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1

Microbial ecology of phototrophic biofilms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biofilms are layered structures of microbial cells and an extracellular matrix of polymeric substances, associated with surfaces and interfaces. Biofilms trap nutrients for growth of the enclosed microbial community and help prevent detachment of cells from surfaces in flowing systems.\\u000aPhototrophic biofilms can best be defined as surface attached microbial communities mainly driven by light as the energy source with

G. Roeselers

2007-01-01

2

Manipulatiaon of Biofilm Microbial Ecology  

SciTech Connect

The Biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms by generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desquamation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in the distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Palmer, R.J.; Smith, C.A.; Whitaker, K.W.; White, D.C.; Zinn, M.; kirkegaard, R.

1998-08-09

3

Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology  

SciTech Connect

The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

1998-08-15

4

Microbial biofilm studies of the Environmental Control and Life Support System water recovery test for Space Station Freedom  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analysis of biofilm accumulation, studies of iodine disinfection of biofilm, and the potential for microbially influenced corrosion in the water recovery test (WRT) are presented. The analysis of WRT components showed the presence of biofilms and organic deposits in selected tubing. Water samples from the WRT contained sulfate-reducing and acid-producing organisms implicated in corrosion processes. Corrosion of an aluminum alloy was accelerated in the presence of these water samples, but stainless steel corrosion rates were not accelerated.

Obenhuber, D. C.; Huff, T. L.; Rodgers, E. B.

1991-01-01

5

Posttranslational modification and sequence variation of redox-active proteins correlate with biofilm life cycle in natural microbial communities  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing proteins recovered from natural microbial communities affords the opportunity to correlate protein expression and modification with environmental factors, including species composition and successional stage. Proteogenomic and biochemical studies of pellicle biofilms from subsurface acid mine drainage streams have shown abundant cytochromes from the dominant organism, Leptospirillum Group II. These cytochromes are proposed to be key proteins in aerobic Fe(II) oxidation, the dominant mode of cellular energy generation by the biofilms. In this study, we determined that posttranslational modification and expression of amino-acid sequence variants change as a function of biofilm maturation. For Cytochrome579 (Cyt579), the most abundant cytochrome in the biofilms, late developmental-stage biofilms differed from early-stage biofilms in N-terminal truncations and decreased redox potentials. Expression of sequence variants of two monoheme c-type cytochromes also depended on biofilm development. For Cyt572, an abundant membrane-bound cytochrome, the expression of multiple sequence variants was observed in both early and late developmental-stage biofilms; however, redox potentials of Cyt572 from these different sources did not vary significantly. These cytochrome analyses show a complex response of the Leptospirillum Group II electron transport chain to growth within a microbial community and illustrate the power of multiple proteomics techniques to define biochemistry in natural systems.

Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley

2010-01-01

6

Microbial biofilms: biosurfactants as antibiofilm agents.  

PubMed

Current microbial inhibition strategies based on planktonic bacterial physiology have been known to have limited efficacy on the growth of biofilm communities. This problem can be exacerbated by the emergence of increasingly resistant clinical strains. All aspects of biofilm measurement, monitoring, dispersal, control, and inhibition are becoming issues of increasing importance. Biosurfactants have merited renewed interest in both clinical and hygienic sectors due to their potential to disperse microbial biofilms in addition to many other advantages. The dispersal properties of biosurfactants have been shown to rival those of conventional inhibitory agents against bacterial and yeast biofilms. This makes them suitable candidates for use in new generations of microbial dispersal agents and for use as adjuvants for existing microbial suppression or eradication strategies. In this review, we explore aspects of biofilm characteristics and examine the contribution of biologically derived surface-active agents (biosurfactants) to the disruption or inhibition of microbial biofilms. PMID:25359476

Banat, Ibrahim M; De Rienzo, Mayri A Díaz; Quinn, Gerry A

2014-12-01

7

Voice prostheses, microbial colonization and biofilm formation.  

PubMed

Total laryngectomy is performed in advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer stages and results in reduced quality of life due to the loss of voice and smell, permanent tracheostoma and occasionally dysphagia. Therefore, successful voice rehabilitation is highly beneficial for the patients' quality of life after surgery. Over the past decades, voice prostheses have evolved to the gold standard in rehabilitation and allow faster and superior voicing results after laryngectomy compared to esophageal speech. Polyspecies biofilm formation has become the limiting factor for device lifetimes and causes prosthesis dysfunction, leakage and in consequence pneumonia, if not replaced immediately. Although major improvements in prosthesis design have been made and scientific insight in the complexity of biofilm evolution and material interaction progresses, the microbial colonization continues to restrict device lifetimes, causing patient discomfort and elevated health costs. However, present scientific findings and advances in technology yield promising future approaches to improve the situation for laryngectomized patients. PMID:25366225

Leonhard, Matthias; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

2015-01-01

8

MICROBIAL BIOFILMS AS INDICATORS OF ESTUARINE CONDITION  

EPA Science Inventory

Microbial biofilms are complex communities of bacteria, protozoa, microalgae, and micrometazoa which exist in a polymer matrix on submerged surfaces. Their development is integrative of environmental conditions and is affected by local biodiversity, the availability of organic ma...

9

Microbial biofilms in ophthalmology and infectious disease.  

PubMed

Most bacterial infections involve biofilms. Biofilms are collections of microorganisms encased in a matrix that is often composed of both bacterial and host materials. They form on natural surfaces such as heart valves or abiotic surfaces such as contact lenses or intraocular lenses. The biofilm matrix promotes adherence of the microbe to smooth surfaces as well as to other cells. Biofilms thereby form large 3-dimensional microbial communities of complex architecture through cell-to-cell communication and coordinated multicellular behavior. The biofilm architecture promotes the exchange of nutrients and waste products. The ability of microorganisms to attach to abiotic surfaces and grow in highly stable communities greatly confounds the medical use of implantable devices. Much effort is now being invested to understand the molecular nature of biofilms, with a view toward designing biofilm-resistant implantable devices and more effective antimicrobials. PMID:19001227

Behlau, Irmgard; Gilmore, Michael S

2008-11-01

10

Molecular Survey of Concrete Biofilm Microbial Communities  

EPA Science Inventory

Although several studies have shown that bacteria can deteriorate concrete structures, there is very little information on the composition of concrete microbial communities. To this end, we studied different microbial communities associated with concrete biofilms using 16S rRNA g...

11

Spatial Distributions of Copper in Microbial Biofilms by Scanning  

E-print Network

Spatial Distributions of Copper in Microbial Biofilms by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Z H I resulting in heterogeneous surface coatings (or biofilms) consisting of the attached microbial population macroscopic 3-D structures containing pores, channels, and mushroom- shaped protuberances (3

Houston, Paul L.

12

Microbial biofilms in intertidal systems: an overview  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intertidal marine systems are highly dynamic systems which are characterized by periodic fluctuations in environmental parameters. Microbial processes play critical roles in the remineralization of nutrients and primary production in intertidal systems. Many of the geochemical and biological processes which are mediated by microorganisms occur within microenvironments which can be measured over micrometer spatial scales. These processes are localized by cells within a matrix of extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), collectively called a "microbial biofilm". Recent examinations of intertidal systems by a range of investigators using new approaches show an abundance of biofilm communities. The purpose of this overview is to examine recent information concerning the roles of microbial biofilms in intertidal systems. The microbial biofilm is a common adaptation of natural bacteria and other microorganisms. In the fluctuating environments of intertidal systems, biofilms form protective microenvironments and may structure a range of microbial processes. The EPS matrix of biofilm forms sticky coatings on individual sediment particles and detrital surfaces, which act as a stabilizing anchor to buffer cells and their extracellular processes during the frequent physical stresses (e.g., changes in salinity and temperature, UV irradiation, dessication). EPS is an operational definition designed to encompass a range of large microbially-secreted molecules having widely varying physical and chemical properties, and a range of biological roles. Examinations of EPS using Raman and Fourier-transform infared spectroscopy, and atomic-force microscopy suggest that some EPS gels possess physical and chemical properties which may hasten the development of sharp geochemical gradients, and contribute a protective effect to cells. Biofilm polymers act as a sorptive sponge which binds and concentrates organic molecules and ions close to cells. Concurrently, the EPS appear to localize extracellular enzyme activities of bacteria, and hence contribute to the efficient biomineralization of organics. At larger spatial scales, the copious secretion of specific types of EPS by diatoms on the surfaces of intertidal mudflats may stabilize sediments against resuspension. Biofilms exert important roles in environmental- and public health processes occurring within intertidal systems. The sorptive properties of EPS effectively chelate toxic metals and other contaminants, which then act as an efficient trophic-transfer vehicle for the entry of contaminants into food webs. In the water column, biofilm microenvironments in suspended flocs may form a stabilizing refugia that enhances the survival and propagation of pathogenic (i.e., disease-causing) bacteria entering coastal waters from terrestrial and freshwater sources. The EPS matrix affords microbial cells a tremendous potential for resiliency during periods of stress, and may enhance the overall physiological activities of bacteria. It is emphasized here that the influences of small-scale microbial biofilms must be addressed in understanding larger-scale processes within intertidal systems.

Decho, Alan W.

2000-07-01

13

Microbial Biofilms: from Ecology to Molecular Genetics  

PubMed Central

Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms attached to surfaces or associated with interfaces. Despite the focus of modern microbiology research on pure culture, planktonic (free-swimming) bacteria, it is now widely recognized that most bacteria found in natural, clinical, and industrial settings persist in association with surfaces. Furthermore, these microbial communities are often composed of multiple species that interact with each other and their environment. The determination of biofilm architecture, particularly the spatial arrangement of microcolonies (clusters of cells) relative to one another, has profound implications for the function of these complex communities. Numerous new experimental approaches and methodologies have been developed in order to explore metabolic interactions, phylogenetic groupings, and competition among members of the biofilm. To complement this broad view of biofilm ecology, individual organisms have been studied using molecular genetics in order to identify the genes required for biofilm development and to dissect the regulatory pathways that control the plankton-to-biofilm transition. These molecular genetic studies have led to the emergence of the concept of biofilm formation as a novel system for the study of bacterial development. The recent explosion in the field of biofilm research has led to exciting progress in the development of new technologies for studying these communities, advanced our understanding of the ecological significance of surface-attached bacteria, and provided new insights into the molecular genetic basis of biofilm development. PMID:11104821

Davey, Mary Ellen; O'toole, George A.

2000-01-01

14

Microbial Biofilms: How Effective in Rhizobium –Legume Symbiosis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Diverse genera of bacteria live as microbial communities called biofilms on biotic or abiotic surfaces, or interfaces. They\\u000a exhibit elevated microbial action, as a result of symbiosis in biofilm structure and physiological adaptation. The formation\\u000a of fungal–bacterial biofilms by bacterial colonization on biotic fungal surfaces gives the biofilms enhanced microbial effectiveness\\u000a compared to monocultures. When the bacteria include rhizobia, they

G. Seneviratne; M. L. M. A. W. Weerasekara; J. S. Zavahir

15

Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link  

PubMed Central

Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals – clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human) studies, abstracts, review articles. PMID:23633764

Dhir, Sangeeta

2013-01-01

16

Biophysical controls on cluster dynamics and architectural differentiation of microbial biofilms in contrasting flow environments  

PubMed Central

Ecology, with a traditional focus on plants and animals, seeks to understand the mechanisms underlying structure and dynamics of communities. In microbial ecology, the focus is changing from planktonic communities to attached biofilms that dominate microbial life in numerous systems. Therefore, interest in the structure and function of biofilms is on the rise. Biofilms can form reproducible physical structures (i.e. architecture) at the millimetre-scale, which are central to their functioning. However, the spatial dynamics of the clusters conferring physical structure to biofilms remains often elusive. By experimenting with complex microbial communities forming biofilms in contrasting hydrodynamic microenvironments in stream mesocosms, we show that morphogenesis results in ‘ripple-like’ and ‘star-like’ architectures – as they have also been reported from monospecies bacterial biofilms, for instance. To explore the potential contribution of demographic processes to these architectures, we propose a size-structured population model to simulate the dynamics of biofilm growth and cluster size distribution. Our findings establish that basic physical and demographic processes are key forces that shape apparently universal biofilm architectures as they occur in diverse microbial but also in single-species bacterial biofilms. PMID:23879839

Hödl, Iris; Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Suweis, Samir; Besemer, Katharina; Rinaldo, Andrea; Battin, Tom J

2014-01-01

17

Biophysical controls on cluster dynamics and architectural differentiation of microbial biofilms in contrasting flow environments.  

PubMed

Ecology, with a traditional focus on plants and animals, seeks to understand the mechanisms underlying structure and dynamics of communities. In microbial ecology, the focus is changing from planktonic communities to attached biofilms that dominate microbial life in numerous systems. Therefore, interest in the structure and function of biofilms is on the rise. Biofilms can form reproducible physical structures (i.e. architecture) at the millimetre-scale, which are central to their functioning. However, the spatial dynamics of the clusters conferring physical structure to biofilms remains often elusive. By experimenting with complex microbial communities forming biofilms in contrasting hydrodynamic microenvironments in stream mesocosms, we show that morphogenesis results in 'ripple-like' and 'star-like' architectures--as they have also been reported from monospecies bacterial biofilms, for instance. To explore the potential contribution of demographic processes to these architectures, we propose a size-structured population model to simulate the dynamics of biofilm growth and cluster size distribution. Our findings establish that basic physical and demographic processes are key forces that shape apparently universal biofilm architectures as they occur in diverse microbial but also in single-species bacterial biofilms. PMID:23879839

Hödl, Iris; Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Suweis, Samir; Besemer, Katharina; Rinaldo, Andrea; Battin, Tom J

2014-03-01

18

Environmental transcriptome analysis reveals physiological differences between biofilm and planktonic modes of life of the iron oxidizing bacteria Leptospirillum spp. in their natural microbial community  

PubMed Central

Background Extreme acidic environments are characterized by their high metal content and lack of nutrients (oligotrophy). Macroscopic biofilms and filaments usually grow on the water-air interface or under the stream attached to solid substrates (streamers). In the Río Tinto (Spain), brown filaments develop under the water stream where the Gram-negative iron-oxidizing bacteria Leptospirillum spp. (L. ferrooxidans and L. ferriphilum) and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans are abundant. These microorganisms play a critical role in bioleaching processes for industrial (biominery) and environmental applications (acid mine drainage, bioremediation). The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological differences between the free living (planktonic) and the sessile (biofilm associated) lifestyles of Leptospirillum spp. as part of its natural extremely acidophilic community. Results Total RNA extracted from environmental samples was used to determine the composition of the metabolically active members of the microbial community and then to compare the biofilm and planktonic environmental transcriptomes by hybridizing to a genomic microarray of L. ferrooxidans. Genes up-regulated in the filamentous biofilm are involved in cellular functions related to biofilm formation and maintenance, such as: motility and quorum sensing (mqsR, cheAY, fliA, motAB), synthesis of cell wall structures (lnt, murA, murB), specific proteases (clpX/clpP), stress response chaperons (clpB, clpC, grpE-dnaKJ, groESL), etc. Additionally, genes involved in mixed acid fermentation (poxB, ackA) were up-regulated in the biofilm. This result, together with the presence of small organic acids like acetate and formate (1.36 mM and 0.06 mM respectively) in the acidic (pH 1.8) water stream, suggests that either L. ferrooxidans or other member of the microbial community are producing acetate in the acidophilic biofilm under microaerophilic conditions. Conclusions Our results indicate that the acidophilic filaments are dynamic structures in which different mechanisms for biofilm formation/dispersion are operating. Specific transcriptomic fingerprints can be inferred for both planktonic and sessile cells, having the former a more active TCA cycle, while the mixed acid fermentation process dominate in the latter. The excretion of acetate may play a relevant ecological role as a source of electron donor for heterotrophic Fe3+ reducers like some Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacterium spp. and Sulfobacillus spp., also present in the biofilm. Additionally, acetate may have a negative effect on bioleaching by inhibiting the growth of chemolithotrophic bacteria. PMID:20576116

2010-01-01

19

Microbial biofilm formation and its consequences for the CELSS program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A major goal of the Controlled Ecology Life Support System (CELSS) program is to provide reliable and efficient life support systems for long-duration space flights. A principal focus of the program is on the growth of higher plants in growth chambers. These crops should be grown without the risk of damage from microbial contamination. While it is unlikely that plant pathogens will pose a risk, there are serious hazards associated with microorganisms carried in the nutrient delivery systems and in the atmosphere of the growth chamber. Our experience in surface microbiology showed that colonization of surfaces with microorganisms is extremely rapid even when the inoculum is small. After initial colonization extensive biofilms accumulate on moist surfaces. These microbial films metabolize actively and slough off continuously to the air and water. During plant growth in the CELSS program, microbial biofilms have the potential to foul sensors and to plug nutrient delivery systems. In addition both metabolic products of microbial growth and degradation products of materials being considered for use as nutrient reservoirs and for delivery are likely sources of chemicals known to adversly affect plant growth.

Mitchell, R.

1994-01-01

20

MICROBIAL BIOFILMS AS INTEGRATIVE SENSORS OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Snyder, Richard A., Michael A. Lewis, Andreas Nocker and Joe E. Lepo. In press. Microbial Biofilms as Integrative Sensors of Environmental Quality. In: Estuarine Indicators Workshop Proceedings. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. 34 p. (ERL,GB 1198). Microbial biofilms are comple...

21

Microbial composition and antibiotic resistance of biofilms recovered from endotracheal tubes of mechanically ventilated patients.  

PubMed

In critically ill patients, breathing is impaired and mechanical ventilation, using an endotracheal tube (ET) connected to a ventilator, is necessary. Although mechanical ventilation is a life-saving procedure, it is not without risk. Because of several reasons, a biofilm often forms at the distal end of the ET and this biofilm is a persistent source of bacteria which can infect the lungs, causing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). There is a link between the microbial flora of ET biofilms and the microorganisms involved in the onset of VAP. Culture dependent and independent techniques were already used to identify the microbial flora of ET biofilms and also, the antibiotic resistance of microorganisms obtained from ET biofilms was determined. The ESKAPE pathogens play a dominant role in the onset of VAP and these organisms were frequently identified in ET biofilms. Also, antibiotic resistant microorganisms were frequently present in ET biofilms. Members of the normal oral flora were also identified in ET biofilms but it is thought that these organisms initiate ET biofilm formation and are not directly involved in the development of VAP. PMID:25366226

Vandecandelaere, Ilse; Coenye, Tom

2015-01-01

22

Unraveling the resistance of microbial biofilms: has proteomics been helpful?  

PubMed

Biofilms are surface-attached, matrix-encased, structured microbial communities which display phenotypic features that are dramatically different from those of their free-floating, or planktonic, counterparts. Biofilms seem to be the preferred mode of growth of microorganisms in nature, and at least 65% of all human infections are associated with biofilms. The most notable and clinically relevant property of biofilms is their greater resistance to antimicrobials compared with their planktonic counterparts. Although both bacterial and fungal biofilms display this phenotypic feature, the exact mechanisms underlying their increased drug resistance are yet to be determined. Advances in proteomics techniques during the past decade have facilitated in-depth analysis of the possible mechanisms underpinning increased drug resistance in biofilms. These studies have demonstrated the ability of proteomics techniques to unravel new targets for combating microbial biofilms. In this review, we discuss the putative drug resistance mechanisms of microbial biofilms that have been uncovered by proteomics and critically evaluate the possible contribution of the new knowledge to future development in the field. We also summarize strategic uses of novel proteomics technologies in studies related to drug resistance mechanisms of microbial biofilms. PMID:22246638

Seneviratne, C Jayampath; Wang, Yu; Jin, Lijian; Wong, Sarah S W; Herath, Thanuja D K; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

2012-02-01

23

Early microbial biofilm formation on marine plastic debris  

Microsoft Academic Search

An important aspect of the global problem of plastic debris pollution is plastic buoyancy. There is some evidence that buoyancy is influenced by attached biofilms but as yet this is poorly understood. We submerged polyethylene plastic in seawater and sampled weekly for 3weeks in order to study early stage processes. Microbial biofilms developed rapidly on the plastic and coincided with

Delphine Lobelle; Michael Cunliffe

2011-01-01

24

Dynamic Remodeling of Microbial Biofilms by Functionally Distinct Exopolysaccharides  

E-print Network

Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence ...

Chew, Su Chuen

25

Computational Modeling of Synthetic Microbial Biofilms Timothy J. Rudge,,  

E-print Network

transcriptional regulation, intercellular signaling, and cell biophysics. Computational modeling could help models of individual cells with models of genetic regulation and intercellular signaling. The method. KEYWORDS: microbial, biofilm, simulation, biophysics, morphology, CellModeller Bacteria form self

Haseloff, Jim

26

The biofilm ecology of microbial biofouling, biocide resistance and corrosion  

SciTech Connect

In biotechnological or bioremediation processes it is often the aim to promote biofilm formation, and maintain active, high density biomass. In other situations, biofouling can seriously restrict effective heat transport, membrane processes, and potentate macrofouling with loss of transportation efficiency. In biotechnological or bioremediation processes it is often the aim to promote biofilm formation, and maintain active, high density biomass. In other situations, biofouling can seriously restrict effective heat transport, membrane processes, and potentate macrofouling with loss of transportation efficiency. Heterogeneous distribution of microbes and/or their metabolic activity can promote microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) which is a multibillion dollar problem. Consequently, it is important that biofilm microbial ecology be understood so it can be manipulated rationally. It is usually simple to select organisms that form biofilms by flowing a considerably dilute media over a substratum, and propagating the organisms that attach. To examine the biofilm most expeditiously, the biomass accumulation, desquamation, and metabolic activities need to be monitored on-line and non-destructively. This on-line monitoring becomes even more valuable if the activities can be locally mapped in time and space within the biofilm. Herein the authors describe quantitative measures of microbial biofouling, the ecology of pathogens in drinking water distributions systems, and localization of microbial biofilms and activities with localized MIC.

White, D.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Science Div.; Kirkegaard, R.D.; Palmer, R.J. Jr.; Flemming, C.A.; Chen, G.; Leung, K.T.; Phiefer, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology; Arrage, A.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology]|[Microbial Insights, Inc., Rockford, TN (United States)

1997-06-01

27

Method for Studying Microbial Biofilms in Flowing-Water Systems  

PubMed Central

A method for the study of microbial biofilms in flowing-water systems was developed with special reference to the flow conditions in electrochemical concentration cells. Seawater was circulated in a semiclosed flow system through biofilm reactors (3 cm s?1) with microscope cover slips arranged in lamellar piles parallel with the flow. At fixed time intervals cover slips with their biofilm were removed from the pile, stained with crystal violet, and mounted on microscope slides. The absorbances of the slides were measured at 590 nm and plotted against time to give microbial biofilm development. From calibration experiments a staining time of 1 min and a rinse time of 10 min in a tap water flow (3 cm s?1) were considered sufficient. When an analysis of variance was performed on biofilm development data, 78% of the total variance was found to be due to random natural effects; the rest could be explained by experimental effects. The absorbance values correlated well with protein N, dry weight, and organic weight in two biofilm experiments, one with a biofilm with a high (75%) and one with a low (?25%, normal) inorganic content. Comparisons of regression lines revealed that the absorbance of the stained biofilms was an estimate closely related to biofilm dry weight. PMID:16345929

Pedersen, Karsten

1982-01-01

28

Single-species microbial biofilm screening for industrial applications.  

PubMed

While natural microbial biofilms often consist of multiple species, single-species biofilms are of great interest to biotechnology. The current study evaluates biofilm formation for common industrial and laboratory microorganisms. A total of 68 species of biosafety level one bacteria and yeasts from over 40 different genera and five phyla were screened by growing them in microtiter plates and estimating attached biomass by crystal violet staining. Most organisms showed biofilm formation on surfaces of polystyrene within 24 h. By changing a few simple conditions such as substratum characteristics, inoculum and nutrient availability, 66 strains (97%) demonstrated biofilm formation under at least one of the experimental conditions and over half of these strains were classified as strong biofilm formers, potentially suitable as catalysts in biofilm applications. Many non-motile bacteria were also strong biofilm formers. Biofilm morphologies were visualized for selected strains. A model organism, Zymomonas mobilis, easily established itself as a biofilm on various reactor packing materials, including stainless steel. PMID:17653709

Li, Xuan Zhong; Hauer, Bernhard; Rosche, Bettina

2007-10-01

29

Laser Microbial Killing and Biofilm Disruption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Objectives: To analyze the ability of NIR lasers to reduce bacterial load and demonstrate the capability of fiber-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser disrupting biofilm. Study Design: NIR diode laser was tested in vitro and in vivo using pathogenic microorganisms (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa). In addition biofilms were grown from clinical Pseudomonas isolates and placed in culture plates, screws, tympanostomy tubes and PET sutures. Methods: In the animal experiments acute rhinosinusitis model was created by packing the rabbit nose with bacteria soaked solution. The nasal pack was removed in two days and nose was exposed to laser irradiation. A 940 nm diode laser with fiber diffuser was used. Nasal cultures were obtained before and after the laser treatments. Animals were sacrificed fifteen days following laser treatment and bacteriologic/histologic results analyzed. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generated shockwave pulses were delivered on biofilm using special probes over culture plates, screws, tubes, and PET sutures for the biofilm experiments. Results: Average of two log bacteria reduction was achieved with NIR laser compared to controls. Histologic studies demonstrated preservation of tissue integrity without significant damage to mucosa. Biofilms were imaged before, during and after treatment using a confocal microscope. During laser-generated shockwave application, biofilm was initially seen to oscillate and eventually break off. Large and small pieces of biofilm were totally and instantly removed from the surface to which they were attached in seconds. Conclusions: Significant bacterial reduction was achieved with NIR laser therapy in this experimental in vitro and animal study. In addition we disrupted Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and special probes generating plasma and shockwave. This new and innovative method of bacteria killing and biofilm disruption without injuring host tissue may have clinical application in the future.

Krespi, Yosef P.; Kizhner, Victor

2009-06-01

30

Extremophiles Microbial Life Under Extreme  

E-print Network

online: 24 May 2011 Ã? Springer 2011 Abstract The microbial ecology associated with sili- ceous sinters and in situ microbial physi- ological and ecological studies have shown that an abundant diversity1 23 Extremophiles Microbial Life Under Extreme Conditions ISSN 1431-0651 Volume 15 Number 4

Benning, Liane G.

31

Dynamic Remodeling of Microbial Biofilms by Functionally Distinct Exopolysaccharides  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. PMID:25096883

Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A.; Doyle, Patrick

2014-01-01

32

Modelling mechanical characteristics of microbial biofilms by network theory  

PubMed Central

In this contribution, we present a constitutive model to describe the mechanical behaviour of microbial biofilms based on classical approaches in the continuum theory of polymer networks. Although the model is particularly developed for the well-studied biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, it could easily be adapted to other biofilms. The basic assumption behind the model is that the network of extracellular polymeric substances can be described as a superposition of worm-like chain networks, each connected by transient junctions of a certain lifetime. Several models that were applied to biofilms previously are included in the presented approach as special cases, and for small shear strains, the governing equations are those of four parallel Maxwell elements. Rheological data given in the literature are very adequately captured by the proposed model, and the simulated response for a series of compression tests at large strains is in good qualitative agreement with reported experimental behaviour. PMID:23034354

Ehret, Alexander E.; Böl, Markus

2013-01-01

33

Modelling mechanical characteristics of microbial biofilms by network theory.  

PubMed

In this contribution, we present a constitutive model to describe the mechanical behaviour of microbial biofilms based on classical approaches in the continuum theory of polymer networks. Although the model is particularly developed for the well-studied biofilms formed by mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, it could easily be adapted to other biofilms. The basic assumption behind the model is that the network of extracellular polymeric substances can be described as a superposition of worm-like chain networks, each connected by transient junctions of a certain lifetime. Several models that were applied to biofilms previously are included in the presented approach as special cases, and for small shear strains, the governing equations are those of four parallel Maxwell elements. Rheological data given in the literature are very adequately captured by the proposed model, and the simulated response for a series of compression tests at large strains is in good qualitative agreement with reported experimental behaviour. PMID:23034354

Ehret, Alexander E; Böl, Markus

2012-10-01

34

ORAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES: Biofilms, Interactions, and Genetic Systems1  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract Oral microbial-plaque communities are biofilms composed of numer- ous genetically distinct types of bacteria that live in close juxtaposition on host surfaces. These bacteria communicate through physical interactions called coaggregation and coadhesion, as well as other physiological and metabolic interactions. Streptococci and actinomyces are the major initial colonizers of the tooth surface, and the inter- actions between them

Paul E. Kolenbrander

2000-01-01

35

Molecular Survey of Concrete Sewer Biofilm Microbial Communities  

EPA Science Inventory

Although bacteria are implicated in deteriorating concrete structures, there is very little information on the composition of concrete microbial communities. To this end, we studied different concrete biofilms by performing sequence analysis of 16S rDNA concrete clone libraries. ...

36

Utilization of microbial biofilms as monitors of bioremediation  

SciTech Connect

A down-well aquifer microbial sampling system was developed using glass wool or Bio-Sep beads as a solid-phase support matrix. Here we describe the use of these devices to monitor the groundwater microbial community dynamics during field bioremediation experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Programs Field Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During the 6-week deployment, microbial biofilms colonized glass wool and bead internal surfaces. Changes in viable biomass, community composition, metabolic status, and respiratory state were reflected in sampler composition, type of donor, and groundwater pH. Biofilms that formed on Bio-Sep beads had 2-13 times greater viable biomass; however, the bead communities were less metabolically active [higher cyclopropane/monoenoic phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) ratios] and had a lower aerobic respiratory state (lower total respiratory quinone/PLFA ratio and ubiquinone/menaquinone ratio) than the biofilms formed on glass wool. Anaerobic growth in these systems was characterized by plasmalogen phospholipids and was greater in the wells that received electron donor additions. Partial 16S rDNA sequences indicated that Geobacter and nitrate-reducing organisms were induced by the acetate, ethanol, or glucose additions. DNA and lipid biomarkers were extracted and recovered without the complications that commonly plague sediment samples due to the presence of clay or dissolved organic matter. Although microbial community composition in the groundwater or adjacent sediments may differ from those formed on down-well biofilm samplers, the metabolic activity responses of the biofilms to modifications in groundwater geochemistry record the responses of the microbial community to biostimulation while providing integrative sampling and ease of recovery for biomarker analysis.

Peacock, Aaron D. [University of Tennessee; IstokD., Jonathan [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Krumholz, Lee R. [University of Oklahoma; Geyer, Roland [ORNL; Kinsall, Barry Lee [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Sublette, K. [University of Tulsa; White, David C. [University of Tennessee

2004-03-01

37

Microbial Diversity of Biofilms in Dental Unit Water Systems  

PubMed Central

We investigated the microbial diversity of biofilms found in dental unit water systems (DUWS) by three methods. The first was microscopic examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), acridine orange staining, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Most bacteria present in the biofilm were viable. FISH detected the ? and ?, but not the ?, subclasses of Proteobacteria. In the second method, 55 cultivated biofilm isolates were identified with the Biolog system, fatty acid analysis, and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing. Only 16S identified all 55 isolates, which represented 13 genera. The most common organisms, as shown by analyses of 16S rDNA, belonged to the genera Afipia (28%) and Sphingomonas (16%). The third method was a culture-independent direct amplification and sequencing of 165 subclones from community biofilm 16S rDNA. This method revealed 40 genera: the most common ones included Leptospira (20%), Sphingomonas (14%), Bacillus (7%), Escherichia (6%), Geobacter (5%), and Pseudomonas (5%). Some of these organisms may be opportunistic pathogens. Our results have demonstrated that a biofilm in a health care setting may harbor a vast diversity of organisms. The results also reflect the limitations of culture-based techniques to detect and identify bacteria. Although this is the greatest diversity reported in DUWS biofilms, other genera may have been missed. Using a technique based on jackknife subsampling, we projected that a 25-fold increase in the number of subclones sequenced would approximately double the number of genera observed, reflecting the richness and high diversity of microbial communities in these biofilms. PMID:12788744

Singh, Ruby; Stine, O. Colin; Smith, David L.; Spitznagel, John K.; Labib, Mohamed E.; Williams, Henry N.

2003-01-01

38

Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

Kumar, Aloke [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

2012-01-01

39

Sponge larval settlement cues: the role of microbial biofilms in a warming ocean  

PubMed Central

Microbial biofilms play important roles in initiating settlement of marine invertebrate larvae. Given the importance of habitat selection by the motile larval phase, understanding settlement choices is critical if we are to successfully predict the population dynamics of sessile adults. Marine microbial biofilms show remarkable variability in community composition, often mediated by environmental conditions and biofilm age. To determine if biofilm communities were influenced by the time allowed to establish (age) and/or seawater temperature, we manipulated experimental surfaces to firstly determine biofilm community composition and secondly test larval settlement responses for the abundant coral reef sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile. Microbial profiling of biofilms revealed different communities according to both age and temperature. Biofilm community composition, as a result of both elevated seawater temperature and biofilm age, contributed to settlement for sponge larvae with markedly higher numbers of larvae settling to biofilms developed over longer periods (10?d) and at temperatures 2–6°C above ambient. PMID:24518965

Whalan, S.; Webster, N. S.

2014-01-01

40

Life Support Systems Microbial Challenges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the current microbial challenges of environmental control and life support systems. The contents include: 1) Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) What is it?; 2) A Look Inside the International Space Station (ISS); 3) The Complexity of a Water Recycling System; 4) ISS Microbiology Acceptability Limits; 5) Overview of Current Microbial Challenges; 6) In a Perfect World What we Would like to Have; and 7) The Future.

Roman, Monserrate C.

2009-01-01

41

Microbial genomes: Blueprints for life  

SciTech Connect

Complete microbial genome sequences hold the promise of profound new insights into microbial pathogenesis, evolution, diagnostics, and therapeutics. From these insights will come a new foundation for understanding the evolution of single-celled life, as well as the evolution of more complex life forms. This report is an in-depth analysis of scientific issues that provides recommendations and will be widely disseminated to the scientific community, federal agencies, industry and the public.

Relman, David A.; Strauss, Evelyn

2000-12-31

42

Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media  

EPA Science Inventory

A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

43

Life Support Systems Microbial Challenges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many microbiological studies were performed during the development of the Space Station Water Recovery and Management System from1990-2009. Studies include assessments of: (1) bulk phase (planktonic) microbial population (2) biofilms, (3) microbially influenced corrosion (4) biofouling treatments. This slide presentation summarizes the studies performed to assess the bulk phase microbial community during the Space Station Water Recovery Tests (WRT) from 1990 to 1998. This report provides an overview of some of the microbiological analyses performed during the Space Station WRT program. These tests not only integrated several technologies with the goal of producing water that met NASA s potable water specifications, but also integrated humans, and therefore human flora into the protocols. At the time these tests were performed, not much was known (or published) about the microbial composition of these types of wastewater. It is important to note that design changes to the WRS have been implemented over the years and results discussed in this report might be directly related to test configurations that were not chosen for the final flight configuration. Results microbiological analyses performed Conclusion from the during the WRT showed that it was possible to recycle water from different sources, including urine, and produce water that can exceed the quality of municipally produced water.

Roman, Monsi C.

2010-01-01

44

Probing of microbial biofilm communities for coadhesion partners.  

PubMed

Investigations of interbacterial adhesion in dental plaque development are currently limited by the lack of a convenient assay to screen the multitude of species present in oral biofilms. To overcome this limitation, we developed a solid-phase fluorescence-based screening method to detect and identify coadhesive partner organisms in mixed-species biofilms. The applicability of this method was demonstrated using coaggregating strains of type 2 fimbrial adhesin-bearing actinomyces and receptor polysaccharide (RPS)-bearing streptococci. Specific adhesin/receptor-mediated coadhesion was detected by overlaying bacterial strains immobilized to a nitrocellulose membrane with a suspended, fluorescein-labeled bacterial partner strain. Coadhesion was comparable regardless of which cell type was labeled and which was immobilized. Formaldehyde treatment of bacteria, either in suspension or immobilized on nitrocellulose, abolished actinomyces type 2 fimbrial adhesin but not streptococcal RPS function, thereby providing a simple method for assigning complementary adhesins and glycan receptors to members of a coadhering pair. The method's broader applicability was shown by overlaying colony lifts of dental plaque biofilm cultures with fluorescein-labeled strains of type 2 fimbriated Actinomyces naeslundii or RPS-bearing Streptococcus oralis. Prominent coadhesion partners included not only streptococci and actinomyces, as expected, but also other bacteria not identified in previous coaggregation studies, such as adhesin- or receptor-bearing strains of Neisseria pharyngitis, Rothia dentocariosa, and Kingella oralis. The ability to comprehensively screen complex microbial communities for coadhesion partners of specific microorganisms opens a new approach in studies of dental plaque and other mixed-species biofilms. PMID:25107971

Ruhl, Stefan; Eidt, Andreas; Melzl, Holger; Reischl, Udo; Cisar, John O

2014-11-01

45

Factors Regulating Microbial Biofilm Development in a System with Slowly Flowing Seawater  

PubMed Central

Microbial biofilm development was followed under growth conditions similar to those of a projected salinity power plant. Microscope glass cover slips were piled in biofilm reactors to imitate the membrane stacks in such a plant. A staining technique closely correlating absorbance values with biofilm dry weight was used for the study. Generally, the biofilms consisted of solitary and filamentous bacteria which were evenly distributed with considerable amounts of various protozoa and entrapped debris of organic origin. Protozoa predation was shown to decrease the amount of biofilm produced. The biofilm development lag phase was longer at lower temperatures. The subsequent growth phase was approximately arithmetic until stationary phase appeared. Adaptation of a hyperbolic saturation function gave curves that agreed well with the logarithm of the amount of biofilm as a function of time. Increased flow velocity, temperature, and nutrient concentration increased the biofilm production rate. An exponential relationship was shown between biofilm production rate and flow velocity within the range of 0 to 15 cm s?1. Intervals in which the biofilms were exposed to fresh water decreased the biofilm production rate more than four times. If the cover slips were inoculated with untreated seawater for 24 h, subsequent UV treatment had an insignificant effect on the biofilm formation. Images PMID:16346136

Pedersen, Karsten

1982-01-01

46

Sunlight-Exposed Biofilm Microbial Communities Are Naturally Resistant to Chernobyl Ionizing-Radiation Levels  

PubMed Central

Background The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general diversity patterns, despite increased mutation levels at the single-OTU level. Therefore, biofilm communities growing in sunlight exposed substrates are capable of coping with increased mutation rates and appear pre-adapted to levels of ionizing radiation in Chernobyl due to their natural adaptation to periodical desiccation and ambient UV radiation. PMID:21765911

Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

2011-01-01

47

Microbial analysis of anodic biofilm in a microbial fuel cell using slaughterhouse wastewater.  

PubMed

The ability of dual-chambered microbial fuel cell, fed with slaughterhouse wastewater with an anaerobic mixed-sludge as initial source of bacteria, to generate power is investigated. MFC voltage generation across a fixed 100 ? load indicates power generation capability, with power production correlated to changes in anolyte VFA content. A maximum MFC power density of 578 mW/m(2) is obtained for an MFC developed under 100 ? load, compared to a maximum power density of 277 mW/m(2) for an MFC developed under higher resistance (1 M?) control conditions. Voltammetry of the biofilm developed under 100 ? load displays a current-voltage signal indicative of bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of feed at a potential of -0.35 V vs. Ag/AgCl, compared to negligible signals for biofilms developed under control conditions. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments reveals that the anodic bacterial communities in reactors operated under 100 ? load result in communities of lower diversity than for the control condition, with Geovibrio ferrireducens dominant in the anodic biofilm community. These results indicate that in MFC reactors, functionally stable electroactive bacteria are enriched under 100 ? load compared to high resistance control conditions, and were able to sustain higher power in MFCs. PMID:22226620

Katuri, Krishna P; Enright, Ann-Marie; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Leech, Dónal

2012-10-01

48

Microbial interactions in marine water amended by eroded benthic biofilm: A case study from an intertidal mudflat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In shallow macrotidal ecosystems with large intertidal mudflats, the sediment-water coupling plays a crucial role in structuring the pelagic microbial food web functioning, since inorganic and organic matter and microbial components (viruses and microbes) of the microphytobenthic biofilm can be suspended toward the water column. Two experimental bioassays were conducted in March and July 2008 to investigate the importance of biofilm input for the pelagic microbial and viral loops. Pelagic inocula (< 0.6 ?- and < 10 ? filtrates) were diluted either with < 30 kDa-ultrafiltered seawater or with this ultrafiltrate enriched with the respective size-fractionated benthic biofilm or with < 30 kDa-benthic compounds (BC). The kinetics of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF), bacteria and viruses were assessed together with bacterial and viral genomic fingerprints, bacterial enzymatic activities and viral life strategies. The experimental design allowed us to evaluate the effect of BC modulated by those of benthic size-fractionated microorganisms (virus + bacteria, + HNF). BC presented (1) in March, a positive effect on viruses and bacteria weakened by pelagic HNF. Benthic microorganisms consolidated this negative effect and sustained the viral production together with a relatively diverse and uneven bacterial assemblage structure; (2) in July, no direct impact on viruses but a positive effect on bacteria modulated by HNF, which indirectly enhanced viral multiplication. Both effects were intensified by benthic microorganisms and bacterial assemblage structure became more even. HNF indirectly profited from BC more in March than in July. The microbial loop would be stimulated by biofilm during periods of high resources (March) and the viral loop during periods of depleted resources (July).

Montanié, Hélène; Ory, Pascaline; Orvain, Francis; Delmas, Daniel; Dupuy, Christine; Hartmann, Hans J.

2014-09-01

49

New methods for analysis of spatial distribution and coaggregation of microbial populations in complex biofilms.  

PubMed

In biofilms, microbial activities form gradients of substrates and electron acceptors, creating a complex landscape of microhabitats, often resulting in structured localization of the microbial populations present. To understand the dynamic interplay between and within these populations, quantitative measurements and statistical analysis of their localization patterns within the biofilms are necessary, and adequate automated tools for such analyses are needed. We have designed and applied new methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital image analysis of directionally dependent (anisotropic) multispecies biofilms. A sequential-FISH approach allowed multiple populations to be detected in a biofilm sample. This was combined with an automated tool for vertical-distribution analysis by generating in silico biofilm slices and the recently developed Inflate algorithm for coaggregation analysis of microbial populations in anisotropic biofilms. As a proof of principle, we show distinct stratification patterns of the ammonia oxidizers Nitrosomonas oligotropha subclusters I and II and the nitrite oxidizer Nitrospira sublineage I in three different types of wastewater biofilms, suggesting niche differentiation between the N. oligotropha subclusters, which could explain their coexistence in the same biofilms. Coaggregation analysis showed that N. oligotropha subcluster II aggregated closer to Nitrospira than did N. oligotropha subcluster I in a pilot plant nitrifying trickling filter (NTF) and a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), but not in a full-scale NTF, indicating important ecophysiological differences between these phylogenetically closely related subclusters. By using high-resolution quantitative methods applicable to any multispecies biofilm in general, the ecological interactions of these complex ecosystems can be understood in more detail. PMID:23892743

Almstrand, Robert; Daims, Holger; Persson, Frank; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

2013-10-01

50

New Methods for Analysis of Spatial Distribution and Coaggregation of Microbial Populations in Complex Biofilms  

PubMed Central

In biofilms, microbial activities form gradients of substrates and electron acceptors, creating a complex landscape of microhabitats, often resulting in structured localization of the microbial populations present. To understand the dynamic interplay between and within these populations, quantitative measurements and statistical analysis of their localization patterns within the biofilms are necessary, and adequate automated tools for such analyses are needed. We have designed and applied new methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital image analysis of directionally dependent (anisotropic) multispecies biofilms. A sequential-FISH approach allowed multiple populations to be detected in a biofilm sample. This was combined with an automated tool for vertical-distribution analysis by generating in silico biofilm slices and the recently developed Inflate algorithm for coaggregation analysis of microbial populations in anisotropic biofilms. As a proof of principle, we show distinct stratification patterns of the ammonia oxidizers Nitrosomonas oligotropha subclusters I and II and the nitrite oxidizer Nitrospira sublineage I in three different types of wastewater biofilms, suggesting niche differentiation between the N. oligotropha subclusters, which could explain their coexistence in the same biofilms. Coaggregation analysis showed that N. oligotropha subcluster II aggregated closer to Nitrospira than did N. oligotropha subcluster I in a pilot plant nitrifying trickling filter (NTF) and a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), but not in a full-scale NTF, indicating important ecophysiological differences between these phylogenetically closely related subclusters. By using high-resolution quantitative methods applicable to any multispecies biofilm in general, the ecological interactions of these complex ecosystems can be understood in more detail. PMID:23892743

Almstrand, Robert; Daims, Holger; Persson, Frank; Sörensson, Fred

2013-01-01

51

Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses.  

PubMed

Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfection biofilms were developed with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses. Biofilms, as well as planktonic cultures of these same bacterial species, were incubated under anaerobic conditions with a human oral epithelial cell line, OKF4, for up to 24h. Gro-1?, IL1?, IL-6, IL-8, TGF?, Fractalkine, MIP-1?, and IP-10 were shown to be produced in response to a range of the planktonic or biofilm forms of these species. P. gingivalis biofilms significantly inhibited the production of all of these cytokines and chemokines, except MIP-1?. Generally, the biofilms of all species inhibited Gro-1?, TGF?, and Fractalkine production, while F. nucleatum biofilms stimulated significant increases in IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10. A. naeslundii biofilms induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10. The oral streptococcal species in biofilms or planktonic forms were poor stimulants for any of these mediators from the epithelial cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that oral bacteria in biofilms elicit a substantially different profile of responses compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Moreover, certain oral species are highly stimulatory when in biofilms and interact with host cell receptors to trigger pathways of responses that appear quite divergent from individual bacteria. PMID:22266273

Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Novak, Karen F; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

2012-04-01

52

Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses  

PubMed Central

Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfection biofilms were developed with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses. Biofilms, as well as planktonic cultures of these same bacterial species, were incubated under anaerobic conditions with a human oral epithelial cell line, OKF4, for up to 24 h. Gro-1?, IL1?, IL-6, IL-8, TGF?, Fractalkine, MIP-1?, and IP-10 were shown to be produced in response to a range of the planktonic or biofilm forms of these species. P. gingivalis biofilms significantly inhibited the production of all of these cytokines and chemokines, except MIP-1?. Generally, the biofilms of all species inhibited Gro-1?, TGF?, and Fractalkine production, while F. nucleatum biofilms stimulated significant increases in IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10. A. naeslundii biofilms induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10. The oral streptococcal species in biofilms or planktonic forms were poor stimulants for any of these mediators from the epithelial cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that oral bacteria in biofilms elicit a substantially different profile of responses compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Moreover, certain oral species are highly stimulatory when in biofilms and interact with host cell receptors to trigger pathways of responses that appear quite divergent from individual bacteria. PMID:22266273

Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S.; Novak, Karen F.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

2012-01-01

53

A biofilm enhanced miniature microbial fuel cell using Shewanella oneidensis DSP10 and oxygen reduction cathodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A miniature-microbial fuel cell (mini-MFC, chamber volume: 1.2mL) was used to monitor biofilm development from a pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis DSP10 on graphite felt (GF) under minimal nutrient conditions. ESEM evidence of biofilm formation on GF is supported by substantial power density (per device cross-section) from the mini-MFC when using an acellular minimal media anolyte (1500mW\\/m2). These experiments demonstrate

Justin C. Biffinger; Jeremy Pietron; Ricky Ray; Brenda Little; Bradley R. Ringeisen

2007-01-01

54

Electricity production and microbial biofilm characterization in cellulose-fed microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Converting biodegradable materials into electricity, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) present a promising technology for renewable energy production in specific applications. Unlike typical soluble substrates that have been used as electron donors in MFC studies, cellulose is unique because it requires a microbial consortium that can metabolize both an insoluble electron donor (cellulose) and electron acceptor (electrode). In this study, electricity generation and the microbial ecology of cellulose-fed MFCs were analyzed using a defined co-culture of Clostridium cellulolyticum and Geobacter sulfurreducens. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative PCR showed that when particulate MN301 cellulose was used as sole substrate, most Clostridium cells were found adhered to cellulose particles in suspension, while most Geobacter cells were attached to the electrode. By comparison, both bacteria resided in suspension and biofilm samples when soluble carboxymethyl cellulose was used. This distinct function-related distribution of the bacteria suggests an opportunity to optimize reactor operation by settling cellulose and decanting supernatant to extend cellulose hydrolysis and improve cellulose-electricity conversion. PMID:18725730

Ren, Z; Steinberg, L M; Regan, J M

2008-01-01

55

EPS in Environmental Microbial Biofilms as Examined by Advanced Imaging Techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biofilm communities are highly structured associations of cellular and polymeric components which are involved in biogenic and geogenic environmental processes. Furthermore, biofilms are also important in medical (infection), industrial (biofouling) and technological (biofilm engineering) processes. The interfacial microbial communities in a specific habitat are highly dynamic and change according to the environmental parameters affecting not only the cellular but also the polymeric constituents of the system. Through their EPS biofilms interact with dissolved, colloidal and particulate compounds from the bulk water phase. For a long time the focus in biofilm research was on the cellular constituents in biofilms and the polymer matrix in biofilms has been rather neglected. The polymer matrix is produced not only by different bacteria and archaea but also by eukaryotic micro-organisms such as algae and fungi. The mostly unidentified mixture of EPS compounds is responsible for many biofilm properties and is involved in biofilm functionality. The chemistry of the EPS matrix represents a mixture of polymers including polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, neutral polymers, charged polymers, amphiphilic polymers and refractory microbial polymers. The analysis of the EPS may be done destructively by means of extraction and subsequent chemical analysis or in situ by means of specific probes in combination with advanced imaging. In the last 15 years laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has been established as an indispensable technique for studying microbial communities. LSM with 1-photon and 2-photon excitation in combination with fluorescence techniques allows 3-dimensional investigation of fully hydrated, living biofilm systems. This approach is able to reveal data on biofilm structural features as well as biofilm processes and interactions. The fluorescent probes available allow the quantitative assessment of cellular as well as polymer distribution. For this purpose lectin-binding- analysis has been suggested as a suitable approach to image glycoconjugates within the polymer matrix of biofilm communities. More recently synchrotron radiation is increasingly recognized as a powerful tool for studying biological samples. Hard X-ray excitation can be used to map elemental composition whereas IR imaging allows examination of biological macromolecules. A further technique called soft X-ray scanning transmission microscopy (STXM) has the advantage of both techniques and may be employed to detect elements as well as biomolecules. Using the appropriate spectra, near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) microscopy allows quantitative chemical mapping at 50 nm resolution. In this presentation the applicability of LSM and STXM will be demonstrated using several examples of different environmental biofilm systems. The techniques in combination provide a new view of complex microbial communities and their interaction with the environment. These advanced imaging techniques offer the possibility to study the spatial structure of cellular and polymeric compounds in biofilms as well as biofilm microhabitats, biofilm functionality and biofilm processes.

Neu, T. R.; Lawrence, J. R.

2006-12-01

56

The study of electrochemically active microbial biofilms on different carbon-based anode materials in microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

In this communication we show that the achievable maximum current density for mature wastewater-based microbial biofilms is strongly dependent on the electrode material and the operation temperature. On graphite and polycrystalline carbon rods, the catalytic current of about 500 microA cm(-2) (projected surface area) at 30 degrees C was achieved. Carbon fiber veil or carbon-paper based materials, having a large microbially-accessible surface gave a projected current density approximately 40% higher than on graphite rod. In contrast, the biofilm cannot form well on graphite foil. Elevating the temperature from 30 to 40 degrees C increased current density by 80% on graphite rod anodes. Interestingly, the formal potential of the active site (-0.12 V (vs. standard hydrogen electrode (SHE))) is similar to all electrocatalytically active microbial biofilms and to that found for Geobacter sulfurreducens in previous studies. In addition, the real surface area values measured by BET surface area technique cannot provide a reasonable explanation for suitability of an electrode material for the formation of electrochemically active biofilm. PMID:20189793

Liu, Ying; Harnisch, Falk; Fricke, Katja; Schröder, Uwe; Climent, Victor; Feliu, Juan Miguel

2010-05-15

57

Homogeneity and Synchronous Dynamics of Microbial Communities in Particulate Biofilms: from Major Populations to Minor Groups  

PubMed Central

Natural or engineered microbial populations often show variations over time. These variations may be due to environmental fluctuations or intrinsic factors. Thus, studying the dynamics of microbial diversity for different communities living in a spatially homogeneous landscape is of interest. As a model ecosystem, nitrifying biofilm communities were grown in a two litre inverse turbulent bed reactor (ITBR) containing an estimated 200 million small particles (about 150 ?m in diameter). Each particulate biofilm is considered as a distinct community growing in the neighborhood of other similar particles, in a homogeneous and well-controlled environmental context. A molecular approach was adopted to test how microbial community structures might evolve: either in synchrony, converging or diverging. The shape of biofilm was observed by microscopy for each particle. The biomass content was evaluated by quantitative PCR and showed similar values for each particle. The microbial community structure was evaluated by Capillary Electrophoresis-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (CE-SSCP) fingerprinting and showed extraordinary homogeneity between particles, even though transitory community structures were observed when reactor operating conditions were modified. This homogeneity was observed for the Bacteria primer set but, more interestingly, was also observed when minor non-nitrifying bacteria making up the biofilm, representing about 5% and 10% of total cells, were targeted. PMID:22791046

Gévaudan, Gaëlle; Hamelin, Jérôme; Dabert, Patrick; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Bernet, Nicolas

2012-01-01

58

Microbial cell surface proteins and secreted metabolites involved in multispecies biofilms.  

PubMed

A considerable number of infectious diseases involve multiple microbial species coexisting and interacting in a host. Only recently however the impact of these polymicrobial diseases has been appreciated and investigated. Often, the causative microbial species are embedded in an extracellular matrix forming biofilms, a form of existence that offers protection against chemotherapeutic agents and host immune defenses. Therefore, recent efforts have focused on developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting biofilm-associated polymicrobial infections, a task that has proved to be challenging. One promising approach to inhibit the development of such complex infections is to impede the interactions between the microbial species via inhibition of adhesion. To that end, studies have focused on identifying specific cell wall adhesins and receptors involved in the interactions between the various bacterial species and the most pathogenic human fungal species Candida albicans. This review highlights the important findings from these studies and describes the available tools and techniques that have provided insights into the role of secreted molecules orchestrating microbial interactions in biofilms. Specifically, we focus on the interactions that take place in oral biofilms and the implications of these interactions on oral health and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24376219

Demuyser, Liesbeth; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Van Dijck, Patrick

2014-04-01

59

Dominant Microbial Populations in Limestone-Corroding Stream Biofilms, Frasassi Cave System, Italy  

PubMed Central

Waters from an extensive sulfide-rich aquifer emerge in the Frasassi cave system, where they mix with oxygen-rich percolating water and cave air over a large surface area. The actively forming cave complex hosts a microbial community, including conspicuous white biofilms coating surfaces in cave streams, that is isolated from surface sources of C and N. Two distinct biofilm morphologies were observed in the streams over a 4-year period. Bacterial 16S rDNA libraries were constructed from samples of each biofilm type collected from Grotta Sulfurea in 2002. ?-, ?-, ?-, and ?-proteobacteria in sulfur-cycling clades accounted for ?75% of clones in both biofilms. Sulfate-reducing and sulfur-disproportionating ?-proteobacterial sequences in the clone libraries were abundant and diverse (34% of phylotypes). Biofilm samples of both types were later collected at the same location and at an additional sample site in Ramo Sulfureo and examined, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The biomass of all six stream biofilms was dominated by filamentous ?-proteobacteria with Beggiatoa-like and/or Thiothrix-like cells containing abundant sulfur inclusions. The biomass of ?-proteobacteria detected using FISH was consistently small, ranging from 0 to less than 15% of the total biomass. Our results suggest that S cycling within the stream biofilms is an important feature of the cave biogeochemistry. Such cycling represents positive biological feedback to sulfuric acid speleogenesis and related processes that create subsurface porosity in carbonate rocks. PMID:16885314

Macalady, Jennifer L.; Lyon, Ezra H.; Koffman, Bess; Albertson, Lindsey K.; Meyer, Katja; Galdenzi, Sandro; Mariani, Sandro

2006-01-01

60

Influence of Microbial Biofilms on the Preservation of Primary Soft Tissue in Fossil and Extant Archosaurs  

PubMed Central

Background Mineralized and permineralized bone is the most common form of fossilization in the vertebrate record. Preservation of gross soft tissues is extremely rare, but recent studies have suggested that primary soft tissues and biomolecules are more commonly preserved within preserved bones than had been presumed. Some of these claims have been challenged, with presentation of evidence suggesting that some of the structures are microbial artifacts, not primary soft tissues. The identification of biomolecules in fossil vertebrate extracts from a specimen of Brachylophosaurus canadensis has shown the interpretation of preserved organic remains as microbial biofilm to be highly unlikely. These discussions also propose a variety of potential mechanisms that would permit the preservation of soft-tissues in vertebrate fossils over geologic time. Methodology/Principal Findings This study experimentally examines the role of microbial biofilms in soft-tissue preservation in vertebrate fossils by quantitatively establishing the growth and morphology of biofilms on extant archosaur bone. These results are microscopically and morphologically compared with soft-tissue extracts from vertebrate fossils from the Hell Creek Formation of southeastern Montana (Latest Maastrichtian) in order to investigate the potential role of microbial biofilms on the preservation of fossil bone and bound organic matter in a variety of taphonomic settings. Based on these analyses, we highlight a mechanism whereby this bound organic matter may be preserved. Conclusions/Significance Results of the study indicate that the crystallization of microbial biofilms on decomposing organic matter within vertebrate bone in early taphonomic stages may contribute to the preservation of primary soft tissues deeper in the bone structure. PMID:20967227

Peterson, Joseph E.; Lenczewski, Melissa E.; Scherer, Reed P.

2010-01-01

61

Microbial Characterization of Biofilms in Domestic Drains and the Establishment of Stable Biofilm Microcosms  

PubMed Central

We have used heterotrophic plate counts, together with live-dead direct staining and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), to characterize the eubacterial communities that had formed as biofilms within domestic sink drain outlets. Laboratory microcosms of these environments were established using excised biofilms from two separate drain biofilm samples to inoculate constant-depth film fermentors (CDFFs). Drain biofilms harbored 9.8 to 11.3 log10 cells of viable enteric species and pseudomonads/g, while CDFF-grown biofilms harbored 10.6 to 11.4 log10 cells/g. Since live-dead direct staining revealed various efficiencies of recovery by culture, samples were analyzed by DGGE, utilizing primers specific for the V2-V3 region of eubacterial 16S rDNA. These analyses showed that the major PCR amplicons from in situ material were represented in the microcosms and maintained there over extended periods. Sequencing of amplicons resolved by DGGE revealed that the biofilms were dominated by a small number of genera, which were also isolated by culture. One drain sample harbored the protozoan Colpoda maupasi, together with rhabtidid nematodes and bdelloid rotifers. The microcosm enables the maintenance of stable drain-type bacterial communities and represents a useful tool for the modeling of this ecosystem. PMID:12513993

McBain, Andrew J.; Bartolo, Robert G.; Catrenich, Carl E.; Charbonneau, Duane; Ledder, Ruth G.; Rickard, Alexander H.; Symmons, Sharon A.; Gilbert, Peter

2003-01-01

62

Stratified microbial structure and activity in sulfide- and methane-producing anaerobic sewer biofilms.  

PubMed

Simultaneous production of sulfide and methane by anaerobic sewer biofilms has recently been observed, suggesting that sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic archaea (MA), microorganisms known to compete for the same substrates, can coexist in this environment. This study investigated the community structures and activities of SRB and MA in anaerobic sewer biofilms (average thickness of 800 ?m) using a combination of microelectrode measurements, molecular techniques, and mathematical modeling. It was seen that sulfide was mainly produced in the outer layer of the biofilm, between the depths of 0 and 300 ?m, which is in good agreement with the distribution of SRB population as revealed by cryosection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). SRB had a higher relative abundance of 20% on the surface layer, which decreased gradually to below 3% at a depth of 400 ?m. In contrast, MA mainly inhabited the inner layer of the biofilm. Their relative abundances increased from 10% to 75% at depths of 200 ?m and 700 ?m, respectively, from the biofilm surface layer. High-throughput pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons showed that SRB in the biofilm were mainly affiliated with five genera, Desulfobulbus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfovibrio, Desulfatiferula, and Desulforegula, while about 90% of the MA population belonged to the genus Methanosaeta. The spatial organizations of SRB and MA revealed by pyrosequencing were consistent with the FISH results. A biofilm model was constructed to simulate the SRB and MA distributions in the anaerobic sewer biofilm. The good fit between model predictions and the experimental data indicate that the coexistence and spatial structure of SRB and MA in the biofilm resulted from the microbial types and their metabolic transformations and interactions with substrates. PMID:25192994

Sun, Jing; Hu, Shihu; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

2014-11-01

63

Quantum dots conjugated zinc oxide nanosheets: Impeder of microbial growth and biofilm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The grieving problem of the 21st century has been the antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic microorganisms to conventional antibiotics. Therefore, developments of novel antibacterial materials which effectively inhibit or kill such resistant microorganisms have become the need of the hour. In the present study, we communicate the synthesis of quantum dots conjugated zinc oxide nanostructures (ZnO/CdTe) as an impeder of microbial growth and biofilm. The as-synthesized nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The growth impedance property of ZnO and ZnO/CdTe on Gram positive organism, Bacillus subtilis NCIM 2063 and Gram negative, Escherichia coli NCIM 2931 and biofilm impedance activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa O1 was found to occur due to photocatalytical action on the cell biofilm surfaces. The impedance in microbial growth and biofilm formation was further supported by ruptured appearances of cells and dettrered biofilm under field emission scanning electron and confocal laser scanning microscope. The ZnO/CdTe nanostructures array synthesized by hydrothermal method has an advantage of low growth temperature, and opportunity to fabricate inexpensive material for nano-biotechnological applications.

Patil, Rajendra; Gholap, Haribhau; Warule, Sambhaji; Banpurkar, Arun; Kulkarni, Gauri; Gade, Wasudeo

2015-01-01

64

Microbial Community Analysis of Fresh and Old Microbial Biofilms on Bayon Temple Sandstone of Angkor Thom, Cambodia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The temples of Angkor monuments including Angkor Thom and Bayon in Cambodia and surrounding countries were exclusively constructed\\u000a using sandstone. They are severely threatened by biodeterioration caused by active growth of different microorganisms on the\\u000a sandstone surfaces, but knowledge on the microbial community and composition of the biofilms on the sandstone is not available\\u000a from this region. This study investigated

Wensheng Lan; Hui Li; Wei-Dong Wang; Yoko Katayama; Ji-Dong Gu

2010-01-01

65

Microbial community composition and dynamics of moving bed biofilm reactor systems treating municipal sewage.  

PubMed

Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems are increasingly used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, yet in contrast to activated sludge (AS) systems, little is known about their constituent microbial communities. This study investigated the community composition of two municipal MBBR wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Wellington, New Zealand. Monthly samples comprising biofilm and suspended biomass were collected over a 12-month period. Bacterial and archaeal community composition was determined using a full-cycle community approach, including analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA). Differences in microbial community structure and abundance were observed between the two WWTPs and between biofilm and suspended biomass. Biofilms from both plants were dominated by Clostridia and sulfate-reducing members of the Deltaproteobacteria (SRBs). FISH analyses indicated morphological differences in the Deltaproteobacteria detected at the two plants and also revealed distinctive clustering between SRBs and members of the Methanosarcinales, which were the only Archaea detected and were present in low abundance (<5%). Biovolume estimates of the SRBs were higher in biofilm samples from one of the WWTPs which receives both domestic and industrial waste and is influenced by seawater infiltration. The suspended communities from both plants were diverse and dominated by aerobic members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. This study represents the first detailed analysis of microbial communities in full-scale MBBR systems and indicates that this process selects for distinctive biofilm and planktonic communities, both of which differ from those found in conventional AS systems. PMID:22138984

Biswas, Kristi; Turner, Susan J

2012-02-01

66

Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics of Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor Systems Treating Municipal Sewage  

PubMed Central

Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems are increasingly used for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment, yet in contrast to activated sludge (AS) systems, little is known about their constituent microbial communities. This study investigated the community composition of two municipal MBBR wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Wellington, New Zealand. Monthly samples comprising biofilm and suspended biomass were collected over a 12-month period. Bacterial and archaeal community composition was determined using a full-cycle community approach, including analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA). Differences in microbial community structure and abundance were observed between the two WWTPs and between biofilm and suspended biomass. Biofilms from both plants were dominated by Clostridia and sulfate-reducing members of the Deltaproteobacteria (SRBs). FISH analyses indicated morphological differences in the Deltaproteobacteria detected at the two plants and also revealed distinctive clustering between SRBs and members of the Methanosarcinales, which were the only Archaea detected and were present in low abundance (<5%). Biovolume estimates of the SRBs were higher in biofilm samples from one of the WWTPs which receives both domestic and industrial waste and is influenced by seawater infiltration. The suspended communities from both plants were diverse and dominated by aerobic members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. This study represents the first detailed analysis of microbial communities in full-scale MBBR systems and indicates that this process selects for distinctive biofilm and planktonic communities, both of which differ from those found in conventional AS systems. PMID:22138984

Turner, Susan J.

2012-01-01

67

Multi-technique approach to assess the effects of microbial biofilms involved in copper plumbing corrosion.  

PubMed

Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is recognized as an unusual and severe type of corrosion that causes costly failures around the world. A microbial biofilm could enhance the copper release from copper plumbing into the water by forming a reactive interface. The biofilm increases the corrosion rate, the mobility of labile copper from its matrix and the detachment of particles enriched with copper under variable shear stress due to flow conditions. MIC is currently considered as a series of interdependent processes occurring at the metal-liquid interface. The presence of a biofilm results in the following effects: (a) the formation of localized microenvironments with distinct pH, dissolved oxygen concentrations, and redox conditions; (b) sorption and desorption of labile copper bonded to organic compounds under changing water chemistry conditions; (c) change in morphology by deposition of solid corrosion by-products; (d) diffusive transport of reactive chemical species from or towards the metal surface; and (e) detachment of scale particles under flow conditions. Using a multi-technique approach that combines pipe and coupon experiments this paper reviews the effects of microbial biofilms on the corrosion of copper plumbing systems, and proposes an integrated conceptual model for this phenomenon supported by new experimental data. PMID:24355512

Vargas, Ignacio T; Alsina, Marco A; Pavissich, Juan P; Jeria, Gustavo A; Pastén, Pablo A; Walczak, Magdalena; Pizarro, Gonzalo E

2014-06-01

68

Influence of an Oyster Reef on Development of the Microbial Heterotrophic Community of an Estuarine Biofilm  

PubMed Central

We characterized microbial biofilm communities developed over two very closely located but distinct benthic habitats in the Pensacola Bay estuary using two complementary cultivation-independent molecular techniques. Biofilms were grown for 7 days on glass slides held in racks 10 to 15 cm over an oyster reef and an adjacent muddy sand bottom. Total biomass and optical densities of dried biofilms showed dramatic differences for oyster reef versus non-oyster reef biofilms. This study assessed whether the observed spatial variation was reflected in the heterotrophic prokaryotic species composition. Genomic biofilm DNA from both locations was isolated and served as a template to amplify 16S rRNA genes with universal eubacterial primers. Fluorescently labeled PCR products were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, creating a genetic fingerprint of the composition of the microbial communities. Unlabeled PCR products were cloned in order to construct a clone library of 16S rRNA genes. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis was used to screen and define ribotypes. Partial sequences from unique ribotypes were compared with existing database entries to identify species and to construct phylogenetic trees representative of community structures. A pronounced difference in species richness and evenness was observed at the two sites. The biofilm community structure from the oyster reef setting had greater evenness and species richness than the one from the muddy sand bottom. The vast majority of the bacteria in the oyster reef biofilm were related to members of the ?- and ?-subdivisions of Proteobacteria, the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium -Bacteroides cluster, and the phyla Planctomyces and Holophaga-Acidobacterium. The same groups were also present in the biofilm harvested at the muddy sand bottom, with the difference that nearly half of the community consisted of representatives of the Planctomyces phylum. Total species richness was estimated to be 417 for the oyster reef and 60 for the muddy sand bottom, with 10.5% of the total unique species identified being shared between habitats. The results suggest dramatic differences in habitat-specific microbial diversity that have implications for overall microbial diversity within estuaries. PMID:15528551

Nocker, Andreas; Lepo, Joe E.; Snyder, Richard A.

2004-01-01

69

Microbial Extremophiles in Aspect of Limits of Life  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During Earth's evolution accompanied by geophysical and climatic changes a number of ecosystems have been formed. These ecosystems differ by the broad variety of physicochemical and biological factors composing our environment. Traditionally, pH and salinity are considered as geochemical extremes, as opposed to the temperature, pressure and radiation that are referred to as physical extremes (Van den Burg, 2003). Life inhabits all possible places on Earth interacting with the environment and within itself (cross species relations). In nature it is very rare when an ecotope is inhabited by a single species. As a rule, most ecosystems contain the functionally related and evolutionarily adjusted communities (consortia and populations). In contrast to the multicellular structure of eukaryotes (tissues, organs, systems of organs, whole organism), the highest organized form of prokaryotic life in nature is the benthic colonization in biofilms and microbial mats. In these complex structures all microbial cells of different species are distributed in space and time according to their functions and to physicochemical gradients that allow more effective system support, self-protection, and energy distribution. In vitro, of course, the most primitive organized structure for bacterial and archaeal cultures is the colony, the size, shape, color, consistency, and other characteristics of which could carry varies specifics on species or subspecies levels. In table 1 all known types of microbial communities are shown (Pikuta et a]., 2005). In deep underground (lithospheric) and deep-sea ecosystems an additional factor - pressure, and irradiation - could also be included in the list of microbial communities. Currently the beststudied ecosystems are: human body (due to the medical importance), and fresh water and marine ecosystems (due to the reason of an environmental safety). For a long time, extremophiles were terra incognita, since the environments with aggressive parameters (compared to the human body temperature, pH, mineralization, and pressure) were considered a priori as a dead zone.

Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Tang, Jane

2007-01-01

70

In situ environment rather than substrate type dictates microbial community structure of biofilms in a cold seep system.  

PubMed

Using microscopic and molecular techniques combined with computational analysis, this study examined the structure and composition of microbial communities in biofilms that formed on different artificial substrates in a brine pool and on a seep vent of a cold seep in the Red Sea to test our hypothesis that initiation of the biofilm formation and spreading mode of microbial structures differs between the cold seep and the other aquatic environments. Biofilms on different substrates at two deployment sites differed morphologically, with the vent biofilms having higher microbial abundance and better structural features than the pool biofilms. Microbes in the pool biofilms were more taxonomically diverse and mainly composed of various sulfate-reducing bacteria whereas the vent biofilms were exclusively dominated by sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira. These results suggest that the redox environments at the deployment sites might have exerted a strong selection on microbes in the biofilms at two sites whereas the types of substrates had limited effects on the biofilm development. PMID:24399144

Lee, On On; Wang, Yong; Tian, Renmao; Zhang, Weipeng; Shek, Chun Shum; Bougouffa, Salim; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Batang, Zenon B; Xu, Wei; Wang, Guang Chao; Zhang, Xixiang; Lafi, Feras F; Bajic, Vladmir B; Qian, Pei-Yuan

2014-01-01

71

Detection of microbial biofilms on food processing surfaces: hyperspectral fluorescence imaging study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We used a portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system to evaluate biofilm formations on four types of food processing surface materials including stainless steel, polypropylene used for cutting boards, and household counter top materials such as formica and granite. The objective of this investigation was to determine a minimal number of spectral bands suitable to differentiate microbial biofilm formation from the four background materials typically used during food processing. Ultimately, the resultant spectral information will be used in development of handheld portable imaging devices that can be used as visual aid tools for sanitation and safety inspection (microbial contamination) of the food processing surfaces. Pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella cells were grown in low strength M9 minimal medium on various surfaces at 22 +/- 2 °C for 2 days for biofilm formation. Biofilm autofluorescence under UV excitation (320 to 400 nm) obtained by hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system showed broad emissions in the blue-green regions of the spectrum with emission maxima at approximately 480 nm for both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella biofilms. Fluorescence images at 480 nm revealed that for background materials with near-uniform fluorescence responses such as stainless steel and formica cutting board, regardless of the background intensity, biofilm formation can be distinguished. This suggested that a broad spectral band in the blue-green regions can be used for handheld imaging devices for sanitation inspection of stainless, cutting board, and formica surfaces. The non-uniform fluorescence responses of granite make distinctions between biofilm and background difficult. To further investigate potential detection of the biofilm formations on granite surfaces with multispectral approaches, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using the hyperspectral fluorescence image data. The resultant PCA score images revealed distinct contrast between biofilms and granite surfaces. This investigation demonstrated that biofilm formations on food processing surfaces, even for background materials with heterogeneous fluorescence responses, can be detected. Furthermore, a multispectral approach in developing handheld inspection devices may be needed to inspect surface materials that exhibit non-uniform fluorescence.

Jun, Won; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kaunglin; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Roberts, Michael S.; McNaughton, James L.

2009-05-01

72

Microbial Composition and Structure of Aerobic Granular Sewage Biofilms?  

PubMed Central

Aerobic activated sludge granules are dense, spherical biofilms which can strongly improve purification efficiency and sludge settling in wastewater treatment processes. In this study, the structure and development of different granule types were analyzed. Biofilm samples originated from lab-scale sequencing batch reactors which were operated with malthouse, brewery, and artificial wastewater. Scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy together with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed insights into the structure of these biofilms. Microscopic observation revealed that granules consist of bacteria, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), protozoa and, in some cases, fungi. The biofilm development, starting from an activated sludge floc up to a mature granule, follows three phases. During phase 1, stalked ciliated protozoa of the subclass Peritrichia, e.g., Epistylis spp., settle on activated sludge flocs and build tree-like colonies. The stalks are subsequently colonized by bacteria. During phase 2, the ciliates become completely overgrown by bacteria and die. Thereby, the cellular remnants of ciliates act like a backbone for granule formation. During phase 3, smooth, compact granules are formed which serve as a new substratum for unstalked ciliate swarmers settling on granule surfaces. These mature granules comprise a dense core zone containing bacterial cells and EPS and a loosely structured fringe zone consisting of either ciliates and bacteria or fungi and bacteria. Since granules can grow to a size of up to several millimeters in diameter, we developed and applied a modified FISH protocol for the study of cryosectioned biofilms. This protocol allows the simultaneous detection of bacteria, ciliates, and fungi in and on granules. PMID:17704280

Weber, S. D.; Ludwig, W.; Schleifer, K.-H.; Fried, J.

2007-01-01

73

Molecular Analysis of Microbial Communities in Endotracheal Tube Biofilms  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundVentilator-associated pneumonia is the most prevalent acquired infection of patients on intensive care units and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Evidence suggests that an improved understanding of the composition of the biofilm communities that form on endotracheal tubes may result in the development of improved preventative strategies for ventilator-associated pneumonia.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsThe aim of this study was to characterise

Scott Cairns; John Gilbert Thomas; Samuel James Hooper; Matthew Peter Wise; Paul John Frost; Melanie Julia Wilson; Michael Alexander Oxenham Lewis; David Wynne Williams; Niyaz Ahmed

2011-01-01

74

Metagenome analyses of corroded concrete wastewater pipe biofilms reveal a complex microbial system  

PubMed Central

Background Concrete corrosion of wastewater collection systems is a significant cause of deterioration and premature collapse. Failure to adequately address the deteriorating infrastructure networks threatens our environment, public health, and safety. Analysis of whole-metagenome pyrosequencing data and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries was used to determine microbial composition and functional genes associated with biomass harvested from crown (top) and invert (bottom) sections of a corroded wastewater pipe. Results Taxonomic and functional analysis demonstrated that approximately 90% of the total diversity was associated with the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. The top (TP) and bottom pipe (BP) communities were different in composition, with some of the differences attributed to the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Additionally, human fecal bacteria were more abundant in the BP communities. Among the functional categories, proteins involved in sulfur and nitrogen metabolism showed the most significant differences between biofilms. There was also an enrichment of genes associated with heavy metal resistance, virulence (protein secretion systems) and stress response in the TP biofilm, while a higher number of genes related to motility and chemotaxis were identified in the BP biofilm. Both biofilms contain a high number of genes associated with resistance to antibiotics and toxic compounds subsystems. Conclusions The function potential of wastewater biofilms was highly diverse with level of COG diversity similar to that described for soil. On the basis of the metagenomic data, some factors that may contribute to niche differentiation were pH, aerobic conditions and availability of substrate, such as nitrogen and sulfur. The results from this study will help us better understand the genetic network and functional capability of microbial members of wastewater concrete biofilms. PMID:22727216

2012-01-01

75

Extraterrestrial Life in the Microbial Age  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Humankind has long been fascinated with the potential for alien civilizations within the Solar System and beyond (e.g., Crowe and Dowd 2013; Sullivan 2013). Despite the early optimism for life beyond Earth, humankind has yet to make first contact with an alien race. Historical discourse on the topic of alien life can provide some useful input into questions about how the people of Earth today might respond to contact with alien life (e.g., Dick 2013). However, this discourse is primarily devoted to understanding humankind's response to intelligent life. We must recognize that the search for life's potential beyond Earth has dramatically changed since the dawn of the Space Age. We now know that advanced civilizations are not common on planets in our solar system. The search for life on nearby worlds is now limited to non-intelligent, microbial life. Any chance we have of contacting intelligent life lies in receiving transmissions from distant worlds, and contact with such cultures would be greatly limited by the vast expanse of space. This chapter discusses the need for more attention paid to the possible social, economic, and legal ramifications that the discovery of non-intelligent, alien microbial life might bring.

Gronstal, Aaron L.

76

Molecular techniques revealed highly diverse microbial communities in natural marine biofilms on polystyrene dishes for invertebrate larval settlement.  

PubMed

Biofilm microbial communities play an important role in the larval settlement response of marine invertebrates. However, the underlying mechanism has yet to be resolved, mainly because of the uncertainties in characterizing members in the communities using traditional 16S rRNA gene-based molecular methods and in identifying the chemical signals involved. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to characterize the bacterial communities in intertidal and subtidal marine biofilms developed during two seasons. We revealed highly diverse biofilm bacterial communities that varied with season and tidal level. Over 3,000 operational taxonomic units with estimates of up to 8,000 species were recovered in a biofilm sample, which is by far the highest number recorded in subtropical marine biofilms. Nineteen phyla were found, of which Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria were the most dominant one in the intertidal and subtidal biofilms, respectively. Apart from these, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes were the major groups recovered in both intertidal and subtidal biofilms, although their relative abundance varied among samples. Full-length 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed for the four biofilm samples and showed similar bacterial compositions at the phylum level to those revealed by pyrosequencing. Laboratory assays confirmed that cyrids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite preferred to settle on the intertidal rather than subtidal biofilms. This preference was independent of the biofilm bacterial density or biomass but was probably related to the biofilm community structure, particularly, the Proteobacterial and Cyanobacterial groups. PMID:24402362

Lee, On On; Chung, Hong Chun; Yang, Jiangke; Wang, Yong; Dash, Swagatika; Wang, Hao; Qian, Pei-Yuan

2014-07-01

77

Implications of in situ calcification for photosynthesis in a ~ 3.3 Ga-old microbial biofilm from the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Timing the appearance of photosynthetic microorganisms is crucial to understanding the evolution of life on Earth. The ability of the biosphere to use sunlight as a source of energy (photoautotrophy) would have been essential for increasing biomass and for increasing the biogeochemical capacity of all prokaryotes across the range of redox reactions that support life. Typical proxies for photosynthesis in the rock record include features, such as a mat-like, laminated morphology (stratiform, domical, conical) often associated with bulk geochemical signatures, such as calcification, and a fractionated carbon isotope signature. However, to date, in situ, calcification related to photosynthesis has not been demonstrated in the oldest known microbial mats. We here use in situ nanometre-scale techniques to investigate the structural and compositional architecture in a 3.3 billion-year (Ga) old microbial biofilm from the Barberton greenstone belt, thus documenting in situ calcification that was most likely related to anoxygenic photosynthesis. The Josefsdal Chert Microbial Biofilm (JCMB) formed in a littoral (photic) environment. It is characterised by a distinct vertical structural and compositional organisation. The lower part is calcified in situ by aragonite, progressing upwards into uncalcified kerogen characterised by up to 1% sulphur, followed by an upper layer that contains intact filaments at the surface. Crystallites of pseudomorphed pyrite are also associated with the biofilm suggesting calcification related to the activity of heterotrophic sulphur reducing bacteria. In this anoxygenic, nutrient-limited environment, the carbon required by the sulphur reducing bacteria could only have been produced by photoautotrophy. We conclude that the Josfsdal Chert Microbial Biofilm was formed by a consortium of anoxygenic microorganisms, including photosynthesisers and sulphur reducing bacteria.

Westall, Frances; Cavalazzi, Barbara; Lemelle, Laurence; Marrocchi, Yves; Rouzaud, Jean-Noël; Simionovici, Alexandre; Salomé, Murielle; Mostefaoui, Smail; Andreazza, Caroline; Foucher, Frédéric; Toporski, Jan; Jauss, Andrea; Thiel, Volker; Southam, Gordon; MacLean, Lachlan; Wirick, Susan; Hofmann, Axel; Meibom, Anders; Robert, François; Défarge, Christian

2011-10-01

78

Microbial diversity and prevalence of virulent pathogens in biofilms developed in a water reclamation system.  

PubMed

Bacterial biofilm is a common phenomenon in both natural and engineered systems which often becomes a source of contamination and microbially influenced corrosion. It is thought that formation of biofilm in the monoculture of several bacterial species is regulated by acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signals. In this study, we investigated the microbial diversity and existence of AHL-producing and AHL-degrading bacterial species in the biofilm samples from a water reclamation system located in a tropical environment. 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing analysis indicated the presence of at least 11 bacterial species, including the frequently encountered bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and several rare pathogens. We showed that only two groups of isolates, belonging to P. aeruginosa and Enterobacter agglomerans, produced AHL signals. We also found that three bacterial isolates, i.e., Agrobacterium tumefaciens XJ01, Bacillus cereus XJ08, and Ralstonia sp. XJ12, expressed AHL degradation enzymes. Furthermore, we showed that P. aeruginosa isolate HL43 was virulent against animal model Caenorhabditis elegans and released 2-6-fold more pyocyanin cytotoxin than P. aeruginosa strains PA01 and PA14, the two commonly used laboratory strains. These data indicate the complexity and importance of biofilm research in water reclamation. PMID:14596899

Hu, Jiang Yong; Fan, Yang; Lin, Yi-Han; Zhang, Hai-Bao; Ong, Say Leong; Dong, Ning; Xu, Jin-Ling; Ng, Wun Jern; Zhang, Lian-Hui

2003-11-01

79

Successional Change in Microbial Communities of Benthic Phormidium-Dominated Biofilms.  

PubMed

Benthic cyanobacterial blooms are increasing worldwide and can be harmful to human and animal health if they contain toxin-producing species. Microbial interactions are important in the formation of benthic biofilms and can lead to increased dominance and/or toxin production of one or few taxa. This study investigated how microbial interactions contribute to proliferation of benthic blooms dominated by the neurotoxin-producing Phormidium autumnale. Following a rainfall event that cleared the substrate, biofilm succession was characterised at a site on the Hutt River (New Zealand) by sampling every 2-3 days over 32 days. A combination of morphological and molecular community analyses (automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and Illumina™ MiSeq sequencing) identified three distinct phases of succession in both the micro-algal and bacterial communities within P. autumnale-dominated biofilms. Bacterial composition shifted between the phases, and these changes occurred several days before those of the micro-algal community. Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria dominate in the early phase; Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Sphingobacteria and Flavobacteria in the mid-phase; and Sphingobacteria and Flavobacteria in the late phase. Collectively, the results suggest that succession is driven by bacteria in the early stages but becomes dependent on micro-algae in the mid- and late stages of biofilm formation. PMID:25467742

Brasell, Katie A; Heath, Mark W; Ryan, Ken G; Wood, Susanna A

2014-12-01

80

Photosynthetic solar cell using nanostructured proton exchange membrane for microbial biofilm prevention.  

PubMed

Unwanted biofilm formation has a detrimental effect on bioelectrical energy harvesting in microbial cells. This issue still needs to be solved for higher power and longer durability and could be resolved with the help of nanoengineering in designing and manufacturing. Here, we demonstrate a photosynthetic solar cell (PSC) that contains a nanostructure to prevent the formation of biofilm by micro-organisms. Nanostructures were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography, where a film heater array system was introduced to precisely control the local wall temperature. To understand the heat and mass transfer phenomena behind the manufacturing and energy harvesting processes of PSC, we carried out a numerical simulation and experimental measurements. It revealed that the nanostructures developed on the proton exchange membrane enable PSC to produce enhanced output power due to the retarded microbial attachment on the Nafion membrane. We anticipate that this strategy can provide a pathway where PSC can ensure more renewable, sustainable, and efficient energy harvesting performance. PMID:24840499

Lee, Dong Hyun; Oh, Hwa Jin; Bai, Seoung Jae; Song, Young Seok

2014-06-24

81

Utilization of Microbial Biofilms as Monitors of Bioremediation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A down-well aquifer microbial sampling system was developed using glass wool or Bio-Sep beads as a solid-phase support matrix. Here we describe the use of these devices to monitor the groundwater microbial community dynamics during field bioremediation experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Program’s Field Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During

Aaron D. Peacock; Y.-J. Chang; J. D. Istok; L. Krumholz; R. Geyer; B. Kinsall; D. Watson; K. L. Sublette; D. C. White

2004-01-01

82

Microbial community structure and metabolic property of biofilms in vermifiltration for liquid-state sludge stabilization using PLFA profiles.  

PubMed

To investigate effects of earthworms on microbial community structure and metabolic properties of biofilms in vermifiltration for liquid-state sludge stabilization, a vermifilter (VF) with earthworms and a conventional biofilter (BF) without earthworms were compared. The Shannon index of fungi in VF was 16% higher than that in BF, which indicated earthworm activities significantly enhanced fungi diversity. The ratio of monounsaturated to saturated (mono:sat) PLFAs of VF biofilms was higher than that of BF biofilms, which indicated the physiological and nutritional stress for microbial community in VF was relieved due to the increasing of soluble substances caused by the earthworm ingestion. Further investigation showed that the burrowing action of earthworms promoted the aeration condition and led to aerobic microorganisms were predominant in VF. Those results indicated earthworms improved microbial community structure and metabolic properties of biofilms and thus resulted in the overall optimization of the vermifiltration system for liquid-state sludge stabilization. PMID:24262843

Zhao, Chunhui; Xing, Meiyan; Yang, Jian; Lu, Yongsen; Lv, Baoyi

2014-01-01

83

Microbial Life in a Liquid Asphalt Desert  

E-print Network

An active microbiota, reaching up to 10 E+7 cells/g, was found to inhabit a naturally occurring asphalt lake characterized by low water activity and elevated temperature. Geochemical and molecular taxonomic approaches revealed novel and deeply branching microbial assemblages mediating anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation, metal respiration and C1 utilization pathways. These results open a window into the origin and adaptive evolution of microbial life within recalcitrant hydrocarbon matrices, and establish the site as a useful analog for the liquid hydrocarbon environments on Saturn's moon Titan.

Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Antonio, Marina Resendes de Sousa; Ali, Denzil; Hosein, Riad; Song, Young C; Yang, Jinshu; Zaikova, Elena; Beckles, Denise M; Guinan, Edward; Lehto, Harry J; Hallam, Steven J

2010-01-01

84

Analytical Challenges of Microbial Biofilms on Medical Devices Microbial colonization of medical devices is a widespread problem that tests the limits of conventional  

E-print Network

#12;Analytical Challenges of Microbial Biofilms on Medical Devices Microbial colonization of medical devices is a widespread problem that tests the limits of conventional analytical methods *S Supporting Information Robert Gates The use of medical devices is one of the fastest growing areas

Vertes, Akos

85

Effect of biofilm formation on the performance of microbial fuel cell for the treatment of palm oil mill effluent.  

PubMed

Anode biofilm is a crucial component in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electrogenesis. Better knowledge about the biofilm development process on electrode surface is believed to improve MFC performance. In this study, double-chamber microbial fuel cell was operated with diluted POME (initial COD = 1,000 mg L(-1)) and polyacrylonitrile carbon felt was used as electrode. The maximum power density, COD removal efficiency and Coulombic efficiency were found as 22 mW m(-2), 70 and 24 %, respectively. FTIR and TGA analysis confirmed the formation of biofilm on the electrode surface during MFC operation. The impact of anode biofilm on anodic polarization resistance was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and microbial community changes during MFC operation using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The EIS-simulated results showed the reduction of charge transfer resistance (R ct) by 16.9 % after 14 days of operation of the cell, which confirms that the development of the microbial biofilm on the anode decreases the R ct and therefore improves power generation. DGGE analysis showed the variation in the biofilm composition during the biofilm growth until it forms an initial stable microbial community, thereafter the change in the diversity would be less. The power density showed was directly dependent on the biofilm development and increased significantly during the initial biofilm development period. Furthermore, DGGE patterns obtained from 7th and 14th day suggest the presence of less diversity and probable functional redundancy within the anodic communities possibly responsible for the stable MFC performance in changing environmental conditions. PMID:24981021

Baranitharan, E; Khan, Maksudur R; Prasad, D M R; Teo, Wee Fei Aaron; Tan, Geok Yuan Annie; Jose, Rajan

2015-01-01

86

Microbial astronauts: assembling microbial communities for advanced life support systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Extension of human habitation into space requires that humans carry with them many of the microorganisms with which they coexist on Earth. The ubiquity of microorganisms in close association with all living things and biogeochemical processes on Earth predicates that they must also play a critical role in maintaining the viability of human life in space. Even though bacterial populations exist as locally adapted ecotypes, the abundance of individuals in microbial species is so large that dispersal is unlikely to be limited by geographical barriers on Earth (i.e., for most environments "everything is everywhere" given enough time). This will not be true for microbial communities in space where local species richness will be relatively low because of sterilization protocols prior to launch and physical barriers between Earth and spacecraft after launch. Although community diversity will be sufficient to sustain ecosystem function at the onset, richness and evenness may decline over time such that biological systems either lose functional potential (e.g., bioreactors may fail to reduce BOD or nitrogen load) or become susceptible to invasion by human-associated microorganisms (pathogens) over time. Research at the John F. Kennedy Space Center has evaluated fundamental properties of microbial diversity and community assembly in prototype bioregenerative systems for NASA Advanced Life Support. Successional trends related to increased niche specialization, including an apparent increase in the proportion of nonculturable types of organisms, have been consistently observed. In addition, the stability of the microbial communities, as defined by their resistance to invasion by human-associated microorganisms, has been correlated to their diversity. Overall, these results reflect the significant challenges ahead for the assembly of stable, functional communities using gnotobiotic approaches, and the need to better define the basic biological principles that define ecosystem processes in the space environment. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag.

Roberts, M. S.; Garland, J. L.; Mills, A. L.

2004-01-01

87

Community transcriptomics reveals unexpected high microbial diversity in acidophilic biofilm communities.  

PubMed

A fundamental question in microbial ecology relates to community structure, and how this varies across environment types. It is widely believed that some environments, such as those at very low pH, host simple communities based on the low number of taxa, possibly due to the extreme environmental conditions. However, most analyses of species richness have relied on methods that provide relatively low ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sampling depth. Here we used community transcriptomics to analyze the microbial diversity of natural acid mine drainage biofilms from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, California. Our analyses target deep pools of rRNA gene transcripts recovered from both natural and laboratory-grown biofilms across varying developmental stages. In all, 91.8% of the ?254 million Illumina reads mapped to rRNA genes represented in the SILVA database. Up to 159 different taxa, including Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryotes, were identified. Diversity measures, ordination and hierarchical clustering separate environmental from laboratory-grown biofilms. In part, this is due to the much larger number of rare members in the environmental biofilms. Although Leptospirillum bacteria generally dominate biofilms, we detect a wide variety of other Nitrospira organisms present at very low abundance. Bacteria from the Chloroflexi phylum were also detected. The results indicate that the primary characteristic that has enabled prior extensive cultivation-independent 'omic' analyses is not simplicity but rather the high dominance by a few taxa. We conclude that a much larger variety of organisms than previously thought have adapted to this extreme environment, although only few are selected for at any one time. PMID:25361394

Aliaga Goltsman, Daniela S; Comolli, Luis R; Thomas, Brian C; Banfield, Jillian F

2014-11-01

88

Metal Interactions with Microbial Biofilms in Acidic and Neutral pH Environments  

PubMed Central

Microbial biofilms were grown on strips of epoxy-impregnated filter paper submerged at four sites in water contaminated with metals from mine wastes. At two sample stations, the water was acidic (pH 3.1); the other sites were in a lake restored to a near neutral pH level by application of a crushed limestone slurry. During a 17-week study period, planktonic bacterial counts increased from 101 to 103 CFU/ml at all sites. Biofilm counts increased rapidly over the first 5 weeks and then leveled to 104 CFU/cm2 in the neutral pH system and 103 CFU/cm2 at the acidic sites. In each case, the biofilms bound Mn, Fe, Ni, and Cu in excess of the amounts adsorbed by control strips covered with nylon filters (pore size, 0.22 ?m) to exclude microbial growth; Co bound under neutral conditions but not under acidic conditions. Conditional adsorption capacity constants, obtained graphically from the data, showed that biofilm metal uptake at a neutral pH level was enhanced by up to 12 orders of magnitude over acidic conditions. Similarly, adsorption strength values were usually higher at elevated pH levels. In thin sections of the biofilms, encapsulated bacterial cells were commonly found enmeshed together in microcolonies. The extracellular polymers often contained iron oxide precipitates which generated weak electron diffraction patterns with characteristic reflections for ferrihydrite (Fe2O3 · H2O) at d equaling 0.15 and 0.25 nm. At neutral pH levels, these deposits incorporated trace amounts of Si and exhibited a granular morphology, whereas acicular crystalloids containing S developed under acidic conditions. Images PMID:16347914

Ferris, F. G.; Schultze, S.; Witten, T. C.; Fyfe, W. S.; Beveridge, T. J.

1989-01-01

89

Waste Water Derived Electroactive Microbial Biofilms: Growth, Maintenance, and Basic Characterization  

PubMed Central

The growth of anodic electroactive microbial biofilms from waste water inocula in a fed-batch reactor is demonstrated using a three-electrode setup controlled by a potentiostat. Thereby the use of potentiostats allows an exact adjustment of the electrode potential and ensures reproducible microbial culturing conditions. During growth the current production is monitored using chronoamperometry (CA). Based on these data the maximum current density (jmax) and the coulombic efficiency (CE) are discussed as measures for characterization of the bioelectrocatalytic performance. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), a nondestructive, i.e. noninvasive, method, is used to study the extracellular electron transfer (EET) of electroactive bacteria. CV measurements are performed on anodic biofilm electrodes in the presence of the microbial substrate, i.e. turnover conditions, and in the absence of the substrate, i.e. nonturnover conditions, using different scan rates. Subsequently, data analysis is exemplified and fundamental thermodynamic parameters of the microbial EET are derived and explained: peak potential (Ep), peak current density (jp), formal potential (Ef) and peak separation (?Ep). Additionally the limits of the method and the state-of the art data analysis are addressed. Thereby this video-article shall provide a guide for the basic experimental steps and the fundamental data analysis. PMID:24430581

Gimkiewicz, Carla; Harnisch, Falk

2013-01-01

90

Initial development and structure of biofilms on microbial fuel cell anodes  

PubMed Central

Background Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) rely on electrochemically active bacteria to capture the chemical energy contained in organics and convert it to electrical energy. Bacteria develop biofilms on the MFC electrodes, allowing considerable conversion capacity and opportunities for extracellular electron transfer (EET). The present knowledge on EET is centred around two Gram-negative models, i.e. Shewanella and Geobacter species, as it is believed that Gram-positives cannot perform EET by themselves as the Gram-negatives can. To understand how bacteria form biofilms within MFCs and how their development, structure and viability affects electron transfer, we performed pure and co-culture experiments. Results Biofilm viability was maintained highest nearer the anode during closed circuit operation (current flowing), in contrast to when the anode was in open circuit (soluble electron acceptor) where viability was highest on top of the biofilm, furthest from the anode. Closed circuit anode Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were considerably thinner compared to the open circuit anode (30 ± 3 ?m and 42 ± 3 ?m respectively), which is likely due to the higher energetic gain of soluble electron acceptors used. The two Gram-positive bacteria used only provided a fraction of current produced by the Gram-negative organisms. Power output of co-cultures Gram-positive Enterococcus faecium and either Gram-negative organisms, increased by 30-70% relative to the single cultures. Over time the co-culture biofilms segregated, in particular, Pseudomonas aeruginosa creating towers piercing through a thin, uniform layer of Enterococcus faecium. P. aeruginosa and E. faecium together generated a current of 1.8 ± 0.4 mA while alone they produced 0.9 ± 0.01 and 0.2 ± 0.05 mA respectively. Conclusion We postulate that this segregation may be an essential difference in strategy for electron transfer and substrate capture between the Gram-negative and the Gram-positive bacteria used here. PMID:20356407

2010-01-01

91

Biofilm formation at warming temperature: acceleration of microbial colonization and microbial interactive effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

River biofilms that grow on wet benthic surface are mainly composed of bacteria, algae, cyanobacteria and protozoa embedded in a polysaccharide matrix. The effects of increased river water temperature on biofilm formation were investigated. A laboratory experiment was designed employing two temperatures (11.1–13.2°C, night–day; 14.7–16.0°C, night–day) and two nutrient levels (0.054 mg P l, 0.75 mg N l; 0.54 mg

Verónica Díaz Villanueva; Thomas Schwartz; Anna M. Romaní

2010-01-01

92

Microbial diversity of peri-implant biofilms on implant fixed bar and telescopic double crown attachments.  

PubMed

One of the principal problems in oral implantation is inflammation of peri-implant hard and soft tissues caused by bacterial biofilms. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the microbial diversity of peri-implant biofilms on 2 different implant-anchored attachment types in vivo. Samples of peri-implant sulcus fluid were collected from 8 patients with implant-supported bar attachments and 8 patients with implant-anchored telescopic double crown attachments. Samples of sulcus fluid of the adjacent teeth were also collected from the partially edentulous patients with implant fixed telescopic double crowns. The mixed amplicons of 16S rRNA fragments of different bacterial origins were separated by use of single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis to identify the predominant bacterial genera. With 3.5 ± 2.1 different predominant bacterial genera in the sulcus fluid surrounding implant-supported bar attachments and 6.3 ± 3.1 different predominant genera in the sulcular fluid of implant-anchored double crown attachments, the differences were not statistically significant (P = .11). The microbial diversity in the sulcus fluid surrounding the remaining dentition was similar to that of the implant fixed telescopic attachments (6.3 ± 2.1). Aside from host response and other individual factors, the microbial diversity of peri-implant biofilms seems to be impaired by cofactors such as the possibility of cleaning the implant-supported supraconstructions and the different plaque-retaining sites. Nevertheless, these differences do not lead to statistically significant differences in the microbial diversity of peri-implant plaques. PMID:21332328

Heuer, Wieland; Kettenring, Andreas; Demling, Anton; Stumpp, Sascha Nico; Gellermann, Eva; Winkel, Andreas; Stiesch, Meike

2013-12-01

93

Optically Transparent Porous Medium for Nondestructive Studies of Microbial Biofilm Architecture and Transport Dynamics  

PubMed Central

We describe a novel and noninvasive, microscopy-based method for visualizing the structure and dynamics of microbial biofilms, individual fluorescent microbial cells, and inorganic colloids within a model porous medium. Biofilms growing in flow cells packed with granules of an amorphous fluoropolymer could be visualized as a consequence of refractive index matching between the solid fluoropolymer grains and the aqueous immersion medium. In conjunction with the capabilities of confocal microscopy for nondestructive optical sectioning, the use of amorphous fluoropolymers as a solid matrix permits observation of organisms and dynamic processes to a depth of 2 to 3 mm, whereas sediment biofilms growing in sand-filled flow cells can only be visualized in the region adjacent to the flow cell wall. This method differs fundamentally from other refractive index-matching applications in that optical transparency was achieved by matching a solid phase to water (and not vice versa), thereby permitting real-time microscopic studies of particulate-containing, low-refractive-index media such as biological and chromatographic systems. PMID:16085878

Leis, Andrew P.; Schlicher, Sven; Franke, Hilmar; Strathmann, Martin

2005-01-01

94

Influence of Support Media Characteristics on Biofilm Activity in Graywater Treatment Systems for Advanced Life Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced life support systems for long-duration space missions will require efficient recycling of water and air. Biological treatment systems may be used as the initial process in a multistep recycling system. Biofilm reactors (or biotrickling filters) have been shown to be effective for treatment of air and water. A major design consideration for these reactors is the selection of biofilm

Neepa Shah; Sybill E. Sharvelle; M. Katherine Banks

2007-01-01

95

Microbial biofilms control economic metal mobility in an acid-sulfate hydrothermal system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trace metal cycling in hydrothermal systems has been the subject of a variety of geochemical and economical geology studies. Typically in these settings these elements are sequestered in sulfide and oxide mineral fractions, however in near-surface low-temperature environments organic matter and microorganisms (typically in mats) have been implicated in their mobility through sorption. Here we specifically examine the role of microbial biofilms on metal partitioning in an acid-sulfate hydrothermal system. We studied the influence of microorganisms and microbial biofilms on trace metal adsorption in Pailas de Aguas I, an acid-sulfate hot spring on the southwest flank of Rincon de la Vieja, a composite stratovolcano in the Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica. Spring waters contain high suspended loads, and are characterized by high T (79.6-89.3oC), low pH (2.6-4), and high ionic strengths (I= 0.5-0.8). Waters contain high concentrations of the biogeochemically active elements Fe (4-6 mmol/l) and SO42- (38 mmol/l), but PO43- are below detection limits (bdl). Silver, Ni, and Mo concentrations are bdl; however other trace metals are present in solution in concentrations of 0.1-0.2 mg/l Cd, 0.2-0.4 mg/l Cr and V, 0.04-1 mg/l Cu,. Preliminary 16S rRNA analyses of microorganisms in sediments reveal several species of algae, including Galderia sp., Cyanidium sp, ?-proteobacteria, Acidithiobacillus caldus, Euryarcheota, and methanogens. To evaluate microbial biofilms' impact on trace metal mobility we analyzed a combination of suspended, bulk and biofilm associated sediment samples via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and trace element sequential extractions (SE). XRD analysis indicated all samples were primarily composed of Fe/Al clay minerals (nontronite, kaolinite), 2- and 6-line ferrihydrite, goethite, and hematite, quartz, and opal-?. SE showed the highest concentrations of Cu, Mo, and V were found in the suspended load. Molybdenum was found primarily in the residual and organic fractions of suspended sediments. Copper is distributed in all but the carbonate fraction of suspended sediments. Vanadium was bound primarily to the oxide and residual fractions with Si, which is probably found as opal-?. In contrast, biofilm sediments had the highest concentrations of Fe, Si, Cd, Al, Zn, Ag, and Ni. Trace metals were sequestered mainly in the organic fraction in decreasing concentrations of: Cu biofilm sediments, which may be the result of sulfur oxidizing organisms generating elemental sulfur. Because trace metals are primarily bound in the organic fraction we posit that this may be a strategy by microorganisms to reduce metal toxicity in an acid environment through sequestration, making these metals relatively immobile until geochemical conditions dramatically changed. Similar patterns of trace metal partitioning into microbial biofilms have been observed in other acid systems, including acid mine drainage at Rio Tinto, Spain. Therefore, microbial sequestration of toxic metals may be a common coping mechanism in acid sulfate systems.

Phillips-Lander, C. M.; Roberts, J. A.; Hernandez, W.; Mora, M.; Fowle, D. A.

2012-12-01

96

Identification of Biofilm Matrix-Associated Proteins from an Acid Mine Drainage Microbial Community  

SciTech Connect

In microbial communities, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), also called the extracellular matrix, provide the spatial organization and structural stability during biofilm development. One of the major components of EPS is protein, but it is not clear what specific functions these proteins contribute to the extracellular matrix or to microbial physiology. To investigate this in biofilms from an extremely acidic environment, we used shotgun proteomics analyses to identify proteins associated with EPS in biofilms at two developmental stages, designated DS1 and DS2. The proteome composition of the EPS was significantly different from that of the cell fraction, with more than 80% of the cellular proteins underrepresented or undetectable in EPS. In contrast, predicted periplasmic, outer membrane, and extracellular proteins were overrepresented by 3- to 7-fold in EPS. Also, EPS proteins were more basic by 2 pH units on average and about half the length. When categorized by predicted function, proteins involved in motility, defense, cell envelope, and unknown functions were enriched in EPS. Chaperones, such as histone-like DNA binding protein and cold shock protein, were overrepresented in EPS. Enzymes, such as protein peptidases, disulfide-isomerases, and those associated with cell wall and polysaccharide metabolism, were also detected. Two of these enzymes, identified as -N-acetylhexosaminidase and cellulase, were confirmed in the EPS fraction by enzymatic activity assays. Compared to the differences between EPS and cellular fractions, the relative differences in the EPS proteomes between DS1 and DS2 were smaller and consistent with expected physiological changes during biofilm development.

Jiao, Yongqin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); D'Haeseleer, Patrik M [ORNL; Dill, Brian [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley

2011-01-01

97

Characterization of a filamentous biofilm community established in a cellulose-fed microbial fuel cell  

PubMed Central

Background Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microorganisms to generate electric power from organic matter. Despite the development of efficient MFC reactors, the microbiology of electricity generation remains to be sufficiently understood. Results A laboratory-scale two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) was inoculated with rice paddy field soil and fed cellulose as the carbon and energy source. Electricity-generating microorganisms were enriched by subculturing biofilms that attached onto anode electrodes. An electric current of 0.2 mA was generated from the first enrichment culture, and ratios of the major metabolites (e.g., electric current, methane and acetate) became stable after the forth enrichment. In order to investigate the electrogenic microbial community in the anode biofilm, it was morphologically analyzed by electron microscopy, and community members were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene clone-library analyses. Electron microscopy revealed that filamentous cells and rod-shaped cells with prosthecae-like filamentous appendages were abundantly present in the biofilm. Filamentous cells and appendages were interconnected via thin filaments. The clone library analyses frequently detected phylotypes affiliated with Clostridiales, Chloroflexi, Rhizobiales and Methanobacterium. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization revealed that the Rhizobiales population represented rod-shaped cells with filamentous appendages and constituted over 30% of the total population. Conclusion Bacteria affiliated with the Rhizobiales constituted the major population in the cellulose-fed MFC and exhibited unique morphology with filamentous appendages. They are considered to play important roles in the cellulose-degrading electrogenic community. PMID:18186940

Ishii, Shun'ichi; Shimoyama, Takefumi; Hotta, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Kazuya

2008-01-01

98

Exoelectrogenic Bacterium Phylogenetically Related to Citrobacter freundii, Isolated from Anodic Biofilm of a Microbial Fuel Cell.  

PubMed

An electrogenic bacterium, named Citrobacter freundii Z7, was isolated from the anodic biofilm of microbial fuel cell (MFC) inoculated with aerobic sewage sludge. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analysis exhibited that the strain Z7 had relatively high electrochemical activity. When the strain Z7 was inoculated into MFC, the maximum power density can reach 204.5 mW/m(2) using citrate as electron donor. Series of substrates including glucose, glycerol, lactose, sucrose, and rhammose could be utilized to generate power. CV tests and the addition of anode solution as well as AQDS experiments indicated that the strain Z7 might transfer electrons indirectly via secreted mediators. PMID:25427595

Huang, Jianjian; Zhu, Nengwu; Cao, Yanlan; Peng, Yue; Wu, Pingxiao; Dong, Wenhao

2014-11-27

99

Human plasma enhances the expression of Staphylococcal microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules promoting biofilm formation and increases antimicrobial tolerance In Vitro  

PubMed Central

Background Microbial biofilms have been associated with the development of chronic human infections and represent a clinical challenge given their increased antimicrobial tolerance. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing a diverse range of diseases, of which biofilms are often involved. Staphylococcal attachment and the formation of biofilms have been shown to be facilitated by host factors that accumulate on surfaces. To better understand how host factors enhance staphylococcal biofilm formation, we evaluated the effect of whole human plasma on biofilm formation in clinical isolates of S. aureus and the expression of seven microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) known to be involved in biofilm formation by quantitative real-time PCR. We also evaluated whether plasma augmented changes in S. aureus biofilm morphology and antimicrobial resistance. Results Exposure of clinical isolates of S. aureus to human plasma (10%) within media, and to a lesser extent when coated onto plates, significantly enhanced biofilm formation in all of the clinical isolates tested. Compared to biofilms grown under non-supplemented conditions, plasma-augmented biofilms displayed significant changes in both the biofilm phenotype and cell morphology as determined by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Exposure of bacteria to plasma resulted in a significant fold-increase in MSCRAMM expression in both a time and isolate-dependent manner. Additionally, plasma-augmented biofilms displayed an increased tolerance to vancomycin compared to biofilms grown in non-supplemented media. Conclusions Collectively, these studies support previous findings demonstrating a role for host factors in biofilm formation and provide further insight into how plasma, a preferred growth medium for staphylococcal biofilm formation enhances as well as augments other intrinsic properties of S. aureus biofilms. Consequently, these findings indicate that incorporation of host factors may be necessary to better replicate in vivo conditions and for the best utility of a clinical biofilm assay to evaluate the process of biofilm formation and treatments. PMID:25034276

2014-01-01

100

Microbial biofilm development on neonatal enteral feeding tubes.  

PubMed

Neonates in intensive care units often require supporting medical devices and antibiotic treatment. The intensive care treatment combined with their immature immune system, the increased permeability of mucosa, and the undeveloped microflora of the gut may render the neonates highly vulnerable to colonisation and subsequent infections when exposed to opportunistic pathogens. These infections may not only be local gastrointestinal infections, but also systematic following translocation from the gastrointestinal system. This could be particularly alarming considering that common antibiotics may not be effective if the causative strain is multi-drug resistant.This chapter reviews our information on the microbial colonization of neonatal feeding tubes. The range of organisms which have been recovered are wide, and while primarily bacterial, fungi such as Candida have also been found. The bacteria are principally Staphylococcus spp. and Enterobacteriaceae. The Enterobacteriaceae isolates are predominantly Enterobacter cancerogenus, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter hormaechei, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Many of these isolates encode for antibiotic resistance; E. hormaechei (ceftazidine and cefotaxime) and S. marcescens strains (amoxicillin and co-amoxiclav). PMID:25366224

Juma, Noha A; Forsythe, Stephen J

2015-01-01

101

A biofilm enhanced miniature microbial fuel cell using Shewanella oneidensis DSP10 and oxygen reduction cathodes.  

PubMed

A miniature-microbial fuel cell (mini-MFC, chamber volume: 1.2 mL) was used to monitor biofilm development from a pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis DSP10 on graphite felt (GF) under minimal nutrient conditions. ESEM evidence of biofilm formation on GF is supported by substantial power density (per device cross-section) from the mini-MFC when using an acellular minimal media anolyte (1500 mW/m2). These experiments demonstrate that power density per volume for a biofilm flow reactor MFC should be calculated using the anode chamber volume alone (250W/m3), rather than with the full anolyte volume. Two oxygen reduction cathodes (uncoated GF or a Pt/vulcanized carbon coating on GF) were also compared to a cathode using uncoated GF and a 50mM ferricyanide catholyte solution. The Pt/C-GF (2-4% Pt by mass) electrodes with liquid cultures of DSP10 produced one order of magnitude larger power density (150W/m3) than bare graphite felt (12W/m3) in this design. These advances are some of the required modifications to enable the mini-MFC to be used in real-time, long-term environmental power generating situations. PMID:16939710

Biffinger, Justin C; Pietron, Jeremy; Ray, Ricky; Little, Brenda; Ringeisen, Bradley R

2007-03-15

102

Role of bacterial adhesion in the microbial ecology of biofilms in cooling tower systems  

PubMed Central

The fate of the three heterotrophic biofilm forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. in pilot scale cooling towers was evaluated both by observing the persistence of each species in the recirculating water and the formation of biofilms on steel coupons placed in each cooling tower water reservoir. Two different cooling tower experiments were performed: a short-term study (6 days) to observe the initial bacterial colonization of the cooling tower, and a long-term study (3 months) to observe the ecological dynamics with repeated introduction of the test strains. An additional set of batch experiments (6 days) was carried out to evaluate the adhesion of each strain to steel surfaces under similar conditions to those found in the cooling tower experiments. Substantial differences were observed in the microbial communities that developed in the batch systems and cooling towers. P. aeruginosa showed a low degree of adherence to steel surfaces both in batch and in the cooling towers, but grew much faster than K. pneumoniae and Flavobacterium in mixed-species biofilms and ultimately became the dominant organism in the closed batch systems. However, the low degree of adherence caused P. aeruginosa to be rapidly washed out of the open cooling tower systems, and Flavobacterium became the dominant microorganism in the cooling towers in both the short-term and long-term experiments. These results indicate that adhesion, retention and growth on solid surfaces play important roles in the bacterial community that develops in cooling tower systems. PMID:19177226

Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas; Warta, Richard; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Packman, Aaron

2009-01-01

103

Mathematical model for microbial fuel cells with anodic biofilms and anaerobic digestion.  

PubMed

This study describes the integration of IWA's anaerobic digestion model (ADM1) within a computational model of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Several populations of methanogenic and electroactive microorganisms coexist suspended in the anolyte and in the biofilm attached to the anode. A number of biological, chemical and electrochemical reactions occur in the bulk liquid, in the biofilm and at the electrode surface, involving glucose, organic acids, H2 and redox mediators. Model output includes the evolution in time of important measurable MFC parameters (current production, consumption of substrates, suspended and attached biomass growth). Two- and three-dimensional model simulations reveal the importance of current and biomass heterogeneous distribution over the planar anode surface. Voltage- and power-current characteristics can be calculated at different moments in time to evaluate the limiting regime in which the MFC operates. Finally, model simulations are compared with experimental results showing that, in a batch MFC, smaller electrical resistance of the circuit leads to selection of electroactive bacteria. Higher coulombic yields are so obtained because electrons from substrate are transferred to anode rather than following the methanogenesis pathway. In addition to higher currents, faster COD consumption rates are so achieved. The potential of this general modelling framework is in the understanding and design of more complex cases of wastewater-fed microbial fuel cells. PMID:18441420

Picioreanu, C; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Katuri, K P; Scott, K; Head, I M

2008-01-01

104

Microbial biofilms on the sandstone monuments of the Angkor Wat Complex, Cambodia.  

PubMed

Discoloring biofilms from Cambodian temples Angkor Wat, Preah Khan, and the Bayon and West Prasat in Angkor Thom contained a microbial community dominated by coccoid cyanobacteria. Molecular analysis identified Chroococcidiopsis as major colonizer, but low similarity values (<95%) suggested a similar genus or species not present in the databases. In only two of the six sites sampled were filamentous cyanobacteria, Microcoleus, Leptolyngbya, and Scytonema, found; the first two detected by sequencing of 16S rRNA gene library clones from samples of a moist green biofilm on internal walls in Preah Khan, where Lyngbya (possibly synonymous with Microcoleus) was seen by direct microscopy as major colonizer. Scytonema was detected also by microscopy on an internal wall in the Bayon. This suggests that filamentous cyanobacteria are more prevalent in internal (high moisture) areas. Heterotrophic bacteria were found in all samples. DNA sequencing of bands from DGGE gels identified Proteobacteria (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Methylobacterium radiotolerans) and Firmicutes (Bacillus sp., Bacillus niacini, Bacillus sporothermodurans, Lysinibacillus fusiformis, Paenibacillus sp., Paenibacillus panacisoli, and Paenibacillus zanthoxyli). Some of these bacteria produce organic acids, potentially degrading stone. Actinobacteria, mainly streptomycetes, were present in most samples; algae and fungi were rare. A dark-pigmented filamentous fungus was detected in internal and external Preah Khan samples, while the alga Trentepohlia was found only in samples taken from external, pink-stained stone at Preah Khan. Results show that these microbial biofilms are mature communities whose major constituents are resistant to dehydration and high levels of irradiation and can be involved in deterioration of sandstone. Such analyses are important prerequisites to the application of control strategies. PMID:22006074

Gaylarde, Christine C; Rodríguez, César Hernández; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Ortega-Morales, B Otto

2012-02-01

105

Biofilms in lab and nature: a molecular geneticist's voyage to microbial ecology.  

PubMed

This article reviews the latest findings on how extracellular signaling controls cell fate determination during the process of biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis in the artificial setting of the laboratory. To complement molecular genetic approaches, surface-associated communities in settings as diverse as the pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea and the human lung were investigated. The study of the pitcher plant revealed that the presence or absence of a mosquito larva in the pitcher plant controlled bacterial diversity in the ecosystem inside the pitcher plant. Through the analysis of the respiratory tract microbiota of humans suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) a correlation between lung function and bacterial community diversity was found. Those that had lungs in good condition had also more diverse communities, whereas patients harboring Pseudomonas aeruginosa-the predominant CF pathogen-in their lungs had less diverse communities. Further studies focused on interspecies and intraspecies relationships at the molecular level in search for signaling molecules that would promote biofilm formation. Two molecules were found that induced biofilm formation in B. subtilis: nystatin-released by other species-and surfactin-released by B. subtilis itself. This is a role not previously known for two molecules that were known for other activities-nystatin as an antifungal and surfactin as a surfactant. In addition, surfactin was found to also trigger cannibalism under starvation. This could be a strategy to maintain the population because the cells destroyed serve as nutrients for the rest. The path that led the author to the study of microbial biofilms is also described. PMID:20890834

Kolter, Roberto

2010-03-01

106

Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions  

SciTech Connect

Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

2014-04-07

107

Methods for Observing Microbial Biofilms Directly on Leaf Surfaces and Recovering Them for Isolation of Culturable Microorganisms  

PubMed Central

Epifluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to observe microbial biofilms directly on leaf surfaces. Biofilms were observed on leaves of all species sampled (spinach, lettuce, Chinese cabbage, celery, leeks, basil, parsley, and broad-leaved endive), although the epifluorescent images were clearest when pale green tissue or cuticle pieces were used. With these techniques, biofilms were observed that were about 20 (mu)m in depth and up to 1 mm in length and that contained copious exopolymeric matrices, diverse morphotypes of microorganisms, and debris. The epifluorescence techniques described here can be used to rapidly determine the abundance and localization of biofilms on leaves. An additional technique was developed to recover individual biofilms or portions of single biofilms from leaves and to disintegrate them for isolation of the culturable microorganisms they contained. Nineteen biofilms from broad-leaved endive, spinach, parsley, and olive leaves were thus isolated and characterized to illustrate the applications of this technique. PMID:16535579

Morris, C. E.; Monier, J.; Jacques, M.

1997-01-01

108

Structural, physicochemical and microbial properties of flocs and biofilms in integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFFAS) systems.  

PubMed

Integrated fixed-film activated sludge systems (IFFAS) may achieve year-round nitrification or gain additional treatment capacity due to the presence of both flocs and biofilms, and the potential for multiple redox states and long solids retention time. Flocs and biofilms are distinctive microbial structures and characterization of the physicochemical and structural properties of these may provide insight into their respective roles in wastewater treatment and contaminant removal in IFFAS. Flocs and biofilms were examined from five different pilot media systems being evaluated for potential full scale implementation at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant. Flocs and biofilms within the same system possessed different surface characteristics; flocs were found to have a higher negative surface charge (-0.35 to -0.65 meq./g VSS) and are more hydrophobic (60%-75%) than biofilms (-0.05 to -0.07 meq/g VSS; 19-34%). The EPS content of flocs was significantly higher (range of 2.1-4.5 folds) than that of biofilms. In floc-derived extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), protein (PN) was clearly dominant; whereas in biofilm-derived EPS, PN and polysaccharide (PS) were present in approximately equal proportions. Biofilm EPS had a higher proportion of DNA when compared to flocs. Biofilm growth was preferential on the protected internal surfaces of the media. Colonization of the external surfaces of the media was evident by the presence of small microcolonies. The structural heterogeneity of the biofilms examined was supported by observed differences in biomass content, thickness and roughness of biofilm surface. The biofilm on the interior surface of media was found to be patchy with clusters of cells connected by an irregular arrangement of interconnecting EPS projections. Biofilm thickness ranged between 139 ?m and 253 ?m. The pattern of oxygen penetration is expected to be complex. Nitrifiers and denitrifiers were predominantly associated with the biofilms, and the latter were found to be dispersed throughout the film and arranged in micro-clusters, suggesting partial oxygen penetration. PMID:22832219

Mahendran, Basuvaraj; Lishman, Lori; Liss, Steven N

2012-10-15

109

Microbial diversity of biofilm communities in microniches associated with the didemnid ascidian Lissoclinum patella  

PubMed Central

We assessed the microbial diversity and microenvironmental niche characteristics in the didemnid ascidian Lissoclinum patella using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, microsensor and imaging techniques. L. patella harbors three distinct microbial communities spatially separated by few millimeters of tunic tissue: (i) a biofilm on its upper surface exposed to high irradiance and O2 levels, (ii) a cloacal cavity dominated by the prochlorophyte Prochloron spp. characterized by strong depletion of visible light and a dynamic chemical microenvironment ranging from hyperoxia in light to anoxia in darkness and (iii) a biofilm covering the underside of the animal, where light is depleted of visible wavelengths and enriched in near-infrared radiation (NIR). Variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging demonstrated photosynthetic activity, and hyperspectral imaging revealed a diversity of photopigments in all microhabitats. Amplicon sequencing revealed the dominance of cyanobacteria in all three layers. Sequences representing the chlorophyll d containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina and anoxygenic phototrophs were abundant on the underside of the ascidian in shallow waters but declined in deeper waters. This depth dependency was supported by a negative correlation between A. marina abundance and collection depth, explained by the increased attenuation of NIR as a function of water depth. The combination of microenvironmental analysis and fine-scale sampling techniques used in this investigation gives valuable first insights into the distribution, abundance and diversity of bacterial communities associated with tropical ascidians. In particular, we show that microenvironments and microbial diversity can vary significantly over scales of a few millimeters in such habitats; which is information easily lost by bulk sampling. PMID:22134643

Behrendt, Lars; Larkum, Anthony W D; Trampe, Erik; Norman, Anders; Sørensen, Søren J; Kühl, Michael

2012-01-01

110

Seasonal variations of the composition of microbial biofilms in sandy tidal flats: Focus of fatty acids, pigments and exopolymers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biofilms, or microbial mats, are common associations of microorganisms in tidal flats; they generally consist of a large diversity of organisms embedded in a matrix of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS). These molecules are mainly composed of carbohydrates and proteins, but their detailed monomer compositions and seasonal variations are currently unknown. Yet this composition determines the numerous roles of biofilms in these systems. This study investigated the changes in composition of carbohydrates in intertidal microbial mats over a year to decipher seasonal variations in biofilms and in varying hydrodynamic conditions. This work also aimed to assess how these compositions are related to microbial assemblages. In this context, natural biofilms whose development was influenced or not by artificial structures mimicking polychaete tubes were sampled monthly for over a year in intertidal flats of the Chausey archipelago. Biofilms were compared through the analysis of their fatty acid and pigment contents, and the monosaccharide composition of their EPS carbohydrates. Carbohydrates from both colloidal and bound EPS contained mainly glucose and, to a lower extent, galactose and mannose but they showed significant differences in their detailed monosaccharide compositions. These two fractions displayed different seasonal evolution, even if glucose accumulated in both fractions in summer; bound EPS only were affected by artificial biogenic structures. Sediment composition in fatty acids and pigments showed that microbial communities were dominated by diatoms and heterotrophic bacteria. Their relative proportions, as well as those of other groups like cryptophytes, changed between times and treatments. The changes in EPS composition were not fully explained by modifications of microbial assemblages but also depended on the processes taking place in sediments and on environmental conditions. These variations of EPS compositions are likely to alter different ecosystem processes such as biostabilisation or pollutants trapping.

Passarelli, Claire; Meziane, Tarik; Thiney, Najet; Boeuf, Dominique; Jesus, Bruno; Ruivo, Mickael; Jeanthon, Christian; Hubas, Cédric

2015-02-01

111

Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially life-threatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duod...

112

Biofilms: Online Manual  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This on-line collection of exercises can be conducted to illustrate the formation and properties of microbial biofilms. Activities include: A Biofilm Primer, An Interesting Paradox, Build a Biofilm Reactor, Bring 'em Back Alive, Buccal Epithelial Cells & Bacterial Cells: Negative Staining, Buried Slide Technique, Dental Biofilms, Flow Through Gram Stain, Microbial Fishing, Pellicle Formation in a Hay Infusion, Rhizosphere Visualization, Microbial Leaching of Copper Ore, Build a Winogradsky Column, Growth of Dental Plaque in vitro, Biofilms from Soil Crumbs, Vinegar Production and Acetic Acid Titration, Isolation of Azospirillum, Observation of the Formation of Biofilms in a Flowing Environment, Measuring Biofilm Depth.

Lennox, John; Altoona, Penn S.

113

Prevention of microbial biofilms - the contribution of micro and nanostructured materials.  

PubMed

Microbial biofilms are associated with drastically enhanced resistance to most of the antimicrobial agents and with frequent treatment failures, generating the search for novel strategies which can eradicate infections by preventing the persistent colonization of the hospital environment, medical devices or human tissues. Some of the current approaches for fighting biofilms are represented by the development of novel biomaterials with increased resistance to microbial colonization and by the improvement of the current therapeutic solutions with the aid of nano (bio)technology. This special issues includes papers describing the applications of nanotechnology and biomaterials science for the development of improved drug delivery systems and nanostructured surfaces for the prevention and treatment of medical biofilms. Nanomaterials display unique and well-defined physical and chemical properties making them useful for biomedical applications, such as: very high surface area to volume ratio, biocompatibility, biodegradation, safety for human ingestion, capacity to support surface modification and therefore, to be combined with other bioactive molecules or substrata and more importantly being seemingly not attracting antimicrobial resistance. The use of biomaterials is significantly contributing to the reduction of the excessive use of antibiotics, and consequently to the decrease of the emergence rate of resistant microorganisms, as well as of the associated toxic effects. Various biomaterials with intrinsic antimicrobial activity (inorganic nanoparticles, polymers, composites), medical devices for drug delivery, as well as factors influencing their antimicrobial properties are presented. One of the presented papers reviews the recent literature on the use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP)-based nanomaterials in antimicrobial applications for biomedicine, focusing on the growth inhibition and killing of bacteria and fungi, and, on viral inactivation. The anti-pathogenic activity of the most common types of metallic/metal oxide nanoparticles, as well as the photocontrolled targeted drug-delivery system and the development of traditional Chinese herbs nanoparticles are some of the highlights of another paper of this issue. The applications of synthetic, biodegradable polymers for the improvement of antiinfective therapeutic and prophylactic agents (i.e., antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agents and vaccines) activity, as well as for the design of biomaterials with increased biocompatibility and resistance to microbial colonization are also discussed, as well as one of the most recent paradigms of the pharmaceutical field and nanobiotechnology, represented by the design of smart multifunctional polymeric nanocarriers for controlled drug delivery. These systems are responding to physico-chemical changes and as a result, they can release the active substances in a controlled and targeted manner. The advantages and limitations of the main routes of polymerization by which these nanovehicles are obtained, as well as the practical appllications in the field of drug nanocarriers are presented. The authors describe the therapeutic applications of dendrimers, which are unimolecular, monodisperse nanocarriers with unique branched tree-like globular structure. The applications of nanotechnology for the stabilization and improved release of anti-pathogenic natural or synthetic compounds, which do not interfere with the microbial growth, but inhibit different features of microbial pathogenicity are also highlighted. We expect this special issue would offer a comprehensive update and give new directions for the design of micro/nano engineered materials to inhibit microbial colonization on the surfaces or to potentiate the efficiency of the current/ novel/alternative antimicrobial agents by improving their bioavailability and pharmacokinetic features. PMID:24606506

Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Chifiriuc, Carmen Mariana

2014-01-01

114

Enhanced current production by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans biofilm in a mediator-less microbial fuel cell.  

PubMed

In this study, a mediator-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) inoculated with a sulfate-reducing bacterium (SBR), Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, was equipped with bare and surface-treated graphite felt electrodes. Electrochemical treatment of the anode surface facilitated biofilm formation on the electrode, resulting in rapid and enhanced current production. The maximum current density of the treated anode was 233±24.2mA/m(2), which was 41% higher than that of the untreated anode. The electron transfer rate also increased from 2.45±0.04 to 3.0±0.02?mol of electrons/mg of protein·min. Biofilm formation on the treated anode was mainly due to the strong hydrogen or peptide bonds between the amide groups of bacterial materials (including cytochrome c) and carboxyl groups formed on the electrodes. These results provide useful information on direct electron transfer by SRB in a mediator-less MFC through cytochrome c and the effects of the electrochemical treatment of electrodes on MFC performance. PMID:24751374

Kang, Christina S; Eaktasang, Numfon; Kwon, Dae-Young; Kim, Han S

2014-08-01

115

Metabolic modeling of spatial heterogeneity of biofilms in microbial fuel cells reveals substrate limitations in electrical current generation.  

PubMed

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been proposed as an alternative energy resource for the conversion of organic compounds to electricity. In an MFC, microorganisms such as Geobacter sulfurreducens form an anode-associated biofilm that can completely oxidize organic matter (electron donor) to carbon dioxide with direct electron transfer to the anode (electron acceptor). Mathematical models are useful in analyzing biofilm processes; however, existing models rely on Nernst-Monod type expressions, and evaluate extracellular processes separated from the intracellular metabolism of the microorganism. Thus, models that combine both extracellular and intracellular components, while addressing spatial heterogeneity, are essential for improved representation of biofilm processes. The goal of this work is to develop a model that integrates genome-scale metabolic models with the model of biofilm environment. This integrated model shows the variations of electrical current production and biofilm thickness under the presence/absence of NH4 in the bulk solution, and under varying maintenance energy demands. Further, sensitivity analysis suggested that conductivity is not limiting electrical current generation and that increasing cell density can lead to enhanced current generation. In addition, the modeling results also highlight instances such as the transformation into respiring cells, where the mechanism of electrical current generation during biofilm development is not yet clearly understood. PMID:25113946

Jayasinghe, Nadeera; Franks, Ashley; Nevin, Kelly P; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

2014-10-01

116

[Microbial ecology analysis of the biofilm from two biological contact oxidation processes with different performance].  

PubMed

This study investigated the performance of one-step aerobic biological oxidation process and anoxic/aerobic two-step biological oxidation process treating modeled river water containing low carbon and rich ammonia. Biofilm microbial ecology was analyzed with multiple molecular technologies including PCR-DGGE, FISH/CLSM and FISH/FCM to investigate the succession of bacteria community and space distribution along with abundance of the main functional bacteria, and to research the micro-influential factors and the mechanism of different biological contact oxidation processes for their performance. Results showed that two-step contact oxidation process achieved higher removal percentage than that of the one-step process, with COD and NH4(+) -N removal enhanced about 10% and 32%-59%, respectively. A much thicker biofilm was obtained by the one-step process compared to the two-step process, and nitrobacterium was mainly distributed in the depth of 180-200 microm and 105-125 microm, respectively. PCR-DGGE results found that the two-step process demonstrated less microbial diversity than that of the one-step process, FISH/FCM results showed that ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) abundance increased in the two-step process with the increase of operation time, while that of the one-step process declined. Experiment results demonstrate that functional partitioning of the anoxic-aerobic two-step biological contact oxidation process could be in favor for harvesting nitrobacteria and other special bacteria in different reactor spaces, which can improve removal efficiency for organics and ammonia finally. PMID:22624389

Qian, Yin; Quan, Xiang-Chun; Pei, Yuan-Sheng; Ma, Jing-Yun; Tao, Kun

2012-03-01

117

Influence of microbial interactions and EPS/polysaccharide composition on nutrient removal activity in biofilms formed by strains found in wastewater treatment systems.  

PubMed

The study of biofilm function, structure and microbial interactions might help to improve our understanding of biofilm wastewater treatment processes. However, few reports specifically address the influence of interactions within multispecies biofilms on microbial activity and biofilm composition. Thus, the relationship between biofilm formation, denitrification activity, phosphorus removal and the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), exopolysaccharides and the bacterial community was investigated using biofilms of denitrifying and phosphorus removing strains Comamonas denitrificans 110, Brachymonas denitrificans B79, Aeromonas hydrophila L6 and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ATCC23055. Denitrification activity within the biofilms generally increased with the amount of biofilm while phosphorus removal depended on bacterial growth rate. Synergistic effects of co-growth on denitrification (B. denitrificans B79 and A. hydrophila L6) and phosphorus removal (C. denitrificans 110 with either A. calcoaceticus or A. hydrophila L6) were observed. B. denitrificans B79 was highly affected by interspecies interactions with respect to biofilm formation, denitrification activity and EPS composition, while C. denitrificans 110 remained largely unaffected. In some of the dual and quadruple strain biofilms new exopolysaccharide monomers were detected which were not present in the pure strain samples. PMID:20869860

Andersson, Sofia; Dalhammar, Gunnel; Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna

2011-09-20

118

Enrichment of anodic biofilm inoculated with anaerobic or aerobic sludge in single chambered air-cathode microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Aerobic sludge after anaerobic pretreatment and anaerobic sludge were separately used as inoculum to start up air-cathode single-chamber MFCs. Aerobic sludge-inoculated MFCs arrived at 0.27 V with a maximum power density of 5.79 W m(-3), while anaerobic sludge-inoculated MFCs reached 0.21 V with 3.66 W m(-3). Microbial analysis with DGGE profiling and high-throughput sequencing indicated that aerobic sludge contained more diverse bacterial populations than anaerobic sludge. Nitrospira species dominated in aerobic sludge, while anaerobic sludge was dominated by Desulfurella and Acidithiobacillus species. Microbial community structure and composition in anodic biofilms enriched, respectively from aerobic and anaerobic sludges tended gradually to be similar. Potentially exoelectrogenic Geobacter and Anaeromusa species, biofilm-forming Zoogloea and Acinetobacter species were abundant in both anodic biofilms. This study indicated that aerobic sludge performed better for MFCs startup, and the enrichment of anodic microbial consortium with different inocula but same substrate resulted in uniformity of functional microbial communities. PMID:24973773

Gao, Chongyang; Wang, Aijie; Wu, Wei-Min; Yin, Yalin; Zhao, Yang-Guo

2014-09-01

119

Shifts in the microbial community, nitrifiers and denitrifiers in the biofilm in a full-scale rotating biological contactor.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to investigate the microbial community shifts, especially nitrifiers and denitrifiers, in the biofilm of two rotating biological contactor (RBC) trains with different running times along the plug flowpath. The microbial consortia were profiled using multiple approaches, including 454 high-throughput sequencing of the V3-V4 region of 16S rRNA gene, clone libraries, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results demonstrated that (1) the overall microbial community at different locations had distinct patterns, that is, there were similar microbial communities at the beginnings of the two RBC trains and completely different populations at the ends of the two RBC trains; (2) nitrifiers, including ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB, Nitrosomonas) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB, Nitrospira), increased in relative abundance in the biofilm along the flowpath, whereas denitrifiers (Rhodanobacter, Paracoccus, Thauera, and Azoarcus) markedly decreased; (3) the AOA were subdominant to the AOB in all sampled sections; and (4) strong ecological associations were shown among different bacteria. Overall, the results of this study provided more comprehensive information regarding the biofilm community composition and assemblies in full-scale RBCs. PMID:24936907

Peng, Xingxing; Guo, Feng; Ju, Feng; Zhang, Tong

2014-07-15

120

Pyrosequencing analysis yields comprehensive assessment of microbial communities in pilot-scale two-stage membrane biofilm reactors.  

PubMed

We studied the microbial community structure of pilot two-stage membrane biofilm reactors (MBfRs) designed to reduce nitrate (NO3(-)) and perchlorate (ClO4(-)) in contaminated groundwater. The groundwater also contained oxygen (O2) and sulfate (SO4(2-)), which became important electron sinks that affected the NO3(-) and ClO4(-) removal rates. Using pyrosequencing, we elucidated how important phylotypes of each "primary" microbial group, i.e., denitrifying bacteria (DB), perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), responded to changes in electron-acceptor loading. UniFrac, principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), and diversity analyses documented that the microbial community of biofilms sampled when the MBfRs had a high acceptor loading were phylogenetically distant from and less diverse than the microbial community of biofilm samples with lower acceptor loadings. Diminished acceptor loading led to SO4(2-) reduction in the lag MBfR, which allowed Desulfovibrionales (an SRB) and Thiothrichales (sulfur-oxidizers) to thrive through S cycling. As a result of this cooperative relationship, they competed effectively with DB/PRB phylotypes such as Xanthomonadales and Rhodobacterales. Thus, pyrosequencing illustrated that while DB, PRB, and SRB responded predictably to changes in acceptor loading, a decrease in total acceptor loading led to important shifts within the "primary" groups, the onset of other members (e.g., Thiothrichales), and overall greater diversity. PMID:24917125

Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Tang, Youneng; Zhao, He-Ping; Friese, David; Overstreet, Ryan; Smith, Jennifer; Evans, Patrick; Rittmann, Bruce E; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

2014-07-01

121

Characterisation of microbial flocs formed from raw textile wastewater in aerobic biofilm reactor (ABR).  

PubMed

Microbial flocs formed from raw textile wastewater in a prototype Aerobic Biofilm Reactor (ABR) system were characterised and studied for their potential use in the treatment of textile wastewater. After 90-100 days of operation, microbial flocs of loose irregular structures were obtained from the reactor with good settling velocity of 33 m/h and sludge volume index (SVI) of 48.2 mL/g. Molecular analysis of the flocs using PCR-amplified 16S rDNA sequence showed 98% homology to those of Bacillus sp, Paenibacillus sp and Acromobacter sp. Detection of Ca(2+)(131 mg/g) and Fe(2+)(131 mg/g) using atomic absorption spectrometer might be implicated with the flocs formation. In addition, presence of Co(2+) and Ni(2+) were indicative of the flocs ability to accumulate at least a fraction of the metals' present in the wastewater. When the flocs were used for the treatment of raw textile wastewater, they showed good removal of COD and colour about 55% and 70% respectively, indicating their potential application. PMID:19657163

Ibrahim, Zaharah; Amin, Mohamad Faiz Mohd; Yahya, Adibah; Aris, Azmi; Umor, Noor Azrimi; Muda, Khalida; Sofian, Nur Shalena

2009-01-01

122

Microbial composition and structure of a rotating biological contactor biofilm treating ammonium-rich wastewater without organic carbon.  

PubMed

High nitrogen losses were observed in a rotating biological contactor (RBC) treating ammonium-rich (up to 500 mg NH4(+)-N/L) but organic-carbon-poor leachate from a hazardous waste landfill in Kölliken, Switzerland. The composition and spatial structure of the microbial community in the biofilm on the RBC was analyzed with specific attention for the presence of aerobic ammonium and nitrite oxidizing bacteria and anaerobic ammonium oxidizers. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) involves the oxidation of ammonium with nitrite to N2. First the diversity of the biofilm community was determined from sequencing cloned PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments. This revealed the presence of a number of very unusual 16S rDNA sequences, but very few sequences related to known ammonium or nitrite oxidizing bacteria. From analysis of biofilm samples by fluorescence in situ hybridization with known phylogenetic probes and by dot-blot hybridization of the same probes to total RNA purified from biofilm samples, the main groups of microorganisms constituting the biofilm were found to be ammonium-oxidizing bacteria from the Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha group, anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria of the "Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis" type, filamentous bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria from the genus Nitrospira. Aerobic and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria were present in similar amounts of around 20 to 30% of the biomass, whereas members of the CFB phylum were present at around 7%. Nitrite oxidizing bacteria were only present in relatively low amounts (less than 5% determined with fluorescence in situ hybridization). Data from 16S rRNA dot-blot and in situ hybridization were not in all cases congruent. FISH analysis of thin-sliced and fixed biofilm samples clearly showed that the aerobic nitrifiers were located at the top of the biofilm in an extremely high density and in alternating clusters. Anammox bacteria were exclusively present in the lower half of the biofilm, whereas CFB-type filamentous bacteria were present throughout the biofilm. The structure and composition of these biofilms correlated very nicely with the proposed physiological functional separations in ammonium conversion. PMID:12704553

Egli, K; Bosshard, F; Werlen, C; Lais, P; Siegrist, H; Zehnder, A J B; Van der Meer, J R

2003-05-01

123

Enhanced visualization of microbial biofilms by staining and environmental scanning electron microscopy.  

PubMed

Bacterial biofilms, i.e. surface-associated cells covered in hydrated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), are often studied with high-resolution electron microscopy (EM). However, conventional desiccation and high vacuum EM protocols collapse EPS matrices which, in turn, deform biofilm appearances. Alternatively, wet-mode environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) is performed under a moderate vacuum and without biofilm drying. If completely untreated, however, EPS is not electron dense and thus is not resolved well in ESEM. Therefore, this study was towards adapting several conventional SEM staining protocols for improved resolution of biofilms and EPS using ESEM. Three different biofilm types were used: 1) Pseudomonas aeruginosa unsaturated biofilms cultured on membranes, 2) P. aeruginosa cultured in moist sand, and 3) mixed community biofilms cultured on substrates in an estuary. Working with the first specimen type, a staining protocol using ruthenium red, glutaraldehyde, osmium tetroxide and lysine was optimized for best topographic resolution. A quantitative image analysis tool that maps relief, newly adopted here for studying biofilms, was used to compare micrographs. When the optimized staining and ESEM protocols were applied to moist sand cultures and aquatic biofilms, the smoothening effect that bacterial biofilms have on rough sand, and the roughening that aquatic biofilms impart on initially smooth coupons, were each quantifiable. This study thus provides transferable staining and ESEM imaging protocols suitable for a wide range of biofilms, plus a novel tool for quantifying biofilm image data. PMID:17196692

Priester, John H; Horst, Allison M; Van de Werfhorst, Laurie C; Saleta, José L; Mertes, Leal A K; Holden, Patricia A

2007-03-01

124

In situ microbial ecology for quantitative appraisal, monitoring, and risk assessment of pollution remediation in soils, the subsurface, the rhizosphere and in biofilms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous studies have established a relationship between soil, sediment, surface biofilm and subsurface contaminant pollution and a marked impact on the in situ microbial community in both microcosms and in the field. The impact of pollution on the in situ microbial community can now be quantitatively measured by molecular `fingerprinting' using `signature' biomarkers. Such molecular fingerprinting methods can replace classical

David C White; Cecily A Flemming; Kam T Leung; Sarah J Macnaughton

1998-01-01

125

Continuous nondestructive monitoring of microbial biofilms: A review of analytical techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fundamental requirement for the understanding and control of biofilms is the continuous nondestructive monitoring of biofilm processes. This paper reviews research analytical techniques that monitor biofilm processes in a continuous nondestructive manner and that could also be modified for industrial applications. To be considered ‘continuous’ and ‘nondestructive’ for the purpose of this review a technique must: (a) function in

D E Nivens; RJ Palmer Jr; D C White

1995-01-01

126

The possibility of alternative microbial life on Earth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite its amazing morphological diversity, life as we know it on Earth today is remarkably similar in its basic molecular architecture and biochemistry. The assumption that all life on Earth today shares these molecular and biochemical features is part of the paradigm of modern biology. This paper examines the possibility that this assumption is false, more specifically, that the contemporary Earth contains as yet unrecognized alternative forms of microbial life. The possibility that more than one form of life arose on Earth is consistent with our current understanding of conditions on the early Earth and the biochemical and molecular possibilities for life. Arguments that microbial descendents of an alternative origin of life could not co-exist with familiar life are belied by what we know of the complexity and diversity of microbial communities. Furthermore, the tools that are currently used to explore the microbial world microscopy (with the aid of techniques such as DAPI staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization), cultivation and PCR amplification of rRNA genes could not detect such organisms if they existed. Thus, the fact that we have not discovered any alternative life forms cannot be taken as evidence that they do not exist.

Cleland, Carol E.; Copley, Shelley D.

2005-10-01

127

Microbial Life in a Liquid Asphalt Desert  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pitch Lake in Trinidad and Tobago is a natural asphalt reservoir nourished by pitch seepage, a form of petroleum that consists of mostly asphaltines, from the surrounding oil-rich region. During upward seepage, pitch mixes with mud and gases under high pressure, and the lighter portion evaporates or is volatilized, which produces a liquid asphalt residue characterized by low water activity, recalcitrant carbon substrates, and noxious chemical compounds. An active microbial community of archaea and bacteria, many of them novel strains (particularly from the new Tar ARC groups), totaling a biomass of up to 107 cells per gram, was found to inhabit the liquid hydrocarbon matrix of Pitch Lake. Geochemical and molecular taxonomic approaches revealed diverse, novel, and deeply branching microbial lineages with the potential to mediate anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation processes in different parts of the asphalt column. In addition, we found markers for archaeal methane metabolism and specific gene sequences affiliated with facultative and obligate anaerobic sulfur- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The microbial diversity at Pitch Lake was found to be unique when compared to microbial communities analyzed at other hydrocarbon-rich environments, which included Rancho Le Brea, a natural asphalt environment in California, USA, and an oil well and a mud volcano in Trinidad and Tobago, among other sites. These results open a window into the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of recalcitrant hydrocarbon matrices and establish the site as a terrestrial analogue for modeling the biotic potential of hydrocarbon lakes such as those found on Saturn's largest moon Titan.

Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Haque, Shirin; de Sousa Antonio, Marina Resendes; Ali, Denzil; Hosein, Riad; Song, Young C.; Yang, Jinshu; Zaikova, Elena; Beckles, Denise M.; Guinan, Edward; Lehto, Harry J.; Hallam, Steven J.

2011-04-01

128

Hydrogenophaga electricum sp. nov., isolated from anodic biofilms of an acetate-fed microbial fuel cell.  

PubMed

A Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterial strain, AR20(T), was isolated from anodic biofilms of an acetate-fed microbial fuel cell in Japan and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain AR20(T) grew optimally at pH 7.0-8.0 and 25°C. It contained Q-8 as the predominant ubiquinone and C16:0, summed feature 3 (C16:1?7c and/or iso-C15:02OH), and C18:1?7c as the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 67.1 mol%. A neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree revealed that strain AR20(T) clustered with three type strains of the genus Hydrogenophaga (H. flava, H. bisanensis and H. pseudoflava). Strain AR20(T) exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 95.8-97.7% to the type strains of the genus Hydrogenophaga. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain AR20(T) is considered a novel species of the genus Hydrogenophaga, for which the name Hydrogenophaga electricum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AR20(T) (= KCTC 32195(T) = NBRC 109341(T)). PMID:24005175

Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Okabe, Satoshi

2013-01-01

129

Raoultella electrica sp. nov., isolated from anodic biofilms of a glucose-fed microbial fuel cell.  

PubMed

A Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain 1GB(T), was isolated from anodic biofilms of a glucose-fed microbial fuel cell. Strain 1GB(T) was facultatively anaerobic and chemo-organotrophic, having both a respiratory and a fermentative type of metabolism, and utilized a wide variety of sugars as carbon and energy sources. Cells grown aerobically contained Q-8 as the major quinone, but excreted Q-9 and a small amount of Q-10 when cultured with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of 1GB(T) was 54.5 mol%. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis showed that strain 1GB(T) represented a distinct lineage within the genus Raoultella (98.5-99.4?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and 94.0-96.5?% sequence similarity based on the three concatenated housekeeping genes gyrA, rpoB and parC. Strain 1GB(T) exhibited DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness of 7-43?% with type strains of all established species of the genus Raoultella. On the basis of these phenotypic, phylogenetic and genotypic data, the name Raoultella electrica sp. nov. is proposed for strain 1GB(T). The type strain is 1GB(T) (?=?NBRC 109676(T)?=?KCTC 32430(T)). PMID:24449794

Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Chung, Kyung Mi; Itoh, Hiroaki; Hiraishi, Akira; Okabe, Satoshi

2014-04-01

130

Characterization of the microbial community in a partial nitrifying sequencing batch biofilm reactor.  

PubMed

A lab-scale partial nitrifying sequencing batch biofilm reactor was a successful start-up. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to investigate the bacterial community dynamics in three periods together with inocula sludge at ambient temperature. The DGGE profiles of bacteria and Shannon-Wiener index (H') results showed that high free ammonia (FA) concentration referred to lower diversity in the bioreactor system. Cluster analysis indicated that microorganism in period III was similar with inocula sludge and was different from that in periods I and II. Similar results also appeared in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community structure and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) community structure, and at least four AOB species and two NOB species were present in period III, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of amoA gene sequences showed that Nitrosomonas eutropha cluster was predominant in all the three periods. With lower ammonium loads, three new operational taxonomic units formed and consisted Nitrosomonas sp. Cluster. This article demonstrated that microbial community, AOB, and NOB diversity were related with FA concentration closely at ambient temperature. PMID:21956665

Zeng, Taotao; Li, Dong; Zhang, Jie

2011-12-01

131

Time-course correlation of biofilm properties and electrochemical performance in single-chamber microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

The relationship between anode microbial characteristics and electrochemical parameters in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was analyzed by time-course sampling of parallel single-bottle MFCs operated under identical conditions. While voltage stabilized within 4days, anode biofilms continued growing during the six-week operation. Viable cell density increased asymptotically, but membrane-compromised cells accumulated steadily from only 9% of total cells on day 3 to 52% at 6weeks. Electrochemical performance followed the viable cell trend, with a positive correlation for power density and an inverse correlation for anode charge transfer resistance. The biofilm architecture shifted from rod-shaped, dispersed cells to more filamentous structures, with the continuous detection of Geobacter sulfurreducens-like 16S rRNA fragments throughout operation and the emergence of a community member related to a known phenazine-producing Pseudomonas species. A drop in cathode open circuit potential between weeks two and three suggested that uncontrolled biofilm growth on the cathode deleteriously affects system performance. PMID:20591659

Ren, Zhiyong; Ramasamy, Ramaraja P; Cloud-Owen, Susan Red; Yan, Hengjing; Mench, Matthew M; Regan, John M

2011-01-01

132

Atmospheres and evolution. [of microbial life on earth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Studies concerning the regulation of the earth atmosphere and the relation of atmospheric changes to the evolution of microbial life are reviewed. The improbable nature of the composition of the earth atmosphere in light of the atmospheric compositions of Mars and Venus and equilibrium considerations is pointed out, and evidence for the existence of microbial (procaryotic) life on earth as far back as 3.5 billion years ago is presented. The emergence of eucaryotic life in the Phanerozoic due to evolving symbioses between different procaryotic species is discussed with examples given of present-day symbiotic relationships between bacteria and eucaryotes. The idea that atmospheric gases are kept in balance mainly by the actions of bacterial cells is then considered, and it is argued that species diversity is necessary for the maintenance and origin of life on earth in its present form.

Margulis, L.; Lovelock, J. E.

1981-01-01

133

Tree of Life: An Introduction to Microbial Phylogeny  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How do phylogenetic trees help us look more closely at microbial evolution? Explore sequence data and extend your tree thinking to examine possible relationships between the microbes and other life forms. The Biology Workbench provides access to data and tools for investigating these relationships. * read a phylogenetic tree

Beverly Brown (Nazareth College;Biology); Sam Fan (Bradley University;Biology); LeLeng To Isaacs (Goucher College;Biology); Min-Ken Liao (Furman University;Biology)

2006-05-20

134

Microbial spoilage of portuguese chouriço along shelf life period  

PubMed Central

Microbial flora of portuguese chouriço (Alentejano (A) and Ribatejano (R)) with abnormal sensorial characteristics along shelf life was studied. Mesophilic anaerobic bacteria, enterococci, mesophilic sporeformers, coliforms, coagulase-positive staphylococci, sulphite reducing clostridia, Clostridium perfringens, moulds and yeasts were the most representative in both types of chouriço. PMID:24159290

de Jesus da Silva Matos, Teresa; Bruno-Soares, Arminda; Azevedo, António Amaral

2013-01-01

135

Innovative biofilm inhibition and anti-microbial behavior of molybdenum sulfide nanostructures generated by microwave-assisted solvothermal route  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The incessant use of antibiotics against infectious diseases has translated into a vicious circle of developing new antibiotic drug and its resistant strains in short period of time due to inherent nature of micro-organisms to alter their genes. Many researchers have been trying to formulate inorganic nanoparticles-based antiseptics that may be linked to broad-spectrum activity and far lower propensity to induce microbial resistance than antibiotics. The way-out approaches in this direction are nanomaterials based (1) bactericidal and (2) bacteriostatic activities. We, herein, present hitherto unreported observations on microbial abatement using non-cytotoxic molybdenum disulfide nanostructures (MSNs) which are synthesized using microwave assisted solvothermal route. Inhibition of biofilm formation using MSNs is a unique feature of our study. Furthermore, this study evinces antimicrobial mechanism of MSNs by reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent generation of superoxide anion radical via disruption of cellular functions.

Qureshi, Nilam; Patil, Rajendra; Shinde, Manish; Umarji, Govind; Causin, Valerio; Gade, Wasudev; Mulik, Uttam; Bhalerao, Anand; Amalnerkar, Dinesh P.

2014-06-01

136

A Fatty Acid Messenger Is Responsible for Inducing Dispersion in Microbial Biofilms?  

PubMed Central

It is well established that in nature, bacteria are found primarily as residents of surface-associated communities called biofilms. These structures form in a sequential process initiated by attachment of cells to a surface, followed by the formation of matrix-enmeshed microcolonies, and culminating in dispersion of the bacteria from the mature biofilm. In the present study, we have demonstrated that, during growth, Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces an organic compound we have identified as cis-2-decenoic acid, which is capable of inducing the dispersion of established biofilms and of inhibiting biofilm development. When added exogenously to P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms at a native concentration of 2.5 nM, cis-2-decenoic acid was shown to induce the dispersion of biofilm microcolonies. This molecule was also shown to induce dispersion of biofilms, formed by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and the yeast Candida albicans. Active at nanomolar concentrations, cis-2-decenoic acid appears to be functionally and structurally related to the class of short-chain fatty acid signaling molecules such as diffusible signal factor, which act as cell-to-cell communication molecules in bacteria and fungi. PMID:19074399

Davies, David G.; Marques, Cláudia N. H.

2009-01-01

137

Time to “go large” on biofilm research: advantages of an omics approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

In nature, the biofilm mode of life is of great importance in the cell cycle for many microorganisms. Perhaps because of biofilm\\u000a complexity and variability, the characterization of a given microbial system, in terms of biofilm formation potential, structure\\u000a and associated physiological activity, in a large-scale, standardized and systematic manner has been hindered by the absence\\u000a of high-throughput methods. This

Nuno F. Azevedo; Susana P. Lopes; Charles W. Keevil; Maria O. Pereira; Maria J. Vieira

2009-01-01

138

Biofilm-based central line-associated bloodstream infections.  

PubMed

Different types of central venous catheters (CVCs) have been used in clinical practice to improve the quality of life of chronically and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, indwelling devices are usually associated with microbial biofilms and eventually lead to catheter-related bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).An estimated 250,000-400,000 CLABSIs occur every year in the United States, at a rate of 1.5 per 1,000 CVC days and a mortality rate of 12-25 %. The annual cost of caring for patients with CLABSIs ranges from 296 million to 2.3 billion dollars.Biofilm formation occurs on biotic and abiotic surfaces in the clinical setting. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand biofilm formation, including different biofilm developmental stages, biofilm matrix compositions, quorum-sensing regulated biofilm formation, biofilm dispersal (and its clinical implications), and multi-species biofilms that are relevant to polymicrobial infections.When microbes form a matured biofilm within human hosts through medical devices such as CVCs, the infection becomes resistant to antibiotic treatment and can develop into a chronic condition. For that reason, many techniques have been used to prevent the formation of biofilm by targeting different stages of biofilm maturation. Other methods have been used to diagnose and treat established cases of CLABSI.Catheter removal is the conventional management of catheter associated bacteremia; however, the procedure itself carries a relatively high risk of mechanical complications. Salvaging the catheter can help to minimize these complications.In this article, we provide an overview of microbial biofilm formation; describe the involvement of various genetic determinants, adhesion proteins, organelles, mechanism(s) of biofilm formation, polymicrobial infections, and biofilm-associated infections on indwelling intravascular catheters; and describe the diagnosis, management, and prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections. PMID:25366227

Yousif, Ammar; Jamal, Mohamed A; Raad, Issam

2015-01-01

139

Influence of tetracycline on the microbial community composition and activity of nitrifying biofilms.  

PubMed

The present work aims to evaluate the bacterial composition and activity (carbon and nitrogen removal) of nitrifying biofilms exposed to 50?gL(-1) of tetracycline. The tetracycline removal efficiency and the occurrence of tetracycline resistance (tet) genes were also studied. Two sequencing batch biofilm reactors (SBBRs) fed with synthetic wastewater were operated without (SBBR1) and with (SBBR2) the antibiotic. Both SBBRs showed similar organic matter biodegradation and nitrification activity. Tetracycline removal was about 28% and biodegradation was probably the principal removal mechanism of the antibiotic. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of the bacterial community showed shifts leading to not only the fading of some ribotypes, but also the emergence of new ones in the biofilm with tetracycline. The study of the tet genes showed that tet(S) was only detected in the biofilm with tetracycline, suggesting a relationship between its occurrence and the presence of the antibiotic. PMID:25127228

Matos, Maria; Pereira, Maria A; Parpot, Pier; Brito, António G; Nogueira, Regina

2014-12-01

140

Uranium removal and microbial community in a H2-based membrane biofilm reactor.  

PubMed

We evaluated a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) for its capacity to reduce and remove hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from water. After a startup period that allowed slow-growing U(VI) reducers to form biofilms, the MBfR successfully achieved and maintained 94-95% U(VI) removal over 8 months when the U surface loading was 6-11 e(-) mEq/m(2)-day. The MBfR biofilm was capable of self-recovery after a disturbance due to oxygen exposure. Nanocrystalline UO2 aggregates and amorphous U precipitates were associated with vegetative cells and apparently mature spores that accumulated in the biofilm matrix. Despite inoculation with a concentrated suspension of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, this bacterium was not present in the U(VI)-reducing biofilm. Instead, the most abundant group in the biofilm community contained U(VI) reducers in the Rhodocyclaceae family when U(VI) was the only electron acceptor. When sulfate was present, the community dramatically shifted to the Clostridiaceae family, which included spores that were potentially involved in U(VI) reduction. PMID:25073000

Zhou, Chen; Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Cornette de Saint Cyr, Louis; Zevin, Alexander S; Carey, Sara E; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Rittmann, Bruce E

2014-11-01

141

Microbial interactions and differential protein expression in Staphylococcus aureus –Candida albicans dual-species biofilms  

PubMed Central

The fungal species Candida albicans and the bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus are responsible for a majority of hospital-acquired infections and often coinfect critically ill patients as complicating polymicrobial biofilms. To investigate biofilm structure during polymicrobial growth, dual-species biofilms were imaged with confocal scanning laser microscopy. Analyses revealed a unique biofilm architecture where S. aureus commonly associated with the hyphal elements of C. albicans. This physical interaction may provide staphylococci with an invasion strategy because candidal hyphae can penetrate through epithelial layers. To further understand the molecular mechanisms possibly responsible for previously demonstrated amplified virulence during coinfection, protein expression studies were undertaken. Differential in-gel electrophoresis identified a total of 27 proteins to be significantly differentially produced by these organisms during coculture biofilm growth. Among the upregulated staphylococcal proteins was l-lactate dehydrogenase 1, which confers resistance to host-derived oxidative stressors. Among the downregulated proteins was the global transcriptional repressor of virulence factors, CodY. These findings demonstrate that the hyphae-mediated enhanced pathogenesis of S. aureus may not only be due to physical interactions but can also be attributed to the differential regulation of specific virulence factors induced during polymicrobial growth. Further characterization of the intricate interaction between these pathogens at the molecular level is warranted, as it may aid in the design of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at combating fungal–bacterial polymicrobial infection. PMID:20608978

Peters, Brian M; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Scheper, Mark A; Leid, Jeff G; Costerton, John William; Shirtliff, Mark E

2010-01-01

142

Microbial interactions and differential protein expression in Staphylococcus aureus -Candida albicans dual-species biofilms.  

PubMed

The fungal species Candida albicans and the bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus are responsible for a majority of hospital-acquired infections and often coinfect critically ill patients as complicating polymicrobial biofilms. To investigate biofilm structure during polymicrobial growth, dual-species biofilms were imaged with confocal scanning laser microscopy. Analyses revealed a unique biofilm architecture where S. aureus commonly associated with the hyphal elements of C. albicans. This physical interaction may provide staphylococci with an invasion strategy because candidal hyphae can penetrate through epithelial layers. To further understand the molecular mechanisms possibly responsible for previously demonstrated amplified virulence during coinfection, protein expression studies were undertaken. Differential in-gel electrophoresis identified a total of 27 proteins to be significantly differentially produced by these organisms during coculture biofilm growth. Among the upregulated staphylococcal proteins was l-lactate dehydrogenase 1, which confers resistance to host-derived oxidative stressors. Among the downregulated proteins was the global transcriptional repressor of virulence factors, CodY. These findings demonstrate that the hyphae-mediated enhanced pathogenesis of S. aureus may not only be due to physical interactions but can also be attributed to the differential regulation of specific virulence factors induced during polymicrobial growth. Further characterization of the intricate interaction between these pathogens at the molecular level is warranted, as it may aid in the design of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at combating fungal-bacterial polymicrobial infection. PMID:20608978

Peters, Brian M; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Scheper, Mark A; Leid, Jeff G; Costerton, John William; Shirtliff, Mark E

2010-08-01

143

Community structure of microbial biofilms associated with membrane-based water purification processes as revealed using a polyphasic approach.  

PubMed

The microbial communities of membrane biofilms occurring in two full-scale water purification processes employing microfiltration (MF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were characterized using a polyphasic approach that employed bacterial cultivation, 16S rDNA clone library and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. All methods showed that the alpha-Proteobacteria was the largest microbial fraction in the samples, followed by the gamma-Proteobacteria. This suggested that members of these two groups could be responsible for the biofouling on the membranes studied. Furthermore, the microbial community structures between the MF and RO samples were considerably different in composition of the most predominant 16S rDNA clones and bacterial isolates from the alpha-Proteobacteria and only shared two common groups ( Bradyrhizobium, Bosea) out of more than 17 different bacterial groups observed. The MF and RO samples further contained Planctomycetes and Fibroacter/ Acidobacteria as the second predominant bacterial clones, respectively, and differed in minor bacterial clones and isolates. The community structure differences were mainly attributed to differences in feed water, process configurations and operating environments, such as the pressure and hydrodynamic conditions present in the water purification systems. PMID:12682791

Chen, C-L; Liu, W-T; Chong, M-L; Wong, M-T; Ong, S L; Seah, H; Ng, W J

2004-01-01

144

On microbial contaminants, micropseudofossils, and the oldest records of life  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Microbial contaminants may be introduced on outcrop as well as en route to or in the laboratory. Micropseudofossils may be natural or man-made. It is possible to recognize such misleading objects and important that they are not allowed to dilute the growing record of authentic pre-Phanerozoic life. Filamentous microbial contaminants from minute cracks in samples of ancient carbonate rocks from Brazil (perhaps 1 Ga old) and South Africa (???2.3 Ga old) are similar to occurrences previously described as fossils. Published records of supposedly Archean microbial life also include microcontaminants and laboratory artifacts. Although microstructures from sedimentary rocks of the Swaziland system could be fossils, they are not demonstrably so. The oldest structurally preserved fossils yet known seem to be the filaments described by Lois Nagy from stromatolitic limestone in the ???2.3 Ga old Malmani Dolomite of South Africa. It will be difficult to establish unequivocal older records in the absence of definitive ultrastructural or micro-chemical evidence. ?? 1979.

Cloud, P.; Morrison, K.

1979-01-01

145

Effect of Different Disinfection Protocols on Microbial and Biofilm Contamination of Dental Unit Waterlines in Community Dental Practices  

PubMed Central

Output water from dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) may be a potential source of infection for both dental healthcare staff and patients. This study compared the efficacy of different disinfection methods with regard to the water quality and the presence of biofilm in DUWLs. Five dental units operating in a public dental health care setting were selected. The control dental unit had no disinfection system; two were disinfected intermittently with peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide 0.26% and two underwent continuous disinfection with hydrogen peroxide/silver ions (0.02%) and stabilized chlorine dioxide (0.22%), respectively. After three months of applying the disinfection protocols, continuous disinfection systems were more effective than intermittent systems in reducing the microbial contamination of the water, allowing compliance with the CDC guidelines and the European Council regulatory thresholds for drinking water. P. aeruginosa, Legionella spp, sulphite-reducing Clostridium spores, S. aureus and ?-haemolytic streptococci were also absent from units treated with continuous disinfection. The biofilm covering the DUWLs was more extensive, thicker and more friable in the intermittent disinfection dental units than in those with continuous disinfection. Overall, the findings showed that the products used for continuous disinfection of dental unit waterlines showed statistically better results than the intermittent treatment products under the study conditions. PMID:24552789

Dallolio, Laura; Scuderi, Amalia; Rini, Maria S.; Valente, Sabrina; Farruggia, Patrizia; Bucci Sabattini, Maria A.; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Acacci, Anna; Roncarati, Greta; Leoni, Erica

2014-01-01

146

Electrochemical response of a biofilm community to changes in electron-acceptor redox potential elucidated using microbial fuel cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently, we have limited insight into how mineral properties affect dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) or the microbial communities that contain them. Advances in our understanding of DMRB metabolism have been achieved using microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which exploit the ability of these organisms to transfer electrons extracellularly. By replacing the mineral electron acceptor with a conductive electrode under potentiostat control, the activity of microorganisms capable of interfacial electron transfer can be quantified by the current flowing through the electrode and related to the thermodynamics of respiration. We seek to understand how communities and their individual members respond to changes in mineralogy, and expect mineral redox potential to be a primary control. The ability to precisely control the redox potential of the electron-accepting anodic electrode is our primary motivation for using MFCs. We inoculated duplicate MFCs containing 10 mM acetate in phosphate buffered media with a slurry of subsurface sediment and groundwater obtained from the Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site at Rifle, CO. Electroactive biofilms were established on graphite anodes poised at a favorable potential (0.0 V vs. SHE) before poising at -0.2 V—a potential representative of natural iron reduction. The current was stable across both anodes over more than 100 days of operation, and the percentage of the electrons in acetate recovered as current ("Coulombic efficiency") was typically 70 to >90%. Current density reached 0.4 A/m2 at -0.2 V, to a max of over 1.0 A/m2 at or above ~0.0 V (based on geometric electrode surface area). Media exchanges and biofilm cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments indicate that electrode-attached microbial communities were responsible for primary electron transfer. Cryo-electron and confocal fluorescence microscopies of the biofilm reveal numerous morphologies of viable microorganisms that are currently being characterized using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. We studied how the microbial activity changed when the anode potential was varied. Altering the anode potential caused reversible changes in the mid-point potential(s), Em, measured using CV. Qualitatively, the average Em always shifted toward the set anode potential. A maximum shift in the peak of the derivative CV spectra of ~100 mV defines the approximate upper and lower Em values for the proteins contributing to this feature. The change in the electrochemical response was complete ~30 minutes after a 400 mV anode-potential step. We attribute these observations to either a switch in the principle electron-transport pathway (different enzymes) that individual species use to deliver electrons to the anode or changes in the relative contributions of different community members, or both. However, some impact of changes in pH within the biofilm could contribute to the change in Em. Ongoing investigations attempt to resolve these possibilities.

Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

2012-12-01

147

Microbial diversities (16S and 18S rDNA gene pyrosequencing) and environmental pathogens within drinking water biofilms grown on the common premise plumbing materials unplasticized polyvinylchloride and copper  

EPA Science Inventory

Drinking water (DW) biofilm communities influence the survival of opportunistic pathogens, e.g. Legionella pneumophila, via parasitization of free-living amoebae such as Acanthamoebae. Yet knowledge about the microbial composition of DW biofilms developed on common in-premise pl...

148

Detection of microbial biofilms on food processing surfaces: Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging study  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We used a portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system to evaluate biofilm formations on four types of food processing surface materials including stainless steel, polypropylene used for cutting boards, and household counter top materials such as formica and granite. The objective of this inve...

149

Purification of high ammonia wastewater in a biofilm airlift loop bioreactor with microbial communities analysis.  

PubMed

A 70 m(3) gas-liquid-solid three-phase flow airlift loop bioreactor, in which biofilm attached on granular active carbon carriers, was used for purification of the high ammonia wastewater from bioethanol production. Under the optimum operating conditions, COD and NH4 (+)-N average removal rate of 89.0 and 98.6 % were obtained at hydraulic retention time of 10 h. Scanning electron microscopy was applied for observation of the biofilm formation. High contaminants removal efficiency was achieved by holding high biomass concentration in the reactor due to the attached biofilm over the carriers. The 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis indicated that 68.6 % of the clones were affiliated with the two phyla Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, and residual clones clustered with various sequences from uncultured bacteria. The presence of various anoxic/anaerobic bacteria indicated that the oxygen gradient inside the biofilm could provide appropriate micro-environment for nitrogen removal through simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. PMID:25344088

Qiu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Dandan; Sun, Liping; Wen, Jianping

2015-01-01

150

Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms  

PubMed Central

The microzonation of O2 respiration, H2S oxidation, and SO42- reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100 ?m) with microsensors for O2, S2-, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured concentration profiles by using a simple one-dimensional diffusion reaction model. The importance of electron acceptor and electron donor availability for the microzonation of respiratory processes and their reaction rates was investigated. Oxygen respiration was found in the upper 0.2 to 0.4 mm of the biofilm, whereas sulfate reduction occurred in deeper, anoxic parts of the biofilm. Sulfate reduction accounted for up to 50% of the total mineralization of organic carbon in the biofilms. All H2S produced from sulfate reduction was reoxidized by O2 in a narrow reaction zone, and no H2S escaped to the overlying water. Turnover times of H2S and O2 in the reaction zone were only a few seconds owing to rapid bacterial H2S oxidation. Anaerobic H2S oxidation with NO3- could be induced by addition of nitrate to the medium. Total sulfate reduction rates increased when the availability of SO42- or organic substrate increased as a result of deepening of the sulfate reduction zone or an increase in the sulfate reduction intensity, respectively. PMID:16348687

Kühl, Michael; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

1992-01-01

151

Effect of leaf litter exclusion on microbial enzyme activity associated with wood biofilms in streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leaf litter inputs have been excluded from 1 of 2 Ist-order streams at Coweeta Hydro- logic Laboratory, North Carolina since August 1993 to examine the bottom-up effects of resource reduction on stream ecosystems. As part of the larger project, we studied the effect of litter exclusion on the extracellular enzyme activity and fungal biomass of wood biofilms in the presence

JENNIFER L. TANK; J. R. WEBSTER; E. F. BENFIELD; ROBERT L. SINSABAUGH

1998-01-01

152

ADAPTATION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL BIOFILM COMMUNITIES IN RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL STRESSORS  

EPA Science Inventory

The impact of this work will help improve our understanding of how subsurface biofilm communities respond to chemical stressors that are likely to be present at hazardous waste sites. Ultimately, these results can be used to determine more effective ways to insure proper envir...

153

Is the microbial tree of life verificationist? E.K. Lienau and R. DeSalle*  

E-print Network

Is the microbial tree of life verificationist? E.K. Lienau and R. DeSalle* Sackler Institute discuss several tests that aim to test rigorously the hypothesis that a tree of life exists in microbial studies that need to be considered when suggesting that HGT confounds the tree of life. Ã?

DeSalle, Rob

154

Photoautotrophic-heterotrophic biofilm communities: a laboratory incubator designed for growing axenic diatoms and bacteria in defined mixed-species biofilms.  

PubMed

Biofilm communities in the euphotic zone of aquatic habitats comprise photoautotrophic microorganisms, such as diatoms, green algae and cyanobacteria, which produce the organic carbon that fuels the life of a heterotrophic contingent of microorganisms, mostly bacteria. Such photoautotrophic-heterotrophic mixed-species biofilms have received little attention in biofilm research due to a lack of suitable pure-culture laboratory model systems. However, they offer important insight into microbial population dynamics and community interactions during a biofilm-developmental process that shapes highly structured, extremely well-adapted microbial landscapes. Here, we report on the development of a sterile incubation chamber for growing and monitoring axenic phototrophic biofilms, i.e. a sterilizable, illuminated, continuous-flow system for a routine work with pure cultures. The system has been designed to simulate the growth conditions in the shallow, littoral zone of aquatic habitats (horizontal surface, submerged in water, illuminated, aerated). Additional features of the concept include automated photometrical monitoring of biofilm density (as biofilm turbidity), analysis via confocal microscopy, direct harvesting of cells, and options to control illumination, flow velocity, and composition of culture fluid. The application of the system was demonstrated in growth experiments using axenic diatom biofilms, or axenic diatom biofilms co-cultivated with different bacterial strains isolated from epilithic biofilms of an oligotrophic freshwater lake. PMID:23757240

Buhmann, Matthias; Kroth, Peter G; Schleheck, David

2012-02-01

155

In situ techniques and digital image analysis methods for quantifying spatial localization patterns of nitrifiers and other microorganisms in biofilm and flocs.  

PubMed

The spatial localization patterns of microorganisms in multispecies biofilms reflect numerous phenomena that influence sessile microbial life, such as substrate concentration gradients within the biofilm and biological interactions with other biofilm populations. Quantitative and population-specific in situ analyses of spatial patterns have a high potential to provide novel insights into the biology of biofilm organisms, including yet uncultured microbes, but such approaches have been developed and used in a few studies only. Here, we outline digital image analysis methods to quantify the coaggregation, mutual avoidance, or random distribution of microbial populations in biofilm and flocs. A protocol is provided for fluorescence in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted probes, which preserves the three-dimensional biofilm architecture for confocal microscopy and image analysis, and the combined use of these approaches is demonstrated by spatial analyses of nitrifying bacteria in complex biofilm samples. PMID:21514465

Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

2011-01-01

156

Design of a microfluidic device for the analysis of biofilm behavior in a microbial fuel cell  

E-print Network

This thesis presents design, manufacturing, testing, and modeling of a laminar-flow microbial fuel cell. Novel means were developed to use graphite and other bulk-scale materials in a microscale device without loosing any ...

Jones, A-Andrew D., III (Akhenaton-Andrew Dhafir)

2014-01-01

157

Biofilm formation and microbial activity in a biofilter system in the presence of MTBE, ETBE and TAME.  

PubMed

Emerging water contaminants derived from unleaded gasoline such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME), are in need of effective bioremediation technologies for restoring water resources. In order to design the conditions of a future groundwater bioremediating biofilter, this work assesses the potential use of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus M10, Rhodococcus ruber E10 and Gordonia amicalis T3 for the removal of MTBE, ETBE and TAME in consortia or as individual strains. Biofilm formation on an inert polyethylene support material was assessed with scanning electron microscopy, and consortia were also analysed with fluorescent in situ hybridisation to examine the relation between the strains. A. calcoaceticus M10 was the best coloniser, followed by G. amicalis T3, however, biofilm formation of pair consortia favoured consortium M10-E10 both in formation and activity. However, degradation batch studies determined that neither consortium exhibited higher degradation than individual strain degradation. The physiological state of the three strains was also determined through flow cytometry using propidium iodide and 3'-dihexylocarbocyanine iodide thus gathering information on their viability and activity with the three oxygenates since previous microbial counts revealed slow growth. Strain E10 was observed to have the highest physiological activity in the presence of MTBE, and strain M10 activity with TAME was only maintained for 24 h, thus we believe that biotransformation of MTBE occurs within the active periods established by the cytometry analyses. Viable cell counts and oxygenate removal were determined in the presence of the metabolites tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) and tert-amyl alcohol (TAA), resulting in TBA biotransformation by M10 and E10, and TAA by M10. Our results show that A. calcoaceticus M10 and the consortium M10-E10 could be adequate inocula in MTBE and TAME bioremediating technologies. PMID:21774959

Purswani, Jessica; Juárez, Belén; Rodelas, Belén; Gónzalez-López, Jesús; Pozo, Clementina

2011-10-01

158

Influence of Disinfectant Residual on Biofilm Development, Microbial Ecology, and Pathogen Fate and Transport in Drinking Water Infrastructure  

EPA Science Inventory

This project focuses on providing basic data to bound risk estimates resulting from pathogens associated with pipe biofilms. Researchers will compare biofilm pathogen effects under two different disinfection scenarios (free chlorine or chloramines) for a conventionally treated s...

159

Biogeochemical signals from deep microbial life in terrestrial crust.  

PubMed

In contrast to the deep subseafloor biosphere, a volumetrically vast and stable habitat for microbial life in the terrestrial crust remains poorly explored. For the long-term sustainability of a crustal biome, high-energy fluxes derived from hydrothermal circulation and water radiolysis in uranium-enriched rocks are seemingly essential. However, the crustal habitability depending on a low supply of energy is unknown. We present multi-isotopic evidence of microbially mediated sulfate reduction in a granitic aquifer, a representative of the terrestrial crust habitat. Deep meteoric groundwater was collected from underground boreholes drilled into Cretaceous Toki granite (central Japan). A large sulfur isotopic fractionation of 20-60‰ diagnostic to microbial sulfate reduction is associated with the investigated groundwater containing sulfate below 0.2 mM. In contrast, a small carbon isotopic fractionation (<30‰) is not indicative of methanogenesis. Except for 2011, the concentrations of H2 ranged mostly from 1 to 5 nM, which is also consistent with an aquifer where a terminal electron accepting process is dominantly controlled by ongoing sulfate reduction. High isotopic ratios of mantle-derived 3He relative to radiogenic 4He in groundwater and the flux of H2 along adjacent faults suggest that, in addition to low concentrations of organic matter (<70 µM), H2 from deeper sources might partly fuel metabolic activities. Our results demonstrate that the deep biosphere in the terrestrial crust is metabolically active and playing a crucial role in the formation of reducing groundwater even under low-energy fluxes. PMID:25517230

Suzuki, Yohey; Konno, Uta; Fukuda, Akari; Komatsu, Daisuke D; Hirota, Akinari; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Togo, Yoko; Morikawa, Noritoshi; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Aosai, Daisuke; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Tsunogai, Urumu; Nagao, Seiya; Ito, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Takashi

2014-01-01

160

Biogeochemical Signals from Deep Microbial Life in Terrestrial Crust  

PubMed Central

In contrast to the deep subseafloor biosphere, a volumetrically vast and stable habitat for microbial life in the terrestrial crust remains poorly explored. For the long-term sustainability of a crustal biome, high-energy fluxes derived from hydrothermal circulation and water radiolysis in uranium-enriched rocks are seemingly essential. However, the crustal habitability depending on a low supply of energy is unknown. We present multi-isotopic evidence of microbially mediated sulfate reduction in a granitic aquifer, a representative of the terrestrial crust habitat. Deep meteoric groundwater was collected from underground boreholes drilled into Cretaceous Toki granite (central Japan). A large sulfur isotopic fractionation of 20–60‰ diagnostic to microbial sulfate reduction is associated with the investigated groundwater containing sulfate below 0.2 mM. In contrast, a small carbon isotopic fractionation (<30‰) is not indicative of methanogenesis. Except for 2011, the concentrations of H2 ranged mostly from 1 to 5 nM, which is also consistent with an aquifer where a terminal electron accepting process is dominantly controlled by ongoing sulfate reduction. High isotopic ratios of mantle-derived 3He relative to radiogenic 4He in groundwater and the flux of H2 along adjacent faults suggest that, in addition to low concentrations of organic matter (<70 µM), H2 from deeper sources might partly fuel metabolic activities. Our results demonstrate that the deep biosphere in the terrestrial crust is metabolically active and playing a crucial role in the formation of reducing groundwater even under low-energy fluxes. PMID:25517230

Fukuda, Akari; Komatsu, Daisuke D.; Hirota, Akinari; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Togo, Yoko; Morikawa, Noritoshi; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Aosai, Daisuke; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Tsunogai, Urumu; Nagao, Seiya; Ito, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Takashi

2014-01-01

161

Microbial Studies on Shelf Life of Cabbage and Coleslaw  

PubMed Central

The microbiology of a common commercial type of coleslaw was investigated with the objective of extending its shelf life at refrigerator temperature by delaying microbiological spoilage. Cabbage, its principal ingredient, had a total bacterial count of about 105/g. Microbial growth in cabbage was prevented by storage at 1 C but not at 10 C or above. In coleslaw, the cabbage flora died and was replaced by the flora of the cultured sour cream contained in the dressing. At 14 C, the total count increased and the coleslaw deteriorated organoleptically. At 7 C, bacterial growth was suppressed but organoleptic deterioration occurred as rapidly as at 14 C. Thus, the deterioration was caused primarily by the physiological breakdown of plant tissue rather than by microorganisms, as was the original premise. PMID:16345155

King, A. Douglas; Michener, H. David; Bayne, Henry G.; Mihara, Keiko L.

1976-01-01

162

Microbial mats and the early evolution of life  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microbial mats have descended from perhaps the oldest and most widespread biological communities known. Mats harbor microbes that are crucial for studies of bacterial phylogeny and physiology. They illustrate how several oxygen-sensitive biochemical processes have adapted to oxygen, and they show how life adapted to dry land long before the rise of plants. The search for the earliest grazing protists and metazoa in stromatolites is aided by observations of mats: in them, organic compounds characteristic of ancient photosynthetic protists can be identified. Recent mat studies suggest that the 13C/12C increase observed over geological time in stromatolitic organic matter was driven at least in part by a long-term decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

Des Marais, D. J.

1990-01-01

163

Exploration of deep intraterrestrial microbial life: current perspectives.  

PubMed

Intraterrestrial life has been found at depths of several thousand metres in deep sub-sea floor sediments and in the basement crust beneath the sediments. It has also been found at up to 2800-m depth in continental sedimentary rocks, 5300-m depth in igneous rock aquifers and in fluid inclusions in ancient salt deposits from salt mines. The biomass of these intraterrestrial organisms may be equal to the total weight of all marine and terrestrial plants. The intraterrestrial microbes generally seem to be active at very low but significant rates and several investigations indicate chemolithoautotrophs to form a chemosynthetic base. Hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide gases are continuously generated in the interior of our planet and probably constitute sustainable sources of carbon and energy for deep intraterrestrial biosphere ecosystems. Several prospective research areas are foreseen to focus on the importance of microbial communities for metabolic processes such as anaerobic utilisation of hydrocarbons and anaerobic methane oxidation. PMID:10731600

Pedersen, K

2000-04-01

164

Reproducible analyses of microbial food for advanced life support systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of yeasts in controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) for microbial food regeneration in space required the accurate and reproducible analysis of intracellular carbohydrate and protein levels. The reproducible analysis of glycogen was a key element in estimating overall content of edibles in candidate yeast strains. Typical analytical methods for estimating glycogen in Saccharomyces were not found to be entirely aplicable to other candidate strains. Rigorous cell lysis coupled with acid/base fractionation followed by specific enzymatic glycogen analyses were required to obtain accurate results in two strains of Candida. A profile of edible fractions of these strains was then determined. The suitability of yeasts as food sources in CELSS food production processes is discussed.

Petersen, Gene R.

1988-01-01

165

Intermittent contact of fluidized anode particles containing exoelectrogenic biofilms for continuous power generation in microbial  

E-print Network

of particles that contact the current collector. These results provide proof of concept for the development A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an electrochemical device that converts chemical energy contained in organicDirect Journal of Power Sources journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/jpowsour http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j

166

Metagenome Analyses of Corroded Concrete Wastewater Pipe Biofilms Reveals a Complex Microbial System  

EPA Science Inventory

Analysis of whole-metagenome pyrosequencing data and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries was used to determine microbial composition and functional genes associated with biomass harvested from crown (top) and invert (bottom) sections of a corroded wastewater pipe. Taxonomic and functio...

167

Electrical spiking in bacterial biofilms.  

PubMed

In nature, biofilms are the most common form of bacterial growth. In biofilms, bacteria display coordinated behaviour to perform specific functions. Here, we investigated electrical signalling as a possible driver in biofilm sociobiology. Using a multi-electrode array system that enables high spatio-temporal resolution, we studied the electrical activity in two biofilm-forming strains and one non-biofilm-forming strain. The action potential rates monitored during biofilm-forming bacterial growth exhibited a one-peak maximum with a long tail, corresponding to the highest biofilm development. This peak was not observed for the non-biofilm-forming strain, demonstrating that the intensity of the electrical activity was not linearly related to the bacterial density, but was instead correlated with biofilm formation. Results obtained indicate that the analysis of the spatio-temporal electrical activity of bacteria during biofilm formation can open a new frontier in the study of the emergence of collective microbial behaviour. PMID:25392401

Masi, Elisa; Ciszak, Marzena; Santopolo, Luisa; Frascella, Arcangela; Giovannetti, Luciana; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Mancuso, Stefano

2015-01-01

168

The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances and soluble microbial products in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor.  

PubMed

The characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP) in conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR) and in moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactors (MBBR-MBR) were investigated in long-term (170 days) experiments. The results showed that all reactors had high removal efficiency of ammonium and COD, despite very different fouling conditions. The MBBR-MBR with media fill ratio of 26.7% had much lower total membrane resistance and no obvious fouling were detected during the whole operation. In contrast, MBR and MBBR-MBR with lower and higher media fill experienced more significant fouling. Low fouling at optimum fill ratio may be due to the higher percentage of small molecular size (<1 kDa) and lower percentage of large molecular size (>100 kDa) of EPS and SMP in the reactor. The composition of EPS and SMP affected fouling due to different O-H bonds in hydroxyl functional groups, and less polysaccharides and lipids. PMID:24077152

Duan, Liang; Jiang, Wei; Song, Yonghui; Xia, Siqing; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

2013-11-01

169

Biofilm-associated persistence of food-borne pathogens.  

PubMed

Microbial life abounds on surfaces in both natural and industrial environments, one of which is the food industry. A solid substrate, water and some nutrients are sufficient to allow the construction of a microbial fortress, a so-called biofilm. Survival strategies developed by these surface-associated ecosystems are beginning to be deciphered in the context of rudimentary laboratory biofilms. Gelatinous organic matrices consisting of complex mixtures of self-produced biopolymers ensure the cohesion of these biological structures and contribute to their resistance and persistence. Moreover, far from being just simple three-dimensional assemblies of identical cells, biofilms are composed of heterogeneous sub-populations with distinctive behaviours that contribute to their global ecological success. In the clinical field, biofilm-associated infections (BAI) are known to trigger chronic infections that require dedicated therapies. A similar belief emerging in the food industry, where biofilm tolerance to environmental stresses, including cleaning and disinfection/sanitation, can result in the persistence of bacterial pathogens and the recurrent cross-contamination of food products. The present review focuses on the principal mechanisms involved in the formation of biofilms of food-borne pathogens, where biofilm behaviour is driven by its three-dimensional heterogeneity and by species interactions within these biostructures, and we look at some emergent control strategies. PMID:25500382

Bridier, A; Sanchez-Vizuete, P; Guilbaud, M; Piard, J-C; Naïtali, M; Briandet, R

2015-02-01

170

Microbial biofilms on needleless connectors for central venous catheters: comparison of standard and silver-coated devices collected from patients in an acute care hospital.  

PubMed

Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P=0.11). There were no significant associations (P>0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P=0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P=0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M Ryan; Donlan, Rodney M

2014-03-01

171

Microbial Communities that are Concealed Within Mineral Deposits: Expanding our Detection of Life  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In addition to clearly biological microbial mats, lava tubes contain many non-biological appearing mineral deposits that contain life. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on other extrater-restrial bodies.

Northup, D. E.; Spilde, M. N.; Hathaway, J. J. M.; Moya, M.; Garcia, M. G.; Boston, P. J.

2010-04-01

172

Microbial Fuel Cell as Life Detector: Arsenic Cycling in Hypersaline Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detection of extant life on Mars or Europa is a future goal of exobiology. For the present, biosignatures arising from life in extreme environments on Earth suggest how to search for life elsewhere. One such biosignature is the electrical current derived from the metabolic activity of microorganisms, which may be measured using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). MFCs generate electricity by

L. G. Miller; J. S. Blum; R. S. Oremland

2006-01-01

173

Steady-state problem of substrate consumption in a biofilm for a square law of microbial death rate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The steady-state problem of substrate consumption by a biofilm is solved over a wide range of biochemical parameters. It is\\u000a shown that, regardless of the biofilm thickness, it can be completely saturated with the substrate. Ranges of applicability\\u000a of analytical solutions for various problem parameters are presented.

L. L. Min’kov; S. V. Pyl’nik; J. H. Dueck

2006-01-01

174

Shells of crabs like these may be the key to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells that  

E-print Network

Shells of crabs like these may be the key to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells that power/06/ 070604123858.htm Marine Sediment Microbial Fuel Cells Get A Nutritional Boost ScienceDaily (June 11, 2007) -- Discarded crab and lobster shells may be the key to prolonging the life of microbial fuel cells that power

175

Nitric oxide: a key mediator of biofilm dispersal with applications in infectious diseases.  

PubMed

Studies of the biofilm life cycle can identify novel targets and strategies for improving biofilm control measures. Of particular interest are dispersal events, where a subpopulation of cells is released from the biofilm community to search out and colonize new surfaces. Recently, the simple gas and ubiquitous biological signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) was identified as a key mediator of biofilm dispersal conserved across microbial species. Here, we review the role and mechanisms of NO mediating dispersal in bacterial biofilms, and its potential for novel therapeutics. In contrast to previous attempts using high dose NO aimed at killing pathogens, the use of low, non-toxic NO signals (picomolar to nanomolar range) to disperse biofilms represents an innovative and highly favourable approach to improve infectious disease treatments. Further, several NO-based technologies have been developed that offer a versatile range of solutions to control biofilms, including: (i) NO-generating compounds with short or long half-lives and safe or inert residues, (ii) novel compounds for the targeted delivery of NO to infectious biofilms during systemic treatments, and (iii) novel NO-releasing materials and surface coatings for the prevention and dispersal of biofilms. Overall the use of low levels of NO exploiting its signaling properties to induce dispersal represents an unprecedented and promising strategy for the control of biofilms in clinical and industrial contexts. PMID:25189865

Barraud, Nicolas; Kelso, Michael J; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

2015-01-01

176

IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION  

SciTech Connect

This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

Leschine, Susan

2009-10-31

177

Community living long before man: fossil and living microbial mats and early life  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microbial mats are layered communities of bacteria that form cohesive structures, some of which are preserved in sedimentary rocks as stromatolites. Certain rocks, approximately three and a half thousand million years old and representing the oldest known fossils, are interpreted to derive from microbial mats and to contain fossils of microorganisms. Modern microbial mats (such as the one described here from Matanzas, Cuba) and their fossil counterparts are of great interest in the interpretation of early life on Earth. Since examination of microbial mats and stromatolites increases our understanding of long-term stability and change, within the global environment, such structures should be protected wherever possible as natural science preserves. Furthermore, since they have existed virtually from the time of life's origin, microbial mats have developed exemplary mechanisms of local community persistence and may even play roles in the larger global environment that we do not understand.

Margulis, L.; Lopez Baluja, L.; Awramik, S. M.; Sagan, D.

1986-01-01

178

Pressure as an environmental parameter for microbial life--a review.  

PubMed

Microbial life has been prevailing in the biosphere for the last 3.8 Ga at least. Throughout most of the Earth's history it has experienced a range of pressures; both dynamic pressure when the young Earth was heavily bombarded, and static pressure in subsurface environments that could have served as a refuge and where microbial life nowadays flourishes. In this review, we discuss the extent of high-pressure habitats in early and modern times and provide a short overview of microbial survival under dynamic pressures. We summarize the current knowledge about the impact of microbial activity on biogeochemical cycles under pressures characteristic of the deep subsurface. We evaluate the possibility that pressure can be a limiting parameter for life at depth. Finally, we discuss the open questions and knowledge gaps that exist in the field of high-pressure geomicrobiology. PMID:23891571

Picard, Aude; Daniel, Isabelle

2013-12-15

179

Microbial diversity of the supra- and subgingival biofilm of healthy individuals after brushing with chlorhexidine- or silver-coated toothbrush bristles.  

PubMed

Nanoparticulate silver has recently been reported as an effective antimicrobial agent. The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the potential changes on the oral microbiota of healthy individuals after controlled brushing with chlorhexidine- or silver-coated toothbrush bristles. Twenty-four healthy participants were enrolled in this investigation and randomly submitted to 3 interventions. All the participants received, in a crossover format, the following toothbrushing interventions: (i) chlorhexidine-coated bristles, (ii) silver-coated bristles, and (iii) conventional toothbrush (Control). All the interventions had a duration of 30 days. The DNA checkerboard hybridization method was used to identify and quantify up to 43 microbial species colonizing the supra- and subgingival biofilm. The supragingival samples presented higher genome counts than the subgingival samples (p < 0.0001). The total genome counts from the Control group showed the highest values, followed by the silver and chlorhexidine groups (p < 0.0001). After 4 weeks of brushing, the silver-coated and chlorhexidine-coated bristles were capable of reducing or maintaining lower levels of the bacterial counts of the putative periodontal pathogens Tanerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Other major periodontal pathogens, such as Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella nigrescens, and Parvimonas micra, were also detected at lower levels. The toothbrush bristles impregnated with silver nanoparticles reduced the total and individual genome count in the supra- and subgingival biofilm after 4 weeks of brushing. Chlorhexidine was not effective in reducing the total genome counts in both supra- or subgingival biofilm after 4 weeks of brushing. Chlorhexidine reduced the individual genome counts in the supragingival biofilm for most of the target species, including putative periodontal pathogens. PMID:25581046

do Nascimento, Cássio; Paulo, Diana Ferreira; Pita, Murillo Sucena; Pedrazzi, Vinícius; de Albuquerque Junior, Rubens Ferreira

2015-02-01

180

Bacterial cellulose may provide the microbial-life biosignature in the rock records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a matrix for a biofilm formation, which is critical for survival and persistence of microbes in harsh environments. BC could play a significant role in the formation of microbial mats in pristine ecosystems on Earth. The prime objective of this study was to measure to what extent spectral and other characteristics of BC were changed under the performance of BC interaction with the earthly rock - anorthosite - via microorganisms. The spectral analyses (Fourier Transform Infrared FT-IR, spectroscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy) showed unprecedented accumulation of chemical elements in the BC-based biofilm. The absorption capacity of IR by BC was shielded a little by mineral crust formed by microorganisms on the BC-based biofilm surface, especially clearly seen in the range of 1200-900 cm-1 in FT-IR spectra. Confocal scanning laser microscopy analysis revealed that elements bioleached from anorthosite created surface coats on the BC nanofibril web. At the same time, the vibrational spectra bands showed the presence of the characteristic region of anomeric carbons (960-730 cm-1), wherein a band at 897 cm-1 confirmed the presence of ?-1, 4-linkages, which may serve as the cellulose fingerprint region. Results show that BC may be a biosignature for search signs of living organisms in rock records.

Zaets, I.; Podolich, O.; Kukharenko, O.; Reshetnyak, G.; Shpylova, S.; Sosnin, M.; Khirunenko, L.; Kozyrovska, N.; de Vera, J.-P.

2014-03-01

181

Life under flow: A novel microfluidic device for the assessment of anti-biofilm technologies  

PubMed Central

In the current study, we have developed and fabricated a novel lab-on-a-chip device for the investigation of biofilm responses, such as attachment kinetics and initial biofilm formation, to different hydrodynamic conditions. The microfluidic flow channels are designed using computational fluid dynamic simulations so as to have a pre-defined, homogeneous wall shear stress in the channels, ranging from 0.03 to 4.30?Pa, which are relevant to in-service conditions on a ship hull, as well as other man-made marine platforms. Temporal variations of biofilm formation in the microfluidic device were assessed using time-lapse microscopy, nucleic acid staining, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Differences in attachment kinetics were observed with increasing shear stress, i.e., with increasing shear stress there appeared to be a delay in bacterial attachment, i.e., at 55, 120, 150, and 155?min for 0.03, 0.60, 2.15, and 4.30?Pa, respectively. CLSM confirmed marked variations in colony architecture, i.e.,: (i) lower shear stresses resulted in biofilms with distinctive morphologies mainly characterised by mushroom-like structures, interstitial channels, and internal voids, and (ii) for the higher shear stresses compact clusters with large interspaces between them were formed. The key advantage of the developed microfluidic device is the combination of three architectural features in one device, i.e., an open-system design, channel replication, and multiple fully developed shear stresses. PMID:24454610

Salta, Maria; Capretto, Lorenzo; Carugo, Dario; Wharton, Julian A.; Stokes, Keith R.

2013-01-01

182

Microbial Fuel Cells Applied to the Metabolically-Based Detection of Extraterrestrial Life  

E-print Network

Since the 1970's, when the Viking spacecrafts carried out experiments aimed to the detection of microbial metabolism on the surface of Mars, the search for nonspecific methods to detect life in situ has been one of the goals of astrobiology. It is usually required that the methodology can detect life independently from its composition or form, and that the chosen biological signature points to a feature common to all living systems, as the presence of metabolism. In this paper we evaluate the use of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) for the detection of microbial life in situ. MFCs are electrochemical devices originally developed as power electrical sources, and can be described as fuel cells in which the anode is submerged in a medium that contains microorganisms. These microorganisms, as part of their metabolic process, oxidize organic material releasing electrons that contribute to the electric current, which is therefore proportional to metabolic and other redox processes. We show that power and current density...

Abrevaya, Ximena C; Cortón, Eduardo

2010-01-01

183

In situ biofilm coupon device  

DOEpatents

An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

1997-06-24

184

In situ biofilm coupon device  

DOEpatents

An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

Peyton, Brent M. (Kennewick, WA); Truex, Michael J. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01

185

Hexacyanoferrate-adapted biofilm enables the development of a microbial fuel cell biosensor to detect trace levels of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in oxygenated seawater.  

PubMed

A marine microbial fuel cell (MFC) type biosensor was developed for the detection of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in ocean water for the purpose of online water quality monitoring for seawater desalination plants prone to biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. The anodophilic biofilm that developed on the graphite tissue anode could detect acetate as the model AOC to concentrations as low as 5?µM (120?µg/L of AOC), which is sufficiently sensitive as an online biofouling risk sensor. Although the sensor was operated at a higher (+200?±?10?mV) than the usual (-300?mV) anodic potential, the presence of oxygen completely suppressed the electrical signal. In order to overcome this outcompeting effect of oxygen over the anode as electron acceptor by the bacteria, hexacyanoferrate (HCF(III)) was found to enable the development of an adapted biofilm that transferred electrons to HCF(III) rather than oxygen. As the resultant of the reduced HCF(II) could readily transfer electrons to the anode while being re-oxidised to HCF(III), the marine MFC biosensor developed could be demonstrated to work in the presence of oxygen unlike traditional MFC. The possibility of operating the marine MFC in batch or continuous (in-line) mode has been explored by using coulombic or potentiometric interpretation of the signal. PMID:24942462

Cheng, Liang; Quek, Soon Bee; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

2014-12-01

186

Discovering Biofilms: Inquiry-Based Activities for the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In nature, bacteria exist in and adapt to different environments by forming microbial communities called "biofilms." We propose simple, inquiry-based laboratory exercises utilizing a biofilm formation assay, which allows controlled biofilm growth. Students will be able to qualitatively assess biofilm growth via staining. Recently, we developed a…

Redelman, Carly V.; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

2012-01-01

187

Electrochemical micro-structuring of graphite felt electrodes for accelerated formation of electroactive biofilms on microbial anodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electroactive biofilms were formed on graphite felt anodes under constant potential polarisation using compost leachate as the inoculum and dairy waste as the substrate. A new surface treatment is presented that consists of creating micro-cavities on the electrode surface by strong anodisation. This surface treatment, combined with pre-adsorption of the dairy waste, proved very efficient in accelerating the formation of

Bibiana Cercado-Quezada; Marie-Line Delia; Alain Bergel

2011-01-01

188

A 3.8 b.y. History of Bacterial Biofilms and Their Significance in the Search for Extraterrestrial Life  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Bacterial biofilms are almost ubiquitous in terrestrial environments, many similar to past or present Martian environments. Together with ToF-SIMS analysis of the in situ organics, fossil biofilms constitute reliable biomarkers.

Westall, Frances; Steele, Andrew; Toporski, Jan; Walsh, Maud; Allen, Carlton; Guidry, Sean; McKay, David; Gibson, Everett; Chafetz, Henry

2000-01-01

189

Intelligibility in microbial complex systems: Wittgenstein and the score of life  

PubMed Central

Knowledge in microbiology is reaching an extreme level of diversification and complexity, which paradoxically results in a strong reduction in the intelligibility of microbial life. In our days, the “score of life” metaphor is more accurate to express the complexity of living systems than the classic “book of life.” Music and life can be represented at lower hierarchical levels by music scores and genomic sequences, and such representations have a generational influence in the reproduction of music and life. If music can be considered as a representation of life, such representation remains as unthinkable as life itself. The analysis of scores and genomic sequences might provide mechanistic, phylogenetic, and evolutionary insights into music and life, but not about their real dynamics and nature, which is still maintained unthinkable, as was proposed by Wittgenstein. As complex systems, life or music is composed by thinkable and only showable parts, and a strategy of half-thinking, half-seeing is needed to expand knowledge. Complex models for complex systems, based on experiences on trans-hierarchical integrations, should be developed in order to provide a mixture of legibility and imageability of biological processes, which should lead to higher levels of intelligibility of microbial life. PMID:22919679

Baquero, Fernando; Moya, Andrés

2012-01-01

190

Marine Microbial Mats and the Search for Evidence of Life in Deep Time and Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cyanobacterial mats in extensive seawater evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico, have been excellent subjects for microbial ecology research. The studies reviewed here have documented the steep and rapidly changing environmental gradients experienced by mat microorganisms and the very high rates of biogeochemical processes that they maintained. Recent genetic studies have revealed an enormous diversity of bacteria as well as the spatial distribution of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. These findings, together with emerging insights into the intimate interactions between these diverse populations, have contributed substantially to our understanding of the origins, environmental impacts, and biosignatures of photosynthetic microbial mats. The biosignatures (preservable cells, sedimentary fabrics, organic compounds, minerals, stable isotope patterns, etc.) potentially can serve as indicators of past life on early Earth. They also can inform our search for evidence of any life on Mars. Mars exploration has revealed evidence of evaporite deposits and thermal spring deposits; similar deposits on Earth once hosted ancient microbial mat ecosystems.

Des Marais, David J.

2011-01-01

191

Microbial fuel cells applied to the metabolically based detection of extraterrestrial life.  

PubMed

Since the 1970s, when the Viking spacecrafts carried out experiments to detect microbial metabolism on the surface of Mars, the search for nonspecific methods to detect life in situ has been one of the goals of astrobiology. It is usually required that a methodology detect life independently from its composition or form and that the chosen biological signature point to a feature common to all living systems, such as the presence of metabolism. In this paper, we evaluate the use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for the detection of microbial life in situ. MFCs are electrochemical devices originally developed as power electrical sources and can be described as fuel cells in which the anode is submerged in a medium that contains microorganisms. These microorganisms, as part of their metabolic process, oxidize organic material, releasing electrons that contribute to the electric current, which is therefore proportional to metabolic and other redox processes. We show that power and current density values measured in MFCs that use microorganism cultures or soil samples in the anode are much larger than those obtained with a medium free of microorganisms or sterilized soil samples, respectively. In particular, we found that this is true for extremophiles, which have been proposed as potential inhabitants of extraterrestrial environments. Therefore, our results show that MFCs have the potential to be used for in situ detection of microbial life. PMID:21162676

Abrevaya, Ximena C; Mauas, Pablo J D; Cortón, Eduardo

2010-12-01

192

Metagenomic Analysis of Showerhead Biofilms from a Hospital in Ohio  

EPA Science Inventory

Background: The National Institute of Health estimated that 80% of human microbial infections are associated with biofilms. Although water supplies and hospital equipments are constantly treated with disinfectants, the presence of biofilms in these areas has been frequently obser...

193

Differentiation of Microbial Species and Strains in Coculture Biofilms by Multivariate Analysis of Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectra  

PubMed Central

7.87 to 10.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon energies were used in laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) to analyze biofilms comprised of binary cultures of interacting microorganisms. The effect of photon energy was examined using both tunable synchrotron and laser sources of VUV radiation. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to the MS data to differentiate species in Escherichia coli-Saccharomyces cerevisiae coculture biofilms. PCA of LDPI-MS also differentiated individual E. coli strains in a biofilm comprised of two interacting gene deletion strains, even though these strains differed from the wild type K-12 strain by no more than four gene deletions each out of approximately 2000 genes. PCA treatment of 7.87 eV LDPI-MS data separated the E. coli strains into three distinct groups, two “pure” groups, and a mixed region. Furthermore, the “pure” regions of the E. coli cocultures showed greater variance by PCA at 7.87 eV photon energies compared to 10.5 eV radiation. This is consistent with the expectation that the 7.87 eV photoionization selects a subset of low ionization energy analytes while 10.5 eV is more inclusive, detecting a wider range of analytes. These two VUV photon energies therefore give different spreads via PCA and their respective use in LDPI-MS constitute an additional experimental parameter to differentiate strains and species. PMID:24067765

Bhardwaj, Chhavi; Cui, Yang; Hofstetter, Theresa; Liu, Suet Yi; Bernstein, Hans C.; Carlson, Ross P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Hanley, Luke

2013-01-01

194

Discriminative detection and enumeration of microbial life in marine subsurface sediments.  

PubMed

Detection and enumeration of microbial life in natural environments provide fundamental information about the extent of the biosphere on Earth. However, it has long been difficult to evaluate the abundance of microbial cells in sedimentary habitats because non-specific binding of fluorescent dye and/or auto-fluorescence from sediment particles strongly hampers the recognition of cell-derived signals. Here, we show a highly efficient and discriminative detection and enumeration technique for microbial cells in sediments using hydrofluoric acid (HF) treatment and automated fluorescent image analysis. Washing of sediment slurries with HF significantly reduced non-biological fluorescent signals such as amorphous silica and enhanced the efficiency of cell detachment from the particles. We found that cell-derived SYBR Green I signals can be distinguished from non-biological backgrounds by dividing green fluorescence (band-pass filter: 528/38 nm (center-wavelength/bandwidth)) by red (617/73 nm) per image. A newly developed automated microscope system could take a wide range of high-resolution image in a short time, and subsequently enumerate the accurate number of cell-derived signals by the calculation of green to red fluorescence signals per image. Using our technique, we evaluated the microbial population in deep marine sediments offshore Peru and Japan down to 365 m below the seafloor, which provided objective digital images as evidence for the quantification of the prevailing microbial life. Our method is hence useful to explore the extent of sub-seafloor life in the future scientific drilling, and moreover widely applicable in the study of microbial ecology. PMID:19212428

Morono, Yuki; Terada, Takeshi; Masui, Noriaki; Inagaki, Fumio

2009-05-01

195

Microbial life in martian ice: A biotic origin of methane on Mars?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite the fact that microbial cells are unlikely to be found in the Martian soil in the near future, this paper is written on the assumption that some of the seasonally varying concentration of Martian methane is due to ongoing methanogenesis. It is first pointed out that life might have arisen on Mars first and been transported to Earth later. A case is made that an icy origin of life is more likely than a hot origin, especially if biomolecules take advantage of the high encounter rates and stability against hydrolysis, and that microorganisms feed on the ions that comprise eutectic solutions in ice. Although certain difficulties are avoided if RNA and DNA grow while adsorbed on clay grains, double strand-breaks of microbial DNA due to alpha radioactivity are a far greater threat to microbial survival on clay or other rock types than in ice. Developing a relation between the rate of microbial metabolism in ice and the experimentally determined rate of production of trapped gases of microbial origin, one can estimate the concentration of methanogens that could account for the methane production rate as a function of temperature of their habitat. The result, of order 1 cell cm -3 in the Martian subsurface, seems an attainable goal provided samples are taken from at least 1 or 2 m below the hostile surface of Mars. Instruments on NASA's 2011 Mars Science Lab will measure stable isotopes for methane, water, and carbon dioxide, which on Earth served to distinguish abiotic, thermogenic, and microbial origins. Future measurements of chirality of biomolecules might also provide evidence for Martian life.

Buford Price, P.

2010-08-01

196

Survival of microbial life under shock compression: implications for Panspermia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An analysis is carried out of the survival fraction of micro-organisms exposed to extreme shock pressures. A variety of data sources are used in this analysis. The key findings are that survival depends on the behaviour of the cell wall. Below a critical shock pressure there is a relatively slow fall in survival fraction as shock pressures increase. Above the critical threshold survival starts to fall rapidly as shock pressure increases further. The critical shock pressures found here are in the range 2.4 to 20 GPa, and vary not only from organism to organism, but also depend on the growth stage of given organisms, with starved (i.e., no growth) states favoured for survival. At the shock pressures typical of those involved in interplanetary transfer of rocky materials, the survival fractions are found to be small but finite. This lends credence to the idea of Panspermia, i.e. life may naturally migrate through space. Thus for example, Martian meteorites should not a prior be considered as sterile due to the shock processes they have undergone, but their lack of viable micro-organisms either reflects no such life being present at the source at the time of departure or the influence of other hazardous processes such as radiation in space or heating of surfaces during entry into a planetary atmosphere.

Burchell, M.

2007-09-01

197

Surface display of roGFP for monitoring redox status of extracellular microenvironments in Shewanella oneidensis biofilms.  

PubMed

Biofilms are the most ubiquitous and resilient form of microbial life on earth. One most important feature of a biofilm is the presence of a self-produced matrix, which creates highly heterogeneous and dynamic microenvironments within biofilms. Redox status in biofilm microenvironments plays a critical role in biofilm development and function. However, there is a lack of non-intrusive tools to quantify extracellular redox status of microenvironments within a biofilm matrix. In this study, using Shewanella oneidensis as a model organism, we demonstrated a novel approach to monitor extracellular redox status in biofilm microenvironments. Specifically, we displayed a redox sensitive fluorescence protein roGFP onto the cell surface of S. oneidensis by fusing it to the C-terminus of BpfA, a large surface protein, and used the surface displayed roGFP as a sensor to quantify the extracellular redox status in the matrix of S. oneidensis biofilms. The fusion of roGFP into BpfA has no negative impacts on cell growth and biofilm formation. Upon exposure to oxidizing agents such as H2 O2 , Ag(+) , and SeO3 (2-) , S. oneidensis BpfA-roGFP cells exhibited a characteristic fluorescence of roGFP. Proteinase treatment assay and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy confirmed the surface localization of BpfA-roGFP. We further used the surface displayed roGFP monitored the extracellular redox status in the matrix at different depths of a biofilm exposed to H2 O2 . This study provides a novel approach to non-invasively monitor extracellular redox status in microenvironments within biofilms, which can be used to understand redox responses of biofilms to environmental perturbations. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 512-520. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25255765

Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Mukherjee, Manisha; Cheng, Hsin-I; Zhang, Yingdan; Ji, Lianghui; Cao, Bin

2015-03-01

198

"Primers" on Research Techniques Used in Geomicrobiology for Students and Novices from Microbial Life Educational Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbial Life Educational Resources (MLER) provides web-based resources and services that support learning about the diversity, ecology and evolution of the (geo)microbial world for students, K-12 teachers, university faculty, as well as for the general public. One of the main goals of MLER is to facilitate integration of modern research techniques and results and effective instructional practices. Two new collections of on-line resources include 1) TechniqueSheets which are 'primers' on analytical techniques commonly used in field and laboratory studies, and 2) focused case studies that demonstrate the use of these techniques in research projects supported by NSF's Microbial Observatory program. TechniqueSheets provide educators and students with essential information about common field and laboratory techniques with image-rich contemporary examples of the employment of these methods in the biogeosciences and microbial life realms. A wide variety of techniques are described including environmental sampling, biogeochemical methods, genomic methods, and microscopy. Every technique includes a general description of what the technique is and how it works, background theory, instrumentation, typical applications and limitations, sampling and sample preparation protocols, data collection, reduction, and representation; interpretations, links to the scientific literature, and collections of related teaching activities. Web-based profiles of the Microbial Observatory projects provide students with case-based learning environments that a) define the "big scientific questions," b) introduce the research teams, c) demonstrate modern research strategies and methodologies, and d) present the key scientific findings. These case studies span a variety of locations from microbial life in the extreme environments of Yellowstone National Park to the diversity of marine sponges in Florida to microbial diversity in Antarctic lakes. The goal of these websites is to help students and other novice-learners to be "critical consumers" of scientific data, to understand how the data were obtained and interpreted, to be able to ask the next important question, to be able to communicate with colleagues in related disciplines, to be able to attend a departmental seminar or read a journal article and be able to comprehend the evidence and interpretations, and ultimately, to provide the foundations that will allow students to design and implement their own research projects employing these techniques. This project was supported by NSF grants 0333402 and 0333363.

Bruckner, M. Z.; Rice, G.; Mogk, D. W.

2007-12-01

199

The Microbial Community of the Cystic Fibrosis Airway Is Disrupted in Early Life  

PubMed Central

Background Molecular techniques have uncovered vast numbers of organisms in the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, the clinical significance of which is yet to be determined. The aim of this study was to describe and compare the microbial communities of the lower airway of clinically stable children with CF and children without CF. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and paired oropharyngeal swabs from clinically stable children with CF (n?=?13) and BAL from children without CF (n?=?9) were collected. DNA was isolated, the 16S rRNA regions amplified, fragmented, biotinylated and hybridised to a 16S rRNA microarray. Patient medical and demographic information was recorded and standard microbiological culture was performed. Results A diverse bacterial community was detected in the lower airways of children with CF and children without CF. The airway microbiome of clinically stable children with CF and children without CF were significantly different as measured by Shannon's Diversity Indices (p?=?0.001; t test) and Principle coordinate analysis (p?=?0.01; Adonis test). Overall the CF airway microbial community was more variable and had a less even distribution than the microbial community in the airways of children without CF. We highlighted several bacteria of interest, particularly Prevotella veroralis, CW040 and a Corynebacterium, which were of significantly differential abundance between the CF and non-CF lower airways. Both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae culture abundance were found to be associated with CF airway microbial community structure. The CF upper and lower airways were found to have a broadly similar microbial milieu. Conclusion The microbial communities in the lower airways of stable children with CF and children without CF show significant differences in overall diversity. These discrepancies indicate a disruption of the airway microflora occurring early in life in children with CF. PMID:25526264

Renwick, Julie; McNally, Paul; John, Bettina; DeSantis, Todd; Linnane, Barry; Murphy, Philip

2014-01-01

200

An Update on the Management of Endodontic Biofilms Using Root Canal Irrigants and Medicaments  

PubMed Central

Microbial biofilm is defined as a sessile multicellular microbial community characterized by cells that are firmly attached to a surface and enmeshed in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilms play a very important role in pulp and periradicular pathosis. The aim of this article was to review the role of endodontic biofilms and the effects of root canal irrigants, medicaments as well as lasers on biofilms A Medline search was performed on the English articles published from 1982 to 2013 and was limited to papers published in English. The searched keywords were “Biofilms AND endodontics”, “Biofilms AND sodium hypochlorite”, "Biofilms AND chlorhexidine", "Biofilms AND MTAD", "Biofilms AND calcium hydroxide", “Biofilms AND ozone”, “Biofilms AND lasers” and "Biofilms AND nanoparticles". The reference list of each article was manually searched to find other suitable sources of information. PMID:24688576

Mohammadi, Zahed; Soltani, Mohammad Karim; Shalavi, Sousan

2014-01-01

201

Biofilm Formation by Cryptococcus neoformans Under Distinct Environmental Conditions  

PubMed Central

Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with a propensity to infect the central nervous system of immune compromised individuals causing life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Cryptococcal biofilms have been described as a protective niche against microbial predators in nature and shown to enhance resistance against antifungal agents and specific mediators of host immune responses. Based on the potential importance of cryptococcal biofilms to its survival in the human host and in nature, these studies were designed to investigate those factors that mediate biofilm formation by C. neoformans. We observed that C. neoformans preferentially grew as planktonic cells when cultured under specific conditions designed to mimic growth within host tissues (37°C, neutral pH, and ~5% CO2) or phagocytes (37°C, acidic pH, and ~5% CO2) and as biofilms when cultured under conditions such as those encountered in the external environment (25–37°C, neutral pH, and ambient CO2). Altogether, our studies suggest that conditions similar to those observed in its natural habitat may be conducive to biofilm formation by C. neoformans. PMID:19130292

Ravi, Sailatha; Pierce, Christopher; Witt, Colleen; Wormley, Floyd L.

2014-01-01

202

Microbial life at high salt concentrations: phylogenetic and metabolic diversity  

PubMed Central

Halophiles are found in all three domains of life. Within the Bacteria we know halophiles within the phyla Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Bacteroidetes. Within the Archaea the most salt-requiring microorganisms are found in the class Halobacteria. Halobacterium and most of its relatives require over 100–150 g/l salt for growth and structural stability. Also within the order Methanococci we encounter halophilic species. Halophiles and non-halophilic relatives are often found together in the phylogenetic tree, and many genera, families and orders have representatives with greatly different salt requirement and tolerance. A few phylogenetically coherent groups consist of halophiles only: the order Halobacteriales, family Halobacteriaceae (Euryarchaeota) and the anaerobic fermentative bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales (Firmicutes). The family Halomonadaceae (Gammaproteobacteria) almost exclusively contains halophiles. Halophilic microorganisms use two strategies to balance their cytoplasm osmotically with their medium. The first involves accumulation of molar concentrations of KCl. This strategy requires adaptation of the intracellular enzymatic machinery, as proteins should maintain their proper conformation and activity at near-saturating salt concentrations. The proteome of such organisms is highly acidic, and most proteins denature when suspended in low salt. Such microorganisms generally cannot survive in low salt media. The second strategy is to exclude salt from the cytoplasm and to synthesize and/or accumulate organic 'compatible' solutes that do not interfere with enzymatic activity. Few adaptations of the cells' proteome are needed, and organisms using the 'organic-solutes-in strategy' often adapt to a surprisingly broad salt concentration range. Most halophilic Bacteria, but also the halophilic methanogenic Archaea use such organic solutes. A variety of such solutes are known, including glycine betaine, ectoine and other amino acid derivatives, sugars and sugar alcohols. The 'high-salt-in strategy' is not limited to the Halobacteriaceae. The Halanaerobiales (Firmicutes) also accumulate salt rather than organic solutes. A third, phylogenetically unrelated organism accumulates KCl: the red extremely halophilic Salinibacter (Bacteroidetes), recently isolated from saltern crystallizer brines. Analysis of its genome showed many points of resemblance with the Halobacteriaceae, probably resulting from extensive horizontal gene transfer. The case of Salinibacter shows that more unusual types of halophiles may be waiting to be discovered. PMID:18412960

Oren, Aharon

2008-01-01

203

Microbial life at high salt concentrations: phylogenetic and metabolic diversity.  

PubMed

Halophiles are found in all three domains of life. Within the Bacteria we know halophiles within the phyla Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Bacteroidetes. Within the Archaea the most salt-requiring microorganisms are found in the class Halobacteria. Halobacterium and most of its relatives require over 100-150 g/l salt for growth and structural stability. Also within the order Methanococci we encounter halophilic species. Halophiles and non-halophilic relatives are often found together in the phylogenetic tree, and many genera, families and orders have representatives with greatly different salt requirement and tolerance. A few phylogenetically coherent groups consist of halophiles only: the order Halobacteriales, family Halobacteriaceae (Euryarchaeota) and the anaerobic fermentative bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales (Firmicutes). The family Halomonadaceae (Gammaproteobacteria) almost exclusively contains halophiles. Halophilic microorganisms use two strategies to balance their cytoplasm osmotically with their medium. The first involves accumulation of molar concentrations of KCl. This strategy requires adaptation of the intracellular enzymatic machinery, as proteins should maintain their proper conformation and activity at near-saturating salt concentrations. The proteome of such organisms is highly acidic, and most proteins denature when suspended in low salt. Such microorganisms generally cannot survive in low salt media. The second strategy is to exclude salt from the cytoplasm and to synthesize and/or accumulate organic 'compatible' solutes that do not interfere with enzymatic activity. Few adaptations of the cells' proteome are needed, and organisms using the 'organic-solutes-in strategy' often adapt to a surprisingly broad salt concentration range. Most halophilic Bacteria, but also the halophilic methanogenic Archaea use such organic solutes. A variety of such solutes are known, including glycine betaine, ectoine and other amino acid derivatives, sugars and sugar alcohols. The 'high-salt-in strategy' is not limited to the Halobacteriaceae. The Halanaerobiales (Firmicutes) also accumulate salt rather than organic solutes. A third, phylogenetically unrelated organism accumulates KCl: the red extremely halophilic Salinibacter (Bacteroidetes), recently isolated from saltern crystallizer brines. Analysis of its genome showed many points of resemblance with the Halobacteriaceae, probably resulting from extensive horizontal gene transfer. The case of Salinibacter shows that more unusual types of halophiles may be waiting to be discovered. PMID:18412960

Oren, Aharon

2008-01-01

204

Biofilms’ Role in Planktonic Cell Proliferation  

PubMed Central

The detachment of single cells from biofilms is an intrinsic part of this surface-associated mode of bacterial existence. Pseudomonas sp. strain CT07gfp biofilms, cultivated in microfluidic channels under continuous flow conditions, were subjected to a range of liquid shear stresses (9.42 mPa to 320 mPa). The number of detached planktonic cells was quantified from the effluent at 24-h intervals, while average biofilm thickness and biofilm surface area were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis. Biofilm accumulation proceeded at the highest applied shear stress, while similar rates of planktonic cell detachment was maintained for biofilms of the same age subjected to the range of average shear rates. The conventional view of liquid-mediated shear leading to the passive erosion of single cells from the biofilm surface, disregards the active contribution of attached cell metabolism and growth to the observed detachment rates. As a complement to the conventional conceptual biofilm models, the existence of a biofilm surface-associated zone of planktonic cell proliferation is proposed to highlight the need to expand the traditional perception of biofilms as promoting microbial survival, to include the potential of biofilms to contribute to microbial proliferation. PMID:24201127

Bester, Elanna; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.; Aznaveh, Nahid B.; Greener, Jesse

2013-01-01

205

Microbial trace fossils in Antarctica and the search for evidence of early life on Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is possible to hypothesize that, if microbial life evolved on early Mars, fossil remnants of these organisms may be preserved on the surface. However, the cooling and drying of Mars probably resembled a cold desert and such an environment is not suitable for the process of fossilization. The frigid Ross Desert of Antarctica is probably the closest terrestrial analog to conditions that may have prevailed on the surface of the cooling and drying Mars. In this desert, cryptoendolithic microbial communities live in the airspaces of porous rocks, the last habitable niche in a hostile outside environment. The organisms produce characteristic chemical and physical changes in the rock substrate. Environmental changes (deterioration of conditions) may result in the death of the community. Although no cellular structures are fossilized, the conspicuous changes in the rock substrate are preserved as trace fossils. Likewise, microbial trace fossils (without cellular structures) may also be preserved on Mars: Discontinuities in structure or chemistry of the rock that are independent of physical or chemical gradients may be of biological origin. Ross Desert trace fossils can be used as a model for planning search strategies and for instrument design to find evidence of past Martian life.

Friedmann, E. Imre; Friedmann, Roseli O.

1989-01-01

206

Intestinal Microbial Diversity during Early-Life Colonization Shapes Long-Term IgE Levels  

PubMed Central

Summary Microbial exposure following birth profoundly impacts mammalian immune system development. Microbiota alterations are associated with increased incidence of allergic and autoimmune disorders with elevated serum IgE as a hallmark. The previously reported abnormally high serum IgE levels in germ-free mice suggests that immunoregulatory signals from microbiota are required to control basal IgE levels. We report that germ-free mice and those with low-diversity microbiota develop elevated serum IgE levels in early life. B cells in neonatal germ-free mice undergo isotype switching to IgE at mucosal sites in a CD4 T-cell- and IL-4-dependent manner. A critical level of microbial diversity following birth is required in order to inhibit IgE induction. Elevated IgE levels in germ-free mice lead to increased mast-cell-surface-bound IgE and exaggerated oral-induced systemic anaphylaxis. Thus, appropriate intestinal microbial stimuli during early life are critical for inducing an immunoregulatory network that protects from induction of IgE at mucosal sites. PMID:24237701

Cahenzli, Julia; Köller, Yasmin; Wyss, Madeleine; Geuking, Markus B.; McCoy, Kathy D.

2013-01-01

207

Complete Nucleotide Sequence and Analysis of Two Conjugative Broad Host Range Plasmids from a Marine Microbial Biofilm  

PubMed Central

The complete nucleotide sequence of plasmids pMCBF1 and pMCBF6 was determined and analyzed. pMCBF1 and pMCBF6 form a novel clade within the IncP-1 plasmid family designated IncP-1 ?. The plasmids were exogenously isolated earlier from a marine biofilm. pMCBF1 (62 689 base pairs; bp) and pMCBF6 (66 729 bp) have identical backbones, but differ in their mercury resistance transposons. pMCBF1 carries Tn5053 and pMCBF6 carries Tn5058. Both are flanked by 5 bp direct repeats, typical of replicative transposition. Both insertions are in the vicinity of a resolvase gene in the backbone, supporting the idea that both transposons are “res-site hunters” that preferably insert close to and use external resolvase functions. The similarity of the backbones indicates recent insertion of the two transposons and the ongoing dynamics of plasmid evolution in marine biofilms. Both plasmids also carry the insertion sequence ISPst1, albeit without flanking repeats. ISPs1is located in an unusual site within the control region of the plasmid. In contrast to most known IncP-1 plasmids the pMCBF1/pMCBF6 backbone has no insert between the replication initiation gene (trfA) and the vegetative replication origin (oriV). One pMCBF1/pMCBF6 block of about 2.5 kilo bases (kb) has no similarity with known sequences in the databases. Furthermore, insertion of three genes with similarity to the multidrug efflux pump operon mexEF and a gene from the NodT family of the tripartite multi-drug resistance-nodulation-division (RND) system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found. They do not seem to confer antibiotic resistance to the hosts of pMCBF1/pMCBF6, but the presence of RND on promiscuous plasmids may have serious implications for the spread of antibiotic multi-resistance. PMID:24647540

Norberg, Peter; Bergström, Maria; Hermansson, Malte

2014-01-01

208

Innovative Strategies to Overcome Biofilm Resistance  

PubMed Central

We review the recent literature concerning the efficiency of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation toward various microbial species in planktonic and biofilm cultures. The review is mainly focused on biofilm-growing microrganisms because this form of growth poses a threat to chronically infected or immunocompromised patients and is difficult to eradicate from medical devices. We discuss the biofilm formation process and mechanisms of its increased resistance to various antimicrobials. We present, based on data in the literature, strategies for overcoming the problem of biofilm resistance. Factors that have potential for use in increasing the efficiency of the killing of biofilm-forming bacteria include plant extracts, enzymes that disturb the biofilm structure, and other nonenzymatic molecules. We propose combining antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with various antimicrobial and antibiofilm approaches to obtain a synergistic effect to permit efficient microbial growth control at low photosensitizer doses. PMID:23509680

Taraszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Fila, Grzegorz; Grinholc, Mariusz; Nakonieczna, Joanna

2013-01-01

209

Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm  

PubMed Central

Biofilms are masses of microorganisms that bind to and multiply on a solid surface, typically with a fluid bathing the microbes. The microorganisms that are not attached but are free-floating in an aqueous environment are termed planktonic cells. Traditionally, microbiology research has addressed results from planktonic bacterial cells. However, many recent studies have indicated that biofilms are the preferred form of growth of most microbes and particularly those of a pathogenic nature. Biofilms on animal hosts have significantly increased resistance to various antimicrobials compared to planktonic cells. These microbial communities form microcolonies that interact with each other using very sophisticated communication methods (i.e., quorum-sensing). The development of unique microbiological tools to detect and assess the various biofilms around us is a tremendously important focus of research in many laboratories. In the present review, we discuss the major biofilm mechanisms and the interactions among oral bacteria. PMID:21778817

Huang, Ruijie; Li, Mingyun

2011-01-01

210

Electrical Conductivity in a Mixed-Species Biofilm  

PubMed Central

Geobacter sulfurreducens can form electrically conductive biofilms, but the potential for conductivity through mixed-species biofilms has not been examined. A current-producing biofilm grown from a wastewater sludge inoculum was highly conductive with low charge transfer resistance even though microorganisms other than Geobacteraceae accounted for nearly half the microbial community. PMID:22706052

Lau, Joanne; Nevin, Kelly P.; Franks, Ashley E.; Tuominen, Mark T.; Lovley, Derek R.

2012-01-01

211

Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms  

PubMed Central

Background The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown. PMID:25523872

Hirschfeld, Josefine

2014-01-01

212

Biofilms On Orbit and On Earth: Current Methods, Future Needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Biofilms have played a significant role on the effectiveness of life support hardware on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). This presentation will discuss how biofilms impact flight hardware, how on orbit biofilms are analyzed from an engineering and research perspective, and future needs to analyze and utilize biofilms for long duration, deep space missions.

Vega, Leticia

2013-01-01

213

Life on the outside: role of biofilms in environmental persistence of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

Escherichia coli is a heterogeneous species that can be part of the normal flora of humans but also include strains of medical importance. Among pathogenic members, Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) are some of the more prominent pathogenic E. coli within the public sphere. STEC disease outbreaks are typically associated with contaminated beef, contaminated drinking water, and contaminated fresh produce. These water- and food-borne pathogens usually colonize cattle asymptomatically; cows will shed STEC in their feces and the subsequent fecal contamination of the environment and processing plants is a major concern for food and public safety. This is especially important because STEC can survive for prolonged periods of time outside its host in environments such as water, produce, and farm soil. Biofilms are hypothesized to be important for survival in the environment especially on produce, in rivers, and in processing plants. Several factors involved in biofilm formation such as curli, cellulose, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, and colanic acid are involved in plant colonization and adherence to different surfaces often found in meat processing plants. In food processing plants, contamination of beef carcasses occurs at different stages of processing and this is often caused by the formation of STEC biofilms on the surface of several pieces of equipment associated with slaughtering and processing. Biofilms protect bacteria against several challenges, including biocides used in industrial processes. STEC biofilms are less sensitive than planktonic cells to several chemical sanitizers such as quaternary ammonium compounds, peroxyacetic acid, and chlorine compounds. Increased resistance to sanitizers by STEC growing in a biofilm is likely to be a source of contamination in the processing plant. This review focuses on the role of biofilm formation by STEC as a means of persistence outside their animal host and factors associated with biofilm formation. PMID:25071733

Vogeleer, Philippe; Tremblay, Yannick D. N.; Mafu, Akier A.; Jacques, Mario; Harel, Josée

2014-01-01

214

Life on the outside: role of biofilms in environmental persistence of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli.  

PubMed

Escherichia coli is a heterogeneous species that can be part of the normal flora of humans but also include strains of medical importance. Among pathogenic members, Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) are some of the more prominent pathogenic E. coli within the public sphere. STEC disease outbreaks are typically associated with contaminated beef, contaminated drinking water, and contaminated fresh produce. These water- and food-borne pathogens usually colonize cattle asymptomatically; cows will shed STEC in their feces and the subsequent fecal contamination of the environment and processing plants is a major concern for food and public safety. This is especially important because STEC can survive for prolonged periods of time outside its host in environments such as water, produce, and farm soil. Biofilms are hypothesized to be important for survival in the environment especially on produce, in rivers, and in processing plants. Several factors involved in biofilm formation such as curli, cellulose, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, and colanic acid are involved in plant colonization and adherence to different surfaces often found in meat processing plants. In food processing plants, contamination of beef carcasses occurs at different stages of processing and this is often caused by the formation of STEC biofilms on the surface of several pieces of equipment associated with slaughtering and processing. Biofilms protect bacteria against several challenges, including biocides used in industrial processes. STEC biofilms are less sensitive than planktonic cells to several chemical sanitizers such as quaternary ammonium compounds, peroxyacetic acid, and chlorine compounds. Increased resistance to sanitizers by STEC growing in a biofilm is likely to be a source of contamination in the processing plant. This review focuses on the role of biofilm formation by STEC as a means of persistence outside their animal host and factors associated with biofilm formation. PMID:25071733

Vogeleer, Philippe; Tremblay, Yannick D N; Mafu, Akier A; Jacques, Mario; Harel, Josée

2014-01-01

215

Terrestrial Biomarkers for Early Life on Earth as Analogs for Possible Martian Life Forms: Examples of Minerally Replaced Bacteria and Biofilms From the 3.5 - 3.3-Ga Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The search for extraterrestrial life and especially martian life hinges on a variety of methods used to identify vestiges of what we could recognize as life, including chemical signatures, morphological fossils, and biogenic precipitates. Although the possibility of extant life on Mars (subsurface) is being considered, most exploration efforts may be directed toward the search for fossil life. Geomorphological evidence points to a warmer and wetter Mars early on in its history, a scenario that encourages comparison with the early Earth. For this reason, study of the early terrestrial life forms and environment in which they lived may provide clues as to how to search for extinct martian life. As a contribution to the early Archean database of terrestrial microfossils, we present new data on morphological fossils from the 3.5-3.3-Ga Barberton greenstone belt (BGB), South Africa. This study underlines the variety of fossil types already present in some of the oldest, best-preserved terrestrial sediments, ranging from minerally replaced bacteria and bacteria molds of vaRious morphologies (coccoid, coccobacillus, bacillus) to minerally replaced biofilm. Biofilm or extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) is produced by bacteria and appears to be more readily fossilisable than bacteria themselves. The BGB fossils occur in shallow water to subaerial sediments interbedded with volcanic lavas, the whole being deposited on oceanic crust. Penecontemporaneous silicification of sediments and volcanics resulted in the chertification of the rocks, which were later subjected to low-grade metamorphism (lower greenschist).

Westall, F.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; deWit, M. J.; Dann, J.; Gerneke, D.; deRonde, C. E. J.

1998-01-01

216

Biofilms: survival mechanisms of clinically relevant microorganisms.  

PubMed

Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes involved in cell attachment and biofilm formation. PMID:11932229

Donlan, Rodney M; Costerton, J William

2002-04-01

217

Biofilms: Survival Mechanisms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms  

PubMed Central

Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes involved in cell attachment and biofilm formation. PMID:11932229

Donlan, Rodney M.; Costerton, J. William

2002-01-01

218

Detection of in-situ derivatized peptides in microbial biofilms by laser desorption 7.87 eV postionizaton mass spectrometry.  

SciTech Connect

A novel analytical method based on laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) was developed to investigate the competence and sporulation factor-a pentapeptide of amino acid sequence ERGMT-within intact Bacillus subtilis biofilms. Derivatization of the neat ERGMT peptide with quinoline- and anthracene-based tags was separately used to lower the peptide ionization potential and permit direct ionization by 7.87-eV vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The techniques of mass shifting and selective ionization of the derivatized peptide were combined here to permit detection of ERGMT peptide within intact biofilms by LDPI-MS, without any prior extraction or chromatographic separation. Finally, imaging MS specific to the derivatized peptide was demonstrated on an intact biofilm using LDPI-MS. The presence of ERGMT in the biofilms was verified by bulk extraction/LC-MS. However, MALDI imaging MS analyses were unable to detect ERGMT within intact biofilms.

Edirisinghe, P. D.; Moore, J. F.; Skinner-Nemec, K. A.; Lindberg, C.; Giometti, C. S.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Hunt, J. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Hanley, L.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; MassThink

2007-01-01

219

Microbial life in the Lake Medee, the largest deep-sea salt-saturated formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic lakes (DHALs) of the Eastern Mediterranean represent some of the most hostile environments on our planet. We investigated microbial life in the recently discovered Lake Medee, the largest DHAL found to-date. Medee has two unique features: a complex geobiochemical stratification and an absence of chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria, which usually play the primary role in dark bicarbonate assimilation in DHALs interfaces. Presumably because of these features, Medee is less productive and exhibits reduced diversity of autochthonous prokaryotes in its interior. Indeed, the brine community almost exclusively consists of the members of euryarchaeal MSBL1 and bacterial KB1 candidate divisions. Our experiments utilizing cultivation and [14C]-assimilation, showed that these organisms at least partially rely on reductive cleavage of osmoprotectant glycine betaine and are engaged in trophic cooperation. These findings provide novel insights into how prokaryotic communities can adapt to salt-saturated conditions and sustain active metabolism at the thermodynamic edge of life.

Yakimov, Michail M.; La Cono, Violetta; Slepak, Vladlen Z.; La Spada, Gina; Arcadi, Erika; Messina, Enzo; Borghini, Mireno; Monticelli, Luis S.; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Golyshina, Olga V.; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N.; Giuliano, Laura

2013-12-01

220

Microbial ecology and host-microbiota interactions during early life stages  

PubMed Central

The role of human microbiota has been redefined during recent years and its physiological role is now much more important than earlier understood. Intestinal microbial colonization is essential for the maturation of immune system and for the developmental regulation of the intestinal physiology. Alterations in this process of colonization have been shown to predispose and increase the risk to disease later in life. The first contact of neonates with microbes is provided by the maternal microbiota. Moreover, mode of delivery, type of infant feeding and other perinatal factors can influence the establishment of the infant microbiota. Taken into consideration all the available information it could be concluded that the exposure to the adequate microbes early in gestation and neonatal period seems to have a relevant role in health. Maternal microbial environment affects maternal and fetal immune physiology and, of relevance, this interaction with microbes at the fetal-maternal interface could be modulated by specific microbes administered to the pregnant mother. Indeed, probiotic interventions aiming to reduce the risk of immune-mediated diseases may appear effective during early life. PMID:22743759

Collado, Maria Carmen; Cernada, Maria; Baüerl, Christine; Vento, Máximo; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

2012-01-01

221

MstX and a Putative Potassium Channel Facilitate Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis  

PubMed Central

Biofilms constitute the predominant form of microbial life and a potent reservoir for innate antibiotic resistance in systemic infections. In the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the transition from a planktonic to sessile state is mediated by mutually exclusive regulatory pathways controlling the expression of genes required for flagellum or biofilm formation. Here, we identify mstX and yugO as novel regulators of biofilm formation in B. subtilis. We show that expression of mstX and the downstream putative K+ efflux channel, yugO, is necessary for biofilm development in B. subtilis, and that overexpression of mstX induces biofilm assembly. Transcription of the mstX-yugO operon is under the negative regulation of SinR, a transcription factor that governs the switch between planktonic and sessile states. Furthermore, mstX regulates the activity of Spo0A through a positive autoregulatory loop involving KinC, a histidine kinase that is activated by potassium leakage. The addition of potassium abrogated mstX-mediated biofilm formation. Our findings expand the role of Spo0A and potassium homeostasis in the regulation of bacterial development. PMID:23737939

Lundberg, Matthew E.; Becker, Eric C.; Choe, Senyon

2013-01-01

222

Identification of ypqP as a New Bacillus subtilis Biofilm Determinant That Mediates the Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents in Mixed-Species Communities.  

PubMed

In most habitats, microbial life is organized in biofilms, three-dimensional edifices sustained by extracellular polymeric substances that enable bacteria to resist harsh and changing environments. Under multispecies conditions, bacteria can benefit from the polymers produced by other species ("public goods"), thus improving their survival under toxic conditions. A recent study showed that a Bacillus subtilis hospital isolate (NDmed) was able to protect Staphylococcus aureus from biocide action in multispecies biofilms. In this work, we identified ypqP, a gene whose product is required in NDmed for thick-biofilm formation on submerged surfaces and for resistance to two biocides widely used in hospitals. NDmed and S. aureus formed mixed biofilms, and both their spatial arrangement and pathogen protection were mediated by YpqP. Functional ypqP is present in other natural B. subtilis biofilm-forming isolates. However, the gene is disrupted by the SP? prophage in the weak submerged-biofilm-forming strains NCIB3610 and 168, which are both less resistant than NDmed to the biocides tested. Furthermore, in a 168 laboratory strain cured of the SP? prophage, the reestablishment of a functional ypqP gene led to increased thickness and resistance to biocides of the associated biofilms. We therefore propose that YpqP is a new and important determinant of B. subtilis surface biofilm architecture, protection against exposure to toxic compounds, and social behavior in bacterial communities. PMID:25326298

Sanchez-Vizuete, Pilar; Le Coq, Dominique; Bridier, Arnaud; Herry, Jean-Marie; Aymerich, Stéphane; Briandet, Romain

2015-01-01

223

DIFFUSION IN BIOFILMS RESPIRING ON ELECTRODES  

PubMed Central

The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that 1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; 2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; 3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and 4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms. PMID:23420623

Renslow, RS; Babauta, JT; Majors, PD; Beyenal, H

2013-01-01

224

Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

2013-02-15

225

Evaluation of the Microbial Population in the Multibiological Life Support System Experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to develop and evaluate a ground-based bioregenerative life support system satisfying half of one crew member's requirement towards O2 , Multibiological Life Support System Exper-iments (MLSSE) have been conducted. The MLSSE involved humans participating in the gas exchange with the closed equipment simulating the future extraterrestrial life support systems, which included three phases. The Phase I test involved one person participating in the gas exchange with lettuce in plant chamber as the primary means of air revitalization for 3 months. The Phase II test involved one person participating in the gas exchange with lettuce in plant chamber and micoalgae in bioreactor as the means of air revitalization for 1 month. In the Phase III test, silkworm was introduced into animal chamber for 2 months based on Phase II. The microbial dynamics in the closed chambers were evaluated during the whole experiments. The surfaces, water, and air of closed equipment were sampled for microbial content during the whole experiments. In general, the numbers of microbes in the chambers slowly increased with length of occupation. Compared with Phase I, the numbers of microbes of Phase II ob-viously increased, however, the numbers of microbes of Phase III did not increase relative to Phase II. The types of microbes found on the surfaces and in the air in all the experimental phases were similar. The most common bacteria were Bacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., as well as Sphingomonas sp., with Pencillium sp. and Cladosporium sp. the most common fungi. A few opportunistic pathogens were also determined, but neither phase had levels of microbes that would be considered an occupational health threat.

Fu, Yuming; Tong, Ling; Li, Ming; Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Dawei; He, Wenting; Liu, Hong

226

Successional development of biofilms in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems treating municipal wastewater.  

PubMed

Biofilm-based technologies, such as moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems, are widely used to treat wastewater. Biofilm development is important for MBBR systems as much of the microbial biomass is retained within reactors as biofilm on suspended carriers. Little is known about this process of biofilm development and the microorganisms upon which MBBRs rely. We documented successional changes in microbial communities as biofilms established in two full-scale MBBR systems treating municipal wastewater over two seasons. 16S rRNA gene-targeted pyrosequencing and clone libraries were used to describe microbial communities. These data indicate a successional process that commences with the establishment of an aerobic community dominated by Gammaproteobacteria (up to 52 % of sequences). Over time, this community shifts towards dominance by putatively anaerobic organisms including Deltaproteobacteria and Clostridiales. Significant differences were observed between the two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), mostly due to a large number of sequences (up to 55 %) representing Epsilonproteobacteria (mostly Arcobacter) at one site. Archaea in young biofilms included several lineages of Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. In contrast, the mature biofilm consisted entirely of Methanosarcinaceae (Euryarchaeota). This study provides new insights into the community structure of developing biofilms at full-scale WWTPs and provides the basis for optimizing MBBR start-up and operational parameters. PMID:23838795

Biswas, Kristi; Taylor, Michael W; Turner, Susan J

2014-02-01

227

Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of biofilms  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Microbial activity that leads to the formation of biofilms on process equipment can accelerate corrosion, reduce heat transfer rates, and generally decrease process efficiencies. Additional concerns arise in the food and pharma industries where product quality and safety are a high priority. Pharmac...

228

Can nanotechnology deliver the promised benefits without negatively impacting soil microbial life?  

PubMed

Nanotechnology exploits the enhanced reactivity of materials at the atomic scale to improve various applications for humankind. In agriculture, potential nanotechnology applications include crop protection and fertilization. However, such benefits could come with risks for the environment: non-target plants, plant-beneficial soil microbes and other life forms could be impacted if nanoparticles (nanomaterials) contaminate the environment. This review evaluates the impact of the major metallic nanoparticles (Ag, ZnO, CuO, CeO2 , TiO2 , and FeO-based nanoparticles) on soil microbes involved in agricultural processes. The current literature indicate that in addition to population and organismal-scale effects on microbes, other subtle impacts of nanoparticles are seen in the nitrogen cycle, soil enzyme activities, and processes involved in iron metabolism, phytohormone, and antibiotic production. These effects are negative or positive, the outcome being dependent on specific nanoparticles. Collectively, published results suggest that nanotechnology portends considerable, many negative, implications for soil microbes and, thus, agricultural processes that are microbially driven. Nonetheless, the potential of plant and soil microbial processes to mitigate the bioreactivity of nanoparticles also are observed. Whereas the roots of most terrestrial plants are associated with microbes, studies of nanoparticle interactions with plants and microbes are generally conducted separately. The few studies in actual microbe-plant systems found effects of nanoparticles on the functioning of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, nitrogen fixation, as well as on the production of microbial siderophores in the plant rhizosphere. It is suggested that a better understanding of the agro-ecological ramifications of nanoparticles would require more in-depth interactive studies in combined plant-microbe-nanoparticle systems. PMID:24913194

Dimkpa, Christian O

2014-09-01

229

Do inactivated microbial preparations improve life history traits of the copepod Acartia tonsa?  

PubMed

We have tested a microbial preparation with probiotic effects (PSI; Sorbial A/S DANISCO) on the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana) development time and reproduction effectiveness in culture. The hypotheses were that PSI increases the productivity and quality of copepods in culture (increased egg production and hatching success, HS). This was carried out because the use of copepods as live prey in aquaculture could increase the number of fish successfully raised through their entire life cycle. However, the availability of copepods is limited by their difficulty to be effectively raised. Our results show that the addition of PSI to the algal food increased the individual size of the adult females and their egg production. The PSI, together with Rhodomonas salina, also increased the HS of the eggs produced by PSI-treated females. These effects were observed despite that the biochemical analysis of the PSI revealed that it is a nutritionally poor food lacking essential fatty acids, and hence it cannot be used alone to raise copepods but instead as a food additive. This is the first demonstration that the effectiveness of copepod culturing can be improved using microbial preparations as a food additive. PMID:21213117

Drillet, Guillaume; Rabarimanantsoa, Tahina; Frouël, Stéphane; Lamson, Jacob S; Christensen, Anette M; Kim-Tiam, Sandra; Hansen, Benni W

2011-10-01

230

Searching for fossil microbial biofilms on Mars: a case study using a 3.46 billion-year old example from the Pilbara in Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the immanent arrival of three Mars landers, one of which (Beagle 2) is dedicated to the search for life on Mars, analogue studies that are of general relevance to the search for past life on Mars are timely. We are using a 3.46 Ga, fossiliferous, sedimentary rock as a reference sample. The rock consists of laminated sediments, whose components were derived from volcanic rocks (volcaniclastic) that were deposited in a shallow water basin. Microbial mats occur at the surfaces of the sediments. This rock formed in an environment and from materials that would have existed on early Mars. Preliminary observation with the Beagle 2 camera shows that it should be possible to identify sedimentary structures, such as ripple marks and laminations, in fine detail. A 2 mm high ministromatolite/thrombolite layer was also readily visible. Further analysis using the microscope and the spectrometers would provide additional information that would lead to the choice of suitable samples, such as the ministromatolite/thrombolite layer, for chemical study with the gas analysis package. In this way details concerning the nature (and biogenicity) of the carbonaceous matter.

Westall, Frances; Hofmann, Beda; Brack, André

2004-03-01

231

Investigation of biocide efficacy by photoacoustic biofilm monitoring.  

PubMed

The undesired growth of biofilms on solid surfaces is often termed biofouling. Biofilms consist mainly of water and microbial cells which are embedded in a biopolymer matrix. Biofouling lowers the water quality and increases the frictional resistance in tubes. Further, biofilms increase the pressure differences in membrane processes and can clog filtration membranes, valves, and nozzles. For investigation and improvement of biocide efficacy and anti-fouling strategies, on-line and in situ monitoring of the biofilm is necessary. In this study, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) was employed for biofilm monitoring. PAS allows the depth-resolved investigation of growth and detachment processes of biofilms. Strategies based on the oxidant hydrogen peroxide were compared to popular isothiazolinone biocides. Hydrogen peroxide allowed a very fast and efficient removal of attached biofilms, whereas no effect on the biofilm matrix was observed in most cases when isothiazolinone biocides were used. PMID:14975652

Schmid, T; Panne, U; Adams, J; Niessner, R

2004-03-01

232

Lava Cave Microbial Communities Within Mats and Secondary Mineral Deposits: Implications for Life Detection on Other Planets  

PubMed Central

Abstract Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai‘i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai‘i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai‘i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies. Key Words: Biosignatures—Astrobiology—Bacteria—Caves—Life detection—Microbial mats. Astrobiology 11, 601–618. PMID:21879833

Melim, L.A.; Spilde, M.N.; Hathaway, J.J.M.; Garcia, M.G.; Moya, M.; Stone, F.D.; Boston, P.J.; Dapkevicius, M.L.N.E.; Riquelme, C.

2011-01-01

233

Deliberations on Microbial Life in the Subglacial Lake Vostok, East Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective was to estimate microbial contents of accretion (lake originating) ice from the Lake Vostok buried beneath 4-km thick East Antarctic ice sheet with the ultimate goal to discover microbial life in this extreme icy environment featured by no light, close to freezing point temperature, ultra-low DOC contents, and an excess of oxygen. The PCR based bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing constrained by Forensic Biology and Ancient DNA research criteria was used as a main approach. Epifluorescent and confocal microscopies as well as flow cytometry were implemented. DNA study showed that the accretion ice is essentially bacteria- and archaea-free. Up to now, the only accretion ice type 1 featured by mica-clay sediments presence and namely one horizon of four studied (3607m) allowed the recovery a few bacterial phylotypes. This unexpectedly included the chemolithoautotrophic thermophile Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus and two more unclassified phylotypes all passing numerous contaminant controls. In contrast, the deeper and cleaner accretion ice 2 (three cores) with no sediments presence and near detection limit gas contents gave no reliable signals. The microbes detected in accretion ice 1 are unbelievable to resist an excess of oxygen in the lake water body (700 - 1300 mg O2/l). They are supposed to be thriving in rather warm anoxic sediments in deep faults at the lake bottom and sporadically flushing out along with sediments to the lake veins in a shallow depth bay due to a seismotectonic activity likely operating in the lake environment. A few geophysical and geological evidences support this scenario. In the bay the presence of mica-clay sediments, higher accretion rate due to relief rise and likely oxygen-depleted upper layer of water can provide microbes with a chance to escape the high oxygen tension by the rapid entrapment into accretion ice 1. Sediment-free accretion ice 2, which forms above a deeper part of the lake, shows no evidence for reasonable source for microbe contribution given highly oxygenated lake water environment. Microscopy and flow cytometry trials on strictly decontaminated ice samples gave supporting results. While microscopy failed to reveal cells because the local concentrations were below the detection limit, the flow cytometry succeeded in a preliminary estimate of 9 and 24 cells/ml for accretion 1 (3561m) and control glacial (2054m) ice samples, respectively. However, given the ratio contaminants to indigenous cells is about 10:1 (from PCR results), the genuine microbial contents for both accretion and glacial ice samples is expected to be as low as 1 cell/ml what practically means "sterile" conditions. Thus, the accretion ice from Lake Vostok contains the very low unevenly distributed biomass indicating that the water body (at least upper layer) should also be hosting a highly sparse life, if any. By this, the Lake Vostok for the first time could present the big natural "sterile" water body on Earth providing a unique test area for searching for life on icy moons and planets. The search for life in Lake Vostok is constrained by a high chance of forward-contamination which can be minimized by using of stringent decontamination procedures and comprehensive biological controls.

Bulat, S.; Alekhina, I.; Lipenkov, V.; Lukin, V.; Marie, D.; Petit, J.

2004-12-01

234

Microfluidics Expanding the Frontiers of Microbial Ecology  

PubMed Central

The ability afforded by microfluidics to observe the behaviors of microbes in highly controlled and confined microenvironments, across scales from a single cell to mixed communities, has significantly contributed to expand the frontiers of microbial ecology over the last decade. Spatially and temporally varying distributions of organisms and chemical cues that mimic natural microbial habitats can now be established by exploiting physics at the micrometer scale and by incorporating structures with specific geometries and materials. Here we review applications of microfluidics that have resulted in highly insightful discoveries on fundamental aspects of microbial life, ranging from growth and sensing to cell-cell interactions and population dynamics. We anticipate that this flexible, multidisciplinary technology will continue to facilitate discoveries regarding the ecology of microorganisms and help uncover strategies to control phenomena such as biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. PMID:24773019

Rusconi, Roberto; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman

2014-01-01

235

Biofilms: The Stronghold of Legionella pneumophila  

PubMed Central

Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila and is defined as a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5% to 80%. L. pneumophila is ubiquitous in natural and anthropogenic water systems. L. pneumophila is transmitted by inhalation of contaminated aerosols produced by a variety of devices. While L. pneumophila replicates within environmental protozoa, colonization and persistence in its natural environment are also mediated by biofilm formation and colonization within multispecies microbial communities. There is now evidence that some legionellosis outbreaks are correlated with the presence of biofilms. Thus, preventing biofilm formation appears as one of the strategies to reduce water system contamination. However, we lack information about the chemical and biophysical conditions, as well as the molecular mechanisms that allow the production of biofilms by L. pneumophila. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation by L. pneumophila and the roles of other microbial species in L. pneumophila biofilm colonization. In addition, we discuss the protective roles of biofilms against current L. pneumophila sanitation strategies along with the initial data available on the regulation of L. pneumophila biofilm formation. PMID:24185913

Abdel-Nour, Mena; Duncan, Carla; Low, Donald E.; Guyard, Cyril

2013-01-01

236

Towards a hybrid anaerobic digester-microbial fuel cell integrated energy recovery system: an overview of the development of an electrogenic biofilm.  

PubMed

An electrogenic biofilm was developed on a macroporous chitosan-carbon nanotube (CHIT-CNT) electrode under constant poised potential (-0.25V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode) and flow through conditions utilizing the effluent of an anaerobic digester as both the inoculant and substrate for the electrogenic biofilm. After 125 days of inoculation the bioelectrode demonstrated an open circuit potential of -0.62V and a current density of 9.43?Acm(-3) (at -0.25V). Scanning electron microscopy images indicate thorough surface coverage of the biofilm with a high density of bacterial nanowires physically connecting bacteria to bacteria and bacteria to carbon nanotube (electrode surface) suggesting the nanowires are electrically conductive. DGGE was used to identify the major bacterial and archaeal populations. PMID:23608503

Higgins, Scott R; Lopez, Ryan J; Pagaling, Eulyn; Yan, Tao; Cooney, Michael J

2013-05-10

237

Microbial life in cold, sulfur-rich environments: Investigations of an Arctic ecosystem and implications for life detection at Europa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exobiological investigations require a detailed understanding of life's interactions with its environment here on Earth before we can confidently recognize signs of these interactions at other worlds such as Europa. Using a cold, sulfur-based ecosystem at Borup Fiord pass in the Canadian High Arctic as a study site, I investigated how the supraglacial non-ice materials are represented across different scales in spectral data, how microbiology is influencing the mineralogy of the site, and whether the products of microbial sulfide oxidation preserve indications of their biogenic origin. A systematic scale-integrated approach was applied to query orbital (Hyperion), field, and laboratory spectra to identify sulfur-rich materials precipitated on a glacier. While sulfur, the main constituent of the deposits, is well represented in Hyperion data, minor constituents such as calcite and gypsum are partially or entirely masked. Absorption features of sulfates, where present, are shifted in wavelength due to the effects of mixing or temperature. Autonomous detection methods were successfully applied to monitor the generation and extent of the deposits, which show spectral similarities to Europa's non-ice materials. Geomicrobiological cultivation of sulfide oxidizing bacteria succeeded in demonstrating that the microbiological community present at the site has the potential to catalyze the generation of sulfur deposits. Sulfur generated in culture is present as biomineralized structures comprised of microbial filaments and sheaths along which sulfur globules are deposited. Consortia producing these structures are dominated by gamma-Proteobacteria closely related to Marinobacter, not previously known to oxidize sulfide. The sulfur structures produced by these consortia are not observed in abiotic controls and have the potential to serve as morphological biosignatures. Investigations into the biogenicity of field deposits reveal mineral assemblages with similar morphologies to those generated in culture. X-ray diffraction analyses show some evidence for rosickyite, a metastable form of biogenic sulfur. Mid-infrared laboratory spectroscopy also indicates the presence of organic functional groups diagnostic of proteins and fatty acids within the sulfur deposits. These combined investigations suggest that sulfur minerals extruded onto Europa's near surface, analogous to those of Borup Fiord pass, have the potential to contain identifiable biosignatures which low-temperature conditions could help stabilize and preserve.

Gleeson, Damhnait Fagan

2009-12-01

238

3.5 billion years of glass bioalteration: Volcanic rocks as a basis for microbial life?  

SciTech Connect

Alteration textures in volcanic glass from the seafloor fall into two classes, one suggestive of abiotic/diffusive hydration and chemical exchange, and another likely to be caused by microbial, cavity-forming, congruent dissolution. Glass bioalteration is common in submarine lavas throughout the world's ocean, dominant in the upper 300 m of the oceanic crust, and found in all well-preserved ophiolites and greenstone belts dating back to 3.5 Ga. It may yield a significant fraction of the global biomass and geochemical fluxes and is relevant to the development of the earliest life on Earth. We present a critical review concerning these glass bioalteration textures and present new data on their microchemical environment. We explore arguments for their biogenicity and further develop the prevalent model for their formation by relating corrosion morphology to the mechanism of microbial dissolution. Biological alteration produces conspicuous micron-scale granular and tubular textures. Granular glass alteration is well explained by colonizing microbes that selectively dissolve the glass in their contact area, forming a sponge-like interconnected network of micron-sized cavities along glass surfaces. Tubular alteration meanwhile, is more likely to be caused by filamentous cell extensions in a process similar to fungal tunneling of soil feldspars and marine carbonates. While we see clear functional similarities to fungal dissolution behavior, we do not know whether fungal or prokaryotic organisms are involved. However, this functional constraint may eventually help to identify potential microbes responsible for these features, potentially including eukaryotic or prokaryotic organisms. Yet, we caution that these organisms may be difficult to identify and to study, because they are likely to be sparsely distributed, slow growing, and difficult to cultivate.

Staudigel, H.; Furnes, H.; McLoughlin, N.; Banerjee, N.R.; Connell, L.B.; Templeton, A. (UCLJ); (UWO); (Colorado); (Bergen); (Maine)

2009-04-07

239

Microbial community structure across the tree of life in the extreme Río Tinto  

PubMed Central

Understanding biotic versus abiotic forces that shape community structure is a fundamental aim of microbial ecology. The acidic and heavy metal extreme Río Tinto (RT) in southwestern Spain provides a rare opportunity to conduct an ecosystem-wide biodiversity inventory at the level of all three domains of life, because diversity there is low and almost exclusively microbial. Despite improvements in high-throughput DNA sequencing, environmental biodiversity studies that use molecular metrics and consider entire ecosystems are rare. These studies can be prohibitively expensive if domains are considered separately, and differences in copy number of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA genes can bias estimates of relative abundances of phylotypes recovered. In this study we have overcome these barriers (1) by targeting all three domains in a single polymerase chain reaction amplification and (2) by using a replicated sampling design that allows for incidence-based methods to extract measures of richness and carry out downstream analyses that address community structuring effects. Our work showed that combined bacterial and archaeal richness is an order of magnitude higher than eukaryotic richness. We also found that eukaryotic richness was highest at the most extreme sites, whereas combined bacterial and archaeal richness was highest at less extreme sites. Quantitative community phylogenetics showed abiotic forces to be primarily responsible for shaping the RT community structure. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed co-occurrence of obligate symbionts and their putative hosts that may contribute to biotic forces shaping community structure and may further provide a possible mechanism for persistence of certain low-abundance bacteria encountered in the RT. PMID:20631808

Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Zettler, Erik R; Theroux, Susanna M; Palacios, Carmen; Aguilera, Angeles; Amils, Ricardo

2011-01-01

240

Microbial community structure across the tree of life in the extreme Río Tinto.  

PubMed

Understanding biotic versus abiotic forces that shape community structure is a fundamental aim of microbial ecology. The acidic and heavy metal extreme Río Tinto (RT) in southwestern Spain provides a rare opportunity to conduct an ecosystem-wide biodiversity inventory at the level of all three domains of life, because diversity there is low and almost exclusively microbial. Despite improvements in high-throughput DNA sequencing, environmental biodiversity studies that use molecular metrics and consider entire ecosystems are rare. These studies can be prohibitively expensive if domains are considered separately, and differences in copy number of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA genes can bias estimates of relative abundances of phylotypes recovered. In this study we have overcome these barriers (1) by targeting all three domains in a single polymerase chain reaction amplification and (2) by using a replicated sampling design that allows for incidence-based methods to extract measures of richness and carry out downstream analyses that address community structuring effects. Our work showed that combined bacterial and archaeal richness is an order of magnitude higher than eukaryotic richness. We also found that eukaryotic richness was highest at the most extreme sites, whereas combined bacterial and archaeal richness was highest at less extreme sites. Quantitative community phylogenetics showed abiotic forces to be primarily responsible for shaping the RT community structure. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed co-occurrence of obligate symbionts and their putative hosts that may contribute to biotic forces shaping community structure and may further provide a possible mechanism for persistence of certain low-abundance bacteria encountered in the RT. PMID:20631808

Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Zettler, Erik R; Theroux, Susanna M; Palacios, Carmen; Aguilera, Angeles; Amils, Ricardo

2011-01-01

241

3.5 billion years of glass bioalteration: Volcanic rocks as a basis for microbial life?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alteration textures in volcanic glass from the seafloor fall into two classes, one suggestive of abiotic/diffusive hydration and chemical exchange, and another likely to be caused by microbial, cavity-forming, congruent dissolution. Glass bioalteration is common in submarine lavas throughout the world's ocean, dominant in the upper 300 m of the oceanic crust, and found in all well-preserved ophiolites and greenstone belts dating back to 3.5 Ga. It may yield a significant fraction of the global biomass and geochemical fluxes and is relevant to the development of the earliest life on Earth. We present a critical review concerning these glass bioalteration textures and present new data on their microchemical environment. We explore arguments for their biogenicity and further develop the prevalent model for their formation by relating corrosion morphology to the mechanism of microbial dissolution. Biological alteration produces conspicuous micron-scale granular and tubular textures. Granular glass alteration is well explained by colonizing microbes that selectively dissolve the glass in their contact area, forming a sponge-like interconnected network of micron-sized cavities along glass surfaces. Tubular alteration meanwhile, is more likely to be caused by filamentous cell extensions in a process similar to fungal tunneling of soil feldspars and marine carbonates. While we see clear functional similarities to fungal dissolution behavior, we do not know whether fungal or prokaryotic organisms are involved. However, this functional constraint may eventually help to identify potential microbes responsible for these features, potentially including eukaryotic or prokaryotic organisms. Yet, we caution that these organisms may be difficult to identify and to study, because they are likely to be sparsely distributed, slow growing, and difficult to cultivate.

Staudigel, Hubert; Furnes, Harald; McLoughlin, Nicola; Banerjee, Neil R.; Connell, Laurie B.; Templeton, Alexis

2008-08-01

242

How Cyanobacterial Distributions Reveal Flow and Irradiance Conditions of Photosynthetic Biofilm Formation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microbial life on Earth is enormously abundant at sediment-water interfaces. The fossil record in fact contains abundant evidence of the preservation of life on such surfaces. It is therefore critical to our interpretation of early Earth history, and potentially to history of life on other planets, to be able to recognize life forms at these interfaces. On Earth this life often occurs as organized structures of microbes and their extracellular exudates known as biofilms. When such biofilms occur in areas receiving sunlight photosynthetic biofilms are the dominant form in natural ecosystems due to selective advantage inherent in their ability to utilize solar energy. Cyanobacteria are the dominant phototrophic microbes in most modern and ancient photosynthetic biofilms, microbial mats and stromatolites. Due to their long (3.5 billion year) evolutionary history, this group has extensively diversified resulting in an enormous array of morphologies and physiological abilities. This enormous diversity and specialization results in very specific selection for a particular cyanobacterium in each available photosynthetic niche. Furthermore these organisms can alter their spatial orientation, cell morphology, pigmentation and associations with heterotrophic organisms in order to fine tune their optimization to a given micro-niche. These adaptations can be detected, and if adequate knowledge of the interaction between environmental conditions and organism response is available, the detectable organism response can be used to infer the environmental conditions causing that response. This presentation will detail two specific examples which illustrate this point, Light and water are essential to photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and these organisms have specific detectable behavioural responses to these parameters. We will present cyanobacterial responses to quantified flow and irradiance to demonstrate the interpretative power of distribution and orientation information. This study presents new results, but many such examples are already found in the literature.

Prufert-Bebout, Lee; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

243

Thermal zonation of microbial biogeography in the hydrothermal fields of Guaymas Basin: insights into the limits of life  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrothermally active sediments at Guaymas Basin are rich in organic substrates and host a wide range of shallow subsurface temperatures: from 3°C to 200°C in the upper 45 centimeters. High temperatures and hydrothermal flow cause upward compression of metabolic zones in Guaymas Basin seafloor sediments. Using push core samples collected by the Alvin submersible (Cruises AT15-40 and 56 in 2008 and 2009) we are investigating thermal structure and carbon and sulfur substrate utilization and their influence on microbial biogeography. As a proxy for viable microbial life total RNA is being extracted from seven high temperature cores that approach, and in three of the cores surpass the upper temperature limit for life at 122°C (Takai et al., 2008). We are using reverse transcription PCR and subsequent pyrosequencing of the V5-V8 region of 16S rRNA to determine key hyperthermophilic archaeal and bacterial groups as well as the upper thermal limit for microbial life in situ. Porewater concentrations of sulfur species and concentrations and isotopic values of carbon species have been investigated in parallel to our high temperature cores. A combination of pyrosequencing data and porewater geochemistry profiles of carbon and sulfur species will help to elucidate the boundaries of life and provide insight into physiological mechanisms under extreme environmental conditions.

Mckay, L. J.; Klokman, V.; Teske, A.

2013-12-01

244

Current and future trends for biofilm reactors for fermentation processes.  

PubMed

Abstract Biofilms in the environment can both cause detrimental and beneficial effects. However, their use in bioreactors provides many advantages including lesser tendencies to develop membrane fouling and lower required capital costs, their higher biomass density and operation stability, contribution to resistance of microorganisms, etc. Biofilm formation occurs naturally by the attachment of microbial cells to the support without use of any chemicals agent in biofilm reactors. Biofilm reactors have been studied and commercially used for waste water treatment and bench and pilot-scale production of value-added products in the past decades. It is important to understand the fundamentals of biofilm formation, physical and chemical properties of a biofilm matrix to run the biofilm reactor at optimum conditions. This review includes the principles of biofilm formation; properties of a biofilm matrix and their roles in the biofilm formation; factors that improve the biofilm formation, such as support materials; advantages and disadvantages of biofilm reactors; and industrial applications of biofilm reactors. PMID:23919241

Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

2015-03-01

245

Minimum information about a biofilm experiment (MIABiE): standards for reporting experiments and data on sessile microbial communities living at interfaces.  

PubMed

The minimum information about a biofilm experiment (MIABiE) initiative has arisen from the need to find an adequate and scientifically sound way to control the quality of the documentation accompanying the public deposition of biofilm-related data, particularly those obtained using high-throughput devices and techniques. Thereby, the MIABiE consortium has initiated the identification and organization of a set of modules containing the minimum information that needs to be reported to guarantee the interpretability and independent verification of experimental results and their integration with knowledge coming from other fields. MIABiE does not intend to propose specific standards on how biofilms experiments should be performed, because it is acknowledged that specific research questions require specific conditions which may deviate from any standardization. Instead, MIABiE presents guidelines about the data to be recorded and published in order for the procedure and results to be easily and unequivocally interpreted and reproduced. Overall, MIABiE opens up the discussion about a number of particular areas of interest and attempts to achieve a broad consensus about which biofilm data and metadata should be reported in scientific journals in a systematic, rigorous and understandable manner. PMID:24478124

Lourenço, Anália; Coenye, Tom; Goeres, Darla M; Donelli, Gianfranco; Azevedo, Andreia S; Ceri, Howard; Coelho, Filipa L; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Juhna, Talis; Lopes, Susana P; Oliveira, Rosário; Oliver, Antonio; Shirtliff, Mark E; Sousa, Ana M; Stoodley, Paul; Pereira, Maria Olivia; Azevedo, Nuno F

2014-04-01

246

Natural Microbial Assemblages Reflect Distinct Organismal and Functional Partitioning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to link microbial community structure to function has long been a primary focus of environmental microbiology. With the advent of community genomic and proteomic techniques, along with advances in microscopic imaging techniques, it is now possible to gain insights into the organismal and functional makeup of microbial communities. Biofilms growing within highly acidic solutions inside the Richmond Mine (Iron Mountain, Redding, California) exhibit distinct macro- and microscopic morphologies. They are composed of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life, including archaea, bacteria and eukarya. The proportion of each organismal type depends on sampling location and developmental stage. For example, mature biofilms floating on top of acid mine drainage (AMD) pools exhibit layers consisting of a densely packed bottom layer of the chemoautolithotroph Leptospirillum group II, a less dense top layer composed mainly of archaea, and fungal filaments spanning across the entire biofilm. The expression of cytochrome 579 (the most highly abundant protein in the biofilm, believed to be central to iron oxidation and encoded by Leptospirillum group II) is localized at the interface of the biofilm with the AMD solution, highlighting that biofilm architecture is reflected at the functional gene expression level. Distinct functional partitioning is also apparent in a biological wastewater treatment system that selects for distinct polyphosphate accumulating organisms. Community genomic data from " Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" dominated activated sludge has enabled high mass-accuracy shotgun proteomics for identification of key metabolic pathways. Comprehensive genome-wide alignment of orthologous proteins suggests distinct partitioning of protein variants involved in both core-metabolism and specific metabolic pathways among the dominant population and closely related species. In addition, strain- resolved proteogenomic analysis of the AMD biofilms also highlights the importance of strain heterogeneity for the maintenance of community structure and function. These findings explain the importance of genetic diversity in facilitating the stable performance of complex microbial processes. Furthermore, although very different in terms of habitat, both microbial communities exhibit distinct functional compartmentalization and demonstrate its role in sustaining microbial community structure.

Wilmes, P.; Andersson, A.; Kalnejais, L. H.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Lefsrud, M. G.; Wexler, M.; Singer, S. W.; Shah, M.; Bond, P. L.; Thelen, M. P.; Hettich, R. L.; Banfield, J. F.

2007-12-01

247

Current understanding of multi-species biofilms  

PubMed Central

Direct observation of a wide range of natural microorganisms has revealed the fact that the majority of microbes persist as surface-attached communities surrounded by matrix materials, called biofilms. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial strain. However, most natural biofilms are actually formed by multiple bacterial species. Conventional methods for bacterial cleaning, such as applications of antibiotics and/or disinfectants are often ineffective for biofilm populations due to their special physiology and physical matrix barrier. It has been estimated that billions of dollars are spent every year worldwide to deal with damage to equipment, contaminations of products, energy losses, and infections in human beings resulted from microbial biofilms. Microorganisms compete, cooperate, and communicate with each other in multi-species biofilms. Understanding the mechanisms of multi-species biofilm formation will facilitate the development of methods for combating bacterial biofilms in clinical, environmental, industrial, and agricultural areas. The most recent advances in the understanding of multi-species biofilms are summarized and discussed in the review. PMID:21485311

Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong; Høiby, Niels; Molin, Søren; Song, Zhi-jun

2011-01-01

248

A 'crytic' microbial mat: A new model ecosystem for extant life on Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

If life were present on Mars today, it would face potentially lethal environmental conditions such as a lack of water, frigid temperatures, ultraviolet radiation, and soil oxidants. In addition, the Viking missions did not detect near-surface organic carbon available for assimilation. Autotrophic organisms that lived under a protective layer of sand or gravel would be able to circumvent the ultraviolet radiation and lack of fixed carbon. Two terrestrial photosynthetic near-surface microbial communities have been identified, one in the inter- and supertidal of Laguna Ojo de Liebere (Baja California Sur, Mexico) and one in the acidic gravel near several small geysers in Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming, U.S.A.). Both communities have been studied with respect to their ability to fix carbon under different conditions, including elevated levels of inorganic carbon. Although these sand communities have not been exposed to the entire suite of Martian environmental conditions simultaneously, such communities can provide a useful model ecosystem for a potential extant Martian biota.

Rothschild, L. J.

1995-01-01

249

Effects of gamma irradiation on chemical, microbial quality and shelf life of shrimp  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present study the combined effect of gamma irradiation (1, 3 and 5 kGy) and storage at two temperatures: refrigeration (+4 °C) and frozen (-18 °C), on the shelf-life extension of fresh shrimp meat was investigated. The study was based on microbiological and physicochemical changes occuring in the shrimp samples. Total volatile base nitrogen values and trimethylamine values for irradiated shrimp samples were significantly lower than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures, and the rate of decrease was more pronounced in samples irradiated at the higher dose (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid values for irradiated shrimp samples were significantly higher than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures (p<0.05). pH values of shrimp samples were affected significantly by both irradiating dose and storage temperatures (p<0.05). Microbial counts for non-irradiated shrimp samples were higher than the respective irradiated samples at both storage temperatures (p<0.05). The results revealed that irradiation at high dose (5 kGy) might enhance lipid oxidation, although the growth of microorganisms and protein oxidation was inhibited.

Hocao?lu, Asl?; Sükrü Demirci, Ahmet; Gümüs, Tuncay; Demirci, Mehmet

2012-12-01

250

Imperfect asymmetry of life: earth microbial communities prefer D-lactate but can use L-lactate also.  

PubMed

Asymmetrical utilization of chiral compounds has been sought on Mars as evidence for biological activity. This method was recently validated in glucose. Earth organisms utilize D-glucose, not L-glucose, a perfect asymmetry. In this study, we tested the method in lactate and found utilization of both enantiomers. Soil-, sediment-, and lake-borne microbial communities prefer D-lactate but can consume L-lactate if given extra time to acclimate. This situation is termed imperfect asymmetry. Future life-detection mission investigators need to be aware of imperfect asymmetry so as not to miss relatively subtle signs of life. PMID:20528194

Moazeni, Faegheh; Zhang, Gaosen; Sun, Henry J

2010-05-01

251

Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms  

PubMed Central

Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attentionto the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields as well as future therapies are also discussed. PMID:23551419

Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

2013-01-01

252

Biofilms in infectious disease and on medical devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microbial biofilms constitute a major reason for infections to occur and persist at various sites in the human body, especially in association with medical devices. The organisms invariably form these biofilms on surfaces which have host proteins and other substances coating them. Once adherent, the bacteria multiply and anchor themselves in quite intricate structures which appear to allow for communication

G Reid

1999-01-01

253

Bacterial biofilms: from the Natural environment to infectious diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biofilms — matrix-enclosed microbial accretions that adhere to biological or non-biological surfaces — represent a significant and incompletely understood mode of growth for bacteria. Biofilm formation appears early in the fossil record (?3.25 billion years ago) and is common throughout a diverse range of organisms in both the Archaea and Bacteria lineages, including the 'living fossils' in the most deeply

Luanne Hall-Stoodley; J. William Costerton; Paul Stoodley

2004-01-01

254

Dispersal of Biofilms by Secreted, Matrix Degrading, Bacterial DNase  

PubMed Central

Microbial biofilms are composed of a hydrated matrix of biopolymers including polypeptides, polysaccharides and nucleic acids and act as a protective barrier and microenvironment for the inhabiting microbes. While studying marine biofilms, we observed that supernatant produced by a marine isolate of Bacillus licheniformis was capable of dispersing bacterial biofilms. We investigated the source of this activity and identified the active compound as an extracellular DNase (NucB). We have shown that this enzyme rapidly breaks up the biofilms of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We demonstrate that bacteria can use secreted nucleases as an elegant strategy to disperse established biofilms and to prevent de novo formation of biofilms of competitors. DNA therefore plays an important dynamic role as a reversible structural adhesin within the biofilm. PMID:21179489

Nijland, Reindert; Hall, Michael J.; Burgess, J. Grant

2010-01-01

255

Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm  

SciTech Connect

Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

Kumar, Aloke [ORNL] [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph] [University of Guelph; Acharya, Rajesh K [ORNL] [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL] [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL] [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01

256

Effects of Bacteriocins on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm  

PubMed Central

Control of biofilms formed by microbial pathogens is an important subject for medical researchers, since the development of biofilms on foreign-body surfaces often causes biofilm-associated infections in patients with indwelling medical devices. The present study examined the effects of different kinds of bacteriocins, which are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by certain bacteria, on biofilms formed by a clinical isolate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The activities and modes of action of three bacteriocins with different structures (nisin A, lacticin Q, and nukacin ISK-1) were evaluated. Vancomycin, a glycopeptide antibiotic used in the treatment of MRSA infections, showed bactericidal activity against planktonic cells but not against biofilm cells. Among the tested bacteriocins, nisin A showed the highest bactericidal activity against both planktonic cells and biofilm cells. Lacticin Q also showed bactericidal activity against both planktonic cells and biofilm cells, but its activity against biofilm cells was significantly lower than that of nisin A. Nukacin ISK-1 showed bacteriostatic activity against planktonic cells and did not show bactericidal activity against biofilm cells. Mode-of-action studies indicated that pore formation leading to ATP efflux is important for the bactericidal activity against biofilm cells. Our results suggest that bacteriocins that form stable pores on biofilm cells are highly potent for the treatment of MRSA biofilm infections. PMID:23979748

Zendo, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Iwase, Tadayuki; Tajima, Akiko; Yamada, Satomi; Sonomoto, Kenji

2013-01-01

257

Spaceflight Promotes Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa  

PubMed Central

Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K.; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C.; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Plawsky, Joel L.; Collins, Cynthia H.

2013-01-01

258

Biofilm-based implant infections in orthopaedics.  

PubMed

The demand for joint replacement surgery is continuously increasing with rising costs for hospitals and healthcare systems. Staphylococci are the most prevalent etiological agents of orthopedic infections. After an initial adhesin-mediated implant colonization, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis produce biofilm. Biofilm formation proceeds as a four-step process: (1) initial attachment of bacterial cells; (2) cell aggregation and accumulation in multiple cell layers; (3) biofilm maturation and (4) detachment of cells from the biofilm into a planktonic state to initiate a new cycle of biofilm formation elsewhere. The encasing of bacteria in biofilms gives rise to insuperable difficulties not only in the treatment of the infection, but also in assessing the state and the nature of the infection using traditional cultural methods. Therefore, DNA-based molecular methods have been developed to provide rapid identification of all microbial pathogens. To combat biofilm-centered implant infections, new strategies are being developed, among which anti-infective or infective-resistant materials are at the forefront. Infection-resistant materials can be based on different approaches: (i) modifying the biomaterial surface to give anti-adhesive properties, (ii) doping the material with antimicrobial substances, (iii) combining anti-adhesive and antimicrobial effects in the same coating, (iv) designing materials able to oppose biofilm formation and support bone repair. PMID:25366219

Arciola, Carla Renata; Campoccia, Davide; Ehrlich, Garth D; Montanaro, Lucio

2015-01-01

259

Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.  

PubMed

Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight. PMID:23658630

Kim, Wooseong; Tengra, Farah K; Young, Zachary; Shong, Jasmine; Marchand, Nicholas; Chan, Hon Kit; Pangule, Ravindra C; Parra, Macarena; Dordick, Jonathan S; Plawsky, Joel L; Collins, Cynthia H

2013-01-01

260

Image-Based Screening in Vibrio Cholerae: Platform Development, Image Analysis, and Small Molecule Biofilm Modulators  

E-print Network

Natural Product Biofilm Inhibitors and Synthetic Analogues Primary Application of Microbially-Derived Secondary Metabolites Cell-to-Cell CommunicationNatural Product Biofilm Inhibitors and Synthetic Analogues Primary Application of Microbially-Derived Secondary Metabolites Cell-to-Cell Communication

Peach, Kelly Corbus

2013-01-01

261

Microbial Community Structure during Nitrate and Perchlorate Reduction in Ion-exchange Brine Using the Hydrogen-based membrane Biofilm Reactor (MBIR)  

EPA Science Inventory

Detoxification of perchlorate by microbial communities under denitrifying conditions has been recently reported, although the identity of the mixed populations involved in perchlorate reduction is not well understood. In order to address this, the bacterial diversity of membrane ...

262

Lava cave microbial communities within mats and secondary mineral deposits: implications for life detection on other planets.  

PubMed

Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai'i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai'i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai'i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies. PMID:21879833

Northup, D E; Melim, L A; Spilde, M N; Hathaway, J J M; Garcia, M G; Moya, M; Stone, F D; Boston, P J; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Riquelme, C

2011-09-01

263

Biofilms and planktonic cells of Deinococcus geothermalis in extreme environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In addition to the several extreme environments on Earth, Space can be considered as just another exceptional environment with a unique mixture of stress factors comprising UV radiation, vacuum, desiccation, temperature, ionizing radiation and microgravity. Life that processes in these environments can depend on the life forms and their state of living. The question is whether there are different strategies for individual microorganisms compared to communities of the same organisms to cope with the different factors of their surroundings. Comparative studies of the survi-val of these communities called biofilms and planktonic cell samples of Deinococcus geothermalis stand at the focal point of the presented investigations. A biofilm is a structured community of microorganisms that live encapsulated in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances on a surface. Microorganisms living in a biofilm usually have significantly different properties to cooperate than individually living microorganisms of the same species. An advantage of the biofilm is increased resistance to various chemical and physical effects, while the dense extracellular matrix and the outer layer of the cells protect the interior of the microbial consortium. The space experiment BOSS (Biofilm organisms surfing Space) as part the ESA experimental unit EXPOSE R-2 with a planned launch date in July 2014 will be subsequently mounted on the Russian Svesda module outside the ISS. An international team of scientists coordinated by Dr. P. Rettberg will investigate the hypothesis whether microorganisms organized as biofilm outmatch the same microorganisms exposed individually in the long-term survival of the harsh environmental conditions as they occur in space and on Mars. Another protective function in the samples could be dust par-ticles for instance Mars regolith simulant contained inside the biofilms or mixed with the planktonic cells, as additional shelter especially against the extraterrestrial UV radiation. D. geothermalis besides others, like co-cultures of Halomonas muralis and Halococcus morrhuae, Bacillus horneckiae, Chroococcidiopsis CCMEE 029 and Streptomyces + Polaromonas and Arthrobacter strains from volcanic rocks, was involved in the several preparatory test runs at the Planetary and Space Simulation facilities at the German Aerospace Center in Cologne. Results of the already carried out EVTs (Experiment Verification Test) and the SVT (Science verification test) as EXPOSE-R2 mission pre-paration tests, where investigated parameters like dehydration, temperature extremes, extraterrestrial UV radiation, simulated Martian atmosphere, and a Mars-like UV climate were tested individually as well as in combination will be presented. Following exposure to the parameters listed above, the survival of both biofilms and planktonic cells of D. geothermalis was assessed in terms of (i) culturability by colony counts on R2A medium, (ii) membrane integrity by using the Live/Dead differential staining kit, (iii) ATP content by using a commercial luminometric assay, and (iv) the presence of 16S rRNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization. So far, the results suggest that Deinococcus geothermalis remains viable in the desiccated state over weeks to months, whereas culturability, intracellular ATP levels, and membrane integrity were preserved in biofilm cells at a significantly higher level than in planktonic cells. Furthermore, cells of both sample types were able to survive simulated space and Martian conditions and showed high resistance after irradiation with monochromatic and polychromatic UV. The results will contribute to the fundamental understanding of the opportunities and limitations of viability of microorganisms organized in biofilms or as planktonic cells under the extreme environ-mental conditions of space or other planets.

Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Guenther; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Froesler, Jan

264

Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm in Flow Cells  

PubMed Central

Many microbial cells have the ability to form sessile microbial communities defined as biofilms that have altered physiological and pathological properties compared to free living microorganisms. Biofilms in nature are often difficult to investigate and reside under poorly defined conditions1. Using a transparent substratum it is possible to device a system where simple biofilms can be examined in a non-destructive way in real-time: here we demonstrate the assembly and operation of a flow cell model system, for in vitro 3D studies of microbial biofilms generating high reproducibility under well-defined conditions2,3. The system consists of a flow cell that serves as growth chamber for the biofilm. The flow cell is supplied with nutrients and oxygen from a medium flask via a peristaltic pump and spent medium is collected in a waste container. This construction of the flow system allows a continuous supply of nutrients and administration of e.g. antibiotics with minimal disturbance of the cells grown in the flow chamber. Moreover, the flow conditions within the flow cell allow studies of biofilm exposed to shear stress. A bubble trapping device confines air bubbles from the tubing which otherwise could disrupt the biofilm structure in the flow cell. The flow cell system is compatible with Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) and can thereby provide highly detailed 3D information about developing microbial biofilms. Cells in the biofilm can be labeled with fluorescent probes or proteins compatible with CLSM analysis. This enables online visualization and allows investigation of niches in the developing biofilm. Microbial interrelationship, investigation of antimicrobial agents or the expression of specific genes, are of the many experimental setups that can be investigated in the flow cell system. PMID:21304454

Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren; Regenberg, Birgitte

2011-01-01

265

Performances and microbial features of an aerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor developed to post-treat an olive mill effluent from an anaerobic GAC reactor  

PubMed Central

Background Olive mill wastewater (OMW) is the aqueous effluent of olive oil producing processes. Given its high COD and content of phenols, it has to be decontaminated before being discharged. Anaerobic digestion is one of the most promising treatment process for such an effluent, as it combines high decontamination efficiency with methane production. The large scale anaerobic digestion of OMWs is normally conducted in dispersed-growth reactors, where however are generally achieved unsatisfactory COD removal and methane production yields. The possibility of intensifying the performance of the process using a packed bed biofilm reactor, as anaerobic treatment alternative, was demonstrated. Even in this case, however, a post-treatment step is required to further reduce the COD. In this work, a biological post-treatment, consisting of an aerobic biological "Manville" silica bead-packed bed aerobic reactor, was developed, tested for its ability to complete COD removal from the anaerobic digestion effluents, and characterized biologically through molecular tools. Results The aerobic post-treatment was assessed through a 2 month-continuous feeding with the digested effluent at 50.42 and 2.04 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. It was found to be a stable process, able to remove 24 and 39% of such organic loads, respectively, and to account for 1/4 of the overall decontamination efficiency displayed by the anaerobic-aerobic integrated system when fed with an amended OMW at 31.74 and 1.70 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of biomass samples from the aerobic reactor biofilm revealed that it was colonized by Rhodobacterales, Bacteroidales, Pseudomonadales, Enterobacteriales, Rhodocyclales and genera incertae sedis TM7. Some taxons occurring in the influent were not detected in the biofilm, whereas others, such as Paracoccus, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Enterobacter, enriched significantly in the biofilter throughout the treatment. Conclusion The silica-bead packed bed biofilm reactor developed and characterized in this study was able to significantly decontaminate anaerobically digested OMWs. Therefore, the application of an integrated anaerobic-aerobic process resulted in an improved system for valorization and decontamination of OMWs. PMID:16595023

Bertin, Lorenzo; Colao, Maria Chiara; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Marchetti, Leonardo; Fava, Fabio

2006-01-01

266

Life in Oligotropic Desert Environments: Contrasting Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Two Microbial Mats with Metagenomics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The metagenomic analysis of two microbial mats from the oligotrophic waters in the Cuatrociéngas basin reveals large differences both at taxonomic and functional level. These are explained in terms of environmental stability and nutrient availability.

Bonilla-Rosso, G.; Peimbert, M.; Olmedo, G.; Alcaraz, L. D.; Eguiarte, L. E.; Souza, V.

2010-04-01

267

Biofilm Formation by Pneumocystis spp.? †  

PubMed Central

Pneumocystis spp. can cause a lethal pneumonia in hosts with debilitated immune systems. The manner in which these fungal infections spread throughout the lung, the life cycles of the organisms, and their strategies used for survival within the mammalian host are largely unknown, due in part to the lack of a continuous cultivation method. Biofilm formation is one strategy used by microbes for protection against environmental assaults, for communication and differentiation, and as foci for dissemination. We posited that the attachment and growth of Pneumocystis within the lung alveoli is akin to biofilm formation. An in vitro system comprised of insert wells suspended in multiwell plates containing supplemented RPMI 1640 medium supported biofilm formation by P. carinii (from rat) and P. murina (from mouse).Dramatic morphological changes accompanied the transition to a biofilm. Cyst and trophic forms became highly refractile and produced branching formations that anastomosed into large macroscopic clusters that spread across the insert. Confocal microscopy revealed stacking of viable organisms enmeshed in concanavalin A-staining extracellular matrix. Biofilms matured over a 3-week time period and could be passaged. These passaged organisms were able to cause infection in immunosuppressed rodents. Biofilm formation was inhibited by farnesol, a quorum-sensing molecule in Candida spp., suggesting that a similar communication system may be operational in the Pneumocystis biofilms. Intense staining with a monoclonal antibody to the major surface glycoproteins and an increase in (1,3)-?-d-glucan content suggest that these components contributed to the refractile properties. Identification of this biofilm process provides a tractable in vitro system that should fundamentally advance the study of Pneumocystis. PMID:18820078

Cushion, Melanie T.; Collins, Margaret S.; Linke, Michael J.

2009-01-01

268

Voronoi Tessellation Captures Very Early Clustering of Single Primary Cells as Induced by Interactions in Nascent Biofilms  

PubMed Central

Biofilms dominate microbial life in numerous aquatic ecosystems, and in engineered and medical systems, as well. The formation of biofilms is initiated by single primary cells colonizing surfaces from the bulk liquid. The next steps from primary cells towards the first cell clusters as the initial step of biofilm formation remain relatively poorly studied. Clonal growth and random migration of primary cells are traditionally considered as the dominant processes leading to organized microcolonies in laboratory grown monocultures. Using Voronoi tessellation, we show that the spatial distribution of primary cells colonizing initially sterile surfaces from natural streamwater community deviates from uniform randomness already during the very early colonisation. The deviation from uniform randomness increased with colonisation — despite the absence of cell reproduction — and was even more pronounced when the flow of water above biofilms was multidirectional and shear stress elevated. We propose a simple mechanistic model that captures interactions, such as cell-to-cell signalling or chemical surface conditioning, to simulate the observed distribution patterns. Model predictions match empirical observations reasonably well, highlighting the role of biotic interactions even already during very early biofilm formation despite few and distant cells. The transition from single primary cells to clustering accelerated by biotic interactions rather than by reproduction may be particularly advantageous in harsh environments — the rule rather than the exception outside the laboratory. PMID:22028865

Hödl, Iris; Hödl, Josef; Wörman, Anders; Singer, Gabriel; Besemer, Katharina; Battin, Tom J.

2011-01-01

269

Modulation of Metabolism and Switching to Biofilm Prevail over Exopolysaccharide Production in the Response of Rhizobium alamii to Cadmium  

PubMed Central

Heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd2+) affect microbial metabolic processes. Consequently, bacteria adapt by adjusting their cellular machinery. We have investigated the dose-dependent growth effects of Cd2+ on Rhizobium alamii, an exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bacterium that forms a biofilm on plant roots. Adsorption isotherms show that the EPS of R. alamii binds cadmium in competition with calcium. A metabonomics approach based on ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry has showed that cadmium alters mainly the bacterial metabolism in pathways implying sugars, purine, phosphate, calcium signalling and cell respiration. We determined the influence of EPS on the bacterium response to cadmium, using a mutant of R. alamii impaired in EPS production (MS?GT). Cadmium dose-dependent effects on the bacterial growth were not significantly different between the R. alamii wild type (wt) and MS?GT strains. Although cadmium did not modify the quantity of EPS isolated from R. alamii, it triggered the formation of biofilm vs planktonic cells, both by R. alamii wt and by MS?GT. Thus, it appears that cadmium toxicity could be managed by switching to a biofilm way of life, rather than producing EPS. We conclude that modulations of the bacterial metabolism and switching to biofilms prevails in the adaptation of R. alamii to cadmium. These results are original with regard to the conventional role attributed to EPS in a biofilm matrix, and the bacterial response to cadmium. PMID:22096497

Schue, Mathieu; Fekete, Agnes; Ortet, Philippe; Brutesco, Catherine; Heulin, Thierry; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Achouak, Wafa; Santaella, Catherine

2011-01-01

270

Rediscovering Biology - Unit 4: Microbial Diversity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page is the jumping-off point for an educational unit on microbial diversity. There are links to a course outline and classroom activity worksheets, a 30-minute video, an online textbook chapter, images and animations that supplement the chapter, transcripts of interviews with five experts featured in the video, and a glossary and bibliography. The video and chapter cover the three domains (archaea, bacteria, eukaryotes), methods of studying the tree of life, the diversity of microbial metabolic systems, biofilms, and the role of microbes in global carbon and nitrogen cycling and human health. The course outline provides a structure for incorporating the video, the textbook chapter, and four classroom activities into a 2hr session appropriate for high school or undergraduate students.

Broadcasting, Oregon P.; Learner.org, Annenberg M.

271

Desmids and biofilms of freshwater wetlands: development and microarchitecture.  

PubMed

Freshwater wetlands constitute important ecosystems, and their benthic, attached microbial communities, including biofilms, represent key habitats that contribute to primary productivity, nutrient cycling, and substrate stabilization. In many wetland biofilms, algae constitute significant parts of the microbial population, yet little is known about their activities in these communities. An analysis of wetland biofilms from the Adirondack region of New York (USA) was performed with special emphasis on desmids, a group of evolutionarily advanced green algae commonly found in these habitats. Desmids constituted as much as 23.7% of the total algal and cyanobacterial flora of the biofilms during the July and August study periods. These algae represented some of the first eukaryotes to colonize new substrates, and during July their numbers correlated with fluctuations in general biofilm parameters such as biofilm thickness and dry weight as well as total carbohydrate. Significant numbers of bacteria were associated with both the EPS sheaths and cell wall surfaces of the desmids. Colonization of new substrates and development of biofilms were rapid and were followed by various fluctuations in microbial community structure over the short- and long-term observations. In addition to desmids, diatoms, filamentous green algae and transient non-motile phases of flagellates represented the photosynthetic eukaryotes of these biofilms. PMID:17450460

Domozych, David S; Domozych, Catherine Rogers

2008-01-01

272

Detection of biofilm production and antibiotic resistance pattern in clinical isolates from indwelling medical devices.  

PubMed

Microbial biofilms pose great threat for patients requiring indwelling medical devices (IMDs) as it is difficult to remove them. It is, therefore, crucial to follow an appropriate method for the detection of biofilms. The present study focuses on detection of biofilm formation among the isolates from IMDs. We also aimed to explore the antibiogram of biofilm producers. This prospective analysis included 65 prosthetic samples. After isolation and identification of bacteria following standard methodology, antibiogram of the isolates were produced following Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Detection of biofilms was done by tube adherence (TA), Congo red agar and tissue culture plate (TCP) methods. Out of 67 clinical isolates from IMDs, TCP detected 31 (46.3 %) biofilm producers and 36 (53.7 %) biofilm non-producers. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex were found to be the most frequent biofilm producers. The TA method correlated well with the TCP method for biofilm detection. Higher antibiotic resistance was observed in biofilm producers than in biofilm non-producers. The most effective antibiotics for biofilm producing Gram-positive isolates were Vancomycin and Tigecycline, and that for biofilm producing Gram-negative isolates were Polymyxin-B, Colistin Sulphate and Tigecycline. Nearly 46 % of the isolates were found to be biofilm producers. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern in the present study showed Amoxicillin to be an ineffective drug for isolates from the IMDs. For the detection of biofilm production, TA method can be an economical and effective alternative to TCP method. PMID:25239012

Mishra, Shyam Kumar; Basukala, Prashant; Basukala, Om; Parajuli, Keshab; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani; Rijal, Basista Prasad

2015-01-01

273

Tracking the autochthonous carbon transfer in stream biofilm food webs.  

PubMed

Food webs in the rhithral zone rely mainly on allochthonous carbon from the riparian vegetation. However, autochthonous carbon might be more important in open canopy streams. In streams, most of the microbial activity occurs in biofilms, associated with the streambed. We followed the autochthonous carbon transfer toward bacteria and grazing protozoa within a stream biofilm food web. Biofilms that developed in a second-order stream (Thuringia, Germany) were incubated in flow channels under climate-controlled conditions. Six-week-old biofilms received either ¹³C- or ¹²C-labeled CO?, and uptake into phospholipid fatty acids was followed. The dissolved inorganic carbon of the flow channel water became immediately labeled. In biofilms grown under 8-h light/16-h dark conditions, more than 50% of the labeled carbon was incorporated in biofilm algae, mainly filamentous cyanobacteria, pennate diatoms, and nonfilamentous green algae. A mean of 29% of the labeled carbon reached protozoan grazer. The testate amoeba Pseudodifflugia horrida was highly abundant in biofilms and seemed to be the most important grazer on biofilm bacteria and algae. Hence, stream biofilms dominated by cyanobacteria and algae seem to play an important role in the uptake of CO? and transfer of autochthonous carbon through the microbial food web. PMID:22067054

Risse-Buhl, Ute; Trefzger, Nicolai; Seifert, Anne-Gret; Schönborn, Wilfried; Gleixner, Gerd; Küsel, Kirsten

2012-01-01

274

Subseafloor Microbial Life in Venting Fluids from the Mid Cayman Rise Hydrothermal System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In hard rock seafloor environments, fluids emanating from hydrothermal vents are one of the best windows into the subseafloor and its resident microbial community. The functional consequences of an extensive population of microbes living in the subseafloor remains unknown, as does our understanding of how these organisms interact with one another and influence the biogeochemistry of the oceans. Here we report the abundance, activity, and diversity of microbes in venting fluids collected from two newly discovered deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the ultra-slow spreading Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR). Fluids for geochemical and microbial analysis were collected from the Von Damm and Piccard vent fields, which are located within 20 km of one another, yet have extremely different thermal, geological, and depth regimes. Geochemical data indicates that both fields are highly enriched in volatiles, in particular hydrogen and methane, important energy sources for and by-products of microbial metabolism. At both sites, total microbial cell counts in the fluids ranged in concentration from 5 x 10 4 to 3 x 10 5 cells ml-1 , with background seawater concentrations of 1-2 x 10 4 cells ml-1 . In addition, distinct cell morphologies and clusters of cells not visible in background seawater were seen, including large filaments and mineral particles colonized by microbial cells. These results indicate local enrichments of microbial communities in the venting fluids, distinct from background populations, and are consistent with previous enumerations of microbial cells in venting fluids. Stable isotope tracing experiments were used to detect utilization of acetate, formate, and dissolve inorganic carbon and generation of methane at 70 °C under anaerobic conditions. At Von Damm, a putatively ultra-mafic hosted site located at ~2200 m with a maximum temperature of 226 °C, stable isotope tracing experiments indicate methanogenesis is occurring in most fluid samples. No activity was detected in Piccard vent fluids, a basalt-hosted black smoker site located at ~4950 m with a maximum temperature of 403 °C. However, hyperthermophilic and thermophilic heterotrophs of the genus Thermococcus were isolated from Piccard vent fluids, but not Von Damm. These obligate anaerobes, growing optimally at 55-90 °C, are ubiquitous at hydrothermal systems and serve as a readily cultivable indicator organism of subseafloor populations. Finally, molecular analysis of vent fluids is on-going and will define the microbial population structure in this novel ecosystem and allow for direct comparisons with other deep-sea and subsurface habitats as part of our continuing efforts to explore the deep microbial biosphere on Earth.

Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J.; Reddington, E.; McDermott, J. M.; Sylva, S. P.; Breier, J. A.; German, C. R.; Seewald, J.

2012-12-01

275

Biofilm/Mat assays for budding yeast.  

PubMed

Many microbial species form biofilms/mats under nutrient-limiting conditions, and fungal pathogens rely on this social behavior for virulence. In budding yeast, mat formation is dependent on the mucin-like flocculin Flo11, which promotes cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate adhesion in mats. The biofilm/mat assays described here allow the evaluation of the role of Flo11 in the formation of mats. Cells are grown on surfaces with different degrees of rigidity to assess their expansion and three-dimensional architecture, and the cells are also exposed to plastic surfaces to quantify their adherence. These assays are broadly applicable to studying biofilm/mat formation in microbial species. PMID:25646504

Cullen, Paul J

2015-01-01

276

Microbial and sensory quality of commercial fresh processed red lettuce throughout the production chain and shelf life.  

PubMed

Red pigmented 'Lollo Rosso' lettuce was processed under usual and controlled conditions in an industrial plant. At different steps of the production chain (reception, shredding, washing, draining, rinsing, centrifugation, and packaging), microbial counts were evaluated. Following industrial practices, processed lettuce was packaged at 5 degrees C in sealed polypropylene (PP) bags with an initial atmosphere containing 3 kPa O(2) and 5 kPa CO(2). The numbers of psychrotrophic bacteria, coliform and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were influenced by all the studied steps of the production chain of the fresh processed 'Lollo Rosso' lettuce. Shredding, rinsing and centrifugation in particular increased bacterial counts. During a storage period of 7 days at 5 degrees C, sensory attributes (general appearance, texture, aroma, translucency, initial and persistent off-odors, leaves superficial browning, leaves edges browning, and decay) as well as microbial counts (psychrotrophic and mesophilic bacteria, coliforms and lactic acid bacteria) were monitored. Due to high microbial counts and off-odors evaluation, a shelf life shorter than 7 days should be considered for fresh processed 'Lollo Rosso' lettuce. PMID:14996454

Allende, A; Aguayo, E; Artés, F

2004-03-01

277

Biofilms: United They Stand, Divided They Colonize  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Curricular materials designed to teach parallel computational modeling to undergraduate or graduate students in science and other STEM disciplines. The module begins with the construction of a cellular automaton model of microbial biofilms using Mathematica. This model is then re-implemented with C and parallelized using MPI.

Shiflet, Angela B.; Shiflet, George W.; Ellison, Shay M.

278

Oral Biofilm Architecture on Natural Teeth  

PubMed Central

Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and accessibility. Despite descriptions of initial plaque formation on the tooth surface, studies on mature plaque and plaque structure below the gum are limited to landmark studies from the 1970s, without appreciating the breadth of microbial diversity in the plaque. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize in vivo the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis on seven embedded teeth obtained from four different subjects. The data showed convincingly the dominance of Actinomyces sp., Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes in subgingival plaque. The latter proved to be new with a possibly important role in host-pathogen interaction due to its localization in close proximity to immune cells. The present study identified for the first time in vivo that Lactobacillus sp. are the central cells of bacterial aggregates in subgingival plaque, and that Streptococcus sp. and the yeast Candida albicans form corncob structures in supragingival plaque. Finally, periodontal pathogens colonize already formed biofilms and form microcolonies therein. These in vivo observations on oral biofilms provide a clear vision on biofilm architecture and the spatial distribution of predominant species. PMID:20195365

Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M. Barbara M.; Degener, John E.; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmür, Rudolf; M. Harmsen, Hermie J.

2010-01-01

279

Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces  

PubMed Central

Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

2013-01-01

280

Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces.  

PubMed

Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong Q; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

2013-05-01

281

Microbial life in frozen boreal soils-environmental constraints on catabolic and anabolic activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbial activity in frozen soils has recently gained increasing attention and the fact that soil microorganisms can perform significant metabolic activity at temperatures below freezing is apparent. However, to what extent microbial activity is constrained by the environmental conditions prevailing in a frozen soil matrix is still very uncertain. This presentation will address how the fundamental environmental factors of temperature, liquid water availability and substrate availability combine to regulate rates of catabolic and anabolic microbial processes in frozen soils. The presented results are gained from investigations of the surface layers of boreal forest soils with seasonal freezing. We show that the amount and availability of liquid water is an integral factor regulating rates of microbial activity in the frozen soil matrix and can also explain frequently observed deviations in the temperature responses of biogenic CO2 production in frozen soils, as compared to unfrozen soils. In turn, the capacity for a specific soil to retain liquid water at sub-zero temperatures is controlled by the structural composition of the soil, and especially the soil organic matter is of integral importance. We also show that the partitioning of substrate carbon, in the form of monomeric sugar (glucose), for catabolic and anabolic metabolism remain constant in the temperature range of -4C to 9C. This confirms that microbial growth may proceed even when soils are frozen. In addition we present corresponding data for organisms metabolizing polymeric substrates (cellulose) requiring exoenzymatic activity. We conclude that the metabolic response of soil microorganism to controlling factors may change substantially across the freezing point of soil water, and also the patterns of interaction among controlling factors are affected. Thus, it is evident that metabolic response functions derived from investigations of unfrozen soils cannot be superimposed on frozen soils. Nonetheless, the soil microbial population appear very adapted to seasonal freezing with respect to their metabolic performance.

Oquist, M. G.; Sparrman, T.; Haei, M.; Segura, J.; Schleucher, J.; Nilsson, M. B.

2013-12-01

282

Rock Surfaces as Life Indicators: New Ways to Demonstrate Life and Traces of Former Life  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Life and its former traces can only be detected from space when they are abundant and exposed to the planetary atmosphere at the moment of investigation by orbiters. Exposed rock surfaces present a multifractal labyrinth of niches for microbial life. Based upon our studies of highly stress-resistant microcolonial fungi of stone monument and desert rock surfaces, we propose that microbial biofilms that develop and become preserved on rock surfaces can be identified remotely by the following characteristics: (1) the existence of spectroscopically identifiable compounds that display unique adsorption, diffraction, and reflection patterns characteristic of biogenerated organic compounds (e.g., chlorophylls, carotenes, melanins, and possibly mycosporines), (2) demonstrably biogenic geomorphological features (e.g., biopitting, biochipping, and bioexfoliation), and (3) biominerals produced in association with biofilms that occupy rock surfaces (e.g., oxalates, forsterite, and special types of carbonates, sulfides, and silicates). Such traces or biosignatures of former life could provide macroscopically visible morphotypes and chemically identifiable products uniquely indicative of life. This work was supported by DFG grants Go 897/2-1 and Kr 333/30-1.

Gorbushina, A. A.; Krumbein, W. E.; Volkmann, M.

2002-12-01

283

Rock Surfaces as Life Indicators: New Ways to Demonstrate Life and Traces of Former Life  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Life and its former traces can only be detected from space when they are abundant and exposed to the planetary atmosphere at the moment of investigation by orbiters. Exposed rock surfaces present a multifractal labyrinth of niches for microbial life. Based upon our studies of highly stress-resistant microcolonial fungi of stone monument and desert rock surfaces, we propose that microbial biofilms that develop and become preserved on rock surfaces can be identified remotely by the following characteristics: (1) the existence of spectroscopically identifiable compounds that display unique adsorption, diffraction, and reflection patterns characteristic of biogenerated organic compounds (e.g., chlorophylls, carotenes, melanins, and possibly mycosporines), (2) demonstrably biogenic geomorphological features (e.g., biopitting, biochipping, and bioexfoliation), and (3) biominerals produced in association with biofilms that occupy rock surfaces (e.g., oxalates, forsterite, and special types of carbonates, sulfides, and silicates). Such traces or biosignatures of former life could provide macroscopically visible morphotypes and chemically identifiable products uniquely indicative of life.

Gorbushina, Anna A.; Krumbein, Wolfgang E.; Volkmann, Marc

2002-06-01

284

The impact of culture medium on the development and physiology of biofilms of Pseudomonas fluorescens formed on polyurethane paint.  

PubMed

Microbial biofilms cause the deterioration of polymeric coatings such as polyurethanes (PUs). In many cases, microbes have been shown to use the PU as a nutrient source. The interaction between biofilms and nutritive substrata is complex, since both the medium and the substratum can provide nutrients that affect biofilm formation and biodeterioration. Historically, studies of PU biodeterioration have monitored the planktonic cells in the medium surrounding the material, not the biofilm. This study monitored planktonic and biofilm cell counts, and biofilm morphology, in long-term growth experiments conducted with Pseudomonas fluorescens under different nutrient conditions. Nutrients affected planktonic and biofilm cell numbers differently, and neither was representative of the system as a whole. Microscopic examination of the biofilm revealed the presence of intracellular storage granules in biofilms grown in M9 but not yeast extract salts medium. These granules are indicative of nutrient limitation and/or entry into stationary phase, which may impact the biodegradative capability of the biofilm. PMID:23697763

Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Bojanowski, Caitlin L; Kay, Michelle L; Lloyd, Pamela F; Blankemeier, Andrew; Hurtubise, Jennifer M; Singh, Kristi M; Barlow, Daniel E; Ladouceur, Harold D; Matt Eby, D; Johnson, Glenn R; Mirau, Peter A; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Fraser, Hamish L; Russell, John N

2013-01-01

285

Differential Lipopolysaccharide Core Capping Leads to Quantitative and Correlated Modifications of Mechanical and Structural Properties in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacterial biofilms are responsible for the majority of all microbial infections and have profound impact on industrial and geochemical processes. While many studies documented phenotypic differentiation and gene regulation of biofilms, the importance of their structural and mechanical properties is poorly understood. Here we investigate how changes in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core capping in Pseudomonas aeruginosa affect biofilm structure through modification

Peter C. Y. Lau; Theresa Lindhout; Terry J. Beveridge; John R. Dutcher; Joseph S. Lam

2009-01-01

286

Impact of Chloramination on the Development of Laboratory-Grown Biofilms Fed with Filter-Pretreated Groundwater  

PubMed Central

This study evaluated the continuous impact of monochloramine disinfection on laboratory-grown biofilms through the characterization of biofilm architecture and microbial community structure. Biofilm development and disinfection were achieved using CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) biofilm reactor systems with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coupons as the substratum and sand filter-pretreated groundwater as the source of microbial seeding and growth nutrient. After 2 weeks of growth, the biofilms were subjected to chloramination for 8 more weeks at concentrations of 7.5±1.4 to 9.1±0.4 mg Cl2 L?1. Control reactors received no disinfection during the development of biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis indicated that chloramination could lead to 81.4–83.5% and 86.3–95.6% reduction in biofilm biomass and thickness, respectively, but could not eliminate biofilm growth. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis indicated that microbial community structures between chloraminated and non-chloraminated biofilms exhibited different successional trends. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis further revealed that chloramination could select members of Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria as the dominant populations, whereas natural development leads to the selection of members of Nitrospira and Bacteroidetes as dominant biofilm populations. Overall, chloramination treatment could alter the growth of multi-species biofilms on the PVC surface, shape the biofilm architecture, and select a certain microbial community that can survive or proliferate under chloramination. PMID:23124766

Ling, Fangqiong; Liu, Wen-Tso

2013-01-01

287

Microbial Weathering of Olivine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Controlled microbial weathering of olivine experiments displays a unique style of nanoetching caused by biofilm attachment to mineral surfaces. We are investigating whether the morphology of biotic nanoetching can be used as a biosignature. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

McKay, D. S.; Longazo, T. G.; Wentworth, S. J.; Southam, G.

2002-01-01

288

Antibody-Guided Alpha Radiation Effectively Damages Fungal Biofilms  

PubMed Central

The use of indwelling medical devices—pacemakers, prosthetic joints, catheters—is rapidly growing and is often complicated by infections with biofilm-forming microbes that are resistant to antimicrobial agents and host defense mechanisms. We investigated for the first time the use of microbe-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) as delivery vehicles for targeting biofilms with cytocidal radiation. MAb 18B7 (immunoglobulin G1 [IgG1]), which binds to capsular polysaccharides of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, penetrated cryptococcal biofilms, as shown by confocal microscopy. When the alpha radiation-emitter 213-Bismuth (213Bi) was attached to MAb 18B7 and the radiolabeled MAb was added to C. neoformans biofilms, there was a 50% reduction in biofilm metabolic activity. In contrast, when the IgM MAb 13F1 labeled with 213Bi was used there was no penetration of the fungal biofilm and no damage. Unlabeled 18B7, 213Bi-labeled nonspecific MAbs, and gamma and beta types of radiation did not have an effect on biofilms. The lack of efficacy of gamma and beta radiation probably reflects the radioprotective properties of polysaccharide biofilm matrix. Our results indicate that C. neoformans biofilms are susceptible to treatment with antibody-targeted alpha radiation, suggesting a novel option for the prevention or treatment of microbial biofilms on indwelling medical devices. PMID:16723575

Martinez, L. R.; Bryan, R. A.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A.; Casadevall, A.; Dadachova, E.

2006-01-01

289

Anti-Biofilm Compounds Derived from Marine Sponges  

PubMed Central

Bacterial biofilms are surface-attached communities of microorganisms that are protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules. In the biofilm state, bacteria are significantly more resistant to external assault, including attack by antibiotics. In their native environment, bacterial biofilms underpin costly biofouling that wreaks havoc on shipping, utilities, and offshore industry. Within a host environment, they are insensitive to antiseptics and basic host immune responses. It is estimated that up to 80% of all microbial infections are biofilm-based. Biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, since once the device is colonized, infection is almost impossible to eliminate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there is a notable effort towards developing small, synthetically available molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. Here, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms specifically through non-microbicidal mechanisms. Importantly, we discuss several sets of compounds derived from marine sponges that we are developing in our labs to address the persistent biofilm problem. We will discuss: discovery/synthesis of natural products and their analogues—including our marine sponge-derived compounds and initial adjuvant activity and toxicological screening of our novel anti-biofilm compounds. PMID:22073007

Stowe, Sean D.; Richards, Justin J.; Tucker, Ashley T.; Thompson, Richele; Melander, Christian; Cavanagh, John

2011-01-01

290

Anticorrosive Microbial Polysaccharides: Structure-Function Relationships  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Water-soluble microbial polysaccharides are often implicated in biofilm formation and are believed to mediate cell-cell aggregation and adhesion to surfaces. Generally, biofilm formation is considered harmful or undesirable, as it leads to increased drag, plugging of pores, dimished heat transfer, ...

291

Growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis biofilms.  

PubMed

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of human tuberculosis, has an extraordinary ability to survive against environmental stresses including antibiotics. Although stress tolerance of M. tuberculosis is one of the likely contributors to the 6-month long chemotherapy of tuberculosis (1), the molecular mechanisms underlying this characteristic phenotype of the pathogen remain unclear. Many microbial species have evolved to survive in stressful environments by self-assembling in highly organized, surface attached, and matrix encapsulated structures called biofilms (2-4). Growth in communities appears to be a preferred survival strategy of microbes, and is achieved through genetic components that regulate surface attachment, intercellular communications, and synthesis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) (5,6). The tolerance to environmental stress is likely facilitated by EPS, and perhaps by the physiological adaptation of individual bacilli to heterogeneous microenvironments within the complex architecture of biofilms (7). In a series of recent papers we established that M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis have a strong propensity to grow in organized multicellular structures, called biofilms, which can tolerate more than 50 times the minimal inhibitory concentrations of the anti-tuberculosis drugs isoniazid and rifampicin (8-10). M. tuberculosis, however, intriguingly requires specific conditions to form mature biofilms, in particular 9:1 ratio of headspace: media as well as limited exchange of air with the atmosphere (9). Requirements of specialized environmental conditions could possibly be linked to the fact that M. tuberculosis is an obligate human pathogen and thus has adapted to tissue environments. In this publication we demonstrate methods for culturing M. tuberculosis biofilms in a bottle and a 12-well plate format, which is convenient for bacteriological as well as genetic studies. We have described the protocol for an attenuated strain of M. tuberculosis, mc(2)7000, with deletion in the two loci, panCD and RD1, that are critical for in vivo growth of the pathogen (9). This strain can be safely used in a BSL-2 containment for understanding the basic biology of the tuberculosis pathogen thus avoiding the requirement of an expensive BSL-3 facility. The method can be extended, with appropriate modification in media, to grow biofilm of other culturable mycobacterial species. Overall, a uniform protocol of culturing mycobacterial biofilms will help the investigators interested in studying the basic resilient characteristics of mycobacteria. In addition, a clear and concise method of growing mycobacterial biofilms will also help the clinical and pharmaceutical investigators to test the efficacy of a potential drug. PMID:22371116

Kulka, Kathleen; Hatfull, Graham; Ojha, Anil K

2012-01-01

292

Implications of Biofilm Formation on Urological Devices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite millions of dollars and several decades of research targeted at their prevention and eradication, biofilm-associated infections remain the major cause of urological device failure. Numerous strategies have been aimed at improving device design, biomaterial composition, surface properties and drug delivery, but have been largely circumvented by microbes and their plethora of attachment, host evasion, antimicrobial resistance, and dissemination strategies. This is not entirely surprising since natural biofilm formation has been going on for millions of years and remains a major part of microorganism survival and evolution. Thus, the fact that biofilms develop on and in the biomaterials and tissues of humans is really an extension of this natural tendency and greatly explains why they are so difficult for us to combat. Firstly, biofilm structure and composition inherently provide a protective environment for microorganisms, shielding them from the shear stress of urine flow, immune cell attack and some antimicrobials. Secondly, many biofilm organisms enter a metabolically dormant state that renders them tolerant to those antibiotics and host factors able to penetrate the biofilm matrix. Lastly, the majority of organisms that cause biofilm-associated urinary tract infections originate from our own oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts and therefore have already adapted to many of our host defenses. Ultimately, while biofilms continue to hold an advantage with respect to recurrent infections and biomaterial usage within the urinary tract, significant progress has been made in understanding these dynamic microbial communities and novel approaches offer promise for their prevention and eradication. These include novel device designs, antimicrobials, anti-adhesive coatings, biodegradable polymers and biofilm-disrupting compounds and therapies.

Cadieux, Peter A.; Wignall, Geoffrey R.; Carriveau, Rupp; Denstedt, John D.

2008-09-01

293

Dental plaque biofilm in oral health and disease.  

PubMed

Dental plaque is an archetypical biofilm composed of a complex microbial community. It is the aetiological agent for major dental diseases such as dental caries and periodontal disease. The clinical picture of these dental diseases is a net result of the cross-talk between the pathogenic dental plaque biofilm and the host tissue response. In the healthy state, both plaque biofilm and adjacent tissues maintain a delicate balance, establishing a harmonious relationship between the two. However, changes occur during the disease process that transform this 'healthy' dental plaque into a 'pathogenic' biofilm. Recent advances in molecular microbiology have improved the understanding of dental plaque biofilm and produced numerous clinical benefits. Therefore, it is imperative that clinicians keep abreast with these new developments in the field of dentistry. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind dental diseases will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to establish a 'healthy dental plaque biofilm' by modulating both host and microbial factors. In this review, the present authors aim to summarise the current knowledge on dental plaque as a microbial biofilm and its properties in oral health and disease. PMID:22319749

Seneviratne, Chaminda Jayampath; Zhang, Cheng Fei; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

2011-01-01

294

Oil biodegradation. Water droplets in oil are microhabitats for microbial life.  

PubMed

Anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons, typically occurring at the oil-water transition zone, influences the quality of oil reservoirs. In Pitch Lake, Trinidad and Tobago--the world's largest asphalt lake--we found that microorganisms are metabolically active in minuscule water droplets (1 to 3 microliters) entrapped in oil. Pyrotag sequencing of individual droplet microbiomes revealed complex methanogenic microbial communities actively degrading the oil into a diverse range of metabolites, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. High salinity and water-stable isotopes of the droplets indicate a deep subsurface origin. The 13.5% water content and the large surface area of the droplets represent an underestimated potential for biodegradation of oil away from the oil-water transition zone. PMID:25104386

Meckenstock, Rainer U; von Netzer, Frederick; Stumpp, Christine; Lueders, Tillmann; Himmelberg, Anne M; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philipp; Harir, Mourad; Hosein, Riad; Haque, Shirin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

2014-08-01

295

Bacterial communities in pigmented biofilms formed on the sandstone bas-relief walls of the Bayon Temple, Angkor Thom, Cambodia.  

PubMed

The Bayon temple in Angkor Thom, Cambodia has shown serious deterioration and is subject to the formation of various pigmented biofilms. Because biofilms are damaging the bas-reliefs, low reliefs engraved on the surface of sandstone, information about the microbial community within them is indispensable to control biofilm colonization. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of biofilm samples from the pigmented sandstone surfaces showed that the bacterial community members in the biofilms differed clearly from those in the air and had low sequence similarity to database sequences. Non-destructive sampling of biofilm revealed novel bacterial groups of predominantly Rubrobacter in salmon pink biofilm, Cyanobacteria in chrome green biofilm, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in signal violet biofilm, Chloroflexi in black gray biofilm, and Deinococcus-Thermus, Cyanobacteria, and Rubrobacter in blue green biofilm. Serial peeling-off of a thick biofilm by layers with adhesive sheets revealed a stratified structure: the blue-green biofilm, around which there was serious deterioration, was very rich in Cyanobacteria near the surface and Chloroflexi in deep layer below. Nitrate ion concentrations were high in the blue-green biofilm. The characteristic distribution of bacteria at different biofilm depths provides valuable information on not only the biofilm formation process but also the sandstone weathering process in the tropics. PMID:24334526

Kusumi, Asako; Li, Xianshu; Osuga, Yu; Kawashima, Arata; Gu, Ji-Dong; Nasu, Masao; Katayama, Yoko

2013-01-01

296

CO2 Production as an Indicator of Biofilm Metabolism? †  

PubMed Central

Biofilms are important in aquatic nutrient cycling and microbial proliferation. In these structures, nutrients like carbon are channeled into the production of extracellular polymeric substances or cell division; both are vital for microbial survival and propagation. The aim of this study was to assess carbon channeling into cellular or noncellular fractions in biofilms. Growing in tubular reactors, biofilms of our model strain Pseudomonas sp. strain CT07 produced cells to the planktonic phase from the early stages of biofilm development, reaching pseudo steady state with a consistent yield of ?107 cells·cm?2·h?1 within 72 h. Total direct counts and image analysis showed that most of the converted carbon occurred in the noncellular fraction, with the released and sessile cells accounting for <10% and <2% of inflowing carbon, respectively. A CO2 evolution measurement system (CEMS) that monitored CO2 in the gas phase was developed to perform a complete carbon balance across the biofilm. The measurement system was able to determine whole-biofilm CO2 production rates in real time and showed that gaseous CO2 production accounted for 25% of inflowing carbon. In addition, the CEMS made it possible to measure biofilm response to changing environmental conditions; changes in temperature or inflowing carbon concentration were followed by a rapid response in biofilm metabolism and the establishment of new steady-state conditions. PMID:19346353

Kroukamp, Otini; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.

2009-01-01

297

On growth and form of Bacillus subtilis biofilms.  

PubMed

A general feature of mature biofilms is their highly heterogeneous architecture that partitions the microbial city into sectors with specific micro-environments. To understand how this heterogeneity arises, we have investigated the formation of a microbial community of the model organism Bacillus subtilis. We first show that the growth of macroscopic colonies is inhibited by the accumulation of ammoniacal by-products. By constraining biofilms to grow approximately as two-dimensional layers, we then find that the bacteria which differentiate to produce extracellular polymeric substances form tightly packed bacterial chains. In addition to the process of cellular chaining, the biomass stickiness also strongly hinders the reorganization of cells within the biofilm. Based on these observations, we then write a biomechanical model for the growth of the biofilm where the cell density is constant and the physical mechanism responsible for the spreading of the biomass is the pressure generated by the division of the bacteria. Besides reproducing the velocity field of the biomass across the biofilm, the model predicts that, although bacteria divide everywhere in the biofilm, fluctuations in the growth rates of the bacteria lead to a coarsening of the growing bacterial layer. This process of kinetic roughening ultimately leads to the formation of a rough biofilm surface exhibiting self-similar properties. Experimental measurements of the biofilm texture confirm these predictions. PMID:25485075

Dervaux, Julien; Magniez, Juan Carmelo; Libchaber, Albert

2014-12-01

298

Microenvironments of reduced salinity harbour biofilms in Dead Sea underwater springs.  

PubMed

The Dead Sea is a hypersaline lake where only few types of organisms can grow. Recently, abundant and diverse microbial life was discovered in biofilms covering rocks and permeable sediments around underwater freshwater springs and seeps. We used a newly developed salinity mini-sensor (spatial resolution 300??m) to investigate the salinity environment around these biofilms in a flume that simulates an underwater spring. Compared with the hypersaline bulk water, salinity at the sediment surface decreased to zero at seeping velocities of 7?cm?s(-1). At similar flow velocities, salinity above rocks decreased to 100-200?g?L(-1) at a distance of 300??m from the surface. This depended on the position on the rock, and coincided with locations of natural biofilms. The salinity reduction substantially diminished at flow velocities of 3.5?cm?s(-1). We suggest that locally decreased salinity due to freshwater input is one of the main factors that make areas around underwater freshwater springs and seeps in the Dead Sea more favourable for life. However, due to frequent fluctuations in the freshwater flow, the locally decreased salinity is unstable. Therefore, microorganisms that inhabit these environments must be capable of withstanding large and rapid salinity fluctuations. PMID:24596288

Häusler, Stefan; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz E; Polerecky, Lubos; Meyer, Volker; de Beer, Dirk; Ionescu, Danny

2014-04-01

299

Laser Induced Fluorescence Emission (L.I.F.E.): In Situ Non-Destructive Detection of Microbial Life on Supraglacial Environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser-induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.) is an in situ laser scanning technique to detect photoautotrophic pigments such as phycoerythrin of an ice ecosystem such as supraglacial environments without contamination. The sensitivity of many psychrophiles to even moderate changes in temperature, and the logistical difficulties associated with either in situ analysis or sampling makes it difficult to study microbial metabolism in ice ecosystems in a high resolution. Surface communities of cold ecosystems are highly autotrophic and therefor ideal systems for L.I.F.E examinations. 532nm green lasers excite photopigments in cyanobacteria and produce multiple fluorescence signatures between 550nm and 750nm including carotenoids, phycobiliproteins which would enable a non-invasive in-situ measurement. The sensitivity of many psychrophiles to even moderate changes in temperature, and the logistical difficulties associated with either in situ analysis or sampling makes it difficult to study these cryosphere ecosystems. In general, the ice habitat has to be disrupted using techniques that usually include coring, sawing, and melting. Samples are also often chosen blindly, with little indication of probable biomass. The need for an in situ non-invasive, non-destructive technique to detect, localize, and sample cryosphere biomass in the field is therefore of considerable importance. L.I.F.E has already been tested in remote ecosystems like Antarctica (Lake Untersee, Lake Fryxell), supraglacial environments in the Kongsfjord region in the High Arctic and High Alpine glaciers but until now no calibration was set to convert the L.I.F.E. signal into pigment concentration. Here we describe the standardization for detection of Phycobiliproteins (Phycoerythrine) which are found in red algae, cyanobacteria, and cryptomonads. Similar methods are already used for detection of phytoplankton in liquid systems like oceans and lakes by NASÁs Airborne Oceanographic LIDAR since 1979. The possibility to use L.I.F.E. in ice though is a novelty and provides a promising tool to monitor vanishing ice systems like retreating glaciers.

Sattler, B.; Tilg, M.; Storrie-Lombardi, M.; Remias, D.; Psenner, R.

2012-04-01

300

Microbial Life in the Subseafloor at Mid-Ocean Ridges: A Key to Understanding Ancient Ecosystems on Earth and Elsewhere?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some planets and moons in our solar system were similar to Earth in their geological properties during the first few hundred million years after accretion. This is the period when life arose and became established on Earth. It follows that understanding the geophysical and geochemical characteristics of early Earth could provide insight into life-supporting environments on other solar bodies that have not evolved "Garden of Eden" conditions. Hydrothermal systems are primordial and their emergence coincided with the accumulation of liquid water on Earth. The interactions of water and rock associated with hydrothermal systems result in predictable suites of dissolved elements and volatiles. While the concentrations of these chemicals vary at different vent locations and were certainly different during the early Archaean, the overall chemical composition of aqueous hydrothermal fluid is likely to be the same because of the basaltic nature of oceanic crust. In present-day hydrothermal systems, those environments not contaminated by electron acceptors produced from pelagic photosynthesis would most closely mimic the earliest conditions on Earth. These conditions include the subseafloor and high temperature, anaerobic environments associated with hydrothermal systems. The microorganisms associated with these environments derive energy from sulfur, iron, hydrogen and organic compounds. New seafloor eruptions and diffuse flow vents provide unprecedented access to deep subseafloor microbial communities. For example, 12 new eruptions have occurred in the past 15 years including five in the Northeast Pacific. Hyperthermophiles were isolated from 5-30oC diffuse vent fluids from new eruption sites at CoAxial within months of the June, 1993 eruption and from the 1998 eruption at Axial Volcano, and from plume fluids within days of the February, 1996 eruption at the N. Gorda Ridge. The presence of such organisms in fluids that are 20 to 50°C below their minimum growth temperature indicates that they originated from a hot subseafloor habitat. Based on the 16S rRNA sequences and the RFLP patterns of the 500 base sequence between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (intergenic spacer region), these heterotrophic archaea represent new species, and a new genus, within the Thermococcales (Summit and Baross, 1998; 2001). These isolates grow over an unusually wide temperature range and in low levels of organic material. While Thermococcus and Methanococcus species are the most commonly isolated species of hyperthermophiles from subseafloor biotopes, preliminary phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA sequences of microbial communities in the diffuse flow fluids at new eruption sites show a high diversity of archaea that are not related to cultured organisms. Results to date support the hypothesis that subseafloor microbes associated with hydrothermal systems have nutritional, physiological and bioenergetic characteristics that reflect the physical and geochemical properties of their habitat. Moreover, we propose that deep-sea subsurface environments are analogs of ecosystems on other solar bodies. Thus, by examining the chemical and microbial ecology and energetics of the subsurface, and particularly the subsurface associated with hydrothermal systems, a framework for studying the prospects of extraterrestrial life can be developed. It is predicted that if there were life on other hydrothermally active solar bodies, the same energy sources would fuel microbial metabolism even though the molecular characteristics of these life forms may not resemble Earth organisms having identical metabolisms.

Baross, J. A.; Delaney, J. R.

2001-12-01

301

Strategies for antimicrobial drug delivery to biofilm.  

PubMed

Biofilms are formed by the attachment of single or mixed microbial communities to a variety of biological and/or synthetic surfaces. Biofilm micro-organisms benefit from many advantages of the polymicrobial environment including increased resistance against antimicrobials and protection against the host organism's defence mechanisms. These benefits stem from a number of structural and physiological differences between planktonic and biofilm-resident microbes, but two main factors are the presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and quorum sensing communication. Once formed, biofilms begin to synthesise EPS, a complex viscous matrix composed of a variety of macromolecules including proteins, lipids and polysaccharides. In terms of drug delivery strategies, it is the EPS that presents the greatest barrier to diffusion for drug delivery systems and free antimicrobial agents alike. In addition to EPS synthesis, biofilm-based micro-organisms can also produce small, diffusible signalling molecules involved in cell density-dependent intercellular communication, or quorum sensing. Not only does quorum sensing allow microbes to detect critical cell density numbers, but it also permits co-ordinated behaviour within the biofilm, such as iron chelation and defensive antibiotic activities. Against this backdrop of microbial defence and cell density-specific communication, a variety of drug delivery systems have been developed to deliver antimicrobial agents and antibiotics to extracellular and/or intracellular targets, or more recently, to interfere with the specific mechanisms of quorum sensing. Successful delivery strategies have employed lipidic and polymeric-based formulations such as liposomes and cyclodextrins respectively, in addition to inorganic carriers e.g. metal nanoparticles. This review will examine a range of drug delivery systems and their application to biofilm delivery, as well as pharmaceutical formulations with innate antimicrobial properties such as silver nanoparticles and microemulsions. PMID:25189862

Martin, Claire; Low, Wan Li; Gupta, Abhishek; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Radecka, Iza; Britland, Stephen T; Raj, Prem; Kenward, Ken M A

2015-01-01

302

Effect of UHPH on indigenous microbiota of apple juice: a preliminary study of microbial shelf-life.  

PubMed

The effect of ultra high pressure homogenisation (UHPH) at 100, 200 and 300 MPa on apple juice at two different inlet temperatures (4 and 20 degrees C) was studied. Raw and conventional heat treated (PA) apple juice was compared with UHPH treated juice after treatment and during 60 days of storage at 4 degrees C. The microbial quality was studied by enumerating aerobic mesophilic counts (AM), psychrotrophs (PS), moulds and yeasts (MY), lactobacilli (LB), enterobacteriaceae (EB), and faecal coliforms (FC). PA samples were below detection level (< or = -2 log cfu/mL) for all groups, the same as UHPH treated juices at 200 MPa and above but for around 1 log cfu/mL for AM. Those AM counts did not change during 60 days storage at 4 degrees C and proved to be spores. Juices treated at 100 MPa shown little reductions in microbial counts, and surviving microorganisms significantly increased their numbers during storage. This research work showed that non-thermal methods such a UHPH technology may give new opportunities to develop "fresh like" apple juice with a shelf-life equivalent to PA in terms of microbiological characteristics without affecting the product quality. PMID:19954853

Suárez-Jacobo, A; Gervilla, R; Guamis, B; Roig-Sagués, A X; Saldo, J

2010-01-01

303

Use of 70% alcohol for the routine removal of microbial hard surface bioburden in life science cleanrooms.  

PubMed

Alcohol-based disinfectants are used for the removal of microbial hard surface bioburden in Life science Cleanrooms. Evidence for using formulations containing 70% alcohol has been lost over time but probably originates from historical observations of the activity of 60-70% alcohol. Tradition is no longer adequate to inform contemporary cleaning practice. We evaluated the efficacy of ethanol, isopropanol and trade-specific denatured alcohol 7 against vegetative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus hirae using standardized European Suspension and Hard Surface tests. All three alcohols were effective at lower concentrations than the 70% standard. This constitutes the first evaluation of disinfectant formulations containing ?70% alcohol using standard methodology. The utility of trade-specific denatured alcohol #7 and evidence-based cleanroom practice warrant further validation. PMID:25405882

Salvage, Richard; Hull, Claire M; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

2014-01-01

304

Endosymbiotic and horizontal gene transfer in microbial eukaryotes: Impacts on cell evolution and the tree of life.  

PubMed

The evolution of microbial eukaryotes, in particular of photosynthetic lineages, is complicated by multiple instances of endosymbiotic and horizontal gene transfer (E/HGT) resulting from plastid origin(s). Our recent analysis of diatom membrane transporters provides evidence of red and/or green algal origins of 172 of the genes encoding these proteins (ca. 25% of the examined phylogenies), with the majority putatively derived from green algae. These data suggest that E/HGT has been an important driver of evolutionary innovation among diatoms (and likely other stramenopiles), and lend further support to the hypothesis of an ancient, cryptic green algal endosymbiosis in "chromalveolate" lineages. Here, we discuss the implications of our findings on the understanding of eukaryote evolution and inference of the tree of life. PMID:22934244

Chan, Cheong Xin; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian

2012-03-01

305

Animal models to investigate fungal biofilm formation.  

PubMed

Microbial biofilms play an essential role in several infectious diseases and are defined as extensive communities of sessile organisms irreversibly associated with a surface, encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix (ECM), and exhibiting enhanced resistance to antimicrobial drugs. Forming a biofilm provides the microbes protection from environmental stresses due to contaminants, nutritional depletion, or imbalances, but is dangerous to human health due to their inherent robustness and elevated resistance.The use of indwelling medical devices (e.g., central venous catheters, CVCs) in current therapeutic practice is associated with 80-90 % of hospital-acquired bloodstream and deep tissue infections. Most cases of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) involve colonization of microorganisms on catheter surfaces where they form a biofilm. Additionally, Fusarium solani and F. oxysporum were the causative organisms of the 2005/2006 outbreak of contact lens-associated fungal keratitis in the United States, Europe, the UK, and Singapore, and these infections involved formation of biofilms on contact lens. Fungal biofilm formation is studied using a number of techniques, involving the use of a wide variety of substrates and growth conditions. In vitro techniques involving the use of confocal scanning laser/scanning electron microscopy, metabolic activity assay, dry weight measurements, and antifungal susceptibility assays are increasingly used by investigators to quantify and evaluate biofilm morphology. However, there are not many in vivo models used to validate biofilm-associated infections. In this protocol, we describe a clinically relevant rabbit model of C. albicans biofilm-associated catheter infection to evaluate the morphology, topography, and architecture of fungal biofilms. We also describe a murine model of contact lens-associated Fusarium keratitis.Evaluation of the formation of fungal biofilms on catheters in vivo, their analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quantitative catheter culture (QCC), and treatment of biofilms using antimicrobial lock therapy can be completed in ~20-25 days using the described methods. The rabbit model has utility in evaluating the efficacy of lock solutions. In addition, the murine model of contact lens-associated Fusarium keratitis enables characterizing/comparing the formation of Fusarium biofilms on contact lenses in vitro and determining their role in vivo. PMID:24664831

Chandra, Jyotsna; Pearlman, Eric; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

2014-01-01

306

Synthetic Biology and Microbial Fuel Cells: Towards Self-Sustaining Life Support Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA ARC and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) collaborated to investigate the development of advanced microbial fuels cells (MFCs) for biological wastewater treatment and electricity production (electrogenesis). Synthetic biology techniques and integrated hardware advances were investigated to increase system efficiency and robustness, with the intent of increasing power self-sufficiency and potential product formation from carbon dioxide. MFCs possess numerous advantages for space missions, including rapid processing, reduced biomass and effective removal of organics, nitrogen and phosphorus. Project efforts include developing space-based MFC concepts, integration analyses, increasing energy efficiency, and investigating novel bioelectrochemical system applications

Hogan, John Andrew

2014-01-01

307

Microbially induced sedimentary structures in evaporite–siliciclastic sediments of Ras Gemsa sabkha, Red Sea Coast, Egypt  

PubMed Central

The coastal sabkha in Ras Gemsa, Red Sea coast with its colonizing microbial mats and biofilms was investigated. The sabkha sediments consist mainly of terrigenous siliciclastic material accompanied by the development of evaporites. Halite serves as a good conduit for light and reduces the effect of intensive harmful solar radiation, which allows microbial mats to survive and flourish. The microbial mats in the evaporite–siliciclastic environments of such sabkha display distinctive sedimentary structures (microbially induced sedimentary structures), including frozen multidirected ripple marks, salt-encrusted crinkle mats, jelly roll structure, and petee structures. Scanning electron microscopy of the sediment surface colonized by cyanobacteria revealed that sand grains of the studied samples are incorporated into the biofilm by trapping and binding processes. Filamentous cyanobacteria and their EPS found in the voids in and between the particles construct a network that effectively interweaves and stabilizes the surface sediments. In advanced stages, the whole surface is covered by a spider web-like structure of biofilm, leading to a planar surface morphology. Sabkha with its chemical precipitates is a good model for potential preservation of life signatures. It is worthy to note that the available, published works on the subject of the present work are not numerous.

Taher, Amany G.

2013-01-01

308

Life in extreme environments: microbial diversity in Great Salt Lake, Utah.  

PubMed

Great Salt Lake (GSL) represents one of the world's most hypersaline environments. In this study, the archaeal and bacterial communities at the North and South arms of the lake were surveyed by cloning and sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. The sampling locations were chosen for high salt concentration and the presence of unique environmental gradients, such as petroleum seeps and high sulfur content. Molecular techniques have not been systematically applied to this extreme environment, and thus the composition and the genetic diversity of microbial communities at GSL remain mostly unknown. This study led to the identification of 58 archaeal and 42 bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our phylogenetic and statistical analyses displayed a high biodiversity of the microbial communities in this environment. In this survey, we also showed that the majority of the 16S rRNA gene sequences within the clone library were distantly related to previously described environmental halophilic archaeal and bacterial taxa and represent novel phylotypes. PMID:24682608

Tazi, Loubna; Breakwell, Donald P; Harker, Alan R; Crandall, Keith A

2014-05-01

309

Form and function of Clostridium thermocellum biofilms.  

PubMed

The importance of bacterial adherence has been acknowledged in microbial lignocellulose conversion studies; however, few reports have described the function and structure of biofilms supported by cellulosic substrates. We investigated the organization, dynamic formation, and carbon flow associated with biofilms of the obligately anaerobic cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum 27405. Using noninvasive, in situ fluorescence imaging, we showed biofilms capable of near complete substrate conversion with a characteristic monolayered cell structure without an extracellular polymeric matrix typically seen in biofilms. Cell division at the interface and terminal endospores appeared throughout all stages of biofilm growth. Using continuous-flow reactors with a rate of dilution (2 h(-1)) 12-fold higher than the bacterium's maximum growth rate, we compared biofilm activity under low (44 g/liter) and high (202 g/liter) initial cellulose loading. The average hydrolysis rate was over 3-fold higher in the latter case, while the proportions of oligomeric cellulose hydrolysis products lost from the biofilm were 13.7% and 29.1% of the total substrate carbon hydrolyzed, respectively. Fermentative catabolism was comparable between the two cellulose loadings, with ca. 4% of metabolized sugar carbon being utilized for cell production, while 75.4% and 66.7% of the two cellulose loadings, respectively, were converted to primary carbon metabolites (ethanol, acetic acid, lactic acid, carbon dioxide). However, there was a notable difference in the ethanol-to-acetic acid ratio (g/g), measured to be 0.91 for the low cellulose loading and 0.41 for the high cellulose loading. The results suggest that substrate availability for cell attachment rather than biofilm colonization rates govern the efficiency of cellulose conversion. PMID:23087042

Dumitrache, Alexandru; Wolfaardt, Gideon; Allen, Grant; Liss, Steven N; Lynd, Lee R

2013-01-01

310

Form and Function of Clostridium thermocellum Biofilms  

PubMed Central

The importance of bacterial adherence has been acknowledged in microbial lignocellulose conversion studies; however, few reports have described the function and structure of biofilms supported by cellulosic substrates. We investigated the organization, dynamic formation, and carbon flow associated with biofilms of the obligately anaerobic cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum 27405. Using noninvasive, in situ fluorescence imaging, we showed biofilms capable of near complete substrate conversion with a characteristic monolayered cell structure without an extracellular polymeric matrix typically seen in biofilms. Cell division at the interface and terminal endospores appeared throughout all stages of biofilm growth. Using continuous-flow reactors with a rate of dilution (2 h?1) 12-fold higher than the bacterium's maximum growth rate, we compared biofilm activity under low (44 g/liter) and high (202 g/liter) initial cellulose loading. The average hydrolysis rate was over 3-fold higher in the latter case, while the proportions of oligomeric cellulose hydrolysis products lost from the biofilm were 13.7% and 29.1% of the total substrate carbon hydrolyzed, respectively. Fermentative catabolism was comparable between the two cellulose loadings, with ca. 4% of metabolized sugar carbon being utilized for cell production, while 75.4% and 66.7% of the two cellulose loadings, respectively, were converted to primary carbon metabolites (ethanol, acetic acid, lactic acid, carbon dioxide). However, there was a notable difference in the ethanol-to-acetic acid ratio (g/g), measured to be 0.91 for the low cellulose loading and 0.41 for the high cellulose loading. The results suggest that substrate availability for cell attachment rather than biofilm colonization rates govern the efficiency of cellulose conversion. PMID:23087042

Dumitrache, Alexandru; Allen, Grant; Liss, Steven N.; Lynd, Lee R.

2013-01-01

311

Cell growth and protein expression of Shewanella oneidensis in biofilms and hydrogel-entrapped cultures.  

PubMed

The performance of biofilm-based bioprocesses is difficult to predict and control because of the intrinsic heterogeneous and dynamic properties of microbial biofilms. Biofilm mimics, such as microbial cells entrapped in polymeric scaffolds that are permeable for nutrients, have been proposed to replace real biofilms to achieve long-term robust performance in engineering applications. However, the physiological differences between cells that are physically entrapped in a synthetic polymeric matrix and biofilm cells that are encased in a self-produced polymeric matrix remain unknown. In this study, using Shewanella oneidensis as a model organism and alginate hydrogel as a model synthetic matrix, we compared the cell growth and protein expression in entrapped cultures and biofilms. The hydrogel-entrapped cultures were found to exhibit a growth rate comparable with biofilms. There was no substantial difference in cell viability, surface charge, as well as hydrophobicity between the cells grown in alginate hydrogel and those grown in biofilms. However, the gel-entrapped cultures were found to be physiologically different from biofilms. The gel-entrapped cultures had a higher demand for metabolic energy. The siderophore-mediated iron uptake was repressed in the gel-entrapped cells. The presence of the hydrogel matrix decreased the expression of proteins involved in biofilm formation, while inducing the production of extracellular DNA (eDNA) in the gel-entrapped cultures. These results advance the fundamental understanding of the physiology of hydrogel-entrapped cells, which can lead to more efficient biofilm mimic-based applications. PMID:24626808

Zhang, Yingdan; Ng, Chun Kiat; Cohen, Yehuda; Cao, Bin

2014-05-01

312

The Microbial Community on Marine Plastic Debris: Life in the "Plastisphere"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plastic debris is an abundant substrate of anthropogenic origin in the marine environment that is receiving increased attention. We documented the bacterial (V6-V4) and eukaryotic (V9) communities on open ocean plastic debris samples using 454 amplicon sequencing of small-subunit rRNA hypervariable regions and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Parametric alpha diversity measures of plastic samples showed considerable species richness comparable to the surrounding seawater with many Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) unique to the plastic substrates. We also found that while all samples contained an OTU assigned to SAR 11 (Candidatus Pelagibacter), considered to be one of most abundant heterotrophic bacteria in the ocean, this was not the most abundant OTU in our samples. Quite surprisingly, the most abundant OTU found in our polypropylene sample was an OTU assigned to the genus Vibrio. Although endemic to the marine environment, the genus Vibrio has several members that are human and animal pathogens. Our samples also included representatives from many protist groups and fungi. Sequences recovered were dominated by heterotrophs including an unidentified sequence related to colonial radiolaria and suctorian ciliates, but many photosynthetic groups including dinoflagellates, diatoms, and green, brown, and red algae were also present. SEM images revealed a complex landscape of microbes on the surface of the plastic; rich bacterial biofilms included diatoms and stalked suctorian ciliates covered with what appeared to be bacterial epibionts. The fact that these communities are distinct from the surrounding surface water suggests that plastic surfaces may serve as a unique new ecological habitat in the open ocean and warrant further investigation. We have proposed the term "Plastisphere" to describe the community of organisms closely associated with plastic debris in aquatic systems.

Amaral-Zettler, L. A.; Zettler, E. R.; Mincer, T. J.

2011-12-01

313

Three-Dimensional Stratification of Bacterial Biofilm Populations in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor for Nitritation-Anammox  

PubMed Central

Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are increasingly used for nitrogen removal with nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) processes in wastewater treatment. Carriers provide protected surfaces where ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox bacteria form complex biofilms. However, the knowledge about the organization of microbial communities in MBBR biofilms is sparse. We used new cryosectioning and imaging methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to study the structure of biofilms retrieved from carriers in a nitritation-anammox MBBR. The dimensions of the carrier compartments and the biofilm cryosections after FISH showed good correlation, indicating little disturbance of biofilm samples by the treatment. FISH showed that Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha-related cells dominated the AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida-related cells dominated the anammox guild. New carriers were initially colonized by AOB, followed by anammox bacteria proliferating in the deeper biofilm layers, probably in anaerobic microhabitats created by AOB activity. Mature biofilms showed a pronounced three-dimensional stratification where AOB dominated closer to the biofilm-water interface, whereas anammox were dominant deeper into the carrier space and towards the walls. Our results suggest that current mathematical models may be oversimplifying these three-dimensional systems and unless the multidimensionality of these systems is considered, models may result in suboptimal design of MBBR carriers. PMID:24481066

Almstrand, Robert; Persson, Frank; Daims, Holger; Ekenberg, Maria; Christensson, Magnus; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

2014-01-01

314

Three-dimensional stratification of bacterial biofilm populations in a moving bed biofilm reactor for nitritation-anammox.  

PubMed

Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are increasingly used for nitrogen removal with nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) processes in wastewater treatment. Carriers provide protected surfaces where ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox bacteria form complex biofilms. However, the knowledge about the organization of microbial communities in MBBR biofilms is sparse. We used new cryosectioning and imaging methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to study the structure of biofilms retrieved from carriers in a nitritation-anammox MBBR. The dimensions of the carrier compartments and the biofilm cryosections after FISH showed good correlation, indicating little disturbance of biofilm samples by the treatment. FISH showed that Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha-related cells dominated the AOB and Candidatus Brocadia fulgida-related cells dominated the anammox guild. New carriers were initially colonized by AOB, followed by anammox bacteria proliferating in the deeper biofilm layers, probably in anaerobic microhabitats created by AOB activity. Mature biofilms showed a pronounced three-dimensional stratification where AOB dominated closer to the biofilm-water interface, whereas anammox were dominant deeper into the carrier space and towards the walls. Our results suggest that current mathematical models may be oversimplifying these three-dimensional systems and unless the multidimensionality of these systems is considered, models may result in suboptimal design of MBBR carriers. PMID:24481066

Almstrand, Robert; Persson, Frank; Daims, Holger; Ekenberg, Maria; Christensson, Magnus; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

2014-01-01

315

How Cyanobacterial Distributions Reveal Flow and Irradiance Conditions of Photosynthetic Biofilm Formation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microbial life on Earth is enormously abundant at sediment-water interfaces. The fossil record in fact contains abundant evidence of the preservation of life on such surfaces. It is therefore critical to our interpretation of early Earth history, and potentially to history of life on other planets, to be able to recognize life forms at these interfaces. On Earth this life often occurs as organized structures of microbes and their extracellular exudates known as biofilms. When such biofilms occur in areas receiving sunlight photosynthetic biofilms are the dominant form in natural ecosystems due to selective advantage inherent in their ability to utilize solar energy. Cyanobacteria are the dominant phototrophic microbes in most modern and ancient photosynthetic biofilms, microbial mats and stromatolites. Due to their long (3.5 billion year) evolutionary history, this group has extensively diversified resulting in an enormous array of morphologies and physiological abilities. This enormous diversity and specialization results in very specific selection for a particular cyanobacterium in each available photosynthetic niche. Furthermore these organisms can alter their spatial orientation, cell morphology, pigmentation and associations with heterotrophic organisms in order to fine tune their optimization to a given micro-niche. These adaptations can be detected, and if adequate knowledge of the interaction between environmental conditions and organism response is available, the detectable organism response can be used to infer the environmental conditions causing that response. This presentation will detail two specific examples which illustrate this point. Light and water are essential to photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and these organisms have specific detectable behavioral responses to these parameters. We will present cyanobacterial responses to quantified flow and irradiance to demonstrate the interpretative power of distribution and orientation information. This study presents new results, but many such examples are already found in the literature. However this information exists in such a wide variety of journals, spanning decades of research that the utility of the vast storehouse of information is limited, not by the ability of cyanobacteria to respond in recognizable ways to environmental stimuli, but by our ability to compile and use this information. Recent advances in information technology will soon allow us to overcome these difficulties and utilize the detailed responses of cyanobacteria to environmental microniches as powerful records of the interaction between the biosphere and lithosphere.

Prufert-Bebout, Lee

2001-01-01

316

Biofilm Shows Spatially Stratified Metabolic Responses to Contaminant Exposure  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to elucidate the spatiotemporal responses of live S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42-), important environmental contaminants at DOE contaminated sites. Toward this goal, we applied noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, diffusion, relaxation and spectroscopy techniques to monitor in situ spatiotemporal responses of S. oneidensis biofilms to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure in terms of changes in biofilm structures, diffusion properties, and cellular metabolism. Exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI) did not appear to change the overall biomass distribution but caused changes in the physicochemical microenvironments inside the biofilm as indicated by diffusion measurements. Changes in the diffusion properties of the biofilms in response to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure imply a novel function of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affecting the biotransformation and transport of contaminants in the environment. In the presence of U(VI) or Cr(VI), the anaerobic metabolism of lactate was inhibited significantly, although the biofilms were still capable of reducing U(VI) and Cr(VI). Local concentrations of Cr(III)aq in the biofilm suggested relatively high Cr(VI) reduction activities at the top of the biofilm, near the medium-biofilm interface. The depth-resolved metabolic activities of the biofilm suggested higher diversion effects of gluconeogenesis and C1 metabolism pathways at the bottom of the biofilm and in the presence of U(VI). This study provides a noninvasive means to investigate spatiotemporal responses of biofilms, including surface-associated microbial communities in engineering, natural and medical settings, to various environmental perturbations including exposure to environmental contaminants and antimicrobials.

Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, B.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Sylvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-01

317

Adhesion as a weapon in microbial competition.  

PubMed

Microbes attach to surfaces and form dense communities known as biofilms, which are central to how microbes live and influence humans. The key defining feature of biofilms is adhesion, whereby cells attach to one another and to surfaces, via attachment factors and extracellular polymers. While adhesion is known to be important for the initial stages of biofilm formation, its function within biofilm communities has not been studied. Here we utilise an individual-based model of microbial groups to study the evolution of adhesion. While adhering to a surface can enable cells to remain in a biofilm, consideration of within-biofilm competition reveals a potential cost to adhesion: immobility. Highly adhesive cells that are resistant to movement face being buried and starved at the base of the biofilm. However, we find that when growth occurs at the base of a biofilm, adhesion allows cells to capture substratum territory and force less adhesive, competing cells out of the system. This process may be particularly important when cells grow on a host epithelial surface. We test the predictions of our model using the enteric pathogen Vibrio cholerae, which produces an extracellular matrix important for biofilm formation. Flow cell experiments indicate that matrix-secreting cells are highly adhesive and form expanding clusters that remove non-secreting cells from the population, as predicted by our simulations. Our study shows how simple physical properties, such as adhesion, can be critical to understanding evolution and competition within microbial communities. PMID:25290505

Schluter, Jonas; Nadell, Carey D; Bassler, Bonnie L; Foster, Kevin R

2015-01-01

318

Ice Shelf Microbial Ecosystems in the High Arctic and Implications for Life on Snowball Earth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (83°N, 74°W) is the largest remaining section of thick (>10m) landfast sea ice along the northern coastline of Ellesmere Island, Canada. Extensive meltwater lakes and streams occur on the surface of the ice and are colonized by photosynthetic microbial mat communities. This High Arctic cryo-ecosystem is similar in several of its physical, biological and geochemical features to the McMurdo Ice Shelf in Antarctica. The ice-mats in both polar regions are dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria but also contain diatoms, chlorophytes, flagellates, ciliates, nematodes, tardigrades and rotifers. The luxuriant Ward Hunt consortia also contain high concentrations (107-108cm-2) of viruses and heterotrophic bacteria. During periods of extensive ice cover, such as glaciations during the Proterozoic, cryotolerant mats of the type now found in these polar ice shelf ecosystems would have provided refugia for the survival, growth and evolution of a variety of organisms, including multicellular eukaryotes.

Vincent, W. F.; Gibson, J. A. E.; Pienitz, R.; Villeneuve, V.; Broady, P. A.; Hamilton, P. B.; Howard-Williams, C.

319

Quorum sensing inhibitors as anti-biofilm agents.  

PubMed

Biofilms are microbial sessile communities characterized by cells that are attached to a substratum or interface or to each other, are embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances and exhibit an altered phenotype compared to planktonic cells. Biofilms are estimated to be associated with 80% of microbial infections and it is currently common knowledge that growth of micro-organisms in biofilms can enhance their resistance to antimicrobial agents. As a consequence antimicrobial therapy often fails to eradicate biofilms from the site of infection. For this reason, innovative anti-biofilm agents with novel targets and modes of action are needed. One alternative approach is targeting the bacterial communication system (quorum sensing, QS). QS is a process by which bacteria produce and detect signal molecules and thereby coordinate their behavior in a cell-density dependent manner. Three main QS systems can be distinguished: the acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) QS system in Gram-negative bacteria, the autoinducing peptide (AIP) QS system in Gram-positive bacteria and the autoinducer-2 (AI-2) QS system in both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Although much remains to be learned about the involvement of QS in biofilm formation, maintenance, and dispersal, QS inhibitors (QSI) have been proposed as promising antibiofilm agents. In this article we will give an overview of QS inhibitors which have been shown to play a role in biofilm formation and/or maturation. PMID:25189863

Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom

2015-01-01

320

Effect of temperature on shelf life and microbial population of lightly processed cactus pear fruit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The possibility of using cactus pear fruit (Opuntia ficus indica Mill, cv. Gialla) to produce ready-to-eat fruit was investigated. Changes in sensory quality and proliferation of spoilage microorganisms on lightly processed and packaged fruit as a function of storage temperature and modified atmosphere packaging were measured. The shelf life of the samples was kinetically modelled in order to check the

M. R Corbo; C Altieri; D D’Amato; D Campaniello; M. A Del Nobile; M Sinigaglia

2004-01-01

321

Tracking the cellulolytic activity of Clostridium thermocellum biofilms  

PubMed Central

Background Microbial cellulose conversion by Clostridium thermocellum 27405 occurs predominantly through the activity of substrate-adherent bacteria organized in thin, primarily single cell-layered biofilms. The importance of cellulosic surface exposure to microbial hydrolysis has received little attention despite its implied impact on conversion kinetics. Results We showed the spatial heterogeneity of fiber distribution in pure cellulosic sheets, which made direct measurements of biofilm colonization and surface penetration impossible. Therefore, we utilized on-line measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) production in continuous-flow reactors, in conjunction with confocal imaging, to observe patterns of biofilm invasion and to indirectly estimate microbial accessibility to the substrate’s surface and the resulting limitations on conversion kinetics. A strong positive correlation was found between cellulose consumption and CO2 production (R2?=?0.996) and between surface area and maximum biofilm activity (R2?=?0.981). We observed an initial biofilm development rate (0.46 h-1, 0.34 h-1 and 0.33 h-1) on Whatman sheets (#1, #598 and #3, respectively) that stabilized when the accessible surface was maximally colonized. The results suggest that cellulose conversion kinetics is initially subject to a microbial limitation period where the substrate is in excess, followed by a substrate limitation period where cellular mass, in the form of biofilms, is not limiting. Accessible surface area acts as an important determinant of the respective lengths of these two distinct periods. At end-point fermentation, all sheets were digested predominantly under substrate accessibility limitations (e.g., up to 81% of total CO2 production for Whatman #1). Integration of CO2 production rates over time showed Whatman #3 underwent the fastest conversion efficiency under microbial limitation, suggestive of best biofilm penetration, while Whatman #1 exhibited the least recalcitrance and the faster degradation during the substrate limitation period. Conclusion The results showed that the specific biofilm development rate of cellulolytic bacteria such as C. thermocellum has a notable effect on overall reactor kinetics during the period of microbial limitation, when ca. 20% of cellulose conversion occurs. The study further demonstrated the utility of on-line CO2 measurements as a method to assess biofilm development and substrate digestibility pertaining to microbial solubilization of cellulose, which is relevant when considering feedstock pre-treatment options. PMID:24286524

2013-01-01

322

Microbial Preservation in Sulfates in the Haughton Impact Structure Suggests Target in Search for Life on Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microbes in Haughton Crater Sulfates: Impact craters are of high interest in planetary exploration because they are viewed as possible sites for evidence of life [1]. Hydrothermal systems in craters are particularly regarded as sites where primitive life could evolve. Evidence from the Miocene Haughton impact structure shows that crater hydrothermal deposits may also be a preferred site for subsequent colonization and hence possible extant life: Hydrothermal sulfates at Haughton are colonized by viable cyanobacteria [2]. The Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Canadian High Arctic, is a 24 km-diameter crater of mid-Tertiary age. The structure preserves an exceptional record of impact-induced hydrothermal activity, including sulfide, and sulfate mineralization [3]. The target rocks excavated at the site included massive gypsum-bearing carbonate rocks of Ordovician age. Impact-remobilized sulfates occur as metre-scale masses of intergrown crystals of the clear form of gypsum selenite in veins and cavity fillings within the crater s impact melt breccia deposits [4]. The selenite is part of the hydrothermal assemblage as it was precipitated by cooling hot waters that were circulating as a result of the impact. Remobilization of the sulfate continues to the present day, such that it occurs in soil crusts (Fig. 1) including sandy beds with a gypsum cement. The sulfate-cemented beds make an interesting comparison with the sulfate-bearing sandy beds encountered by the Opportunity MER [5]. The selenite crystals are up to 0.3 m in width, of high purity, and transparent. They locally exhibit frayed margins where cleavage surfaces have separated. This exfoliation may be a response to freeze-thaw weathering. The selenite contains traces of rock detritus, newly precipitated gypsum, and microbial colonies. The rock detritus consists of sediment particles which penetrated the opened cleavages by up to 2cm from the crystal margins. Some of the detritus is cemented into place by gypsum, which must have been dissolved and reprecipitated from the host selenite.

Parnell, J.; Osinski, G. R.; Lee, P.; Cockell, C. S.

2005-01-01

323

Application of Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM19280 in gluten-free sourdough bread to improve the microbial shelf life.  

PubMed

The present study investigated the antifungal activity of Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM19280 as a starter culture for gluten-free quinoa sourdough bread under pilot-plant conditions to extend the microbial shelf life. Challenge tests against environmental moulds were conducted and a negative control with non-antifungal strain, L. amylovorus DSM20531(T), as well as a chemically acidified and a non-acidified control were included. Organic acid production, antifungal metabolites, carbohydrates changes during fermentation and bread quality were compared to wheat counterparts. The application of quinoa sourdough fermented with the antifungal L. amylovorus DSM19280 extended the mould free shelf life by 4 days compared to the non-acidified control. No significant difference in lactic acid production was found between the lactobacilli strains. HPLC-UV/DAD was used to quantify antifungal compounds. The concentration of 4-hydroxyphenyllactic acid, phloretic acid, 3-phenyllactic acid and hydroferulic acid were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the quinoa sourdough fermented with the antifungal L. amylovorus DSM19280 when compared to the non-antifungal strain, thus indicating their contribution to the antifungal activity. Evaluation of bread characteristics such as specific volume or crumb hardness, revealed that the addition of L. amylovorus fermented sourdough also improved bread quality. In conclusion, the combination of quinoa flour fermented with the antifungal L. amylovorus DSM19280 serves a great potential biopreservative ingredient to produce gluten-free breads with an improved nutritional value, better bread quality and higher safety due to an extended shelf life, and therefore meeting consumer needs for good quality and preservatives-free food products. PMID:25583336

Axel, Claudia; Röcker, Bettina; Brosnan, Brid; Zannini, Emanuele; Furey, Ambrose; Coffey, Aidan; Arendt, Elke K

2015-05-01

324

Polymeric substances and biofilms as biomarkers in terrestrial materials: Implications for extraterrestrial samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organic polymeric substances are a fundamental component of microbial biofilms. Microorganisms, especially bacteria, secrete extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to form slime layers in which they reproduce. In the sedimentary environment, biofilms commonly contain the products of degraded bacteria as well as allochthonous and autochthonous mineral components. They are complex structures which serve as protection for the colonies of microorganisms living

Frances Westall; Andrew Steele; Jan Toporski; Maud Walsh; Carlton Allen; Sean Guidry; David McKay; Everett Gibson; Henry Chafetz

2000-01-01

325

BIOFILM REACTORS FOR INDUSTRIAL BIOCONVERSION PROCESSES: EMPLOYING POTENTIAL OF ENHANCED REACTIONS RATES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This article describes the use of biofilm reactors for the production of various chemicals by fermentation and wastewater treatment. Biofilm formation is a natural process where microbial cells attach to the support (adsorbent) without use of chemicals and form thick layers of cells known as “biofi...

326

Three-dimensional biofilm model with individual cells and continuum EPS matrix.  

PubMed

An innovative type of biofilm model is derived by combining an individual description of microbial particles with a continuum representation of the biofilm matrix. This hybrid model retains the advantages of each approach, while providing a more realistic description of the temporal development of biofilm structure in two or three spatial dimensions. The general model derivation takes into account any possible number of soluble components. These are substrates and metabolic products, which diffuse and react in the biofilm within individual microbial cells. The cells grow, divide, and produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in a multispecies model setting. The EPS matrix is described by a continuum representation as incompressible viscous fluid, which can expand and retract due to generation and consumption processes. The cells move due to a pushing mechanism between cells in colonies and by an advective mechanism supported by the EPS dynamics. Detachment of both cells and EPS follows a continuum approach, whereas cells attach in discrete events. Two case studies are presented for model illustration. Biofilm consolidation is explained by shrinking due to EPS and cell degradation processes. This mechanism describes formation of a denser layer of cells in the biofilm depth and occurrence of an irregularly shaped biofilm surface under nutrient limiting conditions. Micro-colony formation is investigated by growth of autotrophic microbial colonies in an EPS matrix produced by heterotrophic cells. Size and shape of colonies of ammonia and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are comparatively studied in a standard biofilm and in biofilms aerated from a membrane side. PMID:16615160

Alpkvist, Erik; Picioreanu, Cristian; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Heyden, Anders

2006-08-01

327

Impact of bacterial biofilm on the treatment of prosthetic joint infections.  

PubMed

Microbial biofilm contributes to chronic infection and is involved in the pathogenesis of prosthetic joint infections. Biofilms are structurally complex and should be considered a dynamic system able to protect the bacteria from host defence mechanisms and from antibacterial agents. Despite the use of antibiotics recognized as effective against acute infections, prosthetic joint infections require long-term suppressive treatment acting on adherent bacteria. Conventional in vitro susceptibility testing methods are not suitable for biofilm-associated infections given that these tests do not take into account the physiological parameters of bacterial cells in vivo. Most anti-staphylococcal drugs are able to inhibit in vitro the adhesion of bacteria to a surface, considered to be the first step in biofilm formation. Recent studies suggest that the lack of activity of antibiotics against biofilm-embedded bacteria seems to be more related to the decreased effect of the drug on the pathogen than to the poor penetration of the drug into the biofilm. Eradication of biofilm-embedded bacteria is a very difficult task and combination therapy is required in the treatment of persistent infections involving biofilm. Although several combinations demonstrate potent efficacy, rifampicin is the most common partner drug of effective combinations against staphylococcal biofilms. Considering the complexity of biofilm-related infections, further studies are needed to assess the activity of new therapeutic agents in combination with antibiotics (quorum-sensing inhibitors, biofilm disruptors and specific anti-biofilm molecules). PMID:25135088

Jacqueline, Cédric; Caillon, Jocelyne

2014-09-01

328

Microbial life at ?13 °C in the brine of an ice-sealed Antarctic lake  

PubMed Central

The permanent ice cover of Lake Vida (Antarctica) encapsulates an extreme cryogenic brine ecosystem (?13 °C; salinity, 200). This aphotic ecosystem is anoxic and consists of a slightly acidic (pH 6.2) sodium chloride-dominated brine. Expeditions in 2005 and 2010 were conducted to investigate the biogeochemistry of Lake Vida’s brine system. A phylogenetically diverse and metabolically active Bacteria dominated microbial assemblage was observed in the brine. These bacteria live under very high levels of reduced metals, ammonia, molecular hydrogen (H2), and dissolved organic carbon, as well as high concentrations of oxidized species of nitrogen (i.e., supersaturated nitrous oxide and ?1 mmol?L?1 nitrate) and sulfur (as sulfate). The existence of this system, with active biota, and a suite of reduced as well as oxidized compounds, is unusual given the millennial scale of its isolation from external sources of energy. The geochemistry of the brine suggests that abiotic brine-rock reactions may occur in this system and that the rich sources of dissolved electron acceptors prevent sulfate reduction and methanogenesis from being energetically favorable. The discovery of this ecosystem and the in situ biotic and abiotic processes occurring at low temperature provides a tractable system to study habitability of isolated terrestrial cryoenvironments (e.g., permafrost cryopegs and subglacial ecosystems), and is a potential analog for habitats on other icy worlds where water-rock reactions may cooccur with saline deposits and subsurface oceans. PMID:23185006

Murray, Alison E.; Kenig, Fabien; Fritsen, Christian H.; McKay, Christopher P.; Cawley, Kaelin M.; Edwards, Ross; Kuhn, Emanuele; McKnight, Diane M.; Ostrom, Nathaniel E.; Peng, Vivian; Ponce, Adrian; Priscu, John C.; Samarkin, Vladimir; Townsend, Ashley T.; Wagh, Protima; Young, Seth A.; Yung, Pung To; Doran, Peter T.

2012-01-01

329

Microbial detection and monitoring in advanced life support systems like the international space station  

Microsoft Academic Search

Potentially pathogenic microbes and so-called technophiles may form a serious threat in advanced life support systems, such\\u000a as the International Space Station (ISS). They not only pose a threat to the health of the crew, but also to the technical\\u000a equipment and materials of the space station. The development of fast and easy to use molecular detection and quantification\\u000a methods

Sandra P. van Tongeren; Gerwin C. Raangs; Gjalt W. Welling; Hermie J. M. Harmsen; Janneke Krooneman

2006-01-01

330

Microbial Diversity of Carbonate Chimneys at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field: Implications for Life-Sustaining Systems in Peridotite Seafloor Environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is a novel peridotite-hosted vent environment discovered in Dec. 2000 at 30 N near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This field contains multiple large (up to 60 m), carbonate chimneys venting high pH (9-10), moderate temperature (45-75 C) fluids. The LCHF is unusual in that it is located on 1.5 my-old oceanic crust, 15 km from the nearest spreading axis. Hydrothermal flow in this system is believed to be driven by exothermic serpentinization reactions involving iron-bearing minerals in the underlying seafloor. The conditions created by such reactions, which include significant quantities of dissolved methane and hydrogen, create habitats for microbial communities specifically adapted to this unusual vent environment. Ultramafic, reducing hydrothermal environments like the LCHF may be analogous to geologic settings present on the early Earth, which have been suggested to be important for the emergence of life. Additionally, the existence of hydrothermal environments far away from an active spreading center expands the range of potential life-supporting environments elsewhere in the solar system. To study the abundance and diversity of microbial communities inhabiting the environments that characterize the LCHF, carbonate chimney samples were analyzed by microscopic and molecular methods. Cell densities of between 105 and 107 cells/g were observed within various samples collected from the chimneys. Interestingly, 4-11% of the microbial population in direct contact with vent fluids fluoresced with Flavin-420, a key coenzyme involved in methanogenesis. Enrichment culturing from chimney material under aerobic and anaerobic conditions yielded microorganisms in the thermophilic and mesophilic temperature regimes in media designed for methanogenesis, methane-oxidation, and heterotrophy. PCR analysis of chimney material indicated the presence of both Archaea and Eubacteria in the carbonate samples. SSU rDNA clone libraries constructed from the Eubacterial DNA show that diverse microbial communities, including autotrophic microorganisms and animal symbionts, are contained within the vent structures. In concert, these results indicate that abundant and varied microbial communities inhabit different regions of the chimney structure and may be specifically adapted to the reducing, volatile-rich fluids percolating through the chimneys. In addition to expanding the range of known deep-sea ecosystems, the microbial ecology of carbonate structures associated with hydrothermal venting at the LCHF may provide key insights into the microbiology of subsurface environments near this site. Studying the microbial communities within these systems will enable us to better understand geo-microbial processes associated with serpentinite environments and perhaps allow us to expand our search for life elsewhere in the universe.

Schrenk, M. O.; Cimino, P.; Kelley, D. S.; Baross, J. A.

2002-12-01

331

Photodynamic therapy as a novel antimicrobial strategy against biofilm-based nosocomial infections: study protocols.  

PubMed

Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), also known as nosocomial infections, are one of the most serious health-care issues currently influencing health-care costs. Among them, those sustained by microbial biofilm represent a major public health concern. Here, we describe the experimental protocols for microbial biofilm inactivation relying on antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) as a new strategy for the control of these kinds of infections. PMID:24664842

Giuliani, Francesco

2014-01-01

332

Simulation of batch-operated experimental wetland mesocosms in AQUASIM biofilm reactor compartment.  

PubMed

In this study, a mathematical biofilm reactor model based on the structure of the Constructed Wetland Model No.1 (CWM1) coupled to AQUASIM's biofilm reactor compartment has been used to reproduce the sequence of transformation and degradation of organic matter, nitrogen and sulphur observed in a set of constructed wetland mesocosms and to elucidate the development over time of microbial species as well as the biofilm thickness of a multispecies bacterial biofilm in a subsurface constructed wetland. Experimental data from 16 wetland mesocosms operated under greenhouse conditions, planted with three different plant species (Typha latifolia, Carex rostrata, Schoenoplectus acutus) and an unplanted control were used in the calibration of this mechanistic model. Within the mesocosms, a thin (predominantly anaerobic) biofilm was simulated with an initial thickness of 49 ?m (average) and in which no concentration gradients developed. The biofilm density and area, and the distribution of the microbial species within the biofilm were evaluated to be the most sensitive biofilm properties; while the substrate diffusion limitations were not significantly sensitive to influence the bulk volume concentrations. The simulated biofilm density ranging between 105,000 and 153,000 gCOD/m(3) in the mesocosms was observed to vary with temperature, the presence as well as the species of macrophyte. The biofilm modeling was found to be a better tool than the suspended bacterial modeling approach to show the influence of the rhizosphere configuration on the performance of the constructed wetlands. PMID:24468449

Mburu, Njenga; Rousseau, Diederik P L; Stein, Otto R; Lens, Piet N L

2014-02-15

333

Particle-Based Multidimensional Multispecies Biofilm Model  

PubMed Central

In this paper we describe a spatially multidimensional (two-dimensional [2-D] and three-dimensional [3-D]) particle-based approach for modeling the dynamics of multispecies biofilms growing on multiple substrates. The model is based on diffusion-reaction mass balances for chemical species coupled with microbial growth and spreading of biomass represented by hard spherical particles. Effectively, this is a scaled-up version of a previously proposed individual-based biofilm model. Predictions of this new particle-based model were quantitatively compared with those obtained with an established one-dimensional (1-D) multispecies model for equivalent problems. A nitrifying biofilm containing aerobic ammonium and nitrite oxidizers, anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, and inert biomass was chosen as an example. The 2-D and 3-D models generally gave the same results. If only the average flux of nutrients needs to be known, 2-D and 1-D models are very similar. However, the behavior of intermediates, which are produced and consumed in different locations within the biofilm, is better described in 2-D and 3-D models because of the multidirectional concentration gradients. The predictions of 2-D or 3-D models are also different from those of 1-D models for slowly growing or minority species in the biofilm. This aspect is related to the mechanism of biomass spreading or advection implemented in the models and should receive more attention in future experimental studies. PMID:15128564

Picioreanu, Cristian; Kreft, Jan-Ulrich; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.

2004-01-01

334

New life in old reservoirs - the microbial conversion of oil to methane  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since almost 20 years it is known from stable isotope studies that large amounts of biogenic methane are formed in oil reservoirs. The investigation of this degradation process and of the underlying biogeochemical controls are of economical and social importance, since even under optimal conditions, not more than 30-40 % of the oil in a reservoir is actually recovered. The conversion of parts of this non-recoverable oil via an appropriate biotechnological treatment into easily recoverable methane would provide an extensive and ecologically sound energy resource. Laboratory mesocosm as well as high pressure autoclave experiments with samples from different geosystems showed high methane production rates after the addition of oils, single hydrocarbons or coals. The variation of parameters, like temperature, pressure or salinity, showed a broad tolerance to environmental conditions. The fingerprinting of the microbial enrichments with DGGE showed a large bacterial diversity while that of Archaea was limited to three to four dominant species. The Q-PCR results showed the presence of high numbers of Archaea and Bacteria. To analyse their function, we measured the abundances of genes indicative of metal reduction (16S rRNA gene for Geobacteraceae), sulphate reduction (sulphate reductase, dsr), and methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M-reductase, mcrA). The methanogenic consortia will be further characterised to determine enzymatic pathways and the individual role of each partner. Degradation pathways for different compounds will be studied using 13C-labelled substrates and molecular techniques. Our stable isotope data from both, methane produced in our incubations with samples from various ecosystems and field studies, implies a common methanogenic biodegradation mechanism, resulting in consistent patterns of hydrocarbon alteration.

Gründger, Friederike; Feisthauer, Stefan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Siegert, Michael; Krüger, Martin

2010-05-01

335

Rock physics models for constraining quantitative interpretation of ultrasonic data for biofilm growth and development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examines the use of rock physics modeling for quantitative interpretation of seismic data in the context of microbial growth and biofilm formation in unconsolidated sediment. The impetus for this research comes from geophysical experiments by Davis et al. (2010) and Kwon and Ajo-Franklin et al. (2012). These studies observed that microbial growth has a small effect on P-wave velocities (VP) but a large effect on seismic amplitudes. Davis et al. (2010) and Kwon and Ajo-Franklin et al. (2012) speculated that the amplitude variations were due to a combination of rock mechanical changes from accumulation of microbial growth related features such as biofilms. A more definite conclusion can be drawn by developing rock physics models that connect rock properties to seismic amplitudes. The primary objective of this work is to provide an explanation for high amplitude attenuation due to biofilm growth. The results suggest that biofilm formation in the Davis et al. (2010) experiment exhibit two growth styles: a loadbearing style where biofilm behaves like an additional mineral grain and a non-loadbearing mode where the biofilm grows into the pore spaces. In the loadbearing mode, the biofilms contribute to the stiffness of the sediments. We refer to this style as "filler." In the non-loadbearing mode, the biofilms contribute only to change in density of sediments without affecting their strength. We refer to this style of microbial growth as "mushroom." Both growth styles appear to be changing permeability more than the moduli or the density. As the result, while the VP velocity remains relatively unchanged, the amplitudes can change significantly depending on biofilm saturation. Interpreting seismic data from biofilm growths in term of rock physics models provide a greater insight into the sediment-fluid interaction. The models in turn can be used to understand microbial enhanced oil recovery and in assisting in solving environmental issues such as creating bio-barriers to prevent water contamination or CO2 leakage.

Alhadhrami, Fathiya Mohammed

336

Combined effect of dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC) and nisin on indigenous microorganisms of litchi juice and its microbial shelf life.  

PubMed

The individual and combined influences of dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC) and nisin (200 IU/mL) at mild heat on the inactivation of indigenous microorganisms in litchi juice, including bacteria, molds and yeasts (M&Y), were investigated. The fresh litchi juice with or without nisin were exposed to 250 mg/L DMDC at 30, 40, or 45 °C for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 6 h. A complete inactivation of M&Y in the litchi juice with or without nisin was achieved as exposed to 250 mg/L DMDC at 30, 40, or 45 °C for 0.5 h. The bacteria, especially Bacillus sp. and Leuconstoc mesenteroides showed higher resistance than M&Y in the litchi juice. Bacillus sp. and Leuconstoc mesenteroides in the litchi juice was not completely inactivated by 250 mg/L DMDC at 30, 40, or 45 °C. However, nisin addition can enhanced the inactivation of these bacteria by DMDC, and nisin and DMDC also showed a synergistic effect on the inactivation of bacteria. M&Y and bacteria were not detected in the litchi juice added with 200 IU/mL nisin as exposed to 250 mg/L DMDC at 45 °C for 3 h. In addition, microbial shelf life of the litchi juice during storage at 4 °C also was evaluated as treated by 250 mg/L DMDC or combination with nisin at 45 °C for 3 h. PMID:23957413

Yu, Yuanshan; Wu, Jijun; Xiao, Gengsheng; Xu, Yujuan; Tang, Daobang; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Yousheng

2013-08-01

337

The Search for Life on Mars Using Macroscopically Visible Microbial Mats (Stromatolites) in 3.5 3.3 Ga Cherts from the Pilbara in Australia and Barberton in South Africa as Analogues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbial mats from early terrestrial environments can be macroscopically visible and represent excellent analogues in the search for life on Mars. Tests using the Beagle 2 camera show that they can be observed by in situ instrumentation.

Westall, F.; Hofmann, B.; Brack, A.

2004-03-01

338

Development of static system procedures to study aquatic biofilms and their responses to disinfection and invading species  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The microbial ecology facility in the Analytical and Physical Chemistry Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center is tasked with anticipation of potential microbial problems (and opportunities to exploit microorganisms) which may occur in partially closed systems such as space station/vehicles habitats and in water reclamation systems therein, with particular emphasis on the degradation of materials. Within this context, procedures for microbial biofilm research are being developed. Reported here is the development of static system procedures to study aquatic biofilms and their responses to disinfection and invading species. Preliminary investigations have been completed. As procedures are refined, it will be possible to focus more closely on the elucidation of biofilm phenomena.

Smithers, G. A.

1992-01-01

339

Drinking water quality and formation of biofilms in an office building during its first year of operation, a full scale study.  

PubMed

Complex interactions existing between water distribution systems' materials and water can cause a reduction in water quality and unwanted changes in materials, aging or corrosion of materials and formation of biofilms on surfaces. Substances leaching from pipe materials and water fittings, as well as the microbiological quality of water and formation of biofilms were evaluated by applying a Living Lab theme i.e. a research in a real life setting using a full scale system during its first year of operation. The study site was a real office building with one part of the building lined with copper pipes, the other with cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) pipes thus enabling material comparison; also differences within the cold and hot water systems were analysed. It was found that operational conditions, such as flow conditions and temperature affected the amounts of metals leaching from the pipe network. In particular, brass components were considered to be a source of leaching; e. g. the lead concentration was highest during the first few weeks after the commissioning of the pipe network when the water was allowed to stagnate. Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and microbially available phosphorus (MAP) were found to leach from PEX pipelines with minor effects on biomass of the biofilm. Cultivable and viable biomass (heterotrophic plate count (HPC), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)) levels in biofilms were higher in the cold than in the hot water system whereas total microbial biomass (total cell count (DAPI)) was similar with both systems. The type of pipeline material was not found to greatly affect the microbial biomass or Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria profiles (16s rRNA gene copies) after the first one year of operation. Also microbiological quality of water was found to deteriorate due to stagnation. PMID:24317021

Inkinen, Jenni; Kaunisto, Tuija; Pursiainen, Anna; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Kusnetsov, Jaana; Riihinen, Kalle; Keinänen-Toivola, Minna M

2014-02-01

340

Sulfate- and Sulfur-Reducing Bacteria as Terrestrial Analogs for Microbial Life on Jupiter's Satellite Io  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations from the Voyager and Galileo spacecraft have revealed Jupiter's moon Io to be the most volcanically active body of our Solar System. The Galileo Near Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (NIMS) detected extensive deposits of sulfur compounds, elemental sulfur and SO2 frost on the surface of Io. There are extreme temperature variations on Io's surface, ranging from -130 C to over 2000 C at the Pillan Patera volcanic vent. The active volcanoes, fumaroles, calderas, and lava lakes and vast sulfur deposits on this frozen moon indicate that analogs of sulfur- and sulfate-reducing bacteria might inhabit Io. Hence Io may have great significance to Astrobiology. Earth's life forms that depend on sulfur respiration are members of two domains: Bacteria and Archaea. Two basic links of the biogeochemical sulfur cycle of Earth have been studied: 1) the sulfur oxidizing process (occurring at aerobic conditions) and 2) the process of sulfur-reduction to hydrogen sulfide (anaerobic conditions). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (StRB) and sulfur-reducing bacteria (SrRB) are responsible for anaerobic reducing processes. At the present time the systematics of StRB include over 112 species distributed into 35 genera of Bacteria and Archaea. Moderately thermophilic and mesophilic SrRB belong to the Bacteria. The hyperthermophilic SrRB predominately belong to the domain Archaea and are included in the genera: Pyrodictium, Thermoproteus, Pyrobaculum, Thermophilum, Desulfurococcus, and Thermodiscus. The StRB and SrRB use a wide spectrum of substrates as electron donors for lithotrophic and heterotrophic type nutrition. The electron acceptors for the StRB include: sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, sulfur, arsenate, dithionite, tetrathionate, sulfur monoxide, iron, nitrite, selenite, fumarate, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and chlorine-containing phenol compounds. The Sulfate- and Sulfur-reducing bacteria are widely distributed in anaerobic ecosystems, including extreme environments like hot springs, deepsea hydrothermal vents, soda and high salinity lakes, and cryo-environments. Furthermore, the StRB and SrRB have Astrobiological significance as these anaerobic extremophiles may represent the dominant relic life forms that inhabited our planet during the extensive volcanic activity in the Earth's early evolutionary period.

Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

341

Community structure and biogeochemical impacts of microbial life on floating pumice.  

PubMed

Volcanic eruptions are a widespread force of geological and ecological disturbance and present recurrent opportunities for the study of biological responses to novel habitat formation. However, scientific study of such events is difficult given their short duration and often distant location. Here we report results from opportunistic sampling of unique volcano-generated habitats formed during the 2011 explosive eruption in the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle complex (Chile), when massive amounts of pumice were ejected, creating novel floating substrata that have never before been characterized from a microbiological perspective. DNA sequencing revealed a dynamic community of microbes that came to inhabit the pumice, with a unique composition distinct from that of the lakes' surface waters and with suggestions of ecological convergence across lakes and sampling times. Furthermore, biogeochemical studies of net nutrient fluxes showed that, while the fresh pumice arriving to the lakes was an initial source of phosphorus (P), colonized pumice had high rates of nitrogen (N) and P uptake and was sufficiently abundant to represent a significant lake-wide nutrient sink. These findings highlight the remarkable versatility of microbes in exploiting novel environments and are consistent with a recent proposal of floating pumice as a favorable environment for the initial origins of life on early Earth. PMID:25527547

Elser, J J; Bastidas Navarro, M; Corman, J R; Emick, H; Kellom, M; Laspoumaderes, C; Lee, Z M; Poret-Peterson, A T; Balseiro, E; Modenutti, B

2015-03-01

342

Nature of Phosphorus Compounds Fueling Microbial Life in Deep-Sea Sediments at North Pond  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phosphorus is an essential nutrient that can be limiting in some environments. Despite its critical importance for life, many components of its cycle, including phosphorus uptake and cycling in deep-sea sediments, remain unclear. Understanding phosphorus cycling in open ocean sediments is crucial, since a significant portion of Earth's prokaryotes thrives in this environment. However, little is known about the nature of phosphorus compounds these microorganisms are taking up or the mechanisms used. This study aims to identify the specific phosphorus forms within the labile and refractory sedimentary phosphorus pools that "fuel" the deep biosphere at North Pond, an isolated sediment pond on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic ridge. Sediment samples were collected from four boreholes drilled during the IODP expedition 336. Sedimentary phosphorus compounds are characterized using sequential extractions (SEDEX), which separate them into distinct reservoirs. In addition, solution phase 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to further characterize phosphorus forms. We hypothesize that phosphorus in deep sub-seafloor sediments has low bioavailability and is mainly present in mineral phases.

Defforey, D.; Paytan, A.

2012-12-01

343

Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilms: Carbon and energy flow contribute to the distinct biofilm growth state  

PubMed Central

Background Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) that is intensively studied in the context of metal corrosion and heavy-metal bioremediation, and SRB populations are commonly observed in pipe and subsurface environments as surface-associated populations. In order to elucidate physiological changes associated with biofilm growth at both the transcript and protein level, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were done on mature biofilm cells and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. The biofilms were cultivated with lactate and sulfate in a continuously fed biofilm reactor, and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. Results The functional genomic analysis demonstrated that biofilm cells were different compared to planktonic cells, and the majority of altered abundances for genes and proteins were annotated as hypothetical (unknown function), energy conservation, amino acid metabolism, and signal transduction. Genes and proteins that showed similar trends in detected levels were particularly involved in energy conservation such as increases in an annotated ech hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and rnf oxidoreductase, and the biofilm cells had elevated formate dehydrogenase activity. Several other hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases also showed an increased protein level, while decreased transcript and protein levels were observed for putative coo hydrogenase as well as a lactate permease and hyp hydrogenases for biofilm cells. Genes annotated for amino acid synthesis and nitrogen utilization were also predominant changers within the biofilm state. Ribosomal transcripts and proteins were notably decreased within the biofilm cells compared to exponential-phase cells but were not as low as levels observed in planktonic, stationary-phase cells. Several putative, extracellular proteins (DVU1012, 1545) were also detected in the extracellular fraction from biofilm cells. Conclusions Even though both the planktonic and biofilm cells were oxidizing lactate and reducing sulfate, the biofilm cells were physiologically distinct compared to planktonic growth states due to altered abundances of genes/proteins involved in carbon/energy flow and extracellular structures. In addition, average expression values for multiple rRNA transcripts and respiratory activity measurements indicated that biofilm cells were metabolically more similar to exponential-phase cells although biofilm cells are structured differently. The characterization of physiological advantages and constraints of the biofilm growth state for sulfate-reducing bacteria will provide insight into bioremediation applications as well as microbially-induced metal corrosion. PMID:22507456

2012-01-01

344

Modeling phototrophic biofilms in a plug-flow reactor.  

PubMed

The use of phototrophic biofilms in wastewater treatment has been recognized as a potential option for development of new reactor configurations. For better understanding of these systems, a numerical model was developed including relevant microbial processes. As a novelty, this model was implemented in COMSOL Multiphysics, a modern computational environment for complex dynamic models. A two-dimensional biofilm model was used to study the spatial distribution of microbial species within the biofilm and along the length of the reactor. The biofilm model was coupled with a one-dimensional plug-flow bulk liquid model. The impact of different operational conditions on the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia conversions was assessed. The model was tuned by varying two parameters: the half-saturation coefficient for light use by phototrophs and the oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The mass transfer coefficient was found to be determining for the substrate conversion rate. Simulations indicate that heterotrophs would overgrow nitrifiers and phototrophs within the biofilm until a low biodegradable COD value in the wastewater is reached (organic loading rate <2.32 gCOD/(m(2) d)). This limits the proposed positive effect of treating wastewater with a combination of algae and heterotrophs/autotrophs. Mechanistic models like this one are made for understanding the microbial interactions and their influence on the reactor performance. PMID:25325552

Muñoz Sierra, J D; Picioreanu, C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

2014-01-01

345

Smart central venous port for early detection of bacterial biofilm related infections.  

PubMed

Central venous catheters (CVC) are commonly used in clinical practice to improve a patient's quality of life. Unfortunately, there is an intrinsic risk of acquiring an infection related to microbial biofilm formation inside the catheter lumen. It has been estimated that 80 % of all human bacterial infections are biofilm-associated. Additionally, 50 % of all nosocomial infections are associated with indwelling devices. Bloodstream infections account for 30-40 % of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock, and are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of bloodstream infections must be performed promptly so that adequate antimicrobial therapy can be started and patient outcome improved. An ideal diagnostic technology would identify the infecting organism(s) in a timely manner, so that appropriate pathogen-driven therapy could begin promptly. Unfortunately, despite the essential information it provides, blood culture, the gold standard, largely fails in this purpose because time is lost waiting for bacterial or fungal growth. This work presents a new design of a venous access port that allows the monitoring of the inner reservoir surface by means of an impedimetric biosensor. An ad-hoc electronic system was designed to manage the sensor and to allow communication with the external receiver. Historic data recorded and stored in the device was used as the reference value for the detection of bacterial biofilm. The RF communication system sends an alarm signal to the external receiver when a microbial colonization of the port occurs. The successful in vitro analysis of the biosensor, the electronics and the antenna of the new indwelling device prototype are shown. The experimental conditions were selected in each case as the closest to the clinical working conditions for the smart central venous catheter (SCVC) testing. The results of this work allow a new generation of this kind of device that could potentially provide more efficient treatments for catheter-related infections. PMID:24515846

Paredes, J; Alonso-Arce, M; Schmidt, C; Valderas, D; Sedano, B; Legarda, J; Arizti, F; Gómez, E; Aguinaga, A; Del Pozo, J L; Arana, S

2014-06-01

346

Immune indexes of larks from desert and temperate regions show weak associations with life history but stronger links to environmental variation in microbial abundance.  

PubMed

Immune defense may vary as a result of trade-offs with other life-history traits or in parallel with variation in antigen levels in the environment. We studied lark species (Alaudidae) in the Arabian Desert and temperate Netherlands to test opposing predictions from these two hypotheses. Based on their slower pace of life, the trade-off hypothesis predicts relatively stronger immune defenses in desert larks compared with temperate larks. However, as predicted by the antigen exposure hypothesis, reduced microbial abundances in deserts should result in desert-living larks having relatively weaker immune defenses. We quantified host-independent and host-dependent microbial abundances of culturable microbes in ambient air and from the surfaces of birds. We measured components of immunity by quantifying concentrations of the acute-phase protein haptoglobin, natural antibody-mediated agglutination titers, complement-mediated lysis titers, and the microbicidal ability of whole blood. Desert-living larks were exposed to significantly lower concentrations of airborne microbes than temperate larks, and densities of some bird-associated microbes were also lower in desert species. Haptoglobin concentrations and lysis titers were also significantly lower in desert-living larks, but other immune indexes did not differ. Thus, contrary to the trade-off hypothesis, we found little evidence that a slow pace of life predicted increased immunological investment. In contrast, and in support of the antigen exposure hypothesis, associations between microbial exposure and some immune indexes were apparent. Measures of antigen exposure, including assessment of host-independent and host-dependent microbial assemblages, can provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying immunological variation. PMID:22902379

Horrocks, Nicholas P C; Hegemann, Arne; Matson, Kevin D; Hine, Kathryn; Jaquier, Sophie; Shobrak, Mohammed; Williams, Joseph B; Tinbergen, Joost M; Tieleman, B Irene

2012-01-01

347

Anodic and cathodic microbial communities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a rapidly growing technology for energy production from wastewater and biomasses. In a MFC, a microbial biofilm oxidizes organic matter and transfers electrons from reduced compounds to an anode as the electron acceptor by extracellular electron transfer (EET). The aim of this work was to characterize the microbial communities operating in a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell (SCMFC) fed with acetate and inoculated with a biogas digestate in order to gain more insight into anodic and cathodic EET. Taxonomic characterization of the communities was carried out by Illumina sequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Microorganisms belonging to Geovibrio genus and purple non-sulfur (PNS) bacteria were found to be dominant in the anodic biofilm. The alkaliphilic genus Nitrincola and anaerobic microorganisms belonging to Porphyromonadaceae family were the most abundant bacteria in the cathodic biofilm. PMID:25291711

Daghio, Matteo; Gandolfi, Isabella; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Franzetti, Andrea; Guerrini, Edoardo; Cristiani, Pierangela

2015-01-25

348

Staphylococcus aureus biofilms  

PubMed Central

Increasing attention has been focused on understanding bacterial biofilms and this growth modality's relation to human disease. In this review we explore the genetic regulation and molecular components involved in biofilm formation and maturation in the context of the Gram-positive cocci, Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, we discuss diseases and host immune responses, along with current therapies associated with S. aureus biofilm infections and prevention strategies. PMID:21921685

Archer, Nathan K; Mazaitis, Mark J; Costerton, J William; Leid, Jeff G; Powers, Mary Elizabeth

2011-01-01

349

Microbiota diversity and gene expression dynamics in human oral biofilms  

PubMed Central

Background Micro-organisms inhabiting teeth surfaces grow on biofilms where a specific and complex succession of bacteria has been described by co-aggregation tests and DNA-based studies. Although the composition of oral biofilms is well established, the active portion of the bacterial community and the patterns of gene expression in vivo have not been studied. Results Using RNA-sequencing technologies, we present the first metatranscriptomic study of human dental plaque, performed by two different approaches: (1) A short-reads, high-coverage approach by Illumina sequencing to characterize the gene activity repertoire of the microbial community during biofilm development; (2) A long-reads, lower-coverage approach by pyrosequencing to determine the taxonomic identity of the active microbiome before and after a meal ingestion. The high-coverage approach allowed us to analyze over 398 million reads, revealing that microbial communities are individual-specific and no bacterial species was detected as key player at any time during biofilm formation. We could identify some gene expression patterns characteristic for early and mature oral biofilms. The transcriptomic profile of several adhesion genes was confirmed through qPCR by measuring expression of fimbriae-associated genes. In addition to the specific set of gene functions overexpressed in early and mature oral biofilms, as detected through the short-reads dataset, the long-reads approach detected specific changes when comparing the metatranscriptome of the same individual before and after a meal, which can narrow down the list of organisms responsible for acid production and therefore potentially involved in dental caries. Conclusions The bacteria changing activity during biofilm formation and after meal ingestion were person-specific. Interestingly, some individuals showed extreme homeostasis with virtually no changes in the active bacterial population after food ingestion, suggesting the presence of a microbial community which could be associated to dental health. PMID:24767457

2014-01-01

350

Corrosion inhibition of mild steel by aerobic biofilm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mild steel electrodes were incubated in phosphate-buffered basal salt solution (BSS) having two different aerobic bacteria, viz. Pseudomonas alcaligenes and Pseudomonas cichorii. In the medium containing P. cichorii, significant reduction in the corrosion rate was observed due to the surface reaction leading to the formation of corrosion inhibiting bacterial biofilm. With a view to understand the mechanism of microbially influenced

Shobhana Chongdar; G. Gunasekaran; Pradeep Kumar

2005-01-01

351

Functional characterization of two concrete biofilms using pyrosequencing data  

EPA Science Inventory

Phylogenetic studies of concrete biofilms using 16SrRNA-based approaches have demonstrated that concrete surfaces harbor a diverse microbial community. These approaches can provide information on the general taxonomical groups present in a sample but cannot shed light on the func...

352

Corrosion influenced by biofilms during wet nuclear waste storage  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, effects of microbial populations within a nuclear waste repository were studied. Consequences of biofilm formation, bacterial biosorption of metals, and bacterial radioresistance must be assessed. Water samples taken during the interim storage of spent fuel at the Atomic Energy Research Institute in Budapest were examined. Six morphologically different bacteria were isolated from the samples. The radiosensitivities of

G. Diósi; J. Telegdi; Gy. Farkas; L. G. Gazsó; E. Bokori

2003-01-01

353

Molecular determinants of staphylococcal biofilm dispersal and structuring  

PubMed Central

Staphylococci are frequently implicated in human infections, and continue to pose a therapeutic dilemma due to their ability to form deeply seated microbial communities, known as biofilms, on the surfaces of implanted medical devices and host tissues. Biofilm development has been proposed to occur in three stages: (1) attachment, (2) proliferation/structuring, and (3) detachment/dispersal. Although research within the last several decades has implicated multiple molecules in the roles as effectors of staphylococcal biofilm proliferation/structuring and detachment/dispersal, to date, only phenol soluble modulins (PSMs) have been consistently demonstrated to serve in this role under both in vitro and in vivo settings. PSMs are regulated directly through a density-dependent manner by the accessory gene regulator (Agr) system. They disrupt the non-covalent forces holding the biofilm extracellular matrix together, which is necessary for the formation of channels, a process essential for the delivery of nutrients to deeper biofilm layers, and for dispersal/dissemination of clusters of biofilm to distal organs in acute infection. Given their relevance in both acute and chronic biofilm-associated infections, the Agr system and the psm genes hold promise as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25505739

Le, Katherine Y.; Dastgheyb, Sana; Ho, Trung V.; Otto, Michael

2014-01-01

354

Perpetuation of subgingival biofilms in an in vitro model.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the reproducibility of in-vitro-grown biofilms, initiated with subgingival plaque from patients with periodontal disease, and continued through several cycles by re-inoculating new biofilms from previously grown biofilms. Subgingival plaque samples from bleeding pockets along with saliva samples were collected from three patients with chronic periodontitis and perpetuated through seven cycles. Calcium hydroxyapatite disks were coated with sterilized saliva inoculated with dispersed subgingival plaque. The biofilms were grown anaerobically at 37 degrees C for 10 days, and at specific intervals total viable bacteria were enumerated and the species present were analysed by DNA-DNA checkerboard hybridization. All cycles of biofilm growth occurred at similar rates and reached steady-state at day 7. No statistically or microbially significant differences were found for viable counts or species present, at the same period of maturation, among the different cycles. This study demonstrated that growth of certain target subgingival periodontal species in this biofilm model was reproducible and could be perpetuated in vitro through several cycles. The model could be useful in future studies to characterize different periodontopathogenic properties and biofilm interactions, especially in recolonization studies. PMID:20331796

Shaddox, L M; Alfant, B; Tobler, J; Walker, C

2010-02-01

355

Electron acceptor-dependent respiratory and physiological stratifications in biofilms.  

PubMed

Bacterial respiration is an essential driving force in biogeochemical cycling and bioremediation processes. Electron acceptors respired by bacteria often have solid and soluble forms that typically coexist in the environment. It is important to understand how sessile bacteria attached to solid electron acceptors respond to ambient soluble alternative electron acceptors. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) provide a useful tool to investigate this interaction. In MFCs with Shewanella decolorationis, azo dye was used as an alternative electron acceptor in the anode chamber. Different respiration patterns were observed for biofilm and planktonic cells, with planktonic cells preferred to respire with azo dye while biofilm cells respired with both the anode and azo dye. The additional azo respiration dissipated the proton accumulation within the anode biofilm. There was a large redox potential gap between the biofilms and anode surface. Changing cathodic conditions caused immediate effects on the anode potential but not on the biofilm potential. Biofilm viability showed an inverse and respiration-dependent profile when respiring with only the anode or azo dye and was enhanced when respiring with both simultaneously. These results provide new insights into the bacterial respiration strategies in environments containing multiple electron acceptors and support an electron-hopping mechanism within Shewanella electrode-respiring biofilms. PMID:25495895

Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Sun, Guoping; Wu, Wei-Min; Xu, Meiying

2015-01-01

356

Toluene Diffusion and Reaction in Unsaturated Pseudomonas putida Biofilms  

PubMed Central

Biofilms are frequently studied in the context of submerged or aquatic systems. However, much less is known about biofilms in unsaturated systems, despite their importance to such processes as food spoilage, terrestrial nutrient cycling, and biodegradation of environmental pollutants in soils. Using modeling and experimentation, we have described the biodegradation of toluene in unsaturated media by bacterial biofilms as a function of matric water potential, a dominant variable in unsaturated systems. We experimentally determined diffusion and kinetic parameters for Pseudomonas putida biofilms, then predicted biodegradation rates over a range of matric water potentials. For validation, we measured the rate of toluene depletion by intact biofilms and found the results to reasonably follow the model predictions. The diffusion coefficient for toluene through unsaturated P. putida biofilm averaged 1.3 × 10?7 cm2/s, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than toluene diffusivity in water. Our studies show that, at the scale of the microbial biofilm, the diffusion of toluene to biodegrading bacteria can limit the overall rate of biological toluene depletion in unsaturated systems. PMID:18642338

Holden, Patricia A.; Hunt, James R.; Firestone, Mary K.

2010-01-01

357

Preferential Feeding by the Ciliates Chilodonella and Tetrahymena spp. and Effects of These Protozoa on Bacterial Biofilm Structure and Composition?  

PubMed Central

Protozoa are important components of microbial food webs, but protozoan feeding preferences and their effects in the context of bacterial biofilms are not well understood. The feeding interactions of two contrasting ciliates, the free-swimming filter feeder Tetrahymena sp. and the surface-associated predator Chilodonella sp., were investigated using biofilm-forming bacteria genetically modified to express fluorescent proteins. According to microscopy, both ciliates readily consumed cells from both Pseudomonas costantinii and Serratia plymuthica biofilms. When offered a choice between spatially separated biofilms, each ciliate showed a preference for P. costantinii biofilms. Experiments with bacterial cell extracts indicated that both ciliates used dissolved chemical cues to locate biofilms. Chilodonella sp. evidently used bacterial chemical cues as a basis for preferential feeding decisions, but it was unclear whether Tetrahymena sp. did also. Confocal microscopy of live biofilms revealed that Tetrahymena sp. had a major impact on biofilm morphology, forming holes and channels throughout S. plymuthica biofilms and reducing P. costantinii biofilms to isolated, grazing-resistant microcolonies. Grazing by Chilodonella sp. resulted in the development of less-defined trails through S. plymuthica biofilms and caused P. costantinii biofilms to become homogeneous scatterings of cells. It was not clear whether the observed feeding preferences for spatially separated P. costantinii biofilms over S. plymuthica biofilms resulted in selective targeting of P. costantinii cells in mixed biofilms. Grazing of mixed biofilms resulted in the depletion of both types of bacteria, with Tetrahymena sp. having a larger impact than Chilodonella sp., and effects similar to those seen in grazed single-species biofilms. PMID:21602372

Dopheide, Andrew; Lear, Gavin; Stott, Rebecca; Lewis, Gillian

2011-01-01

358

Anaerobic bacteria grow within Candida albicans biofilms and induce biofilm formation in suspension cultures.  

PubMed

The human microbiome contains diverse microorganisms, which share and compete for the same environmental niches. A major microbial growth form in the human body is the biofilm state, where tightly packed bacterial, archaeal, and fungal cells must cooperate and/or compete for resources in order to survive. We examined mixed biofilms composed of the major fungal species of the gut microbiome, Candida albicans, and each of five prevalent bacterial gastrointestinal inhabitants: Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis. We observed that biofilms formed by C. albicans provide a hypoxic microenvironment that supports the growth of two anaerobic bacteria, even when cultured in ambient oxic conditions that are normally toxic to the bacteria. We also found that coculture with bacteria in biofilms induces massive gene expression changes in C. albicans, including upregulation of WOR1, which encodes a transcription regulator that controls a phenotypic switch in C. albicans, from the "white" cell type to the "opaque" cell type. Finally, we observed that in suspension cultures, C. perfringens induces aggregation of C. albicans into "mini-biofilms," which allow C. perfringens cells to survive in a normally toxic environment. This work indicates that bacteria and C. albicans interactions modulate the local chemistry of their environment in multiple ways to create niches favorable to their growth and survival. PMID:25308076

Fox, Emily P; Cowley, Elise S; Nobile, Clarissa J; Hartooni, Nairi; Newman, Dianne K; Johnson, Alexander D

2014-10-20

359

Adenoid Reservoir for Pathogenic Biofilm Bacteria?  

PubMed Central

Biofilms of pathogenic bacteria are present on the middle ear mucosa of children with chronic otitis media (COM) and may contribute to the persistence of pathogens and the recalcitrance of COM to antibiotic treatment. Controlled studies indicate that adenoidectomy is effective in the treatment of COM, suggesting that the adenoids may act as a reservoir for COM pathogens. To investigate the bacterial community in the adenoid, samples were obtained from 35 children undergoing adenoidectomy for chronic OM or obstructive sleep apnea. We used a novel, culture-independent molecular diagnostic methodology, followed by confocal microscopy, to investigate the in situ distribution and organization of pathogens in the adenoids to determine whether pathogenic bacteria exhibited criteria characteristic of biofilms. The Ibis T5000 Universal Biosensor System was used to interrogate the extent of the microbial diversity within adenoid biopsy specimens. Using a suite of 16 broad-range bacterial primers, we demonstrated that adenoids from both diagnostic groups were colonized with polymicrobial biofilms. Haemophilus influenzae was present in more adenoids from the COM group (P = 0.005), but there was no significant difference between the two patient groups for Streptococcus pneumoniae or Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, lectin binding, and the use of antibodies specific for host epithelial cells demonstrated that pathogens were aggregated, surrounded by a carbohydrate matrix, and localized on and within the epithelial cell surface, which is consistent with criteria for bacterial biofilms. PMID:21307211

Nistico, L.; Kreft, R.; Gieseke, A.; Coticchia, J. M.; Burrows, A.; Khampang, P.; Liu, Y.; Kerschner, J. E.; Post, J. C.; Lonergan, S.; Sampath, R.; Hu, F. Z.; Ehrlich, G. D.; Stoodley, P.; Hall-Stoodley, L.

2011-01-01

360

Mass Transfer Enhancement in Moving Biofilm Structures  

PubMed Central

Biofilms are layers of microbial cells growing on an interface and they can form highly complex structures adapted to a wide variety of environmental conditions. Biofilm streamers have a small immobile base attached to the support and a flexible tail elongated in the flow direction, which can vibrate in fast flows. Herein we report numerical results for the role of the periodical movement of biofilm streamers on the nutrient uptake and in general on the solute mass transfer enhancement due to flow-induced oscillations. We developed what to our knowledge is a novel two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model coupled to unsteady solute mass transport and solved the model using the finite element method with a moving mesh. Results demonstrate that the oscillatory movement of the biofilm tail significantly increases the substrate uptake. The mass transfer coefficient is the highest in regions close to the streamer tip. The reason for substrate transfer enhancement is the increase in speed of tip movement relative to the surrounding liquid, thereby reducing the thickness of the mass transfer boundary layer. In addition, we show that the relative mass transfer enhancement in unsteady conditions compared with the rigid static structure is larger at higher flow velocities, and this relative increase favors a more flexible structure. PMID:22500748

Taherzadeh, Danial; Picioreanu, Cristian; Horn, Harald

2012-01-01

361

Sulfur Cycling and Microbial Community Structure in Cave Environment: some geomicrobiological aspects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last decade, cave microbiology has emerged as a growing interdisciplinary field. Because of caves provides a unique subsurface environment for the exploration of microbial life and their roles on biogeochemical cycling under extreme condition. Sulfidic caves form in carbonate rocks where sulfide-rich waters interact with oxygen at the water table or at subterranean springs (1). Terrestrial sulfidic caves and springs are abundant and diverse, as assessed by efforts to characterize cave microbial ecosystems and to understand large scale geochemical processes (2). In this study we examined the geochemical features, microbial community and capacity of sulfur cycling in sulfidic cave ( Kaklik Cave, Turkey ) and its two hot springs. Pyrosequencing were used to understand bacterial diversity and community structure in this study area with contrasting hydrochemial and geological properties. Environmental nucleic acids were extracted, and PCR-directed screens reveal the presence or absence of functional genes, indicating genetic capacity for sulfur cycling. The microbial community displayed a high level of microbial diversity, representing 22 phylum of the Bacteria and 5 phylum of the Archaea. Our results provide a comparative view of the microbial communities and processes involved in sulfur cycling in sulfidic cave environments. 1- Macalady et al. (2007) Extremely acidic, pendulous cave wall biofilms from the Frasassi cave system, Italy. Env.Mic. 9(6), 1402-1414 2- Rossmassler et al. Drivers of epsilonproteobacterial community composition in sulfidic caves and springs.

Gulecal, Y.; Temel, M.

2013-12-01

362

Plant-Associated Biofilms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacteria colonizing plant surfaces are of great importance in agriculture, having either a negative (pathogens surviving on leaf surfaces) or a positive (beneficial root-colonizing bacteria) role. Plant-associated populations develop in a way that shows similarities to that observed in biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces, and certain genetic determinants are common to both processes. The mechanisms involved in biofilm formation and

María Antonia Molina; Juan-Luis Ramos; Manuel Espinosa-Urgel

2003-01-01

363

Modeling microbial spoilage and quality of gilthead seabream fillets: combined effect of osmotic pretreatment, modified atmosphere packaging, and nisin on shelf life.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was the kinetic modeling of the effect of storage temperature on the quality and shelf life of chilled fish, modified atmosphere-packed (MAP), and osmotically pretreated with the addition of nisin as antimicrobial agent. Fresh gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) fillets were osmotically treated with 50% high dextrose equivalent maltodextrin (DE 47) plus 5% NaCl. Water loss, solid gain, salt content, and water activity were monitored throughout treatment and treatment conditions were selected for the shelf life study. Untreated and osmotically pretreated slices with and without nisin (2 x 10(4) IU/100 g osmotic solution), packed in air or modified atmosphere (50% CO(2)-50% air), and stored at controlled isothermal conditions (0, 5, 10, and 15 degrees C) were studied. Quality assessment and modeling were based on growth of several microbial indices, total volatile nitrogen, trimethylamine nitrogen, lipid oxidation (TBARS), and sensory scoring. Temperature dependence of quality loss rates was modeled by the Arrhenius equation, validated under dynamic conditions. Pretreated samples showed improved quality stability during subsequent refrigerated storage, in terms of microbial growth, chemical changes, and organoleptic degradation. Osmotic pretreatment with the addition of nisin in combination with MAP was the most effective treatment resulting in significant shelf life extension of gilthead seabream fillets (48 days compared to 10 days for the control at 0 degrees C). PMID:20546417

Tsironi, Theofania N; Taoukis, Petros S

2010-05-01

364

Discovery and Biological Characterization of the Auromomycin Chromophore as an Inhibitor of Biofilm Formation in Vibrio cholerae  

PubMed Central

Bacterial biofilms pose a significant challenge in clinical environments due to their inherent lack of susceptibility to antibiotic treatment. It is widely recognized that most pathogenic bacterial strains in the clinical setting persist in the biofilm state, and are the root cause of many recrudescent infections. Discovery and development of compounds capable of either inhibiting biofilm formation or initiating biofilm dispersal may provide new therapeutic avenues for reducing the number of hospital acquired, biofilm-mediated infections. We now report the application of our recently reported image-based, high-throughput screen to the discovery of microbially-derived natural products with biofilm inhibitory activity against Vibrio cholerae. Examination of a prefractionated library of microbially-derived marine natural products has lead to the identification of a new biofilm inhibitor that is structurally unrelated to previously reported inhibitors and is one of the most potent inhibitors reported to date against V. cholerae. Combination of this compound with sub-MIC concentrations of a number of clinically relevant antibiotics was shown to improve the biofilm inhibitory efficacy of this new compound compared to monotherapy treatments, and provides evidence for the potential therapeutic benefit of biofilm inhibitors in treating persistent biofilm-mediated infections. PMID:24106077

Peach, Kelly C.; Cheng, Andrew T.; Oliver, Allen G.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

2013-01-01

365

Heterotrophic Archaea Contribute to Carbon Cycling in Low-pH, Suboxic Biofilm Communities  

PubMed Central

Archaea are widely distributed and yet are most often not the most abundant members of microbial communities. Here, we document a transition from Bacteria- to Archaea-dominated communities in microbial biofilms sampled from the Richmond Mine acid mine drainage (AMD) system (?pH 1.0, ?38°C) and in laboratory-cultivated biofilms. This transition occurs when chemoautotrophic microbial communities that develop at the air-solution interface sink to the sediment-solution interface and degrade under microaerobic and anaerobic conditions. The archaea identified in these sunken biofilms are from the class Thermoplasmata, and in some cases, the highly divergent ARMAN nanoarchaeal lineage. In several of the sunken biofilms, nanoarchaea comprise 10 to 25% of the community, based on fluorescent in situ hybridization and metagenomic analyses. Comparative community proteomic analyses show a persistence of bacterial proteins in sunken biofilms, but there is clear evidence for amino acid modifications due to acid hydrolysis. Given the low representation of bacterial cells in sunken biofilms based on microscopy, we infer that hydrolysis reflects proteins derived from lysed cells. For archaea, we detected ?2,400 distinct proteins, including a subset involved in proteolysis and peptide uptake. Laboratory cultivation experiments using complex carbon substrates demonstrated anaerobic enrichment of Ferroplasma and Aplasma coupled to the reduction of ferric iron. These findings indicate dominance of acidophilic archaea in degrading biofilms and suggest that they play roles in anaerobic nutrient cycling at low pH. PMID:23001646

Justice, Nicholas B.; Pan, Chongle; Mueller, Ryan; Spaulding, Susan E.; Shah, Vega; Sun, Christine L.; Yelton, Alexis P.; Miller, Christopher S.; Thomas, Brian C.; Shah, Manesh; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Hettich, Robert

2012-01-01

366

Photodynamic inactivation of biofilm: taking a lightly colored approach to stubborn infection.  

PubMed

Microbial biofilms are responsible for a variety of microbial infections in different parts of the body, such as urinary tract infections, catheter infections, middle-ear infections, gingivitis, caries, periodontitis, orthopedic implants, and so on. The microbial biofilm cells have properties and gene expression patterns distinct from planktonic cells, including phenotypic variations in enzymic activity, cell wall composition and surface structure, which increase the resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobial treatments. There is consequently an urgent need for new approaches to attack biofilm-associated microorganisms, and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) may be a promising candidate. aPDT involves the combination of a nontoxic dye and low-intensity visible light which, in the presence of oxygen, produces cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. It has been demonstrated that many biofilms are susceptible to aPDT, particularly in dental disease. This review will focus on aspects of aPDT that are designed to increase efficiency against biofilms modalities to enhance penetration of photosensitizer into biofilm, and a combination of aPDT with biofilm-disrupting agents. PMID:23879608

de Melo, Wanessa C M A; Avci, Pinar; de Oliveira, Milene Nóbrega; Gupta, Asheesh; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Perussi, Livia R; Tegos, George P; Perussi, Janice R; Dai, Tianhong; Hamblin, Michael R

2013-07-01

367