taxonomic approaches revealed diverse, novel, and deeply branching microbial lineages with the potential to mediate anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation processes in different parts of the asphalt column. In addition, we found markers for archaeal methane metabolism and specific gene sequences affiliated with facultative and obligate anaerobic sulfur- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The microbial diversity at Pitch Lake was found to be unique when compared to microbial communities analyzed at other hydrocarbon-rich environments, which included Rancho Le Brea, a natural asphalt environment in California, USA, and an oil well and a mud volcano in Trinidad and Tobago, among other sites. These results open a window into the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of recalcitrant hydrocarbon matrices and establish the site as a terrestrial analogue for modeling the biotic potential of hydrocarbon lakes such as those found on Saturn's largest moon Titan. PMID:21480792

  3. Microbial Life in Soil - Linking Biophysical Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Dani; Tecon, Robin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Kleyer, Hannah; Ilie, Olga; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Microbial life in soil occurs within fragmented aquatic habitats formed in complex pore spaces where motility is restricted to short hydration windows (e.g., following rainfall). The limited range of self-dispersion and physical confinement promote spatial association among trophically interdepended microbial species. Competition and preferences for different nutrient resources and byproducts and their diffusion require high level of spatial organization to sustain the functioning of multispecies communities. We report mechanistic modeling studies of competing multispecies microbial communities grown on hydrated surfaces and within artificial soil aggregates (represented by 3-D pore network). Results show how trophic dependencies and cell-level interactions within patchy diffusion fields promote spatial self-organization of motile microbial cells. The spontaneously forming patterns of segregated, yet coexisting species were robust to spatial heterogeneities and to temporal perturbations (hydration dynamics), and respond primarily to the type of trophic dependencies. Such spatially self-organized consortia may reflect ecological templates that optimize substrate utilization and could form the basic architecture for more permanent surface-attached microbial colonies. Hydration dynamics affect structure and spatial arrangement of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities and their biogeochemical functions. Experiments with well-characterized artificial soil microbial assemblies grown on porous surfaces provide access to community dynamics during wetting and drying cycles detected through genetic fingerprinting. Experiments for visual observations of spatial associations of tagged bacterial species with known trophic dependencies on model porous surfaces are underway. Biophysical modeling provide a means for predicting hydration-mediated critical separation distances for activation of spatial self-organization. The study provides new modeling and observational tools that enable new mechanistic insights into how differences in substrate affinities among microbial species and soil micro-hydrological conditions may give rise to a remarkable spatial and functional order in an extremely heterogeneous soil microbial world

  4. Enhanced visualization of microbial biofilms by staining and environmental scanning electron microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John H. Priester; Allison M. Horst; Laurie C. Van De Werfhorst; José L. Saleta; Leal A. K. Mertes; Patricia A. Holden

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms, i.e. surface-associated cells covered in hydrated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), are often studied with high-resolution electron microscopy (EM). However, conventional desiccation and high vacuum EM protocols collapse EPS matrices which, in turn, deform biofilm appearances. Alternatively, wet-mode environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) is performed under a moderate vacuum and without biofilm drying. If completely untreated, however, EPS is

  5. Characterisation of the physical composition and microbial community structure of biofilms within a model full-scale drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Fish, Katherine E; Collins, Richard; Green, Nicola H; Sharpe, Rebecca L; Douterelo, Isabel; Osborn, A Mark; Boxall, Joby B

    2015-01-01

    Within drinking water distribution systems (DWDS), microorganisms form multi-species biofilms on internal pipe surfaces. A matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) is produced by the attached community and provides structure and stability for the biofilm. If the EPS adhesive strength deteriorates or is overcome by external shear forces, biofilm is mobilised into the water potentially leading to degradation of water quality. However, little is known about the EPS within DWDS biofilms or how this is influenced by community composition or environmental parameters, because of the complications in obtaining biofilm samples and the difficulties in analysing EPS. Additionally, although biofilms may contain various microbial groups, research commonly focuses solely upon bacteria. This research applies an EPS analysis method based upon fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with digital image analysis (DIA), to concurrently characterize cells and EPS (carbohydrates and proteins) within drinking water biofilms from a full-scale DWDS experimental pipe loop facility with representative hydraulic conditions. Application of the EPS analysis method, alongside DNA fingerprinting of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities, was demonstrated for biofilms sampled from different positions around the pipeline, after 28 days growth within the DWDS experimental facility. The volume of EPS was 4.9 times greater than that of the cells within biofilms, with carbohydrates present as the dominant component. Additionally, the greatest proportion of EPS was located above that of the cells. Fungi and archaea were established as important components of the biofilm community, although bacteria were more diverse. Moreover, biofilms from different positions were similar with respect to community structure and the quantity, composition and three-dimensional distribution of cells and EPS, indicating that active colonisation of the pipe wall is an important driver in material accumulation within the DWDS. PMID:25706303

  6. 3D Imaging of Microbial Biofilms: Integration of Synchrotron Imaging and an Interactive Visualization Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Mathew; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miller, Erin A.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Carson, James P.

    2014-08-26

    Understanding the interactions of structured communities known as “biofilms” and other complex matrixes is possible through the X-ray micro tomography imaging of the biofilms. Feature detection and image processing for this type of data focuses on efficiently identifying and segmenting biofilms and bacteria in the datasets. The datasets are very large and often require manual interventions due to low contrast between objects and high noise levels. Thus new software is required for the effectual interpretation and analysis of the data. This work specifies the evolution and application of the ability to analyze and visualize high resolution X-ray micro tomography datasets.

  7. Microbial biofilm detection on food contact surfaces by macro-scale fluorescence imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging methods were utilized to evaluate the potential of multispectral fluorescence methods for detection of pathogenic biofilm formations on four types of food contact surface materials: stainless steel, high density polyethylene (HDPE) commonly used for cutting boards,...

  8. Effect of formation of biofilms and chemical scale on the cathode electrode on the performance of a continuous two-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyungmi; Fujiki, Itto; Okabe, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    A two-chamber MFC system was operated continuously for more than 500 days to evaluate effects of biofilm and chemical scale formation on the cathode electrode on power generation. A stable power density of 0.57 W/m(2) was attained after 200 days operation. However, the power density decreased drastically to 0.2 W/m(2) after the cathodic biofilm and chemical scale were removed. As the cathodic biofilm and chemical scale partially accumulated on the cathode, the power density gradually recovered with time. Microbial community structure of the cathodic biofilm was analyzed based on 16S rRNA clone libraries. The clones closely related to Xanthomonadaceae bacterium and Xanthomonas sp. in the Gammaproteobacteria subdivision were most frequently retrieved from the cathodic biofilm. Results of the SEM-EDX analysis revealed that the cation species (Na(+) and Ca(2+)) were main constituents of chemical scale, indicating that these cations diffused from the anode chamber through the Nafion membrane. However, an excess accumulation of the biofilm and chemical scale on the cathode exhibited adverse effects on the power generation due to a decrease in the active cathode surface area and an increase in diffusion resistance for oxygen. Thus, it is important to properly control the formation of chemical scale and biofilm on the cathode during long-term operation. PMID:20923722

  9. Microbial Community Structure and Physiological Status of Different Types of Biofilms in an Acid Mine Drainage Site Determined by Phospholipid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.

    2009-12-01

    A unique aspect of the acid mine drainage (AMD) system at the Green Valley coal mine site (GVS) in western Indiana is the abundance of biofims and biolaminates - stromatolites. Three major types of biofilms have been observed from the AMD site: bright green biofilm dominated by the acidophilic, oxygenic photosynthetic protozoan Euglena mutabilis, olive green biofilm of photosynthetic diatom belonging to the genus Nitzschia, and an olive-green to brownish-green filamentous algae-dominated community. These biofilms are either attached to hard substrata of the effluent channel, or floating at the surface of the effluent with abundant oxygen bubbles, with or without encrusted Fe precipitates. We analyzed lipids (hydrocarbons, wax esters, phospholipids, glycolipids, and neutral lipids) to determine the microbial biomass, community structure and physiological status of biofims collected from the GVS site. Distinctive lipid compositions were observed. The attached, red-crusted biofilms were characterized by abundant wax esters, monounsaturated fatty acids, whereas the floating biofilms by phytadienes, phytanol, polyunsaturated n-alkenes, polyunsaturated fatty acids. The accumulation of abundant wax esters probably reflects the readily available carbon and limitation of nutrients to the biofilm. Alternatively, the wax esters may be the biochemical relics of the anaerobic past of the Earth and the detection of these compounds has important implications for the evolution of eukaryotes and the paleo-environmental conditions on early Earth. This type of biochemical machine may have allowed early eukaryotes to survive recurrent anoxic conditions on early Earth.

  10. Uranium removal and microbial community in a H2-based membrane biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Cornette de Saint Cyr, Louis; Zevin, Alexander S; Carey, Sara E; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) for its capacity to reduce and remove hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from water. After a startup period that allowed slow-growing U(VI) reducers to form biofilms, the MBfR successfully achieved and maintained 94-95% U(VI) removal over 8 months when the U surface loading was 6-11 e(-) mEq/m(2)-day. The MBfR biofilm was capable of self-recovery after a disturbance due to oxygen exposure. Nanocrystalline UO2 aggregates and amorphous U precipitates were associated with vegetative cells and apparently mature spores that accumulated in the biofilm matrix. Despite inoculation with a concentrated suspension of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, this bacterium was not present in the U(VI)-reducing biofilm. Instead, the most abundant group in the biofilm community contained U(VI) reducers in the Rhodocyclaceae family when U(VI) was the only electron acceptor. When sulfate was present, the community dramatically shifted to the Clostridiaceae family, which included spores that were potentially involved in U(VI) reduction. PMID:25073000

  11. Biofilm modeling with AQUASIM.

    PubMed

    Wanner, O; Morgenroth, E

    2004-01-01

    AQUASIM is a computer program for the identification and simulation of aquatic systems. The program includes a one-dimensional multisubstrate and multispecies biofilm model and represents a suitable tool for biofilm simulation. The program can be used to calculate substrate removal in biofilm reactors for any user specified microbial system. One-dimensional spatial profiles of substrates and microbial species in the biofilm can be predicted. The program also calculates the development of the biofilm thickness and of the substrates and microbial species in the biofilm and in the bulk fluid over time. Detachment and attachment of microbial cells at the biofilm surface and in the biofilm interior can be considered, and simulations of sloughing events can be performed. Furthermore, AQUASIM allows pseudo two-dimensional modeling of plug flow biofilm reactors by a series of biofilm reactor compartments. The most significant limitation of the model is that it only considers spatial gradients of substrates and microbial species in the biofilm in the direction perpendicular to the substratum. PMID:15303734

  12. On microbial contaminants, micropseudofossils, and the oldest records of life

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloud, P.; Morrison, K.

    1979-01-01

    Microbial contaminants may be introduced on outcrop as well as en route to or in the laboratory. Micropseudofossils may be natural or man-made. It is possible to recognize such misleading objects and important that they are not allowed to dilute the growing record of authentic pre-Phanerozoic life. Filamentous microbial contaminants from minute cracks in samples of ancient carbonate rocks from Brazil (perhaps 1 Ga old) and South Africa (???2.3 Ga old) are similar to occurrences previously described as fossils. Published records of supposedly Archean microbial life also include microcontaminants and laboratory artifacts. Although microstructures from sedimentary rocks of the Swaziland system could be fossils, they are not demonstrably so. The oldest structurally preserved fossils yet known seem to be the filaments described by Lois Nagy from stromatolitic limestone in the ???2.3 Ga old Malmani Dolomite of South Africa. It will be difficult to establish unequivocal older records in the absence of definitive ultrastructural or micro-chemical evidence. ?? 1979.

  13. Microsensor determination of multiple microbial processes in an oxygen-based membrane aerated biofilm.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shuying; Yu, Tong; Shi, Han-chang

    2014-01-01

    Microsensor techniques were used to investigate in situ the simultaneous occurrence of sulfate reduction and nitrogen removal in a membrane aerated biofilm reactor. H2S, O2, pH, ORP, NH4(+) and NO3(-) microsensors were fabricated and used to measure the profiles inside the membrane aerated biofilm. Production and consumption rates of H2S, O2, NH4(+) and NO3(-) were estimated using corresponding concentration profiles. The results showed that in anoxic zone, located from the interface between biofilm and bulk liquid to about 550 ?m below the interface, both sulfate reduction and denitrification occurred. Highest H2S production rates (around 0.27 mg L(-1)s(-1)) were found about 400 to 450 ?m below the interface. Below the anoxic zone, an aerobic zone was present. High H2S oxidation activity occurred at around 550-700 ?m below the interface. High oxygen consumption rates (0.34 mg L(-1)s(-1)) occurred at around 750-900 ?m below the interface. Nitrification activity occurred at about 500-650 ?m below the interface. Along the entire biofilm depth, pH changed slightly (within 0.2 unit). Near the interface of the aerobic and anoxic zone, there was a drastic redox potential change. These results demonstrated simultaneous sulfate reduction and nitrogen removal in a piece of membrane aerated biofilm. PMID:24622536

  14. Microbial diversities (16S and 18S rDNA gene pyrosequencing) and environmental pathogens within drinking water biofilms grown on the common premise plumbing materials unplasticized polyvinylchloride and copper

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water (DW) biofilm communities influence the survival of opportunistic pathogens, e.g. Legionella pneumophila, via parasitization of free-living amoebae such as Acanthamoebae. Yet knowledge about the microbial composition of DW biofilms developed on common in-premise pl...

  15. Effect of different disinfection protocols on microbial and biofilm contamination of dental unit waterlines in community dental practices.

    PubMed

    Dallolio, Laura; Scuderi, Amalia; Rini, Maria S; Valente, Sabrina; Farruggia, Patrizia; Sabattini, Maria A Bucci; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Acacci, Anna; Roncarati, Greta; Leoni, Erica

    2014-02-01

    Output water from dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) may be a potential source of infection for both dental healthcare staff and patients. This study compared the efficacy of different disinfection methods with regard to the water quality and the presence of biofilm in DUWLs. Five dental units operating in a public dental health care setting were selected. The control dental unit had no disinfection system; two were disinfected intermittently with peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide 0.26% and two underwent continuous disinfection with hydrogen peroxide/silver ions (0.02%) and stabilized chlorine dioxide (0.22%), respectively. After three months of applying the disinfection protocols, continuous disinfection systems were more effective than intermittent systems in reducing the microbial contamination of the water, allowing compliance with the CDC guidelines and the European Council regulatory thresholds for drinking water. P. aeruginosa, Legionella spp, sulphite-reducing Clostridium spores, S. aureus and ?-haemolytic streptococci were also absent from units treated with continuous disinfection. The biofilm covering the DUWLs was more extensive, thicker and more friable in the intermittent disinfection dental units than in those with continuous disinfection. Overall, the findings showed that the products used for continuous disinfection of dental unit waterlines showed statistically better results than the intermittent treatment products under the study conditions. PMID:24552789

  16. MLPA diagnostics of complex microbial communities: Relative quantification of bacterial species in oral biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zewdu Terefework; Chi L. Pham; Anja C. Prosperi; Mark M. Entius; Abdellatif Errami; Egija Zaura; Jacob M. ten Cate; Wim Crielaard

    2008-01-01

    A multitude of molecular methods are currently used for identification and characterization of oral biofilms or for community profiling. However, multiplex PCR techniques that are able to routinely identify several species in a single assay are not available. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) identifies up to 45 unique fragments in a single tube PCR. Here we report a novel use

  17. ADAPTATION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL BIOFILM COMMUNITIES IN RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL STRESSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of this work will help improve our understanding of how subsurface biofilm communities respond to chemical stressors that are likely to be present at hazardous waste sites. Ultimately, these results can be used to determine more effective ways to insure proper envir...

  18. Stabilization of Plutonium in Subsursface Environments via Microbial Reduction and Biofilm Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Patricia

    2006-06-01

    Our work is towards mechanistically understanding interactions of unsaturated bacterial biofilms and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with actinide metals and metal surrogates under vadose zone conditions. Because metal contaminants in the vadose zone co-occur with organic pollutants, some of our work has included experiments with organic pollutants.

  19. Stabilization of Plutonium in Subsursface Environments via Microbial Reduction and Biofilm Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Patricia; Neu, Mary P.

    2005-06-01

    Our work is towards mechanistically understanding interactions of unsaturated bacterial biofilms and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with actinide metals and metal surrogates under vadose zone conditions. Because metal contaminants in the vadose zone co-occur with organic pollutants, some of our work has included experiments with organic pollutants.

  20. Metagenomics of microbial life in extreme temperature environments.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Anna; Wentzel, Alexander; Valla, Svein

    2013-06-01

    Microbial life in extreme environments is attracting broad scientific interest. Knowledge about it helps in defining the boundaries for life to exist, and organisms living under extreme conditions are also interesting sources for enzymes with unusual and desirable properties. The tremendous progress in DNA sequencing technologies now makes it relatively easy to gain a representative overview of the composition of such communities, and many community studies have in the last decade applied metagenomics to characterize habitats extreme in, for example, temperature, salt and acidity. The future challenges in the field are likely to become more and more related to the conversion of the expected massive amounts of sequence information into an understanding of the corresponding biological community functions. PMID:23146837

  1. Psychrophiles and astrobiology: microbial life of frozen worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    Most bodies of our Solar System are "Frozen Worlds" where the prevailing surface temperature remains at or below freezing. On Earth there are vast permanently frozen regions of permafrost, polar ice sheets, and glaciers and the deep oceans and deep-sea marine sediments have remained at 2 - 4°C for eons. Psychrophilic and psychrotrophic microbiota that inhabit these regimes provide analogs for microbial life that might inhabit ice sheets and permafrost of Mars, comets, or the ice/water interfaces or sediments deep beneath the icy crusts of Europa, Callisto, or Ganymede. Cryopreserved micro-organisms can remain viable (in a deep anabiotic state) for millions of years frozen in permafrost and ice. Psychrophilic and psychrotrophic (cold-loving) microbes can carry out metabolic processes in water films and brine, acidic, or alkaline chanels in permafrost or ice at temperatures far below 0°C. These microbes of the cryosphere help define the thermal and temporal limits of life on Earth and may provide clues to where and how to search for evidence of life elsewhere in the Cosmos. Astrobiologists at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have collected microbial extremophiles from the Pleistocene ice wedges and frozen thermokarst ponds from the Fox Permafrost Tunnel of Alaska. Microbes have also been isolated from samples of Magellanic Penguin guano from Patagonia; deep-sea marine muds near hydrothermal vents; snow and permafrost from Siberia, and deep ice cores, ice-bubble and cryoconite rocks of the Central Antarctic Ice Sheet. These samples have yielded microbial extremophiles representing a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria and archaea. These microbes have been isolated, cultured, characterized and analyzed by phylogenetic and genomic methods. Images were obtained by Phase Contrast, Environmental, Field Emission Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopes to study the ultra-microstructure and elemental distribution in the composition of these micro-organisms. We consider the Astrobiological significance of the Fox Tunnel with its rich assemblage of frozen microbes as proxy for developing techniques that may help optimize the search for evidence of life in the permafrost of Mars. We provide images of a novel anaerobic, heterotrophic, psychrotrophic bacterium (str.FTR1) isolated in pure culture from the Fox Tunnel. We also describe novel psychrotrophs isolated from guano of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) from the southern tip of Patagonia. These strains PmagG1 and PPP2) represent new species and genera of anaerobic microbes that grow at very low temperatures. The lowest limit for growth without morphological changes of str.PmagG1 is -4°C.

  2. Composition of Microbial Oral Biofilms during Maturation in Young Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Langfeldt, Daniela; Neulinger, Sven C.; Heuer, Wieland; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Künzel, Sven; Baines, John F.; Eberhard, Jörg; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we aimed to analyze the bacterial community structure of oral biofilms at different maturation stages in young healthy adults. Oral biofilms established on membrane filters were collected from 32 human subjects after 5 different maturation intervals (1, 3, 5, 9 and 14 days) and the respective phylogenetic diversity was analyzed by 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing. Our analyses revealed highly diverse entire colonization profiles, spread into 8 phyla/candidate divisions and in 15 different bacterial classes. A large inter-individual difference in the subjects’ microbiota was observed, comprising 35% of the total variance, but lacking conspicuous general temporal trends in both alpha and beta diversity. We further obtained strong evidence that subjects can be categorized into three clusters based on three differently occurring and mutually exclusive species clusters. PMID:24503584

  3. Comparison of microbial changes in early re-developing biofilms on natural teeth and dentures

    PubMed Central

    Teles, F.R.; Teles, R.P.; Sachdeo, A.; Uzel, N.G.; Song, X.Q.; Torresyap, G.; Singh, M.; Papas, A.; Haffajee, A.D.; Socransky, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective Surfaces and fluids can affect oral bacterial colonization. The aim of this study was to compare re-developing biofilms on natural teeth and dentures. Methods Supragingival plaque samples were taken from 55 dentate subjects and the denture teeth of 62 edentulous subjects before and after professional cleaning. Also, samples from 7 “teeth” in randomly selected quadrants were collected after 1, 2, 4 and 7 days of no oral hygiene. Samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Counts and proportions of 41 bacterial taxa were determined at each time point and significant differences were sought using the Mann-Whitney test. Ecological succession was determined using a modified moving window analysis. Results Mean total DNA probe counts were similar pre-cleaning but were higher in dentate subjects at all post-cleaning visits (p<0.01). Pre-cleaning edentate biofilms had higher counts and proportions of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mutans, whereas dentate subjects had higher proportions of Tannerella forsythia, Selenomonas noxia and Neisseria mucosa. By 2 days, mean counts of all taxa were higher in natural teeth and most remained higher at 7 days (p<0.01). Succession was more rapid and complex in dentate subjects. Both groups demonstrated increased proportions of S. mitis and S. oralis by 1 day. N. mucosa, Veillonella parvula and Eikenella corrodens increased in both groups but later in edentate samples. Conclusions “Mature” natural and denture teeth biofilms have similar total numbers of bacteria but different species proportions. Post-cleaning biofilm re-development is more rapid and more complex on natural than denture teeth. PMID:22443543

  4. Early microbial succession in re-developing dental biofilms in periodontal health and disease

    PubMed Central

    TELES, F.R.; TELES, R.P.; UZEL, N.G.; SONG, X.Q.; TORRESYAP, G.; SOCRANSKY, S.S.; HAFFAJEE, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the order of bacterial species succession in re-developing supra and subgingival biofilms. Methods Supra and subgingival plaque samples were taken separately from 28 teeth in 38 healthy and 17 periodontitis subjects immediately after professional cleaning. Samples were taken again from 7 teeth in randomly selected quadrants after 1, 2, 4 and 7 days of no oral hygiene and analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. % DNA probe counts were averaged within subjects at each time point. Ecological succession was determined using a modified moving window analysis. Results Succession in supragingival biofilms from periodontitis and health was similar. At 1 day, Streptococcus mitis and Neisseria mucosa showed increased proportions, followed by Capnocytophaga gingivalis, Eikenella corrodens, Veillonella parvula and Streptococcus oralis at 1–4 days. At 4–7 days, Campylobacter rectus, Campylobacter showae, Prevotella melaninogenica and Prevotella nigrescens became elevated. Subgingival plaque redevelopment was slower and very different from supragingival. Increased proportions were first observed for S. mitis, followed by V. parvula and C. gingivalis and, at 7 days by Capnocytophaga sputigena and P. nigrescens. No significant increase in proportions of periodontal pathogens was observed in any of the clinical groups or locations. Conclusions There is a defined order in bacterial species succession in early supra and subgingival biofilm re-development after professional cleaning. PMID:21895662

  5. Design of a microfluidic device for the analysis of biofilm behavior in a microbial fuel cell

    E-print Network

    Jones, A-Andrew D., III (Akhenaton-Andrew Dhafir)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents design, manufacturing, testing, and modeling of a laminar-flow microbial fuel cell. Novel means were developed to use graphite and other bulk-scale materials in a microscale device without loosing any ...

  6. Characterization of a filamentous biofilm community established in a cellulose-fed microbial fuel cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shun'ichi Ishii; Takefumi Shimoyama; Yasuaki Hotta; Kazuya Watanabe

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microorganisms to generate electric power from organic matter. Despite the development of efficient MFC reactors, the microbiology of electricity generation remains to be sufficiently understood. RESULTS: A laboratory-scale two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) was inoculated with rice paddy field soil and fed cellulose as the carbon and energy source. Electricity-generating microorganisms

  7. Biogeochemical Signals from Deep Microbial Life in Terrestrial Crust

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Akari; Komatsu, Daisuke D.; Hirota, Akinari; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Togo, Yoko; Morikawa, Noritoshi; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Aosai, Daisuke; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Tsunogai, Urumu; Nagao, Seiya; Ito, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the deep subseafloor biosphere, a volumetrically vast and stable habitat for microbial life in the terrestrial crust remains poorly explored. For the long-term sustainability of a crustal biome, high-energy fluxes derived from hydrothermal circulation and water radiolysis in uranium-enriched rocks are seemingly essential. However, the crustal habitability depending on a low supply of energy is unknown. We present multi-isotopic evidence of microbially mediated sulfate reduction in a granitic aquifer, a representative of the terrestrial crust habitat. Deep meteoric groundwater was collected from underground boreholes drilled into Cretaceous Toki granite (central Japan). A large sulfur isotopic fractionation of 20–60‰ diagnostic to microbial sulfate reduction is associated with the investigated groundwater containing sulfate below 0.2 mM. In contrast, a small carbon isotopic fractionation (<30‰) is not indicative of methanogenesis. Except for 2011, the concentrations of H2 ranged mostly from 1 to 5 nM, which is also consistent with an aquifer where a terminal electron accepting process is dominantly controlled by ongoing sulfate reduction. High isotopic ratios of mantle-derived 3He relative to radiogenic 4He in groundwater and the flux of H2 along adjacent faults suggest that, in addition to low concentrations of organic matter (<70 µM), H2 from deeper sources might partly fuel metabolic activities. Our results demonstrate that the deep biosphere in the terrestrial crust is metabolically active and playing a crucial role in the formation of reducing groundwater even under low-energy fluxes. PMID:25517230

  8. Biogeochemical signals from deep microbial life in terrestrial crust.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yohey; Konno, Uta; Fukuda, Akari; Komatsu, Daisuke D; Hirota, Akinari; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Togo, Yoko; Morikawa, Noritoshi; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Aosai, Daisuke; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Tsunogai, Urumu; Nagao, Seiya; Ito, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the deep subseafloor biosphere, a volumetrically vast and stable habitat for microbial life in the terrestrial crust remains poorly explored. For the long-term sustainability of a crustal biome, high-energy fluxes derived from hydrothermal circulation and water radiolysis in uranium-enriched rocks are seemingly essential. However, the crustal habitability depending on a low supply of energy is unknown. We present multi-isotopic evidence of microbially mediated sulfate reduction in a granitic aquifer, a representative of the terrestrial crust habitat. Deep meteoric groundwater was collected from underground boreholes drilled into Cretaceous Toki granite (central Japan). A large sulfur isotopic fractionation of 20-60‰ diagnostic to microbial sulfate reduction is associated with the investigated groundwater containing sulfate below 0.2 mM. In contrast, a small carbon isotopic fractionation (<30‰) is not indicative of methanogenesis. Except for 2011, the concentrations of H2 ranged mostly from 1 to 5 nM, which is also consistent with an aquifer where a terminal electron accepting process is dominantly controlled by ongoing sulfate reduction. High isotopic ratios of mantle-derived 3He relative to radiogenic 4He in groundwater and the flux of H2 along adjacent faults suggest that, in addition to low concentrations of organic matter (<70 µM), H2 from deeper sources might partly fuel metabolic activities. Our results demonstrate that the deep biosphere in the terrestrial crust is metabolically active and playing a crucial role in the formation of reducing groundwater even under low-energy fluxes. PMID:25517230

  9. Quantification and characterization of microbial biofilm community attached on the surface of fermentation vessels used in green table olive processing.

    PubMed

    Grounta, Athena; Doulgeraki, Agapi I; Panagou, Efstathios Z

    2015-06-16

    The aim of the present study was the quantification of biofilm formed on the surface of plastic vessels used in Spanish-style green olive fermentation and the characterization of the biofilm community by means of molecular fingerprinting. Fermentation vessels previously used in green olive processing were subjected to sampling at three different locations, two on the side and one on the bottom of the vessel. Prior to sampling, two cleaning treatments were applied to the containers, including (a) washing with hot tap water (60°C) and household detergent (treatment A) and (b) washing with hot tap water, household detergent and bleach (treatment B). Population (expressed as logCFU/cm(2)) of total viable counts (TVC), lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts were enumerated by standard plating. Bulk cells (whole colonies) from agar plates were isolated for further characterization by PCR-DGGE. Results showed that regardless of the cleaning treatment no significant differences were observed between the different sampling locations in the vessel. The initial microbial population before cleaning ranged between 3.0-4.5logCFU/cm(2) for LAB and 4.0-4.6logCFU/cm(2) for yeasts. Cleaning treatments exhibited the highest effect on LAB that were recovered at 1.5logCFU/cm(2) after treatment A and 0.2logCFU/cm(2) after treatment B, whereas yeasts were recovered at approximately 1.9logCFU/cm(2) even after treatment B. High diversity of yeasts was observed between the different treatments and sampling spots. The most abundant species recovered belonged to Candida genus, while Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Debaryomyces hansenii and Pichia guilliermondii were frequently detected. Among LAB, Lactobacillus pentosus was the most abundant species present on the abiotic surface of the vessels. PMID:25770432

  10. Exploration of deep intraterrestrial microbial life: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, K

    2000-04-01

    Intraterrestrial life has been found at depths of several thousand metres in deep sub-sea floor sediments and in the basement crust beneath the sediments. It has also been found at up to 2800-m depth in continental sedimentary rocks, 5300-m depth in igneous rock aquifers and in fluid inclusions in ancient salt deposits from salt mines. The biomass of these intraterrestrial organisms may be equal to the total weight of all marine and terrestrial plants. The intraterrestrial microbes generally seem to be active at very low but significant rates and several investigations indicate chemolithoautotrophs to form a chemosynthetic base. Hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide gases are continuously generated in the interior of our planet and probably constitute sustainable sources of carbon and energy for deep intraterrestrial biosphere ecosystems. Several prospective research areas are foreseen to focus on the importance of microbial communities for metabolic processes such as anaerobic utilisation of hydrocarbons and anaerobic methane oxidation. PMID:10731600

  11. Reproducible analyses of microbial food for advanced life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Gene R.

    1988-01-01

    The use of yeasts in controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) for microbial food regeneration in space required the accurate and reproducible analysis of intracellular carbohydrate and protein levels. The reproducible analysis of glycogen was a key element in estimating overall content of edibles in candidate yeast strains. Typical analytical methods for estimating glycogen in Saccharomyces were not found to be entirely aplicable to other candidate strains. Rigorous cell lysis coupled with acid/base fractionation followed by specific enzymatic glycogen analyses were required to obtain accurate results in two strains of Candida. A profile of edible fractions of these strains was then determined. The suitability of yeasts as food sources in CELSS food production processes is discussed.

  12. Microbial mats and the early evolution of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Microbial mats have descended from perhaps the oldest and most widespread biological communities known. Mats harbor microbes that are crucial for studies of bacterial phylogeny and physiology. They illustrate how several oxygen-sensitive biochemical processes have adapted to oxygen, and they show how life adapted to dry land long before the rise of plants. The search for the earliest grazing protists and metazoa in stromatolites is aided by observations of mats: in them, organic compounds characteristic of ancient photosynthetic protists can be identified. Recent mat studies suggest that the 13C/12C increase observed over geological time in stromatolitic organic matter was driven at least in part by a long-term decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  13. Microbial Life in an Underground Gas Storage Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombach, Petra; van Almsick, Tobias; Richnow, Hans H.; Zenner, Matthias; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    While underground gas storage is technically well established for decades, the presence and activity of microorganisms in underground gas reservoirs have still hardly been explored today. Microbial life in underground gas reservoirs is controlled by moderate to high temperatures, elevated pressures, the availability of essential inorganic nutrients, and the availability of appropriate chemical energy sources. Microbial activity may affect the geochemical conditions and the gas composition in an underground reservoir by selective removal of anorganic and organic components from the stored gas and the formation water as well as by generation of metabolic products. From an economic point of view, microbial activities can lead to a loss of stored gas accompanied by a pressure decline in the reservoir, damage of technical equipment by biocorrosion, clogging processes through precipitates and biomass accumulation, and reservoir souring due to a deterioration of the gas quality. We present here results from molecular and cultivation-based methods to characterize microbial communities inhabiting a porous rock gas storage reservoir located in Southern Germany. Four reservoir water samples were obtained from three different geological horizons characterized by an ambient reservoir temperature of about 45 °C and an ambient reservoir pressure of about 92 bar at the time of sampling. A complementary water sample was taken at a water production well completed in a respective horizon but located outside the gas storage reservoir. Microbial community analysis by Illumina Sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated the presence of phylogenetically diverse microbial communities of high compositional heterogeneity. In three out of four samples originating from the reservoir, the majority of bacterial sequences affiliated with members of the genera Eubacterium, Acetobacterium and Sporobacterium within Clostridiales, known for their fermenting capabilities. In contrast, bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae were the most frequently encountered species in the sample from the water production well. Furthermore, bacterial sequences belonging to thermophiles within the family Thermotogaceae were found in all samples investigated. Archaeal community analysis revealed the dominance of methanogens clustering with members of Methanosarcinaceae, Methanomicrobiaceae and Methanobacteriaceae in three reservoir samples and the sample from the water production well. Cultivations of water samples under an atmosphere of storage gas blended by hydrogen as electron source at in situ-like conditions (45°C, 92 bar, p(H2) = 6 bar) revealed that hydrogen was quickly consumed in all laboratory microcosms with reservoir samples. Quantitative PCR analysis of the gene encoding for methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) along with reaction educt and product analyses suggested that methanogenesis was primarily responsible for hydrogen consumption during the experiments. While it is currently in question whether or not the laboratory data can be upscaled to actual reservoir conditions, they may allude to fermenting and thermophilic bacteria playing an important role for the investigated reservoir microbiology and also indicate potential stimulation of hydrogenotrophic methanogens if hydrogen would be introduced into the reservoir.

  14. Influence of Disinfectant Residual on Biofilm Development, Microbial Ecology, and Pathogen Fate and Transport in Drinking Water Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project focuses on providing basic data to bound risk estimates resulting from pathogens associated with pipe biofilms. Researchers will compare biofilm pathogen effects under two different disinfection scenarios (free chlorine or chloramines) for a conventionally treated s...

  15. Effects of nitrate treatment on a mixed species, oil field microbial biofilm.

    PubMed

    Dunsmore, Braden; Youldon, James; Thrasher, David R; Vance, Ian

    2006-06-01

    Biofilms of bacteria, indigenous to oil field produced water, were grown in square section, glass capillary flow cells at 45 degrees C. Initially, in situ image analysis microscopy revealed predominantly coccoid bacteria (length-to-width ratio measurements (l (c):w (c)) of bacterial cells gave a mean value of 1.1), while chemical measurements confirmed sulphate reduction and sulphide production. After nitrate ion addition at 100 and 80 mg/l, in the two repeat experiments respectively, the dominance of rod-shaped bacteria (mean l (c):w (c) = 2.8) was observed. This coincided with the occurrence of nitrate reduction in the treated flow cells. Beneficially, no significant increase in biofilm cover was observed after the addition of nitrate. The dominant culturable nitrate-reducing bacterium was Marinobacter aquaeolei. The l (c):w (c) ratio measured here concurs with previously reported cell dimensions for this organism. Several Marinobacter strains were also isolated from different oil fields in the North Sea where nitrate treatment has been applied to successfully treat reservoir souring, implying that this genus may play an important role in nitrate treatment. PMID:16491355

  16. Metagenome Analyses of Corroded Concrete Wastewater Pipe Biofilms Reveals a Complex Microbial System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of whole-metagenome pyrosequencing data and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries was used to determine microbial composition and functional genes associated with biomass harvested from crown (top) and invert (bottom) sections of a corroded wastewater pipe. Taxonomic and functio...

  17. Effect of biofilm in irrigation pipes on the microbial quality of irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that microbial quality of irrigation water can be substantially altered by the association of E. coli with pipe lining in irrigation systems. Methods and Results: The sprinkler irrigation system was outfitted with coupons that were extracted before four 2-hour long irri...

  18. The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances and soluble microbial products in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liang; Jiang, Wei; Song, Yonghui; Xia, Siqing; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2013-11-01

    The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP) in conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR) and in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactors (MBBR-MBR) were investigated in long-term (170 days) experiments. The results showed that all reactors had high removal efficiency of ammonium and COD, despite very different fouling conditions. The MBBR-MBR with media fill ratio of 26.7% had much lower total membrane resistance and no obvious fouling were detected during the whole operation. In contrast, MBR and MBBR-MBR with lower and higher media fill experienced more significant fouling. Low fouling at optimum fill ratio may be due to the higher percentage of small molecular size (<1 kDa) and lower percentage of large molecular size (>100 kDa) of EPS and SMP in the reactor. The composition of EPS and SMP affected fouling due to different O-H bonds in hydroxyl functional groups, and less polysaccharides and lipids. PMID:24077152

  19. Kinetic analysis of microbial sulfate reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in an anaerobic upflow porous media biofilm reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chingi; Mueller, R.F.; Griebe, T. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Biofilm Engineering)

    1994-02-20

    An anaerobic upflow porous media biofilm reactor was designed to study the kinetics and stoichiometry of hydrogen sulfide production by the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 5575) as the first step for the modeling and control of formation souring (H[sub 2]S) in oil field porous media. The initial indication of souring was the appearance of well-separated black spots (precipitates of iron sulfide) in the sand bed. Analysis of the pseudo-steady state column shows that there were concentration gradients for lactate and hydrogen sulfide along the column. The results indicate that most of the lactate was consumed at the front part of the column. Measurements of SRB biomass on the solid phase (sand) and in the liquid phase indicate that the maximum concentration of SRB biomass resided at the front part of the column while the maximum in the liquid phase occurred further downstream. The stoichiometry regarding lactate consumption and hydrogen sulfide production observed in the porous media reactor was different from that in a chemostat. After analyzing the radial dispersion coefficient for the SRB in porous media and kinetics of microbial growth, it was deduced that transport phenomena dominate the souring process in the porous media reactor system.

  20. Microbial shifts during dental biofilm re-development in the absence of oral hygiene in periodontal health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Uzel, N.G.; Teles, F.R.; Teles, R.P.; Song, X.Q.; Torresyap, G.; Socransky, S.S.; Haffajee, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    Aim to monitor microbial shifts during dental biofilm re-development Methods Supra and subgingival plaque samples were taken separately from 28 teeth in 38 healthy and 17 periodontitis subjects at baseline and immediately after tooth cleaning. Samples were taken again from 7 teeth in randomly selected quadrants during 1, 2, 4 and 7 days of no oral hygiene. Samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Species counts were averaged within subjects at each time point. Significant differences in counts between healthy and periodontitis subjects were sought using the Mann-Whitney test. Results Total supra and subgingival counts were significantly higher in periodontitis on entry and reached or exceeded baseline values after day 2. Supragingival counts of Veillonella parvula, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii and Neisseria mucosa increased from 2 to 7 days. Subgingival counts were greater for Actinomyces, green and orange complex species. Significant differences between groups in supragingival counts occurred for 17 of 41 species at entry, 0 at day 7; for subgingival plaque these values were 39/41 taxa at entry, 17/41 at day 7. Conclusions Supragingival plaque re-development was similar in periodontitis and health, but subgingival species recolonization was more marked in periodontitis. PMID:21488936

  1. Sunlight-Exposed Biofilm Microbial Communities Are Naturally Resistant to Chernobyl Ionizing-Radiation Levels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie Ragon; Gwendal Restoux; David Moreira; Anders Pape Møller; Purificación López-García

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundThe Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme

  2. Biofilm-associated persistence of food-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bridier, A; Sanchez-Vizuete, P; Guilbaud, M; Piard, J-C; Naïtali, M; Briandet, R

    2015-02-01

    Microbial life abounds on surfaces in both natural and industrial environments, one of which is the food industry. A solid substrate, water and some nutrients are sufficient to allow the construction of a microbial fortress, a so-called biofilm. Survival strategies developed by these surface-associated ecosystems are beginning to be deciphered in the context of rudimentary laboratory biofilms. Gelatinous organic matrices consisting of complex mixtures of self-produced biopolymers ensure the cohesion of these biological structures and contribute to their resistance and persistence. Moreover, far from being just simple three-dimensional assemblies of identical cells, biofilms are composed of heterogeneous sub-populations with distinctive behaviours that contribute to their global ecological success. In the clinical field, biofilm-associated infections (BAI) are known to trigger chronic infections that require dedicated therapies. A similar belief emerging in the food industry, where biofilm tolerance to environmental stresses, including cleaning and disinfection/sanitation, can result in the persistence of bacterial pathogens and the recurrent cross-contamination of food products. The present review focuses on the principal mechanisms involved in the formation of biofilms of food-borne pathogens, where biofilm behaviour is driven by its three-dimensional heterogeneity and by species interactions within these biostructures, and we look at some emergent control strategies. PMID:25500382

  3. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  4. Biofilm Susceptibility to Antimicrobials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Gilbert; J. Das; I. Foley

    1997-01-01

    Microbial biofilms, where organisms are intimately associated with each other and a solid substratum through binding and inclusion within an exopolymer matrix, are widely distributed in nature and disease. In the mouth, multispecies biofilms are associated not only with dental plaque and tooth decay but also with soft tissues of the buccal cavity and with most forms of periodontal disease.

  5. 3.45 b.y.-old microbial associations in cherts from the Pilbara: lessons for potential Martian life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westall, F.

    2003-04-01

    3.45 b.y.-old cherts from the Kitty's Gap locality in the Pilbara contain superbly preserved microbial biofilms that formed on an early Earth characterised by extreme conditions. They therefore represent good analogues for potential early Martian life. Volcaniclastic sediments influenced by hydrothermal activity were deposited in very shallow water to exposed conditions, as evidenced by interstratified cross-bedded and evaporite units. Two microbial layers with different characteristics, occurring within 2 cm of each other, have been closely studied in the field, by optical microscopy, and by high resolution SEM (+ light element EDS) of carefully etched, cut surfaces. Both layers can be traced laterally for at least a couple of meters before being broken up by a chert vein. The lower microbialite is a 2--3 mm thick stromatolite-thrombolite association. The stromatolites consist of tiny columns, 250 ?m wide and about 2 mm high, whereas the thrombolitic zones present a simple, clotted texture. They were formed by microbial colonies consisting of consortia of mostly coccoidal bacteria (two species, one <0.5 ?m and one ˜1 ?m in diameter). Most of the organisms present a turgid condition and large numbers of them exhibit cell division (fission and budding). Filamentous bacteria occur but are rare. The deflated and lysed filaments are small, 4--5 ?m and about 100 nm in width. Small amounts of EPS are associated with the colonies. The second microbialite is a fine microbial mat (tabular stromatolite) that occurs at the surface of an evaporite horizon 2 cm above the first microbialite. The 0.5 cm thick evaporite horizon consists of ghosts of carbonate and possibly halite crystals. It is coated by a <50 ?m thick microbial mat, formed by consortia of 0.5 ?m coccoidal bacteria and filaments, 0.2--0.4 ?m wide and 10--20 ?m long. Some EPS is associated with the bacteria and the sedimentary particle surfaces are coated with a nm-thick polymer layer. The filaments are characterised by a striated surface. Both coccoids and filaments exhibit some deflation due to lysis before fossilisation. The organisms in both layers have been silicified but still contain significant amounts of carbon. Silicification of these deposits appeared to be continuous, since there was also secondary replacement by silica of the evaporites and silica cementation of the volcaniclastic and evaporite particles. Shallow water to evaporitic environments influenced by hydrothermal activity would have been common on Mars during the Noachian period and possibly also later. If life ever arose on Mars, it could have left similar, macroscopic to microscopic traces that could be investigated both in situ and in returned samples.

  6. Shells of crabs like these may be the key to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells that

    E-print Network

    Shells of crabs like these may be the key to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells that power/06/ 070604123858.htm Marine Sediment Microbial Fuel Cells Get A Nutritional Boost ScienceDaily (June 11, 2007) -- Discarded crab and lobster shells may be the key to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells that power

  7. Microbial Biofilms on Needleless Connectors for Central Venous Catheters: Comparison of Standard and Silver-Coated Devices Collected from Patients in an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T.; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P.; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P = 0.11). There were no significant associations (P > 0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P = 0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P = 0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  8. Natural and synthetic cathelicidin peptides with anti-microbial and anti-biofilm activity against Staphylococcus aureus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott N Dean; Barney M Bishop; Monique L van Hoek

    2011-01-01

    Background  Chronic, infected wounds typically contain multiple genera of bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, many of which are strong biofilm formers. Bacterial biofilms are thought to be a direct impediment to wound healing. New\\u000a therapies that focus on a biofilm approach may improve the recovery and healing rate for infected wounds. In this study, cathelicidins\\u000a and related short, synthetic peptides were tested

  9. Kinetic analysis of microbial sulfate reduction by desulfovibrio desulfuricans in an anaerobic upflow porous media biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, C I; Mueller, R F; Griebe, T

    1994-02-20

    An anaerobic upflow porous media biofilm reactor was designed to study the kinetics and stoichiometry of hydrogen sulfide production by the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 5575) as the first step for the modeling and control of formation souring (H(2)S) in oil field porous media. The reactor was a packed bed (50 x 5.5 cm) tubular reactor. Sea sand (140 to 375 mum) was used as the porous media. The initial indication of souring was the appearance of well-separated black spots (precipitates of iron sulfide) in the sand bed. The blackened zones expanded radially and upward through the column. New spots also appeared and expanded into the cone shapes. Lactate (substrate) was depleted and hydrogen sulfide appeared in the effluent.Analysis of the pseudo-steady state column shows that there were concentration gradients for lactate and hydrogen sulfide along the column. The results indicate that most of the lactate was consumed at the front part of the column. Measurements of SRB biomass on the solid phase (sand) and in the liquid phase indicate that the maximum concentration of SRB biomass resided at the front part of the column while the maximum in the liquid phase occurred further downstream. The stoichiometry regarding lactate consumption and hydrogen sulfide production observed in the porous media reactor was different from that in a chemostat. After analyzing the radial dispersion coefficient for the SRB in porous media and kinetics of microbial growth, it was deduced that transport phenomena dominate the souring process in our porous media reactor system. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18615689

  10. Multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms in seawater cathodic biofilms operating in sediment microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Hsu, Lewis; Atci, Erhan; Kagan, Jeff; Chadwick, Bart; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-01

    In this study, multiple reaction mechanisms in cathodes of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry and microelectrode measurements of dissolved oxygen and pH. The cathodes were acclimated in SMFCs with sediment and seawater from San Diego Bay. Two limiting current regions were observed with onset potentials of approximately +400 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current I and -120 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current II. The appearance of two catalytic waves suggests that multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms influence cathodic performance. Microscale oxygen concentration measurements showed a zero surface concentration at the electrode surface for limiting current II but not for limiting current I, which allowed us to distinguish limiting current II as the conventional oxygen reduction reaction and limiting current I as a currently unidentified cathodic reaction mechanism. Microscale pH measurements further confirmed these results. PMID:25154833

  11. Influence of the spatial structure on the effective nutrient diffusion in bacterial biofilm

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Influence of the spatial structure on the effective nutrient diffusion in bacterial biofilm T of microbial biofilms. Our approach requires to analyze several experimental spatial structures of biofilms with the biofilm structure. These results suggest that microbial biofilm structures can favour the nutrient access

  12. Pressure as an environmental parameter for microbial life--a review.

    PubMed

    Picard, Aude; Daniel, Isabelle

    2013-12-15

    Microbial life has been prevailing in the biosphere for the last 3.8 Ga at least. Throughout most of the Earth's history it has experienced a range of pressures; both dynamic pressure when the young Earth was heavily bombarded, and static pressure in subsurface environments that could have served as a refuge and where microbial life nowadays flourishes. In this review, we discuss the extent of high-pressure habitats in early and modern times and provide a short overview of microbial survival under dynamic pressures. We summarize the current knowledge about the impact of microbial activity on biogeochemical cycles under pressures characteristic of the deep subsurface. We evaluate the possibility that pressure can be a limiting parameter for life at depth. Finally, we discuss the open questions and knowledge gaps that exist in the field of high-pressure geomicrobiology. PMID:23891571

  13. Microbial life in volcanic/geothermal areas: how soil geochemistry shapes microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; D'Alessandro, Walter; Franzetti, Andrea; Parello, Francesco; Tagliavia, Marcello; Quatrini, Paola

    2015-04-01

    Extreme environments, such as volcanic/geothermal areas, are sites of complex interactions between geosphere and biosphere. Although biotic and abiotic components are strictly related, they were separately studied for long time. Nowadays, innovative and interdisciplinary approaches are available to explore microbial life thriving in these environments. Pantelleria island (Italy) hosts a high enthalpy geothermal system characterized by high CH4 and low H2S fluxes. Two selected sites, FAV1 and FAV2, located at Favara Grande, the main exhalative area of the island, show similar physical conditions with a surface temperature close to 60° C and a soil gas composition enriched in CH4, H2 and CO2. FAV1 soil is characterized by harsher conditions (pH 3.4 and 12% of H2O content); conversely, milder conditions were recorded at site FAV2 (pH 5.8 and 4% of H2O content). High methanotrophic activity (59.2 nmol g-1 h-1) and wide diversity of methanotrophic bacteria were preliminary detected at FAV2, while no activity was detected at FAV1(1). Our aim was to investigate how the soil microbial communities of these two close geothermal sites at Pantelleria island respond to different geochemical conditions. Bacterial and Archaeal communities of the sites were investigated by MiSeq Illumina sequencing of hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. More than 33,000 reads were obtained for Bacteria and Archaea from soil samples of the two sites. At FAV1 99% of the bacterial sequences were assigned to four main phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi). FAV2 sequences were distributed in the same phyla with the exception of Chloroflexi that was represented below 1%. Results indicate a high abundance of thermo-acidophilic chemolithotrophs in site FAV1 dominated by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (25%), Nitrosococcus halophilus (10%), Alicyclobacillus spp. (7%) and the rare species Ktedonobacter racemifer (11%). The bacterial community at FAV2 soil is dominated by the methanotrophs (~40% of the reads) Methylocaldum gracile, Beijerinckia sp. and Methylobacterium sp.. The Archaea assemblages are similar in both sites and dominated by the moderately thermophilic chemolithotrophic ammonia-oxidating candidate species Nitrososphaera gargensis, in the phylum Thaumarchaeota. Volcanic/geothermal activities represent a complex phenomenon, this shaping different and peculiar microbial niches even at adjacent sites. Lower pH, higher water, NH4+ and H2content are probably the discriminating factors that prevent methanotrophy at FAV1 and favor chemolithotrophy. Site FAV2 hosts an extraordinary diversity of methanotrophs due to large supply of CH4, scarce presence of inhibitors of methanotrophy (H2S and NH3) and slightly acidic soil pH. This study integrates geochemical and biological information to move a step ahead in the still scarce knowledge on the complex ecology of microbes living in geothermal sites and their interactions with the geosphere. (1)Gagliano et al., 2014 Biogeosciences, 11, 5865-5875

  14. Streptococcus thermophilus Biofilm Formation: A Remnant Trait of Ancestral Commensal Life?

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Céline; Renault, Pierre; Briandet, Romain; Guédon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have a long history of use in food production and preservation. Their adaptation to food environments has profoundly modified their features, mainly through genomic flux. Streptococcus thermophilus, one of the most frequent starter culture organisms consumed daily by humans emerged recently from a commensal ancestor. As such, it is a useful model for genomic studies of bacterial domestication processes. Many streptococcal species form biofilms, a key feature of the major lifestyle of these bacteria in nature. However, few descriptions of S. thermophilus biofilms have been reported. An analysis of the ability of a representative collection of natural isolates to form biofilms revealed that S. thermophilus was a poor biofilm producer and that this characteristic was associated with an inability to attach firmly to surfaces. The identification of three biofilm-associated genes in the strain producing the most biofilms shed light on the reasons for the rarity of this trait in this species. These genes encode proteins involved in crucial stages of biofilm formation and are heterogeneously distributed between strains. One of the biofilm genes appears to have been acquired by horizontal transfer. The other two are located in loci presenting features of reductive evolution, and are absent from most of the strains analyzed. Their orthologs in commensal bacteria are involved in adhesion to host cells, suggesting that they are remnants of ancestral functions. The biofilm phenotype appears to be a commensal trait that has been lost during the genetic domestication of S. thermophilus, consistent with its adaptation to the milk environment and the selection of starter strains for dairy fermentations. PMID:26035177

  15. Bacterial cellulose may provide the microbial-life biosignature in the rock records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaets, I.; Podolich, O.; Kukharenko, O.; Reshetnyak, G.; Shpylova, S.; Sosnin, M.; Khirunenko, L.; Kozyrovska, N.; de Vera, J.-P.

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a matrix for a biofilm formation, which is critical for survival and persistence of microbes in harsh environments. BC could play a significant role in the formation of microbial mats in pristine ecosystems on Earth. The prime objective of this study was to measure to what extent spectral and other characteristics of BC were changed under the performance of BC interaction with the earthly rock - anorthosite - via microorganisms. The spectral analyses (Fourier Transform Infrared FT-IR, spectroscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy) showed unprecedented accumulation of chemical elements in the BC-based biofilm. The absorption capacity of IR by BC was shielded a little by mineral crust formed by microorganisms on the BC-based biofilm surface, especially clearly seen in the range of 1200-900 cm-1 in FT-IR spectra. Confocal scanning laser microscopy analysis revealed that elements bioleached from anorthosite created surface coats on the BC nanofibril web. At the same time, the vibrational spectra bands showed the presence of the characteristic region of anomeric carbons (960-730 cm-1), wherein a band at 897 cm-1 confirmed the presence of ?-1, 4-linkages, which may serve as the cellulose fingerprint region. Results show that BC may be a biosignature for search signs of living organisms in rock records.

  16. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  17. Stabilization of Plutonium in Subsurface Environments via Microbial Reduction and Biofilm Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim Boukhalfa; Gary A. Icopini; Sean D. Reilly; Mary P. Neu

    2007-04-19

    Plutonium has a long half-life (2.4 x 104 years) and is of concern because of its chemical and radiological toxicity, high-energy alpha radioactive decay. A full understanding of its speciation and interactions with environmental processes is required in order to predict, contain, or remediate contaminated sites. Under aerobic conditions Pu is sparingly soluble, existing primarily in its tetravalent oxidation state. To the extent that pentavalent and hexavalent complexes and small colloidal species form they will increase the solubility and resultant mobility from contamination sources. There is evidence that in both marine environments and brines substantial fractions of the plutonium in solution is present as hexavalent plutonyl, PuO2 2+.

  18. Microbial Fuel Cells Applied to the Metabolically-Based Detection of Extraterrestrial Life

    E-print Network

    Abrevaya, Ximena C; Cortón, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1970's, when the Viking spacecrafts carried out experiments aimed to the detection of microbial metabolism on the surface of Mars, the search for nonspecific methods to detect life in situ has been one of the goals of astrobiology. It is usually required that the methodology can detect life independently from its composition or form, and that the chosen biological signature points to a feature common to all living systems, as the presence of metabolism. In this paper we evaluate the use of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) for the detection of microbial life in situ. MFCs are electrochemical devices originally developed as power electrical sources, and can be described as fuel cells in which the anode is submerged in a medium that contains microorganisms. These microorganisms, as part of their metabolic process, oxidize organic material releasing electrons that contribute to the electric current, which is therefore proportional to metabolic and other redox processes. We show that power and current density...

  19. Microbial Life in a Fjord: Metagenomic Analysis of a Microbial Mat in Chilean Patagonia

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde, Juan A.; Gallardo, Maria J.; Belmar, Camila; Muñoz, Práxedes; Ruiz-Tagle, Nathaly; Ferrada-Fuentes, Sandra; Espinoza, Carola; Allen, Eric E.; Gallardo, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The current study describes the taxonomic and functional composition of metagenomic sequences obtained from a filamentous microbial mat isolated from the Comau fjord, located in the northernmost part of the Chilean Patagonia. The taxonomic composition of the microbial community showed a high proportion of members of the Gammaproteobacteria, including a high number of sequences that were recruited to the genomes of Moritella marina MP-1 and Colwelliapsycherythraea 34H, suggesting the presence of populations related to these two psychrophilic bacterial species. Functional analysis of the community indicated a high proportion of genes coding for the transport and metabolism of amino acids, as well as in energy production. Among the energy production functions, we found protein-coding genes for sulfate and nitrate reduction, both processes associated with Gammaproteobacteria-related sequences. This report provides the first examination of the taxonomic composition and genetic diversity associated with these conspicuous microbial mat communities and provides a framework for future microbial studies in the Comau fjord. PMID:24015199

  20. Intelligibility in microbial complex systems: Wittgenstein and the score of life

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Fernando; Moya, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge in microbiology is reaching an extreme level of diversification and complexity, which paradoxically results in a strong reduction in the intelligibility of microbial life. In our days, the “score of life” metaphor is more accurate to express the complexity of living systems than the classic “book of life.” Music and life can be represented at lower hierarchical levels by music scores and genomic sequences, and such representations have a generational influence in the reproduction of music and life. If music can be considered as a representation of life, such representation remains as unthinkable as life itself. The analysis of scores and genomic sequences might provide mechanistic, phylogenetic, and evolutionary insights into music and life, but not about their real dynamics and nature, which is still maintained unthinkable, as was proposed by Wittgenstein. As complex systems, life or music is composed by thinkable and only showable parts, and a strategy of half-thinking, half-seeing is needed to expand knowledge. Complex models for complex systems, based on experiences on trans-hierarchical integrations, should be developed in order to provide a mixture of legibility and imageability of biological processes, which should lead to higher levels of intelligibility of microbial life. PMID:22919679

  1. Marine Microbial Mats and the Search for Evidence of Life in Deep Time and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats in extensive seawater evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico, have been excellent subjects for microbial ecology research. The studies reviewed here have documented the steep and rapidly changing environmental gradients experienced by mat microorganisms and the very high rates of biogeochemical processes that they maintained. Recent genetic studies have revealed an enormous diversity of bacteria as well as the spatial distribution of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. These findings, together with emerging insights into the intimate interactions between these diverse populations, have contributed substantially to our understanding of the origins, environmental impacts, and biosignatures of photosynthetic microbial mats. The biosignatures (preservable cells, sedimentary fabrics, organic compounds, minerals, stable isotope patterns, etc.) potentially can serve as indicators of past life on early Earth. They also can inform our search for evidence of any life on Mars. Mars exploration has revealed evidence of evaporite deposits and thermal spring deposits; similar deposits on Earth once hosted ancient microbial mat ecosystems.

  2. Biofilms and extracellular matrices on geomaterials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Kemmling; M. Kämper; C. Flies; O. Schieweck; M. Hoppert

    2004-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are ubiquitous in aquatic and terrestric ecosystems as well as on man-made material. They are initial colonizers on all surfaces and take part in biogenic weathering on natural rocks as well as on building stone. The structure and function of the biofilm matrix, mainly extracellular polysaccharides (EP), is documented for biofilms on stone surfaces: the hydrated gel acts

  3. Understanding biofilm resistance to antibacterial agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Davies

    2003-01-01

    According to a public announcement by the US National Institutes of Health, “Biofilms are medically important, accounting for over 80% of microbial infections in the body”. Yet bacterial biofilms remain poorly understood and strategies for their control remain underdeveloped. Standard antimicrobial treatments typically fail to eradicate biofilms, which can result in chronic infection and the need for surgical removal of

  4. Hexacyanoferrate-adapted biofilm enables the development of a microbial fuel cell biosensor to detect trace levels of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in oxygenated seawater.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Quek, Soon Bee; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    A marine microbial fuel cell (MFC) type biosensor was developed for the detection of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in ocean water for the purpose of online water quality monitoring for seawater desalination plants prone to biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. The anodophilic biofilm that developed on the graphite tissue anode could detect acetate as the model AOC to concentrations as low as 5?µM (120?µg/L of AOC), which is sufficiently sensitive as an online biofouling risk sensor. Although the sensor was operated at a higher (+200?±?10?mV) than the usual (-300?mV) anodic potential, the presence of oxygen completely suppressed the electrical signal. In order to overcome this outcompeting effect of oxygen over the anode as electron acceptor by the bacteria, hexacyanoferrate (HCF(III)) was found to enable the development of an adapted biofilm that transferred electrons to HCF(III) rather than oxygen. As the resultant of the reduced HCF(II) could readily transfer electrons to the anode while being re-oxidised to HCF(III), the marine MFC biosensor developed could be demonstrated to work in the presence of oxygen unlike traditional MFC. The possibility of operating the marine MFC in batch or continuous (in-line) mode has been explored by using coulombic or potentiometric interpretation of the signal. PMID:24942462

  5. Microbial fuel cells applied to the metabolically based detection of extraterrestrial life.

    PubMed

    Abrevaya, Ximena C; Mauas, Pablo J D; Cortón, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    Since the 1970s, when the Viking spacecrafts carried out experiments to detect microbial metabolism on the surface of Mars, the search for nonspecific methods to detect life in situ has been one of the goals of astrobiology. It is usually required that a methodology detect life independently from its composition or form and that the chosen biological signature point to a feature common to all living systems, such as the presence of metabolism. In this paper, we evaluate the use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for the detection of microbial life in situ. MFCs are electrochemical devices originally developed as power electrical sources and can be described as fuel cells in which the anode is submerged in a medium that contains microorganisms. These microorganisms, as part of their metabolic process, oxidize organic material, releasing electrons that contribute to the electric current, which is therefore proportional to metabolic and other redox processes. We show that power and current density values measured in MFCs that use microorganism cultures or soil samples in the anode are much larger than those obtained with a medium free of microorganisms or sterilized soil samples, respectively. In particular, we found that this is true for extremophiles, which have been proposed as potential inhabitants of extraterrestrial environments. Therefore, our results show that MFCs have the potential to be used for in situ detection of microbial life. PMID:21162676

  6. Modelling of biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wanner, O

    1996-01-01

    A mixed-culture biofilm (MCB) model is available which describes the progression of biofilm thickness and the spatial distribution and development in time of dissolved and paniculate components in the biofilm. The MCB model is able to predict the physico-chemical conditions at the interface between the biofilm and the solid surface, on which the biofilm grows, as a function of the conditions in the bulk fluid, the microbial composition of the biofilm, and the transport and transformation processes which take place in the biofilm. The mass balance equations of the MCB model are generally valid and can be applied to almost any microbial system if its kinetics and stoichiometry can be provided. AQUASIM is a new computer program for the identification and simulation of aquatic systems. The program solves the equations of the MCB model. It has a window-type user interface and includes routines for simulation, sensitivity analysis, automatic parameter estimation and data fitting. The MCB model has been developed and is primarily used in the field of waste water treatment. However, under certain conditions and with some additional simplifications this model can also be used for the investigation of biofouling and biocorrosion problems. The possibilities and limitations of the application of the MCB model and of AQUASIM to this type of problem are briefly discussed. PMID:22115101

  7. In situ biofilm coupon device

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, Brent M. (Kennewick, WA); Truex, Michael J. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

  8. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOEpatents

    Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

  9. Characterization of the microbial community in an anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing biofilm cultured on a nonwoven biomass carrier

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takao Fujii; Hiroyuki Sugino; Joseph D. Rouse; Kenji Furukawa

    2002-01-01

    The enrichment and characterization of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing biofilm cultures are ongoing in our laboratories. Biomass, with a predominately red color, demonstrating simultaneous removal of ammonium and nitrite under autotrophic and anoxic conditions, which is characteristic of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing planctomycetes, was enriched and maintained for an extended period on a polyester nonwoven carrier. To investigate the bacterial composition of the mature

  10. Biochemical markers for measurement of predation effects on the biomass, community structure, nutritional status, and metabolic activity of microbial biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David C. White; Robert H. Findlay

    1988-01-01

    Chemical measures for the biomass, community structure, nutritional status, and metabolic activities of mi- crobes in biofilms attached to detrital or sediment surfaces based on analysis of components of cells and ex- tracellular polymers represent a quantitative and sensitive method for the analysis of predation. These methods require neither the quantitative removal of the organisms from the surfaces nor the

  11. Time-course correlation of biofilm properties and electrochemical performance in single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    E-print Network

    Mench, Matthew M.

    an initial catalyst loading and subsequent catalyst decay. However, the effect of this factor on system that the anode electrochemical polarization resistance can constrain system performance in both two and three suggested that uncontrolled biofilm growth on the cathode deleteriously affects system performance

  12. Discovering Biofilms: Inquiry-Based Activities for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redelman, Carly V.; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    In nature, bacteria exist in and adapt to different environments by forming microbial communities called "biofilms." We propose simple, inquiry-based laboratory exercises utilizing a biofilm formation assay, which allows controlled biofilm growth. Students will be able to qualitatively assess biofilm growth via staining. Recently, we developed a…

  13. Microbial life in martian ice: A biotic origin of methane on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford Price, P.

    2010-08-01

    Despite the fact that microbial cells are unlikely to be found in the Martian soil in the near future, this paper is written on the assumption that some of the seasonally varying concentration of Martian methane is due to ongoing methanogenesis. It is first pointed out that life might have arisen on Mars first and been transported to Earth later. A case is made that an icy origin of life is more likely than a hot origin, especially if biomolecules take advantage of the high encounter rates and stability against hydrolysis, and that microorganisms feed on the ions that comprise eutectic solutions in ice. Although certain difficulties are avoided if RNA and DNA grow while adsorbed on clay grains, double strand-breaks of microbial DNA due to alpha radioactivity are a far greater threat to microbial survival on clay or other rock types than in ice. Developing a relation between the rate of microbial metabolism in ice and the experimentally determined rate of production of trapped gases of microbial origin, one can estimate the concentration of methanogens that could account for the methane production rate as a function of temperature of their habitat. The result, of order 1 cell cm -3 in the Martian subsurface, seems an attainable goal provided samples are taken from at least 1 or 2 m below the hostile surface of Mars. Instruments on NASA's 2011 Mars Science Lab will measure stable isotopes for methane, water, and carbon dioxide, which on Earth served to distinguish abiotic, thermogenic, and microbial origins. Future measurements of chirality of biomolecules might also provide evidence for Martian life.

  14. Methodological approaches for studying the microbial ecology of drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Douterelo, Isabel; Boxall, Joby B; Deines, Peter; Sekar, Raju; Fish, Katherine E; Biggs, Catherine A

    2014-11-15

    The study of the microbial ecology of drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) has traditionally been based on culturing organisms from bulk water samples. The development and application of molecular methods has supplied new tools for examining the microbial diversity and activity of environmental samples, yielding new insights into the microbial community and its diversity within these engineered ecosystems. In this review, the currently available methods and emerging approaches for characterising microbial communities, including both planktonic and biofilm ways of life, are critically evaluated. The study of biofilms is considered particularly important as it plays a critical role in the processes and interactions occurring at the pipe wall and bulk water interface. The advantages, limitations and usefulness of methods that can be used to detect and assess microbial abundance, community composition and function are discussed in a DWDS context. This review will assist hydraulic engineers and microbial ecologists in choosing the most appropriate tools to assess drinking water microbiology and related aspects. PMID:25105587

  15. Biochemical markers for measurement of predation effects on the biomass, community structure, nutritional status, and metabolic activity of microbial biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David C. White; Robert H. Findlay

    1988-01-01

    Chemical measures for the biomass, community structure, nutritional status, and metabolic activities of microbes in biofilms\\u000a attached to detrital or sediment surfaces based on analysis of components of cells and extracellular polymers represent a\\u000a quantitative and sensitive method for the analysis of predation. These methods require neither the quantitative removal of\\u000a the organisms from the surfaces nor the efficient culture

  16. Metagenomic Analysis of Showerhead Biofilms from a Hospital in Ohio

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The National Institute of Health estimated that 80% of human microbial infections are associated with biofilms. Although water supplies and hospital equipments are constantly treated with disinfectants, the presence of biofilms in these areas has been frequently obser...

  17. Biogenic selenium and tellurium nanoparticles synthesized by environmental microbial isolates efficaciously inhibit bacterial planktonic cultures and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zonaro, Emanuele; Lampis, Silvia; Turner, Raymond J.; Qazi, S. Junaid S.; Vallini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with Se0- and Te0-based nanoparticles bio-synthesized by two selenite- and tellurite-reducing bacterial strains, namely Stenotrophomonas maltophilia SeITE02 and Ochrobactrum sp. MPV1, isolated from polluted sites. We evidenced that, by regulating culture conditions and exposure time to the selenite and tellurite oxyanions, differently sized zero-valent Se and Te nanoparticles were produced. The results revealed that these Se0 and Te0 nanoparticles possess antimicrobial and biofilm eradication activity against Escherichia coli JM109, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. In particular, Se0 nanoparticles exhibited antimicrobial activity at quite low concentrations, below that of selenite. Toxic effects of both Se0 and Te0 nanoparticles can be related to the production of reactive oxygen species upon exposure of the bacterial cultures. Evidence so far achieved suggests that the antimicrobial activity seems to be strictly linked to the dimensions of the nanoparticles: indeed, the highest activity was shown by nanoparticles of smaller sizes. In particular, it is worth noting how the bacteria tested in biofilm mode responded to the treatment by Se0 and Te0 nanoparticles with a susceptibility similar to that observed in planktonic cultures. This suggests a possible exploitation of both Se0 and Te0 nanoparticles as efficacious antimicrobial agents with a remarkable biofilm eradication capacity. PMID:26136728

  18. Biogenic selenium and tellurium nanoparticles synthesized by environmental microbial isolates efficaciously inhibit bacterial planktonic cultures and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zonaro, Emanuele; Lampis, Silvia; Turner, Raymond J; Qazi, S Junaid S; Vallini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with Se(0)- and Te(0)-based nanoparticles bio-synthesized by two selenite- and tellurite-reducing bacterial strains, namely Stenotrophomonas maltophilia SeITE02 and Ochrobactrum sp. MPV1, isolated from polluted sites. We evidenced that, by regulating culture conditions and exposure time to the selenite and tellurite oxyanions, differently sized zero-valent Se and Te nanoparticles were produced. The results revealed that these Se(0) and Te(0) nanoparticles possess antimicrobial and biofilm eradication activity against Escherichia coli JM109, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. In particular, Se(0) nanoparticles exhibited antimicrobial activity at quite low concentrations, below that of selenite. Toxic effects of both Se(0) and Te(0) nanoparticles can be related to the production of reactive oxygen species upon exposure of the bacterial cultures. Evidence so far achieved suggests that the antimicrobial activity seems to be strictly linked to the dimensions of the nanoparticles: indeed, the highest activity was shown by nanoparticles of smaller sizes. In particular, it is worth noting how the bacteria tested in biofilm mode responded to the treatment by Se(0) and Te(0) nanoparticles with a susceptibility similar to that observed in planktonic cultures. This suggests a possible exploitation of both Se(0) and Te(0) nanoparticles as efficacious antimicrobial agents with a remarkable biofilm eradication capacity. PMID:26136728

  19. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression. PMID:25959674

  20. Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers of higher-power-producing bacteria than abundant genera

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick D. Kiely; Douglas F. Call; Matthew D. Yates; John M. Regan; Bruce E. Logan

    2010-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode communities often reveal just a few genera, but it is not known to what extent less abundant\\u000a bacteria could be important for improving performance. We examined the microbial community in an MFC fed with formic acid\\u000a for more than 1 year and determined using 16S rRNA gene cloning and fluorescent in situ hybridization that members of

  1. Improving the Microbial Quality and Shelf Life of Chicken Carcasses by Trisodium Phosphate and Lactic Acid Dipping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alaa Eldin Mohammed A; Khalid Ibrahim Sallam

    2009-01-01

    This study determined the influence of Trisodium Phosphate (TSP) and Lactic Acid (LA) dipping on the microbial load and shelf life of broiler chicken carcasses during refrigerated storage for 8 days at 2±1 C. The results indicated that both TSP (12%) and LA (2%) dipping significantly reduced the initial o microbial load of Aerobic Plate Counts (APC), Psychrotrophic Counts (PTC),

  2. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to identify biofilms. PMID:25767760

  3. In Situ Identification and Stratification of Monochloramine Inhibition Effects on Nitrifying Biofilms as Determined by the Use of Microelectrodes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nitrifying biofilm grown in an annular biofilm reactor and the microbial deactivation achieved after monochloramine treatment were investigated using microelectrodes. The nitrifying biofilm ammonium microprofile was measured and the effect of monochloramine on nitrifying bio...

  4. "Primers" on Research Techniques Used in Geomicrobiology for Students and Novices from Microbial Life Educational Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; Rice, G.; Mogk, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    Microbial Life Educational Resources (MLER) provides web-based resources and services that support learning about the diversity, ecology and evolution of the (geo)microbial world for students, K-12 teachers, university faculty, as well as for the general public. One of the main goals of MLER is to facilitate integration of modern research techniques and results and effective instructional practices. Two new collections of on-line resources include 1) TechniqueSheets which are 'primers' on analytical techniques commonly used in field and laboratory studies, and 2) focused case studies that demonstrate the use of these techniques in research projects supported by NSF's Microbial Observatory program. TechniqueSheets provide educators and students with essential information about common field and laboratory techniques with image-rich contemporary examples of the employment of these methods in the biogeosciences and microbial life realms. A wide variety of techniques are described including environmental sampling, biogeochemical methods, genomic methods, and microscopy. Every technique includes a general description of what the technique is and how it works, background theory, instrumentation, typical applications and limitations, sampling and sample preparation protocols, data collection, reduction, and representation; interpretations, links to the scientific literature, and collections of related teaching activities. Web-based profiles of the Microbial Observatory projects provide students with case-based learning environments that a) define the "big scientific questions," b) introduce the research teams, c) demonstrate modern research strategies and methodologies, and d) present the key scientific findings. These case studies span a variety of locations from microbial life in the extreme environments of Yellowstone National Park to the diversity of marine sponges in Florida to microbial diversity in Antarctic lakes. The goal of these websites is to help students and other novice-learners to be "critical consumers" of scientific data, to understand how the data were obtained and interpreted, to be able to ask the next important question, to be able to communicate with colleagues in related disciplines, to be able to attend a departmental seminar or read a journal article and be able to comprehend the evidence and interpretations, and ultimately, to provide the foundations that will allow students to design and implement their own research projects employing these techniques. This project was supported by NSF grants 0333402 and 0333363.

  5. Biofilm in wound care.

    PubMed

    Rajpaul, Kumal

    2015-03-01

    A biofilm can be described as a microbial colony encased in a polysaccharide matrix which can become attached to a wound surface. This can affect the healing potential of chronic wounds due to the production of destructive enzymes and toxins which can promote a chronic inflammatory state within the wound. Biofilms can be polymicrobial and can result in delayed wound healing and chronic wound infection resistant to antibiotics, leading to prolonged hospitalisation for some patients. There appears to be a correlation between biofilms and non-healing in chronic wounds. It is suggested that biofilms are a major player in the chronicity of wounds. They are a complex concept to diagnose and management needs to be multifactorial. PMID:25757387

  6. Life in a drop of Ocean: microfluidic insights into microbial ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Roman

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria are the most abundant and successful form of life on Earth. Their physico-chemical interactions with their fluid environment are surprisingly complex and have enormous implications, which we can only hope to grasp if we learn to study microorganisms within realistic microenvironments. Microfluidics for the first time enables us to create microhabitats, including chemical and fluid mechanical landscapes, while visualizing bacterial behavior at a single-cell resolution. Here I focus on the application of microfluidics to gain insight in the life of marine bacteria. In their quest for nturients, marine bacteria often experience the Ocean as a desert, where rare and ephemeral nutrient patches represent transient resource oases. In this patchy seascape, swimming and chemotaxis represent critical assets, but effective patch utilization is constrained by energetic requirements. And then there are predators and viruses... These interactions form the basis of the 'microbial loop', the ensemble of microbial processes known to directly impact the productivity of marine ecosystems and the rates of carbon turnover in the Ocean. I will show how fundamental new insight on selected aspects of microbial life in a drop of Ocean can be achieved by a combination of microfluidic experiments and theoretical modeling.

  7. The effect of antimicrobial agents and modified atmosphere packaging on the microbial shelf life of corn tortillas 

    E-print Network

    Tellez-Giron, Alfredo

    1988-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING ON THE MICROBIAL SHELF LIFE OF CORN TORTILLAS A Thesis by ALFREDO TELLEZ-GIRON, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology THE EFFECT OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING ON THE MICROBIAL SHELF LIFE OF CORN TORTILLAS A Thesis by ALFREDO TELLEZ...

  8. Engineering biofilm formation and dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Thomas K.; Hong, Seok Hoon; Ma, Qun

    2011-01-01

    Anywhere water is in the liquid state, bacteria will exist as biofilms, which are complex communities of cells cemented together. Although frequently associated with disease and biofouling, biofilms are also important for engineering applications, such as bioremediation, biocatalysis and microbial fuel cells. Here we review approaches to alter genetic circuits and cell signaling toward controlling biofilm formation, and emphasize utilizing these tools for engineering applications. Based on a better understanding of the genetic basis of biofilm formation, we find that biofilms may be controlled by manipulating extracellular signals and that they may be dispersed using conserved intracellular signals and regulators. Biofilms could also be formed at specific locations where they might be engineered to make chemicals or treat human disease. PMID:21131080

  9. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    This document and the accompanying manuscripts summarize the technical accomplishments for our one-year LDRD-ER effort. Biofilm forming microbes have existed on this planet for billions of years and make up 60% of the biological mass on earth. Such microbes exhibit unique biochemical pathways during biofilm formation and play important roles in human health and the environment. Microbial biofilms have been directly implicated in, for example, product contamination, energy losses, and medical infection that cost the loss of human lives and billions of dollars. In no small part due to the lack of detailed understanding, biofilms unfortunately are resistant to control, inhibition, and destruction, either through treatment with antimicrobials or immunological defense mechanisms of the body. Current biofilm research has concentrated on the study of biofilms in the bulk. This is primarily due to the lack of analytical and physical tools to study biofilms non-destructively, in three dimensions, and on the micron or sub-micron scale. This has hindered the development of a clear understanding of either the early stage mechanisms of biofilm growth or the interactions of biofilms with their environment. Enzymatic studies have deduced a biochemical reaction that results in the oxidation of reduced sulfur species with the concomitant reduction of nitrate, a common groundwater pollutant, to dinitrogen gas by the bacterium, Thiobacillus denitrificans (TD). Because of its unique involvement in biologically relevant environmental pathways, TD is scheduled for genome sequencing in the near future by the DOE's Joint Genome Institute and is of interest to DOE's Genomes to Life Program. As our ecosystem is exposed to more and more nitrate contamination large scale livestock and agricultural practices, a further understanding of biofilm formation by organisms that could alleviate these problems is necessary in order to protect out biosphere. However, in order to study this complicated organism, we needed to first turn our attention to a well understood organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a well-studied organism and will be used to compare our results with others. Then, we will turn our attention to TD. It is expected that the research performed will provide key data to validate biochemical studies of TD and result in high profile publications in leading journals. For this project, our ultimate goal was to combine both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experimental analysis with computer simulations to provide unique 3D molecular structural, dynamics, and functional information on the order of microns for this DOE mission relevant microorganism, T. denitrificans. For FY05, our goals were to: (1) Determine proper media for optimal growth of PA; growth rate measurements in that media and characterization of metabolite signatures during growth via {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, (2) Determine and build mineral, metal, and implant material surfaces to support growth of PA, (3) Implementing new MRI sequences to image biofilms more efficiently and increase resolution with new hardware design, (4) Develop further diffusion and flow MRI measurements of biofilms and biofilm formation with different MRI pulse sequences and different hardware design, and (5) Develop a zero dimension model of the rate of growth and the metabolite profiles of PA. Our major accomplishments are discussed in the following text. However, the bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled, ''NMR Metabolomics of Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa''. This paper will be submitted to the Journal of Bacteriology in coming weeks. In addition, this one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign during FY05 for some proof-of-principle MRI measurements on polymers. We are currently using similar methods to evaluate these polymers. In addition, this work on MRI measurements on polymers has lead to a paper entitled, ''Characterization of local deformation in filled

  10. Deep microbial life in the Altmark natural gas reservoir: baseline characterization prior CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Daria; Shaheed, Mina; Vieth, Andrea; Krüger, Martin; Kock, Dagmar; Würdemann, Hilke

    2010-05-01

    Within the framework of the CLEAN project (CO2 Largescale Enhanced gas recovery in the Altmark Natural gas field) technical basics with special emphasis on process monitoring are explored by injecting CO2 into a gas reservoir. Our study focuses on the investigation of the in-situ microbial community of the Rotliegend natural gas reservoir in the Altmark, located south of the city Salzwedel, Germany. In order to characterize the microbial life in the extreme habitat we aim to localize and identify microbes including their metabolism influencing the creation and dissolution of minerals. The ability of microorganisms to speed up dissolution and formation of minerals might result in changes of the local permeability and the long-term safety of CO2 storage. However, geology, structure and chemistry of the reservoir rock and the cap rock as well as interaction with saline formation water and natural gases and the injected CO2 affect the microbial community composition and activity. The reservoir located at the depth of about 3500m, is characterised by high salinity fluid and temperatures up to 127° C. It represents an extreme environment for microbial life and therefore the main focus is on hyperthermophilic, halophilic anaerobic microorganisms. In consequence of the injection of large amounts of CO2 in the course of a commercial EGR (Enhanced Gas Recovery) the environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, pressure and solubility of minerals) for the autochthonous microorganisms will change. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes are applied for detecting structural changes in the community by using PCR- SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism) and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). First results of the baseline survey indicate the presence of microorganisms similar to representatives from other saline, hot, anoxic, deep environments. However, due to the hypersaline and hyperthermophilic reservoir conditions, cell numbers are low, so that the quantification of those microorganisms as well as the determination of microbial activity was not yet possible. Microbial monitoring methods have to be further developed to study microbial activities under these extreme conditions to access their influence on the EGR technique and on enhancing the long term safety of the process by fixation of carbon dioxide by precipitation of carbonates. We would like to thank GDF SUEZ for providing the data for the Rotliegend reservoir, sample material and enabling sampling campaigns. The CLEAN project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in the frame of the Geotechnologien Program.

  11. Impact of drinking water conditions and copper materials on downstream biofilm microbial communities and legionella pneumophila colonization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Legionella pneumophila, the medically important species within the genus Legionella, is a concern in engineered water systems. Its ability to amplify within free-living amoebae is well documented, but its interactions/ecology within the microbial community of drinking water biofi...

  12. Synthetic networks in microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suel, Gurol

    2015-03-01

    While bacteria are single celled organisms, they predominantly reside in structured communities known as biofilms. Cells in biofilms are encapsulated and protected by the extracellular matrix (ECM), which also confines cells in space. During biofilm development, microbial cells are organized in space and over time. Little is known regarding the processes that drive the spatio-temporal organization of microbial communities. Here I will present our latest efforts that utilize synthetic biology approaches to uncover the organizational principles that drive biofilm development. I will also discuss the possible implications of our recent findings in terms of the cost and benefit to biofilm cells.

  13. Intestinal Microbial Diversity during Early-Life Colonization Shapes Long-Term IgE Levels

    PubMed Central

    Cahenzli, Julia; Köller, Yasmin; Wyss, Madeleine; Geuking, Markus B.; McCoy, Kathy D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Microbial exposure following birth profoundly impacts mammalian immune system development. Microbiota alterations are associated with increased incidence of allergic and autoimmune disorders with elevated serum IgE as a hallmark. The previously reported abnormally high serum IgE levels in germ-free mice suggests that immunoregulatory signals from microbiota are required to control basal IgE levels. We report that germ-free mice and those with low-diversity microbiota develop elevated serum IgE levels in early life. B cells in neonatal germ-free mice undergo isotype switching to IgE at mucosal sites in a CD4 T-cell- and IL-4-dependent manner. A critical level of microbial diversity following birth is required in order to inhibit IgE induction. Elevated IgE levels in germ-free mice lead to increased mast-cell-surface-bound IgE and exaggerated oral-induced systemic anaphylaxis. Thus, appropriate intestinal microbial stimuli during early life are critical for inducing an immunoregulatory network that protects from induction of IgE at mucosal sites. PMID:24237701

  14. Bifunctional quaternary ammonium compounds to inhibit biofilm growth and enhance performance for activated carbon air-cathode in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Liu, Yinan; An, Jingkun; Feng, Cuijuan; Wang, Xin

    2014-12-01

    The slow diffusion of hydroxyl out of the catalyst layer as well as the biofouling on the surface of cathode are two problems affecting power for membrane-less air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In order to solve both of them simultaneously, here we simply modify activated carbon air-cathode using a bifunctional quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) by forced evaporation. The maximum power density reaches 1041 ± 12 mW m-2 in an unbuffered medium (0.5 g L-1 NaCl), which is 17% higher than the control, probably due to the accelerated anion transport in the catalyst layer. After 2 months, the protein content reduced by a factor of 26 and the power density increases by 33%, indicating that the QAC modification can effectively inhibit the growth of cathodic biofilm and improve the stability of performance. The addition of NaOH and QAC epoxy have a negative effect on power production due to the clogging of pores in catalyst layer.

  15. Spatially Oscillating Activity and Microbial Succession of Mercury-Reducing Biofilms in a Technical-Scale Bioremediation System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harald von Canstein; Ying Li; J. Leonhauser; Elke Haase; Andreas Felske; Wolf-Dieter Deckwer; I. Wagner-Dobler

    2002-01-01

    Mercury-contaminated chemical wastewater of a mercury cell chloralkali plant was cleaned on site by a technical-scale bioremediation system. Microbial mercury reduction of soluble Hg(II) to precipitating Hg(0) decreased the mercury load of the wastewater during its flow through the bioremediation system by up to 99%. The system consisted of a packed-bed bioreactor, where most of the wastewater's mercury load was

  16. Complete Nucleotide Sequence and Analysis of Two Conjugative Broad Host Range Plasmids from a Marine Microbial Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Peter; Bergström, Maria; Hermansson, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of plasmids pMCBF1 and pMCBF6 was determined and analyzed. pMCBF1 and pMCBF6 form a novel clade within the IncP-1 plasmid family designated IncP-1 ?. The plasmids were exogenously isolated earlier from a marine biofilm. pMCBF1 (62 689 base pairs; bp) and pMCBF6 (66 729 bp) have identical backbones, but differ in their mercury resistance transposons. pMCBF1 carries Tn5053 and pMCBF6 carries Tn5058. Both are flanked by 5 bp direct repeats, typical of replicative transposition. Both insertions are in the vicinity of a resolvase gene in the backbone, supporting the idea that both transposons are “res-site hunters” that preferably insert close to and use external resolvase functions. The similarity of the backbones indicates recent insertion of the two transposons and the ongoing dynamics of plasmid evolution in marine biofilms. Both plasmids also carry the insertion sequence ISPst1, albeit without flanking repeats. ISPs1is located in an unusual site within the control region of the plasmid. In contrast to most known IncP-1 plasmids the pMCBF1/pMCBF6 backbone has no insert between the replication initiation gene (trfA) and the vegetative replication origin (oriV). One pMCBF1/pMCBF6 block of about 2.5 kilo bases (kb) has no similarity with known sequences in the databases. Furthermore, insertion of three genes with similarity to the multidrug efflux pump operon mexEF and a gene from the NodT family of the tripartite multi-drug resistance-nodulation-division (RND) system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found. They do not seem to confer antibiotic resistance to the hosts of pMCBF1/pMCBF6, but the presence of RND on promiscuous plasmids may have serious implications for the spread of antibiotic multi-resistance. PMID:24647540

  17. Resveratrol treatment controls microbial flora, prolongs shelf life, and preserves nutritional quality of fruit.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Jorge Bernardo; Orea, José María; Montero, Carlos; Ureña, Angel González; Navas, Elena; Slowing, Karla; Gómez-Serranillos, María Pilar; Carretero, Emilia; De Martinis, Domenico

    2005-03-01

    Resveratrol is known as a grapevine secondary metabolite with fungicide activity. Its exogenous application on harvested grapes resulted in the reduction of microbial flora growth, and consequently, prolonged shelf life, without affecting the nutritional quality of the fruit. Resveratrol treatment also resulted in being effective on fruit that normally does not accumulate such metabolites as, for example, tomatoes, apples, avocado pears, and peppers. As a result, all treated fruits maintained their post-harvest quality and health longer than the untreated ones. This study demonstrates the potential use of resveratrol as a natural pesticide to reduce post-harvest fungi development on a broad spectrum of fruit types. PMID:15740035

  18. Innovative Strategies to Overcome Biofilm Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Taraszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Fila, Grzegorz; Grinholc, Mariusz; Nakonieczna, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    We review the recent literature concerning the efficiency of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation toward various microbial species in planktonic and biofilm cultures. The review is mainly focused on biofilm-growing microrganisms because this form of growth poses a threat to chronically infected or immunocompromised patients and is difficult to eradicate from medical devices. We discuss the biofilm formation process and mechanisms of its increased resistance to various antimicrobials. We present, based on data in the literature, strategies for overcoming the problem of biofilm resistance. Factors that have potential for use in increasing the efficiency of the killing of biofilm-forming bacteria include plant extracts, enzymes that disturb the biofilm structure, and other nonenzymatic molecules. We propose combining antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with various antimicrobial and antibiofilm approaches to obtain a synergistic effect to permit efficient microbial growth control at low photosensitizer doses. PMID:23509680

  19. Biofilms Reduce Solar Disinfection of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, B. R.; Jellison, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Solar radiation reduces Cryptosporidium infectivity. Biofilms grown from stream microbial assemblages inoculated with oocysts were exposed to solar radiation. The infectivity of oocysts attached at the biofilm surface and oocysts suspended in water was about half that of oocysts attached at the base of a 32-?m biofilm. PMID:22467508

  20. Microbial life in the Lake Medee, the largest deep-sea salt-saturated formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Michail M.; La Cono, Violetta; Slepak, Vladlen Z.; La Spada, Gina; Arcadi, Erika; Messina, Enzo; Borghini, Mireno; Monticelli, Luis S.; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Golyshina, Olga V.; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N.; Giuliano, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic lakes (DHALs) of the Eastern Mediterranean represent some of the most hostile environments on our planet. We investigated microbial life in the recently discovered Lake Medee, the largest DHAL found to-date. Medee has two unique features: a complex geobiochemical stratification and an absence of chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria, which usually play the primary role in dark bicarbonate assimilation in DHALs interfaces. Presumably because of these features, Medee is less productive and exhibits reduced diversity of autochthonous prokaryotes in its interior. Indeed, the brine community almost exclusively consists of the members of euryarchaeal MSBL1 and bacterial KB1 candidate divisions. Our experiments utilizing cultivation and [14C]-assimilation, showed that these organisms at least partially rely on reductive cleavage of osmoprotectant glycine betaine and are engaged in trophic cooperation. These findings provide novel insights into how prokaryotic communities can adapt to salt-saturated conditions and sustain active metabolism at the thermodynamic edge of life.

  1. Microbial life in the Lake Medee, the largest deep-sea salt-saturated formation.

    PubMed

    Yakimov, Michail M; La Cono, Violetta; Slepak, Vladlen Z; La Spada, Gina; Arcadi, Erika; Messina, Enzo; Borghini, Mireno; Monticelli, Luis S; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Golyshina, Olga V; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N; Giuliano, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic lakes (DHALs) of the Eastern Mediterranean represent some of the most hostile environments on our planet. We investigated microbial life in the recently discovered Lake Medee, the largest DHAL found to-date. Medee has two unique features: a complex geobiochemical stratification and an absence of chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria, which usually play the primary role in dark bicarbonate assimilation in DHALs interfaces. Presumably because of these features, Medee is less productive and exhibits reduced diversity of autochthonous prokaryotes in its interior. Indeed, the brine community almost exclusively consists of the members of euryarchaeal MSBL1 and bacterial KB1 candidate divisions. Our experiments utilizing cultivation and [(14)C]-assimilation, showed that these organisms at least partially rely on reductive cleavage of osmoprotectant glycine betaine and are engaged in trophic cooperation. These findings provide novel insights into how prokaryotic communities can adapt to salt-saturated conditions and sustain active metabolism at the thermodynamic edge of life. PMID:24352146

  2. The emergence of cooperation from a single mutant during microbial life cycles.

    PubMed

    Melbinger, Anna; Cremer, Jonas; Frey, Erwin

    2015-07-01

    Cooperative behaviour is widespread in nature, even though cooperating individuals always run the risk of being exploited by free-riders. Population structure effectively promotes cooperation given that a threshold in the level of cooperation was already reached. However, the question how cooperation can emerge from a single mutant, which cannot rely on a benefit provided by other cooperators, is still puzzling. Here, we investigate this question for a well-defined but generic situation based on typical life cycles of microbial populations where individuals regularly form new colonies followed by growth phases. We analyse two evolutionary mechanisms favouring cooperative behaviour and study their strength depending on the inoculation size and the length of a life cycle. In particular, we find that population bottlenecks followed by exponential growth phases strongly increase the survival and fixation probabilities of a single cooperator in a free-riding population. PMID:26063816

  3. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Josefine

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown. PMID:25523872

  4. BIOFILMS IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Virtually anywhere a surface comes into contact with the water in a distribution system, one can find biofilms. Biofilms are formed in distribution system pipelines when microbial cells attach to pipe surfaces and multiply to form a film or slime layer on the pipe. Probably withi...

  5. Biofilms and Inflammation in Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ge; Usui, Marcia L.; Lippman, Soyeon I.; James, Garth A.; Stewart, Philip S.; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Significance The incidence, cost, morbidity, and mortality associated with non-healing of chronic skin wounds are dramatic. With the increasing numbers of people with obesity, chronic medical conditions, and an increasing life expectancy, the healthcare cost of non-healing ulcers has recently been estimated at $25 billion annually in the United States. The role played by bacterial biofilm in chronic wounds has been emphasized in recent years, particularly in the context of the prolongation of the inflammatory phase of repair. Recent Advances Rapid high-throughput genomic approaches have revolutionized the ability to identify and quantify microbial organisms from wounds. Defining bacterial genomes and using genetic approaches to knock out specific bacterial functions, then studying bacterial survival on cutaneous wounds is a promising strategy for understanding which genes are essential for pathogenicity. Critical Issues When an animal sustains a cutaneous wound, understanding mechanisms involved in adaptations by bacteria and adaptations by the host in the struggle for survival is central to development of interventions that favor the host. Future Directions Characterization of microbiomes of clinically well characterized chronic human wounds is now under way. The use of in vivo models of biofilm-infected cutaneous wounds will permit the study of the mechanisms needed for biofilm formation, persistence, and potential synergistic interactions among bacteria. A more complete understanding of bacterial survival mechanisms and how microbes influence host repair mechanisms are likely to provide targets for chronic wound therapy. PMID:24527355

  6. Spatial Arrangement of Legionella Colonies in Intact Biofilms from a Model Cooling Water System

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael; Ross, Kirstin; Bentham, Richard

    2013-01-01

    There is disagreement among microbiologists about whether Legionella requires a protozoan host in order to replicate. This research sought to determine where in biofilm Legionellae are found and whether all biofilm associated Legionella would be located within protozoan hosts. While it is accepted that Legionella colonizes biofilm, its life cycle and nutritional fastidiousness suggest that Legionella employs multiple survival strategies to persist within microbial systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) demonstrated an undulating biofilm surface architecture and a roughly homogenous distribution of heterotrophic bacteria with clusters of protozoa. Legionella displayed 3 distinct spatial arrangements either contained within or directly associated with protozoa, or dispersed in loosely associated clusters or in tightly packed aggregations of cells forming dense colonial clusters. The formation of discreet clusters of tightly packed Legionella suggests that colony formation is influenced by specific environmental conditions allowing for limited extracellular replication. This work represents the first time that an environmentally representative, multispecies biofilm containing Legionella has been fluorescently tagged and Legionella colony morphology noted within a complex microbial system. PMID:24826074

  7. Spatial arrangement of legionella colonies in intact biofilms from a model cooling water system.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael; Ross, Kirstin; Bentham, Richard

    2013-01-01

    There is disagreement among microbiologists about whether Legionella requires a protozoan host in order to replicate. This research sought to determine where in biofilm Legionellae are found and whether all biofilm associated Legionella would be located within protozoan hosts. While it is accepted that Legionella colonizes biofilm, its life cycle and nutritional fastidiousness suggest that Legionella employs multiple survival strategies to persist within microbial systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) demonstrated an undulating biofilm surface architecture and a roughly homogenous distribution of heterotrophic bacteria with clusters of protozoa. Legionella displayed 3 distinct spatial arrangements either contained within or directly associated with protozoa, or dispersed in loosely associated clusters or in tightly packed aggregations of cells forming dense colonial clusters. The formation of discreet clusters of tightly packed Legionella suggests that colony formation is influenced by specific environmental conditions allowing for limited extracellular replication. This work represents the first time that an environmentally representative, multispecies biofilm containing Legionella has been fluorescently tagged and Legionella colony morphology noted within a complex microbial system. PMID:24826074

  8. Characterization of the deep microbial life in the Altmark natural gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, D.; Alawi, M.; Vieth-Hillebrand, A.; Kock, D.; Krüger, M.; Wuerdemann, H.; Shaheed, M.

    2010-12-01

    Within the framework of the CLEAN project (CO2 Largescale Enhanced gas recovery in the Altmark Natural gas field) technical basics with special emphasis on process monitoring are explored by injecting CO2 into a gas reservoir. Our study focuses on the investigation of the in-situ microbial community of the Rotliegend natural gas reservoir in the Altmark, located south of the city Salzwedel, Germany. In order to characterize the microbial life in the extreme habitat we aim to localize and identify microbes including their metabolism influencing the creation and dissolution of minerals. The ability of microorganisms to speed up dissolution and formation of minerals might result in changes of the local permeability and the long-term safety of CO2 storage. However, geology, structure and chemistry of the reservoir rock and the cap rock as well as interaction with saline formation water and natural gases and the injected CO2 affect the microbial community composition and activity. The reservoir located at the depth of approximately 3500 m, is characterised by high salinity (420 g/l) and temperatures up to 127°C. It represents an extreme environment for microbial life and therefore the main focus is on hyperthermophilic, halophilic anaerobic microorganisms. In consequence of the injection of large amounts of CO2 in the course of a commercial EGR (Enhanced Gas Recovery), the environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, pressure and solubility of minerals) for the autochthonous microorganisms will change. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes are applied for detecting structural changes in the community by using PCR- SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism), DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) and 16S rRNA cloning. First results of the baseline survey indicate the presence of microorganisms similar to representatives from other deep environments. The sequence analyses revealed the presence of several H2-oxidising bacteria (Hydrogenophaga sp., Adicdovorax sp., Ralstonia sp., Pseudomonas sp.), thiosulfate-oxidising bacteria (Diaphorobacter sp.) and biocorrosive thermophilic microorganisms, which have not previously been cultivated. Furthermore, several uncultivated microorganisms were found, that were similar to representatives from other saline, hot, anoxic, deep environments. However, due to the hypersaline and hyperthermophilic reservoir conditions, cell numbers are low, so that the quantification of those microorganisms as well as the determination of microbial activity was not yet possible. Microbial monitoring methods have to be further developed to study microbial activities under these extreme conditions to access their influence on the EGR technique and on enhancing the long term safety of the process by fixation of carbon dioxide by precipitation of carbonates. We thank GDF SUEZ for providing the data for the Rotliegend reservoir, sample material and supporting sampling campaigns. The CLEAN project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in the framework of the GEOTECHNOLOGIEN Program.

  9. Biofilms On Orbit and On Earth: Current Methods, Future Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vega, Leticia

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms have played a significant role on the effectiveness of life support hardware on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). This presentation will discuss how biofilms impact flight hardware, how on orbit biofilms are analyzed from an engineering and research perspective, and future needs to analyze and utilize biofilms for long duration, deep space missions.

  10. Fate of deposited cells in an aerobic binary bacterial biofilm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1989-01-01

    A biofilm is a matrix of microbial cells and their extracellular products that is associated with a solid surface. Previous studies on biofilm development have employed only dissolved compounds as growth limiting substrates, without the influence of microbial species invading from the bulk liquid. The goal of this research project was to quantify the kinetics of processes governing suspended biomass

  11. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; R?zicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient. PMID:18578409

  12. Life on the outside: role of biofilms in environmental persistence of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vogeleer, Philippe; Tremblay, Yannick D N; Mafu, Akier A; Jacques, Mario; Harel, Josée

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a heterogeneous species that can be part of the normal flora of humans but also include strains of medical importance. Among pathogenic members, Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) are some of the more prominent pathogenic E. coli within the public sphere. STEC disease outbreaks are typically associated with contaminated beef, contaminated drinking water, and contaminated fresh produce. These water- and food-borne pathogens usually colonize cattle asymptomatically; cows will shed STEC in their feces and the subsequent fecal contamination of the environment and processing plants is a major concern for food and public safety. This is especially important because STEC can survive for prolonged periods of time outside its host in environments such as water, produce, and farm soil. Biofilms are hypothesized to be important for survival in the environment especially on produce, in rivers, and in processing plants. Several factors involved in biofilm formation such as curli, cellulose, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, and colanic acid are involved in plant colonization and adherence to different surfaces often found in meat processing plants. In food processing plants, contamination of beef carcasses occurs at different stages of processing and this is often caused by the formation of STEC biofilms on the surface of several pieces of equipment associated with slaughtering and processing. Biofilms protect bacteria against several challenges, including biocides used in industrial processes. STEC biofilms are less sensitive than planktonic cells to several chemical sanitizers such as quaternary ammonium compounds, peroxyacetic acid, and chlorine compounds. Increased resistance to sanitizers by STEC growing in a biofilm is likely to be a source of contamination in the processing plant. This review focuses on the role of biofilm formation by STEC as a means of persistence outside their animal host and factors associated with biofilm formation. PMID:25071733

  13. Terrestrial Biomarkers for Early Life on Earth as Analogs for Possible Martian Life Forms: Examples of Minerally Replaced Bacteria and Biofilms From the 3.5 - 3.3-Ga Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westall, F.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; deWit, M. J.; Dann, J.; Gerneke, D.; deRonde, C. E. J.

    1998-01-01

    The search for extraterrestrial life and especially martian life hinges on a variety of methods used to identify vestiges of what we could recognize as life, including chemical signatures, morphological fossils, and biogenic precipitates. Although the possibility of extant life on Mars (subsurface) is being considered, most exploration efforts may be directed toward the search for fossil life. Geomorphological evidence points to a warmer and wetter Mars early on in its history, a scenario that encourages comparison with the early Earth. For this reason, study of the early terrestrial life forms and environment in which they lived may provide clues as to how to search for extinct martian life. As a contribution to the early Archean database of terrestrial microfossils, we present new data on morphological fossils from the 3.5-3.3-Ga Barberton greenstone belt (BGB), South Africa. This study underlines the variety of fossil types already present in some of the oldest, best-preserved terrestrial sediments, ranging from minerally replaced bacteria and bacteria molds of vaRious morphologies (coccoid, coccobacillus, bacillus) to minerally replaced biofilm. Biofilm or extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) is produced by bacteria and appears to be more readily fossilisable than bacteria themselves. The BGB fossils occur in shallow water to subaerial sediments interbedded with volcanic lavas, the whole being deposited on oceanic crust. Penecontemporaneous silicification of sediments and volcanics resulted in the chertification of the rocks, which were later subjected to low-grade metamorphism (lower greenschist).

  14. Permeabilizing biofilms

    DOEpatents

    Soukos, Nikolaos S. (Revere, MA); Lee, Shun (Arlington, VA); Doukas,; Apostolos G. (Belmont, MA)

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  15. Evaluation of the Microbial Population in the Multibiological Life Support System Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuming; Tong, Ling; Li, Ming; Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Dawei; He, Wenting; Liu, Hong

    In order to develop and evaluate a ground-based bioregenerative life support system satisfying half of one crew member's requirement towards O2 , Multibiological Life Support System Exper-iments (MLSSE) have been conducted. The MLSSE involved humans participating in the gas exchange with the closed equipment simulating the future extraterrestrial life support systems, which included three phases. The Phase I test involved one person participating in the gas exchange with lettuce in plant chamber as the primary means of air revitalization for 3 months. The Phase II test involved one person participating in the gas exchange with lettuce in plant chamber and micoalgae in bioreactor as the means of air revitalization for 1 month. In the Phase III test, silkworm was introduced into animal chamber for 2 months based on Phase II. The microbial dynamics in the closed chambers were evaluated during the whole experiments. The surfaces, water, and air of closed equipment were sampled for microbial content during the whole experiments. In general, the numbers of microbes in the chambers slowly increased with length of occupation. Compared with Phase I, the numbers of microbes of Phase II ob-viously increased, however, the numbers of microbes of Phase III did not increase relative to Phase II. The types of microbes found on the surfaces and in the air in all the experimental phases were similar. The most common bacteria were Bacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., as well as Sphingomonas sp., with Pencillium sp. and Cladosporium sp. the most common fungi. A few opportunistic pathogens were also determined, but neither phase had levels of microbes that would be considered an occupational health threat.

  16. Biofilms: Survival Mechanisms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, Rodney M.; Costerton, J. William

    2002-01-01

    Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes involved in cell attachment and biofilm formation. PMID:11932229

  17. Identification of ypqP as a New Bacillus subtilis Biofilm Determinant That Mediates the Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents in Mixed-Species Communities

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Vizuete, Pilar; Le Coq, Dominique; Bridier, Arnaud; Herry, Jean-Marie; Aymerich, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    In most habitats, microbial life is organized in biofilms, three-dimensional edifices sustained by extracellular polymeric substances that enable bacteria to resist harsh and changing environments. Under multispecies conditions, bacteria can benefit from the polymers produced by other species (“public goods”), thus improving their survival under toxic conditions. A recent study showed that a Bacillus subtilis hospital isolate (NDmed) was able to protect Staphylococcus aureus from biocide action in multispecies biofilms. In this work, we identified ypqP, a gene whose product is required in NDmed for thick-biofilm formation on submerged surfaces and for resistance to two biocides widely used in hospitals. NDmed and S. aureus formed mixed biofilms, and both their spatial arrangement and pathogen protection were mediated by YpqP. Functional ypqP is present in other natural B. subtilis biofilm-forming isolates. However, the gene is disrupted by the SP? prophage in the weak submerged-biofilm-forming strains NCIB3610 and 168, which are both less resistant than NDmed to the biocides tested. Furthermore, in a 168 laboratory strain cured of the SP? prophage, the reestablishment of a functional ypqP gene led to increased thickness and resistance to biocides of the associated biofilms. We therefore propose that YpqP is a new and important determinant of B. subtilis surface biofilm architecture, protection against exposure to toxic compounds, and social behavior in bacterial communities. PMID:25326298

  18. Sensory shelf life determination of a processed meat product 'rullepølse' and microbial metabolites as potential indicators.

    PubMed

    Stolzenbach, Sandra; Leisner, Jørgen J; Byrne, Derek V

    2009-10-01

    Sensory profiling was performed for a Danish lightly fermented heat-processed cold cut pork product termed 'rullepølse'. Product samples were stored under modified atmosphere (MAP, 30% CO(2)/70% N(2)) for 0, 28 and 34days and with subsequent aerobic storage for 4days (MAP-OPEN) at temperatures of 4°C and 8°C. Microbial growth and metabolism was also measured with a focus on lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their organic acid metabolites including lactic acid, acetic acid and ?-ketoisocaproic acid. These acids were examined for sensory shelf life indexing potential for the 'rullepølse'. Storage temperature exerted distinct impacts on the sensory characterised shelf life of 'rullepølse' stored under MAP and MAP-OPEN conditions. The MAP stored 'rullepølse' with subsequent 4days storage in air (MAP-OPEN) could be stored for at least 28days at 4°C without a decrease in the sensory quality when opened. Whilst MAP stored 'rullepølse' at 8°C with subsequent open storage (MAP-OPEN), compared to the lower temperature displayed a reduced shelf life of less than 28days if sensory quality of the 'rullepølse' was to be maintained. The stage of sensory deterioration was correlated with high bacterial counts exceeding 10(6)CFUg(-1). With respect to indexing ability of the examined organic acids none were found to have clear potential for prediction of the sensory deterioration. PMID:20416734

  19. Alumina surfaces with nanoscale topography reduce attachment and biofilm formation by Escherichia coli and Listeria spp.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guoping; Cheng, Yifan; Wang, Shu-Yi; Hsu, Lillian C; Feliz, Yazmin; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana A; Worobo, Randy W; Moraru, Carmen I

    2014-01-01

    This work reports on a simple, robust and scientifically sound method to develop surfaces able to reduce microbial attachment and biofilm development, with possible applications in medicine, dentistry, food processing, or water treatment. Anodic surfaces with cylindrical nanopores 15 to 100 nm in diameter were manufactured and incubated with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Listeria innocua. Surfaces with 15 and 25 nm pore diameters significantly repressed attachment and biofilm formation. Surface-bacteria interaction forces calculated using the extended Derjaguin Landau Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory indicate that reduction in attachment and biofilm formation is due to a synergy between electrostatic repulsion and surface effective free energy. An attachment study using E. coli K12 strains unable to express appendages also suggests that the small-pore surfaces may inhibit flagella-dependent attachment. These results can have immediate, far-reaching implications and commercial applications, with substantial benefits for human health and life. PMID:25427545

  20. Transcriptional profiling of Legionella pneumophila biofilm cells and the influence of iron on biofilm formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Hindre; Holger Bruggemann; Carmen Buchrieser; Yann Hechard

    2008-01-01

    In aquatic environments, biofilms constitute an ecological niche where Legionella pneumophila persists as sessile cells. However, very little information on the sessile mode of life of L. pneumophila is currently available. We report here the development of a model biofilm of L. pneumophila strain Lens and the first transcriptome analysis of L. pneumophila biofilm cells. Global gene expression analysis of

  1. Methods for Characterizing the Co-development of Biofilm and Habitat Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobao; Song, Jisun L; Culotti, Alessandro; Zhang, Wei; Chopp, David L; Lu, Nanxi; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-attached microbial communities that have complex structures and produce significant spatial heterogeneities. Biofilm development is strongly regulated by the surrounding flow and nutritional environment. Biofilm growth also increases the heterogeneity of the local microenvironment by generating complex flow fields and solute transport patterns. To investigate the development of heterogeneity in biofilms and interactions between biofilms and their local micro-habitat, we grew mono-species biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and dual-species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli under nutritional gradients in a microfluidic flow cell. We provide detailed protocols for creating nutrient gradients within the flow cell and for growing and visualizing biofilm development under these conditions. We also present protocols for a series of optical methods to quantify spatial patterns in biofilm structure, flow distributions over biofilms, and mass transport around and within biofilm colonies. These methods support comprehensive investigations of the co-development of biofilm and habitat heterogeneity. PMID:25866914

  2. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-02-15

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

  3. Identifying Microbially Influenced Corrosion in Paper

    E-print Network

    Das, Suman

    across. Paper machine white water and many other mill waters are hospitable to bacterial growth Warm form biofilms Sessile bacteria and the materials that adhere to them form biofilms PM biofilm sloughing can produce sheet defects 4 Xavier et al, 2004 #12;3 Microbially Influenced Corrosion under

  4. Microbial dysbiosis in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sameera G.; Raveendran, Ranjith

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is a biofilm-associated inflammatory disease of the periodontium. This disease appears to have multiple etiologies with microbial factor contributing to initiation of the disease and immunological factor of the host propagating the disease. This review is on the concept of “microbial dysbiosis” and molecular nature of periodontitis, and the scope of traditional and emerging technologies for treating this disease. PMID:24174742

  5. Spatial and temporal variability of biomarkers and microbial diversity reveal metabolic and community flexibility in Streamer Biofilm Communities in the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Schubotz, F; Meyer-Dombard, D R; Bradley, A S; Fredricks, H F; Hinrichs, K-U; Shock, E L; Summons, R E

    2013-11-01

    Detailed analysis of 16S rRNA and intact polar lipids (IPLs) from streamer biofilm communities (SBCs), collected from geochemically similar hot springs in the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, shows good agreement and affirm that IPLs can be used as reliable markers for the microbial constituents of SBCs. Uncultured Crenarchaea are prominent in SBS, and their IPLs contain both glycosidic and mixed glyco-phospho head groups with tetraether cores, having 0-4 rings. Archaeal IPL contributions increase with increasing temperature and comprise up to one-fourth of the total IPL inventory at >84 °C. At elevated temperatures, bacterial IPLs contain abundant glycosidic glycerol diether lipids. Diether and diacylglycerol (DAG) lipids with aminopentanetetrol and phosphatidylinositol head groups were identified as lipids diagnostic of Aquificales, while DAG glycolipids and glyco-phospholipids containing N-acetylgycosamine as head group were assigned to members of the Thermales. With decreasing temperature and concomitant changes in water chemistry, IPLs typical of phototrophic bacteria, such as mono-, diglycosyl, and sulfoquinovosyl DAG, which are specific for cyanobacteria, increase in abundance, consistent with genomic data from the same samples. Compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of IPL breakdown products reveals a large isotopic diversity among SBCs in different hot springs. At two of the hot springs, 'Bison Pool' and Flat Cone, lipids derived from Aquificales are enriched in (13) C relative to biomass and approach values close to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (approximately 0‰), consistent with fractionation during autotrophic carbon fixation via the reversed tricarboxylic acid pathway. At a third site, Octopus Spring, the same Aquificales-diagnostic lipids are 10‰ depleted relative to biomass and resemble stable carbon isotope values of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), indicative of heterotrophy. Other bacterial and archaeal lipids show a similar variance, with values resembling the DIC or DOC pool or a mixture thereof. This variance cannot be explained by hot spring chemistry or temperature alone, but instead, we argue that intermittent input of exogenous organic carbon can result in metabolic shifts of the chemotrophic communities from autotrophy to heterotrophy and vice versa. PMID:23981055

  6. Successional development of biofilms in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kristi; Taylor, Michael W; Turner, Susan J

    2014-02-01

    Biofilm-based technologies, such as moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems, are widely used to treat wastewater. Biofilm development is important for MBBR systems as much of the microbial biomass is retained within reactors as biofilm on suspended carriers. Little is known about this process of biofilm development and the microorganisms upon which MBBRs rely. We documented successional changes in microbial communities as biofilms established in two full-scale MBBR systems treating municipal wastewater over two seasons. 16S rRNA gene-targeted pyrosequencing and clone libraries were used to describe microbial communities. These data indicate a successional process that commences with the establishment of an aerobic community dominated by Gammaproteobacteria (up to 52 % of sequences). Over time, this community shifts towards dominance by putatively anaerobic organisms including Deltaproteobacteria and Clostridiales. Significant differences were observed between the two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), mostly due to a large number of sequences (up to 55 %) representing Epsilonproteobacteria (mostly Arcobacter) at one site. Archaea in young biofilms included several lineages of Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. In contrast, the mature biofilm consisted entirely of Methanosarcinaceae (Euryarchaeota). This study provides new insights into the community structure of developing biofilms at full-scale WWTPs and provides the basis for optimizing MBBR start-up and operational parameters. PMID:23838795

  7. Lava Cave Microbial Communities Within Mats and Secondary Mineral Deposits: Implications for Life Detection on Other Planets

    PubMed Central

    Melim, L.A.; Spilde, M.N.; Hathaway, J.J.M.; Garcia, M.G.; Moya, M.; Stone, F.D.; Boston, P.J.; Dapkevicius, M.L.N.E.; Riquelme, C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai‘i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai‘i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai‘i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies. Key Words: Biosignatures—Astrobiology—Bacteria—Caves—Life detection—Microbial mats. Astrobiology 11, 601–618. PMID:21879833

  8. Plaque biofilms: the effect of chemical environment on natural human plaque biofilm architecture.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C; Strafford, S; Rees, G; Brookes, S J; Kirkham, J; Shore, R C; Watson, P S; Wood, S

    2006-11-01

    The architecture of microbial biofilms especially the outer regions have an important influence on the interaction between biofilm and local environment particularly on the flux of materials into and out of biofilm compartments and as a consequence, biofilm metabolic behaviour. In the case of dental plaque biofilms, architecture will determine access of nutrients including acidogenic substrates and therapeutic materials to the microbial biomass and to the underlying tooth surface. Manipulation of this architecture may offer a means of altering mass transfer into the whole biofilm and biomass and raises the possibility of improving access of therapeutics. Plaque biofilms formed in vivo on human enamel were subjected to a number of different chemical conditions while under observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy in reflection mode. In this way the outer 50-100 microm or so of the biofilms was examined. Density and distribution of biomass were recorded as degree of reflectance. The amount and density of biofilm biomass increased from the plaque saliva interface towards the interior. Plaque biofilms were robust and little affected by mechanical manipulation, high ionic strength or low pH (2.5). Detergent (SLS), however, often appeared to either remove biomass and/or dramatically reduce its density. PMID:16806048

  9. Structure and function of bacterial biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, Z. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Center for Biofilm Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Two major problems are troubling researchers studying biofilms at microscale: lack of standard procedures and inadequacy of the existing theoretical framework to quantify the observations. As the lack of standard procedures can be, to an extent, mitigated by careful description of experimental protocols and exercising caution when comparing results generated in different laboratories, lack of a proper theoretical framework to interpret the results is a major factor inhibiting progress in understanding biofilm processes. This paper presents examples of microscale biofilm research projects related to the nature of intrabiofilm mass transport and to the nature of electrochemical interactions between biofilms and metals. The selection of topics intended to satisfy two goals (1) to stimulate interest and evoke appreciation for fundamental microscale biofilm research and (2) to demonstrate relevance of microscale biofilm research to Microbially Influenced Corrosion.

  10. Microbial community structures and in situ sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing activities in biofilms developed on mortar specimens in a corroded sewer system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hisashi Satoh; Mitsunori Odagiri; Tsukasa Ito; Satoshi Okabe

    2009-01-01

    Microbially induced concrete corrosion (MICC) caused by sulfuric acid attack in sewer systems has been a serious problem for a long time. A better understanding of microbial community structures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and their in situ activities is essential for the efficient control of MICC. In this study, the microbial community structures and the in

  11. Biogeochemistry of Hot Spring Biofilms: Major and Trace Element Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havig, J. R.; Prapaipong, P.; Zolotova, N.; Moore, G.; Shock, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Hot spring biofilms are of obvious biological origin, but of surprising composition. Organic carbon makes up a minor percentage of the total mass of chemotrophic and phototrophic biofilms. We have found that the majority of biofilm mass is inorganic material, largely silica, with measurable quantities of dozens of other elements, and that the distribution of major elements mimics that of surrounding rock and soil far more closely than the hot spring fluids. Comparisons of biofilms with the compositions of their geochemical surroundings help identify trace elements that are anomalously enriched or depleted. These anomalies provide insight into the processes of active or passive elemental accumulation by biofilms, which could be used to understand microbial processes of element uptake or to identify evidence for life in hydrothermal deposits in the rock record. Five separate hydrothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park were incorporated into this study: 'Bison Pool' and its outflow (siliceous-sinter depositing, temp. = 93.2 to 56.2 C, pH = 7.4 to 8.3), Flatcone Geyser and its outflow (siliceous-sinter depositing, temp. = 94.3 to 44.3 C, pH = 7.9 to 8.8, Boulder Spring and its outflow (siliceous-sinter depositing, temp. = 92.1 to 64.9 C, pH = 8.2 to 8.7), Octopus Spring and its outflow (siliceous-sinter depositing, temp. = 91.4 to 62.8 C, pH = 7.7 to 8.2), and two unnamed locations in the Obsidian Pool area we have dubbed 'Green Cheese' (temp. = 64.5 to 54.9 C, pH = 5.9 to 6.2) and 'Happy Harfer Pool' (temp. = 59.9 to 48.3 C, pH = 5.5 to 6.3). Analysis of water, biofilm, and contextual samples collected from and around these hot springs offer intriguing patterns of elemental behavior, both similar and dissimilar, among the varying systems. Examples of these patterns include elements that behave the same across all hot spring systems (B, C, Ni, Cu, Ge, Sb, and W), elements with behavior that was consistent throughout most (four of five) of the hot spring systems (Li, N, Si, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn, Ga, Rb, Y, Cd, Sn, Ba, Hf, Ta, and Pb), and elements that varied across all hot spring systems (V, Sr). These results permit multiple hypotheses concerning active microbial uptake or exclusion of individual elements, expedited mineral/glass dissolution, and temperature and fluid composition effects on abiotic ion exchange processes in complex biofilm matrices.

  12. Microbial community structure across the tree of life in the extreme Río Tinto

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Zettler, Erik R; Theroux, Susanna M; Palacios, Carmen; Aguilera, Angeles; Amils, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Understanding biotic versus abiotic forces that shape community structure is a fundamental aim of microbial ecology. The acidic and heavy metal extreme Río Tinto (RT) in southwestern Spain provides a rare opportunity to conduct an ecosystem-wide biodiversity inventory at the level of all three domains of life, because diversity there is low and almost exclusively microbial. Despite improvements in high-throughput DNA sequencing, environmental biodiversity studies that use molecular metrics and consider entire ecosystems are rare. These studies can be prohibitively expensive if domains are considered separately, and differences in copy number of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA genes can bias estimates of relative abundances of phylotypes recovered. In this study we have overcome these barriers (1) by targeting all three domains in a single polymerase chain reaction amplification and (2) by using a replicated sampling design that allows for incidence-based methods to extract measures of richness and carry out downstream analyses that address community structuring effects. Our work showed that combined bacterial and archaeal richness is an order of magnitude higher than eukaryotic richness. We also found that eukaryotic richness was highest at the most extreme sites, whereas combined bacterial and archaeal richness was highest at less extreme sites. Quantitative community phylogenetics showed abiotic forces to be primarily responsible for shaping the RT community structure. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed co-occurrence of obligate symbionts and their putative hosts that may contribute to biotic forces shaping community structure and may further provide a possible mechanism for persistence of certain low-abundance bacteria encountered in the RT. PMID:20631808

  13. Biofilm Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Like all sessile organisms, surface-attached communities of bacteria known as biofilms must release and disperse cells into the environment to colonize new sites. For many pathogenic bacteria, biofilm dispersal plays an important role in the transmission of bacteria from environmental reservoirs to human hosts, in horizontal and vertical cross-host transmission, and in the exacerbation and spread of infection within a host. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial biofilm dispersal are only beginning to be elucidated. Biofilm dispersal is a promising area of research that may lead to the development of novel agents that inhibit biofilm formation or promote biofilm cell detachment. Such agents may be useful for the prevention and treatment of biofilms in a variety of industrial and clinical settings. This review describes the current status of research on biofilm dispersal, with an emphasis on studies aimed to characterize dispersal mechanisms, and to identify environmental cues and inter- and intracellular signals that regulate the dispersal process. The clinical implications of biofilm dispersal and the potential therapeutic applications of some of the most recent findings will also be discussed. PMID:20139339

  14. [Biofilms in otolaryngology].

    PubMed

    Mena Viveros, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    According to the National Institute of Health of the USA, «more than 60% of all microbial infections are caused by biofilms».'This can surprise us, but it is enough to consider that common infections like those of the genito-urinary tract, infections produced by catheters, middle ear infections in children, the formation of dental plaque and gingivitis are caused by biofilms, for this statement to seem more realistic. At present this is one of the subjects of great interest within medicine, particularly in otolaryngology. Bacteria have traditionally been considered to be in a free state without evident organization, partly perhaps by the ease of studying them in this form. Nevertheless, the reality is that, in nature, the great majority of these germs form complex colonies adhered to surfaces, colonies that have received the name of biofilms. These biofilms are more common than previously thought and almost all of the people have been in contact with them in the form of infections in the teeth or humid, slippery areas. New treatments that can eradicate them are currently being investigated. PMID:23245692

  15. A flow cytometric approach to quantify biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kerstens, Monique; Boulet, Gaëlle; Van Kerckhoven, Marian; Clais, Sofie; Lanckacker, Ellen; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Since biofilms are important in many clinical, industrial, and environmental settings, reliable methods to quantify these sessile microbial populations are crucial. Most of the currently available techniques do not allow the enumeration of the viable cell fraction within the biofilm and are often time consuming. This paper proposes flow cytometry (FCM) using the single-stain viability dye TO-PRO(®)-3 iodide as a fast and precise alternative. Mature biofilms of Candida albicans and Escherichia coli were used to optimize biofilm removal and dissociation, as a single-cell suspension is needed for accurate FCM enumeration. To assess the feasibility of FCM quantification of biofilms, E. coli and C. albicans biofilms were analyzed using FCM and crystal violet staining at different time points. A combination of scraping and rinsing proved to be the most efficient technique for biofilm removal. Sonicating for 10 min eliminated the remaining aggregates, resulting in a single-cell suspension. Repeated FCM measurements of biofilm samples revealed a good intraday precision of approximately 5 %. FCM quantification and the crystal violet assay yielded similar biofilm growth curves for both microorganisms, confirming the applicability of our technique. These results show that FCM using TO-PRO(®)-3 iodide as a single-stain viability dye is a valid fast alternative for the quantification of viable cells in a biofilm. PMID:25948317

  16. Early life microbial exposure and fractional exhaled nitric oxide in school-age children: a prospective birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammation is a key factor in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases. Early life exposure to microbial agents may have an effect on the development of the immune system and on respiratory health later in life. In the present work we aimed to evaluate the associations between early life microbial exposures, and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) at school age. Methods Endotoxin, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and ?(1,3)-D-glucan were measured in living room dust collected at 2–3 months of age in homes of participants of three prospective European birth cohorts (LISA, n?=?182; PIAMA, n?=?244; and INMA, n?=?355). Home dampness and pet ownership were periodically reported by the parents through questionnaires. FeNO was measured at age 8 for PIAMA and at age 10/11 for LISA and INMA. Cohort-specific associations between the indoor microbial exposures and FeNO were evaluated using multivariable regression analyses. Estimates were combined using random-effects meta-analyses. Results FeNO at school age was lower in children exposed to endotoxin at age 2–3 months (? -0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.10;-0.01) and in children with reported dog ownership during the first two years of life (GM ratio 0.82, CI 0.70-0.96). FeNO was not significantly associated with early life exposure to EPS, ?(1,3)-D-glucan, indoor dampness and cat ownership. Conclusion Early life exposure to bacterial endotoxin and early life dog ownership are associated with lower FeNO at school age. Further studies are needed to confirm our results and to unravel the underlying mechanisms and possible clinical relevance of this finding. PMID:24295277

  17. How Cyanobacterial Distributions Reveal Flow and Irradiance Conditions of Photosynthetic Biofilm Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prufert-Bebout, Lee; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microbial life on Earth is enormously abundant at sediment-water interfaces. The fossil record in fact contains abundant evidence of the preservation of life on such surfaces. It is therefore critical to our interpretation of early Earth history, and potentially to history of life on other planets, to be able to recognize life forms at these interfaces. On Earth this life often occurs as organized structures of microbes and their extracellular exudates known as biofilms. When such biofilms occur in areas receiving sunlight photosynthetic biofilms are the dominant form in natural ecosystems due to selective advantage inherent in their ability to utilize solar energy. Cyanobacteria are the dominant phototrophic microbes in most modern and ancient photosynthetic biofilms, microbial mats and stromatolites. Due to their long (3.5 billion year) evolutionary history, this group has extensively diversified resulting in an enormous array of morphologies and physiological abilities. This enormous diversity and specialization results in very specific selection for a particular cyanobacterium in each available photosynthetic niche. Furthermore these organisms can alter their spatial orientation, cell morphology, pigmentation and associations with heterotrophic organisms in order to fine tune their optimization to a given micro-niche. These adaptations can be detected, and if adequate knowledge of the interaction between environmental conditions and organism response is available, the detectable organism response can be used to infer the environmental conditions causing that response. This presentation will detail two specific examples which illustrate this point, Light and water are essential to photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and these organisms have specific detectable behavioural responses to these parameters. We will present cyanobacterial responses to quantified flow and irradiance to demonstrate the interpretative power of distribution and orientation information. This study presents new results, but many such examples are already found in the literature.

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on chemical, microbial quality and shelf life of shrimp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocao?lu, Asl?; Sükrü Demirci, Ahmet; Gümüs, Tuncay; Demirci, Mehmet

    2012-12-01

    In the present study the combined effect of gamma irradiation (1, 3 and 5 kGy) and storage at two temperatures: refrigeration (+4 °C) and frozen (-18 °C), on the shelf-life extension of fresh shrimp meat was investigated. The study was based on microbiological and physicochemical changes occuring in the shrimp samples. Total volatile base nitrogen values and trimethylamine values for irradiated shrimp samples were significantly lower than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures, and the rate of decrease was more pronounced in samples irradiated at the higher dose (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid values for irradiated shrimp samples were significantly higher than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures (p<0.05). pH values of shrimp samples were affected significantly by both irradiating dose and storage temperatures (p<0.05). Microbial counts for non-irradiated shrimp samples were higher than the respective irradiated samples at both storage temperatures (p<0.05). The results revealed that irradiation at high dose (5 kGy) might enhance lipid oxidation, although the growth of microorganisms and protein oxidation was inhibited.

  19. The effects of chlorine, washing and evisceration on microbial population and storage-life of fresh fish 

    E-print Network

    Neal, Charles Wade

    1977-01-01

    trimethylamine oxide during spoilage. Ammonia and volatile fatty acids are produced from non-protein nitrogen components. Numerous volatile constituents have been isolated from fish muscle in trace quantities (35, 36, 57). Ex- amples of these compounds are...THE EFFECTS OF CHLORINE, WASHING AND EVISCERATION ON THE MICROBIAL POPULATION AND STORAGE-LIFE OF FRESH FISH A Thesis by CHARLES MADE NEAL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Univ rsity in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  20. Managing biofilm by using dressings.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    2015-06-01

    Biofilm is a thin layer containing masses of microorganisms; it has a gelatinous protective cover that is capable of attaching to virtually any surface. A wound provides the perfect medium for the growth of bacteria. In a wound, the organisms in the biofilm can obtain nutrients more easily than when they live on their own, and they are protected from many of the insults of daily life. This article will focus on these microorganisms and their ability to protect the colony against all attempts to remove it and the problems biofilm creates within a wound. PMID:26052989

  1. Minimum information about a biofilm experiment (MIABiE): standards for reporting experiments and data on sessile microbial communities living at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Anália; Coenye, Tom; Goeres, Darla M; Donelli, Gianfranco; Azevedo, Andreia S; Ceri, Howard; Coelho, Filipa L; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Juhna, Talis; Lopes, Susana P; Oliveira, Rosário; Oliver, Antonio; Shirtliff, Mark E; Sousa, Ana M; Stoodley, Paul; Pereira, Maria Olivia; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2014-04-01

    The minimum information about a biofilm experiment (MIABiE) initiative has arisen from the need to find an adequate and scientifically sound way to control the quality of the documentation accompanying the public deposition of biofilm-related data, particularly those obtained using high-throughput devices and techniques. Thereby, the MIABiE consortium has initiated the identification and organization of a set of modules containing the minimum information that needs to be reported to guarantee the interpretability and independent verification of experimental results and their integration with knowledge coming from other fields. MIABiE does not intend to propose specific standards on how biofilms experiments should be performed, because it is acknowledged that specific research questions require specific conditions which may deviate from any standardization. Instead, MIABiE presents guidelines about the data to be recorded and published in order for the procedure and results to be easily and unequivocally interpreted and reproduced. Overall, MIABiE opens up the discussion about a number of particular areas of interest and attempts to achieve a broad consensus about which biofilm data and metadata should be reported in scientific journals in a systematic, rigorous and understandable manner. PMID:24478124

  2. Minimum information about a biofilm experiment (MIABiE): standards for reporting experiments and data on sessile microbial communities living at interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Anália; Coenye, Tom; Goeres, Darla M.; Donelli, Gianfranco; Azevedo, Andreia S.; Ceri, Howard; Coelho, Filipa L.; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Juhna, Talis; Lopes, Susana P.; Oliveira, Rosário; Oliver, Antonio; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Sousa, Ana M.; Stoodley, Paul; Pereira, Maria Olivia; Azevedo, Nuno F.

    2015-01-01

    The minimum information about a biofilm experiment (MIABiE) initiative has arisen from the need to find an adequate and scientifically sound way to control the quality of the documentation accompanying the public deposition of biofilm-related data, particularly those obtained using high-throughput devices and techniques. Thereby, the MIABiE consortium has initiated the identification and organization of a set of modules containing the minimum information that needs to be reported to guarantee the interpretability and independent verification of experimental results and their integration with knowledge coming from other fields. MIABiE does not intend to propose specific standards on how biofilms experiments should be performed, because it is acknowledged that specific research questions require specific conditions which may deviate from any standardization. Instead, MIABiE presents guidelines about the data to be recorded and published in order for the procedure and results to be easily and unequivocally interpreted and reproduced. Overall, MIABiE opens up the discussion about a number of particular areas of interest and attempts to achieve a broad consensus about which biofilm data and metadata should be reported in scientific journals in a systematic, rigorous and understandable manner. PMID:24478124

  3. Impairment of the Bacterial Biofilm Stability by Triclosan

    PubMed Central

    Hubas, Cédric; Behrens, Sebastian; Ricciardi, Francesco; Paterson, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of the widely-used antibacterial and antifungal compound triclosan (TCS) in freshwaters raises concerns about the impact of this harmful chemical on the biofilms that are the dominant life style of microorganisms in aquatic systems. However, investigations to-date rarely go beyond effects at the cellular, physiological or morphological level. The present paper focuses on bacterial biofilms addressing the possible chemical impairment of their functionality, while also examining their substratum stabilization potential as one example of an important ecosystem service. The development of a bacterial assemblage of natural composition – isolated from sediments of the Eden Estuary (Scotland, UK) – on non-cohesive glass beads (<63 µm) and exposed to a range of triclosan concentrations (control, 2 – 100 µg L?1) was monitored over time by Magnetic Particle Induction (MagPI). In parallel, bacterial cell numbers, division rate, community composition (DGGE) and EPS (extracellular polymeric substances: carbohydrates and proteins) secretion were determined. While the triclosan exposure did not prevent bacterial settlement, biofilm development was increasingly inhibited by increasing TCS levels. The surface binding capacity (MagPI) of the assemblages was positively correlated to the microbial secreted EPS matrix. The EPS concentrations and composition (quantity and quality) were closely linked to bacterial growth, which was affected by enhanced TCS exposure. Furthermore, TCS induced significant changes in bacterial community composition as well as a significant decrease in bacterial diversity. The impairment of the stabilization potential of bacterial biofilm under even low, environmentally relevant TCS levels is of concern since the resistance of sediments to erosive forces has large implications for the dynamics of sediments and associated pollutant dispersal. In addition, the surface adhesive capacity of the biofilm acts as a sensitive measure of ecosystem effects. PMID:22523534

  4. A Comparison of Microbial Communities from Deep Igneous Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R.; Flores, G. E.; Fisk, M. R.; Colwell, F. S.; Thurber, A. R.; Mason, O. U.; Popa, R.

    2013-12-01

    Recent investigations of life in Earth's crust have revealed common themes in organism function, taxonomy, and diversity. Capacities for hydrogen oxidation, carbon fixation, methanogenesis and methanotrophy, iron and sulfur metabolisms, and hydrocarbon degradation often predominate in deep life communities, and crustal mineralogy has been hypothesized as a driving force for determining deep life community assemblages. Recently, we found that minerals characteristic of the igneous crust harbored unique communities when incubated in the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank borehole IODP 1301A. Here we present attached mineral biofilm morphologies and a comparison of our mineral communities to those from a variety of locations, contamination states, and igneous crustal or mineralogical types. We found that differences in borehole mineral communities were reflected in biofilm morphologies. Olivine biofilms were thick, carbon-rich films with embedded cells of uniform size and shape and often contained secondary minerals. Encrusted cells, spherical and rod-shaped cells, and tubes were indicative of glass surfaces. We also found that the attached communities from incubated borehole minerals were taxonomically more similar to native, attached communities from marine and continental crust than to communities from the aquifer water that seeded it. Our findings further support the hypothesis that mineralogy selects for microbial communities that have distinct phylogenetic, morphological, and potentially functional, signatures. This has important implications for resolving ecosystem function and microbial distributions in igneous crust, the largest deep habitat on Earth.

  5. Fungal Biofilms in the Clinical Lab Setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jyotsna Chandra; Pranab K. Mukherjee; Mahmoud A. Ghannoum

    2010-01-01

    Device-related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within polysaccharide-rich extracellular\\u000a matrix) formed by pathogens on surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from infections associated with catheters and dentures, and both Candida and Fusarium are commonly isolated from contact lens–related infections such as fungal keratitis. These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility\\u000a to most

  6. Efflux Pump Inhibitor Potentiates Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation of Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Kishen, Anil; Upadya, Megha; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial biofilm architecture contains numerous protective features including extracellular polymeric material that render biofilms impermeable to conventional antimicrobial agents. This study evaluated the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (aPDI) of Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. The ability of a cationic, phenothiazinium photosensitizer, methylene blue (MB) and an anionic, xanthene photosensitizer, rose bengal (RB) to inactivate biofilms of E. faecalis (OGIRF and FA 2-2) and disrupt the biofilm structure was evaluated. Bacterial cells were tested as planktonic suspensions, intact biofilms and biofilm-derived suspensions obtained by the mechanical disruption of biofilms. The role of a specific microbial efflux pump inhibitor (EPI), verapamil hydrochloride in the MB-mediated aPDI of E. faecalis biofilms was also investigated. The results showed that E. faecalis biofilms exhibited significantly higher resistance to aPDI when compared to E. faecalis in suspension (P < 0.001). aPDI with cationic MB produced superior inactivation of E. faecalis strains in a biofilm along with significant destruction of biofilm structure when compared to anionic RB (P < 0.05). The ability to inactivate biofilm bacteria was further enhanced when the EPI was used with M B (P < 0.001). These experiments demonstrated the advantage of a cationic phenothiazinium photosensitizer combined with an EPI to inactivate biofilm bacteria and disrupt biofilm structure. PMID:20860692

  7. Coupling Genetic and Chemical Microbiome Profiling Reveals Heterogeneity of Archaeome and Bacteriome in Subsurface Biofilms That Are Dominated by the Same Archaeal Species

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Wanner, Gerhard; Andersen, Gary L.; Perras, Alexandra K.; Meck, Sandra; Völkel, Jörg; Bechtel, Hans A.; Wirth, Reinhard; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Earth harbors an enormous portion of subsurface microbial life, whose microbiome flux across geographical locations remains mainly unexplored due to difficult access to samples. Here, we investigated the microbiome relatedness of subsurface biofilms of two sulfidic springs in southeast Germany that have similar physical and chemical parameters and are fed by one deep groundwater current. Due to their unique hydrogeological setting these springs provide accessible windows to subsurface biofilms dominated by the same uncultivated archaeal species, called SM1 Euryarchaeon. Comparative analysis of infrared imaging spectra demonstrated great variations in archaeal membrane composition between biofilms of the two springs, suggesting different SM1 euryarchaeal strains of the same species at both aquifer outlets. This strain variation was supported by ultrastructural and metagenomic analyses of the archaeal biofilms, which included intergenic spacer region sequencing of the rRNA gene operon. At 16S rRNA gene level, PhyloChip G3 DNA microarray detected similar biofilm communities for archaea, but site-specific communities for bacteria. Both biofilms showed an enrichment of different deltaproteobacterial operational taxonomic units, whose families were, however, congruent as were their lipid spectra. Consequently, the function of the major proportion of the bacteriome appeared to be conserved across the geographic locations studied, which was confirmed by dsrB-directed quantitative PCR. Consequently, microbiome differences of these subsurface biofilms exist at subtle nuances for archaea (strain level variation) and at higher taxonomic levels for predominant bacteria without a substantial perturbation in bacteriome function. The results of this communication provide deep insight into the dynamics of subsurface microbial life and warrant its future investigation with regard to metabolic and genomic analyses. PMID:24971452

  8. cDNA Microarray Analysis of Differential Gene Expression in Candida albicans Biofilm Exposed to Farnesol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ying-Ying Cao; Yong-Bing Cao; Zheng Xu; Kang Ying; Yao Li; Yi Xie; Zhen-Yu Zhu; Wan-Sheng Chen; Yuan-Ying Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilms are structured microbial communities with high levels of drug resistance. Farnesol, a quorum-sensing molecule that inhibits hyphal formation in C. albicans, has been found to prevent biofilm formation by C. albicans. There is limited information, however, about the molecular mechanism of farnesol against biofilm formation. We used cDNA microarray analysis to identify the changes in the gene

  9. Effect of Growth Rate on Resistance of Candida albicans Biofilms to Antifungal Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GEORGE S. BAILLIE; L. JULIA DOUGLAS

    1998-01-01

    A perfused biofilm fermentor, which allows growth-rate control of adherent microbial populations, was used to assess whether the susceptibility of Candida albicans biofilms to antifungal agents is dependent on growth rate. Biofilms were generated under conditions of glucose limitation and were perfused with drugs at a high concentration (20 times the MIC). Amphotericin B produced a greater reduction in the

  10. A simple birth-death-migration individual-based model for biofilm development

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A simple birth-death-migration individual-based model for biofilm development Nabil Mabrouk- congnized to play an important role in microbial biofilm formation. In this paper we we investigate using an individual-based model how these processes interplay to yield complex biofilm spatial patterns. 1

  11. The essential role of hydrodynamic shear force in the formation of biofilm and granular sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Liu; Joo-Hwa Tay

    2002-01-01

    Biofilm and granular sludge processes are promising biotechnology for wastewater treatment. The formation, structure and metabolism of immobilized microbial community are associated very closely with hydrodynamic shear force in reactors. Therefore, this paper attempts to review the essential role of shear force in the formation and performance of biofilm and granular sludge. More compact, stable and denser biofilms, aerobic and

  12. Microbial Diversity in the Columbia River Basalt Group and the Context for Life in Subsurface Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalleur, H. J.; Smith, A.; Fisk, M. R.; Colwell, F. S.

    2012-12-01

    Large igneous provinces constitute a sizable volume of porous and fractured materials in the Earth's crust and many of these environments exist within the boundaries of survival for subsurface life. The results of microbiological studies of basalts and other igneous materials in subsurface settings hint at the types of microbes that dwell in these environments. We investigated the microbes in aquifers in the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and also considered the microbial communities in subsurface basalts more broadly to determine if there are recurrent themes in the types of microbes and the nature of diversity present in these geological systems. Bacteria and Archaea collected from five intervals in the CRBG were examined using high-throughput DNA sequencing directed at the 16S rRNA genes. The highest bacterial biomass and the highest bacterial diversity were observed in the deepest samples (>1018 meters below land surface) whereas the highest archaeal diversity was detected in the shallowest samples (<449 mbls). Microbes classified as Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria dominated the aquifers. These findings are generally consistent with earlier cultivation- and clone library-based studies performed on microbes from the CRBG and the Snake River Plain aquifer. Microbes associated with marine basalts are similar to those found in terrestrial settings and include Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, candidate division bacterium OP1, Euryarchaeota, and Crenarchaeota. Based on 16S rRNA sequence similarities to known microbes, both basaltic regions have taxa with representative physiologies likely to include hydrogen oxidation, iron and sulfur metabolism, acetogenesis, and hydrocarbon metabolism. Research on the microbiology of basalt rich provinces on the planet has informed our understanding of biogeochemical cycling where igneous rocks dominate. The knowledge gained in these investigations also promotes our ability to verify the remediation of contaminants and the sequestration of carbon in basalts.

  13. Lava cave microbial communities within mats and secondary mineral deposits: implications for life detection on other planets.

    PubMed

    Northup, D E; Melim, L A; Spilde, M N; Hathaway, J J M; Garcia, M G; Moya, M; Stone, F D; Boston, P J; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Riquelme, C

    2011-09-01

    Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai'i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai'i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai'i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies. PMID:21879833

  14. Polyphosphate Degradation in Stationary Phase Triggers Biofilm Formation via LuxS Quorum Sensing System in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Grillo-Puertas, Mariana; Villegas, Josefina M.; Rintoul, María R.; Rapisarda, Viviana A.

    2012-01-01

    In most natural environments, association with a surface in a structure known as biofilm is the prevailing microbial life-style of bacteria. Polyphosphate (polyP), an ubiquitous linear polymer of hundreds of orthophosphate residues, has a crucial role in stress responses, stationary-phase survival, and it was associated to bacterial biofilm formation and production of virulence factors. In previous work, we have shown that Escherichia coli cells grown in media containing a critical phosphate concentration >37 mM maintained an unusual high polyP level in stationary phase. The aim of the present work was to analyze if fluctuations in polyP levels in stationary phase affect biofilm formation capacity in E. coli. Polymer levels were modulated by the media phosphate concentration or using mutant strains in polyP metabolism. Cells grown in media containing phosphate concentrations higher than 25 mM were defective in biofilm formation. Besides, there was a disassembly of 24 h preformed biofilm by the addition of high phosphate concentration to the medium. These phenotypes were related to the maintenance or re-synthesis of polyP in stationary phase in static conditions. No biofilm formation was observed in ppk?ppx? or ppk?ppx?/ppk+ strains, deficient in polyP synthesis and hydrolysis, respectively. luxS and lsrK mutants, impaired in autoinducer-2 quorum sensing signal metabolism, were unable to form biofilm unless conditioned media from stationary phase wild type cells grown in low phosphate were used. We conclude that polyP degradation is required for biofilm formation in sufficient phosphate media, activating or triggering the production of autoinducer-2. According to our results, phosphate concentration of the culture media should be carefully considered in bacterial adhesion and virulence studies. PMID:23226268

  15. Long-Term Stability of Mercury-Reducing Microbial BiofilmCommunities Analyzed by 16S-23S rDNA Interspacer RegionPolymorphism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. F. von Canstein; Y. Li; A. Felske; I. Wagner-Döbler

    2001-01-01

      The composition of mercury-reducing communities in two bioreactors retaining Hg(II) from chloralkali electrolysis wastewater\\u000a for 485 days was analyzed based on effluent community DNA. Packed bed bioreactors with lava chips as carrier of the biofilm\\u000a were inoculated with nine Hg(II)-resistant isolates that belonged to the alpha and gamma subdivisions of the proteobacteria.\\u000a A rapid DNA-fingerprinting method was applied, using the

  16. What food safety professionals should know about bacterial biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise Lindsay; Alex von Holy

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – This paper seeks to highlight the importance of bacterial associations with surfaces, with particular reference to food processing. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A historical and interdisciplinary review of recent literature combined with research on biofilms on surfaces was conducted. Findings – The association of micro-organisms with surfaces is the prevailing microbial lifestyle and bacterial biofilms may represent reservoirs for the

  17. Biofilms in infectious disease and on medical devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Reid

    1999-01-01

    Microbial biofilms constitute a major reason for infections to occur and persist at various sites in the human body, especially in association with medical devices. The organisms invariably form these biofilms on surfaces which have host proteins and other substances coating them. Once adherent, the bacteria multiply and anchor themselves in quite intricate structures which appear to allow for communication

  18. Bacterial biofilms: from the Natural environment to infectious diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luanne Hall-Stoodley; J. William Costerton; Paul Stoodley

    2004-01-01

    Biofilms — matrix-enclosed microbial accretions that adhere to biological or non-biological surfaces — represent a significant and incompletely understood mode of growth for bacteria. Biofilm formation appears early in the fossil record (?3.25 billion years ago) and is common throughout a diverse range of organisms in both the Archaea and Bacteria lineages, including the 'living fossils' in the most deeply

  19. Quantification of biofilm structures by the novel computer program COMSTAT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arne Heydorn; Alex Toftgaard Nielsen; Morten Hentzer; Claus Sternberg; Michael Givskov; Bjarne Kjær Ersbøll; Søren Molin

    2000-01-01

    The structural organization of four microbial communities was analysed by a novel computer program, COMSTAT, which comprises ten features for quantifying three-dimensional biofilm image stacks. Monospecies biofilms of each of the four bacteria, Pseudomonas putida, P. aureofaciens, P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa, tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) were grown in flow chambers with a defined minimal medium as

  20. Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke [ORNL] [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph] [University of Guelph; Acharya, Rajesh K [ORNL] [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL] [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL] [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

  1. Microbial Community Structure during Nitrate and Perchlorate Reduction in Ion-exchange Brine Using the Hydrogen-based membrane Biofilm Reactor (MBIR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detoxification of perchlorate by microbial communities under denitrifying conditions has been recently reported, although the identity of the mixed populations involved in perchlorate reduction is not well understood. In order to address this, the bacterial diversity of membrane ...

  2. A bioremediation approach using natural transformation in pure-culture and mixed-population biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sudeep Perumbakkam; Thomas F. Hess; Ronald L. Crawford

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial transformation by naked DNA is thought to contribute to gene transfer and microbial evolution within natural environments. In nature many microbial communities exist as complex assemblages known as biofilms where genetic exchange is facilitated. It may be possible to take advantage of natural transformation processes to modify the phenotypes of biofilm communities giving them specific and desirable functions. Work

  3. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attentionto the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields as well as future therapies are also discussed. PMID:23551419

  4. Did mineral surface chemistry and toxicity contribute to evolution of microbial extracellular polymeric substances?

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Campbell, Jay M; Zhang, Nianli; Hickey, William J; Sahai, Nita

    2012-08-01

    Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life in biofilms closely associated with mineral surfaces, which highlights the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral-water interface. Biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because biofilms provide crucial cell survival functions. The potential toxicity of mineral surfaces toward cells and the complexities of the mineral-water-cell interface in determining the toxicity mechanisms, however, have not been fully appreciated. Here, we report a previously unrecognized role for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which form biofilms in shielding cells against the toxicity of mineral surfaces. Using colony plating and LIVE/DEAD staining methods in oxide suspensions versus oxide-free controls, we found greater viability of wild-type, EPS-producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 compared to their isogenic knockout mutant with defective biofilm-producing capacity. Oxide toxicity was specific to its surface charge and particle size. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and assays for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) on mineral surfaces suggested that EPS shield via both physical and chemical mechanisms. Intriguingly, qualitative as well as quantitative measures of EPS production showed that toxic minerals induced EPS production in bacteria. By determining the specific toxicity mechanisms, we provide insight into the potential impact of mineral surfaces in promoting increased complexity of cell surfaces, including EPS and biofilm formation, on early Earth. PMID:22934560

  5. Biofilm-related infections: bridging the gap between clinical management and fundamental aspects of recalcitrance toward antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lebeaux, David; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Beloin, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    Surface-associated microbial communities, called biofilms, are present in all environments. Although biofilms play an important positive role in a variety of ecosystems, they also have many negative effects, including biofilm-related infections in medical settings. The ability of pathogenic biofilms to survive in the presence of high concentrations of antibiotics is called "recalcitrance" and is a characteristic property of the biofilm lifestyle, leading to treatment failure and infection recurrence. This review presents our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of biofilm recalcitrance toward antibiotics and describes how recent progress has improved our capacity to design original and efficient strategies to prevent or eradicate biofilm-related infections. PMID:25184564

  6. Biofilm-based implant infections in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Arciola, Carla Renata; Campoccia, Davide; Ehrlich, Garth D; Montanaro, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    The demand for joint replacement surgery is continuously increasing with rising costs for hospitals and healthcare systems. Staphylococci are the most prevalent etiological agents of orthopedic infections. After an initial adhesin-mediated implant colonization, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis produce biofilm. Biofilm formation proceeds as a four-step process: (1) initial attachment of bacterial cells; (2) cell aggregation and accumulation in multiple cell layers; (3) biofilm maturation and (4) detachment of cells from the biofilm into a planktonic state to initiate a new cycle of biofilm formation elsewhere. The encasing of bacteria in biofilms gives rise to insuperable difficulties not only in the treatment of the infection, but also in assessing the state and the nature of the infection using traditional cultural methods. Therefore, DNA-based molecular methods have been developed to provide rapid identification of all microbial pathogens. To combat biofilm-centered implant infections, new strategies are being developed, among which anti-infective or infective-resistant materials are at the forefront. Infection-resistant materials can be based on different approaches: (i) modifying the biomaterial surface to give anti-adhesive properties, (ii) doping the material with antimicrobial substances, (iii) combining anti-adhesive and antimicrobial effects in the same coating, (iv) designing materials able to oppose biofilm formation and support bone repair. PMID:25366219

  7. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S; Plawsky, Joel L; Collins, Cynthia H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

  8. Potential Application of Phage Therapy Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infection in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aditi Gurkar

    2005-01-01

    Majority of the microbial activity in humans is in the form of biofilms i.e. an Exopolysaccharide-enclosed bacterial mass. Unlike planktonic cells and the cells on the surface of the biofilm, the biofilm-embedded cells are more resistant to the effects of the antibiotics and the host cellular defense mechanisms. A combination of biofilm growth and inherent resistance prevents effective antibiotics treatment

  9. Needle-Type Multi-Analyte MEMS Sensor Arrays for In Situ Measurements in Biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin-Hwan Lee; Youngwoo Seo; Woo Hyoung Lee; Paul Bishop; Ian Papautsky

    \\u000a Biofilms are colonies of microbial cells in a polymeric matrix. Formation of biofilms has been associated with a broad range\\u000a of industrial problems at the annual cost of billions of dollars. For example, biofilms are ubiquitous in water distribution\\u000a systems and control of their growth have been a great challenge, with many water utilities in the US reporting biofilm survival

  10. Influence of slaughter, fabrication and storage conditions on the microbial flora and shelf-life of vacuum-packaged steaks 

    E-print Network

    Chandran, Sasi Kantha

    1984-01-01

    . The microbial flora of steaks stored for 42 days at 5 C was totally dominated by lactic acid bacteria, primarily L t b ill 11 bi , L t b iiiu pig ta and Leuconostoc mesenteroides D ED I CATION This study is dedicated to my husband Rama S. Chandran and my... condition of the carcass. In addition, adequate chilling during storage is an important factor in the control of microbiological growth and shelf-life of fresh red meats. Additional microbiological contamination of wholesale and retail cuts may occur...

  11. Microbial life associated with low-temperature alteration of ultramafic rocks in the Leka ophiolite complex.

    PubMed

    Daae, F L; Økland, I; Dahle, H; Jørgensen, S L; Thorseth, I H; Pedersen, R B

    2013-07-01

    Water-rock interactions in ultramafic lithosphere generate reduced chemical species such as hydrogen that can fuel subsurface microbial communities. Sampling of this environment is expensive and technically demanding. However, highly accessible, uplifted oceanic lithospheres emplaced onto continental margins (ophiolites) are potential model systems for studies of the subsurface biosphere in ultramafic rocks. Here, we describe a microbiological investigation of partially serpentinized dunite from the Leka ophiolite (Norway). We analysed samples of mineral coatings on subsurface fracture surfaces from different depths (10-160 cm) and groundwater from a 50-m-deep borehole that penetrates several major fracture zones in the rock. The samples are suggested to represent subsurface habitats ranging from highly anaerobic to aerobic conditions. Water from a surface pond was analysed for comparison. To explore the microbial diversity and to make assessments about potential metabolisms, the samples were analysed by microscopy, construction of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene clone libraries, culturing and quantitative-PCR. Different microbial communities were observed in the groundwater, the fracture-coating material and the surface water, indicating that distinct microbial ecosystems exist in the rock. Close relatives of hydrogen-oxidizing Hydrogenophaga dominated (30% of the bacterial clones) in the oxic groundwater, indicating that microbial communities in ultramafic rocks at Leka could partially be driven by H2 produced by low-temperature water-rock reactions. Heterotrophic organisms, including close relatives of hydrocarbon degraders possibly feeding on products from Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, dominated in the fracture-coating material. Putative hydrogen-, ammonia-, manganese- and iron-oxidizers were also detected in fracture coatings and the groundwater. The microbial communities reflect the existence of different subsurface redox conditions generated by differences in fracture size and distribution, and mixing of fluids. The particularly dense microbial communities in the shallow fracture coatings seem to be fuelled by both photosynthesis and oxidation of reduced chemical species produced by water-rock reactions. PMID:23551703

  12. Subseafloor Microbial Life in Venting Fluids from the Mid Cayman Rise Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J.; Reddington, E.; McDermott, J. M.; Sylva, S. P.; Breier, J. A.; German, C. R.; Seewald, J.

    2012-12-01

    In hard rock seafloor environments, fluids emanating from hydrothermal vents are one of the best windows into the subseafloor and its resident microbial community. The functional consequences of an extensive population of microbes living in the subseafloor remains unknown, as does our understanding of how these organisms interact with one another and influence the biogeochemistry of the oceans. Here we report the abundance, activity, and diversity of microbes in venting fluids collected from two newly discovered deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR). Fluids for geochemical and microbial analysis were collected from the Von Damm and Piccard vent fields, which are located within 20 km of one another, yet have extremely different thermal, geological, and depth regimes. Geochemical data indicates that both fields are highly enriched in volatiles, in particular hydrogen and methane, important energy sources for and by-products of microbial metabolism. At both sites, total microbial cell counts in the fluids ranged in concentration from 5 x 10 4 to 3 x 10 5 cells ml-1 , with background seawater concentrations of 1-2 x 10 4 cells ml-1 . In addition, distinct cell morphologies and clusters of cells not visible in background seawater were seen, including large filaments and mineral particles colonized by microbial cells. These results indicate local enrichments of microbial communities in the venting fluids, distinct from background populations, and are consistent with previous enumerations of microbial cells in venting fluids. Stable isotope tracing experiments were used to detect utilization of acetate, formate, and dissolve inorganic carbon and generation of methane at 70 °C under anaerobic conditions. At Von Damm, a putatively ultra-mafic hosted site located at ~2200 m with a maximum temperature of 226 °C, stable isotope tracing experiments indicate methanogenesis is occurring in most fluid samples. No activity was detected in Piccard vent fluids, a basalt-hosted black smoker site located at ~4950 m with a maximum temperature of 403 °C. However, hyperthermophilic and thermophilic heterotrophs of the genus Thermococcus were isolated from Piccard vent fluids, but not Von Damm. These obligate anaerobes, growing optimally at 55-90 °C, are ubiquitous at hydrothermal systems and serve as a readily cultivable indicator organism of subseafloor populations. Finally, molecular analysis of vent fluids is on-going and will define the microbial population structure in this novel ecosystem and allow for direct comparisons with other deep-sea and subsurface habitats as part of our continuing efforts to explore the deep microbial biosphere on Earth.

  13. Voronoi tessellation captures very early clustering of single primary cells as induced by interactions in nascent biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hödl, Iris; Hödl, Josef; Wörman, Anders; Singer, Gabriel; Besemer, Katharina; Battin, Tom J

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms dominate microbial life in numerous aquatic ecosystems, and in engineered and medical systems, as well. The formation of biofilms is initiated by single primary cells colonizing surfaces from the bulk liquid. The next steps from primary cells towards the first cell clusters as the initial step of biofilm formation remain relatively poorly studied. Clonal growth and random migration of primary cells are traditionally considered as the dominant processes leading to organized microcolonies in laboratory grown monocultures. Using Voronoi tessellation, we show that the spatial distribution of primary cells colonizing initially sterile surfaces from natural streamwater community deviates from uniform randomness already during the very early colonisation. The deviation from uniform randomness increased with colonisation--despite the absence of cell reproduction--and was even more pronounced when the flow of water above biofilms was multidirectional and shear stress elevated. We propose a simple mechanistic model that captures interactions, such as cell-to-cell signalling or chemical surface conditioning, to simulate the observed distribution patterns. Model predictions match empirical observations reasonably well, highlighting the role of biotic interactions even already during very early biofilm formation despite few and distant cells. The transition from single primary cells to clustering accelerated by biotic interactions rather than by reproduction may be particularly advantageous in harsh environments--the rule rather than the exception outside the laboratory. PMID:22028865

  14. Modulation of Metabolism and Switching to Biofilm Prevail over Exopolysaccharide Production in the Response of Rhizobium alamii to Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Schue, Mathieu; Fekete, Agnes; Ortet, Philippe; Brutesco, Catherine; Heulin, Thierry; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Achouak, Wafa; Santaella, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd2+) affect microbial metabolic processes. Consequently, bacteria adapt by adjusting their cellular machinery. We have investigated the dose-dependent growth effects of Cd2+ on Rhizobium alamii, an exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bacterium that forms a biofilm on plant roots. Adsorption isotherms show that the EPS of R. alamii binds cadmium in competition with calcium. A metabonomics approach based on ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry has showed that cadmium alters mainly the bacterial metabolism in pathways implying sugars, purine, phosphate, calcium signalling and cell respiration. We determined the influence of EPS on the bacterium response to cadmium, using a mutant of R. alamii impaired in EPS production (MS?GT). Cadmium dose-dependent effects on the bacterial growth were not significantly different between the R. alamii wild type (wt) and MS?GT strains. Although cadmium did not modify the quantity of EPS isolated from R. alamii, it triggered the formation of biofilm vs planktonic cells, both by R. alamii wt and by MS?GT. Thus, it appears that cadmium toxicity could be managed by switching to a biofilm way of life, rather than producing EPS. We conclude that modulations of the bacterial metabolism and switching to biofilms prevails in the adaptation of R. alamii to cadmium. These results are original with regard to the conventional role attributed to EPS in a biofilm matrix, and the bacterial response to cadmium. PMID:22096497

  15. Representing life in the Earth system with soil microbial functional traits in the MIMICS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, W. R.; Grandy, A. S.; Kallenbach, C. M.; Taylor, P. G.; Bonan, G. B.

    2015-06-01

    Projecting biogeochemical responses to global environmental change requires multi-scaled perspectives that consider organismal diversity, ecosystem processes, and global fluxes. However, microbes, the drivers of soil organic matter decomposition and stabilization, remain notably absent from models used to project carbon (C) cycle-climate feedbacks. We used a microbial trait-based soil C model with two physiologically distinct microbial communities, and evaluate how this model represents soil C storage and response to perturbations. Drawing from the application of functional traits used to model other ecosystems, we incorporate copiotrophic and oligotrophic microbial functional groups in the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS) model; these functional groups are akin to "gleaner" vs. "opportunist" plankton in the ocean, or r- vs. K-strategists in plant and animal communities. Here we compare MIMICS to a conventional soil C model, DAYCENT (the daily time-step version of the CENTURY model), in cross-site comparisons of nitrogen (N) enrichment effects on soil C dynamics. MIMICS more accurately simulates C responses to N enrichment; moreover, it raises important hypotheses involving the roles of substrate availability, community-level enzyme induction, and microbial physiological responses in explaining various soil biogeochemical responses to N enrichment. In global-scale analyses, we show that MIMICS projects much slower rates of soil C accumulation than a conventional soil biogeochemistry in response to increasing C inputs with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) - a finding that would reduce the size of the land C sink estimated by the Earth system. Our findings illustrate that tradeoffs between theory and utility can be overcome to develop soil biogeochemistry models that evaluate and advance our theoretical understanding of microbial dynamics and soil biogeochemical responses to environmental change.

  16. Microbial life in frozen boreal soils-environmental constraints on catabolic and anabolic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oquist, M. G.; Sparrman, T.; Haei, M.; Segura, J.; Schleucher, J.; Nilsson, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial activity in frozen soils has recently gained increasing attention and the fact that soil microorganisms can perform significant metabolic activity at temperatures below freezing is apparent. However, to what extent microbial activity is constrained by the environmental conditions prevailing in a frozen soil matrix is still very uncertain. This presentation will address how the fundamental environmental factors of temperature, liquid water availability and substrate availability combine to regulate rates of catabolic and anabolic microbial processes in frozen soils. The presented results are gained from investigations of the surface layers of boreal forest soils with seasonal freezing. We show that the amount and availability of liquid water is an integral factor regulating rates of microbial activity in the frozen soil matrix and can also explain frequently observed deviations in the temperature responses of biogenic CO2 production in frozen soils, as compared to unfrozen soils. In turn, the capacity for a specific soil to retain liquid water at sub-zero temperatures is controlled by the structural composition of the soil, and especially the soil organic matter is of integral importance. We also show that the partitioning of substrate carbon, in the form of monomeric sugar (glucose), for catabolic and anabolic metabolism remain constant in the temperature range of -4C to 9C. This confirms that microbial growth may proceed even when soils are frozen. In addition we present corresponding data for organisms metabolizing polymeric substrates (cellulose) requiring exoenzymatic activity. We conclude that the metabolic response of soil microorganism to controlling factors may change substantially across the freezing point of soil water, and also the patterns of interaction among controlling factors are affected. Thus, it is evident that metabolic response functions derived from investigations of unfrozen soils cannot be superimposed on frozen soils. Nonetheless, the soil microbial population appear very adapted to seasonal freezing with respect to their metabolic performance.

  17. Vaginal Lactobacillus: biofilm formation in vivo - clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Ventolini, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli provide protection against intrusive pathogenic bacteria. Some Lactobacillus spp. produce in vitro a thick, protective biofilm. We report in vivo formation of biofilm by vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii. The biofilm formation was captured in fresh wet-mount microscopic samples from asymptomatic patients after treatment for recurrent bacterial vaginitis. In vivo documentation of biofilm formation is in our opinion noteworthy, and has significant clinical implications, among which are the possibility to isolate, grow, and therapeutically utilize lactobacilli to prevent recurrent vaginal infections and preterm labor associated with vaginal microbial pathogens. PMID:25733930

  18. Treatment of Oral Multispecies Biofilms by an Anti-Biofilm Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Human oral biofilms are multispecies microbial communities that exhibit high resistance to antimicrobial agents. Dental plaque gives rise to highly prevalent and costly biofilm-related oral infections, which lead to caries or other types of oral infections. We investigated the ability of the recently identified anti-biofilm peptide 1018 to induce killing of bacterial cells present within oral multispecies biofilms. At 10 ?g/ml (6.5 ?M), peptide 1018 was able to significantly (p<0.05) prevent biofilm formation over 3 days. The activity of the peptide on preformed biofilms was found to be concentration-dependent since more than 60% of the total plaque biofilm cell population was killed by 10 ?g/ml of peptide 1018 in 3 days, while at 5 ?g/ml 50% of cells were dead and at 1 ?g/ml the peptide triggered cell death in around 30% of the total bacterial population, as revealed by confocal microscopy. The presence of saliva did not affect peptide activity, since no statistically significant difference was found in the ability of peptide 1018 to kill oral biofilms using either saliva coated and non-saliva coated hydroxyapatite surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy experiments indicated that peptide 1018 induced cell lysis in plaque biofilms. Furthermore, combined treatment using peptide 1018 and chlorhexidine (CHX) increased the anti-biofilm activity of each compound compared to when these were used alone, resulting in >50% of the biofilm being killed and >35% being dispersed in only 3 minutes. Peptide 1018 may potentially be used by itself or in combination with CHX as a non-toxic and effective anti-biofilm agent for plaque disinfection in clinical dentistry. PMID:26168273

  19. Fungal Biofilms and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Falkler, William A.; Meiller, Timothy F.

    2004-01-01

    Candida species, including the novel opportunistic pathogen Candida dubliniensis, are now emerging as major agents of nosocomial infections. Many such manifestations of infections associated with the formation of Candida biofilms include those occurring on devices such as indwelling intravascular catheters. Fungal biofilm-associated infections are frequently refractory to conventional therapy because of resistance to antimicrobial agents. This resistance could be in part due to the surface-induced upregulation of drug efflux pumps. Biofilm-associated Candida show uniform resistance to a wide spectrum of the currently available conventional antifungal agents, which implies that antimicrobial drugs that specifically target biofilm-associated infections are needed. The novel classes of antifungal agents, the lipid formulation of amphotericins, and the echinocandins have demonstrated unique antifungal activity against the resistant Candida biofilms, providing a breakthrough in the treatment of life-threatening invasive systemic mycoses. The use of drugs effective in combating biofilm-associated infections could lead to major developments in the treatment of fungal implant infections. PMID:15078591

  20. Extracellular matrix structure governs invasion resistance in bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nadell, Carey D; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-08-01

    Many bacteria are highly adapted for life in communities, or biofilms. A defining feature of biofilms is the production of extracellular matrix that binds cells together. The biofilm matrix provides numerous fitness benefits, including protection from environmental stresses and enhanced nutrient availability. Here we investigate defense against biofilm invasion using the model bacterium Vibrio cholerae. We demonstrate that immotile cells, including those identical to the biofilm resident strain, are completely excluded from entry into resident biofilms. Motile cells can colonize and grow on the biofilm exterior, but are readily removed by shear forces. Protection from invasion into the biofilm interior is mediated by the secreted protein RbmA, which binds mother-daughter cell pairs to each other and to polysaccharide components of the matrix. RbmA, and the invasion protection it confers, strongly localize to the cell lineages that produce it. PMID:25603396

  1. The development and succession of microbial communities in 90-day Bioregenerative Life Support Experiment in the Lunar Palace 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi; Liu, Hong; Fu, Yuming; Liu, Bojie; Su, Qiang; Xie, Beizhen; Qin, Youcai; Dong, Chen; Liu, Guanghui

    Lunar Palace 1, as an integrative experiment facility for permanent astrobase life-support artificial closed ecosystem, is an artificial ecosystem which consists of plant cultivation, animal breeding and waste treatment units. It has been used to carry out a 90-day bioregenerative life support experiment with three crew members. Apparently, it’s hard to prevent the growth of microorganisms in such closed ecosystem for their strong adaptive capacity. Original microorganisms in the cabin, microbes in the course of loads delivery and the autologous microorganism by crew members and animals themselves are all the main source of the interior microorganisms, which may grow and regenerate in air, water and plants. Therefore, if these microorganisms could not be effectively monitored and controlled, it may cause microbial contamination and even lead to the unsteadiness of the whole closed ecosystem. In this study, the development and succession of the microbial communities of air, water system, plant system, and key facilities surfaces in Lunar Palace 1 were continuously monitored and analyzed by using plate counting method and molecular biological method during the 90-day experiment. The results were quite useful for the controlling of internal microorganisms and the safe operation of the whole system, and could also reveal the succession rules of microorganisms in an artificial closed ecosystem.

  2. COAGGREGATION OCCURS AMONGST BACTERIA WITHIN AND BETWEEN DOMESTIC SHOWERHEAD BIOFILMS

    PubMed Central

    Vornhagen, Jay; Stevens, Michael; McCormick, David; Dowd, Scot E.; Eisenberg, Joseph N.S.; Boles, Blaise R.; Rickard, Alexander H.

    2014-01-01

    Showerheads support the development multi-species biofilms that can be unsightly, produce malodor, and may harbor pathogens. The outer surface spray plates of many showerheads support visible biofilms that likely contain a mixture of bacteria from freshwater and potentially from human users. Coaggregation, a mechanism by which genetically distinct bacteria specifically recognize one another, may contribute to the retention and enrichment of different species within these biofilms. The aim of this work was to identify the bacterial composition of outer spray plate biofilms of three domestic shower heads and to determine the inter- and intra-biofilm coaggregation ability of each culturable isolate. The bacterial composition of the three biofilms was determined by using bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) and by culturing on R2A medium. An average of 31 genera per biofilm were identified using bTEFAP and a total of 30 isolates were cultured. Even though the microbial diversity of each showerhead biofilm differed, every cultured isolate was able to coaggregate with at least one other isolate from the same or different showerhead biofilm. Promiscuous coaggregating isolates belonged to the genera Brevundimonas, Micrococcus, and Lysobacter. This work suggests that coaggregation may be a common feature of showerhead biofilms. Characterization of the mechanisms mediating coaggregation, and the inter-species interactions they facilitate, may allow for novel strategies to inhibit biofilm development. PMID:23194413

  3. Biofilms and Wounds: An Overview of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Steven L.; McCarty, Sara M.; Lipsky, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Microorganisms can exist both in the planktonic and biofilm state. Each phenotypic state has a role to play in delaying healing and causing infections of both acute and chronic wounds. However, the virulent biofilm state is the fundamental reason that chronic wounds do not heal in a timely manner. We hypothesize that because microorganisms attach to any surface, biofilms can be found in all chronic wounds. However, it is not the biofilm per se that represents the greatest obstacle to the healing of a chronic wound, but its virulence and pathogenicity. Recent Advances: Numerous studies with animals and humans have identified biofilms in wounds. In particular, these studies have highlighted how biofilms impede host fibroblast development, inflammatory responses, and the efficacy of antimicrobial therapy. Despite this, the role biofilms play in affecting the healing of wounds is still vigorously debated. Critical Issues: Clinicians must understand the role that pathogenic biofilms play in impairing the healing of chronic wounds and in increasing the risk for wound infection, with its potentially catastrophic outcomes. The composition of the biofilm, its physiochemical properties, the climaxed indigenous microbiota and their virulence/pathogenicity, microbial numbers and the host's pathophysiology, and immunological fitness will govern the sustainability of a pathogenic biofilm in a wound and its resistance to interventions. Future Directions: Establishing which specific pathogenic biofilms delay wound healing should help guide better wound care practices. PMID:26155379

  4. Biofilm Formation Avoids Complement Immunity and Phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Mirian; Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; García, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a frequent member of the microbiota of the human nasopharynx. Colonization of the nasopharyngeal tract is a first and necessary step in the infectious process and often involves the formation of sessile microbial communities by this human pathogen. The ability to grow and persist as biofilms is an advantage for many microorganisms, because biofilm-grown bacteria show reduced susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and hinder recognition by the immune system. The extent of host protection against biofilm-related pneumococcal disease has not been determined yet. Using pneumococcal strains growing as planktonic cultures or as biofilms, we have investigated the recognition of S. pneumoniae by the complement system and its interactions with human neutrophils. Deposition of C3b, the key complement component, was impaired on S. pneumoniae biofilms. In addition, binding of C-reactive protein and the complement component C1q to the pneumococcal surface was reduced in biofilm bacteria, demonstrating that pneumococcal biofilms avoid the activation of the classical complement pathway. In addition, recruitment of factor H, the downregulator of the alternative pathway, was enhanced by S. pneumoniae growing as biofilms. Our results also show that biofilm formation diverts the alternative complement pathway activation by a PspC-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, phagocytosis of pneumococcal biofilms was also impaired. The present study confirms that biofilm formation in S. pneumoniae is an efficient means of evading both the classical and the PspC-dependent alternative complement pathways the host immune system. PMID:23649097

  5. Modified a colony forming unit microbial adherence to hydrocarbons assay and evaluated cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm production of Vibrio scophthalmi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio scophthalmi has been considered as an opportunistic pathogen of the flat fish. There is little information available on V. scophthalmi adhesion to the host, an important step in the initial infection process. The objectives of this study were to (1) develop a modified Microbial Adherence to H...

  6. Characterization of the deep microbial life in the Altmark natural gas reservoir

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Morozova; M. Alawi; A. Vieth-Hillebrand; D. Kock; M. Krüger; H. Wuerdemann

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of the CLEAN project (CO2 Largescale Enhanced gas recovery in the Altmark Natural gas field) technical basics with special emphasis on process monitoring are explored by injecting CO2 into a gas reservoir. Our study focuses on the investigation of the in-situ microbial community of the Rotliegend natural gas reservoir in the Altmark, located south of the city

  7. Present and past microbial life in continental salt pan sediments in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genderjahn, Steffi; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Alawi, Mashal; Kallmeyer, Jens; Wagner, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    The southwestern African region is characterized by strong climate variability. To get a better understanding on the climate evolution and environmental condition in Namibia and South Africa, terrestrial climate archives are investigated. Since there are almost no lakes, continental salt pans represent the only terrestrial geoarchives with the potential to preserve climate signals during sediment deposition. Climate has a strong impact on the salt pan ecosystem, causing adaptation of salt pan microorganisms to varying temperature, precipitation and salinity conditions. To reconstruct climate variability during the Holocene, the composition, diversity and abundance of indigenous microbial communities with depth and related to different soil parameters are investigated. We are using a combined approach of microbiological and lipid biomarker analyses to demonstrate the response of the microbial communities due to environmental changes. For microbiological analyses outcrops were conducted or short cores (0-100 cm) were drilled at four different salt pans in Aminuis, Koes and Witpan region having rather different geochemical properties. The current work focused on changes within the microbial communities due to the impact of long-term climate variation and the associated environmental changes and is part of the project 'Signals of climate and landscape change preserved in southern African GeoArchives' in the scope of the SPACES program, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). For a quantitative characterization of microbial communities molecular techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) based on the 16S rRNA genes are used. Moreover, 454 sequencing technique is utilized to describe the diversity and abundance of microorganisms in detail. Soil parameters are described by standard soil scientific methods. Furthermore, microbial lipid biomarker analyses were done to characterize living and past microbial biomass in relation to climate change. The distribution of bacteria and archaea in salt pan sediments is strongly correlated to the abundance of total organic carbon (TOC), which varied between 0.2 and 1.5%. Gene copy numbers of bacteria and archaea decrease with depth. In the upper 10 cm of the different salt pan sediments 104 to 106copies g-1 soil are quantified, while gene copy numbers decrease with depth down to 103 copies g-1 soil. In general, gene copy numbers of bacteria are higher than those of archaea and they show a similar pattern in different salt pan sediments. TOC values increase due to higher terrestrial input and the increase coincides with a shift within the microbial community.

  8. Detection of biofilm production and antibiotic resistance pattern in clinical isolates from indwelling medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shyam Kumar; Basukala, Prashant; Basukala, Om; Parajuli, Keshab; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani; Rijal, Basista Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms pose great threat for patients requiring indwelling medical devices (IMDs) as it is difficult to remove them. It is, therefore, crucial to follow an appropriate method for the detection of biofilms. The present study focuses on detection of biofilm formation among the isolates from IMDs. We also aimed to explore the antibiogram of biofilm producers. This prospective analysis included 65 prosthetic samples. After isolation and identification of bacteria following standard methodology, antibiogram of the isolates were produced following Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Detection of biofilms was done by tube adherence (TA), Congo red agar and tissue culture plate (TCP) methods. Out of 67 clinical isolates from IMDs, TCP detected 31 (46.3 %) biofilm producers and 36 (53.7 %) biofilm non-producers. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex were found to be the most frequent biofilm producers. The TA method correlated well with the TCP method for biofilm detection. Higher antibiotic resistance was observed in biofilm producers than in biofilm non-producers. The most effective antibiotics for biofilm producing Gram-positive isolates were Vancomycin and Tigecycline, and that for biofilm producing Gram-negative isolates were Polymyxin-B, Colistin Sulphate and Tigecycline. Nearly 46 % of the isolates were found to be biofilm producers. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern in the present study showed Amoxicillin to be an ineffective drug for isolates from the IMDs. For the detection of biofilm production, TA method can be an economical and effective alternative to TCP method. PMID:25239012

  9. Invasibility of resident biofilms by allochthonous communities in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Micol; Bernet, Nicolas; Harmand, Jérôme; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Milferstedt, Kim

    2015-09-15

    Invasion of non-native species can drastically affect the community composition and diversity of engineered and natural ecosystems, biofilms included. In this study, a molecular community fingerprinting method was used to monitor the putative establishment and colonization of allochthonous consortia in resident multi-species biofilms. To do this, biofilms inoculated with tap water or activated sludge were grown for 10 days in bubble column reactors W1 and W2, and S, respectively, before being exposed to non-native microbial consortia. These consortia consisted of fresh activated sludge suspensions for the biofilms inoculated with tap water (reactors W1 and W2) and of transplanted mature tap water biofilm for the activated sludge biofilm (reactor S). The introduction of virgin, unoccupied coupons into W1 and W2 enabled us to additionally investigate the competition for new resources (space) among the resident biofilm and the allochthonous consortia. CE-SSCP revealed that after the invasion event changes were mostly observed in the abundance of the dominant species in the native biofilms rather than their composition. This suggests that the resident communities within a bioreactor immediately outcompete the allochthonous microbes and shape the microbial community assemblage on both new coupons and already colonized surfaces for the short term. However, with time, latent members of the allochthonous community might grow up affecting the diversity and composition of the original biofilms. PMID:26072021

  10. Tracking the autochthonous carbon transfer in stream biofilm food webs.

    PubMed

    Risse-Buhl, Ute; Trefzger, Nicolai; Seifert, Anne-Gret; Schönborn, Wilfried; Gleixner, Gerd; Küsel, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Food webs in the rhithral zone rely mainly on allochthonous carbon from the riparian vegetation. However, autochthonous carbon might be more important in open canopy streams. In streams, most of the microbial activity occurs in biofilms, associated with the streambed. We followed the autochthonous carbon transfer toward bacteria and grazing protozoa within a stream biofilm food web. Biofilms that developed in a second-order stream (Thuringia, Germany) were incubated in flow channels under climate-controlled conditions. Six-week-old biofilms received either ¹³C- or ¹²C-labeled CO?, and uptake into phospholipid fatty acids was followed. The dissolved inorganic carbon of the flow channel water became immediately labeled. In biofilms grown under 8-h light/16-h dark conditions, more than 50% of the labeled carbon was incorporated in biofilm algae, mainly filamentous cyanobacteria, pennate diatoms, and nonfilamentous green algae. A mean of 29% of the labeled carbon reached protozoan grazer. The testate amoeba Pseudodifflugia horrida was highly abundant in biofilms and seemed to be the most important grazer on biofilm bacteria and algae. Hence, stream biofilms dominated by cyanobacteria and algae seem to play an important role in the uptake of CO? and transfer of autochthonous carbon through the microbial food web. PMID:22067054

  11. Biofilm/Mat Assays for Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Many microbial species form biofilms/mats under nutrient-limiting conditions, and fungal pathogens rely on this social behavior for virulence. In budding yeast, mat formation is dependent on the mucinlike flocculin Flo11, which promotes cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate adhesion in mats. The biofilm/ mat assays described here allow the evaluation of the role of Flo11 in the formation of mats. Cells are grown on surfaces with different degrees of rigidity to assess their expansion and three-dimensional architecture, and the cells are also exposed to plastic surfaces to quantify their adherence. These assays are broadly applicable to studying biofilm/mat formation in microbial species. PMID:25646504

  12. Biological activity at the limits of life: Microbial cycling of C, S and N in cold, permanently stratified, hypersaline Lake Vanda, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joye, S. B.; Schutte, C.; Samarkin, V.; Casciotti, K. L.; Madigan, M.; Saxton, M.

    2014-12-01

    The lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MCM) are the only perennially ice covered lakes on Earth and are the primary refuge for life in this hyper-arid polar desert. As a result of the ice cover and an uncoupled day/night cycle, the physical and biogeochemical processes in the lakes are highly unusual, with biogeochemical gradients and concentrations of specific compounds often exceeding those found in other aquatic ecosystems on Earth. These lakes are ideal systems for the study of redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes, model systems for understanding the effects of global climate change on polar ecosystems, end-member systems that provide insight into biogeochemical and limnological dynamics in meromictic lakes, analogues for life on other planets, and perfect systems to study microbial life at its thermodynamic limits. Lake Vanda, in the Wright valley, is relatively deep (73 m), hypersaline and has anoxic bottom water. High concentrations of chacotrophic salts results in low water activities that exert further challenges on microbial life. We collected details geochemical profiles of nutrients, major ions, dissolved gases, and redox metabolites and measured rates of microbially-mediated processes that cycle carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in the lakes waters and sediments. Despite the harsh and extreme nature of Lake Vanda and the thermodynamic barriers to microbially-mediated geochemical reactions, microorganisms are not only present in the lake but they mediate a diverse suite of geochemical processes. Statistical correlations between geochemical parameters, microbial activity and microbial community composition shed light on the factors that regulate and limit microbial activity in this unique extreme environment.

  13. Biofilms: United They Stand, Divided They Colonize

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Angela B. Shiflet

    Curricular materials designed to teach parallel computational modeling to undergraduate or graduate students in science and other STEM disciplines. The module begins with the construction of a cellular automaton model of microbial biofilms using Mathematica. This model is then re-implemented with C and parallelized using MPI.

  14. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces.

    PubMed

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong Q; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2013-05-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

  15. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

  16. Valuable processes and products from marine intertidal microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Morales, Benjamín Otto; Chan-Bacab, Manuel Jesús; De la Rosa-García, Susana del Carmen; Camacho-Chab, Juan Carlos

    2010-06-01

    Microbial communities are ubiquitous in marine intertidal environments. These communities, which grow preferentially as biofilms on natural and artificial surfaces, carry out key processes contributing to the functioning of coastal environments and providing valuable services to human society, including carbon cycling, primary productivity, trophic linkage, and transfer and removal of pollutants. In addition, their surface-associated life style greatly influences the integrity and performance of marine infrastructure and archaeological heritage materials. The fluctuating conditions of the intertidal zone make it an extreme environment to which intertidal biofilm organisms must adapt at varying levels. This requirement has probably favored the development and spread of specific microorganisms with particular physiological and metabolic processes. These organisms may have potential biotechnological utility, in that they may provide novel secondary metabolites, biopolymers, lipids, and enzymes and even processes for the production of energy in a sustainable manner. PMID:20202811

  17. Oral Biofilm Architecture on Natural Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M. Barbara M.; Degener, John E.; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmür, Rudolf; M. Harmsen, Hermie J.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and accessibility. Despite descriptions of initial plaque formation on the tooth surface, studies on mature plaque and plaque structure below the gum are limited to landmark studies from the 1970s, without appreciating the breadth of microbial diversity in the plaque. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize in vivo the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis on seven embedded teeth obtained from four different subjects. The data showed convincingly the dominance of Actinomyces sp., Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes in subgingival plaque. The latter proved to be new with a possibly important role in host-pathogen interaction due to its localization in close proximity to immune cells. The present study identified for the first time in vivo that Lactobacillus sp. are the central cells of bacterial aggregates in subgingival plaque, and that Streptococcus sp. and the yeast Candida albicans form corncob structures in supragingival plaque. Finally, periodontal pathogens colonize already formed biofilms and form microcolonies therein. These in vivo observations on oral biofilms provide a clear vision on biofilm architecture and the spatial distribution of predominant species. PMID:20195365

  18. Biofilms in Infections of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Bispo, Paulo J. M.; Haas, Wolfgang; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms in a variety of environments is a common trait of bacteria, and may represent one of the earliest defenses against predation. Biofilms are multicellular communities usually held together by a polymeric matrix, ranging from capsular material to cell lysate. In a structure that imposes diffusion limits, environmental microgradients arise to which individual bacteria adapt their physiologies, resulting in the gamut of physiological diversity. Additionally, the proximity of cells within the biofilm creates the opportunity for coordinated behaviors through cell–cell communication using diffusible signals, the most well documented being quorum sensing. Biofilms form on abiotic or biotic surfaces, and because of that are associated with a large proportion of human infections. Biofilm formation imposes a limitation on the uses and design of ocular devices, such as intraocular lenses, posterior contact lenses, scleral buckles, conjunctival plugs, lacrimal intubation devices and orbital implants. In the absence of abiotic materials, biofilms have been observed on the capsule, and in the corneal stroma. As the evidence for the involvement of microbial biofilms in many ocular infections has become compelling, developing new strategies to prevent their formation or to eradicate them at the site of infection, has become a priority. PMID:25806622

  19. Mathematical modeling of hydrolysate diffusion and utilization in cellulolytic biofilms of the extreme thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiwu [ORNL; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Lochner, Adriane [ORNL; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: The morphological and structural properties of microbial biofilms are influenced by internal substrate diffusion and utilization processes. In the case of microbial hydrolysis of plant cell walls, only thin and uniform biofilm structures are typically formed by cellulolytic microorganisms. In this study, we develop a hydrolysate diffusion and utilization model system to examine factors influencing cellulolytic biofilm formation. Model simulations using Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis as a representative organism, reveal that the growth of the cellulolytic biofilm is limited by hydrolysate utilization but not diffusion. As a consequence, the cellulolytic biofilm has a uniform growth rate, and there is a hydrolysate surplus that diffuses through the cellulolytic biofilm into the bulk solution where it is consumed by planktonic cells. Predictions based on the model were tested in a cellulose fermentation study and the results are consistent with the model and previously reported experimental data. The factors determining the rate-limiting step of biofilm growth are also analyzed.

  20. Pathogenesis of mucosal biofilm infections: challenges and progress

    PubMed Central

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Living-tissue biofilms remained unrecognized until very recently, mainly as a result of traditional microbial sampling techniques or histologic processing, which disrupt the spatial organization of the tissue microorganisms. Thus, the biofilm nature of certain mucosal infections was frequently unintentionally missed or disregarded. To a large extent, the study of human tissue biofilms is still in its infancy. However, with the advent of newer methodologies, such as fluorescent in situ hybridization and endoscopic confocal laser scanning microscopy, which combine the identification of microbes with in situ, direct visualization of their relationships with each other and with their substratum, mucosal tissue biofilms are becoming easier to study and, thus, their role in human infections is becoming more apparent. This review summarizes the challenges in the study of tissue biofilms, proposes two inflammation-centered – albeit opposite – pathogenetic models of mucosal tissue biofilm infections and suggests directions for future research and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:18380602

  1. STABILITY AND CHANGE IN ESTUARINE BIOFILM BACTERIAL COMMUNITY DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilms develop on all surfaces in aquatic environments and are defined as matrix-enclosed microbial populations adherent to each other and/or surfaces (1, 31). A substantial part of the microbial activity in nature is associated with surfaces (12). Surface association (biofou...

  2. Uranium Immobilization by Sulfate-reducing Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Beyenal, Haluk; Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2004-04-01

    Hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] was immobilized using biofilms of the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20. The biofilms were grown in flat-plate continuous-flow reactors using lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the electron acceptor. U(VI) was continuously fed into the reactor for 32 weeks at a concentration of 126 íM. During this time, the soluble U(VI) was removed (between 88 and 96% of feed) from solution and immobilized in the biofilms. The dynamics of U immobilization in the sulfate-reducing biofilms were quantified by estimating: (1) microbial activity in the SRB biofilm, defined as the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production rate and estimated from the H2S concentration profiles measured using microelectrodes across the biofilms; (2) concentration of dissolved U in the solution; and (3) the mass of U precipitated in the biofilm. Results suggest that U was immobilized in the biofilms as a result of two processes: (1) enzymatically and (2) chemically, by reacting with microbially generated H2S. Visual inspection showed that the dissolved sulfide species reacted with U(VI) to produce a black precipitate. Synchrotron-based U L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis of U precipitated abiotically by sodium sulfide indicated that U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV). Selected-area electron diffraction pattern and crystallographic analysis of transmission electron microscope lattice-fringe images confirmed the structure of precipitated U as being that of uraninite.

  3. Oil biodegradation. Water droplets in oil are microhabitats for microbial life.

    PubMed

    Meckenstock, Rainer U; von Netzer, Frederick; Stumpp, Christine; Lueders, Tillmann; Himmelberg, Anne M; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philipp; Harir, Mourad; Hosein, Riad; Haque, Shirin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    Anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons, typically occurring at the oil-water transition zone, influences the quality of oil reservoirs. In Pitch Lake, Trinidad and Tobago--the world's largest asphalt lake--we found that microorganisms are metabolically active in minuscule water droplets (1 to 3 microliters) entrapped in oil. Pyrotag sequencing of individual droplet microbiomes revealed complex methanogenic microbial communities actively degrading the oil into a diverse range of metabolites, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. High salinity and water-stable isotopes of the droplets indicate a deep subsurface origin. The 13.5% water content and the large surface area of the droplets represent an underestimated potential for biodegradation of oil away from the oil-water transition zone. PMID:25104386

  4. Characterisation of two quorum sensing systems in the endophytic Serratia plymuthica strain G3: differential control of motility and biofilm formation according to life-style

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) systems have been described in many plant-associated Gram-negative bacteria to control certain beneficial phenotypic traits, such as production of biocontrol factors and plant growth promotion. However, the role of AHL-mediated signalling in the endophytic strains of plant-associated Serratia is still poorly understood. An endophytic Serratia sp. G3 with biocontrol potential and high levels of AHL signal production was isolated from the stems of wheat and the role of QS in this isolate was determined. Results Strain G3 classified as Serratia plymuthica based on 16S rRNA was subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Using primers to conserved sequences of luxIR homologues from the Serratia genus, splIR and spsIR from the chromosome of strain G3 were cloned and sequenced. AHL profiles from strain G3 and Escherichia coli DH5? expressing splI or spsI from recombinant plasmids were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This revealed that the most abundant AHL signals produced by SplI in E. coli were N-3-oxo-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL), N-3-oxo-heptanoylhomoserine lactone (3-oxo-C7-HSL), N-3-hydroxy-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (3-hydroxy-C6-HSL), N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6-HSL), and N-heptanoyl homoserine lactone (C7-HSL); whereas SpsI was primarily responsible for the synthesis of N-butyrylhomoserine lactone (C4-HSL) and N-pentanoylhomoserine lactone (C5-HSL). Furthermore, a quorum quenching analysis by heterologous expression of the Bacillus A24 AiiA lactonase in strain G3 enabled the identification of the AHL-regulated biocontrol-related traits. Depletion of AHLs with this lactonase resulted in altered adhesion and biofilm formation using a microtiter plate assay and flow cells coupled with confocal laser scanning microscopy respectively. This was different from the closely related S. plymuthica strains HRO-C48 and RVH1, where biofilm formation for both strains is AHL-independent. In addition, QS in G3 positively regulated antifungal activity, production of exoenzymes, but negatively regulated production of indol-3-acetic acid (IAA), which is in agreement with previous reports in strain HRO-C48. However, in contrast to HRO-C48, swimming motility was not controlled by AHL-mediated QS. Conclusions This is the first report of the characterisation of two AHL-based quorum sensing systems in the same isolate of the genus Serratia. Our results show that the QS network is involved in the global regulation of biocontrol-related traits in the endophytic strain G3. However, although free-living and endophytic S. plymuthica share some conservation on QS phenotypic regulation, the control of motility and biofilm formation seems to be strain-specific and possible linked to the life-style of this organism. PMID:21284858

  5. Laser Induced Fluorescence Emission (L.I.F.E.): In Situ Non-Destructive Detection of Microbial Life on Supraglacial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, B.; Tilg, M.; Storrie-Lombardi, M.; Remias, D.; Psenner, R.

    2012-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.) is an in situ laser scanning technique to detect photoautotrophic pigments such as phycoerythrin of an ice ecosystem such as supraglacial environments without contamination. The sensitivity of many psychrophiles to even moderate changes in temperature, and the logistical difficulties associated with either in situ analysis or sampling makes it difficult to study microbial metabolism in ice ecosystems in a high resolution. Surface communities of cold ecosystems are highly autotrophic and therefor ideal systems for L.I.F.E examinations. 532nm green lasers excite photopigments in cyanobacteria and produce multiple fluorescence signatures between 550nm and 750nm including carotenoids, phycobiliproteins which would enable a non-invasive in-situ measurement. The sensitivity of many psychrophiles to even moderate changes in temperature, and the logistical difficulties associated with either in situ analysis or sampling makes it difficult to study these cryosphere ecosystems. In general, the ice habitat has to be disrupted using techniques that usually include coring, sawing, and melting. Samples are also often chosen blindly, with little indication of probable biomass. The need for an in situ non-invasive, non-destructive technique to detect, localize, and sample cryosphere biomass in the field is therefore of considerable importance. L.I.F.E has already been tested in remote ecosystems like Antarctica (Lake Untersee, Lake Fryxell), supraglacial environments in the Kongsfjord region in the High Arctic and High Alpine glaciers but until now no calibration was set to convert the L.I.F.E. signal into pigment concentration. Here we describe the standardization for detection of Phycobiliproteins (Phycoerythrine) which are found in red algae, cyanobacteria, and cryptomonads. Similar methods are already used for detection of phytoplankton in liquid systems like oceans and lakes by NASÁs Airborne Oceanographic LIDAR since 1979. The possibility to use L.I.F.E. in ice though is a novelty and provides a promising tool to monitor vanishing ice systems like retreating glaciers.

  6. Microbial fossil record of rocks from the Ross Desert, Antarctica: implications in the search for past life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzchos, Jacek; Ascaso, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Cryptoendolithic microbial communities living within Antarctic rocks are an example of survival in an extremely cold and dry environment. The extinction of these micro-organisms formerly colonizing sandstone in the Mount Fleming area (Ross Desert), was probably provoked by the hostile environment. This is considered to be a good terrestrial analogue of the first stage of the disappearance of possible life on early Mars. To date, only macroscopically observed indirect biomarkers of the past activity of cryptoendoliths in Antarctic rocks have been described. The present paper confirms, for the first time, the existence of cryptoendolith microbial fossils within these sandstone rocks. The novel in situ application of scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging and simultaneous use of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy allowed the clear detection of microfossils left behind by Antarctic endoliths. Careful interpretation of the morphological features of cells, such as preserved cell walls in algae, fungi and bacteria, cytoplasm elements such as chloroplast membranes in algae and organic matter traces, mineral associations, and the spatial context of these structures all point to their identification as cryptoendolith microfossils. This type of investigation will prompt the development of research strategies aimed at locating and identifying the signs that Martian microbiota, probably only bacteria if they existed, may have been left for us to see.

  7. Electrochemically active biofilms: facts and fiction. A review

    PubMed Central

    Babauta, Jerome; Renslow, Ryan; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    This review examines the electrochemical techniques used to study extracellular electron transfer in the electrochemically active biofilms that are used in microbial fuel cells and other bioelectrochemical systems. Electrochemically active biofilms are defined as biofilms that exchange electrons with conductive surfaces: electrodes. Following the electrochemical conventions, and recognizing that electrodes can be considered reactants in these bioelectrochemical processes, biofilms that deliver electrons to the biofilm electrode are called anodic, ie electrode-reducing, biofilms, while biofilms that accept electrons from the biofilm electrode are called cathodic, ie electrode-oxidizing, biofilms. How to grow these electrochemically active biofilms in bioelec-trochemical systems is discussed and also the critical choices made in the experimental setup that affect the experimental results. The reactor configurations used in bioelectrochemical systems research are also described and the authors demonstrate how to use selected voltammetric techniques to study extracellular electron transfer in bioelectrochemical systems. Finally, some critical concerns with the proposed electron transfer mechanisms in bioelectrochemical systems are addressed together with the prospects of bioelectrochemical systems as energy-converting and energy-harvesting devices. PMID:22856464

  8. Biofilm Formation As a Response to Ecological Competition.

    PubMed

    Oliveria, Nuno M; Martinez-Garcia, Esteban; Xavier, Joao; Durham, William M; Kolter, Roberto; Kim, Wook; Foster, Kevin R

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria form dense surface-associated communities known as biofilms that are central to their persistence and how they affect us. Biofilm formation is commonly viewed as a cooperative enterprise, where strains and species work together for a common goal. Here we explore an alternative model: biofilm formation is a response to ecological competition. We co-cultured a diverse collection of natural isolates of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and studied the effect on biofilm formation. We show that strain mixing reliably increases biofilm formation compared to unmixed conditions. Importantly, strain mixing leads to strong competition: one strain dominates and largely excludes the other from the biofilm. Furthermore, we show that pyocins, narrow-spectrum antibiotics made by other P. aeruginosa strains, can stimulate biofilm formation by increasing the attachment of cells. Side-by-side comparisons using microfluidic assays suggest that the increase in biofilm occurs due to a general response to cellular damage: a comparable biofilm response occurs for pyocins that disrupt membranes as for commercial antibiotics that damage DNA, inhibit protein synthesis or transcription. Our data show that bacteria increase biofilm formation in response to ecological competition that is detected by antibiotic stress. This is inconsistent with the idea that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics are cooperative signals that coordinate microbial communities, as is often concluded. Instead, our work is consistent with competition sensing where low-levels of antibiotics are used to detect and respond to the competing genotypes that produce them. PMID:26158271

  9. Biofilm Formation As a Response to Ecological Competition

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Nuno M.; Martinez-Garcia, Esteban; Xavier, Joao; Durham, William M.; Kolter, Roberto; Kim, Wook; Foster, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria form dense surface-associated communities known as biofilms that are central to their persistence and how they affect us. Biofilm formation is commonly viewed as a cooperative enterprise, where strains and species work together for a common goal. Here we explore an alternative model: biofilm formation is a response to ecological competition. We co-cultured a diverse collection of natural isolates of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and studied the effect on biofilm formation. We show that strain mixing reliably increases biofilm formation compared to unmixed conditions. Importantly, strain mixing leads to strong competition: one strain dominates and largely excludes the other from the biofilm. Furthermore, we show that pyocins, narrow-spectrum antibiotics made by other P. aeruginosa strains, can stimulate biofilm formation by increasing the attachment of cells. Side-by-side comparisons using microfluidic assays suggest that the increase in biofilm occurs due to a general response to cellular damage: a comparable biofilm response occurs for pyocins that disrupt membranes as for commercial antibiotics that damage DNA, inhibit protein synthesis or transcription. Our data show that bacteria increase biofilm formation in response to ecological competition that is detected by antibiotic stress. This is inconsistent with the idea that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics are cooperative signals that coordinate microbial communities, as is often concluded. Instead, our work is consistent with competition sensing where low-levels of antibiotics are used to detect and respond to the competing genotypes that produce them. PMID:26158271

  10. Antibody-Guided Alpha Radiation Effectively Damages Fungal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, L. R.; Bryan, R. A.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A.; Casadevall, A.; Dadachova, E.

    2006-01-01

    The use of indwelling medical devices—pacemakers, prosthetic joints, catheters—is rapidly growing and is often complicated by infections with biofilm-forming microbes that are resistant to antimicrobial agents and host defense mechanisms. We investigated for the first time the use of microbe-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) as delivery vehicles for targeting biofilms with cytocidal radiation. MAb 18B7 (immunoglobulin G1 [IgG1]), which binds to capsular polysaccharides of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, penetrated cryptococcal biofilms, as shown by confocal microscopy. When the alpha radiation-emitter 213-Bismuth (213Bi) was attached to MAb 18B7 and the radiolabeled MAb was added to C. neoformans biofilms, there was a 50% reduction in biofilm metabolic activity. In contrast, when the IgM MAb 13F1 labeled with 213Bi was used there was no penetration of the fungal biofilm and no damage. Unlabeled 18B7, 213Bi-labeled nonspecific MAbs, and gamma and beta types of radiation did not have an effect on biofilms. The lack of efficacy of gamma and beta radiation probably reflects the radioprotective properties of polysaccharide biofilm matrix. Our results indicate that C. neoformans biofilms are susceptible to treatment with antibody-targeted alpha radiation, suggesting a novel option for the prevention or treatment of microbial biofilms on indwelling medical devices. PMID:16723575

  11. Anti-Biofilm Compounds Derived from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, Sean D.; Richards, Justin J.; Tucker, Ashley T.; Thompson, Richele; Melander, Christian; Cavanagh, John

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are surface-attached communities of microorganisms that are protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules. In the biofilm state, bacteria are significantly more resistant to external assault, including attack by antibiotics. In their native environment, bacterial biofilms underpin costly biofouling that wreaks havoc on shipping, utilities, and offshore industry. Within a host environment, they are insensitive to antiseptics and basic host immune responses. It is estimated that up to 80% of all microbial infections are biofilm-based. Biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, since once the device is colonized, infection is almost impossible to eliminate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there is a notable effort towards developing small, synthetically available molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. Here, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms specifically through non-microbicidal mechanisms. Importantly, we discuss several sets of compounds derived from marine sponges that we are developing in our labs to address the persistent biofilm problem. We will discuss: discovery/synthesis of natural products and their analogues—including our marine sponge-derived compounds and initial adjuvant activity and toxicological screening of our novel anti-biofilm compounds. PMID:22073007

  12. Microbially induced sedimentary structures in evaporite–siliciclastic sediments of Ras Gemsa sabkha, Red Sea Coast, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Amany G.

    2013-01-01

    The coastal sabkha in Ras Gemsa, Red Sea coast with its colonizing microbial mats and biofilms was investigated. The sabkha sediments consist mainly of terrigenous siliciclastic material accompanied by the development of evaporites. Halite serves as a good conduit for light and reduces the effect of intensive harmful solar radiation, which allows microbial mats to survive and flourish. The microbial mats in the evaporite–siliciclastic environments of such sabkha display distinctive sedimentary structures (microbially induced sedimentary structures), including frozen multidirected ripple marks, salt-encrusted crinkle mats, jelly roll structure, and petee structures. Scanning electron microscopy of the sediment surface colonized by cyanobacteria revealed that sand grains of the studied samples are incorporated into the biofilm by trapping and binding processes. Filamentous cyanobacteria and their EPS found in the voids in and between the particles construct a network that effectively interweaves and stabilizes the surface sediments. In advanced stages, the whole surface is covered by a spider web-like structure of biofilm, leading to a planar surface morphology. Sabkha with its chemical precipitates is a good model for potential preservation of life signatures. It is worthy to note that the available, published works on the subject of the present work are not numerous. PMID:25685526

  13. Implications of Biofilm Formation on Urological Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieux, Peter A.; Wignall, Geoffrey R.; Carriveau, Rupp; Denstedt, John D.

    2008-09-01

    Despite millions of dollars and several decades of research targeted at their prevention and eradication, biofilm-associated infections remain the major cause of urological device failure. Numerous strategies have been aimed at improving device design, biomaterial composition, surface properties and drug delivery, but have been largely circumvented by microbes and their plethora of attachment, host evasion, antimicrobial resistance, and dissemination strategies. This is not entirely surprising since natural biofilm formation has been going on for millions of years and remains a major part of microorganism survival and evolution. Thus, the fact that biofilms develop on and in the biomaterials and tissues of humans is really an extension of this natural tendency and greatly explains why they are so difficult for us to combat. Firstly, biofilm structure and composition inherently provide a protective environment for microorganisms, shielding them from the shear stress of urine flow, immune cell attack and some antimicrobials. Secondly, many biofilm organisms enter a metabolically dormant state that renders them tolerant to those antibiotics and host factors able to penetrate the biofilm matrix. Lastly, the majority of organisms that cause biofilm-associated urinary tract infections originate from our own oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts and therefore have already adapted to many of our host defenses. Ultimately, while biofilms continue to hold an advantage with respect to recurrent infections and biomaterial usage within the urinary tract, significant progress has been made in understanding these dynamic microbial communities and novel approaches offer promise for their prevention and eradication. These include novel device designs, antimicrobials, anti-adhesive coatings, biodegradable polymers and biofilm-disrupting compounds and therapies.

  14. CO2 Production as an Indicator of Biofilm Metabolism? †

    PubMed Central

    Kroukamp, Otini; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.

    2009-01-01

    Biofilms are important in aquatic nutrient cycling and microbial proliferation. In these structures, nutrients like carbon are channeled into the production of extracellular polymeric substances or cell division; both are vital for microbial survival and propagation. The aim of this study was to assess carbon channeling into cellular or noncellular fractions in biofilms. Growing in tubular reactors, biofilms of our model strain Pseudomonas sp. strain CT07 produced cells to the planktonic phase from the early stages of biofilm development, reaching pseudo steady state with a consistent yield of ?107 cells·cm?2·h?1 within 72 h. Total direct counts and image analysis showed that most of the converted carbon occurred in the noncellular fraction, with the released and sessile cells accounting for <10% and <2% of inflowing carbon, respectively. A CO2 evolution measurement system (CEMS) that monitored CO2 in the gas phase was developed to perform a complete carbon balance across the biofilm. The measurement system was able to determine whole-biofilm CO2 production rates in real time and showed that gaseous CO2 production accounted for 25% of inflowing carbon. In addition, the CEMS made it possible to measure biofilm response to changing environmental conditions; changes in temperature or inflowing carbon concentration were followed by a rapid response in biofilm metabolism and the establishment of new steady-state conditions. PMID:19346353

  15. Characterization of biofilm formed by human-derived nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Maria K; Hunter, Larry W; Huebner, Marianne; Lieske, John C; Miller, Virginia M

    2011-01-01

    Aim Microbial biofilm matrix contains polysaccharides and proteins and can require extracellular nucleic acids for initial formation. Experiments were designed to identify infectious pathogens in human aneurysms and to characterize biofilm formed by calcified human arterial-derived nanoparticles. Materials & method A total of 26 different microbial pathogens were isolated from 48 inflammatory aneurysms. Consistent amounts (0.49 McFarland units) of nanoparticles derived from similar tissue were seeded into 24-well plates and cultured for 21 days in the absence (control) or presence of RNase, tetracycline or gentamicin. Results Control biofilm developed within 14 days, as detected by concanavalin A and BacLight™ Green staining. The formation of biofilm in wells treated with RNase was not different from the control; however, gentamicin partially inhibited and tetracycline completely inhibited biofilm formation. Therefore, nanoparticle biofilm retains some characteristics of conventional bacterial biofilm and requires protein–calcium interactions, although extracellular RNA is not required. Conclusion This model system may also allow study of nanosized vesicles derived from donor tissue, including any microbes present, and could provide a useful tool for in vitro investigation of nanoparticle biofilm formation. PMID:19958229

  16. Riddle of Biofilm Resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KIM LEWIS

    2001-01-01

    A biofilm is a population of cells growing on a surface and enclosed in an exopolysaccharide matrix. Biofilms are notori- ously difficult to eradicate and are a source of many recalci- trant infections. The nature of bacterial biofilm resistance to antimicrobials is the subject of the present minireview. Patho- genic yeast such as Candida albicans also form recalcitrant biofilms, and

  17. Evidence of Ancient Microbial Life in an Impact Structure and Its Implications for Astrobiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomas Hode; Sherry L. Cady; Ilka Dalwigk; Per Kristiansson

    The search for present and past life on Mars has drawn major attention from the scientific community, as well as from national\\u000a and international space agencies. A major reason for focusing the search for life on Mars is that, apart from being the closest\\u000a planetary body of major astrobiological interest, Mars may have shared a number of environmental features with

  18. Desiccation tolerance of iron bacteria biofilms on Mars regolith simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyh, Nina; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Iron oxidizing bacteria play an important role in the geological redox cycling of iron on earth. The redox change between Fe(II) and Fe(III) can be used for biological energy production [1]. Therefore iron oxidation in the iron rich martian soils may be or may have been microbially mediated. The microbial conversion of iron is considered to be an ancient form of metabolism [2], so it might have evolved on Mars as well. However, to exist in recent martian soils, bacteria must be able to endure dry and cold conditions. Neutrophilic iron oxidizers can be found in various iron rich aquatic environments, where they lead to the precipitation of insoluble ferric hydroxides. Some of these environments fall temporarily dry, what could have led to an adaptation to desiccation by bacteria, existing there. One strategy of iron bacteria to endure drought stress might be the formation of biofilms by excreting Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS). The deposition of iron hydroxides could enable them to endure dry conditions as well. For our experiments, neutrophilic iron oxidizing bacteria have been isolated from a creek in Bad Salzhausen/Hesse and temporarily drying out pools in Tierra del Fuego. Strains from aquatic environments in the national park "Unteres Odertal" and from water wells in Berlin/Brandenburg are included in the tests as well. In desiccation experiments, the capability of iron bacteria to tolerate dry conditions are investigated. The aim of our first experiment is the adaptation to dry conditions. Biofilms of 15 strains are grown on ceramic beads in liquid medium containing complexed Fe(II), established biofilms contain Fe(III) precipitates. The cultures are desiccated in a sterile airflow until the weight of the cultures remained constant. After a desiccation period of 9 h up to 7 d, the beads are transferred to fresh liquid medium. Adapted strains are used in further desiccation experiments, where biofilms are grown on two martian regolith simulants. These mineral mixtures were developed and produced by the Naturkundemuseum Berlin according to recent data of Mars research missions [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. The minerals are attached to object slides with potassium silicate and biofilms are grown on the mineral surface. The biofilms are quantified by cell counting and the structure is evaluated by epifluorescence microscopy. After desiccation in a sterile airflow, the survival of cells is determined by fluorescence staining. Acknowledgements This research was supported by the Helmholtz Association through the research alliance "Planetary Evolution and Life". References [1] Weber, K. A. et al. (2006). Microorganisms pumping iron: anaerobic microbial iron oxidation and reduction. Nature Reviews Microbiology 4: 752-764. [2] Vargas, M. et al. (1998). Microbiological evidence for Fe(III) reduction on early Earth. Nature 395: 65-67. [3] Bibring, J.-P., Y. Langevin, et al. (2005). Mars surface diversity as revealed by the OMEGA/Mars express observations. Science 307(5715): 1576-1581. [4] Bibring, J.-P., S. W. Squyres, et al. (2006). Merging Views on Mars. Science 313(5795): 1899-1901. [5] Chevrier, V. and P. E. Mathé (2007). Mineralogy and evolution of the surface of Mars: A review. Planetary and Space Science 55(3): 289-314. [6] McCollom, T. M. and B. M. Hynek (2005). A volcanic environment for bedrock diagenesis at Meridiani Planum on Mars. Nature 438(7071): 1129-1131. [7] Poulet, F., J. P. Bibring, et al. (2005). Phyllosilicates on Mars and implications for early martian climate. Nature 438(7068): 623-627.

  19. Adhesion as a weapon in microbial competition

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Jonas; Nadell, Carey D.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Foster, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Microbes attach to surfaces and form dense communities known as biofilms, which are central to how microbes live and influence humans. The key defining feature of biofilms is adhesion, whereby cells attach to one another and to surfaces, via attachment factors and extracellular polymers. While adhesion is known to be important for the initial stages of biofilm formation, its function within biofilm communities has not been studied. Here we utilise an individual-based model of microbial groups to study the evolution of adhesion. While adhering to a surface can enable cells to remain in a biofilm, consideration of within-biofilm competition reveals a potential cost to adhesion: immobility. Highly adhesive cells that are resistant to movement risk being buried and starved at the base of the biofilm. However, we find that when growth occurs at the base of a biofilm, adhesion allows cells to capture substratum territory and force less adhesive, competing cells out of the system. This process may be particularly important when cells grow on a host epithelial surface. We test the predictions of our model using the enteric pathogen Vibrio cholerae, which produces an extracellular matrix important for biofilm formation. Flow cell experiments indicate that matrix-secreting cells are highly adhesive and form expanding clusters that remove non-secreting cells from the population, as predicted by our simulations. Our study shows how simple physical properties, such as adhesion, can be critical to understanding evolution and competition within microbial communities. PMID:25290505

  20. Microbial effect on soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Alex; Rosenzweig, Ravid; Volk, Elazar; Rosenkranz, Hella; Iden, Sascha; Durner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Although largely ignored, the soil contains large amount of biofilms (attached microbes) that can affect many processes. While biochemical processes are studied, biophysical processes receive only little attention. Biofilms may occupy some of the pore space, and by that affect the soil hydraulic properties. This effect on unsaturated soils, however, was not intensively studied. In this research we directly measure the hydraulic properties, namely the soil's unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function and retention curve, for soils containing real biofilm. To do that we inoculate soil with biofilm-forming bacteria and incubate it with sufficient amounts of nutrient until biofilm is formed. The hydraulic properties of the incubated soil are then measured using several techniques, including multi-step outflow and evaporation method. The longer measurements (evaporation method) are conducted under refrigeration conditions to minimize microbial activity during the experiment. The results show a clear effect of the biofilm, where the biofilm-affected soil (sandy loam in our case) behaves like a much finer soil. This qualitatively makes sense as the biofilm generates an effective pore size distribution that is characterized by smaller pores. However, the effect is much more complex and needs to be studied carefully considering (for example) dual porosity models. We compare our preliminary results with other experiments, including flow-through column experiments and experiments with biofilm analogues. Clearly a better understanding of the way microbial activity alters the hydraulic properties may help designing more efficient bioremediation, irrigation, and other soil-related processes.

  1. Stress Tolerance of Methylobacterium Biofilms in Bathrooms

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Takehisa; Kubota, Hiromi; Hanai, Junya; Hitomi, Jun; Tokuda, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of microbial flora within pink biofilms in bathrooms was performed. Pink biofilms develop relatively rapidly in bathrooms, can be difficult to remove, and are quick to recur. Bacterium-sized cells were found to be predominant in 42 pink biofilms in Japan using a scanning electron microscope. Methylobacterium strains were detected from all samples in bathrooms by an isolation method. To explain this predominance, 14 biofilm samples were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Methylobacterium was indicated to be the major genus in all biofilms. The isolated Methylobacterium survived after contact with 1.0% cleaning agents, including benzalkonium chloride for 24 h. Their tolerance did not differ under biofilm-like conditions on fiber reinforced plastics (FRP), a general material of bath tubs, floors, and walls. Also, the strains exhibited higher tolerance to desiccation than other isolated species on FRP. Some Methylobacterium survived and exhibited potential to grow after four weeks of desiccation without any nutrients. These specific characteristics could be a cause of their predominance in bathrooms, an environment with rapid flowing water, drying, low nutrients, and occasional exposure to cleaning agents. PMID:23207727

  2. Did Mineral Surface Chemistry and Toxicity Contribute to Evolution of Microbial Extracellular Polymeric Substances?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jay M.; Zhang, Nianli; Hickey, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life in biofilms closely associated with mineral surfaces, which highlights the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral–water interface. Biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because biofilms provide crucial cell survival functions. The potential toxicity of mineral surfaces toward cells and the complexities of the mineral–water–cell interface in determining the toxicity mechanisms, however, have not been fully appreciated. Here, we report a previously unrecognized role for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which form biofilms in shielding cells against the toxicity of mineral surfaces. Using colony plating and LIVE/DEAD staining methods in oxide suspensions versus oxide-free controls, we found greater viability of wild-type, EPS-producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 compared to their isogenic knockout mutant with defective biofilm-producing capacity. Oxide toxicity was specific to its surface charge and particle size. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and assays for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) on mineral surfaces suggested that EPS shield via both physical and chemical mechanisms. Intriguingly, qualitative as well as quantitative measures of EPS production showed that toxic minerals induced EPS production in bacteria. By determining the specific toxicity mechanisms, we provide insight into the potential impact of mineral surfaces in promoting increased complexity of cell surfaces, including EPS and biofilm formation, on early Earth. Key Words: Mineral toxicity—Bacteria—EPS evolution—Biofilms—Cytotoxicity—Silica—Anatase—Alumina. Astrobiology 12, 785–798. PMID:22934560

  3. Bacterial swimmers that infiltrate and take over the biofilm matrix

    PubMed Central

    Houry, Ali; Gohar, Michel; Deschamps, Julien; Tischenko, Ekaterina; Aymerich, Stéphane; Gruss, Alexandra; Briandet, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria grow in either planktonic form or as biofilms, which are attached to either inert or biological surfaces. Both growth forms are highly relevant states in nature and of paramount scientific focus. However, interchanges between bacteria in these two states have been little explored. We discovered that a subpopulation of planktonic bacilli is propelled by flagella to tunnel deep within a biofilm structure. Swimmers create transient pores that increase macromolecular transfer within the biofilm. Irrigation of the biofilm by swimmer bacteria may improve biofilm bacterial fitness by increasing nutrient flow in the matrix. However, we show that the opposite may also occur (i.e., swimmers can exacerbate killing of biofilm bacteria by facilitating penetration of toxic substances from the environment). We combined these observations with the fact that numerous bacteria produce antimicrobial substances in nature. We hypothesized and proved that motile bacilli expressing a bactericide can also kill a heterologous biofilm population, Staphylococcus aureus in this case, and then occupy the newly created space. These findings identify microbial motility as a determinant of the biofilm landscape and add motility to the complement of traits contributing to rapid alterations in biofilm populations. PMID:22773813

  4. Biofilm Complexity Controls Fine Particle Dynamics in Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, K. R.; Hunter, W. R.; Drummond, J. D.; Battin, T. J.; Boano, F.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Most models of riverine eco-hydrology and biogeochemistry rely upon bulk parameterization of fluxes. However, the transport and retention of carbon and nutrients in headwater streams is strongly influenced by biofilms (surface-attached microbial communities), which results in strong feedbacks between stream hydrodynamics and biogeochemistry. Mechanistic understanding of the interactions between streambed biofilms and nutrient dynamics is lacking. Here we present experimental results linking microscale observations of biofilm community structure to the deposition and resuspension of clay-sized mineral particles in streams. Biofilms were grown in identical 3 m recirculating flumes over periods of 14-50 days. Fluorescent particles were introduced to each flume, and their deposition was traced over 30 minutes. Particle resuspension from the biofilms was then observed under an increased stream flow, mimicking a flood event. We quantified particle fluxes using flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy. We directly observed particle adhesion to the biofilm using a confocal laser scanning microscope. 3-D Optical Coherence Tomography was used to determine biofilm roughness, areal coverage and void space in each flume. These measurements allow us to link biofilm complexity to particle retention during both baseflow and floodflow. The results suggest that increased biofilm complexity favors deposition and retention of fine particles in streams.

  5. Monitoring biofilm attachment on medical devices surfaces using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Hitchins, Victoria M.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Microbial biofilm is a colony of single bacteria cells (planktonic) that attached to surfaces, attract other microorganisms to attach and grow, and together they build an extracellular matrix composed of polysaccharides, protein, and DNA. Eventually, some cells will detach and spread to other surface. Biofilm on medical devices can cause severe infection to all age ranges from infant to adult. Therefore, it is important to detect biofilm in a fast and efficient manner. Hyperspectral imaging was utilized for distinguishing wide area of biofilm coverage on various materials and on different textures of stainless steeltest coupons. Not only is the coverage of biofilm important, but also the shear stress of biofilm on the attached surfaces is significant. This study investigates the effects of shear stress on the adhesion of biofilms on common medical device surfaces such as glass, polycarbonate, polytetrafluoroethylene, and stainless steel with different textures. Biofilm was grown using Ps. aeruginosa and growth was monitored after 24 and 48 hours at 37° C. The coupons covered with biofilm were tilted at 45 degrees and 90 degrees for 30 seconds to induce shear stress and Hyperspectral images were taken. We hypothesize that stronger attachment on rough surface would be able to withstand greater shear stress compared to smooth surface.

  6. Dynamic Temperature Fields under Mars Landing Sites and Implications for Supporting Microbial Life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Ulrich; Tim Kral; Vincent Chevrier; Robert Pilgrim; Larry Roe

    2010-01-01

    While average temperatures on Mars may be too low to support terrestrial life-forms or aqueous liquids, diurnal peak temperatures over most of the planet can be high enough to provide for both, down to a few centimeters beneath the surface for some fraction of the time. A thermal model was applied to the Viking 1, Viking 2, Pathfinder, Spirit, and

  7. Microbial Preservation in Sulfates in the Haughton Impact Structure Suggests Target in Search for Life on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, J.; Osinski, G. R.; Lee, P.; Cockell, C. S.

    2005-01-01

    Microbes in Haughton Crater Sulfates: Impact craters are of high interest in planetary exploration because they are viewed as possible sites for evidence of life [1]. Hydrothermal systems in craters are particularly regarded as sites where primitive life could evolve. Evidence from the Miocene Haughton impact structure shows that crater hydrothermal deposits may also be a preferred site for subsequent colonization and hence possible extant life: Hydrothermal sulfates at Haughton are colonized by viable cyanobacteria [2]. The Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Canadian High Arctic, is a 24 km-diameter crater of mid-Tertiary age. The structure preserves an exceptional record of impact-induced hydrothermal activity, including sulfide, and sulfate mineralization [3]. The target rocks excavated at the site included massive gypsum-bearing carbonate rocks of Ordovician age. Impact-remobilized sulfates occur as metre-scale masses of intergrown crystals of the clear form of gypsum selenite in veins and cavity fillings within the crater s impact melt breccia deposits [4]. The selenite is part of the hydrothermal assemblage as it was precipitated by cooling hot waters that were circulating as a result of the impact. Remobilization of the sulfate continues to the present day, such that it occurs in soil crusts (Fig. 1) including sandy beds with a gypsum cement. The sulfate-cemented beds make an interesting comparison with the sulfate-bearing sandy beds encountered by the Opportunity MER [5]. The selenite crystals are up to 0.3 m in width, of high purity, and transparent. They locally exhibit frayed margins where cleavage surfaces have separated. This exfoliation may be a response to freeze-thaw weathering. The selenite contains traces of rock detritus, newly precipitated gypsum, and microbial colonies. The rock detritus consists of sediment particles which penetrated the opened cleavages by up to 2cm from the crystal margins. Some of the detritus is cemented into place by gypsum, which must have been dissolved and reprecipitated from the host selenite.

  8. How Cyanobacterial Distributions Reveal Flow and Irradiance Conditions of Photosynthetic Biofilm Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prufert-Bebout, Lee

    2001-01-01

    Microbial life on Earth is enormously abundant at sediment-water interfaces. The fossil record in fact contains abundant evidence of the preservation of life on such surfaces. It is therefore critical to our interpretation of early Earth history, and potentially to history of life on other planets, to be able to recognize life forms at these interfaces. On Earth this life often occurs as organized structures of microbes and their extracellular exudates known as biofilms. When such biofilms occur in areas receiving sunlight photosynthetic biofilms are the dominant form in natural ecosystems due to selective advantage inherent in their ability to utilize solar energy. Cyanobacteria are the dominant phototrophic microbes in most modern and ancient photosynthetic biofilms, microbial mats and stromatolites. Due to their long (3.5 billion year) evolutionary history, this group has extensively diversified resulting in an enormous array of morphologies and physiological abilities. This enormous diversity and specialization results in very specific selection for a particular cyanobacterium in each available photosynthetic niche. Furthermore these organisms can alter their spatial orientation, cell morphology, pigmentation and associations with heterotrophic organisms in order to fine tune their optimization to a given micro-niche. These adaptations can be detected, and if adequate knowledge of the interaction between environmental conditions and organism response is available, the detectable organism response can be used to infer the environmental conditions causing that response. This presentation will detail two specific examples which illustrate this point. Light and water are essential to photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and these organisms have specific detectable behavioral responses to these parameters. We will present cyanobacterial responses to quantified flow and irradiance to demonstrate the interpretative power of distribution and orientation information. This study presents new results, but many such examples are already found in the literature. However this information exists in such a wide variety of journals, spanning decades of research that the utility of the vast storehouse of information is limited, not by the ability of cyanobacteria to respond in recognizable ways to environmental stimuli, but by our ability to compile and use this information. Recent advances in information technology will soon allow us to overcome these difficulties and utilize the detailed responses of cyanobacteria to environmental microniches as powerful records of the interaction between the biosphere and lithosphere.

  9. Form and Function of Clostridium thermocellum Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Allen, Grant; Liss, Steven N.; Lynd, Lee R.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of bacterial adherence has been acknowledged in microbial lignocellulose conversion studies; however, few reports have described the function and structure of biofilms supported by cellulosic substrates. We investigated the organization, dynamic formation, and carbon flow associated with biofilms of the obligately anaerobic cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum 27405. Using noninvasive, in situ fluorescence imaging, we showed biofilms capable of near complete substrate conversion with a characteristic monolayered cell structure without an extracellular polymeric matrix typically seen in biofilms. Cell division at the interface and terminal endospores appeared throughout all stages of biofilm growth. Using continuous-flow reactors with a rate of dilution (2 h?1) 12-fold higher than the bacterium's maximum growth rate, we compared biofilm activity under low (44 g/liter) and high (202 g/liter) initial cellulose loading. The average hydrolysis rate was over 3-fold higher in the latter case, while the proportions of oligomeric cellulose hydrolysis products lost from the biofilm were 13.7% and 29.1% of the total substrate carbon hydrolyzed, respectively. Fermentative catabolism was comparable between the two cellulose loadings, with ca. 4% of metabolized sugar carbon being utilized for cell production, while 75.4% and 66.7% of the two cellulose loadings, respectively, were converted to primary carbon metabolites (ethanol, acetic acid, lactic acid, carbon dioxide). However, there was a notable difference in the ethanol-to-acetic acid ratio (g/g), measured to be 0.91 for the low cellulose loading and 0.41 for the high cellulose loading. The results suggest that substrate availability for cell attachment rather than biofilm colonization rates govern the efficiency of cellulose conversion. PMID:23087042

  10. A genetic basis for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm antibiotic resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thien-Fah Mah; Betsey Pitts; Brett Pellock; Graham C. Walker; Philip S. Stewart; George A. O'Toole

    2003-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-attached microbial communities with characteristic architecture and phenotypic and biochemical properties distinct from their free-swimming, planktonic counterparts. One of the best-known of these biofilm-specific properties is the development of antibiotic resistance that can be up to 1,000-fold greater than planktonic cells. We report a genetic determinant of this high-level resistance in the Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We

  11. Anti-microbial peptides for plaque control and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Katherine; Chen, Ping; Leung, Kai P

    2009-11-01

    Anti-microbial peptides perform many functions in the oral cavity. They may provide protection against microbial pathogens, assist in oral biofilm control, and function as an important part of the innate immune system in response to local and systemic infection. Synthetic versions of these peptides may be useful to supplement natural anti-microbial peptides or as therapeutic agents. PMID:19998654

  12. Microbial Diversity of Carbonate Chimneys at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field: Implications for Life-Sustaining Systems in Peridotite Seafloor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrenk, M. O.; Cimino, P.; Kelley, D. S.; Baross, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is a novel peridotite-hosted vent environment discovered in Dec. 2000 at 30 N near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This field contains multiple large (up to 60 m), carbonate chimneys venting high pH (9-10), moderate temperature (45-75 C) fluids. The LCHF is unusual in that it is located on 1.5 my-old oceanic crust, 15 km from the nearest spreading axis. Hydrothermal flow in this system is believed to be driven by exothermic serpentinization reactions involving iron-bearing minerals in the underlying seafloor. The conditions created by such reactions, which include significant quantities of dissolved methane and hydrogen, create habitats for microbial communities specifically adapted to this unusual vent environment. Ultramafic, reducing hydrothermal environments like the LCHF may be analogous to geologic settings present on the early Earth, which have been suggested to be important for the emergence of life. Additionally, the existence of hydrothermal environments far away from an active spreading center expands the range of potential life-supporting environments elsewhere in the solar system. To study the abundance and diversity of microbial communities inhabiting the environments that characterize the LCHF, carbonate chimney samples were analyzed by microscopic and molecular methods. Cell densities of between 105 and 107 cells/g were observed within various samples collected from the chimneys. Interestingly, 4-11% of the microbial population in direct contact with vent fluids fluoresced with Flavin-420, a key coenzyme involved in methanogenesis. Enrichment culturing from chimney material under aerobic and anaerobic conditions yielded microorganisms in the thermophilic and mesophilic temperature regimes in media designed for methanogenesis, methane-oxidation, and heterotrophy. PCR analysis of chimney material indicated the presence of both Archaea and Eubacteria in the carbonate samples. SSU rDNA clone libraries constructed from the Eubacterial DNA show that diverse microbial communities, including autotrophic microorganisms and animal symbionts, are contained within the vent structures. In concert, these results indicate that abundant and varied microbial communities inhabit different regions of the chimney structure and may be specifically adapted to the reducing, volatile-rich fluids percolating through the chimneys. In addition to expanding the range of known deep-sea ecosystems, the microbial ecology of carbonate structures associated with hydrothermal venting at the LCHF may provide key insights into the microbiology of subsurface environments near this site. Studying the microbial communities within these systems will enable us to better understand geo-microbial processes associated with serpentinite environments and perhaps allow us to expand our search for life elsewhere in the universe.

  13. Three-Dimensional Stratification of Bacterial Biofilm Populations in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor for Nitritation-Anammox

    PubMed Central

    Almstrand, Robert; Persson, Frank; Daims, Holger; Ekenberg, Maria; Christensson, Magnus; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

    2014-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are increasingly used for nitrogen removal with nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) processes in wastewater treatment. Carriers provide protected surfaces where ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox bacteria form complex biofilms. However, the knowledge about the organization of microbial communities in MBBR biofilms is sparse. We used new cryosectioning and imaging methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to study the structure of biofilms retrieved from carriers in a nitritation-anammox MBBR. The dimensions of the carrier compartments and the biofilm cryosections after FISH showed good correlation, indicating little disturbance of biofilm samples by the treatment. FISH showed that Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha-related cells dominated the AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida-related cells dominated the anammox guild. New carriers were initially colonized by AOB, followed by anammox bacteria proliferating in the deeper biofilm layers, probably in anaerobic microhabitats created by AOB activity. Mature biofilms showed a pronounced three-dimensional stratification where AOB dominated closer to the biofilm-water interface, whereas anammox were dominant deeper into the carrier space and towards the walls. Our results suggest that current mathematical models may be oversimplifying these three-dimensional systems and unless the multidimensionality of these systems is considered, models may result in suboptimal design of MBBR carriers. PMID:24481066

  14. Three-dimensional stratification of bacterial biofilm populations in a moving bed biofilm reactor for nitritation-anammox.

    PubMed

    Almstrand, Robert; Persson, Frank; Daims, Holger; Ekenberg, Maria; Christensson, Magnus; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

    2014-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are increasingly used for nitrogen removal with nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) processes in wastewater treatment. Carriers provide protected surfaces where ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox bacteria form complex biofilms. However, the knowledge about the organization of microbial communities in MBBR biofilms is sparse. We used new cryosectioning and imaging methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to study the structure of biofilms retrieved from carriers in a nitritation-anammox MBBR. The dimensions of the carrier compartments and the biofilm cryosections after FISH showed good correlation, indicating little disturbance of biofilm samples by the treatment. FISH showed that Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha-related cells dominated the AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida-related cells dominated the anammox guild. New carriers were initially colonized by AOB, followed by anammox bacteria proliferating in the deeper biofilm layers, probably in anaerobic microhabitats created by AOB activity. Mature biofilms showed a pronounced three-dimensional stratification where AOB dominated closer to the biofilm-water interface, whereas anammox were dominant deeper into the carrier space and towards the walls. Our results suggest that current mathematical models may be oversimplifying these three-dimensional systems and unless the multidimensionality of these systems is considered, models may result in suboptimal design of MBBR carriers. PMID:24481066

  15. Microbial life in Champagne Pool, a geothermal spring in Waiotapu, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hetzer, Adrian; Morgan, Hugh W; McDonald, Ian R; Daughney, Christopher J

    2007-07-01

    Surveys of Champagne Pool, one of New Zealand's largest terrestrial hot springs and rich in arsenic ions and compounds, have been restricted to geological and geochemical descriptions, and a few microbiological studies applying culture-independent methods. In the current investigation, a combination of culture and culture-independent approaches were chosen to determine microbial density and diversity in Champagne Pool. Recovered total DNA and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) content of spring water revealed relatively low values compared to other geothermal springs within New Zealand and are in good agreement with low cell numbers of 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10(6) cells/ml obtained for Champagne Pool water samples by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA (small-subunit ribosomal nucleic acid) gene clone library analyses of environmental DNA indicated the abundance of Sulfurihydrogenibium, Sulfolobus, and Thermofilum-like populations in Champagne Pool. From these results, media were selected to target the enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing and sulfur-dependent microorganisms. Three isolates were successfully obtained having 16S rRNA gene sequences with similarities of approximately 98% to Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, 94% to Sulfurihydrogenibium azorense, and 99% to Thermococcus waiotapuensis, respectively. PMID:17426919

  16. Microbial life at -13 °C in the brine of an ice-sealed Antarctic lake.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alison E; Kenig, Fabien; Fritsen, Christian H; McKay, Christopher P; Cawley, Kaelin M; Edwards, Ross; Kuhn, Emanuele; McKnight, Diane M; Ostrom, Nathaniel E; Peng, Vivian; Ponce, Adrian; Priscu, John C; Samarkin, Vladimir; Townsend, Ashley T; Wagh, Protima; Young, Seth A; Yung, Pung To; Doran, Peter T

    2012-12-11

    The permanent ice cover of Lake Vida (Antarctica) encapsulates an extreme cryogenic brine ecosystem (-13 °C; salinity, 200). This aphotic ecosystem is anoxic and consists of a slightly acidic (pH 6.2) sodium chloride-dominated brine. Expeditions in 2005 and 2010 were conducted to investigate the biogeochemistry of Lake Vida's brine system. A phylogenetically diverse and metabolically active Bacteria dominated microbial assemblage was observed in the brine. These bacteria live under very high levels of reduced metals, ammonia, molecular hydrogen (H(2)), and dissolved organic carbon, as well as high concentrations of oxidized species of nitrogen (i.e., supersaturated nitrous oxide and ?1 mmol?L(-1) nitrate) and sulfur (as sulfate). The existence of this system, with active biota, and a suite of reduced as well as oxidized compounds, is unusual given the millennial scale of its isolation from external sources of energy. The geochemistry of the brine suggests that abiotic brine-rock reactions may occur in this system and that the rich sources of dissolved electron acceptors prevent sulfate reduction and methanogenesis from being energetically favorable. The discovery of this ecosystem and the in situ biotic and abiotic processes occurring at low temperature provides a tractable system to study habitability of isolated terrestrial cryoenvironments (e.g., permafrost cryopegs and subglacial ecosystems), and is a potential analog for habitats on other icy worlds where water-rock reactions may cooccur with saline deposits and subsurface oceans. PMID:23185006

  17. Mathematical modeling of dormant cell formation in growing biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Shinya; Kagawa, Yuki; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of dormant cells in microbial biofilms, in which the bacteria are embedded in extracellular matrix, is important for developing successful antibiotic therapies against pathogenic bacteria. Although some of the molecular mechanisms leading to bacterial persistence have been speculated in planktonic bacterial cell, how dormant cells emerge in the biofilms of pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains unclear. The present study proposes four hypotheses of dormant cell formation; stochastic process, nutrient-dependent, oxygen-dependent, and time-dependent processes. These hypotheses were implemented into a three-dimensional individual-based model of biofilm formation. Numerical simulations of the different mechanisms yielded qualitatively different spatiotemporal distributions of dormant cells in the growing biofilm. Based on these simulation results, we discuss what kinds of experimental studies are effective for discriminating dormant cell formation mechanisms in biofilms. PMID:26074911

  18. Microbial detection and monitoring in advanced life support systems like the international space station

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra P. van Tongeren; Gerwin C. Raangs; Gjalt W. Welling; Hermie J. M. Harmsen; Janneke Krooneman

    2006-01-01

    Potentially pathogenic microbes and so-called technophiles may form a serious threat in advanced life support systems, such\\u000a as the International Space Station (ISS). They not only pose a threat to the health of the crew, but also to the technical\\u000a equipment and materials of the space station. The development of fast and easy to use molecular detection and quantification\\u000a methods

  19. Prolongation of the microbial shelf life of wrapped part baked baguettes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Doulia; G. Katsinis; B. Mougin

    2000-01-01

    The effect of some factors, such as ethanol content, type of modified atmosphere packaging and UV radiation dose, on the mould free shelf life of wrapped part?baked baguettes has been investigated in comparison with the conventional chemical preservatives as calcium propionate and potassium sorbate. Ethanol content, ranging between 0.5?15% by weight, can cause a significant increase in the mould free

  20. Development of a High-Throughput Candida albicans Biofilm Chip

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Anand; Uppuluri, Priya; Lopez-Ribot, Jose; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a high-density microarray platform consisting of nano-biofilms of Candida albicans. A robotic microarrayer was used to print yeast cells of C. albicans encapsulated in a collagen matrix at a volume as low as 50 nL onto surface-modified microscope slides. Upon incubation, the cells grow into fully formed “nano-biofilms”. The morphological and architectural complexity of these biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The extent of biofilm formation was determined using a microarray scanner from changes in fluorescence intensities due to FUN 1 metabolic processing. This staining technique was also adapted for antifungal susceptibility testing, which demonstrated that, similar to regular biofilms, cells within the on-chip biofilms displayed elevated levels of resistance against antifungal agents (fluconazole and amphotericin B). Thus, results from structural analyses and antifungal susceptibility testing indicated that despite miniaturization, these biofilms display the typical phenotypic properties associated with the biofilm mode of growth. In its final format, the C. albicans biofilm chip (CaBChip) is composed of 768 equivalent and spatially distinct nano-biofilms on a single slide; multiple chips can be printed and processed simultaneously. Compared to current methods for the formation of microbial biofilms, namely the 96-well microtiter plate model, this fungal biofilm chip has advantages in terms of miniaturization and automation, which combine to cut reagent use and analysis time, minimize labor intensive steps, and dramatically reduce assay costs. Such a chip should accelerate the antifungal drug discovery process by enabling rapid, convenient and inexpensive screening of hundreds-to-thousands of compounds simultaneously. PMID:21544190

  1. Biofilm Shows Spatially Stratified Metabolic Responses to Contaminant Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, B.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Sylvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the spatiotemporal responses of live S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42-), important environmental contaminants at DOE contaminated sites. Toward this goal, we applied noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, diffusion, relaxation and spectroscopy techniques to monitor in situ spatiotemporal responses of S. oneidensis biofilms to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure in terms of changes in biofilm structures, diffusion properties, and cellular metabolism. Exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI) did not appear to change the overall biomass distribution but caused changes in the physicochemical microenvironments inside the biofilm as indicated by diffusion measurements. Changes in the diffusion properties of the biofilms in response to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure imply a novel function of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affecting the biotransformation and transport of contaminants in the environment. In the presence of U(VI) or Cr(VI), the anaerobic metabolism of lactate was inhibited significantly, although the biofilms were still capable of reducing U(VI) and Cr(VI). Local concentrations of Cr(III)aq in the biofilm suggested relatively high Cr(VI) reduction activities at the top of the biofilm, near the medium-biofilm interface. The depth-resolved metabolic activities of the biofilm suggested higher diversion effects of gluconeogenesis and C1 metabolism pathways at the bottom of the biofilm and in the presence of U(VI). This study provides a noninvasive means to investigate spatiotemporal responses of biofilms, including surface-associated microbial communities in engineering, natural and medical settings, to various environmental perturbations including exposure to environmental contaminants and antimicrobials.

  2. Impairment of the Bacterial Biofilm Stability by Triclosan Helen V. Lubarsky1,2.

    E-print Network

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Impairment of the Bacterial Biofilm Stability by Triclosan Helen V. Lubarsky1,2. , Sabine U concerns about the impact of this harmful chemical on the biofilms that are the dominant life style, physiological or morphological level. The present paper focuses on bacterial biofilms addressing the possible

  3. EFFECT OF VARYING FLOW REGIMES ON BIOFILM DENSITIES IN A DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maintenance of a free chlorine residual within water distribution systems is used to reduce the possibility of microbial contamination. However, it has been demonstrated that biofilms within water distribution systems can harbor coliforms. In laboratory scale studies, others have...

  4. Protocol for Detection of Biofilms on Needleless Connectors Attached to Central Venous Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, R. M.; Murga, R.; Bell, M.; Toscano, C. M.; Carr, J. H.; Novicki, T. J.; Zuckerman, C.; Corey, L. C.; Miller, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Central venous catheter needleless connectors (NCs) have been shown to develop microbial contamination. A protocol was developed for the collection, processing, and examination of NCs to detect and measure biofilms on these devices. Sixty-three percent of 24 NCs collected from a bone marrow transplant center contained biofilms comprised primarily of coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:11158143

  5. Polymeric substances and biofilms as biomarkers in terrestrial materials: Implications for extraterrestrial samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frances Westall; Andrew Steele; Jan Toporski; Maud Walsh; Carlton Allen; Sean Guidry; David McKay; Everett Gibson; Henry Chafetz

    2000-01-01

    Organic polymeric substances are a fundamental component of microbial biofilms. Microorganisms, especially bacteria, secrete extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to form slime layers in which they reproduce. In the sedimentary environment, biofilms commonly contain the products of degraded bacteria as well as allochthonous and autochthonous mineral components. They are complex structures which serve as protection for the colonies of microorganisms living

  6. Predation, death, and survival in a biofilm: Bdellovibrio investigated by atomic force microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Megan E. Núñez; Mark O. Martin; Phyllis H. Chan; Eileen M. Spain

    2005-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities that are resistant to attack by bacteriophages and to removal by drugs and chemicals. Here we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image the attack on Escherichia coli biofilms by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J. Bdellovibrio is a small, predatory bacterium that invades and devours other Gram-negative bacteria. We demonstrate that under dilute nutrient conditions, bdellovibrios can

  7. Protocol for Detection of Biofilms on Needleless Connectors Attached to Central Venous Catheters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Donlan; R. Murga; M. Bell; C. M. Toscano; J. H. Carr; T. J. Novicki; C. Zuckerman; L. C. Corey; J. M. Miller

    2001-01-01

    Central venous catheter needleless connectors (NCs) have been shown to develop microbial contamination. A protocol was developed for the collection, processing, and examination of NCs to detect and measure biofilms on these devices. Sixty-three percent of 24 NCs collected from a bone marrow transplant center contained biofilms comprised primarily of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  8. BIOFILM REACTORS FOR INDUSTRIAL BIOCONVERSION PROCESSES: EMPLOYING POTENTIAL OF ENHANCED REACTIONS RATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article describes the use of biofilm reactors for the production of various chemicals by fermentation and wastewater treatment. Biofilm formation is a natural process where microbial cells attach to the support (adsorbent) without use of chemicals and form thick layers of cells known as “biofi...

  9. Focusing on Environmental Biofilms With Variable-Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Joubert; G. M. Wolfaardt; K. Du Plessis

    2006-01-01

    Since the term biofilm has been coined almost 30 years ago, visualization has formed an integral part of investigations on microbial attachment. Electron microscopic (EM) biofilm studies, however, have been limited by the hydrated extracellular matrix which loses structural integrity with conventional preparative techniques, and under required high-vacuum conditions, resulting in a loss of information on spatial relationships and distribution

  10. Organic acid based sanitizers and free chlorine to improve the microbial quality and shelf-life of sugar snaps.

    PubMed

    Van Haute, Sam; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Sampers, Imca

    2013-10-15

    A screening in a sugar snap packaging company showed a converged build-up of aerobic psychrotrophic plate count (APC) (ca. 6.5 log CFU/100mL), yeasts and molds (Y&M), and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (both ca. 4.5 log CFU/100mL) in the wash water in the absence of water sanitizer, and a low build-up of chemical oxygen demand (30 ± 5 mg O2/L) and turbidity (5.2 ± 1.1 NTU). Decontamination experiments were performed in the lab with Purac FCC 80® (80% L(+) lactic acid), two other commercial water sanitizers based on organic acids (NATRApHASe-ABAV®, and NATRApHASe-FVS®) and chlorine to evaluate their performance in reduction of the sugar snap microbial load as well as their functionality as disinfectant of the wash water to avoid cross-contamination. An additional 1 log reduction of APC on the sugar snaps was achieved with lactic acid in the range 0.8 to 1.6%, ABAV 0.5%, and free chlorine 200mg/L when compared to a water wash, while no significant difference in the numbers of Y&M was obtained when washing in sanitizer compared to water. There was no significant influence of the studied concentration and contact time on decontamination efficiency. Treatment with lactic acid 0.8% resulted in a lower APC contamination on the sugar snaps than on the untreated and water washed samples for 10 days. Chlorine 200mg/L was the only treatment able to maintain the Y&M load lower than the untreated samples throughout the entire storage duration. The use of water sanitizers could not extend the sensorial shelf-life. Microbial loads were not indicative/predictive of visual microbial spoilage (shelf-life limiting factor), whereas maturity and amount of damage at the calyx end of the pods were. The APC wash water contamination (5.2 log CFU/100mL) was reduced significantly by chlorine 20 to 200mg/L (to 1.4 log CFU/100mL), ABAV 0.5 to 1.5% (to 2.7 log CFU/100mL), FVS 0.5% (to 2.7 log CFU/100mL) and lactic acid 0.8 to 1.6% (to 3.4 log CFU/100mL). Only the use of chlorine enabled the reduction of the Y&M wash water contamination significantly (from 3.4 to 1.4 log CFU/100mL). The low physicochemical build-up of the sugar snap wash water during the industrial washing process makes free chlorine attractive as a water disinfectant to prevent bacterial and fungal cross-contamination, whereas the sanitizers based on organic acids are not, due to their weak water disinfection efficiency. PMID:24135672

  11. Dynamic temperature fields under Mars landing sites and implications for supporting microbial life.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Richard; Kral, Tim; Chevrier, Vincent; Pilgrim, Robert; Roe, Larry

    2010-01-01

    While average temperatures on Mars may be too low to support terrestrial life-forms or aqueous liquids, diurnal peak temperatures over most of the planet can be high enough to provide for both, down to a few centimeters beneath the surface for some fraction of the time. A thermal model was applied to the Viking 1, Viking 2, Pathfinder, Spirit, and Opportunity landing sites to demonstrate the dynamic temperature fields under the surface at these well-characterized locations. A benchmark temperature of 253 K was used as a lower limit for possible metabolic activity, which corresponds to the minimum found for specific terrestrial microorganisms. Aqueous solutions of salts known to exist on Mars can provide liquid solutions well below this temperature. Thermal modeling has shown that 253 K is reached beneath the surface at diurnal peak heating for at least some parts of the year at each of these landing sites. Within 40 degrees of the equator, 253 K beneath the surface should occur for at least some fraction of the year; and, within 20 degrees , it will be seen for most of the year. However, any life-form that requires this temperature to thrive must also endure daily excursions to far colder temperatures as well as periods of the year where 253 K is never reached at all. PMID:20735254

  12. Short Communication A rapid selection strategy for an anodophilic consortium for microbial fuel cells

    E-print Network

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) a b s t r a c t A rapid selection method was developed to enrich for a stable and efficient anodophilic consortium (AC) for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). A biofilm sample from a microbial. Introduction Current generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is dependent on the presence of exoelectrogenic

  13. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani, Sahar, E-mail: ssoleima@connect.carleton.ca; Isgor, O. Burkan, E-mail: burkan_isgor@carleton.ca; Ormeci, Banu, E-mail: banu_ormeci@carleton.ca

    2013-11-15

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5? biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ? 30 ?m before acidification to ? 60 ?m after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5? biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5? biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  14. Focusing on Environmental Biofilms With Variable-Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert, L.; Wolfaardt, G. M.; Du Plessis, K.

    2006-12-01

    Since the term biofilm has been coined almost 30 years ago, visualization has formed an integral part of investigations on microbial attachment. Electron microscopic (EM) biofilm studies, however, have been limited by the hydrated extracellular matrix which loses structural integrity with conventional preparative techniques, and under required high-vacuum conditions, resulting in a loss of information on spatial relationships and distribution of biofilm microbes. Recent advances in EM technology enable the application of Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscopy (VP SEM) to biofilms, allowing low vacuum and hydrated chamber atmosphere during visualization. Environmental biofilm samples can be viewed in situ, unfixed and fully hydrated, with application of gold-sputter-coating only, to increase image resolution. As the impact of microbial biofilms can be both hazardous and beneficial to man and his environment, recognition of biofilms as a natural form of microbial existence is needed to fully assess the potential role of microbial communities on technology. The integration of multiple techniques to elucidate biofilm processes has become imperative for unraveling complex phenotypic adaptations of this microbial lifestyle. We applied VP SEM as integrative technique with traditional and novel analytical techniques to (1)localize lignocellulosic microbial consortia applied for producing alternative bio-energy sources in the mining wastewater industry, (2) characterize and visualize wetland microbial communities in the treatment of winery wastewater, and (3)determine the impact of recombinant technology on yeast biofilm behavior. Visualization of microbial attachment to a lignocellulose substrate, and degradation of exposed plant tissue, gave insight into fiber degradation and volatile fatty acid production for biological sulphate removal from mining wastewater. Also, the 3D-architecture of complex biofilms developing in constructed wetlands was correlated with molecular fingerprints of wetland communities using tRFLP (Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) - and gave evidence of temporal and spatial variation in a wetland system, to potentially be applied as management tool in wastewater treatment. Visualization of differences in biofilm development by wild and recombinant yeast strains furthermore supported real-time quantitative data of biofilm development by Cryptococcus laurentii and Saccharomyces yeast strains. In all cases VP SEM allowed a more holistic interpretation of biofilm processes than afforded by quantitative empirical data only.

  15. Simulation of batch-operated experimental wetland mesocosms in AQUASIM biofilm reactor compartment.

    PubMed

    Mburu, Njenga; Rousseau, Diederik P L; Stein, Otto R; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-02-15

    In this study, a mathematical biofilm reactor model based on the structure of the Constructed Wetland Model No.1 (CWM1) coupled to AQUASIM's biofilm reactor compartment has been used to reproduce the sequence of transformation and degradation of organic matter, nitrogen and sulphur observed in a set of constructed wetland mesocosms and to elucidate the development over time of microbial species as well as the biofilm thickness of a multispecies bacterial biofilm in a subsurface constructed wetland. Experimental data from 16 wetland mesocosms operated under greenhouse conditions, planted with three different plant species (Typha latifolia, Carex rostrata, Schoenoplectus acutus) and an unplanted control were used in the calibration of this mechanistic model. Within the mesocosms, a thin (predominantly anaerobic) biofilm was simulated with an initial thickness of 49 ?m (average) and in which no concentration gradients developed. The biofilm density and area, and the distribution of the microbial species within the biofilm were evaluated to be the most sensitive biofilm properties; while the substrate diffusion limitations were not significantly sensitive to influence the bulk volume concentrations. The simulated biofilm density ranging between 105,000 and 153,000 gCOD/m(3) in the mesocosms was observed to vary with temperature, the presence as well as the species of macrophyte. The biofilm modeling was found to be a better tool than the suspended bacterial modeling approach to show the influence of the rhizosphere configuration on the performance of the constructed wetlands. PMID:24468449

  16. Biofilms: the matrix revisited

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven S. Branda; Åshild Vik; Lisa Friedman; Roberto Kolter

    2005-01-01

    Microbes often construct and live within surface-associ- ated multicellular communities known as biofilms. The precise structure, chemistry and physiology of the biofilm all vary with the nature of its resident microbes and local environment. However, an important com- monality among biofilms is that their structural integrity critically depends upon an extracellular matrix produced by their constituent cells. Extracellular matrices might

  17. Particle-Based Multidimensional Multispecies Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Picioreanu, Cristian; Kreft, Jan-Ulrich; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe a spatially multidimensional (two-dimensional [2-D] and three-dimensional [3-D]) particle-based approach for modeling the dynamics of multispecies biofilms growing on multiple substrates. The model is based on diffusion-reaction mass balances for chemical species coupled with microbial growth and spreading of biomass represented by hard spherical particles. Effectively, this is a scaled-up version of a previously proposed individual-based biofilm model. Predictions of this new particle-based model were quantitatively compared with those obtained with an established one-dimensional (1-D) multispecies model for equivalent problems. A nitrifying biofilm containing aerobic ammonium and nitrite oxidizers, anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, and inert biomass was chosen as an example. The 2-D and 3-D models generally gave the same results. If only the average flux of nutrients needs to be known, 2-D and 1-D models are very similar. However, the behavior of intermediates, which are produced and consumed in different locations within the biofilm, is better described in 2-D and 3-D models because of the multidirectional concentration gradients. The predictions of 2-D or 3-D models are also different from those of 1-D models for slowly growing or minority species in the biofilm. This aspect is related to the mechanism of biomass spreading or advection implemented in the models and should receive more attention in future experimental studies. PMID:15128564

  18. Mannosylated liposomes for bio-film targeting.

    PubMed

    Vyas, S P; Sihorkar, Vaibhav; Jain, Sanyog

    2007-02-01

    Vesicular systems in general are investigated to achieve bacterial bio-film targeting as their architecture mimics bio-membranes in terms of structure and bio-behavior. This paper elaborates upon the role of the inherent characteristics of the carrier system and further envisages the role of anchored ligands in navigating the contents in the vicinity of bio-films. Vesicles in the present study were coated with hydrophobic derivatives of mannan (cholesteryl mannan and sialo-mannan). The prepared vesicles were characterized for size, shape, percentage entrapment and ligand binding specificity and results were compared with the uncoated versions. Using a set of in vitro and in vivo models, the bio-film targeting potential of plain and mannosylated liposomal formulations were compared. Results suggested that mannosylated vesicles could be effectively targeted to the model bacterial bio-films, compared with plain vesicles. Moreover, the sialo-mannan coated liposomes recorded superior targetability as reflected in the significantly higher percentage growth inhibition when compared with cholesteryl mannan coated liposomes. The engineered systems thus have the potential use for the delivery of anti-microbial agents to the bio-films. PMID:16997519

  19. Sulfate- and Sulfur-Reducing Bacteria as Terrestrial Analogs for Microbial Life on Jupiter's Satellite Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations from the Voyager and Galileo spacecraft have revealed Jupiter's moon Io to be the most volcanically active body of our Solar System. The Galileo Near Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (NIMS) detected extensive deposits of sulfur compounds, elemental sulfur and SO2 frost on the surface of Io. There are extreme temperature variations on Io's surface, ranging from -130 C to over 2000 C at the Pillan Patera volcanic vent. The active volcanoes, fumaroles, calderas, and lava lakes and vast sulfur deposits on this frozen moon indicate that analogs of sulfur- and sulfate-reducing bacteria might inhabit Io. Hence Io may have great significance to Astrobiology. Earth's life forms that depend on sulfur respiration are members of two domains: Bacteria and Archaea. Two basic links of the biogeochemical sulfur cycle of Earth have been studied: 1) the sulfur oxidizing process (occurring at aerobic conditions) and 2) the process of sulfur-reduction to hydrogen sulfide (anaerobic conditions). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (StRB) and sulfur-reducing bacteria (SrRB) are responsible for anaerobic reducing processes. At the present time the systematics of StRB include over 112 species distributed into 35 genera of Bacteria and Archaea. Moderately thermophilic and mesophilic SrRB belong to the Bacteria. The hyperthermophilic SrRB predominately belong to the domain Archaea and are included in the genera: Pyrodictium, Thermoproteus, Pyrobaculum, Thermophilum, Desulfurococcus, and Thermodiscus. The StRB and SrRB use a wide spectrum of substrates as electron donors for lithotrophic and heterotrophic type nutrition. The electron acceptors for the StRB include: sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, sulfur, arsenate, dithionite, tetrathionate, sulfur monoxide, iron, nitrite, selenite, fumarate, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and chlorine-containing phenol compounds. The Sulfate- and Sulfur-reducing bacteria are widely distributed in anaerobic ecosystems, including extreme environments like hot springs, deepsea hydrothermal vents, soda and high salinity lakes, and cryo-environments. Furthermore, the StRB and SrRB have Astrobiological significance as these anaerobic extremophiles may represent the dominant relic life forms that inhabited our planet during the extensive volcanic activity in the Earth's early evolutionary period.

  20. Bacterial biofilms of importance to medicine and bioterrorism: proteomic techniques to identify novel vaccine components and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Daniel J; Limbach, Patrick A; Hennigan, Robert F; Klose, Karl E; Hancock, Robert E W; Platt, Mark D; Hunt, Donald F

    2003-12-01

    Biofilms are highly ordered microbial communities enmeshed in a carefully sculpted matrix designed for survival of organisms either in multi- or mono-genus/species in a specific microniche. In human disease, biofilm infections are some of the most recalcitrant to treat. Even with rigorous antibiotic regimens, some biofilms, such as those within the thick airway mucus of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, persist throughout the course of the disease process. In this editorial, discussion will cover the utility of using advanced proteomic techniques to help identify potential weaknesses in the already impressive defensive armamentarium of biofilm bacteria. Two biofilm systems will be discussed herein, one of which is that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms within CF airway biofilms. The other is referred to as persistent 'bioterrorist agent biofilms' in which Francisella tularensis can grow on surfaces where environmental amoeba can phagocytose them, allowing for growth of F. tularensis within the amoebae. PMID:14640945

  1. Opportunistic pathogens enriched in showerhead biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Feazel, Leah M.; Baumgartner, Laura K.; Peterson, Kristen L.; Frank, Daniel N.; Harris, J. Kirk; Pace, Norman R.

    2009-01-01

    The environments we humans encounter daily are sources of exposure to diverse microbial communities, some of potential concern to human health. In this study, we used culture-independent technology to investigate the microbial composition of biofilms inside showerheads as ecological assemblages in the human indoor environment. Showers are an important interface for human interaction with microbes through inhalation of aerosols, and showerhead waters have been implicated in disease. Although opportunistic pathogens commonly are cultured from shower facilities, there is little knowledge of either their prevalence or the nature of other microorganisms that may be delivered during shower usage. To determine the composition of showerhead biofilms and waters, we analyzed rRNA gene sequences from 45 showerhead sites around the United States. We find that variable and complex, but specific, microbial assemblages occur inside showerheads. Particularly striking was the finding that sequences representative of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and other opportunistic human pathogens are enriched to high levels in many showerhead biofilms, >100-fold above background water contents. We conclude that showerheads may present a significant potential exposure to aerosolized microbes, including documented opportunistic pathogens. The health risk associated with showerhead microbiota needs investigation in persons with compromised immune or pulmonary systems. PMID:19805310

  2. Community structure and biogeochemical impacts of microbial life on floating pumice.

    PubMed

    Elser, J J; Bastidas Navarro, M; Corman, J R; Emick, H; Kellom, M; Laspoumaderes, C; Lee, Z M; Poret-Peterson, A T; Balseiro, E; Modenutti, B

    2015-03-01

    Volcanic eruptions are a widespread force of geological and ecological disturbance and present recurrent opportunities for the study of biological responses to novel habitat formation. However, scientific study of such events is difficult given their short duration and often distant location. Here we report results from opportunistic sampling of unique volcano-generated habitats formed during the 2011 explosive eruption in the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle complex (Chile), when massive amounts of pumice were ejected, creating novel floating substrata that have never before been characterized from a microbiological perspective. DNA sequencing revealed a dynamic community of microbes that came to inhabit the pumice, with a unique composition distinct from that of the lakes' surface waters and with suggestions of ecological convergence across lakes and sampling times. Furthermore, biogeochemical studies of net nutrient fluxes showed that, while the fresh pumice arriving to the lakes was an initial source of phosphorus (P), colonized pumice had high rates of nitrogen (N) and P uptake and was sufficiently abundant to represent a significant lake-wide nutrient sink. These findings highlight the remarkable versatility of microbes in exploiting novel environments and are consistent with a recent proposal of floating pumice as a favorable environment for the initial origins of life on early Earth. PMID:25527547

  3. Biofouling and microbial communities in membrane distillation and reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Zodrow, Katherine R; Bar-Zeev, Edo; Giannetto, Michael J; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-11-18

    Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging desalination technology that uses low-grade heat to drive water vapor across a microporous hydrophobic membrane. Currently, little is known about the biofilms that grow on MD membranes. In this study, we use estuarine water collected from Long Island Sound in a bench-scale direct contact MD system to investigate the initial stages of biofilm formation. For comparison, we studied biofilm formation in a bench-scale reverse osmosis (RO) system using the same feedwater. These two membrane desalination systems expose the natural microbial community to vastly different environmental conditions: high temperatures with no hydraulic pressure in MD and low temperature with hydraulic pressure in RO. Over the course of 4 days, we observed a steady decline in bacteria concentration (nearly 2 orders of magnitude) in the MD feed reservoir. Even with this drop in planktonic bacteria, significant biofilm formation was observed. Biofilm morphologies on MD and RO membranes were markedly different. MD membrane biofilms were heterogeneous and contained several colonies, while RO membrane biofilms, although thicker, were a homogeneous mat. Phylogenetic analysis using next-generation sequencing of 16S rDNA showed significant shifts in the microbial communities. Bacteria representing the orders Burkholderiales, Rhodobacterales, and Flavobacteriales were most abundant in the MD biofilms. On the basis of the results, we propose two different regimes for microbial community shifts and biofilm development in RO and MD systems. PMID:25295386

  4. Quantifying Biofilm in Porous Media Using Rock Physics Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhadhrami, F. M.; Jaiswal, P.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Biofilm formation and growth in porous rocks can change their material properties such as porosity, permeability which in turn will impact fluid flow. Finding a non-intrusive method to quantify biofilms and their byproducts in rocks is a key to understanding and modeling bioclogging in porous media. Previous geophysical investigations have documented that seismic techniques are sensitive to biofilm growth. These studies pointed to the fact that microbial growth and biofilm formation induces heterogeneity in the seismic properties. Currently there are no rock physics models to explain these observations and to provide quantitative interpretation of the seismic data. Our objectives are to develop a new class of rock physics model that incorporate microbial processes and their effect on seismic properties. Using the assumption that biofilms can grow within pore-spaces or as a layer coating the mineral grains, P-wave velocity (Vp) and S-wave (Vs) velocity models were constructed using travel-time and waveform tomography technique. We used generic rock physics schematics to represent our rock system numerically. We simulated the arrival times as well as waveforms by treating biofilms either as fluid (filling pore spaces) or as part of matrix (coating sand grains). The preliminary results showed that there is a 1% change in Vp and 3% change in Vs when biofilms are represented discrete structures in pore spaces. On the other hand, a 30% change in Vp and 100% change in Vs was observed when biofilm was represented as part of matrix coating sand grains. Therefore, Vp and Vs changes are more rapid when biofilm grows as grain-coating phase. The significant change in Vs associated with biofilms suggests that shear velocity can be used as a diagnostic tool for imaging zones of bioclogging in the subsurface. The results obtained from this study have significant implications for the study of the rheological properties of biofilms in geological media. Other applications include assessing biofilms used as barriers in CO2 sequestration studies as well as assisting in evaluating microbial enhanced oil recovery methods (MEOR), where microorganisms are used to plug highly porous rocks for efficient oil production.

  5. Anodic and cathodic microbial communities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Daghio, Matteo; Gandolfi, Isabella; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Franzetti, Andrea; Guerrini, Edoardo; Cristiani, Pierangela

    2015-01-25

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a rapidly growing technology for energy production from wastewater and biomasses. In a MFC, a microbial biofilm oxidizes organic matter and transfers electrons from reduced compounds to an anode as the electron acceptor by extracellular electron transfer (EET). The aim of this work was to characterize the microbial communities operating in a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell (SCMFC) fed with acetate and inoculated with a biogas digestate in order to gain more insight into anodic and cathodic EET. Taxonomic characterization of the communities was carried out by Illumina sequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Microorganisms belonging to Geovibrio genus and purple non-sulfur (PNS) bacteria were found to be dominant in the anodic biofilm. The alkaliphilic genus Nitrincola and anaerobic microorganisms belonging to Porphyromonadaceae family were the most abundant bacteria in the cathodic biofilm. PMID:25291711

  6. Drinking water quality and formation of biofilms in an office building during its first year of operation, a full scale study.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Jenni; Kaunisto, Tuija; Pursiainen, Anna; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Kusnetsov, Jaana; Riihinen, Kalle; Keinänen-Toivola, Minna M

    2014-02-01

    Complex interactions existing between water distribution systems' materials and water can cause a reduction in water quality and unwanted changes in materials, aging or corrosion of materials and formation of biofilms on surfaces. Substances leaching from pipe materials and water fittings, as well as the microbiological quality of water and formation of biofilms were evaluated by applying a Living Lab theme i.e. a research in a real life setting using a full scale system during its first year of operation. The study site was a real office building with one part of the building lined with copper pipes, the other with cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) pipes thus enabling material comparison; also differences within the cold and hot water systems were analysed. It was found that operational conditions, such as flow conditions and temperature affected the amounts of metals leaching from the pipe network. In particular, brass components were considered to be a source of leaching; e. g. the lead concentration was highest during the first few weeks after the commissioning of the pipe network when the water was allowed to stagnate. Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and microbially available phosphorus (MAP) were found to leach from PEX pipelines with minor effects on biomass of the biofilm. Cultivable and viable biomass (heterotrophic plate count (HPC), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)) levels in biofilms were higher in the cold than in the hot water system whereas total microbial biomass (total cell count (DAPI)) was similar with both systems. The type of pipeline material was not found to greatly affect the microbial biomass or Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria profiles (16s rRNA gene copies) after the first one year of operation. Also microbiological quality of water was found to deteriorate due to stagnation. PMID:24317021

  7. Microbial fuel cell with improved anode

    DOEpatents

    Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2010-04-13

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing a microbial fuel cell, wherein the method includes: (i) inoculating an anodic liquid medium in contact with an anode of the microbial fuel cell with one or more types of microorganisms capable of functioning by an exoelectrogenic mechanism; (ii) establishing a biofilm of the microorganisms on and/or within the anode along with a substantial absence of planktonic forms of the microorganisms by substantial removal of the planktonic microorganisms during forced flow and recirculation conditions of the anodic liquid medium; and (iii) subjecting the microorganisms of the biofilm to a growth stage by incorporating one or more carbon-containing nutritive compounds in the anodic liquid medium during biofilm formation or after biofilm formation on the anode has been established.

  8. Biofilms on medical devices.

    PubMed

    Talsma, Silke S

    2007-10-01

    Biofilm consists of microorganisms with altered phenotypes living in a self-organized, cooperative community attached to surfaces and each other and embedded in a self-produced matrix of exopolymer saccharides. Biofilms are relevant for home care and hospice clinicians because they are related to the majority of infectious diseases. Colonization of medical devices plays a key role in the problem of healthcare-associated infections. This article aims to provide an overview of the science of biofilms. Understanding biofilms and the risks associated with them is the first step toward prevention of biofilm formation and the potentially serious outcomes of infections. PMID:18049256

  9. TOF-SIMS imaging of chlorhexidine-digluconate transport in frozen hydrated biofilms of the fungus Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Bonnie J.; Rangaranjan, Srinath; Möller, Jörg; Beumer, Andre'; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.

    2006-07-01

    The diffusion of the anti-microbial chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) has been studied in C. albicans biofilms by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). C. albicans has been shown to become resistant to common anti-microbial agents, including CHG, when growing as a biofilm. Mass transport resistance within biofilms has commonly been suggested as a resistance mechanism, but measurement of transport for most anti-microbial agents in biofilms has proven extremely difficult because of the heterogeneity of the biofilms and the difficulty in detecting these agents within an intact biofilm. In this study, TOF-SIMS has been used to study the transport of CHG and glucose in a frozen hydrated biofilm. The TOF-SIMS images reveal a progression of CHG from the top of the biofilm to its base with time. Images suggest that there are channels within the biofilm and show preferential binding of CHG to cellular components of the biofilm. Additionally, both living and dead cells can be identified in the TOF-SIMS images by the sequestration of K + and the presence of cell markers. This study demonstrates that TOF-SIMS has the unique potential to simultaneously observe the presence of an antimicrobial agent, concentration of nutrients, and the viability of the cell population.

  10. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  11. Gene transfer occurs with enhanced efficiency in biofilms and induces enhanced stabilisation of the biofilm structure.

    PubMed

    Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-06-01

    There has been much interest in bioremediation based on the introduction of bacteria able to catabolise recalcitrant compounds deposited in the environment. In particular, the delivery of catabolic information in the form of conjugative plasmids to bacterial populations in situ has great potential. As most bacteria in the environment live in surface-associated communities (biofilms), the gene transfer systems within these communities need to be better characterised for bio-enhancement strategies to be developed. Recent findings suggest that gene transfer does take place within biofilms, but studies also identified limitations and bottlenecks of the process. The dense population structure in biofilms increases plasmid dispersal by conjugation, and the conjugation mechanism itself may stimulate biofilm development. Moreover, DNA release and transformation seem to be part of a biofilm-related life cycle and released DNA stabilises the biofilm structure. Both of these gene-transfer mechanisms may be autocatalytically promoted in biofilms, presenting new possibilities for efficient bio-enhancement strategies. PMID:12849777

  12. [Atrazine wastewater treatment in a SPG membrane-aerated genetically engineered microorganism biofilm reactor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Gong, Peng-Fei; Xiao, Tai-Min; Zhang, Ming; Nian, Yong-Jia; Yang, Jing-Liang; Zhang, Jing

    2014-08-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) represent a novel membrane-biological wastewater treatment technology. In addition, bioaugmented treatment using genetically engineered microorganism (GEM) biofilm in MABR is proposed to improve refractory pollutant removal. In the present study, a SPG membrane aerated-biofilm reactor (SPG-MABR) with GEM biofilm formed on the SPG membrane surface was applied to treat atrazine wastewater. The influences of air pressure, biofilm biomass and liquid velocity on the performance of the SPG-MABR were investigated. The variation of GEM biofilm during the SPG-MABR operation was observed. The results indicated that the increased air pressure could promote atrazine and COD removal as well as re-oxygenation by increasing oxygen permeability coefficient. A higher biofilm biomass could also enhance atrazine and COD removal, but simultaneously reduce the re-oxygenation rate because biofilm thickness and oxygen transfer resistance increased. When liquid velocity in the SPG-MABR was decreased under laminar flow condition, atrazine and COD removal was improved due to the facilitated contaminant diffusion from wastewater to biofilm. The atrazine removal efficiency reached to 98.6% in the SPG-MABR after 5d treatment at air pressure of 300 kPa, biofilm biomass of 25 g x m(-2) and liquid velocity of 0.05 m x s(-1). The microbial polymorphism of GEM biofilm was observed during the SPG-MABR operation. The surface of GEM biofilm was gradually covered by other microbial cells and the distribution of GEM cells reduced, but inside the GEM biofilm, the GEM cells were still dominant. PMID:25338374

  13. Anti-Biofilm Efficacy of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Silica Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.; Shin, Jae Ho; Paul, Heather S.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing silica nanoparticles to kill biofilm-based microbial cells is reported. Biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Candida albicans were formed in vitro and exposed to NO-releasing silica nanoparticles. Replicative viability experiments revealed that ? 99% of cells from each type of biofilm were killed via NO release, with the greatest efficacy (? 99.999% killing) against gram-negative P. aeruginosa and E. coli biofilms. Cytotoxicity testing demonstrated that the highest dose of NO-releasing silica nanoparticles inhibited fibroblast proliferation to a lesser extent than clinical concentrations of currently-administered antiseptics (e.g., chlorhexidine) with proven wound-healing benefits. This study demonstrates the promise of employing nanoparticles for delivering an antimicrobial agent to microbial biofilms. PMID:19233464

  14. Exploring life's limits: Deep geobiochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    N-dimensional chemical space on Earth and beyond produces diverse habitats for microbial activity. Hydrothermal environments cover a wide range of habitable space up to and including life's known limits and provide a window into deep geological, geochemical, and biological processes. Hydrothermal water compositions, as sampled from and measured in terrestrial hot springs on Earth's surface, vary in chemical constituent speciation and concentrations over orders of magnitude in a plethora of geochemical parameters with biological significance, including hydronium ion, sulfide, iron, zinc, magnesium, manganese, and molybdenum. Proteins provide a link between geochemistry and microbial activity by catalyzing chemical reactions. Proteins extracted and identified by tandem mass spectrometry from 13 hot spring sediments and biofilms - covering pH values from 2-9 and diverse geochemical compositions - function as efflux transporters, permeases, electron transporters, and others, suggesting that these processes were present in the environment and occurring at the time of sampling. Metalloenzymes have been identified, including the iron protein rubrerythrin, thought to be involved in oxidative stress protection in anaerobic bacteria and archaea, as well as proteins involved in macronutrient processing (carbon, phosphorus, nitrogen, and sulfur). The melding of biochemistry with geochemistry shows potential for quantifying microbial activity in deep environments by demonstrating the presence - and as techniques improve, relative abundances - of reaction-catalyzing enzymes. Moreover, using hot spring sources and their outflow channels as chemical and biological models of geologic time helps decipher the origin and co-evolution of life and geochemistry.

  15. Microbiological evaluation of a range of disinfectant products to control mixed-species biofilm contamination in a laboratory model of a dental unit water system.

    PubMed

    Walker, J T; Bradshaw, D J; Fulford, M R; Marsh, P D

    2003-06-01

    Dental unit water system (DUWS) tubing harbors complex multispecies biofilms that are responsible for high microbial levels at the distal outlet. The aim of this study was to use an established biofilm laboratory model to simulate biofouling of DUWS to evaluate practical, cost-effective, and evidence-based methods of microbial decontamination. Reproducible biofilms were developed in the model over 14 days; decontamination was assessed using total viable counts (TVC) and microscopic-image analysis techniques to view the inner surface of tubing. Flushing did not reduce the biofilm coverage or TVC. Combizyme and ozone did not completely eliminate the viable bacteria (70 and 65% reduction in biofilm TVC, respectively), nor did they remove the biofilm (45 and 57% reduction in biofilm coverage, respectively). Chlorhexidine and Bio2000 (active agent: ethanol and chlorhexidine), Tegodor and Gigasept Rapid (aldehyde based), and Grotanol (hydroxide based) completely eliminated the TVC but did not completely remove biofilm (31, 53 33, 34, and 64.9% reduction of biofilm coverage, respectively). Other products including Grotanol Flussig (phenol based), Betadine (povidone-iodine based), Alpron (chlorite based), and the hydroxide-containing products Sporklenz, Sterilex Ultra, Dialox, Sterilox, Sanosil, Oxigenal, and Grotanat Bohrerbad resulted in a 100% reduction in the biofilm TVC and a >95% reduction in biofilm coverage. The study demonstrated that while many disinfectants achieve a sufficient reduction in TVC they may not necessarily remove unwanted biofilm from the tubing surfaces as tested in this laboratory-controlled biofilm model. PMID:12788733

  16. Microbiological Evaluation of a Range of Disinfectant Products To Control Mixed-Species Biofilm Contamination in a Laboratory Model of a Dental Unit Water System

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J. T.; Bradshaw, D. J.; Fulford, M. R.; Marsh, P. D.

    2003-01-01

    Dental unit water system (DUWS) tubing harbors complex multispecies biofilms that are responsible for high microbial levels at the distal outlet. The aim of this study was to use an established biofilm laboratory model to simulate biofouling of DUWS to evaluate practical, cost-effective, and evidence-based methods of microbial decontamination. Reproducible biofilms were developed in the model over 14 days; decontamination was assessed using total viable counts (TVC) and microscopic-image analysis techniques to view the inner surface of tubing. Flushing did not reduce the biofilm coverage or TVC. Combizyme and ozone did not completely eliminate the viable bacteria (70 and 65% reduction in biofilm TVC, respectively), nor did they remove the biofilm (45 and 57% reduction in biofilm coverage, respectively). Chlorhexidine and Bio2000 (active agent: ethanol and chlorhexidine), Tegodor and Gigasept Rapid (aldehyde based), and Grotanol (hydroxide based) completely eliminated the TVC but did not completely remove biofilm (31, 53 33, 34, and 64.9% reduction of biofilm coverage, respectively). Other products including Grotanol Flussig (phenol based), Betadine (povidone-iodine based), Alpron (chlorite based), and the hydroxide-containing products Sporklenz, Sterilex Ultra, Dialox, Sterilox, Sanosil, Oxigenal, and Grotanat Bohrerbad resulted in a 100% reduction in the biofilm TVC and a >95% reduction in biofilm coverage. The study demonstrated that while many disinfectants achieve a sufficient reduction in TVC they may not necessarily remove unwanted biofilm from the tubing surfaces as tested in this laboratory-controlled biofilm model. PMID:12788733

  17. The impacts of ozonation on oil sands process-affected water biodegradability and biofilm formation characteristics in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geelsu; Dong, Tao; Islam, Md Sahinoor; Sheng, Zhiya; Pérez-Estrada, Leónidas A; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2013-02-01

    To examine the effects of the ozonation process (as an oxidation treatment for water and wastewater treatment applications) on microbial biofilm formation and biodegradability of organic compounds present in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), biofilm reactors were operated continuously for 6weeks. Two types of biofilm substrate materials: polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC), and two types of OSPW-fresh and ozonated OSPWs-were tested. Endogenous microorganisms, in OSPW, quickly formed biofilms in the reactors. Without ozonation, the bioreactor (using endogenous microorganisms) removed 13.8% of the total acid-extractable organics (TAO) and 18.5% of the parent naphthenic acids (NAs) from fresh OSPW. The combined ozonation and biodegradation process removed 87.2% of the OSPW TAO and over 99% of the OSPW parent NAs. Further UPLC/HRMS analysis showed that NA biodegradability decreased as the NA cyclization number increased. Microbial biofilm formation was found to depend on the biofilm substrate type. PMID:23313671

  18. Effect of Fluoride and Chlorhexidine Digluconate Mouthrinses on Plaque Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Rabe, Per; Twetman, Svante; Kinnby, Bertil; Svensäter, Gunnel; Davies, Julia R

    2015-01-01

    Objective : To develop a model in which to investigate the architecture of plaque biofilms formed on enamel surfaces in vivo and to compare the effects of anti-microbial agents of relevance for caries on biofilm vitality. Materials and Methodology : Enamel discs mounted on healing abutments in the pre-molar region were worn by three subjects for 7 days. Control discs were removed before subjects rinsed with 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) or 0.2% sodium fluoride (NaF) for 1 minute. Biofilms were stained with Baclight Live/Dead and z-stacks of images created using confocal scanning laser micoscopy. The levels of vital and dead/damaged bacteria in the biofilms, assessed as the proportion of green and red pixels respectively, were analysed using ImageTrak® software. Results : The subjects showed individual differences in biofilm architecture. The thickness of the biofilms varied from 28-96µm although cell density was always the greatest in the middle layers. In control biofilms, the overall levels of vitality were high (71-98%) especially in the area closest to the enamel interface. Rinsing with either CHX or NaF caused a similar reduction in overall vitality. CHX exerted an effect throughout the biofilm, particularly on the surface of cell clusters whereas NaF caused cell damage/death mainly in the middle to lower biofilm layers. Conclusion : We describe a model that allows the formation of mature, undisturbed oral biofilms on human enamel surfaces in vivo and show that CHX and NaF have a similar effect on overall vitality but differ in their sites of action. PMID:25870718

  19. Optimal Biofilm Featues: metabolic and geometric response to multiple oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempes, C.; Okegbe, C.; Mears-Clarke, Z.; Follows, M. J.; Dietrich, L.

    2014-12-01

    An important challenge in understanding complex microbial mat communities is determining how groups of a single species balance metabolic requirements with the dynamics of resource supply. We have investigated this problem in the context of redox resources within a single-species bacterial biofilm. We developed a mathematical model of oxidant availability and metabolic response within biofilm features and we show that observed biofilm geometries maximize cellular reproduction and growth efficiency. Our model accurately predicts the measured distribution of two types of electron acceptors: oxygen, which is available from the environment, and phenazines, redox-active small molecules produced by the bacterium. Because our model is based on resource dynamics, we are also able to predict observed shifts in feature geometry based on changes in the availability of redox resources such as variations in the external availability of oxygen or the removal of phenazines. This analysis suggests various avenues for understanding microstructure and the evolution of spatial metabolism in microbial mats.

  20. Biofilm quantification on stone surfaces: comparison of various methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Prieto; B. Silva; O. Lantes

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the efficacy of three different methods of estimating biofilm biomass on stone (amount of chlorophyll a, fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis and changes in colour) is discussed. Stone samples were sprayed with solutions of cyanobacteria and the actual microbial biomass—determined by cell culture—was compared with the biomass estimated using the different methods. Statistically significant differences between actual biomass

  1. Corrosion inhibition of mild steel by aerobic biofilm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shobhana Chongdar; G. Gunasekaran; Pradeep Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Mild steel electrodes were incubated in phosphate-buffered basal salt solution (BSS) having two different aerobic bacteria, viz. Pseudomonas alcaligenes and Pseudomonas cichorii. In the medium containing P. cichorii, significant reduction in the corrosion rate was observed due to the surface reaction leading to the formation of corrosion inhibiting bacterial biofilm. With a view to understand the mechanism of microbially influenced

  2. Monte-Carlo Simulations of Drug Delivery on Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldum, Alper; Simpson, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The focus of this work is on biofilms that grow in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. A discrete model which describes the nutrient and biomass as discrete particles is created. Diffusion of the nutrient, consumption of the nutrient by microbial particles, and growth and decay of microbial particles are simulated using stochastic processes. Our model extends the complexity of the biofilm system by including the conversion and reversion of living bacteria into a hibernated state, known as persister bacteria. Another new contribution is the inclusion of antimicrobial in two forms: an aqueous solution and encapsulated in biodegradable nanoparticles. The bacteria population growth and spatial variation of drugs and their effectiveness are investigated in this work. The focus of this work is on biofilms that grow in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. A discrete model which describes the nutrient and biomass as discrete particles is created. Diffusion of the nutrient, consumption of the nutrient by microbial particles, and growth and decay of microbial particles are simulated using stochastic processes. Our model extends the complexity of the biofilm system by including the conversion and reversion of living bacteria into a hibernated state, known as persister bacteria. Another new contribution is the inclusion of antimicrobial in two forms: an aqueous solution and encapsulated in biodegradable nanoparticles. The bacteria population growth and spatial variation of drugs and their effectiveness are investigated in this work. Supported by NIH

  3. Functional characterization of two concrete biofilms using pyrosequencing data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phylogenetic studies of concrete biofilms using 16SrRNA-based approaches have demonstrated that concrete surfaces harbor a diverse microbial community. These approaches can provide information on the general taxonomical groups present in a sample but cannot shed light on the func...

  4. Microbiota diversity and gene expression dynamics in human oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Micro-organisms inhabiting teeth surfaces grow on biofilms where a specific and complex succession of bacteria has been described by co-aggregation tests and DNA-based studies. Although the composition of oral biofilms is well established, the active portion of the bacterial community and the patterns of gene expression in vivo have not been studied. Results Using RNA-sequencing technologies, we present the first metatranscriptomic study of human dental plaque, performed by two different approaches: (1) A short-reads, high-coverage approach by Illumina sequencing to characterize the gene activity repertoire of the microbial community during biofilm development; (2) A long-reads, lower-coverage approach by pyrosequencing to determine the taxonomic identity of the active microbiome before and after a meal ingestion. The high-coverage approach allowed us to analyze over 398 million reads, revealing that microbial communities are individual-specific and no bacterial species was detected as key player at any time during biofilm formation. We could identify some gene expression patterns characteristic for early and mature oral biofilms. The transcriptomic profile of several adhesion genes was confirmed through qPCR by measuring expression of fimbriae-associated genes. In addition to the specific set of gene functions overexpressed in early and mature oral biofilms, as detected through the short-reads dataset, the long-reads approach detected specific changes when comparing the metatranscriptome of the same individual before and after a meal, which can narrow down the list of organisms responsible for acid production and therefore potentially involved in dental caries. Conclusions The bacteria changing activity during biofilm formation and after meal ingestion were person-specific. Interestingly, some individuals showed extreme homeostasis with virtually no changes in the active bacterial population after food ingestion, suggesting the presence of a microbial community which could be associated to dental health. PMID:24767457

  5. A Mathematical Model of Quorum Sensing Induced Biofilm Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Emerenini, Blessing O.; Hense, Burkhard A.; Kuttler, Christina; Eberl, Hermann J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cell dispersal (or detachment) is part of the developmental cycle of microbial biofilms. It can be externally or internally induced, and manifests itself in discrete sloughing events, whereby many cells disperse in an instance, or in continuous slower dispersal of single cells. One suggested trigger of cell dispersal is quorum sensing, a cell-cell communication mechanism used to coordinate gene expression and behavior in groups based on population densities. Method To better understand the interplay of colony growth and cell dispersal, we develop a dynamic, spatially extended mathematical model that includes biofilm growth, production of quorum sensing molecules, cell dispersal triggered by quorum sensing molecules, and re-attachment of cells. This is a highly nonlinear system of diffusion-reaction equations that we study in computer simulations. Results Our results show that quorum sensing induced cell dispersal can be an efficient mechanism for bacteria to control the size of a biofilm colony, and at the same time enhance its downstream colonization potential. In fact we find that over the lifetime of a biofilm colony the majority of cells produced are lost into the aqueous phase, supporting the notion of biofilms as cell nurseries. We find that a single quorum sensing based mechanism can explain both, discrete dispersal events and continuous shedding of cells from a colony. Moreover, quorum sensing induced cell dispersal affects the structure and architecture of the biofilm, for example it might lead to the formation of hollow inner regions in a biofilm colony. PMID:26197231

  6. Toluene Diffusion and Reaction in Unsaturated Pseudomonas putida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Patricia A.; Hunt, James R.; Firestone, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Biofilms are frequently studied in the context of submerged or aquatic systems. However, much less is known about biofilms in unsaturated systems, despite their importance to such processes as food spoilage, terrestrial nutrient cycling, and biodegradation of environmental pollutants in soils. Using modeling and experimentation, we have described the biodegradation of toluene in unsaturated media by bacterial biofilms as a function of matric water potential, a dominant variable in unsaturated systems. We experimentally determined diffusion and kinetic parameters for Pseudomonas putida biofilms, then predicted biodegradation rates over a range of matric water potentials. For validation, we measured the rate of toluene depletion by intact biofilms and found the results to reasonably follow the model predictions. The diffusion coefficient for toluene through unsaturated P. putida biofilm averaged 1.3 × 10?7 cm2/s, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than toluene diffusivity in water. Our studies show that, at the scale of the microbial biofilm, the diffusion of toluene to biodegrading bacteria can limit the overall rate of biological toluene depletion in unsaturated systems. PMID:18642338

  7. Assessing Primary and Bacterial Production Rates in Biofilms on Pebbles in Ishite Stream, Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miwa Fukuda; Junya Matsuyama; Toshiya Katano; Shin-ichi Nakano; Frank Dazzo

    2006-01-01

    Various measurements of microbial productivity in streambed pebble biofilms were analyzed almost monthly for 1 year to quantify the importance of primary production as an autochthonous source of organic matter utilized to support heterotrophic bacterial production in the dynamic food web within this natural microbial habitat. Bacterial density varied from 0.3 × 108 to 1.4 × 108 cells cm?2, and

  8. Stable Isotopic Relationships among Biofilm, Algae, and Dissolved Organic Carbon in two Ozark Streams: Spatial and Temporal Considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. L. Piercey; S. L. Brisco; S. E. Ziegler

    2005-01-01

    The identification of carbon (C) sources fueling microorganisms is critical to our understanding of stream biogeochemistry. Biofilm, filamentous algae, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) samples were collected from two contrasting streams to discern biofilm microbial C sources. Samples were collected from multiple sites, representing a gradient in flow, and over diurnal periods to study the variation in the stable isotopic

  9. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Nathan K; Mazaitis, Mark J; Costerton, J William; Leid, Jeff G; Powers, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on understanding bacterial biofilms and this growth modality's relation to human disease. In this review we explore the genetic regulation and molecular components involved in biofilm formation and maturation in the context of the Gram-positive cocci, Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, we discuss diseases and host immune responses, along with current therapies associated with S. aureus biofilm infections and prevention strategies. PMID:21921685

  10. Advances in Biofilm Mechanics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Guélon; Jean-Denis Mathias; Paul Stoodley

    \\u000a A knowledge of the mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms is required to more fully understand how a biofilm will physically\\u000a respond, and adapt, to the physical forces, such as those caused by fluid flow or particle or bubble impingement, acting upon\\u000a it. This is particularly important since biofilms are problematic in a wide diversity of scenarios and spatial and temporal

  11. Comparison of arcobacter butzleri ED-1 and arcobacter L anode biofilm formation and a proteomic comparison of A. butzleri ED-1 at the anode of a half microbial fuel cell 

    E-print Network

    Knighton, Matthew Charles

    2013-11-28

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are electrochemical devices that exploit the ability of certain microorganisms to anaerobically respire using an insoluble terminal electron acceptor and therefore generate an electrical ...

  12. [Biofilms and public health].

    PubMed

    Choisy, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Micro-organisms do not always exist in planctonic forms (single cells or small groups). To survive, especially in limiting media, they may adhere to inert or living surfaces. This enables them to multiply within a community protected by an extracellular matrix, thus forming a biofilm which protects them from antimicrobials. Biofilms have many potential consequences for public health. Some are positive, such as the commensal biofilms that protect against pathogenic bacteria, while environmental biofilms may be a source of outbreaks of respiratory or gastrointestinal diseases or infections associated with implanted medical devices. Respiratory tract infection can be caused by aerosols of fragmented biofilms growing in warm humid conditions (air cooling towers, hot springs, showers, etc.). Digestive tract infection can arise from biofilms formed during food manufacturing or packaging processes. Colonized implanted medical devices can lead to sepsis. This article examines the role of central venous catheters, taking into account the surgical site. In vivo studies show that the source of catheter infection may be exogenous or endogenous, while in vitro studies of biofilms show that ablation of the device is the best solution. Prevention is difficult, as biofilm formation is multifactorial. Physical and biological knowledge of biofilms may help to limit their formation and growth. PMID:22375373

  13. The Exopolysaccharide Matrix Modulates the Interaction between 3D Architecture and Virulence of a Mixed-Species Oral Biofilm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin Xiao; Marlise I. Klein; Megan L. Falsetta; Bingwen Lu; Claire M. Delahunty; John R. Yates; Arne Heydorn; Hyun Koo

    2012-01-01

    Virulent biofilms are responsible for a range of infections, including oral diseases. All biofilms harbor a microbial-derived extracellular-matrix. The exopolysaccharides (EPS) formed on tooth-pellicle and bacterial surfaces provide binding sites for microorganisms; eventually the accumulated EPS enmeshes microbial cells. The metabolic activity of the bacteria within this matrix leads to acidification of the milieu. We explored the mechanisms through which

  14. Microbial community structures differentiated in a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell fueled with rice straw hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbial fuel cell represents a novel technology to simultaneously generate electric power and treat wastewater. Both pure organic matter and real wastewater can be used as fuel to generate electric power and the substrate type can influence the microbial community structure. In the present study, rice straw, an important feedstock source in the world, was used as fuel after pretreatment with diluted acid method for a microbial fuel cell to obtain electric power. Moreover, the microbial community structures of anodic and cathodic biofilm and planktonic culturewere analyzed and compared to reveal the effect of niche on microbial community structure. Results The microbial fuel cell produced a maximum power density of 137.6?±?15.5 mW/m2 at a COD concentration of 400 mg/L, which was further increased to 293.33?±?7.89 mW/m2 through adjusting the electrolyte conductivity from 5.6 mS/cm to 17 mS/cm. Microbial community analysis showed reduction of the microbial diversities of the anodic biofilm and planktonic culture, whereas diversity of the cathodic biofilm was increased. Planktonic microbial communities were clustered closer to the anodic microbial communities compared to the cathodic biofilm. The differentiation in microbial community structure of the samples was caused by minor portion of the genus. The three samples shared the same predominant phylum of Proteobacteria. The abundance of exoelectrogenic genus was increased with Desulfobulbus as the shared most abundant genus; while the most abundant exoelectrogenic genus of Clostridium in the inoculum was reduced. Sulfate reducing bacteria accounted for large relative abundance in all the samples, whereas the relative abundance varied in different samples. Conclusion The results demonstrated that rice straw hydrolysate can be used as fuel for microbial fuel cells; microbial community structure differentiated depending on niches after microbial fuel cell operation; exoelectrogens were enriched; sulfate from rice straw hydrolysate might be responsible for the large relative abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria. PMID:24433535

  15. Groundwater ecosystem resilience to organic contaminations: microbial and geochemical dynamics throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Nossa, Carlos W; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-09-01

    The capacity of groundwater ecosystem to recover from contamination by organic chemicals is a vital concern for environmental scientists. A pilot-scale aquifer system was used to investigate the long-term dynamics of contaminants, groundwater geochemistry, and microbial community structure (by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR) throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume (10% ethanol + 50 mg/L benzene + 50 mg/L toluene). Two-year continuous ethanol-blended release significantly changed the groundwater geochemistry (resulted in anaerobic, low pH, and organotrophic conditions) and increased bacterial and archaeal populations by 82- and 314-fold respectively. Various anaerobic heterotrophs (fermenters, acetogens, methanogens, and hydrocarbon degraders) were enriched. Two years after the release was shut off, all contaminants and their degradation byproducts disappeared and groundwater geochemistry completely restored to the pre-release states (aerobic, neutral pH, and oligotrophic). Bacterial and archaeal populations declined by 18- and 45-fold respectively (relative to the time of shut off). Microbial community structure reverted towards the pre-release states and alpha diversity indices rebounded, suggesting the resilience of microbial community to ethanol blend releases. We also found shifts from O2-sensitive methanogens (e.g., Methanobacterium) to methanogens that are not so sensitive to O2 (e.g., Methanosarcina and Methanocella), which is likely to contribute to the persistence of methanogens and methane generation following the source removal. Overall, the rapid disappearance of contaminants and their metabolites, rebound of geochemical footprints, and resilience of microbial community unequivocally document the natural capacity of groundwater ecosystem to attenuate and recover from a large volume of catastrophic spill of ethanol-based biofuel. PMID:25996759

  16. Discovery and Biological Characterization of the Auromomycin Chromophore as an Inhibitor of Biofilm Formation in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Peach, Kelly C.; Cheng, Andrew T.; Oliver, Allen G.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms pose a significant challenge in clinical environments due to their inherent lack of susceptibility to antibiotic treatment. It is widely recognized that most pathogenic bacterial strains in the clinical setting persist in the biofilm state, and are the root cause of many recrudescent infections. Discovery and development of compounds capable of either inhibiting biofilm formation or initiating biofilm dispersal may provide new therapeutic avenues for reducing the number of hospital acquired, biofilm-mediated infections. We now report the application of our recently reported image-based, high-throughput screen to the discovery of microbially-derived natural products with biofilm inhibitory activity against Vibrio cholerae. Examination of a prefractionated library of microbially-derived marine natural products has lead to the identification of a new biofilm inhibitor that is structurally unrelated to previously reported inhibitors and is one of the most potent inhibitors reported to date against V. cholerae. Combination of this compound with sub-MIC concentrations of a number of clinically relevant antibiotics was shown to improve the biofilm inhibitory efficacy of this new compound compared to monotherapy treatments, and provides evidence for the potential therapeutic benefit of biofilm inhibitors in treating persistent biofilm-mediated infections. PMID:24106077

  17. Effect of surfactants on the biofilm of Rhodococcus erythropolis, a potent degrader of aromatic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Schreiberová, Olga; Hedbávná, Petra; Cejková, Alena; Jirk?, Vladimír; Masák, Jan

    2012-11-15

    Bioremediation processes based on biofilms are usually very effective. The presence of (bio)surfactants in such processes can increase bioavailability of hydrophobic pollutants in aqueous phase. However, surfactants can affect the biofilm as well as individual microbial cells in different ways. Biosurfactants produced by a microbial population can be involved in the final structure of biofilm. An external application of synthetic surfactants or 'foreign' biosurfactants often results in partial or complete destruction of the biofilm and their high concentrations also have a toxic effect on microbial cells. Finding a suitable surfactant and its concentration, which would minimize the negative effects mentioned above, would allow to construct effective bioremediation processes using the benefits of both the biofilm and the surfactant. In this context, G(+) bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis, which has a wide potential for biodegradation of aromatic compounds, was studied. High surface hydrophobicity of its cells, given mainly by the presence of mycolic acids in the cell envelopes, allows formation of stable biofilms. Three synthetic surfactants (Spolapon AOS 146, Novanik 0633A, Tween 80) and rhamnolipid isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used. Changes in initial adhesion and biofilm formation caused by the surfactants were monitored in a flow cell equipped with hydrophilic/hydrophobic carriers and analyzed by image analysis. PMID:22569140

  18. Heterotrophic Archaea Contribute to Carbon Cycling in Low-pH, Suboxic Biofilm Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, Nicholas B [ORNL] [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL] [ORNL; Mueller, Ryan [University of California, Berkeley] [University of California, Berkeley; Spaulding, Susan E. [University of California, Berkeley] [University of California, Berkeley; Shah, Vega [University of California, Berkeley] [University of California, Berkeley; Sun, Christine [University of California, Berkeley] [University of California, Berkeley; Yelton, Alexis P [University of California, Berkeley] [University of California, Berkeley; Miller, CS [University of California, Berkeley] [University of California, Berkeley; Thomas, BC [University of California, Berkeley] [University of California, Berkeley; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL] [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL] [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley] [University of California, Berkeley

    2012-01-01

    Archaea are widely distributed and yet are most often not the most abundant members of microbial communities. Here, we document a transition from Bacteria- to Archaea-dominated communities in microbial biofilms sampled from the Richmond Mine acid mine drainage (AMD) system (pH 1.0,38 C) and in laboratory-cultivated biofilms. This transition occurs when chemoautotrophic microbial communities that develop at the air-solution interface sink to the sediment-solution interface and degrade under microaerobic and anaerobic conditions. The archaea identified in these sunken biofilms are from the class Thermoplasmata, and in some cases, the highly divergent ARMAN nanoarchaeal lineage. In several of the sunken biofilms, nanoarchaea comprise 10 to 25% of the community, based on fluorescent in situ hybridization and metagenomic analyses. Comparative community proteomic analyses show a persistence of bacterial proteins in sunken biofilms, but there is clear evidence for amino acid modifications due to acid hydrolysis. Given the low representation of bacterial cells in sunken biofilms based on microscopy, we infer that hydrolysis reflects proteins derived from lysed cells. For archaea, we detected 2,400 distinct proteins, including a subset involved in proteolysis and peptide uptake. Laboratory cultivation experiments using complex carbon substrates demonstrated anaerobic enrichment of Ferroplasma and Aplasma coupled to the reduction of ferric iron. These findings indicate dominance of acidophilic archaea in degrading biofilms and suggest that they play roles in anaerobic nutrient cycling at low pH.

  19. Heterotrophic Archaea Contribute to Carbon Cycling in Low-pH, Suboxic Biofilm Communities

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Nicholas B.; Pan, Chongle; Mueller, Ryan; Spaulding, Susan E.; Shah, Vega; Sun, Christine L.; Yelton, Alexis P.; Miller, Christopher S.; Thomas, Brian C.; Shah, Manesh; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Hettich, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Archaea are widely distributed and yet are most often not the most abundant members of microbial communities. Here, we document a transition from Bacteria- to Archaea-dominated communities in microbial biofilms sampled from the Richmond Mine acid mine drainage (AMD) system (?pH 1.0, ?38°C) and in laboratory-cultivated biofilms. This transition occurs when chemoautotrophic microbial communities that develop at the air-solution interface sink to the sediment-solution interface and degrade under microaerobic and anaerobic conditions. The archaea identified in these sunken biofilms are from the class Thermoplasmata, and in some cases, the highly divergent ARMAN nanoarchaeal lineage. In several of the sunken biofilms, nanoarchaea comprise 10 to 25% of the community, based on fluorescent in situ hybridization and metagenomic analyses. Comparative community proteomic analyses show a persistence of bacterial proteins in sunken biofilms, but there is clear evidence for amino acid modifications due to acid hydrolysis. Given the low representation of bacterial cells in sunken biofilms based on microscopy, we infer that hydrolysis reflects proteins derived from lysed cells. For archaea, we detected ?2,400 distinct proteins, including a subset involved in proteolysis and peptide uptake. Laboratory cultivation experiments using complex carbon substrates demonstrated anaerobic enrichment of Ferroplasma and Aplasma coupled to the reduction of ferric iron. These findings indicate dominance of acidophilic archaea in degrading biofilms and suggest that they play roles in anaerobic nutrient cycling at low pH. PMID:23001646

  20. Center for Biofilm Engineering www.biofilm.montana.edu

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    Center for Biofilm Engineering www.biofilm.montana.edu Annual Report 2012 from seeing to solving) captured this image of a dual-species anaerobic biofilm. Blue areas indicate presence of cellular material; red areas indicate cells that are metabolically active. In contrast with biofilms that thrive

  1. Microbial life associated with low-temperature hydrothermal venting and formation of barite chimneys at Loki's Castle vent field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorseth, I. H.; Steen, I.; Roalkvam, I.; Dahle, H.; Stokke, R.; Rapp, H.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    A low-temperature diffuse venting area with numbers of small barite chimneys is located on the flank of the large sulphide mound of the Loki’s Castle black smoker vent field at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR). White cotton-like microbial mats on top of the barite chimneys and associated siboglinid tubeworms were observed. The temperature was determined to 20°C for the surface sediment and 0°C for the white microbial mats, just above the ambient bottom seawater temperature of -0.8°C. The microbial mats were sampled using a remote operating vehicle (ROV) equipped with a hydraulic sampling cylinder (biosyringe) and the chimneys using an aluminum scuffle box. Black colored interior flow channels surrounded by white outer sections of nearly pure barite, were observed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of mats showed numerous microbial cells and large amounts of extracellular thread-like material with attached barite crystals. Inside the chimneys microbial cells are partially embedded in barite, and individual crystals are also frequently covered by extracellular material. The microbial activity could thus have an important influence on the nucleation and growth of the barite crystals and thus on the formation of the chimneys. To reveal the microbial community structure, 16S rRNA gene sequence tag-encoded pyrosequencing (1.1 x 104 - 3.5 x 104 amplicons per library) followed by taxonomic classification of the reads using the MEGAN software, were performed. Organisms assigned to a genus of sulfide oxidizers (Sulfurimonas) within the e-Proteobacteria were abundant in each chimney structure; the white microbial mats (86-96% of the reads), the white barite (36% of total reads); the black flow channel (9.9%). The second most dominating taxon in the white chimney barite, including 26% of the reads, was anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME) of the ANME-1 clade, indicating anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) as a major microbial process. Furthermore, the novel AOM associated clade, GOM-arc1 was apparently highly abundant (14.3% of total reads). These latter taxa were identified but clearly less abundant in the mats (ANME-1, 0.7%; GOM-arc1, 2.7%) as well as in black flow channel (ANME-1, 8%; GOM-arc1, 0.49%). Other dominating taxa in the flow channel were; Planctomycetales, 13.5%; Thiotrichales, Leucotrix, 8.8%; Thaumarchaeota, Marine Group 1, 9.35%; Pseudomonadales, Psychrobacter, 7.2%; Rhodobacterales, Rhodobacteraceae, 6.1%; Candidate division TM7, 5.9%; Flavobacteriales, 4.8% and Methylococcales, 3.5% altogether indicating a more diverse microbial community, performing methane, sulfur and ammonia oxidation as well as heterotrophic processes. To further clarify the relationship between crystallization, chimney growth and microbial activity, and the potential for preservation of biosignatures in barite formations, these data will be supplemented by geochemical characteristics, more detailed SEM observations and knowledge of In situ activities determine by analysis of community transcriptome and proteome.

  2. Biofilm streamers cause rapid clogging of flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned; Bassler, Bonnie; Stone, Howard

    2012-11-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant, sessile bacterial communities that are found on most surfaces on Earth. In addition to constituting the most abundant form of bacterial life, biofilms also cause chronic and medical device-associated infections. Despite their importance, basic information about how biofilms behave in common ecological environments is lacking. Here we demonstrate that flow through soil-like porous materials, industrial filters, and medical stents dramatically modifies the morphology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms to form streamers which over time bridge the space between obstacles and corners in non-uniform environments. Using a microfluidic model system we find that, contrary to the accepted paradigm, the accumulation of surface-attached bacterial biofilm has little effect on flow resistance whereas the formation of biofilm streamers causes sudden and rapid clogging. The time at which clogging happens depends on bacterial growth, while the duration of the clogging transition is driven by flow-mediated transport of bacteria to the clogging site. Flow-induced shedding of extracellular matrix from the resident biofilm generates a sieve-like network that catches bacteria flowing by, which add to the network of extracellular matrix, to cause exponentially rapid clogging. We expect these biofilm streamers to be ubiquitous in nature, and to have profound effects on flow through porous materials in environmental, industrial, and medical environments.

  3. Development of a biofilm formation method for waste forms stability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Idachaba, M A; Nyavor, K; Egiebor, N O; Rogers, R D

    2000-10-01

    The development of an accurate assessment protocol is critical for the prediction of long-term performance of waste disposal systems under field conditions. In this study, the development of a biofilm formation method for the evaluation of waste forms stability to microbially induced degradation (MID) is reported. The development process involved significant modifications to the existing Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approach. In the biofilm formation method, the control media and fermenter broths are designed to be of similar pH to avoid overestimation of the microbe's capability to degrade the waste forms. In the NRC approach, the pH values are different. The existing one-stage process of the NRC approach is also replaced with a two-stage process in the biofilm formation method. This is to ensure full evaluation of the microbe's involvement in waste forms degradation. The first stage of the two-stage process is for biofilm formation and the second is for biofilm evaluation. The use of a two-stage process eliminates the possibility of substrate limitation, resulting in values of degradation indices that are about two times higher than those obtained using the single-stage NRC approach. Two waste forms (100% Tuskegee cement and 21% cobalt chloride/79% cement) were used in the development of the biofilm formation method. Both waste forms showed evidence of biofilm formation. The formation of biofilm on the cobalt-containing waste form indicates a lack of anti-microbial capability of cobalt. PMID:10946124

  4. Clinical and microbiological aspects of biofilm-associated surgical site infections.

    PubMed

    Edmiston, Charles E; McBain, Andrew J; Roberts, Christopher; Leaper, David

    2015-01-01

    While microbial biofilms have been recognized as being ubiquitous in nature for the past 40 years, it has only been within the past 20 years that clinical practitioners have realized that biofilm play a significant role in both device-related and tissue-based infections. The global impact of surgical site infections (SSIs) is monumental and as many as 80 % of these infections may involve a microbial biofilm. Recent studies suggest that biofilm- producing organisms play a significant role in persistent skin and soft tissue wound infections in the postoperative surgical patient population. Biofilm, on an organizational level, allows bacteria to survive intrinsic and extrinsic defenses that would inactivate the dispersed (planktonic) bacteria. SSIs associated with biomedical implants are notoriously difficult to eradicate using antibiotic regimens that would typically be effective against the same bacteria growing under planktonic conditions. This biofilm-mediated phenomenon is characterized as antimicrobial recalcitrance, which is associated with the survival of a subset of cells including "persister" cells. The ideal method to manage a biofilm-mediated surgical site wound infection is to prevent it from occurring through rational use of antibiotic prophylaxis, adequate skin antisepsis prior to surgery and use of innovative in-situ irrigation procedures; together with antimicrobial suture technology in an effort to promote wound hygiene at the time of closure; once established, biofilm removal remains a significant clinical problem. PMID:25366220

  5. Laminar flow around corners triggers the formation of biofilm streamers.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard A

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms have an enormous impact on medicine, industry and ecology. These microbial communities are generally considered to adhere to surfaces or interfaces. Nevertheless, suspended filamentous biofilms, or streamers, are frequently observed in natural ecosystems where they play crucial roles by enhancing transport of nutrients and retention of suspended particles. Recent studies in streamside flumes and laboratory flow cells have hypothesized a link with a turbulent flow environment. However, the coupling between the hydrodynamics and complex biofilm structures remains poorly understood. Here, we report the formation of biofilm streamers suspended in the middle plane of curved microchannels under conditions of laminar flow. Experiments with different mutant strains allow us to identify a link between the accumulation of extracellular matrix and the development of these structures. Numerical simulations of the flow in curved channels highlight the presence of a secondary vortical motion in the proximity of the corners, which suggests an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism responsible for the formation of the streamers. Our findings should be relevant to the design of all liquid-carrying systems where biofilms are potentially present and provide new insights on the origins of microbial streamers in natural and industrial environments. PMID:20356880

  6. Modern approaches to non-surgical biofilm management.

    PubMed

    Apatzidou, Danae Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    The subgingival dental plaque is a microbial biofilm consisting of highly variable bacterial microcolonies embedded within a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substance. In contrast to microorganisms growing in a planktonic state, the inhabitants of a biofilm are effectively protected within this dense structure from host defense mechanisms and from therapeutic agents, including antimicrobials. The mechanical removal of the microbial biofilm and the establishment of meticulous plaque control measures comprise the key elements for the success of non-surgical periodontal treatment. Ultrasonic devices are effective in disrupting the biofilm, and carefully remove soft and hard deposits from a root surface with minimal trauma to the tooth structure. Controversies and modern trends in non-surgical periodontal therapy - such as quadrant-wise treatment modalities versus full-mouth approaches, hand-versus power-driven instrumentation, and the time frame of non-surgical periodontal therapy - are discussed here in depth in order to provide an insight into modern approaches to non-surgical biofilm management. Clinical, microbiological and immunological findings following different treatment protocols, in addition to cost-effective benefits of these clinical modalities, are discussed. PMID:22142959

  7. Physiological heterogeneity in biofilms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Franklin; Philip S. Stewart

    2008-01-01

    Biofilms contain bacterial cells that are in a wide range of physiological states. Within a biofilm population, cells with diverse genotypes and phenotypes that express distinct metabolic pathways, stress responses and other specific biological activities are juxtaposed. The mechanisms that contribute to this genetic and physiological heterogeneity include microscale chemical gradients, adaptation to local environmental conditions, stochastic gene expression and

  8. Urea Transformation of Wetland Microbial Communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann-Karin Thorén

    2007-01-01

    Transformation of urea to ammonium is an important link in the nitrogen cycle in soil and water. Although microbial nitrogen\\u000a transformations, such as nitrification and denitrification, are well studied in freshwater sediment and epiphytic biofilm\\u000a in shallow waters, information about urea transformation in these environments is scarce. In this study, urea transformation\\u000a of sedimentary, planktonic, and epiphytic microbial communities was

  9. Transitions in biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita; Thatcher, Travis; Cooley, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Biofilms are multicellular, dynamic communities formed by interacting unicellular organisms bound to a surface. Forming a biofilm is a developmental process, characterized by sequential changes in gene expression and behavior as bacteria and yeast progress from discrete, free-swimming cells though stages that arrive at a mature biofilm. We are developing automated metrics to identify key transitions in early biofilm formation as cells attach to a surface, populate that surface, and adhere to each other to form early microcolonies. Our metrics use high-throughput tracking and analysis of microscopy movies to localize these transitions in space and time. Each of these transitions is associated with a loss of entropy in the bacterial system and, therefore, with biological activity that drives this loss of entropy. Better understanding of these transitions will allow automated determination of the strength and turn-on of attractive cell-surface and cell-cell interactions as biofilm development progresses.

  10. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  11. Osteocompatibility of biofilm inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  12. Effect of oxygen concentration on biological nitrification and microbial kinetics in a cross-flow membrane bioreactor (MBR) and moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) treating old landfill leachate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Canziani; Valeria Emondi; Massimiliano Garavaglia; Francesca Malpei; Eleonora Pasinetti; Gianluigi Buttiglieri

    2006-01-01

    Ammonium nitrogen concentration in leachate from old Italian landfills ranges from 0.5 to as high as 3gL?1. In this paper biological nitrogen removal from leachate has been achieved by partial nitrification to nitrite in a pure-oxygen membrane bioreactor (PO-MBR) and by subsequent denitrification in a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR). When ammonium is biologically oxidized to nitrite, only 75% of the

  13. Annual progress Report on research related to our research project “Stabilization of Plutonium in Subsurface Environments via Microbial Reduction and Biofilm Formation” funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD)

    SciTech Connect

    New, Mary

    2006-06-01

    The overarching goal of this research project is to investigate and optimize the mechanisms for in situ immobilization of Pu species by naturally-occurring bacteria. Specific research objectives are: (a) investigate the mechanism of bacterial accumulation and immobilization of plutonium species by biofilm formation under aerobic conditions and (b) to demonstrate the direct and indirect stabilization of Pu via dissimilatory reduction by Geobacter metallireducens.

  14. Should we stay or should we go: mechanisms and ecological consequences for biofilm dispersal.

    PubMed

    McDougald, Diane; Rice, Scott A; Barraud, Nicolas; Steinberg, Peter D; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    In most environments, bacteria reside primarily in biofilms, which are social consortia of cells that are embedded in an extracellular matrix and undergo developmental programmes resulting in a predictable biofilm 'life cycle'. Recent research on many different bacterial species has now shown that the final stage in this life cycle includes the production and release of differentiated dispersal cells. The formation of these cells and their eventual dispersal is initiated through diverse and remarkably sophisticated mechanisms, suggesting that there are strong evolutionary pressures for dispersal from an otherwise largely sessile biofilm. The evolutionary aspect of biofilm dispersal is now being explored through the integration of molecular microbiology with eukaryotic ecological and evolutionary theory, which provides a broad conceptual framework for the diversity of specific mechanisms underlying biofilm dispersal. Here, we review recent progress in this emerging field and suggest that the merging of detailed molecular mechanisms with ecological theory will significantly advance our understanding of biofilm biology and ecology. PMID:22120588

  15. Efficient suppression of biofilm formation by a nucleic acid aptamer.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yi; Cheng, Lijuan; Ling, Min; Feng, Xinru; Chen, Lingli; Wu, Minxi; Deng, Le

    2015-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that are attached to a solid surface using extracellular polymeric substances. Motility and initial attachment mediated by flagella are required for biofilm formation. Therefore, blocking the motility of flagella is a potential strategy to inhibit biofilm formation. In this study, single-stranded DNA aptamers specific to the Salmonella choleraesuis were selected after 14 cycles of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Among the selected aptamers, the aptamer 3 showed the highest affinity for S. choleraesuis with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 41 ± 2?nM. Aptamer 3, conjugated with magnetic beads, was then used to capture its binding target on the bacteria. After mass spectrometry and specific binding analysis, the flagellin was identified as the target captured by aptamer 3. Furthermore, inhibition experiments, inverted microscopy and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that aptamer 3 was able to control the biofilm formation and promote the inhibitory effect of an antibiotic on bacterial biofilms. Single-stranded DNA aptamers therefore have great potential as inhibitors of biofilm formation. PMID:26025307

  16. Exoelectrogenic bacteria that power microbial fuel cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce E. Logan

    2009-01-01

    There has been an increase in recent years in the number of reports of microorganisms that can generate electrical current in microbial fuel cells. Although many new strains have been identified, few strains individually produce power densities as high as strains from mixed communities. Enriched anodic biofilms have generated power densities as high as 6.9 W per m2 (projected anode

  17. Molecular analysis of long-term biofilm formation on PVC and cast iron surfaces in drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruyin; Zhu, Junge; Yu, Zhisheng; Joshi, DevRaj; Zhang, Hongxun; Lin, Wenfang; Yang, Min

    2014-04-01

    To understand the impacts of different plumbing materials on long-term biofilm formation in water supply system, we analyzed microbial community compositions in the bulk water and biofilms on faucets with two different materials-polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cast iron, which have been frequently used for more than10 years. Pyrosequencing was employed to describe both bacterial and eukaryotic microbial compositions. Bacterial communities in the bulk water and biofilm samples were significantly different from each other. Specific bacterial populations colonized on the surface of different materials. Hyphomicrobia and corrosion associated bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus spp., Aquabacterium spp., Limnobacter thiooxidans, and Thiocapsa spp., were the most dominant bacteria identified in the PVC and cast iron biofilms, respectively, suggesting that bacterial colonization on the material surfaces was selective. Mycobacteria and Legionella spp. were common potential pathogenic bacteria occurred in the biofilm samples, but their abundance was different in the two biofilm bacterial communities. In contrast, the biofilm samples showed more similar eukaryotic communities than the bulk water. Notably, potential pathogenic fungi, i.e., Aspergillus spp. and Candida parapsilosis, occurred in similar abundance in both biofilms. These results indicated that microbial community, especially bacterial composition was remarkably affected by the different pipe materials (PVC and cast iron). PMID:25079417

  18. The effect of antimicrobial agents and modified atmosphere packaging on the microbial shelf life of corn tortillas

    E-print Network

    Tellez-Giron, Alfredo

    1988-01-01

    . In commercial tortillerias and bakeries with good sanitary practices, molds are the primary concern since they constitute the principal group of microbial spoilage organ- isms (King 1981). Molds are present almost everywhere and they are known to disperse... criteria for the pro- ducts to be tested were based on the type of products and the type and amount of antimicrobial preservative added. Plant ?1 used fresh cooked corn and tortilla corn flour for their tortilla pro- duction, while plants ?2 and ?3...

  19. Life in the dark: metagenomic evidence that a microbial slime community is driven by inorganic nitrogen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tetu, Sasha G; Breakwell, Katy; Elbourne, Liam D H; Holmes, Andrew J; Gillings, Michael R; Paulsen, Ian T

    2013-01-01

    Beneath Australia's large, dry Nullarbor Plain lies an extensive underwater cave system, where dense microbial communities known as ‘slime curtains' are found. These communities exist in isolation from photosynthetically derived carbon and are presumed to be chemoautotrophic. Earlier work found high levels of nitrite and nitrate in the cave waters and a high relative abundance of Nitrospirae in bacterial 16S rRNA clone libraries. This suggested that these communities may be supported by nitrite oxidation, however, details of the inorganic nitrogen cycling in these communities remained unclear. Here we report analysis of 16S rRNA amplicon and metagenomic sequence data from the Weebubbie cave slime curtain community. The microbial community is comprised of a diverse assortment of bacterial and archaeal genera, including an abundant population of Thaumarchaeota. Sufficient thaumarchaeotal sequence was recovered to enable a partial genome sequence to be assembled, which showed considerable synteny with the corresponding regions in the genome of the autotrophic ammonia oxidiser Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1. This partial genome sequence, contained regions with high sequence identity to the ammonia mono-oxygenase operon and carbon fixing 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle genes of N. maritimus SCM1. Additionally, the community, as a whole, included genes encoding key enzymes for inorganic nitrogen transformations, including nitrification and denitrification. We propose that the Weebubbie slime curtain community represents a distinctive microbial ecosystem, in which primary productivity is due to the combined activity of archaeal ammonia-oxidisers and bacterial nitrite oxidisers. PMID:23426011

  20. Application of metabolomics to understanding biofilms in water distribution systems: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Beale, D J; Barratt, R; Marlow, D R; Dunn, M S; Palombo, E A; Morrison, P D; Key, C

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms formed in pipes are known to contribute to waterborne diseases, accelerate corrosion and cause aesthetic taste and odour issues within the potable water supply network. This paper describes a pilot study, undertaken to assess the potential of using metabolomics to monitor bacterial activity in biofilms of an urban water network. Using samples from a water mains flushing programme, it was found that a profile of intracellular and extracellular metabolites associated with microbial activity could be obtained by analysing samples using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Chemometric analysis of the chromatograms in conjunction with data from the mass spectrometer showed that it is possible to differentiate between biofilms from different pipe materials and planktonic bacteria. This research demonstrates that metabolomics has the potential for investigating biofilms and other microbial activity within water networks, and could provide a means for enhancing monitoring programmes, understanding the source of water quality complaints, and optimising water network management strategies. PMID:23458161

  1. Development of a System to Assess Biofilm Formation in the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin Charles, E.; Summers, Silvia M.; Roman, Monserrate C.

    1998-01-01

    The design requirements for the water treatment systems aboard the International Space Station (ISS) include and require recycling as much water as possible and to treat the water for intentional contamination (hygiene, urine distillate, condensate, etc.) and unintentional contamination in the form of biofilm and microorganisms. As part of an effort to address the latter issue, a biofilm system was developed by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to simulate the conditions aboard ISS with respect to materials, flow rates, water conditions, water content, and handling. The tubing, connectors, sensors, and fabricated parts included in the system were chosen for specific attributes as applicable to emulate an orbital water treatment system. This paper addresses the design and development process of the system, as well as the configuration, operation, and system procedures for maintenance to assure that the simulation is valid for the representative data as it applies to water degradation and biofilm/microbial growth. Preliminary biofilm/microbial results are also presented.

  2. Cold atmospheric plasma in combination with mechanical treatment improves osteoblast growth on biofilm covered titanium discs.

    PubMed

    Duske, Kathrin; Jablonowski, Lukasz; Koban, Ina; Matthes, Rutger; Holtfreter, Birte; Sckell, Axel; Nebe, J Barbara; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus Dieter; Kocher, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Treatment of implants with peri-implantitis is often unsuccessful, because an instrumented implant surface and residual microbial biofilm impedes re-osseointegration. The application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) could be a simple and effective strategy to overcome the inherent problems of peri-implantitis treatment. CAP is able to destroy and eliminate bacterial biofilms. Additionally, it increases the wettability of titanium, which supports cellular attachment. In this study, the behaviour of osteoblasts on titanium discs was analysed after treatment of bacterial biofilms with CAP, brushing, or a combination of both. A human plaque biofilm was cultured on titanium discs. Treatment with a brush (BR), 1% oxygen/argon CAP (PL), or brushing combined with CAP (BR+PL) was used to eliminate the biofilm. Discs without biofilm (C), autoclaved biofilm (AUTO) and untreated biofilm (BIO) served as controls. Subsequently, human osteoblastic cell growth (MG-63) was observed after 1 and 24 h. Biofilm remnants on BR and PL impaired osteoblastic cell development, whereas the BR+PL provided an increased area of osteoblastic cells. A five-day cell growth was only detectable on BR+PL treated discs. The combination of established brushing and CAP application may be a promising strategy to treat peri-implantitis. PMID:25818439

  3. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma: A High-Performance Tool for the Efficient Removal of Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, Katja; Koban, Ina; Tresp, Helena; Jablonowski, Lukasz; Schröder, Karsten; Kramer, Axel; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Kocher, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The medical use of non-thermal physical plasmas is intensively investigated for sterilization and surface modification of biomedical materials. A further promising application is the removal or etching of organic substances, e.g., biofilms, from surfaces, because remnants of biofilms after conventional cleaning procedures are capable to entertain inflammatory processes in the adjacent tissues. In general, contamination of surfaces by micro-organisms is a major source of problems in health care. Especially biofilms are the most common type of microbial growth in the human body and therefore, the complete removal of pathogens is mandatory for the prevention of inflammatory infiltrate. Physical plasmas offer a huge potential to inactivate micro-organisms and to remove organic materials through plasma-generated highly reactive agents. Method In this study a Candida albicans biofilm, formed on polystyrene (PS) wafers, as a prototypic biofilm was used to verify the etching capability of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet operating with two different process gases (argon and argon/oxygen mixture). The capability of plasma-assisted biofilm removal was assessed by microscopic imaging. Results The Candida albicans biofilm, with a thickness of 10 to 20 µm, was removed within 300 s plasma treatment when oxygen was added to the argon gas discharge, whereas argon plasma alone was practically not sufficient in biofilm removal. The impact of plasma etching on biofilms is localized due to the limited presence of reactive plasma species validated by optical emission spectroscopy. PMID:22880025

  4. Biofilm bacterial communities in urban drinking water distribution systems transporting waters with different purification strategies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiting; Zhang, Jingxu; Mi, Zilong; Xie, Shuguang; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-02-01

    Biofilm formation in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) has many adverse consequences. Knowledge of microbial community structure of DWDS biofilm can aid in the design of an effective control strategy. However, biofilm bacterial community in real DWDS and the impact of drinking water purification strategy remain unclear. The present study investigated the composition and diversity of biofilm bacterial community in real DWDSs transporting waters with different purification strategies (conventional treatment and integrated treatment). High-throughput Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis illustrated a large shift in the diversity and structure of biofilm bacterial community in real DWDS. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Nitrospirae, and Cyanobacteria were the major components of biofilm bacterial community. Proteobacteria (mainly Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria) predominated in each DWDS biofilm, but the compositions of the dominant proteobacterial classes and genera and their proportions varied among biofilm samples. Drinking water purification strategy could shape DWDS biofilm bacterial community. Moreover, Pearson's correlation analysis indicated that Actinobacteria was positively correlated with the levels of total alkalinity and dissolved organic carbon in tap water, while Firmicutes had a significant positive correlation with nitrite nitrogen. PMID:25253043

  5. Gentamicin release from polymethylmethacrylate bone cements and Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hilbrand van De Belt; Daniëlle Neut; Willem Schenk; Jim R van Horn; Henny C van Der Mei; Henk J Busscher

    2000-01-01

    We measured the formation of a Staphylo- coccus aureus biofilm in vitro on unloaded and gentami- cin-loaded bone cements (CMW3 and Palacos R) and re- lated the formation to antibiotic release rates. All experi- ments were done in triplicate. Microbial growth on gen- tamicin-loaded cements occurred despite the release of antibiotic. Biofilm formation on gentamicin loaded CMW3 bone cement was

  6. Advances in biofilm reactors for production of value-added products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kuan-Chen Cheng; Ali Demirci; Jeffrey M. Catchmark

    2010-01-01

    Biofilms are defined as microbial cell layers, which are irreversibly or reversibly attached on solid surfaces. These attached\\u000a cells are embedded in a self-produced exopolysaccharide matrix, and exhibit different growth and bioactivity compared with\\u000a suspended cells. With their high biomass density, stability, and potential for long-term fermentation, biofilm reactors are\\u000a employed for the fermentation and bioconversion, which need large amount

  7. The role of biofilms in the sedimentology of actively forming gypsum deposits at Guerrero Negro, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Marilyn B; Des Marais, David J; Turk, Kendra A; Parenteau, Mary N; Jahnke, Linda L; Kubo, Michael D Y

    2009-11-01

    Actively forming gypsum deposits at the Guerrero Negro sabkha and saltern system provided habitats for stratified, pigmented microbial communities that exhibited significant morphological and phylogenetic diversity. These deposits ranged from meter-thick gypsum crusts forming in saltern seawater concentration ponds to columnar microbial mats with internally crystallized gypsum granules developing in natural anchialine pools. Gypsum-depositing environments were categorized as forming precipitation surfaces, biofilm-supported surfaces, and clastic surfaces. Each surface type was described in terms of depositional environment, microbial diversity, mineralogy, and sedimentary fabrics. Precipitation surfaces developed in high-salinity subaqueous environments where rates of precipitation outpaced the accumulation of clastic, organic, and/or biofilm layers. These surfaces hosted endolithic biofilms comprised predominantly of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes. Biofilm-supported deposits developed in lower-salinity subaqueous environments where light and low water-column turbulence supported dense benthic microbial communities comprised mainly of oxygenic phototrophs. In these settings, gypsum granules precipitated in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix as individual granules exhibiting distinctive morphologies. Clastic surfaces developed in sabkha mudflats that included gypsum, carbonate, and siliclastic particles with thin gypsum/biofilm components. Clastic surfaces were influenced by subsurface brine sheets and capillary evaporation and precipitated subsedimentary gypsum discs in deeper regions. Biofilms appeared to influence both chemical and physical sedimentary processes in the various subaqueous and subaerially exposed environments studied. Biofilm interaction with chemical sedimentary processes included dissolution and granularization of precipitation surfaces, formation of gypsum crystals with equant and distorted habits, and precipitation of trace carbonate and oxide phases. Fine-scale wrinkle structures visible in clastic surfaces of sabkha environments offered evidence of the biofilm's role in physical sedimentary processes. These findings are highly relevant to astrobiology because they expand and refine the known characteristics of gypsum deposits, including their biological components. PMID:19968464

  8. Study of the Response of a Biofilm Bacterial Community to UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Elasri, Mohamed O.; Miller, Robert V.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a bioluminescent whole-cell biosensor that can be incorporated into biofilm ecosystems. RM4440 is a Pseudomonas aeruginosa FRD1 derivative that carries a plasmid-based recA-luxCDABE fusion. We immobilized RM4440 in an alginate matrix to simulate a biofilm, and we studied its response to UV radiation damage. The biofilm showed a protective property by physical shielding against UV C, UV B, and UV A. Absorption of UV light by the alginate matrix translated into a higher survival rate than observed with planktonic cells at similar input fluences. UV A was shown to be effectively blocked by the biofilm matrix and to have no detectable effects on cells contained in the biofilm. However, in the presence of photosensitizers (i.e., psoralen), UV A was effective in inducing light production and cell death. RM4440 has proved to be a useful tool to study microbial communities in a noninvasive manner. PMID:10223995

  9. Binary and mixed population biofilms: time-lapse image analysis and disinfection with biocides.

    PubMed

    Elvers, K T; Leeming, K; Lappin-Scott, H M

    2002-12-01

    Simultaneous binary population biofilm formation by a bacterium and filamentous fungus was demonstrated by time-lapse image analysis in a flow cell system. The accumulation of attached bacterial cells followed an S-shaped graph similar to batch culture bacterial growth, with continual attachment, detachment, rotation, and movement of bacteria over the surface. An extensive hyphal network formed on the surface of the flow cell, protruding into the bulk flow, which subsequently detached. Multiple species mixed fungal-bacterial model biofilms were tested for isothiazolone biocide susceptibility. Biofilms were less susceptible to biocide treatment than planktonic cells of the same organisms. Mixed species biofilms, particularly for the bacterial species, offered greater protection against the action of the biocide compared to single species biofilms. Microbial loss as a result of biocide activity was shown by reduced cell surface coverage in electron micrographs. PMID:12483475

  10. Stabilization of single species Synechocystis biofilms by cultivation under segmented flow.

    PubMed

    David, Christian; Bühler, Katja; Schmid, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    The application of segmented flow on a Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 biofilm prevented excessive biomass formation and clogging by fundamentally changing the structure of the microbial community. It was possible to continuously operate a capillary microreactor for 5 weeks, before the experiment was actively terminated. The biofilm developed up to a thickness of 70-120 µm. Surprisingly, the biofilm stopped growing at this thickness and stayed constant without any detachment events occurring afterwards. The substrates CO2 and light were supplied in a counter-current fashion. Confocal microscopy revealed a throughout photosynthetically active biofilm, indicated by the red fluorescence of photo pigments. This control concept and biofilm reaction setup may enable continuous light driven synthesis of value added compounds in future. PMID:25948048

  11. The Effect of Gold and Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles on Biofilm-Forming Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayanan, Madhu Bala; Balachandranath, Reneta; Genji Srinivasulu, Yuvasri; Kannaiyan, Sathish Kumar; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash

    2013-01-01

    Microbial biofilms on biomaterial implants or devices are hard to eliminate by antibiotics due to their protection by exopolymeric substances that embed the organisms in a matrix, impenetrable for most antibiotics and immune-cells. Application of metals in their nanoparticulated form is currently considered to resolve bacterial infections. Gold and iron-oxide nanoparticles are widely used in different medical applications, but their utilisation to eradicate biofilms on biomaterials implants is novel. Here, we studied the effect of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We report that biofilm growth was reduced at higher concentrations of gold and iron-oxide nanoparticles compared to absence of nanoparticles. Thus nanoparticles with appropriate concentration could show significant reduction in biofilm formation. PMID:24187645

  12. Plasma-Mediated Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Grown on Borosilicate Surfaces under Continuous Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Vandervoort, Kurt G.; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturabilty are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation/sterilization of biofilms grown in a continuous system. PMID:25302815

  13. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    PubMed

    Vandervoort, Kurt G; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation/sterilization of biofilms grown in a continuous system. PMID:25302815

  14. Global and local health burden trade-off through the hybridisation of quantitative microbial risk assessment and life cycle assessment to aid water management.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yumi; Peters, Greg M; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Heimersson, Sara; Svanström, Magdalena; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) and quantitative risk assessment (QRA) are commonly used to evaluate potential human health impacts associated with proposed or existing infrastructure and products. Each approach has a distinct objective and, consequently, their conclusions may be inconsistent or contradictory. It is proposed that the integration of elements of QRA and LCA may provide a more holistic approach to health impact assessment. Here we examine the possibility of merging LCA assessed human health impacts with quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) for waterborne pathogen impacts, expressed with the common health metric, disability adjusted life years (DALYs). The example of a recent large-scale water recycling project in Sydney, Australia was used to identify and demonstrate the potential advantages and current limitations of this approach. A comparative analysis of two scenarios - with and without the development of this project - was undertaken for this purpose. LCA and QMRA were carried out independently for the two scenarios to compare human health impacts, as measured by DALYs lost per year. LCA results suggested that construction of the project would lead to an increased number of DALYs lost per year, while estimated disease burden resulting from microbial exposures indicated that it would result in the loss of fewer DALYs per year than the alternative scenario. By merging the results of the LCA and QMRA, we demonstrate the advantages in providing a more comprehensive assessment of human disease burden for the two scenarios, in particular, the importance of considering the results of both LCA and QRA in a comparative assessment of decision alternatives to avoid problem shifting. The application of DALYs as a common measure between the two approaches was found to be useful for this purpose. PMID:25965885

  15. Swansong Biospheres: Refuges for life and novel microbial biospheres on terrestrial planets near the end of their habitable lifetimes

    E-print Network

    O'Malley-James, J T; Raven, J A; Cockell, C S

    2012-01-01

    The future biosphere on Earth (as with its past) will be made up predominantly of unicellular microorganisms. Unicellular life was probably present for at least 2.5 Gyr before multicellular life appeared and will likely be the only form of life capable of surviving on the planet in the far future, when the ageing Sun causes environmental conditions to become more hostile to more complex forms of life. Therefore, it is statistically more likely that habitable Earth-like exoplanets we discover will be at a stage in their habitable lifetime more conducive to supporting unicellular, rather than multicellular life. The end stage of habitability on Earth is the focus of this work. A simple, latitude-based climate model incorporating eccentricity and obliquity variations is used as a guide to the temperature evolution of the Earth over the next 3 Gyr. This allows inferences to be made about potential refuges for life, particularly in mountains and cold-trap (ice) caves and what forms of life could live in these envi...

  16. Significance of fluid regime and wetted area in biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Muslu, Yilmaz

    2002-06-01

    Mass transfer within microbial films was described using Monod-type biological kinetics in terms of properties of filter media and feed solution. The performance characteristics of a trickling filter were thus modeled. The model enables one to consider the effect of inlet substrate concentration and flow rate upon the removal efficiency. For this purpose a second-order partial differential equation describing the dispersion phenomena inside the liquid layer was solved under special boundary conditions and used to determine substrate flux into the biofilm. A uniform biofilm thickness was considered. The model is based on computer techniques and the numerical evaluation of the normalized biofilm mathematical model. A design procedure was also given to calculate biological filters. The numerical model was also applied to experimental data to demonstrate its validity. PMID:12109815

  17. NMR methods for in-situ biofilm metabolism studies

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Pinchuk, Gregory E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Wind, Robert A.

    2005-09-01

    Novel procedures and instrumentation are described for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging studies of live, in situ microbial films. A perfused NMR/optical microscope sample chamber containing a planar biofilm support was integrated into a recirculation/dilution flow loop growth reactor system and used to grow in situ Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 biofilms. Localized NMR techniques were developed and used to non-invasively monitor time-resolved metabolite concentrations and to image the biomass volume and distribution. As a first illustration of the feasibility of the methodology an initial 13C-labeled lactate metabolic pathway study was performed, yielding results consistent with existing genomic data for MR-1. These results represent progress toward our ultimate goal of correlating time- and depth-resolved metabolism and mass transport with gene expression in live in situ biofilms using combined NMR/optical microscopy techniques.

  18. Perchlorate reduction in microbial electrolysis cell with polyaniline modified cathode.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Jia; Gao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Shu-Guang; Song, Chao; Xu, Yan-Yan

    2015-02-01

    Excellent perchlorate reduction was obtained under various initial concentrations in a non-membrane microbial electrolysis cell with polyaniline (PANI) modified graphite cathode as sole electron donor. PANI modification is conducive to the formation of biofilm due to its porous structure and good electrocatalytic performance. Compared with cathode without biofilm, over 12% higher reduction rates were acquired in the presence of biocathode. The study demonstrates that, instead of perchlorate reduction, the main contribution of biofilm is involved in facilitate electron transfer from cathode to electrolyte. Interestingly, hairlike structure, referred as to pili-like, was observed in the biofilm as well as in the electrolyte. Additionally, the results show that pili were prone to formation under the condition of external electron field as sole electron donor. Analysis of microbial community suggests that perchlorate reduction bacteria community was most consistent with Azospiraoryzae strain DSM 13638 in the subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. PMID:25479396

  19. Use of fixed micro-algae as a direct, simple and quickly measurable indicator of biofilm density in biofilters in order to improve washing operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Delahaye; R. Boussahel; T. Petitgand; J. P. Duguet; A. Montiel

    2005-01-01

    Slow sand filtration is a biological means of surface water clarification that involves both biological and physical mechanisms. During this process, as time progresses, microbiological growth occurs, mainly consisting of micro-algae and bacteria which form a fixed microbial ecosystem (biofilm) on the sand of biofilters. The establishment and maintenance of this biofilm are necessary for an effective treatment because some

  20. Teaching Microbial Identification

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wenfa Ng

    Rapid detection and identification of microorganisms is important for clinical diagnostics and quality control in the food industry. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged over the past decade as a rapid and relatively low-cost microbial identification tool. MALDI-TOF MS microbial typing has received less attention in undergraduate life sciences curriculum relative to culture- and 16S rRNA based techniques. Herein, a simple inquiry-based laboratory exercise for teaching microbial identification using a combined MALDI-TOF MS and proteome database search approach is described.

  1. CMEIAS-aided microscopy of the spatial ecology of individual bacterial interactions involving cell-to-cell communication within biofilms.

    PubMed

    Dazzo, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how the quantitative analytical tools of CMEIAS image analysis software can be used to investigate in situ microbial interactions involving cell-to-cell communication within biofilms. Various spatial pattern analyses applied to the data extracted from the 2-dimensional coordinate positioning of individual bacterial cells at single-cell resolution indicate that microbial colonization within natural biofilms is not a spatially random process, but rather involves strong positive interactions between communicating cells that influence their neighbors' aggregated colonization behavior. Geostatistical analysis of the data provide statistically defendable estimates of the micrometer scale and interpolation maps of the spatial heterogeneity and local intensity at which these microbial interactions autocorrelate with their spatial patterns of distribution. Including in situ image analysis in cell communication studies fills an important gap in understanding the spatially dependent microbial ecophysiology that governs the intensity of biofilm colonization and its unique architecture. PMID:22969336

  2. CMEIAS-Aided Microscopy of the Spatial Ecology of Individual Bacterial Interactions Involving Cell-to-Cell Communication within Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Frank B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how the quantitative analytical tools of CMEIAS image analysis software can be used to investigate in situ microbial interactions involving cell-to-cell communication within biofilms. Various spatial pattern analyses applied to the data extracted from the 2-dimensional coordinate positioning of individual bacterial cells at single-cell resolution indicate that microbial colonization within natural biofilms is not a spatially random process, but rather involves strong positive interactions between communicating cells that influence their neighbors' aggregated colonization behavior. Geostatistical analysis of the data provide statistically defendable estimates of the micrometer scale and interpolation maps of the spatial heterogeneity and local intensity at which these microbial interactions autocorrelate with their spatial patterns of distribution. Including in situ image analysis in cell communication studies fills an important gap in understanding the spatially dependent microbial ecophysiology that governs the intensity of biofilm colonization and its unique architecture. PMID:22969336

  3. Modified wound dressing with phyto-nanostructured coating to prevent staphylococcal and pseudomonal biofilm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, Ion; Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Ficai, Anton; Anghel, Alina Georgiana; Maganu, Maria; Laz?r, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports a newly fabricated nanophyto-modified wound dressing with microbicidal and anti-adherence properties. Nanofluid-based magnetite doped with eugenol or limonene was used to fabricate modified wound dressings. Nanostructure coated materials were characterized by TEM, XRD, and FT-IR. For the quantitative measurement of biofilm-embedded microbial cells, a culture-based method for viable cell count was used. The optimized textile dressing samples proved to be more resistant to staphylococcal and pseudomonal colonization and biofilm formation compared to the uncoated controls. The functionalized surfaces for wound dressing seems to be a very useful tool for the prevention of wound microbial contamination on viable tissues.

  4. Investigations into Monochloramine Biofilm Penetration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. However, this hypothesis remains unconfirmed by direct b...

  5. New In Vitro Model To Study the Effect of Human Simulated Antibiotic Concentrations on Bacterial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Haagensen, Janus A J; Verotta, Davide; Huang, Liusheng; Spormann, Alfred; Yang, Katherine

    2015-07-01

    A new in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic simulator for bacterial biofilms utilizing flow cell technology and confocal laser scanning microscopy is described. The device has the ability to simulate the changing antibiotic concentrations in humans associated with intravenous dosing on bacterial biofilms grown under continuous culture conditions. The free drug concentrations of a single 2-g meropenem intravenous bolus dose and first-order elimination utilizing a half-life of 0.895 h (elimination rate constant, 0.776 h(-1)) were simulated. The antibacterial activity of meropenem against biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and three clinical strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis was investigated. Additionally, the effect of meropenem on PAO1 biofilms cultured for 24 h versus that on biofilms cultured for 72 h was examined. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, rapid biofilm killing was observed in the first hour of the dosing interval for all biofilms. However, for PAO1 biofilms cultured for 72 h, only bacterial subpopulations at the periphery of the biofilm were affected, with subpopulations at the substratum remaining viable, even at the conclusion of the dosing interval. The described model is a novel method to investigate antimicrobial killing of bacterial biofilms using human simulated concentrations. PMID:25918138

  6. D-amino acids indirectly inhibit biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis by interfering with protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Leiman, Sara A; May, Janine M; Lebar, Matthew D; Kahne, Daniel; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms on surfaces and at air-liquid interfaces. It was previously reported that these biofilms disassemble late in their life cycle and that conditioned medium from late-stage biofilms inhibits biofilm formation. Such medium contained a mixture of D-leucine, D-methionine, D-tryptophan, and D-tyrosine and was reported to inhibit biofilm formation via the incorporation of these D-amino acids into the cell wall. Here, we show that L-amino acids were able to specifically reverse the inhibitory effects of their cognate D-amino acids. We also show that D-amino acids inhibited growth and the expression of biofilm matrix genes at concentrations that inhibit biofilm formation. Finally, we report that the strain routinely used to study biofilm formation has a mutation in the gene (dtd) encoding D-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, an enzyme that prevents the misincorporation of D-amino acids into protein in B. subtilis. When we repaired the dtd gene, B. subtilis became resistant to the biofilm-inhibitory effects of D-amino acids without losing the ability to incorporate at least one noncanonical D-amino acid, D-tryptophan, into the peptidoglycan peptide side chain. We conclude that the susceptibility of B. subtilis to the biofilm-inhibitory effects of D-amino acids is largely, if not entirely, due to their toxic effects on protein synthesis. PMID:24097941

  7. Microbial Diversity in Surface Iron-Rich Aqueous Environments: Implications for Seeking Signs of Life on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. I.; Allen, C. C.; Tringe, S. G.; Klatt, C. G.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Garrison, D. H.; McKay, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The success of selecting future landing sites on Mars to discover extinct and/or extant extraterrestrial life is dependent on the correct approximation of available knowledge about terrestrial paleogeochemistry and life evolution to Martian (paleo) geology and geochemistry. It is well known that both Earth and Mars are Fe rich. This widespread occurrence suggests that Fe may have played a key role in early life forms, where it probably served as a key constituent in early prosthetic moieties in many proteins of ancient microbes on Earth and likely Mars. The second critical idea is the premise that Life on Mars could most likely have developed when Mars experienced tectonic activity [1] which dramatically decreased around 1 bin years after Martian creation. After that Martian life could have gone extinct or hibernated in the deep subsurface, which would be expensive to reach in contrast to the successful work of Martian surface rovers. Here we analyze the diversity of microbes in several terrestrial Fe rich surface environments in conjunction with the phylogeny and molecular timing of emergence of those microbes on Earth. Anticipated results should help evaluate future landing sites on Mars in searches for biosignatures.

  8. Antimicrobial Photoinactivation Using Visible Light Plus Water-Filtered Infrared-A (VIS + wIRA) Alters In Situ Oral Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahmad, A.; Bucher, M.; Anderson, A. C.; Tennert, C.; Hellwig, E.; Wittmer, A.; Vach, K.; Karygianni, L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, growing attention has been paid to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in dentistry. Changing the microbial composition of initial and mature oral biofilm by aPDT using visible light plus water-filtered infrared-A wavelengths (VIS + wIRA) has not yet been investigated. Moreover, most aPDT studies have been conducted on planktonic bacterial cultures. Therefore, in the present clinical study we cultivated initial and mature oral biofilms in six healthy volunteers for 2 hours or 3 days, respectively. The biofilms were treated with aPDT using VIS+wIRA (200 mW cm-2), toluidine blue (TB) and chlorine e6 (Ce6) for 5 minutes. Chlorhexidine treated biofilm samples served as positive controls, while untreated biofilms served as negative controls. After aPDT treatment the colony forming units (CFU) of the biofilm samples were quantified, and the surviving bacteria were isolated in pure cultures and identified using MALDI-TOF, biochemical tests and 16S rDNA-sequencing. aPDT killed more than 99.9% of the initial viable bacterial count and 95% of the mature oral biofilm in situ, independent of the photosensitizer. The number of surviving bacterial species was highly reduced to 6 (TB) and 4 (Ce6) in the treated initial oral biofilm compared to the 20 different species of the untreated biofilm. The proportions of surviving bacterial species were also changed after TB- and Ce6-mediated aPDT of the mature oral biofilm, resulting in a shift in the microbial composition of the treated biofilm compared to that of the control biofilm. In conclusion, aPDT using VIS + wIRA showed a remarkable potential to eradicate both initial and mature oral biofilms, and also to markedly alter the remaining biofilm. This encourages the clinical use of aPDT with VIS + wIRA for the treatment of periimplantitis and periodontitis. PMID:26162100

  9. Phototrophic Biofilms on Ancient Mayan Buildings in Yucatan, Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Otto Ortega-Morales; Jean Guezennec; Guillermo Hernández-Duque; Christine C. Gaylarde; Peter M. Gaylarde

    2000-01-01

    .   Buildings at the important archaeological sites of Uxmal and Kabah, Mexico, are being degraded by microbial biofilms. Phospholipid\\u000a fatty acid (PLFA) and chlorophyll a analyses indicated that phototrophs were the major epilithic microorganisms and were more prevalent on interior walls than\\u000a exterior walls. Culture and microscopical techniques showed that Xenococcus formed the major biomass on interior surfaces, but the

  10. Quantitative analyses of Streptococcus mutans biofilms with quartz crystal microbalance, microjet impingement and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kreth, J.; Hagerman, E.; Tam, K.; Merritt, J.; Wong, D. T. W.; Wu, B. M.; Myung, N. V.; Shi, W.; Qi, F.

    2005-01-01

    Microbial biofilm formation can be influenced by many physiological and genetic factors. The conventional microtiter plate assay provides useful but limited information about biofilm formation. With the fast expansion of the biofilm research field, there are urgent needs for more informative techniques to quantify the major parameters of a biofilm, such as adhesive strength and total biomass. It would be even more ideal if these measurements could be conducted in a real-time, non-invasive manner. In this study, we used quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and microjet impingement (MJI) to measure total biomass and adhesive strength, respectively, of S. mutans biofilms formed under different sucrose concentrations. In conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and the COMSTAT software, we show that sucrose concentration affects the biofilm strength, total biomass, and architecture in both qualitative and quantitative manners. Our data correlate well with previous observations about the effect of sucrose on the adherence of S. mutans to the tooth surface, and demonstrate that QCM is a useful tool for studying the kinetics of biofilm formation in real time and that MJI is a sensitive, easy-to-use device to measure the adhesive strength of a biofilm. PMID:16429589

  11. In vitro modulation of probiotic bacteria on the biofilm of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Chew, Shu Yih; Cheah, Yoke Kqueen; Seow, Heng Fong; Sandai, Doblin; Than, Leslie Thian Lung

    2015-08-01

    A conspicuous new concept of pathogens living as the microbial societies in the human host rather than free planktonic cells has raised considerable concerns among scientists and clinicians. Fungal biofilms are communities of cells that possess distinct characteristic such as increased resistance to the immune defence and antimycotic agents in comparison to their planktonic cells counterpart. Therefore, inhibition of the biofilm may represent a new paradigm for antifungal development. In this study, we aim to evaluate the in vitro modulation of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC)-causing Candida glabrata biofilms using probiotic lactobacilli strains. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 were shown to have completely inhibited C. glabrata biofilms and the results were corroborated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which revealed scanty structures of the mixed biofilms of C. glabrata and probiotic lactobacilli strains. In addition, biofilm-related C. glabrata genes EPA6 and YAK1 were downregulated in response to the probiotic lactobacilli challenges. The present study suggested that probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri RC-14 strains inhibited C. glabrata biofilm by partially impeding the adherence of yeast cells and the effect might be contributed by the secretory compounds produced by these probiotic lactobacilli strains. Further investigations are required to examine and identify the biofilm inhibitory compounds and the mechanism of probiotic actions of these lactobacilli strains. PMID:26028405

  12. Biofilm formation on a TiO2 nanotube with controlled pore diameter and surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitha, V. C.; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jintae; Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Joo, Sang Woo; Min, Bong Ki

    2015-02-01

    Titania (TiO2) nanotube arrays (TNAs) with different pore diameters (140 ? 20 nm) are fabricated via anodization using hydrofluoric acid (HF) containing ethylene glycol (EG) by changing the HF-to-EG volume ratio and the anodization voltage. To evaluate the effects of different pore diameters of TiO2 nanotubes on bacterial biofilm formation, Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis) MR-1 cells and a crystal-violet biofilm assay are used. The surface roughness and wettability of the TNA surfaces as a function of pore diameter, measured via the contact angle and AFM techniques, are correlated with the controlled biofilm formation. Biofilm formation increases with the decreasing nanotube pore diameter, and a 20 nm TiO2 nanotube shows the maximum biofilm formation. The measurements revealed that 20 nm surfaces have the least hydrophilicity with the highest surface roughness of ˜17 nm and that they show almost a 90% increase in the effective surface area relative to the 140 nm TNAs, which stimulate the cells more effectively to produce the pili to attach to the surface for more biofilm formation. The results demonstrate that bacterial cell adhesion (and hence, biofilm formation) can effectively be controlled by tuning the roughness and wettability of TNAs via controlling the pore diameters of TNA surfaces. This biofilm formation as a function of the surface properties of TNAs can be a potential candidate for both medical applications and as electrodes in microbial fuel cells.

  13. Impact of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kone, T.; Golfier, F.; Orgogozo, L.; Oltéan, C.; Lefèvre, E.; Block, J. C.; Buès, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    In subsurface systems, biofilm may degrade organic or organometallic pollutants contributing to natural attenuation and soil bioremediation techniques. This increase of microbial activity leads to change the hydrodynamic properties of aquifers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media and more specifically on dispersivity. We pursued this goal by (i) monitoring both spatial concentration fields and solute breakthrough curves from conservative tracer experiments in a biofilm-supporting porous medium, (ii) characterizing in situ the changes in biovolume and visualizing the dynamics of the biological material at the mesoscale. A series of experiments was carried out in a flow cell system (60 cm3) with a silica sand (? = 50-70 mesh) as solid carrier and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as bacterial strain. Biofilm growth was monitored by image acquisition with a digital camera. The biofilm volume fraction was estimated through tracer experiments with the Blue Dextran macromolecule as in size-exclusion chromatography, leading to a fair picture of the biocolonization within the flow cell. Biofilm growth was achieved in the whole flow cell in 29 days and up to 50% of void space volume was plugged. The influence of biofilm maturation on porous medium transport properties was evaluated from tracer experiments using Brilliant Blue FCF. An experimental correlation was found between effective (i.e., nonbiocolonized) porosity and biofilm-affected dispersivity. Comparison with values given by the theoretical model of Taylor and Jaffé (1990b) yields a fair agreement.

  14. Moving-Medium Biofilm Reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rodgers; X.-M. Zhan

    2003-01-01

    Four moving-medium biofilm reactors treating wastewater were reviewed in this paper: the rotating biological contactor (RBC), the moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), the vertically moving biofilm reactor (VMBR) and the fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). The RBC process has been applied widely. MBBR is a good process for upgrading current wastewater treatment systems. VMBR is suitable for treating small wastewater flows. FBR

  15. Biofilms in Food Processing Environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy C. Lee Wong

    1998-01-01

    Biofilms are a constant concern in food processing environments. Our overall research focus has been to understand the interaction of factors affecting bac- terial attachment and biofilm formation with the ulti- mate goal of devising strategies to control this problem. This paper briefly describes three areas of biofilm research in which we have been involved. Listeria monocytogenes, a foodborne pathogen,

  16. A model of optimal dosing of antibiotic treatment in biofilm.

    PubMed

    Imran, Mudassar; Smith, Hal L

    2014-06-01

    Biofilms are heterogeneous matrix enclosed micro-colonies of bacteria mostly found on moist surfaces. Biofilm formation is the primary cause of several persistent infections found in humans. We derive a mathematical model of biofilm and surrounding fluid dynamics to investigate the effect of a periodic dose of antibiotic on elimination of microbial population from biofilm. The growth rate of bacteria in biofilm is taken as Monod type for the limiting nutrient. The pharmacodynamics function is taken to be dependent both on limiting nutrient and antibiotic concentration. Assuming that flow rate of fluid compartment is large enough, we reduce the six dimensional model to a three dimensional model. Mathematically rigorous results are derived providing sufficient conditions for treatment success. Persistence theory is used to derive conditions under which the periodic solution for treatment failure is obtained. We also discuss the phenomenon of bi-stability where both infection-free state and infection state are locally stable when antibiotic dosing is marginal. In addition, we derive the optimal antibiotic application protocols for different scenarios using control theory and show that such treatments ensure bacteria elimination for a wide variety of cases. The results show that bacteria are successfully eliminated if the discrete treatment is given at an early stage in the infection or if the optimal protocol is adopted. Finally, we examine factors which if changed can result in treatment success of the previously treatment failure cases for the non-optimal technique. PMID:24506551

  17. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inhibits Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Bachtiar, Endang W; Bachtiar, Boy M; Jarosz, Lucja M; Amir, Lisa R; Sunarto, Hari; Ganin, Hadas; Meijler, Michael M; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2), synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities. PMID:25101248

  18. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inhibits Candida albicans biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Bachtiar, Endang W.; Bachtiar, Boy M.; Jarosz, Lucja M.; Amir, Lisa R.; Sunarto, Hari; Ganin, Hadas; Meijler, Michael M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2), synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities. PMID:25101248

  19. Connecting Metabolic Potential with Thermodynamic Reality: Lithotrophic Microbial Communities of the Frasassi Cave System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, R. L.; Macalady, J. L.; Schaperdoth, I.

    2013-12-01

    If Martian life evolved during the Noachian period, it likely would have retreated to liquid water refuges where redox chemistry provided metabolically viable substrates. Present-day Mars appears to have such a refuge with data suggesting that liquid water may persist in the subsurface, however limited data is available with regards to subsurface Martian geochemistry and hydrogeology. On Earth, we find microbial communities thriving in subsurface environments utilizing a multitude of lithoautotrophic metabolisms. The Frasassi cave system in Italy hosts many such lithotrophic microbial communities, which are isolated from surface carbon, sunlight, and oxygen similar to possible Martian microbial populations. By studying the community structure, geochemistry and thermodynamics of the system, as well as the metabolic capabilities using metagenomics, we hope to discover microbes are capable of thriving in so-called 'energy-limited' environments and inform the search for life in the solar system. Two subsurface cave lakes in the Frasassi cave system, Lago Infinito and Lago dell'Orsa, have anoxic waters that host rope-like biofilm communities dominated by Deltaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes clades. Thermodynamic calculations based on in situ geochemistry of waters surrounding the biofilms suggest very few metabolisms are energetically-feasible including: 1) anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled with sulfate reduction 2) anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) coupled with sulfate reduction 3) methanogenesis (Lago dell'Orsa only) 4) chemotrophic sulfate reduction AOM and anammox were only recently discovered and appear to have low energy yields associated with slow growth rates. AOM coupled with sulfate reduction has been shown to occur in a syntrophy between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanotrophic Archaea. However, these rope-like biofilms have a small (<10%) Archaeal population, which are not closely related to the syntrophic methanotrophic Archaea. Could Archaea outside of the ANME clades be capable of methanotrophic syntrophy or could a single microbe utilize this metabolism? Anammox coupled with sulfate reduction is even less studied than AOM with SRB and there is no known metabolic pathway to explain its environmental presence. While methanogenesis and chemotrophic sulfate reduction are higher energy yielding reactions, they pose additional questions in regards to these cave biofilms. Methanogenesis is thermodynamically favorable in Lago dell'Orsa, but the Archaeal population is very small and not related to known methanogens. Chemotrophic sulfate reduction is well-documented, but seems unlikely given there is no reliable source of organic carbon in these systems. Metagenomics and carbon isotope data verify that autotrophic SRB are important in these biofilms meaning the organic carbon is likely from the microbial community rather than the supply of energy. Metagenomic data of these two biofilm communities and their metabolic capabilities in regards to the four above listed metabolisms will be discussed. Metagenomic binning using a variety of intrinsic nucleotide as well as long contigs (>10,000 bp) will be used to discuss genes present within the same 'organism'.

  20. Discovery of commonly existing anode biofilm microbes in two different wastewater treatment MFCs using FLX Titanium pyrosequencing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tae Kwon Lee; Tuan Van Doan; Kyuseon Yoo; Soojung Choi; Changwon Kim

    2010-01-01

    In microbial fuel cells (MFC), wastewater is used as a fuel while organic and nutrient pollution in the wastewater are being\\u000a treated. In the present study, commonly existing microbial populations in MFC anode biofilms were identified using high throughput\\u000a FLX Titanium pyrosequencing to provide much more extensive information of anode microbial communities than previously possible.\\u000a Using 454 FLX Titanium pyrosequencing,

  1. Mechanistic models of biofilm growth in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Al-Hadrami, Fathiya; Atekwana, Estella A.; Atekwana, Eliot A.

    2014-07-01

    Nondestructive acoustics methods can be used to monitor in situ biofilm growth in porous media. In practice, however, acoustic methods remain underutilized due to the lack of models that can translate acoustic data into rock properties in the context of biofilm. In this paper we present mechanistic models of biofilm growth in porous media. The models are used to quantitatively interpret arrival times and amplitudes recorded in the 29 day long Davis et al. (2010) physical scale biostimulation experiment in terms of biofilm morphologies and saturation. The model pivots on addressing the sediment elastic behavior using the lower Hashin-Shtrikman bounds for grain mixing and Gassmann substitution for fluid saturation. The time-lapse P wave velocity (VP; a function of arrival times) is explained by a combination of two rock models (morphologies); "load bearing" which assumes the biofilm as an additional mineral in the rock matrix and "pore filling" which assumes the biofilm as an additional fluid phase in the pores. The time-lapse attenuation (QP-1; a function of amplitudes), on the other hand, can be explained adequately in two ways; first, through squirt flow where energy is lost from relative motion between rock matrix and pore fluid, and second, through an empirical function of porosity (?), permeability (?), and grain size. The squirt flow model-fitting results in higher internal ? (7% versus 5%) and more oblate pores (0.33 versus 0.67 aspect ratio) for the load-bearing morphology versus the pore-filling morphology. The empirical model-fitting results in up to 10% increase in ? at the initial stages of the load-bearing morphology. The two morphologies which exhibit distinct mechanical and hydraulic behavior could be a function of pore throat size. The biofilm mechanistic models developed in this study can be used for the interpretation of seismic data critical for the evaluation of biobarriers in bioremediation, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and CO2 sequestration.