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Sample records for biogenic mn oxides

  1. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G.

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments. PMID:26107948

  2. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments. PMID:26107948

  3. Formation of Nano-crystalline Todorokite from Biogenic Mn Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Zhu, M; Ginder-Vogel, M; Ni, C; Parikh, S; Sparks, D

    2010-01-01

    Todorokite, as one of three main Mn oxide phases present in oceanic Mn nodules and an active MnO{sub 6} octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), has garnered much interest; however, its formation pathway in natural systems is not fully understood. Todorokite is widely considered to form from layer structured Mn oxides with hexagonal symmetry, such as vernadite ({delta}-MnO{sub 2}), which are generally of biogenic origin. However, this geochemical process has not been documented in the environment or demonstrated in the laboratory, except for precursor phases with triclinic symmetry. Here we report on the formation of a nanoscale, todorokite-like phase from biogenic Mn oxides produced by the freshwater bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1. At long- and short-range structural scales biogenic Mn oxides were transformed to a todorokite-like phase at atmospheric pressure through refluxing. Topotactic transformation was observed during the transformation. Furthermore, the todorokite-like phases formed via refluxing had thin layers along the c* axis and a lack of c* periodicity, making the basal plane undetectable with X-ray diffraction reflection. The proposed pathway of the todorokite-like phase formation is proposed as: hexagonal biogenic Mn oxide {yields} 10-{angstrom} triclinic phyllomanganate {yields} todorokite. These observations provide evidence supporting the possible bio-related origin of natural todorokites and provide important clues for understanding the transformation of biogenic Mn oxides to other Mn oxides in the environment. Additionally this method may be a viable biosynthesis route for porous, nano-crystalline OMS materials for use in practical applications.

  4. Formation of nano-crystalline todorokite from biogenic Mn oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiong Han; Zhu, Mengqiang; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Ni, Chaoying; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2010-06-01

    Todorokite, as one of three main Mn oxide phases present in oceanic Mn nodules and an active MnO 6 octahedral molecular sieve (OMS), has garnered much interest; however, its formation pathway in natural systems is not fully understood. Todorokite is widely considered to form from layer structured Mn oxides with hexagonal symmetry, such as vernadite (δ-MnO 2), which are generally of biogenic origin. However, this geochemical process has not been documented in the environment or demonstrated in the laboratory, except for precursor phases with triclinic symmetry. Here we report on the formation of a nanoscale, todorokite-like phase from biogenic Mn oxides produced by the freshwater bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1. At long- and short-range structural scales biogenic Mn oxides were transformed to a todorokite-like phase at atmospheric pressure through refluxing. Topotactic transformation was observed during the transformation. Furthermore, the todorokite-like phases formed via refluxing had thin layers along the c∗ axis and a lack of c∗ periodicity, making the basal plane undetectable with X-ray diffraction reflection. The proposed pathway of the todorokite-like phase formation is proposed as: hexagonal biogenic Mn oxide → 10-Å triclinic phyllomanganate → todorokite. These observations provide evidence supporting the possible bio-related origin of natural todorokites and provide important clues for understanding the transformation of biogenic Mn oxides to other Mn oxides in the environment. Additionally this method may be a viable biosynthesis route for porous, nano-crystalline OMS materials for use in practical applications.

  5. Ni(II) Sorption on Biogenic Mn-Oxides with Varying Mn Octahedral Layer Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, M.; Ginder-Vogel, M; Sparks, D

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic Mn-oxides (BioMnO{sub x}), produced by microorganisms, possess an extraordinary ability to sequester metals. BioMnO{sub x} are generally layered structures containing varying amounts of Mn(III) and vacant sites in the Mn layers. However the relationship between the varying structure of BioMnO{sub x} and metal sorption properties remains unclear. In this study, BioMnO{sub x} produced by Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1 was synthesized at either pH 6, 7, or 8 in CaCl{sub 2} solution, and Ni(II) sorption mechanisms were determined at pH 7 and at different Ni(II) loadings, using isotherm and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic analyses. Our data demonstrate that Ni(II) sorbs at vacant sites in the interlayer of the BioMnO{sub x} and the maximum Ni(II) sorption capacity increases as the formation pH of BioMnO{sub x} decreases. This relation indicates that the quantity of BioMnO{sub x} vacant sites increases as formation conditions become more acidic, which is in good agreement with our companion study. Contents of the vacant sites were quantitatively estimated based on maximum Ni(II) sorption capacity. Additionally, this study reveals that imidazole groups are involved in Ni(II) binding to biomaterials, and have a higher Ni(II) sorption affinity, but a lower site density compared to carboxyl groups.

  6. Cation Effects on the Layer Structure of Biogenic Mn-Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, M.; Ginder-Vogel, M; Parikh, S; Feng, X; Sparks, D

    2010-01-01

    Biologically catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation produces biogenic Mn-oxides (BioMnO{sub x}) and may serve as one of the major formation pathways for layered Mn-oxides in soils and sediments. The structure of Mn octahedral layers in layered Mn-oxides controls its metal sequestration properties, photochemistry, oxidizing ability, and topotactic transformation to tunneled structures. This study investigates the impacts of cations (H{sup +}, Ni(II), Na{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+}) during biotic Mn(II) oxidation on the structure of Mn octahedral layers of BioMnO{sub x} using solution chemistry and synchrotron X-ray techniques. Results demonstrate that Mn octahedral layer symmetry and composition are sensitive to previous cations during BioMnO{sub x} formation. Specifically, H{sup +} and Ni(II) enhance vacant site formation, whereas Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} favor formation of Mn(III) and its ordered distribution in Mn octahedral layers. This study emphasizes the importance of the abiotic reaction between Mn(II) and BioMnO{sub x} and dependence of the crystal structure of BioMnO{sub x} on solution chemistry.

  7. Sorption of Ferrioxime B to Synthetic and Biogenic layer type Mn Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O. W.; Bargar, J. R.; Sposito, G.

    2005-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV), we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [principally the species, Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over the pH range between 5 and 9. After 72 h equilibration time at pH 8, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-Ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the X-ray absorption spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed with DFOB, but instead is incorporated into the mineral structure, thus implying that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron.

  8. The role of biogenic Fe-Mn oxides formed in situ for arsenic oxidation and adsorption in aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yaohui; Yang, Tingting; Liang, Jinsong; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-07-01

    As(III&V), Mn(II), and Fe(II) may occur simultaneously in some groundwater and surface water. Studying their redox reactions and interactions is essential to unravel the biogeochemical cycles of these metal ions in aquatic ecosystems and to find effective methods to remove them simultaneously in drinking water treatment. Here, the formation of biogenic Fe-Mn oxides (BFMO, defined as a mixture of biogenic Mn oxide (BMO) and Fe oxide) as well as its oxidation and adsorption of As in a Fe(II)-Mn(II)-As(III&V)-Mn-oxidizing microbe (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) system were investigated. Batch experiments and structure characterization revealed that the BFMO was formed via a sequential precipitation of Fe oxide and BMO. The first formed Fe oxide was identified as FeOOH (lepidocrocite) and the latter formed BMO was identified as MnO2 (similar to hexagonal birnessite). In the BFMO mixture, the BMO part was mainly responsible for As(III) oxidation, and the Fe oxide part dominated As adsorption. Remarkably, the BMO could oxidize Fe(II) to form FeOOH, which may improve As adsorption. The optimum Mn(II)/Fe(II) ratio for As removal was approximately 1:3 (mol/mol). Taken together, in Fe(II)-Mn(II)-As(III&V)-Mn-oxidizing microbe ecosystems, the in situ formation of BFMO could eliminate or decrease Fe(II), Mn(II), and As(III&V) species simultaneously. Therefore, based on this study, new approaches may be developed for As removal from water containing high concentrations of Fe(II) and Mn(II). PMID:27088246

  9. Production of biogenic Mn oxides by leptothrix discophora SS-1 in a chemically defined growth medium and evaluation of their Pb adsorption characteristics

    PubMed

    Nelson; Lion; Ghiorse; Shuler

    1999-01-01

    Biogenic Mn oxides were produced by the bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 (= ATCC 3182) in a chemically defined mineral salts medium, and the Pb binding and specific surface area of these oxides were characterized. Growth of SS-1 in the defined medium with pyruvate as a carbon and energy source required the addition of vitamin B12. Complete oxidation of Mn(II) within 60 h required the addition of >/=0.1 &mgr;M FeSO4. Pb adsorption isotherms were determined for the biogenic Mn oxides (and associated cells with their extracellular polymer) and compared to the Pb adsorption isotherms of cells and exopolymer alone, as well as to abiotic Mn oxides. The Pb adsorption to cells and exopolymer with biogenic Mn oxides (0.8 mmol of Mn per g) at pH 6.0 and 25 degreesC was 2 orders of magnitude greater than the Pb adsorption to cells and exopolymer alone (on a dry weight basis). The Pb adsorption to the biogenic Mn oxide was two to five times greater than the Pb adsorption to a chemically precipitated abiotic Mn oxide and several orders of magnitude greater than the Pb adsorption to two commercially available crystalline MnO2 minerals. The N2 Brunauer-Emmet-Teller specific surface areas of the biogenic Mn oxide and fresh Mn oxide precipitate (224 and 58 m2/g, respectively) were significantly greater than those of the commercial Mn oxide minerals (0.048 and 4. 7 m2/g). The Pb adsorption capacity of the biogenic Mn oxide also exceeded that of a chemically precipitated colloidal hydrous Fe oxide under similar solution conditions. These results show that amorphous biogenic Mn oxides similar to those produced by SS-1 may play a significant role in the control of trace metal phase distribution in aquatic systems. PMID:9872777

  10. Production of Biogenic Mn Oxides by Leptothrix discophora SS-1 in a Chemically Defined Growth Medium and Evaluation of Their Pb Adsorption Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Yarrow M.; Lion, Leonard W.; Ghiorse, William C.; Shuler, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    Biogenic Mn oxides were produced by the bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 (= ATCC 3182) in a chemically defined mineral salts medium, and the Pb binding and specific surface area of these oxides were characterized. Growth of SS-1 in the defined medium with pyruvate as a carbon and energy source required the addition of vitamin B12. Complete oxidation of Mn(II) within 60 h required the addition of ≥0.1 μM FeSO4. Pb adsorption isotherms were determined for the biogenic Mn oxides (and associated cells with their extracellular polymer) and compared to the Pb adsorption isotherms of cells and exopolymer alone, as well as to abiotic Mn oxides. The Pb adsorption to cells and exopolymer with biogenic Mn oxides (0.8 mmol of Mn per g) at pH 6.0 and 25°C was 2 orders of magnitude greater than the Pb adsorption to cells and exopolymer alone (on a dry weight basis). The Pb adsorption to the biogenic Mn oxide was two to five times greater than the Pb adsorption to a chemically precipitated abiotic Mn oxide and several orders of magnitude greater than the Pb adsorption to two commercially available crystalline MnO2 minerals. The N2 Brunauer-Emmet-Teller specific surface areas of the biogenic Mn oxide and fresh Mn oxide precipitate (224 and 58 m2/g, respectively) were significantly greater than those of the commercial Mn oxide minerals (0.048 and 4.7 m2/g). The Pb adsorption capacity of the biogenic Mn oxide also exceeded that of a chemically precipitated colloidal hydrous Fe oxide under similar solution conditions. These results show that amorphous biogenic Mn oxides similar to those produced by SS-1 may play a significant role in the control of trace metal phase distribution in aquatic systems. PMID:9872777

  11. Production of biogenic Mn oxides by Leptothrix discophora SS-1 in a chemically defined growth medium and evaluation of their Pb adsorption characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Y.M.; Lion, L.W.; Ghiorse, W.C.; Shuler, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Biogenic Mn oxides were produced by the bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 (= ATCC 3182) in a chemically defined mineral salts medium, and the Pb binding and specific surface area of these oxides were characterized. Growth of SS-1 in the defined medium with pyruvate as a carbon and energy source required the addition of vitamin B{sub 12}. Complete oxidation of Mn(II) within 60 h required the addition of {ge}0.1 {micro}M FeSO{sub 4}. Pb adsorption isotherms were determined for the biogenic Mn oxides (and associated cells with their extracellular polymer) and compared to the Pb adsorption isotherms of cells and exopolymer alone, as well as to abiotic Mn oxides. The Pb adsorption to cells and exopolymer with biogenic Mn oxides at pH 6.0 and 25 C was 2 orders of magnitude greater than the Pb adsorption to cells and exopolymer alone. The Pb adsorption to the biogenic Mn oxide was two to five times greater than the Pb adsorption to a chemically precipitated abiotic Mn oxide and several orders of magnitude greater than the Pb adsorption to two commercially available crystalline MnO{sub 2} minerals. The N{sub 2} Brunauer-Emmet-Teller specific surface areas of the biogenic Mn oxide and fresh Mn oxide precipitate were significantly greater than those of the commercial Mn oxide minerals. The Pb adsorption capacity of the biogenic Mn oxide also exceeded that of a chemically precipitated colloidal hydrous Fe oxide under similar solution conditions. These results show that amorphous biogenic Mn oxides similar to those produced by SS-1 may play a significant rule in the control of trace metal phase distribution in aquatic systems.

  12. Coupled biotic-abiotic oxidation of organic matter by biogenic MnO_{2}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Julia; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-04-01

    Some reactive soil minerals are strongly implicated in stabilising organic matter. However, others can play an active role in the oxidation of organic molecules. In natural systems, layer-type manganese oxide minerals (MnO2) typically occur as biomineral assemblages consisting of mineral particles and microbial biomass. Both the mineral and biological fractions of the assemblage can be powerful oxidants of organic C. The biological compartment relies on a set of enzymes to drive oxidative transformations of reduced C-substrates, whereas MnO2 minerals are strong, less specific abiotic oxidants that are assumed to rely on interfacial interactions between C-substrates and the mineral surface. This project aims to understand the coupling between microbial C mineralization and abiotic C oxidation mediated by MnO2 in bacterial-MnO2 assemblages. Specifically, under conditions of high C turnover, microbial respiration can significantly alter local pH, dissolved oxygen and pool of available reductants, which may modify rates and mechanism of C oxidation by biotic and abiotic components. We first investigated changes in the solution chemistry of Pseudomonas putida suspensions exposed to varying concentrations of glucose, chosen to represent readily bioavailable substrates in soils. Glucose concentrations tested ranged between 0 and 5.5mM and changes in pH, dissolved oxygen and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon were tracked over 48h. We then combined literature review and wet-chemical experiments to compile the pH dependence of rates of organic substrate oxidation by MnO2, including glucose. Our results demonstrate a strong pH dependence for these abiotic reactions. In assemblages of P. putida - MnO2, kinetic limitations for abiotic C oxidation by MnO2 are overcome by changes in biogeochemical conditions that result from bacterial C metabolism. When extrapolated to a soil solution confronted to an input of fresh dissolved organic matter, bacterial C metabolism of the

  13. Biogenic Ba-rich Mn Oxide-Hydroxide Cemented Sandstone as Possible Mars Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkley, J. L.

    2007-03-01

    A narrow exposure of black sandstone in western New York State displays cement consisting of Ba-rich Mn oxides/hydroxides. Cement mostly occurs as botryoidal laminae suggesting a bacterial origin. These rocks are interpreted as early-Mars-like fossil spri

  14. Zn Sorption Mechanisms onto Sheathed Leptothrix Discophora and the Impact of the Nanoparticulate Biogenic Mn Oxide Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Boonfueng, T.; Axe, L; Yee, N; Hahn, D; Ndiba, P

    2009-01-01

    Zinc sorption on sheathed Leptothrix discophora bacterium, the isolated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) sheath, and Mn oxide-coated bacteria was investigated with macroscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Complexation with L. discophora was dominated by the outer membrane phosphoryl groups of the phospholipid bilayer while sorption to isolated EPS was dominated by carboxyl groups. Precipitation of nanoparticulate Mn oxide coatings on the cell surface increased site capacity by over twenty times with significant increase in metal sorption. XAS analysis of Zn sorption in the coated system showed Mn oxide phase contributions of 18 to 43% through mononuclear inner-sphere complexes. The coordination environments in coprecipitation samples were identical to those of sorption samples, indicating that, even in coprecipitation, Zn is not incorporated into the Mn oxide structure. Rather, through enzymatic oxidation by L. discophora, Mn(II) is oxidized and precipitated onto the biofilm providing a large surface for metal sequestration. The nanoparticulate Mn oxide coating exhibited significant microporosity (75%) suggesting contributions from intraparticle diffusion. Transient studies conducted over 7 months revealed a 170% increase in Zn loading. However, the intraparticle diffusivity of 10{sup -19} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} is two orders of magnitude smaller than that for abiotic Mn oxide which we attribute to morphological changes such as reduced pore sizes in the nanoparticulate oxide. Our results demonstrate that the cell-bound Mn oxide particles can sorb significant amounts of Zn over long periods of time representing an important surface for sequestration of metal contaminants.

  15. Zn sorption mechanisms onto sheathed Leptothrix discophora and the impact of the nanoparticulate biogenic Mn oxide coating.

    PubMed

    Boonfueng, Thipnakarin; Axe, Lisa; Yee, Nathan; Hahn, Dittmar; Ndiba, Peter K

    2009-05-15

    Zinc sorption on sheathed Leptothrix discophora bacterium, the isolated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) sheath, and Mn oxide-coated bacteria was investigated with macroscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Complexation with L. discophora was dominated by the outer membrane phosphoryl groups of the phospholipid bilayer while sorption to isolated EPS was dominated by carboxyl groups. Precipitation of nanoparticulate Mn oxide coatings on the cell surface increased site capacity by over twenty times with significant increase in metal sorption. XAS analysis of Zn sorption in the coated system showed Mn oxide phase contributions of 18 to 43% through mononuclear inner-sphere complexes. The coordination environments in coprecipitation samples were identical to those of sorption samples, indicating that, even in coprecipitation, Zn is not incorporated into the Mn oxide structure. Rather, through enzymatic oxidation by L. discophora, Mn(II) is oxidized and precipitated onto the biofilm providing a large surface for metal sequestration. The nanoparticulate Mn oxide coating exhibited significant microporosity (75%) suggesting contributions from intraparticle diffusion. Transient studies conducted over 7 months revealed a 170% increase in Zn loading. However, the intraparticle diffusivity of 10(-19) cm(2) s(-1) is two orders of magnitude smaller than that for abiotic Mn oxide which we attribute to morphological changes such as reduced pore sizes in the nanoparticulate oxide. Our results demonstrate that the cell-bound Mn oxide particles can sorb significant amounts of Zn over long periods of time representing an important surface for sequestration of metal contaminants. PMID:19268965

  16. Reactivity of biogenic manganese oxide for metal sequestration and photochemistry: Computational solid state physics study

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.D.; Sposito, G.

    2010-02-01

    Many microbes, including both bacteria and fungi, produce manganese (Mn) oxides by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to form insoluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, a kinetically much faster process than abiotic oxidation. These biogenic Mn oxides drive the Mn cycle, coupling it with diverse biogeochemical cycles and determining the bioavailability of environmental contaminants, mainly through strong adsorption and redox reactions. This mini review introduces recent findings based on quantum mechanical density functional theory that reveal the detailed mechanisms of toxic metal adsorption at Mn oxide surfaces and the remarkable role of Mn vacancies in the photochemistry of these minerals.

  17. Biogenic precipitation of manganese oxides and enrichment of heavy metals at acidic soil pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayanna, Sathish; Peacock, Caroline L.; Schäffner, Franziska; Grawunder, Anja; Merten, Dirk; Kothe, Erika; Büchel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides at acidic pH is rarely reported and poorly understood, compared to biogenic Mn oxide precipitation at near neutral conditions. Here we identified and investigated the precipitation of biogenic Mn oxides in acidic soil, and studied their role in the retention of heavy metals, at the former uranium mining site of Ronneburg, Germany. The site is characterized by acidic pH, low carbon content and high heavy metal loads including rare earth elements. Specifically, the Mn oxides were present in layers identified by detailed soil profiling and within these layers pH varied from 4.7 to 5.1, Eh varied from 640 to 660 mV and there were enriched total metal contents for Ba, Ni, Co, Cd and Zn in addition to high Mn levels. Using electron microprobe analysis, synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we identified poorly crystalline birnessite (δ-MnO2) as the dominant Mn oxide in the Mn layers, present as coatings covering and cementing quartz grains. With geochemical modelling we found that the environmental conditions at the site were not favourable for chemical oxidation of Mn(II), and thus we performed 16S rDNA sequencing to isolate the bacterial strains present in the Mn layers. Bacterial phyla present in the Mn layers belonged to Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, and from these phyla we isolated six strains of Mn(II) oxidizing bacteria and confirmed their ability to oxidise Mn(II) in the laboratory. The biogenic Mn oxide layers act as a sink for metals and the bioavailability of these metals was much lower in the Mn layers than in adjacent layers, reflecting their preferential sorption to the biogenic Mn oxide. In this presentation we will report our findings, concluding that the formation of natural biogenic poorly crystalline birnessite can occur at acidic pH, resulting in the formation of a biogeochemical barrier which, in turn, can control the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals in

  18. Activated carbon doped with biogenic manganese oxides for the removal of indigo carmine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yichen; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Gejiao; Liao, Shuijiao

    2016-01-15

    Indigo carmine (IC) is one of the oldest, most important, and highly toxic dyes which is released from the effluents of many industries and results in serious pollution in water. In this study, the biogenic Mn oxides were activated by NaOH and then heated for 3 h at 350 °C to produce activated carbon doped with Mn oxide (Bio-MnOx-C), which were produced by culturing Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial strain MnI7-9 in liquid A medium at 28 °C with 10 mmol/L MnCl2. Bio-MnOx-C was characterized by SEM, TEM, IR, XPS, XRD, etc. It contained C, O, and Mn which comprised Mn (IV) and Mn (III) valence states at a ratio of 3.81:1. It had poorly crystalline ε-MnO2 with a specific surface area of 130.94 m(2)/g. A total of 0.1 g Bio-MnOx-C could remove 45.95 g IC from 500 mg/L IC solution after 0.5 h contact time. IC removal by Bio-MnOx-C included a rapid oxidation reaction and the removal reaction followed second-order kinetic equation. These results confirmed that Bio-MnOx-C could be a potential material for wastewater remediation. PMID:26595178

  19. Diclofenac and 2-anilinophenylacetate degradation by combined activity of biogenic manganese oxides and silver.

    PubMed

    Meerburg, Francis; Hennebel, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2012-05-01

    The occurrence of a range of recalcitrant organic micropollutants in our aquatic environment has led to the development of various tertiary wastewater treatment methods. In this study, biogenic manganese oxides (Bio-MnOx), biogenic silver nanoparticles (Bio-Ag(0)) and ionic silver were used for the oxidative removal of the frequently encountered drug diclofenac and its dechlorinated form, 2-anilinophenylacetate (APA). Diclofenac was rapidly degraded during ongoing manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida MnB6. Furthermore, whereas preoxidized Bio-MnOx, Bio-Ag(0) and Ag(+) separately did not show any removal capacity for diclofenac, an enhanced removal occurred when Bio-MnOx and silver species were combined. Similar results were obtained for APA. Finally, a slow removal of diclofenac but more rapid APA degradation was observed when silver was added to manganese-free P. putida biomass. Combining these results, three mechanisms of diclofenac and APA removal could be distinguished: (i) a co-metabolic removal during active Mn(2+) oxidation by P. putida; (ii) a synergistic interaction between preoxidized Bio-MnOx and silver species; and (iii) a (bio)chemical process by biomass enriched with silver catalysts. This paper demonstrates the use of P. putida for water treatment purposes and is the first report of the application of silver combined with biogenic manganese for the removal of organic water contaminants. PMID:22221449

  20. Diclofenac and 2‐anilinophenylacetate degradation by combined activity of biogenic manganese oxides and silver

    PubMed Central

    Meerburg, Francis; Hennebel, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Summary The occurrence of a range of recalcitrant organic micropollutants in our aquatic environment has led to the development of various tertiary wastewater treatment methods. In this study, biogenic manganese oxides (Bio‐MnOx), biogenic silver nanoparticles (Bio‐Ag0) and ionic silver were used for the oxidative removal of the frequently encountered drug diclofenac and its dechlorinated form, 2‐anilinophenylacetate (APA). Diclofenac was rapidly degraded during ongoing manganese oxidation by Pseudomonas putida MnB6. Furthermore, whereas preoxidized Bio‐MnOx, Bio‐Ag0 and Ag+ separately did not show any removal capacity for diclofenac, an enhanced removal occurred when Bio‐MnOx and silver species were combined. Similar results were obtained for APA. Finally, a slow removal of diclofenac but more rapid APA degradation was observed when silver was added to manganese‐free P. putida biomass. Combining these results, three mechanisms of diclofenac and APA removal could be distinguished: (i) a co‐metabolic removal during active Mn2+ oxidation by P. putida; (ii) a synergistic interaction between preoxidized Bio‐MnOx and silver species; and (iii) a (bio)chemical process by biomass enriched with silver catalysts. This paper demonstrates the use of P. putida for water treatment purposes and is the first report of the application of silver combined with biogenic manganese for the removal of organic water contaminants. PMID:22221449

  1. Sorption of Ferric Iron from Ferrioxamine B to Synthetic and Biogenic Layer Type Manganese Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; John, B.; Sposito, G.

    2006-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effects of predominantly Mn(IV) oxides, we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III, IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over at pH 8. After 72 hours equilibration time, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to into the mineral structure at multiple sites with no evidence of DFOB complexation, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  2. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  3. Sorption of ferric iron from ferrioxamine B to synthetic and biogenic layer type manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2008-07-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments that increase the bioavailability of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but scant information appears to be available about the potential roles of layer type manganese oxides, which are relatively abundant in soils and the oligotrophic marine water column. To probe the effects of layer type manganese oxides on the stability of aqueous Fe-siderophore complexes, we studied the sorption of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB +, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] to two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III,IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB + at pH 8. Analysis of Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that a dominant fraction of Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to the mineral structure at multiple sites, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that layer type manganese oxides, including biogenic minerals, may sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes. We conclude that the sorption of iron-siderophore complexes may play a significant role in the bioavailability and biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  4. Processes of zinc attenuation by biogenic manganese oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Christopher C.; Bargar, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and speciation of Zn sorbed to biogenic Mn oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, AZ, was investigated using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and microfocused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) mapping, and chemical extraction. μSXRF and chemical extractions show that contaminant Zn co-varied with Mn in streambed sediment grain coatings. Bulk and microfocused EXAFS spectra of Zn in the biogenic Mn oxide coating are indicative of Zn forming triple-corner-sharing inner-sphere complexes over octahedral vacancies in the Mn oxide sheet structure. Zn desorbed in response to the decrease in pH in batch experiments and resulted in near-equal dissolved Zn at each pH over a 10-fold range in the solid/solution ratio. The geometry of sorbed Zn was unchanged after 50% desorption at pH 5, indicating that desorption is not controlled by dissolution of secondary Zn phases. In summary, these findings support the idea that Zn attenuation in Pinal Creek is largely controlled by sorption to microbial Mn oxides forming in the streambed during hyporheic exchange. Sorption to biogenic Mn oxides is likely an important process of Zn attenuation in circum-neutral pH reaches of many acid-mine drainage contaminated streams when dissolved Mn is present.

  5. Processes of zinc attenuation by biogenic manganese oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Christopher C.; Bargar, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and speciation of Zn sorbed to biogenic Mn oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, AZ, was investigated using micro-focused Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) mapping , bulk EXAFS, and chemical extraction. μSXRF and chemical extractions show that contaminant Zn co-varied with Mn in streambed sediment grain coatings. Bulk and micro-focused EXAFS spectra of Zn in the biogenic Mn oxides coating are indicative of Zn forming triple corner sharing inner-sphere complexes over octahedral vacancies in the Mn oxide sheet structure. Zn desorbed in response to decreasing in pH in batch experiments and resulted in near-equal dissolved Zn at each pH over a 10-fold range in solid to solution ratio. The geometry of sorbed Zn was unchanged after 50% desorption at pH 5, indicating desorption is not controlled by dissolution of secondary Zn phases. In sum, these findings support the idea that Zn attenuation in Pinal Creek is largely controlled by sorption to microbial Mn oxides forming in the streambed during hyporheic exchange. Sorption to biogenic Mn oxides is likely an important process in Zn attenuation in circum-neutral pH reaches of many acid-mine drainage contaminated streams when dissolved Mn is present. PMID:24460038

  6. Effect of oxide formation mechanisms on lead adsorption by biogenic manganese (hydr)oxides, iron (hydr)oxides, and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Yarrow M; Lion, Leonard W; Shuler, Michael L; Ghiorse, William C

    2002-02-01

    The effects of iron and manganese (hydr)oxide formation processes on the trace metal adsorption properties of these metal (hydr)oxides and their mixtures was investigated by measuring lead adsorption by iron and manganese (hydr)oxides prepared by a variety of methods. Amorphous iron (hydr)oxide formed by fast precipitation at pH 7.5 exhibited greater Pb adsorption (gamma(max) = 50 mmol of Pb/mol of Fe at pH 6.0) than iron (hydr)oxide formed by slow, diffusion-controlled oxidation of Fe(II) at pH 4.5-7.0 or goethite. Biogenic manganese(III/IV) (hydr)oxide prepared by enzymatic oxidation of Mn(II) by the bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 adsorbed five times more Pb (per mole of Mn) than an abiotic manganese (hydr)oxide prepared by oxidation of Mn(II) with permanganate, and 500-5000 times more Pb than pyrolusite oxides (betaMnO2). X-ray crystallography indicated that biogenic manganese (hydr)oxide and iron (hydr)oxide were predominantly amorphous or poorly crystalline and their X-ray diffraction patterns were not significantly affected by the presence of the other (hydr)oxide during formation. When iron and manganese (hydr)oxides were mixed after formation, or for Mn biologically oxidized with iron(III) (hydr)oxide present, observed Pb adsorption was similar to that expected for the mixture based on Langmuir parameters for the individual (hydr)oxides. These results indicate that interactions in iron/manganese (hydr)oxide mixtures related to the formation process and sequence of formation such as site masking, alterations in specific surface area, or changes in crystalline structure either did not occur or had a negligible effect on Pb adsorption by the mixtures. PMID:11871557

  7. Arsenic Bioremediation by Biogenic Iron Oxides and Sulfides

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Raoul-Marie; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Corkhill, Claire L.; Charnock, John M.; Polya, David A.; Vaughan, David; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Microcosms containing sediment from an aquifer in Cambodia with naturally elevated levels of arsenic in the associated groundwater were used to evaluate the effectiveness of microbially mediated production of iron minerals for in situ As remediation. The microcosms were first incubated without amendments for 28 days, and the release of As and other geogenic chemicals from the sediments into the aqueous phase was monitored. Nitrate or a mixture of sulfate and lactate was then added to stimulate biological Fe(II) oxidation or sulfate reduction, respectively. Without treatment, soluble As concentrations reached 3.9 ± 0.9 μM at the end of the 143-day experiment. However, in the nitrate- and sulfate-plus-lactate-amended microcosms, soluble As levels decreased to 0.01 and 0.41 ± 0.13 μM, respectively, by the end of the experiment. Analyses using a range of biogeochemical and mineralogical tools indicated that sorption onto freshly formed hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and iron sulfide mineral phases are the likely mechanisms for As removal in the respective treatments. Incorporation of the experimental results into a one-dimensional transport-reaction model suggests that, under conditions representative of the Cambodian aquifer, the in situ precipitation of HFO would be effective in bringing groundwater into compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO) provisional guideline value for As (10 ppb or 0.13 μM), although soluble Mn release accompanying microbial Fe(II) oxidation presents a potential health concern. In contrast, production of biogenic iron sulfide minerals would not remediate the groundwater As concentration below the recommended WHO limit. PMID:23666325

  8. Mo;ecular Modeling of Biogenic Manganese Oxides Using ab Initio Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oconnor, M.; Sposito, G.; Refson, K.

    2003-12-01

    Layer type manganese oxides with short-range crystalline order (birnessites) are produced by many species of bacteria.Deposits of these oxides form a highly reactive catalytic surface that plays a major role in the destruction and sequestration of organic compounds and metals.Biogenic oxides also contain vacant Mn(IV)sites;these sites,with their associated negative charge, are the probable main cause of the high sorptive reactivity of the oxide surfaces. In order to acquire a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes, a model of a biogenic oxide was built and its structure was optimized using the CASTEP three-dimensional periodic system computational package. The resulting crystal structure shows good agreement with EXAFS data from crystals formed by a strain of the common soil and freshwater bacterium, Pseudomonas putida. The greatest challenge in modeling Mn oxides (like other transition metal oxides)comes in dealing with the electronic factors that lead to their magnetic and catalytic properties: they are highly correlated systems where the spin must be taken into account in order to obtain accurate predictions of their properties.

  9. Oxidation state of Mn in the Mn oxide produced by Leptothrix discophora SS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Lee F.; Ghiorse, William C.

    1988-08-01

    Leptothrix discophora SS-1 excretes at least one Mn 2+-oxidizing protein that, in association with acidic exopolymers, catalyzes a rapid oxidation of Mn 2+. Iodometric titration of Mn oxide product showed that the oxidation state of Mn increased with age of the oxide from 3.32 in samples 11 hours old to 3.62 in samples formed over a period of 30 days. Electron diffraction of 90-day old samples showed evidence of poorly crystalline Mn(IV) oxides. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and Mn oxide formation during 15 min reaction periods indicated that the initial Mn product possessed an average oxidation state no greater than 3.6. Results suggest that the Mn 2+-oxidizing system of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 first generates Mn oxide with an average oxidation state close to Mn(III). Aging increases this oxidation state to give the mixed Mn(III, IV) oxide product observed in older samples.

  10. Structural characterization of terrestrial microbial Mn oxides from Pinal Creek, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John; Fuller, Christopher; Marcus, Matthew A.; Brearley, Adrian J.; Perez De la Rosa, M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Caldwell, Wendel A.

    2008-03-19

    The microbial catalysis of Mn(II) oxidation is believed to be a dominant source of abundant sorption- and redox-active Mn oxides in marine, freshwater, and subsurface aquatic environments. In spite of their importance, environmental oxides of known biogenic origin have generally not been characterized in detail from a structural perspective. Hyporheic zone Mn oxide grain coatings at Pinal Creek, Arizona, a metals-contaminated stream, have been identified as being dominantly microbial in origin and are well studied from bulk chemistry and contaminant hydrology perspectives. This site thus presents an excellent opportunity to study the structures of terrestrial microbial Mn oxides in detail. XRD and EXAFS measurements performed in this study indicate that the hydrated Pinal Creek Mn oxide grain coatings are layer-type Mn oxides with dominantly hexagonal or pseudo-hexagonal layer symmetry. XRD and TEM measurements suggest the oxides to be nanoparticulate plates with average dimensions on the order of 11 nm thick x 35 nm diameter, but with individual particles exhibiting thickness as small as a single layer and sheets as wide as 500 nm. The hydrated oxides exhibit a 10-A basal-plane spacing and turbostratic disorder. EXAFS analyses suggest the oxides contain layer Mn(IV) site vacancy defects, and layer Mn(III) is inferred to be present, as deduced from Jahn-Teller distortion of the local structure. The physical geometry and structural details of the coatings suggest formation within microbial biofilms. The biogenic Mnoxides are stable with respect to transformation into thermodynamically more stable phases over a time scale of at least 5 months. The nanoparticulate layered structural motif, also observed in pure culture laboratory studies, appears to be characteristic of biogenic Mn oxides and may explain the common occurrence of this mineral habit in soils and sediments.

  11. Oxidative dissolution potential of biogenic and abiogenic TcO 2 in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Liu, Chongxuan; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

    2009-04-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Tc is highly mobile in its most oxidized state [Tc(VII)O4-] and less mobile in the reduced form [Tc(IV)O 2· nH 2O]. Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state; unconsolidated Pliocene-age fluvial sediment from the upper Ringold (RG) Formation at the Hanford Site and a clay-rich saprolite from the Field Research Center (FRC) background site on the Oak Ridge Site. Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 reduced Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. After bioreduction and heat-killing, biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO 2-like phase in both sediments. The biogenic redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular scale speciation of Tc compared to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-containing particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 μm-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were attributed to mass

  12. Oxidative dissolution potential of biogenic and abiogenic TcO{sub 2} in subsurface sediments.

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J. K.; Zachara, J. M.; Plymale, A. E.; Heald, S. M.; McKinley, J. P.; Kennedy, D. W.; Liu, C.; Nachimuthu, P.

    2009-04-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Tc is highly mobile in its most oxidized state [Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup -}] and less mobile in the reduced form [Tc(IV)O{sub 2} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O]. Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state; unconsolidated Pliocene-age fluvial sediment from the upper Ringold (RG) Formation at the Hanford Site and a clay-rich saprolite from the Field Research Center (FRC) background site on the Oak Ridge Site. Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 reduced Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. After bioreduction and heat-killing, biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO{sub 2}-like phase in both sediments. The biogenic redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular scale speciation of Tc compared to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-containing particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 {micro}m-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were

  13. BIOGENIC NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM CROPLAND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were determined during late spring and summer 1995 and the spring of 1996 from four agricultural soils on which four different crops were grown. These agricultural soils were located at four different sites throughout North Carolina. Emission rates ...

  14. Identification of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from a low-pH contaminated former uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Akob, Denise M; Bohu, Tsing; Beyer, Andrea; Schäffner, Franziska; Händel, Matthias; Johnson, Carol A; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2014-08-01

    Biological Mn oxidation is responsible for producing highly reactive and abundant Mn oxide phases in the environment that can mitigate metal contamination. However, little is known about Mn oxidation in low-pH environments, where metal contamination often is a problem as the result of mining activities. We isolated two Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH 5.5 (Duganella isolate AB_14 and Albidiferax isolate TB-2) and nine strains at pH 7 from a former uranium mining site. Isolate TB-2 may contribute to Mn oxidation in the acidic Mn-rich subsoil, as a closely related clone represented 16% of the total community. All isolates oxidized Mn over a small pH range, and isolates from low-pH samples only oxidized Mn below pH 6. Two strains with different pH optima differed in their Fe requirements for Mn oxidation, suggesting that Mn oxidation by the strain found at neutral pH was linked to Fe oxidation. Isolates tolerated Ni, Cu, and Cd and produced Mn oxides with similarities to todorokite and birnessite, with the latter being present in subsurface layers where metal enrichment was associated with Mn oxides. This demonstrates that MOB can be involved in the formation of biogenic Mn oxides in both moderately acidic and neutral pH environments. PMID:24928873

  15. Identification of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from a low-pH contaminated former uranium mine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akob, Denise M.; Bohu, Tsing; Beyer, Andrea; Schäffner, Franziska; Händel, Matthias; Johnson, Carol A.; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Biological Mn oxidation is responsible for producing highly reactive and abundant Mn oxide phases in the environment that can mitigate metal contamination. However, little is known about Mn oxidation in low-pH environments, where metal contamination often is a problem as the result of mining activities. We isolated two Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH 5.5 (Duganella isolate AB_14 and Albidiferax isolate TB-2) and nine strains at pH 7 from a former uranium mining site. Isolate TB-2 may contribute to Mn oxidation in the acidic Mn-rich subsoil, as a closely related clone represented 16% of the total community. All isolates oxidized Mn over a small pH range, and isolates from low-pH samples only oxidized Mn below pH 6. Two strains with different pH optima differed in their Fe requirements for Mn oxidation, suggesting that Mn oxidation by the strain found at neutral pH was linked to Fe oxidation. Isolates tolerated Ni, Cu, and Cd and produced Mn oxides with similarities to todorokite and birnessite, with the latter being present in subsurface layers where metal enrichment was associated with Mn oxides. This demonstrates that MOB can be involved in the formation of biogenic Mn oxides in both moderately acidic and neutral pH environments.

  16. Identification of Mn(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from a Low-pH Contaminated Former Uranium Mine

    PubMed Central

    Bohu, Tsing; Beyer, Andrea; Schäffner, Franziska; Händel, Matthias; Johnson, Carol A.; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Biological Mn oxidation is responsible for producing highly reactive and abundant Mn oxide phases in the environment that can mitigate metal contamination. However, little is known about Mn oxidation in low-pH environments, where metal contamination often is a problem as the result of mining activities. We isolated two Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH 5.5 (Duganella isolate AB_14 and Albidiferax isolate TB-2) and nine strains at pH 7 from a former uranium mining site. Isolate TB-2 may contribute to Mn oxidation in the acidic Mn-rich subsoil, as a closely related clone represented 16% of the total community. All isolates oxidized Mn over a small pH range, and isolates from low-pH samples only oxidized Mn below pH 6. Two strains with different pH optima differed in their Fe requirements for Mn oxidation, suggesting that Mn oxidation by the strain found at neutral pH was linked to Fe oxidation. Isolates tolerated Ni, Cu, and Cd and produced Mn oxides with similarities to todorokite and birnessite, with the latter being present in subsurface layers where metal enrichment was associated with Mn oxides. This demonstrates that MOB can be involved in the formation of biogenic Mn oxides in both moderately acidic and neutral pH environments. PMID:24928873

  17. Effects of Cobalt on Manganese Oxidation by Pseudomonas putida MnB1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, J.; Bargar, J.; Sposito, G.

    2005-12-01

    The oxidation of Mn(II) in the environment is thought to occur predominantly through biologically mediated pathways. During the stationary phase of growth, the well-characterized freshwater and soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida MnB1 oxidizes soluble Mn(II) to a poorly crystalline layer type Mn(IV) oxide. These Mn oxide particles (2 - 5 nm thickness) are deposited in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) surrounding the cell, creating a multi-component system distinct from commonly studied synthetic Mn oxides. Accurate characterization of the reactivity of these biomineral assemblages is essential to understanding trace metal biogeochemistry in natural waters and sediments. Moreover, these biogenic oxides may potentially be used for the remediation of surface and ground waters impacted by mining, industrial pollution, and other anthropogenic activities. In this study, we consider the interactions between Co, P. putida MnB1, and its biogenic Mn oxide. Cobalt is a redox-active transition metal which exists in the environment as Co(II) and Co(III). While Co is not generally found in the environment at toxic concentrations, it may be released as a byproduct of mining activities (e.g. levels of up to 20 μM are found in Pinal Creek, AZ, a stream affected by copper mining). In addition, the radionuclide 60Co, formed by neutron activation in nuclear reactors, is of concern at Department of Energy sites, such as that at Hanford, and has several industrial applications, including radiotherapy. We address the following questions: Do high levels of Co inhibit enzymatic processes such as Mn(II) oxidation? Can the multicopper oxidase enzyme involved in Mn(II) oxidation facilitate Co(II) oxidation? Lastly, does the organic matter surrounding the oxides affect Co or Mn oxide reactivity? These issues were approached via wet chemical analysis, synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In the

  18. Iron requirement for Mn(II) oxidation by Leptothrix discophora SS-1.

    PubMed

    El Gheriany, Iman A; Bocioaga, Daniela; Hay, Anthony G; Ghiorse, William C; Shuler, Michael L; Lion, Leonard W

    2009-03-01

    A common form of biocatalysis of Mn(II) oxidation results in the formation of biogenic Mn(III, IV) oxides and is a key reaction in the geochemical cycling of Mn. In this study, we grew the model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 in media with limited iron (0.1 microM iron/5.8 mM pyruvate) and sufficient iron (0.2 microM iron/5.8 mM pyruvate). The influence of iron on the rate of extracellular Mn(II) oxidation was evaluated. Cultures in which cell growth was limited by iron exhibited reduced abilities to oxidize Mn(II) compared to cultures in medium with sufficient iron. While the extracellular Mn(II)-oxidizing factor (MOF) is thought to be a putative multicopper oxidase, Mn(II) oxidation in the presence of zero added Cu(II) was detected and the decrease in the observed Mn(II) oxidation rate in iron-limited cultures was not relieved when the medium was supplemented with Cu(II). The decline of Mn(II) oxidation under iron-limited conditions was not accompanied by siderophore production and is unlikely to be an artifact of siderophore complex formation with Mn(III). The temporal variations in mofA gene transcript levels under conditions of limited and abundant iron were similar, indicating that iron limitation did not interfere with the transcription of the mofA gene. Our quantitative PCR results provide a step forward in understanding the regulation of Mn(II) oxidation. The mechanistic role of iron in Mn(II) oxidation is uncertain; the data are consistent with a direct requirement for iron as a component of the MOF or an indirect effect of iron resulting from the limitation of one of many cellular functions requiring iron. PMID:19114505

  19. Iron Requirement for Mn(II) Oxidation by Leptothrix discophora SS-1▿

    PubMed Central

    El Gheriany, Iman A.; Bocioaga, Daniela; Hay, Anthony G.; Ghiorse, William C.; Shuler, Michael L.; Lion, Leonard W.

    2009-01-01

    A common form of biocatalysis of Mn(II) oxidation results in the formation of biogenic Mn(III, IV) oxides and is a key reaction in the geochemical cycling of Mn. In this study, we grew the model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 in media with limited iron (0.1 μM iron/5.8 mM pyruvate) and sufficient iron (0.2 μM iron/5.8 mM pyruvate). The influence of iron on the rate of extracellular Mn(II) oxidation was evaluated. Cultures in which cell growth was limited by iron exhibited reduced abilities to oxidize Mn(II) compared to cultures in medium with sufficient iron. While the extracellular Mn(II)-oxidizing factor (MOF) is thought to be a putative multicopper oxidase, Mn(II) oxidation in the presence of zero added Cu(II) was detected and the decrease in the observed Mn(II) oxidation rate in iron-limited cultures was not relieved when the medium was supplemented with Cu(II). The decline of Mn(II) oxidation under iron-limited conditions was not accompanied by siderophore production and is unlikely to be an artifact of siderophore complex formation with Mn(III). The temporal variations in mofA gene transcript levels under conditions of limited and abundant iron were similar, indicating that iron limitation did not interfere with the transcription of the mofA gene. Our quantitative PCR results provide a step forward in understanding the regulation of Mn(II) oxidation. The mechanistic role of iron in Mn(II) oxidation is uncertain; the data are consistent with a direct requirement for iron as a component of the MOF or an indirect effect of iron resulting from the limitation of one of many cellular functions requiring iron. PMID:19114505

  20. Oxidation state of Mn in the Mn oxide produced by Leptothrix discophora SS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, L.F.; Ghiorse, W.C. )

    1988-08-01

    Leptothrix discophora SS-1 excretes at least one Mn{sup 2+}-oxidizing protein that, in association with acidic exopolymers, catalyzes a rapid oxidation of Mn{sup 2+}. Iodometric titration of Mn oxide product showed that the oxidation state of Mn increased with age of the oxide from 3.32 in samples 11 hours old to 3.62 in samples formed over a period of 30 days. Electron diffraction of 90-day old samples showed evidence of poorly crystalline Mn(IV) oxides. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and Mn oxide formation during 15 min reaction periods indicated that the initial Mn product possessed an average oxidation state no greater than 3.6. Results suggest that the Mn{sup 2+}-oxidizing system of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 first generates Mn oxide with an average oxidation state close to Mn(III). Aging increases this oxidation state to give the mixed Mn(III, IV) oxide product observed in older samples.

  1. XPS determination of Mn oxidation states in Mn (hydr)oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Post, Jeffrey E.; Heaney, Peter J.; Ling, Florence T.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrous manganese oxides are an important class of minerals that help regulate the geochemical redox cycle in near-surface environments and are also considered to be promising catalysts for energy applications such as the oxidation of water. A complete characterization of these minerals is required to better understand their catalytic and redox activity. In this contribution an empirical methodology using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is developed to quantify the oxidation state of hydrous multivalent manganese oxides with an emphasis on birnessite, a layered structure that occurs commonly in soils but is also the oxidized endmember in biomimetic water-oxidation catalysts. The Mn2p3/2, Mn3p, and Mn3s lines of near monovalent Mn(II), Mn(III), and Mn(IV) oxides were fit with component peaks; after the best fit was obtained the relative widths, heights and binding energies of the components were fixed. Unknown multivalent samples were fit such that binding energies, intensities, and peak-widths of each oxidation state, composed of a packet of correlated component peaks, were allowed to vary. Peak-widths were constrained to maintain the difference between the standards. Both average and individual mole fraction oxidation states for all three energy levels were strongly correlated, with close agreement between Mn3s and Mn3p analyses, whereas calculations based on the Mn2p3/2 spectra gave systematically more reduced results. Limited stoichiometric analyses were consistent with Mn3p and Mn3s. Further, evidence indicates the shape of the Mn3p line was less sensitive to the bonding environment than that for Mn2p. Consequently, fitting the Mn3p and Mn3s lines yielded robust quantification of oxidation states over a range of Mn (hydr)oxide phases. In contrast, a common method for determining oxidation states that utilizes the multiplet splitting of the Mn3s line was found to be not appropriate for birnessites.

  2. Mn-oxidizing Bacteria in Oak Ridge, TN and the Potential for Mercury Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K. L.; McNeal, K. S.; Han, F. X.

    2012-12-01

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, TN was highly contaminated with elemental mercury in the 1950 and 1960. The area is still experiencing the effects of mercury contamination, and researchers are searching for ways to remediate the EFPC. One possible mechanism for bioremediation is the use of biogenic Mn oxides to remove heavy metals from water systems. Six native Pseudomonas bacteria species were isolated from the EFPC in order to examine biogenic Mn oxides production and bioremediation of Oak Ridge slurries. To investigate the biochemical interactions of Pseudomonas and the native microbial communities with Hg, Mn, Fe, S, six different slurry treatment groups were compared using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Oak Ridge slurries were autoclaved to inhibit microbial growth (group 1), autoclaved and amended with HgS (group 2), autoclaved and amended with Pseudomonas isolates and additional HgS (group 3), untreated slurry (group 4), normal slurry amended with HgS (group 5), and normal slurry amended with Pseudomonas isolates and additional HgS (group 6). The comparison of the autoclaved groups with the counterpart untreated and normal Oak Ridge slurries highlighted important microbial interactions. Also, the Pseudomonas isolates were grown separately in a MnSO4 media, and the individual bacteria were monitored for Mn-oxidization using ICP-AES and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the slurry sediments, the Pseudomonas isolates did produce Mn oxides which bound to mercury, and mercury bound to organic matter significantly decreased. However, after a significant decrease of dissolved mercury in the water, dissolved mercury was cycled back into the water system on day 10 of the study. Additionally, two individual native Oak Ridge Pseudomonas isolates demonstrated Mn-oxidization. Biogenic Mn oxides have the potential to decrease mercury cycling, however there is

  3. Biogenic nitrogen and carbon in Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides from an Archean chert, Marble Bar, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Daniele L.; Hashizume, Ko; Orberger, Beate; Gallien, Jean-Paul; Cloquet, Christophe; Massault, Marc

    2007-02-01

    To quantify and localize nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in Archean rocks from the Marble Bar formation, Western Australia, and to gain insights on their origin and potential biogenicity, we conducted nuclear reaction analyses (NRA) and carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio measurements on various samples from the 3460-Myr-old Fe-rich Marble Bar chert. The Marble Bar chert formed during the alteration of basaltic volcanoclastic rocks with Fe- and Si-rich hydrothermal fluids, and the subsequent precipitation of magnetite, carbonates, massive silica, and, locally, sulfides. At a later stage, the magnetite, sulfides, and carbonates were replaced by Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides. Nuclear reaction analyses indicate that most of the N and C resides within these Fe-Mn-oxyhydroxides, but a minor fraction is found in K-feldspars and Ba-mica dispersed in the silica matrix. The N and C isotopic composition of Fe-oxides suggests the presence of a unique biogenic source with δ 15NAIR values from +6.0 +/- 0.5‰ to 7.3 +/- 1.1‰ and a δ 13CPDB value of -19.9 +/- 0.1‰. The C and N isotope ratios are similar to those observed in Proterozoic and Phanerozoic organic matter. Diffusion-controlled fractionation of N and C released during high combustion temperatures indicates that these two elements are firmly embedded within the iron oxides, with activation energies of 18.7 +/- 3.7 kJ/mol for N and 13.0 +/- 3.8 kJ/mol for C. We propose that N and C were chemisorbed on iron and were subsequently embedded in the crystals during iron oxidation and crystal growth. The Fe-isotopic composition of the Marble Bar chert (δ 56Fe = -0.38 +/- 0.02‰) is similar to that measured in iron oxides formed by direct precipitation of iron from hydrothermal plumes in contact with oxygenated waters. To explain the N and C isotopic composition of Marble Bar chert, we propose either (1) a later addition of N and C at the end of Archean when oxygen started to rise or (2) an earlier development of localized oxygenated

  4. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Iris C.; Levine, Joel S.; Poth, Mark A.; Riggan, Philip J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least six months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of exchangeable ammonium in the soil following the burn. Biomass burning is known to be an instantaneous source of NO and N2O resulting from high-temperature combustion. Now it is found that biomass burning also results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of these gases, which persist for months following the burn.

  5. Characterization of the manganese oxide produced by pseudomonas putida strain MnB1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Mario; Toner, Brandy; Bargar, John; Sposito, Garrison

    2003-07-01

    Manganese oxides form typically in natural aqueous environments via Mn(II) oxidation catalyzed by microorganisms, primarily bacteria, but little is known about the structure of the incipient solid-phase products. The Mn oxide produced by a Pseudomonas species representative of soils and freshwaters was characterized as to composition, average Mn oxidation number, and N 2 specific surface area. Electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy were applied to complement the physicochemical data with morphological and structural information. A series of synthetic Mn oxides also was analyzed by the same methods to gain better comparative understanding of the structure of the biogenic oxide. The latter was found to be a poorly crystalline layer type Mn(IV) oxide with hexagonal symmetry, significant negative structural charge arising from cation vacancies, and a relatively small number of randomly stacked octahedral sheets per particle. Its properties were comparable to those of δ-MnO 2 (vernadite) and a poorly crystalline hexagonal birnessite ("acid birnessite") synthesized by reduction of permanganate with HCl, but they were very different from those of crystalline triclinic birnessite. Overall, the structure and composition of the Mn oxide produced by P. putida were similar to what has been reported for other freshly precipitated Mn oxides in natural weathering environments, yielding further support to the predominance of biological oxidation as the pathway for Mn oxide formation. Despite variations in the degree of sheet stacking and Mn(III) content, all poorly crystalline oxides studied showed hexagonal symmetry. Thus, there is a need to distinguish layer type Mn oxides with structures similar to those of natural birnessites from the synthetic triclinic variety. We propose designating the unit cell symmetry as an addition to the current nomenclature for these minerals.

  6. Removal and Recovery of Toxic Silver Ion Using Deep-Sea Bacterial Generated Biogenic Manganese Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yuanjun; Chen, Xiao; Xiong, Dandan; Liao, Shuijiao; Wang, Gejiao

    2013-01-01

    Products containing silver ion (Ag+) are widely used, leading to a large amount of Ag+-containing waste. The deep-sea manganese-oxidizing bacterium Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9 efficiently oxidizes Mn2+ to generate biogenic Mn oxide (BMO). The potential of BMO for recovering metal ions by adsorption has been investigated for some ions but not for Ag+. The main aim of this study was to develop effective methods for adsorbing and recovering Ag using BMO produced by Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9. In addition, the adsorption mechanism was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, specific surface area analysis, adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics. The results showed that BMO had a higher adsorption capacity for Ag+ compared to the chemical synthesized MnO2 (CMO). The isothermal absorption curves of BMO and CMO both fit the Langmuir model well and the maximum adsorption capacities at 28°C were 8.097 mmol/g and 0.787 mmol/g, for BMO and CMO, respectively. The change in enthalpy (ΔHθ) for BMO was 59.69 kJ/mol indicating that it acts primarily by chemical adsorption. The change in free energy (ΔGθ) for BMO was negative, which suggests that the adsorption occurs spontaneously. Ag+ adsorption by BMO was driven by entropy based on the positive ΔSθ values. The Ag+ adsorption kinetics by BMO fit the pseudo-second order model and the apparent activation energy of Ea is 21.72 kJ/mol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 15.29% Ag+ adsorbed by BMO was transferred to Ag(0) and meant that redox reaction had happened during the adsorption. Desorption using nitric acid and Na2S completely recovered the Ag. The results show that BMO produced by strain MnI7-9 has potential for bioremediation and reutilization of Ag+-containing waste. PMID:24312566

  7. Removal and recovery of toxic silver ion using deep-sea bacterial generated biogenic manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yuanjun; Chen, Xiao; Xiong, Dandan; Liao, Shuijiao; Wang, Gejiao

    2013-01-01

    Products containing silver ion (Ag(+)) are widely used, leading to a large amount of Ag(+)-containing waste. The deep-sea manganese-oxidizing bacterium Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9 efficiently oxidizes Mn(2+) to generate biogenic Mn oxide (BMO). The potential of BMO for recovering metal ions by adsorption has been investigated for some ions but not for Ag(+). The main aim of this study was to develop effective methods for adsorbing and recovering Ag using BMO produced by Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9. In addition, the adsorption mechanism was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, specific surface area analysis, adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics. The results showed that BMO had a higher adsorption capacity for Ag(+) compared to the chemical synthesized MnO2 (CMO). The isothermal absorption curves of BMO and CMO both fit the Langmuir model well and the maximum adsorption capacities at 28°C were 8.097 mmol/g and 0.787 mmol/g, for BMO and CMO, respectively. The change in enthalpy (ΔH(θ)) for BMO was 59.69 kJ/mol indicating that it acts primarily by chemical adsorption. The change in free energy (ΔG(θ)) for BMO was negative, which suggests that the adsorption occurs spontaneously. Ag(+) adsorption by BMO was driven by entropy based on the positive ΔS(θ) values. The Ag(+) adsorption kinetics by BMO fit the pseudo-second order model and the apparent activation energy of Ea is 21.72 kJ/mol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 15.29% Ag(+) adsorbed by BMO was transferred to Ag(0) and meant that redox reaction had happened during the adsorption. Desorption using nitric acid and Na2S completely recovered the Ag. The results show that BMO produced by strain MnI7-9 has potential for bioremediation and reutilization of Ag(+)-containing waste. PMID:24312566

  8. Mn4+ emission in pyrochlore oxides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    For the existing Mn4+ activated red phosphors have relatively low emission energies (or long emission wavelengths) and are therefore inefficient for general lighting. Density functional calculations are performed to study Mn4+ emission in rare-earth hafnate, zirconate, and stannate pyrochlore oxides (RE2Hf2O7, RE2Zr2O7, and RE2Sn2O7). We show how the different sizes of the RE3+ cation in these pyrochlores affect the local structure of the distorted MnO6 octahedron, the Mn–O hybridization, and the Mn4+ emission energy. The Mn4+ emission energies of many pyrochlores are found to be higher than those currently known for Mn4+ doped oxides and should be closer to thatmore » of Y2O3:Eu3+ (the current commercial red phosphor for fluorescent lighting). The O–Mn–O bond angle distortion in a MnO6 octahedron is shown to play an important role in weakening Mn–O hybridization and consequently increasing the Mn4+ emission energy. Our result shows that searching for materials that allow significant O–Mn–O bond angle distortion in a MnO6 octahedron is an effective approach to find new Mn4+ activated red phosphors with potential to replace the relatively expensive Y2O3:Eu3+ phosphor.« less

  9. Manganese (Mn) Oxidation Increases Intracellular Mn in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    PubMed Central

    Banh, Andy; Chavez, Valarie; Doi, Julia; Nguyen, Allison; Hernandez, Sophia; Ha, Vu; Jimenez, Peter; Espinoza, Fernanda; Johnson, Hope A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial manganese (Mn) oxidation plays an important role in the global biogeochemical cycling of Mn and other compounds, and the diversity and prevalence of Mn oxidizers have been well established. Despite many hypotheses of why these bacteria may oxidize Mn, the physiological reasons remain elusive. Intracellular Mn levels were determined for Pseudomonas putida GB-1 grown in the presence or absence of Mn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Mn oxidizing wild type P. putida GB-1 had higher intracellular Mn than non Mn oxidizing mutants grown under the same conditions. P. putida GB-1 had a 5 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to the non Mn oxidizing mutant P. putida GB-1-007 and a 59 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to P. putida GB-1 ∆2665 ∆2447. The intracellular Mn is primarily associated with the less than 3 kDa fraction, suggesting it is not bound to protein. Protein oxidation levels in Mn oxidizing and non oxidizing cultures were relatively similar, yet Mn oxidation did increase survival of P. putida GB-1 when oxidatively stressed. This study is the first to link Mn oxidation to Mn homeostasis and oxidative stress protection. PMID:24147089

  10. Pb scavenging from a freshwater lake by Mn oxides in heterogeneous surface coating materials.

    PubMed

    Dong, Deming; Derry, Louis A; Lion, Leonard W

    2003-04-01

    Selective extraction techniques were used to assay the importance of specific solid phases in Pb binding by heterogeneous surface coating materials (biofilms) in Cayuga Lake, NY. Hydroxylamine hydrochloride (NH(2)OH.HC1) was used to extract easily reducible Mn oxides, and sodium dithionite (Na(2)S(2)O(4)) was used to extract Mn and Fe oxides in two sets of biofilm samples retrieved from the lake. Pb remaining after extraction was removed by extraction with 10% HNO(3), determined by analysis of Pb(208) using a sector field mass spectrometer with an inductively coupled plasma ion source (ICP-MS), and compared to the total extractable Pb. The results indicate that the greatest contribution to total Pb binding to the heterogeneous surface coating materials was from Mn oxides. Pb adsorption capacity of Mn oxides exceeded that of Fe oxides on a molar basis by approximately an order of magnitude. The high reactivity observed for natural Mn oxides indicates that they are biogenic in origin, consistent with expectations based on the relative biotic and abiotic rates of Mn(II) oxidation under circumneutral conditions. Collectively, these results confirm expectations based on prior observations of adsorption of added Pb by Cayuga Lake biofilms before and after selective extraction, and also confirm predictions for Pb phase association in the lake based on the behavior of laboratory surrogates for adsorptive surfaces. PMID:12600395

  11. Mn Oxide Biogenesis and Metal Sequestration in the Presence of Co (II) and Cu (II) By Bacillus SG-1 Bacterial Spores

    SciTech Connect

    Bayat, N

    2004-02-05

    Mn oxides play an important role in degrading contaminants and cycling nutrients in soils and natural waters. The process in which Mn (II) oxidizes to form MnO, is slow; however, Bacillus SG-1 bacterial spores can catalyze the process and allow it to proceed up to five orders of magnitude faster. This experiment explored the affects of co-ion metal concentrations on Biogenic Mn oxide production and their ability to sequester metal cations. Spore solutions were prepared with different ratios of Metal (II): Mn (II) added over a three-week period; this was done separately for Co (II) and Cu (II). The copper solutions were analyzed with ICP/AES to check for the amount of copper and manganese left in solution after biogenic MnO, production. ICP/AES was used to analyze the ratio of Co: Mn in spores where Co was the co-ion metal. Observations showed very little dissolved Cu and Mn exist in solutions with low copper concentrations, but a large amount of Cu and Mn were left in solutions where higher Cu concentrations were used. This shows that high Cu concentration inhibits biogenic Mn oxide production and Cu sequestration. For the experiments with Co as the co-ion metal, it was observed that the ratio of Co: Mn in the spores is relatively similar to the ratios added; however, an exception to this rule was experiments where high concentrations of Co were used. The inconsistency in Co: Mn ratios at high Co concentrations showed that high Co concentrations also inhibit biogenic Mn oxide production.

  12. Diversity of Mn oxides produced by Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Santelli, Cara M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2011-02-21

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are environmentally abundant, highly reactive mineral phases that mediate the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, contaminants, carbon, and numerous other elements. Despite the belief that microorganisms (specifically bacteria and fungi) are responsible for the majority of Mn oxide formation in the environment, the impact of microbial species, physiology, and growth stage on Mn oxide formation is largely unresolved. Here, we couple microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to characterize the Mn oxides produced by four different species of Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi (Plectosphaerella cucumerina strain DS2psM2a2, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, and Acremonium strictum strain DS1bioAY4a) isolated from acid mine drainage treatment systems in central Pennsylvania. The site of Mn oxide formation varies greatly among the fungi, including deposition on hyphal surfaces, at the base of reproductive structures (e.g., fruiting bodies), and on envisaged extracellular polymers adjacent to the cell. The primary product of Mn(II) oxidation for all species growing under the same chemical and physical conditions is a nanoparticulate, poorly-crystalline hexagonal birnessite-like phase resembling synthetic d-MnO2. The phylogeny and growth conditions (planktonic versus surface-attached) of the fungi, however, impact the conversion of the initial phyllomanganate to more ordered phases, such as todorokite (A. strictum strain DS1bioAY4a) and triclinic birnessite (Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a). Our findings reveal that the species of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi impacts the size, morphology, and structure of Mn biooxides, which will likely translate to large differences in the reactivity of the Mn oxide phases.

  13. Guidelines for finding concretionary Mn-Fe oxides in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Concretionary Mn-Fe oxides in streams form at interfaces between oxidizing and reducing environments. A reducing environment produces waters high in dissolved Mn and Fe, and an oxidizing environment causes precipitation. Mineralogical, microprobe, and optical studies of concretionary Mn-Fe oxides may further our understanding of the role of Mn-Fe oxides in determining the trace-element geochemistry of stream sediments. ?? 1982.

  14. Evidence for the biogenic origin of manganese-enriched layers in Lake Superior sediments.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Christine; Dittrich, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe)-enriched sediment layers were discovered in Lake Superior within, above and below the oxic-anoxic interface. While the role of bacteria in redox reactions with Mn is known to be significant, little information exists about indigenous microbial communities in many freshwater environments. This study examined the bacterial communities of Mn-enriched layers in Lake Superior to identify the potential Mn(II) oxidizers responsible for the formation of Mn oxides. Anaerobic Mn(II) oxidation occurring in the Mn-enriched layers at the oxic-anoxic interface was investigated using Mn(II)-enriched cultures. High-resolution microscopic and spectroscopic investigations provided evidence of the biogenic formation of Mn oxides on cell surfaces. Spectroscopic mapping confirmed high levels of Mn in structures resembling biogenic Mn oxides. These structures were observed in enrichment cultures and in Mn-enriched layer sediment samples, indicating the significance of biogenic Mn oxidation occurring in situ. 16S ribosomal DNA pyrosequencing was used to identify the bacteria potentially responsible for Mnoxide formation in the enrichment cultures and Mn-enriched layers, revealing that the Mn-enriched layer contains classes with known Mn(II)-oxidizing members. Pyrosequencing of bacterial cultures suggested that these bacteria may be Bacillus strains, and that anaerobic microbial-mediated Mn(II) oxidation contributes to the formation of the layers. PMID:26636960

  15. Characterization of Highly Oxidized Molecules in Fresh and Aged Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Tu, Peijun; Hall, Wiley A; Johnston, Murray V

    2016-04-19

    In this work, highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOMs) in fresh and aged secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from biogenic precursors are characterized with high-resolution mass spectrometry. Fresh SOA was generated by mixing ozone with a biogenic precursor (β-pinene, limonene, α-pinene) in a flow tube reactor. Aging was performed by passing the fresh SOA through a photochemical reactor where it reacted with hydroxyl radicals. Although these aerosols were as a whole not highly oxidized, molecular analysis identified a significant number of HOMs embedded within it. HOMs in fresh SOA consisted mostly of monomers and dimers, which is consistent with condensation of extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs) that have been detected in the gas phase in previous studies and linked to SOA particle formation. Aging caused an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of the HOMs, which is consistent with particle phase oxidation of (less oxidized) oligomers already existing in fresh SOA. HOMs having different combinations of oxygen-to-carbon ratio, hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and average carbon oxidation state are discussed and compared to low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LVOOA), which has been identified in ambient aerosol based on average elemental composition but not fully understood at a molecular level. For the biogenic precursors and experimental conditions studied, HOMs in fresh biogenic SOA have molecular formulas more closely resembling LVOOA than HOMs in aged SOA, suggesting that aging of biogenic SOA is not a good surrogate for ambient LVOOA. PMID:27000653

  16. Influence of Mn oxides on the reduction of uranium(VI) by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Liu, Chongxuan; Duff, Martine C.; Hunter, Douglas B.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2002-09-01

    The potential for Mn oxides to modify the biogeochemical behavior of U during reduction by the subsurface bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was investigated using synthetic Mn(III/IV) oxides (pyrolusite [β-MnO 2], bixbyite [Mn 2O 3] and K +-birnessite [K 4Mn 14O 27 · 8H 2O]). In the absence of bacteria, pyrolusite and bixbyite oxidized biogenic uraninite (UO 2[s]) to soluble U(VI) species, with bixbyite being the most rapid oxidant. The Mn(III/IV) oxides lowered the bioreduction rate of U(VI) relative to rates in their absence or in the presence of gibbsite (Al[OH] 3) added as a non-redox-reactive surface. Evolved Mn(II) increased with increasing initial U(VI) concentration in the biotic experiments, indicating that valence cycling of U facilitated the reduction of Mn(III/IV). Despite an excess of the Mn oxide, 43 to 100% of the initial U was bioreduced after extended incubation. Analysis of thin sections of bacterial Mn oxide suspensions revealed that the reduced U resided in the periplasmic space of the bacterial cells. However, in the absence of Mn(III/IV) oxides, UO 2(s) accumulated as copious fine-grained particles external to the cell. These results indicate that the presence of Mn(III/IV) oxides may impede the biological reduction of U(VI) in subsoils and sediments. However, the accumulation of U(IV) in the cell periplasm may physically protect reduced U from oxidation, promoting at least a temporal state of redox disequilibria.

  17. Linking Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria to natural attenuation at a former U mining site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akob, D.; Bohu, T.; Beyer, A.; Schäffner, F.; Händel, M.; Johnson, C.; Merten, D.; Büchel, G.; Totsche, K.; Küsel, K.

    2012-04-01

    Uranium mining near Ronneburg, Germany resulted in widespread environmental contamination with acid mine drainage (AMD) and high concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides. Despite physical remediation of the area, groundwater is still a source of heavy metal contaminants, e.g., Cd, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn, to nearby ecosystems. However, natural attenuation of heavy metals is occurring in Mn oxide rich soils and sediments ranging in pH from 5 to 7. While microorganisms readily oxidize Mn(II) and precipitate Mn oxides at pH ~7 under oxic conditions, few studies describe Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) at pH ~5 and/or in the presence of heavy metals. In this study we (1) isolated MOB from the contaminated Ronneburg area at pH 5.5 and 7 and (2) evaluated the biological formation of Mn oxides. We isolated nine MOB strains at pH 7 (members of the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes phyla) and a single isolate at pH 5.5 (Oxalobacteraceae isolate AB_14, within the β-Proteobacteria). LA-ICP-MS showed that all isolates accumulated Mn and Fe in their biomass. However, the Oxalobacteraceae isolate AB_14 oxidizes more Mn without additional Fe in the medium. Preliminary FTIR analysis indicated that all isolates formed precipitates, which showed absorption bands that were characteristic for birnessite. High resolution TEM showed variable morphology of precipitates and EDS confirmed the presence of Mn oxides. Isolate AB_14 was not surrounded with precipitates whereas our Actinobacteria isolate AB_18 was encrusted with Mn oxides. Electron diffraction is currently being used to confirm the presence of birnessite and other Mn oxide phases. This, the first known report of any organism capable of Mn oxidation at low pH, demonstrated that MOB can be involved in the natural attenuation of both moderately acidic and neutral pH soils and sediments via the formation of biogenic Mn oxides. Future work will fully evaluate the minerals formed in this process as well

  18. Diversity and As-adsorption properties of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria within tropical wetlands of the Mekong Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, S. C.; Kocar, B. D.; Fendorf, S.; Francis, C. A.

    2007-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) oxides are ubiquitous minerals that occur under similar redox conditions in terrestrial systems and have high sorptive capacities for many trace metals, including arsenic (As). In most natural environments, Fe oxidation is dominated by abiotic processes, while Mn oxides are primarily formed via bacterial Mn(II) oxidation, and both processes can profoundly impact the mobility of metal(loid) contaminants. Deciphering the mechanisms involved in arsenic transport within soils and sediments is essential for aiding many Southeast Asian countries, including Cambodia, where naturally occurring As is in groundwater at concentrations well above the WHO recommended limit. Although numerous past studies have characterized the effects of As adsorption onto Fe and Mn oxides individually, it is unknown whether, in the presence of both oxides, there is preferential adsorption of As onto one oxide over the other. In the present study, we examine the competitive retention of As(III) and As(V) on goethite and biogenic Mn oxides using Donnan membranes--where each oxides is isolated by a semi-permeable membrane through which arsenic can migrate. Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria, isolated from several Mn-rich sites along the Mekong River and wetland areas within the Mekong delta, were dominated by a diverse array of Bacillus strains that rapidly oxidize Mn(II) within three to five days in liquid culture. The results of this study not only expand our knowledge of the diversity and biogeochemical importance of terrestrial Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria, but also contribute to our understanding the relative impact of Fe and Mn oxides on arsenic retention within natural wetlands.

  19. Influence of Mn oxides on the reduction of U(VI) by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Liu, Chongxuan; Duff, Martine C.; Hunter, David; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2002-09-16

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) enzymatically reduce Fe(III), Mn(III/IV), U(VI), and other polyvalent metals during anaerobic respiration. Previous investigations of the bacterial reduction of U(VI) in the presence of goethite (a-FeOOH) found that, in spite of potential competition as an electron acceptor, goethite had little impact on the bacterial reduction of U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Mn(III/IV) oxides are also electron acceptors for DMRB but are stronger oxidants than Fe(III) oxides. Differences in the solubility of oxidized Mn and U challenges predictions of their biogeochemical behavior during redox cycling. The potential for Mn oxides to modify the biogeochemical behavior of U during reduction by a subsurface bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was investigated using synthetic Mn(III/IV) oxides [pyrolusite ({beta}-MnO{sub 2}), bixbyite (Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and K{sup +}-birnessite (K{sub 4}Mn{sub 14}O{sub 27} {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}O)]. In the absence of bacteria, pyrolusite and bixbyite oxidized biogenic uraninite (UO{sub 2}(s)) to soluble U(VI) species, with bixbyite being the most rapid oxidant. The Mn(III/IV) oxides lowered the bioreduction rate of U(VI) relative to rates in their absence, or in the presence of gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] added as a non-redox reactive surface. Evolved Mn(II) increased with increasing initial U(VI) concentration in the biotic experiments, indicating that valence cycling of U facilitated the reduction of Mn(III/IV). Despite an excess of the Mn oxide, 43-100% of the initial U was bioreduced after extended incubation. Analysis of thin sections of bacterial-Mn oxide suspensions revealed that the reduced U resided in the periplasmic space of the bacterial cells. In the absence of Mn(III/IV) oxides, UO{sub 2}(s) accumulated as copius fine-grained particles external to the cell. These results indicate that the presence of Mn(III/IV) oxides may impede the biological reduction of U(VI) in subsoils and sediments?.

  20. Coexistence of Fe(II)- and Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria govern the formation of deep sea umber deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaotong; Ta, Kaiwen; Chen, Shun; Zhang, Lijuan; Xu, Hengchao

    2015-11-01

    The genesis of umber deposits has remained controversial for several decades. Recently, microbial Fe(II) oxidation associated with low-temperature diffuse venting has been identified as a key process for the formation of umber deposits, but the exact biogeochemical mechanisms involved to the precipitation of Mn oxides in umber deposits still remain unknown. Here, we used nano secondary ion mass spectrometer, synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and molecular techniques to demonstrate the coexistence of two types of metal-oxidizing bacteria within deep-sea hydrothermal umber deposits at the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where we found unique spheroids composed of biogenic Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides in the deposits. Our data show that Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides are metabolic by-products of lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and heterotrophic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria, respectively. The hydrothermal vents fuel lithotrophic microorganisms, which constitute a trophic base that might support the activities of heterogenic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The biological origin of umber deposits shed light on the importance of geomicrobiological interaction in triggering the formation of metalliferous deposits, with important implications for the generation of submarine Mn deposits and crusts.

  1. Methyl Chavicol: Characterization of its Biogenic Emission Rate, Abundance, and Oxidation Products in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier-Brown, N. C.; Goldstein, A. H.; Worton, D. R.; Matross, D. M.; Gilman, J.; Kuster, W.; Degouw, J.; Cahill, T. M.; Holzinger, R.

    2008-12-01

    We report quantitative measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments: gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS), proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), and thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG). Previously identified as a potential bark beetle disruptant, methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), a light and temperature dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4-68 % of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72-10.2 μ gCg-1h-1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde) in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many species. We propose this newly- characterized biogenic compound should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  2. Molecular- and Nano-Scale Structure and Reactivity of Biogenic Uranium(IV) Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, E. J.; Bargar, J. R.; Veeramani, H.; Sharp, J. O.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Survova, E.; Giammar, D. E.; Ulrich, K.; Mehta, A.; Webb, S. M.; Conradson, S. D.; Clark, D. L.; Ilton, E. S.

    2008-12-01

    Bioremediation has been proposed and extensively researched as an in-situ immobilization strategy for uranium contamination in the subsurface with nanoparticulate uraninite (UO2) being the commonly reported product. Little detail is known about the structure and reactivity of this material, but based on comparison to its closest abiotic analog, UO2+x (0 < x < 0.25), we expect that it is complex and disordered and capable of structurally incorporating common groundwater cations. In addition, it has been predicted that the nanoparticulate form would induce strain and increase the solubility, and therefore reduce the effectiveness of this method as a remediation technology. In this study, the local-, intermediate- and long-range atomic and nano-scale structure of biogenic UO2 (formed at varying pH and divalent cation concentration, using Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1) was characterized using EXAFS, SR-based powder diffraction and TEM. The lattice parameter of the nanoparticulate phase is seen to be consistent with bulk UO2. There is no evidence for hyperstoichiometry or strain of the UO2 particles, the latter indicating that surface energy is relatively modest. Similar results were obtained for biogenic UO2 particles produced by other metal reducing bacteria indicating that biological variability may play a minimal role in structure. In agreement with the structural analysis, the surface area-normalized dissolution rate of the biogenic UO2 was found to be comparable to that of coarser, synthetic UO2.00. Mn2+ was found to attenuate the particle size of biogenic UO2+xand to be structurally incorporated. This finding suggests that groundwater composition can have a pronounced impact on the structure and properties of biogenic uraninite.

  3. Zinc sorption to biogenic hexagonal-birnessite particles within a hydrated bacterial biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, Brandy; Manceau, Alain; Webb, Samuel M.; Sposito, Garrison

    2006-01-01

    Biofilm-embedded Mn oxides exert important controls on trace metal cycling in aquatic and soil environments. The speciation and mobility of Zn in particular has been linked to Mn oxides found in streams, wetlands, soils, and aquifers. We investigated the mechanisms of Zn sorption to a biogenic Mn oxide within a biofilm produced by model soil and freshwater Mn II-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida. The biogenic Mn oxide is a c-disordered birnessite with hexagonal layer symmetry. Zinc adsorption isotherm and Zn and Mn K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted at pH 6.9 to characterize Zn sorption to this biogenic Mn oxide, and to determine whether the bioorganic components of the biofilm affect metal sorption properties. The EXAFS data were analyzed by spectral fitting, principal component analysis, and linear least-squares fitting with reference spectra. Zinc speciation was found to change as Zn loading to the biosorbent [bacterial cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and biogenic Mn oxide] increased. At low Zn loading (0.13 ± 0.04 mol Zn kg -1 biosorbent), Zn was sorbed to crystallographically well-defined sites on the biogenic oxide layers in tetrahedral coordination to structural O atoms. The fit to the EXAFS spectrum was consistent with Zn sorption above and below the Mn IV vacancy sites of the oxide layers. As Zn loading increased to 0.72 ± 0.04 mol Zn kg -1 biosorbent, Zn was also detected in octahedral coordination to these sites. Overall, our results indicate that the biofilm did not intervene in Zn sorption by the Mn-oxide because sorption to the organic material was observed only after all Mn vacancy sites were capped by Zn. The organic functional groups present in the biofilm contributed significantly to Zn removal from solution when Zn concentrations exceeded the sorption capacity of the biooxide. At the highest Zn loading studied, 1.50 ± 0.36 mol Zn kg -1 biosorbent, the proportion

  4. The effects of fire on biogenic soil emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Boston, Penelope J.; Winstead, Edward L.; Sebacher, Shirley

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of biogenic soil emissions of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) before and after a controlled burn conducted in a chaparral ecosystem on June 22, 1987, showed significantly enhanced emissions of both gases after the burn. Mean NO emissions from heavily burned and wetted (to simulate rainfall) sites exceeded 40 ng N/sq m s, and increase of 2 to 3 compared to preburn wetted site measurements. N2O emissions from burned and wetted sites ranged from 9 to 22 ng N/sq m s. Preburn N2O emissions from these wetted sites were all below the detection level of the instrumentation, indicating a flux below 2 ng N/sq m s. The flux of NO exceeded the N2O flux from burned wetted sites by factors ranging from 2.7 to 3.4. These measurements, coupled with preburn and postburn measurements of ammonium and nitrate in the soil of this chaparral ecosystem and measurements of NO and N2O emissions obtained under controlled laboratory conditions, suggest that the postfire enhancement of NO and N2O emissions is due to production of these gases by nitrifying bacteria.

  5. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier-Brown, N. C.; Goldstein, A. H.; Worton, D. R.; Matross, D. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Cahill, T. M.; Holzinger, R.

    2009-03-01

    We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments - a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG) - and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4-68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72-10.2 μgCg-1 h-1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde) in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  6. Impact of environmental chemistry on mycogenic Mn oxide minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santelli, C. M.; Farfan, G. A.; Post, A.; Post, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in aquatic and terrestrial environments and their presence can have broad environmental consequences. In particular, Mn oxides scavenge nutrients and metals, degrade complex organics, and oxidize a variety of inorganic contaminants. The "reactivity" of Mn oxides, however, is highly dependent upon crystallite size, composition, and structure, which are largely determined by environmental factors such as solution chemistry. It is has been suggested that most Mn oxides in terrestrial and aquatic environments are formed by microbial activity; indeed, a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and fungi have been isolated and their mineral byproducts are consistent with those observed in natural systems. Previous studies showed that Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi produce highly-disordered, nanocrystalline Mn oxides that are structurally similar to synthetic δ-MnO2 or natural vernadite. Unlike related studies with Mn-oxidizing bacteria, Mn oxides produced by these fungi did not "age" or transform to more crystalline mineral phases with time. We hypothesize that fungal growth conditions, in particular the low concentration of cations, are inhibiting secondary mineral formation. The overall goal of this research is to examine the structure and speciation of fungally-precipitated Mn oxides with respect to fungal species, time, and concentration of soluble Mn(II), Na, and Ca - three environmentally relevant cations that promote the transformation of δ-MnO2 to more crystalline mineral phases such as feitknechtite, birnessite, or ranciéite. For this study, we examined the Mn oxides formed by different species of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (Pyrenochaeta sp., Stagonospora sp., Plectosphaerella cucumerina., and Acremonium strictum). Isolates were grown for 8 or 16 days in a nutrient lean media consisting of yeast extract, trace elements and 0.2 mM MnCl2 supplemented with varying concentrations of Na, Ca, or Mn(II) compounds. The

  7. Rapid deposition of oxidized biogenic compounds to a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2015-02-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (∼1 nmol m-2ṡs-1). GEOS-Chem, a widely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS-Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases.

  8. Rapid deposition of oxidized biogenic compounds to a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tran B; Crounse, John D; Teng, Alex P; St Clair, Jason M; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M; Wennberg, Paul O

    2015-02-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (∼1 nmol m(-2)⋅s(-1)). GEOS-Chem, a widely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS-Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases. PMID:25605913

  9. Rapid deposition of oxidized biogenic compounds to a temperate forest

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2015-01-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (∼1 nmol m−2⋅s−1). GEOS−Chem, a widely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS−Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases. PMID:25605913

  10. Rapid Deposition of Oxidized Biogenic Compounds to a Temperate Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2015-01-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (approx. 1 nmol m(exp.-2)·s(exp.-1)). GEOS-Chem, awidely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS-Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases.

  11. Biogenic terbium oxide nanoparticles as the vanguard against osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Iram, Sana; Khan, Salman; Ansary, Abu Ayoobul; Arshad, Mohd; Siddiqui, Sahabjada; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan H; Khan, Mohd Sajid

    2016-11-01

    The synthesis of inner transition metal nanoparticles via an ecofriendly route is quite difficult. This study, for the first time, reports synthesis of terbium oxide nanoparticles using fungus, Fusarium oxysporum. The biocompatible terbium oxide nanoparticles (Tb2O3 NPs) were synthesized by incubating Tb4O7 with the biomass of fungus F. oxysporum. Multiple physical characterization techniques, such as UV-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy, TEM, SAED, and zeta-potential were used to confirm the synthesis, purity, optical and surface characteristics, crystallinity, size, shape, distribution, and stability of the nanoemulsion of Tb2O3 NPs. The Tb2O3 NPs were found to inhibit the propagation of MG-63 and Saos-2 cell-lines (IC50 value of 0.102μg/mL) and remained non-toxic up to a concentration of 0.373μg/mL toward primary osteoblasts. Cell viability decreased in a concentration-dependent manner upon exposure to 10nm Tb2O3 NPs in the concentration range 0.023-0.373μg/mL. Cell toxicity was evaluated by observing changes in cell morphology, cell viability, oxidative stress parameters, and FACS analysis. Morphological examinations of cells revealed cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation, and formation of apoptotic bodies. The level of ROS within the cells-an indicator of oxidative stress was significantly increased. The induction of apoptosis at concentrations ≤IC50 was corroborated by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining (DNA damage and nuclear fragmentation). Flow-cytometric studies indicated that the response was dose dependent with a threshold effect. PMID:27288964

  12. Siderophore-mediated oxidation of Ce and fractionation of HREE by Mn (hydr)oxide-coprecipitation and sorption on MnO2: Experimental evidence for negative Ce-anomalies in abiogenic manganese precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Dennis; Tepe, Nathalie; Bau, Michael

    2014-05-01

    We conducted experiments with Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY), where the REY were sorbed on synthetic manganese dioxide as well as on coprecipitating manganese (hydr)oxide in the presence and absence of the siderophore desferrioxamine-B (DFOB). Siderophores are a group of globally abundant biogenic complexing agents which are excreted by plants and bacteria to enhance the bioavailability of Fe in oxic environments. The model siderophore used in this study, DFOB, is a hydroxamate siderophore occurring in almost all environmental settings with concentrations in the nanomolar to millimolar range and is one of the most thoroughly studied siderophores. In the absence of siderophores and other organic ligands, trivalent Ce is usually surface-oxidized to tetravalent Ce during sorption onto manganese (hydr)oxides. Such Mn precipitates, therefore, often show positive Ce anomalies, whereas the ambient solutions exhibit negative Ce anomalies (Ohta and Kawabe, 2001). In marked contrast, however, REY sorption in the presence of DFOB produces negative Ce anomalies in the Mn precipitates and a distinct and characteristic positive Ce anomaly in the residual siderophore-bearing solution. Furthermore, the heavy REY with ionic radii larger than the radius of Sm are also almost completely prevented from sorption onto the Mn solid phases. Sorption of REY onto Mn (hydr)oxides in the presence of DFOB creates a distinct and pronounced fractionation of Ce and the heavy REY from the light and middle REY. Apart from Ce, which is oxidized in solution by the siderophore, the distribution of the other REY mimics the stability constants for multi-dentate complexes of REY with DFOB, as determined by Christenson & Schijf (2011). Heavier REY are forming stronger complexes (and are hence better "protected" from sorption) than light REY, excluding Ce. Preferential partitioning of Ce into the liquid phase during the precipitation of Mn (hydr)oxides has only rarely been described for natural Mn (hydr)oxides

  13. Biogenic isoprene and implications for oxidant levels in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Chung; Shao, Min; Chou, Charles C. K.; Liu, Shaw-Chen; Zhu, Tong; Lee, Kun-Zhang; Lai, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Po-Hsiung; Wang*, Jia-Lin

    2014-05-01

    As the host of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games, Beijing implemented a series of stringent, short-term air quality control measures to reduce the emissions of anthropogenic air pollutants. Large reductions in the daily average concentrations of primary pollutants, e.g., non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) of approximately 50% were observed at the air quality observatory of Peking University. Nevertheless, high levels of ozone were present during the control period. Although anthropogenic precursors were greatly reduced, the meteorological conditions in summer, including high temperature and light flux, are conducive to the production of large amounts of biogenic isoprene, which is extremely reactive. The diurnal pattern of isoprene showed daily maximum mixing ratios of 0.83 ppbv at noon and a minimum at night, reflecting its primarily biogenic properties. Using the ratio of isoprene to vehicle exhaust tracers, approximately 92% of the daytime isoprene was estimated from biogenic sources, and only 8% was attributed to vehicular emissions. In terms of OH reactivity and the ozone formation potential (OFP), biogenic isoprene with its midday surge can contribute approximately 20% of the total OFPs and 40-50% of the total OH reactivities of the 65 measured NMHCs during the midday hours. The discrepancy between decreased precursor levels and the observed high ozone was most likely caused by a combination of many factors. The changes in the partition among the components of oxidation products (O3, NO2 and NOz) and the contribution of air pollutants from regional sources outside Beijing should be two primary reasons. Furthermore, the influences of biogenic isoprene as well as the non-linearity of O3-VOC-NOx chemistry are other major concerns that can reduce the effectiveness of the control measures for decreasing ozone formation. Although anthropogenic precursors were greatly reduced during the Olympic Games, the presence of sufficient biogenic isoprene

  14. Biogenic isoprene and implications for oxidant levels in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Shao, M.; Chou, C. C. K.; Liu, S.-C.; Wang, J.-L.; Lee, K.-Z.; Lai, C.-H.; Zhu, T.; Lin, P.-H.

    2013-10-01

    As the host of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games, Beijing implemented a series of stringent, short-term air quality control measures to reduce the emissions of anthropogenic air pollutants. Large reductions in the daily average concentrations of primary pollutants, e.g., non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) of approximately 50% were observed at the air quality observatory of Peking University. Nevertheless, high levels of ozone were present during the control period. Although anthropogenic precursors were greatly reduced, the meteorological conditions in summer, including high temperature and light flux, are conducive to the production of large amounts of biogenic isoprene, which is extremely reactive. The diurnal pattern of isoprene showed daily maximum mixing ratios of 0.83 ppbv at noon and a minimum at night, reflecting its primarily biogenic properties. Using the ratio of isoprene to vehicle exhaust tracers, approximately 92% of the daytime isoprene was estimated from biogenic sources, and only 8% was attributed to vehicular emissions. In terms of OH reactivity and the ozone formation potential (OFP), biogenic isoprene with its midday surge can contribute approximately 20% of the total OFPs and 40-50% of the total OH reactivities of the 65 measured NMHCs during the midday hours. The discrepancy between decreased precursor levels and the observed high ozone was most likely caused by a combination of many factors. The changes in the partition among the components of oxidation products (O3, NO2 and NOz) and the contribution of air pollutants from regional sources outside Beijing should be two primary reasons. Furthermore, the influences of biogenic isoprene as well as the non-linearity of O3-VOC-NOx chemistry are other major concerns that can reduce the effectiveness of the control measures for decreasing ozone formation. Although anthropogenic precursors were greatly reduced during the Olympic Games, sufficient biogenic isoprene and moderate NOx

  15. Comparative Dissolution Kinetics of Biogenic and Chemogenic Uraninite Under Oxidizing Conditions in the Presence of Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Ilton, Eugene S.; Veeramani, Harish; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Bargar, John; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2009-10-15

    The long-term stability of biogenic uraninite with respect to oxidation is pivotal to the success of in situ bioreduction strategies for the subsurface remediation of uranium legacies. Given the structural homology between biogenic uraninite nanoparticles obtained from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and chemogenic UO2.00, similar surface free energy and reactivity is expected. Batch and flow-through dissolution experiments were conducted along with spectroscopic analyses to compare both materials with respect to their equilibrium solubility, dissolution mechanisms, and dissolution kinetics in water of varied oxygen and carbonate concentrations. Both uraninite materials exhibited a similar intrinsic solubility of ~10-8 M under reducing conditions. The observation of comparable dissolution rates under anoxic as well as oxidizing conditions is consistent with the structural bulk homology of biogenic and stoichiometric uraninite. Carbonate, a ubiquitous groundwater component and strong complexant of U(VI), reversibly promoted the uraninite dissolution not only under moderately oxidizing, but also under reducing conditions, where the biogenic material yielded higher dissolution rates than the chemogenic. This difference is in accordance with the higher proportion of U(V) detected on the biogenic uraninite surface by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Reasonable sources of the intermediate U(V) are discussed. The observed increase of the dissolution rates can be explained by carbonate complexation of U(V) facilitating the detachment of U(V) from the uraninite surface. The fraction of surface U(VI) increased with increasing oxygen concentration; this result is consistent with x-ray absorption near-edge spectra showing evidence of higher-valent U in the form of UO2+x (0 < x ≤ 0.20). In equilibrium with air, combined spectroscopic results support the formation of a near-surface layer of U4O9 (UO2.25) coated by an outer layer of U(VI) corresponding to a metaschoepite

  16. Environmental estrogen Bisphenol A adsorption/oxidation on Graphene oxide/MnO2 (GO/MnO2) nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bele, Sotiria I.; Deliyanni, Eleni A.

    2015-04-01

    The environmental fate and decontamination of Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogen that is used as a monomer in plastic industry, are of emerging concern. This study focused on the kinetics, influencing factors and pathways of its adsorption and oxidative decomposition by MnO2. Additionally, Graphene oxide/MnO2 (GO/MnO2) nanocomposite was prepared and tested as a kind of adsorbent and/or catalysts for oxidative decomposition of Bisphenol A (BPA). A suspension of graphene oxide/manganese sulfate (GO/MnSO4) produced by the modified Hummers method was in situ transformed into GO/MnO2 nanocomposite in combination with KMnO4. It is found that MnO2 nanoparticles are uniformly distributed in the structure of GO. The surface chemistry and the porous texture of the prepared nanocomposite were characterized by thermal analysis (DTA), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Nitrogen adsorption (BET). The nanocomposite presented superior catalytic activities, much higher than that of the bare MnO2 for the decomposition of BPA in the presence of H2O2. The high activity of GO/MnO2 nanocomposite for the decomposition of BPA could be related to the synergistic effect of GO and MnO2 with the assistance of H2O2 according to the adsorption-oxidation-desorption mechanism.

  17. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  18. The Irony of Iron – Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  19. Biogenic oxides from neutrophilic iron bacteria and possibilities for application in the nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, R.; Blagoev, B.; Slavov, L.; Iliev, M.; Groudeva, V.; Nedkov, I.

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain and characterize the ferric oxides/(oxy)hydroxides formed after cultivation of bacteria under laboratory conditions. The pure cultures of these bacteria isolated from natural habitats are identified by the methods of classical and molecular taxonomy as strains of the Leptothrix genus. Adler (AM) and Silicon iron glucose peptone (SIGP) media are the most appropriate ones for obtaining the iron oxides. The characterization of the oxides and sheaths is performed by different physical methods. The sheaths are formed in a SIGP medium. Light micrograph images and SEM revealed the average size and diameter of the sheaths. The XRD measurements showed the composition of the oxides obtained, as well as the average size of the iron particles (up to 30 nm). The TEM micrographs showed the shape of the biogenic nanoparticles, while the magnetic measurements demonstrated the superparamagnetic character of the magnetic part of the biomaterials. The new biogenic materials are promising for application in magneto electronic for building biosensors.

  20. Cr(III) Oxidation Coupled With Microbially-Mediated Mn(II) Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Youxian Wu; Baolin Deng

    2006-04-05

    Cr(VI) can be reduced to less toxic and mobile Cr(III) species through abiotic and biological processes. Reductive immobilization of Cr(VI) has been widely explored as a cost effective technology for site remediation; Mn oxides are regarded as primary oxidants for Cr(III) oxidation in the environment; and Generation of Mn oxides from Mn(II) in natural environments is believed to be biologically catalyzed.

  1. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier-Brown, N. C.; Goldstein, A. H.; Worton, D. R.; Matross, D. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Cahill, T. M.; Holzinger, R.

    2008-11-01

    We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG) and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4 68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72 10.2 μgCg-1h-1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde) in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  2. Mn(II,III) oxidation and MnO2 mineralization by an expressed bacterial multicopper oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Cristina N.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Spiro, Thomas G.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Mn(IV) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and control the bioavailability and distribution of many toxic and essential elements and organic compounds. Their formation is thought to be dependent on microbial enzymes, because spontaneous Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxidation is slow. Several species of marine Bacillus spores oxidize Mn(II) on their exosporium, the outermost layer of the spore, encrusting them with Mn(IV) oxides. Molecular studies have identified the mnx (Mn oxidation) genes, including mnxG, encoding a putative multicopper oxidase (MCO), as responsible for this two-electron oxidation, a surprising finding because MCOs only catalyze single-electron transfer reactions. Characterization of the enzymatic mechanism has been hindered by the lack of purified protein. By purifying active protein from the mnxDEFG expression construct, we found that the resulting enzyme is a blue (absorption maximum 590 nm) complex containing MnxE, MnxF, and MnxG proteins. Further, by analyzing the Mn(II)- and (III)-oxidizing activity in the presence of a Mn(III) chelator, pyrophosphate, we found that the complex facilitates both electron transfers from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV). X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the Mn mineral product confirmed its similarity to Mn(IV) oxides generated by whole spores. Our results demonstrate that Mn oxidation from soluble Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxides is a two-step reaction catalyzed by an MCO-containing complex. With the purification of active Mn oxidase, we will be able to uncover its mechanism, broadening our understanding of Mn mineral formation and the bioinorganic capabilities of MCOs. PMID:23818588

  3. The effect of coal bed dewatering and partial oxidation on biogenic methane potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Harris, Steve H.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Orem, William H.; Clark, Arthur C.; Corum, Margo D.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Coal formation dewatering at a site in the Powder River Basin was associated with enhanced potential for secondary biogenic methane determined by using a bioassay. We hypothesized that dewatering can stimulate microbial activity and increase the bioavailability of coal. We analyzed one dewatered and two water-saturated coals to examine possible ways in which dewatering influences coal bed natural gas biogenesis by looking at differences with respect to the native coal microbial community, coal-methane organic intermediates, and residual coal oxidation potential. Microbial biomass did not increase in response to dewatering. Small Subunit rRNA sequences retrieved from all coals sampled represented members from genera known to be aerobic, anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic. A Bray Curtis similarity analysis indicated that the microbial communities in water-saturated coals were more similar to each other than to the dewatered coal, suggesting an effect of dewatering. There was a higher incidence of long chain and volatile fatty acid intermediates in incubations of the dewatered coal compared to the water-saturated coals, and this could either be due to differences in microbial enzymatic activities or to chemical oxidation of the coal associated with O2 exposure. Dilute H2O2 treatment of two fractions of structural coal (kerogen and bitumen + kerogen) was used as a proxy for chemical oxidation by O2. The dewatered coal had a low residual oxidation potential compared to the water-saturated coals. Oxidation with 5% H2O2 did increase the bioavailability of structural coal, and the increase in residual oxidation potential in the water saturated coals was approximately equivalent to the higher methanogenic potential measured in the dewatered coal. Evidence from this study supports the idea that coal bed dewatering could stimulate biogenic methanogenesis through partial oxidation of the structural organics in coal once anaerobic conditions are restored.

  4. Synthesis and microstructure of porous Mn-oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musić, Svetozar; Ristić, Mira; Popović, Stanko

    2009-04-01

    Porous Mn-oxide particles were synthesized by urea processing in combination with the thermal treatment of the precursor precipitated. The samples were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, DTA, FE-SEM and EDS. Upon heating of the precursor at 600 °C, α-Mn 2O 3 particles containing nanopores (cheese-like) were obtained. Most nanopores varied from ˜20 to 60 nm, and some were close to ˜100 nm in size. The α-Mn 2O 3 particles showed a strong twinning effect. At 1100 °C, Mn 3O 4 particles, obtained as a single crystal phase, formed a microporous 3D structure.

  5. Deposition of Biogenic Iron Minerals in a Methane Oxidizing Microbial Mat

    PubMed Central

    Wrede, Christoph; Dreier, Anne; Heller, Christina; Reitner, Joachim; Hoppert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The syntrophic community between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria forms thick, black layers within multi-layered microbial mats in chimney-like carbonate concretions of methane seeps located in the Black Sea Crimean shelf. The microbial consortium conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane, which leads to the formation of mainly two biomineral by-products, calcium carbonates and iron sulfides, building up these chimneys. Iron sulfides are generated by the microbial reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds in the microbial mats. Here we show that sulfate reducing bacteria deposit biogenic iron sulfides extra- and intracellularly, the latter in magnetosome-like chains. These chains appear to be stable after cell lysis and tend to attach to cell debris within the microbial mat. The particles may be important nuclei for larger iron sulfide mineral aggregates. PMID:23843725

  6. cumA Multicopper Oxidase Genes from Diverse Mn(II)-Oxidizing and Non-Mn(II)-Oxidizing Pseudomonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Chris A.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2001-01-01

    A multicopper oxidase gene, cumA, required for Mn(II) oxidation was recently identified in Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1. In the present study, degenerate primers based on the putative copper-binding regions of the cumA gene product were used to PCR amplify cumA gene sequences from a variety of Pseudomonas strains, including both Mn(II)-oxidizing and non-Mn(II)-oxidizing strains. The presence of highly conserved cumA gene sequences in several apparently non-Mn(II)-oxidizing Pseudomonas strains suggests that this gene may not be expressed, may not be sufficient alone to confer the ability to oxidize Mn(II), or may have an alternative function in these organisms. Phylogenetic analysis of both CumA and 16S rRNA sequences revealed similar topologies between the respective trees, including the presence of several distinct phylogenetic clusters. Overall, our results indicate that both the cumA gene and the capacity to oxidize Mn(II) occur in phylogenetically diverse Pseudomonas strains. PMID:11526033

  7. Cr(OH)₃(s) Oxidation Induced by Surface Catalyzed Mn(II) Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Namgung, Seonyi; Kwon, M.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lee, Gie Hyeon

    2014-09-16

    This study examined the feasibility of Cr(OH)₃(s) oxidation mediated by surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation under common groundwater pH conditions as a potential pathway of natural Cr(VI) contaminations. Dissolved Mn(II) (50 μM) was reacted with or without synthesized Cr(OH)₃(s) (1.0 g/L) at pH 7 – 9 under oxic or anoxic conditions. In the absence of Cr(OH)₃(s), homogeneous Mn(II) oxidation by dissolved O₂ was not observed at pH ≤ 8.0 for 50 d. At pH 9.0, by contrast, dissolved Mn(II) was completely removed within 8 d and precipitated as hausmannite. When Cr(OH)₃(s) was present, this solid was oxidized and released substantial amounts of Cr(VI) as dissolved Mn(II) was added into the suspension at pH ≥ 8.0 under oxic conditions. Our results suggest that Cr(OH)₃(s) was readily oxidized by a newly formed Mn oxide as a result of Mn(II) oxidation catalyzed on Cr(OH)₃(s) surface. XANES analysis of the residual solids after the reaction between 1.0 g/L Cr(OH)₃(s) and 204 μM Mn(II) at pH 9.0 for 22 d revealed that the product of surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation resembled birnessite. The rate and extent of Cr(OH)₃(s) oxidation was likely controlled by those of surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation as the production of Cr(VI) increased with increasing pH and initial Mn(II) concentrations. This study evokes the potential environmental hazard of sparingly soluble Cr(OH)₃(s) that can be a source of Cr(VI) in the presence of dissolved Mn(II).

  8. Characterization of extracellular Mn2+-oxidizing activity and isolation of an Mn2+-oxidizing protein from Leptothrix discophora SS-1.

    PubMed

    Adams, L F; Ghiorse, W C

    1987-03-01

    Supernatant fluid from Leptothrix discophora SS-1 cultures possessed high Mn2+-ozidizing activity. Studies of temperature and pH optima, chemical inhibition, and protease sensitivity suggested that the activity may be enzymatic. Kinetic studies of unconcentrated supernatant fluid indicated an apparent Km of 7 microM Mn2+ in the 1 to 200 microM Mn2+ range. The greatest Vmax value observed was 1.4 nmol of Mn2+ oxidized min-1 micrograms of protein-1 in unconcentrated samples. When the supernatant fluid was concentrated on DEAE-cellulose and the activity was eluted with MgSO4, an Mn2+-oxidizing protein was detected in the concentrate by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The Mn2+-oxidizing protein appeared to have a molecular weight of 110,000 in 10% polyacrylamide gels and of 100,000 in 8% gels. Periodic acid-Schiff base staining of overloaded polyacrylamide gels showed that the DEAE-cellulose concentrate contained abundant high-molecular-weight polysaccharides; concurrent staining of the Mn2+-oxidizing band suggested that it too contained carbohydrate components. Isolation of the protein was achieved by subjecting the DEAE-cellulose concentrate to Sephacryl gel filtration in the presence of 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, followed by preparative electrophoresis and reverse-polarity elution. However, these procedures resulted in loss of a large proportion of the activity, which precluded recovery of the protein in significant quality. PMID:3818545

  9. Inter-relationships of MnO 2 precipitation, siderophore-Mn (III) complex formation, siderophore degradation, and iron limitation in Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Morita, Takami; Mozafarzadeh, Mylene L.; Verity, Rebecca; McCarthy, James K.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2007-12-01

    To examine the pathways that form Mn (III) and Mn (IV) in the Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial strains Pseudomonas putida GB-1 and MnB1, and to test whether the siderophore pyoverdine (PVD) inhibits Mn (IV)O 2 formation, cultures were subjected to various protocols at known concentrations of iron and PVD. Depending on growth conditions, P. putida produced one of two oxidized Mn species - either soluble PVD-Mn (III) complex or insoluble Mn (IV)O 2 minerals - but not both simultaneously. PVD-Mn (III) was present, and MnO 2 precipitation was inhibited, both in iron-limited cultures that had synthesized 26-50 μM PVD and in iron-replete (non-PVD-producing) cultures that were supplemented with 10-550 μM purified PVD. PVD-Mn (III) arose by predominantly ligand-mediated air oxidation of Mn (II) in the presence of PVD, based on the following evidence: (a) yields and rates of this reaction were similar in sterile media and in cultures, and (b) GB-1 mutants deficient in enzymatic Mn oxidation produced PVD-Mn (III) as efficiently as wild type. Only wild type, however, could degrade PVD-Mn (III), a process linked to the production of both MnO 2 and an altered PVD with absorbance and fluorescence spectra markedly different from those of either PVD or PVD-Mn (III). Two conditions, the presence of bioavailable iron and the absence of PVD at concentrations exceeding those of Mn, both had to be satisfied for MnO 2 to appear. These results suggest that P. putida cultures produce soluble Mn (III) or MnO 2 by different and mutually inhibitory pathways: enzymatic catalysis yielding MnO 2 under iron sufficiency or PVD-promoted oxidation yielding PVD-Mn (III) under iron limitation. Since PVD-producing Pseudomonas species are environmentally prevalent Mn oxidizers, these data predict influences of iron (via PVD-Mn (III) versus MnO 2) on the global oxidation/reduction cycling of various pollutants, recalcitrant organic matter, and elements such as C, S, N, Cr, U, and Mn.

  10. Oxidation of dimethylselenide by δMnO2: oxidation product and factors affecting oxidation rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Bronwen; Burau, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    Volatile dimethylselenide (DMSe) was transformed to a nonvolatile Se compound in a ??-MnO2 suspension. The nonvolatile product was a single compound identified as dimethylselenoxide based on its mass spectra pattern. After 24 h, 100% of the DMSe added to a ??-MnO2 suspension was converted to nonpurgable Se as opposed to 20%, 18%, and 4% conversion for chromate, permanganate, and the filtrate from the suspension, respectively. Manganese was found in solution after reaction. These results imply that the reaction between manganese oxide and DMSe was a heterogeneous redox reaction involving solid phase ??-MnO2 and solution phase DMSe. Oxidation of DMSe to dimethylselenoxide [OSe(CH3)2] by a ??-MnO2 suspension appears to be first order with respect to ??-MnO2, to DMSe, and to hydrogen ion with an overall rate law of d[OSe(CH3)2 ]/dt = 95 M-2 min-1 [MnO2]1[DMSe]1[H+]1 for the MnO2 concentration range of 0.89 ?? 10-3 - 2.46 ?? 10-3 M, the DMSe concentration range of 3.9 ?? 10-7 - 15.5 ?? 10-7 M Se, and a hydrogen ion concentation range of 7.4 ?? 10-6 -9.5 ?? 10-8 M. A general surface site adsorption model is consistent with this rate equation if the uncharged |OMnOH is the surface adsorption site. DMSe acts as a Lewis base, and the manganese oxide surface acts as a Lewis acid. DMSe adsorption to |OMnOH can be viewed as a Lewis acid/ base complex between the largely p orbitals of the DMSe lone pair and the unoccupied eg orbitals on manganese oxide. For such a complex, frontier molecular orbital theory predicts electron transfer to occur via an inner-sphere complex between the DMSe and the manganese oxide. ?? 1995 American Chemical Society.

  11. Adsorption of antimony(V) onto Mn(II)-enriched surfaces of manganese-oxide and FeMn binary oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiping; Xu, Wei; He, Zan; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Prasai, Tista

    2015-11-01

    Manganese(IV) oxide [Mn(IV)] potentially oxidizes antimony(III) [Sb(III)] to antimony(V) [Sb(V)] and improves Sb removal by FeMn binary oxide (FMBO) through an oxidation-adsorption mechanism. This study focused on the effect of Mn(IV) reductive dissolution by potassium sulfite (K2SO3) on Sb(V) adsorption onto manganese oxide (Mn-oxide) and FMBO. The maximum Sb(V) adsorption (Qmax,Sb(V)) increased from 1.0 to 1.1 mmol g(-1) for FMBO and from 0.4 to 0.6 mmol g(-1) for Mn-oxide after pretreatment with 10 mmol L(-1) K2SO3. The addition of 2.5 mmol L(-1) Mn(2+) also significantly improved Sb(V) adsorption, and the observed Qmax,Sb(V) increased to 1.4 and 1.0 mmol g(-1) for FMBO and Mn-oxide, respectively, with pre-adsorbed Mn(2+). Neither K2SO3 nor Mn(2+) addition had any effect on Sb(V) adsorption onto iron oxide (Fe-oxide). Mn(2+) introduced by either Mn(IV) dissolution or addition tended to form outer-sphere surface complexes with hydroxyl groups on Mn-oxide surfaces (MnOOH). Mn(2+) at 2.5 mmol L(-1) shifted the isoelectric point (pHiep) from 7.5 to 10.2 for FMBO and from 4.8 to 9.2 for Mn-oxide and hence benefited Sb(V) adsorption. The adsorption of Sb(V) onto Mn(2+)-enriched surfaces contributed to the release of Mn(2+), and the X-ray photoelectron spectra also indicated increased binding energy of Mn 2p3/2 after the adsorption of Sb(V) onto K2SO3-pretreated FMBO and Mn-oxide. Sb(V) adsorption involved the formation of inner-sphere complexes and contributed to the release of Mn(2+). In the removal of Sb(III) by Mn-based oxides, the oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) by Mn(IV) oxides had an effect; however, Mn(IV) dissolution and Mn(2+)-enrichment also played an important role. PMID:26218341

  12. Oxidative dissolution of biogenic uraninite in groundwater at Old Rifle, CO

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Kate M.; Veeramani, Harish; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Blue, Lisa Y.; Giammar, Dianiel E.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Suvorova, Elena; Yabusaki, Steve; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Mehta, Apurva; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Reductive bioremediation is currently being explored as a possible strategy for uranium-contaminated aquifers such as the Old Rifle site (Colorado). The stability of U(IV) phases under oxidizing conditions is key to the performance of this procedure. An in situ method was developed to study oxidative dissolution of biogenic uraninite (UO2), a desirable U(VI) bioreduction product, in the Old Rifle, CO, aquifer under different variable oxygen conditions. Overall uranium loss rates were 50–100 times slower than laboratory rates. After accounting for molecular diffusion through the sample holders, a reactive transport model using laboratory dissolution rates was able to predict overall uranium loss. The presence of biomass further retarded diffusion and oxidation rates. These results confirm the importance of diffusion in controlling in-aquifer U(IV) oxidation rates. Upon retrieval, uraninite was found to be free of U(VI), indicating dissolution occurred via oxidation and removal of surface atoms. Interaction of groundwater solutes such as Ca2+ or silicate with uraninite surfaces also may retard in-aquifer U loss rates. These results indicate that the prolonged stability of U(IV) species in aquifers is strongly influenced by permeability, the presence of bacterial cells and cell exudates, and groundwater geochemistry.

  13. Oxidative Dissolution of Biogenic Uraninite in Groundwater at Old Rifle, CO.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kate M; Veeramani, Harish; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Blue, Lisa Y; Giammar, Daniel E; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stubbs, Joanne E; Suvorova, Elena; Yabusaki, Steve; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Mehta, Apurva; Long, Philip E; Bargar, John R

    2011-10-15

    Reductive bioremediation is currently being explored as a possible strategy for uranium-contaminated aquifers such as the Old Rifle site (Colorado). The stability of U(IV) phases under oxidizing conditions is key to the performance of this procedure. An in situ method was developed to study oxidative dissolution of biogenic uraninite (UO₂), a desirable U(VI) bioreduction product, in the Old Rifle, CO, aquifer under different variable oxygen conditions. Overall uranium loss rates were 50-100 times slower than laboratory rates. After accounting for molecular diffusion through the sample holders, a reactive transport model using laboratory dissolution rates was able to predict overall uranium loss. The presence of biomass further retarded diffusion and oxidation rates. These results confirm the importance of diffusion in controlling in-aquifer U(IV) oxidation rates. Upon retrieval, uraninite was found to be free of U(VI), indicating dissolution occurred via oxidation and removal of surface atoms. Interaction of groundwater solutes such as Ca²⁺ or silicate with uraninite surfaces also may retard in-aquifer U loss rates. These results indicate that the prolonged stability of U(IV) species in aquifers is strongly influenced by permeability, the presence of bacterial cells and cell exudates, and groundwater geochemistry. PMID:21910475

  14. Oxidative Dissolution of Biogenic Uraninite in Groundwater at Old Rifle, CO

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Kate M.; Veeramani, Harish; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Blue, Lisa; Giammar, Daniel E.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Suvorova, Elena; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Mehta, Apurva; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John R.

    2011-09-12

    Reductive bioremediation is currently being explored as a possible strategy for uranium contaminated aquifers such as the Old Rifle site (Colorado, USA). The stability of U(IV) phases under oxidizing conditions is a key to the performance of this procedure. Biogenic uraninite, a bioreduction product for which kinetic and thermodynamic parameters are known, was deployed into wells using a novel membrane-walled cell to observe the rates and mechanisms of oxidative dissolution in situ in aquifers with different dissolved oxygen conditions. Observed in-aquifer dissolution rates were at least 50 to 100 times lower than measured in laboratory continuous flow reactors with artificial ground water. Upon retrieval, uraninite was found to have similar structure and stoichiometry as the parent material and to be free of U(VI), indicating dissolution occurs via oxidation and removal of surface atoms. Reactive transport modeling suggests that molecular diffusion is likely to be an important factor in limiting the rates of in-aquifer oxidation, and the presence of biomass enhances this effect. Interaction of ground water solutes such as Ca2+ or silicate with uraninite surfaces also may retard in-aquifer U loss rates. These results constrain in-aquifer oxidation rates and indicate U(VI) is more stable in oxic ground water than previously expected.

  15. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines. PMID:25263417

  16. Synthesis and Electrochemistry of Li3MnO4: Mn in the +5 OxidationState

    SciTech Connect

    Saint, Juliette.A.; Doeff, Marca M.; Reed, John

    2007-06-19

    Computational and experimental work directed at exploringthe electrochemical properties of tetrahedrally coordinated Mn in the +5oxidation state is presented. Specific capacities of nearly 700 mAh/g arepredicted for the redox processes of LixMnO4 complexes based on twotwo-phase reactions. One is topotactic extractionof Li from Li3MnO4 toform LiMnO4 and the second is topotactic insertion of Li into Li3MnO4 toform Li5MnO4. In experiments, it is found that the redox behavior ofLi3MnO4 is complicated by disproportionation of Mn5+ in solution to formMn4+ and Mn7+ and byother irreversible processes; although an initialcapacity of about 275 mAh/g in lithiumcells was achieved. Strategiesbased on structural considerations to improve the electrochemicalproperties of MnO4n- complexes are given.

  17. Microbially mediated formation of a new REE enriched Mn-oxide, Ytterby mine, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, Susanne; Allard, Bert; Rattray, Jayne E.; Callac, Nolwenn; Skelton, Alasdair; Ivarsson, Magnus; Karlsson, Stefan; Sjöberg, Viktor; Dupraz, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of a black substance seeping from fractured bedrock in a subterranean tunnel revealed a new, microbially mediated, secondary manganese oxide mineralisation, highly enriched in rare earth elements (REEs). This tunnel is dry and at shallow depth and was built to convert the former Ytterby mine, known for the discovery of yttrium (Y), scandium (Sc) and five rare earth elements, into a fuel deposit for the Swedish Armed Forces. As the type locality of these rare earth elements, the Ytterby mine gave its name to yttrium, ytterbium, erbium and terbium. Geochemical analysis shows that the substance is enriched in REEs with concentrations one to two orders of magnitude higher than the surrounding rocks. Elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction establish that the main component is a manganese oxide of the birnessite type (general formula: [Na,Ca]0.5[Mn(III),Mn(IV)]2O4xAq). There are also minor fractions of calcite, some other manganese oxides, feldspars, quartz and about 1% organic matter, but no iron oxides. Leaching studies (sequential and selective) were performed in order to establish how the minor components are associated with the matrix (in the lattice or merely adsorbed on the outer surface). It shows that the Ytterby birnessite contains about 1% REEs in the lattice, as well as calcium but no sodium. Formation of birnessite by manganese oxidizing bacteria is well-known (e.g. Tebo et al, 2004). Quantitative PCR shows that the total number of bacteria in the Ytterby substance is in the order 1010 cells per g substance while the water feeding the fracture has in the order of 106 cells per ml groundwater. qPCR data further confirm that manganese oxidizing microorganisms are present and that the abundance varies with the seasons. Analysis of the precipitated manganese using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy shows that the substance is composed of two or more components, with one part having a biogenic signature. The occurrence of C31 to C35

  18. Biogenic VOC Oxidation is Modulated by Anthropogenic Pollution in the South East US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misztal, P. K.; Romer, P.; Duffey, K.; Cohen, R. C.; Kaser, L.; Seco, R.; Park, J.; Kim, S.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) are known to play important roles for atmospheric chemistry, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and thus climate. However, the impacts of anthropogenic emissions on the BVOC oxidation mechanisms and SOA formation processes are not yet well understood. The SOAS summer 2013 campaign goals include looking holistically at physicochemical processes of BVOC emission, oxidation, and subsequent SOA formation and the role of anthropogenic emissions in those processes. Gas-phase composition changes of the broad range of VOCs were measured by PTR-ToF-MS at the Centreville SEARCH site located in a mixed deciduous forest near Brent, Alabama. The instrument sampled from the top of the tower at a high acquisition rate (10 Hz) using an inlet collocated with other measurements (wind, radicals, nitrogen oxides, etc.). Isoprene concentrations were extremely high, peaking at up to approximately 10 ppb during the hottest and sunniest days. Isoprene oxidation chemistry was clearly affected by anthropogenic influences. The rate of isoprene oxidation and the abundance of the first (MVK, MAC, etc.) and second (hydroxyacetone, etc.) order products were significantly different under cleaner conditions than under more polluted conditions. Isoprene oxidation likely is more dominated by the hydroperoxyl pathway under clean conditions while the NO pathway is more important under pollution conditions. Observations of the full range of detected isoprene oxidation products will be discussed and examined under relatively clean and polluted conditions. Both daytime and nighttime oxidation pathways will be examined, and comparison with airborne measurements will be shown to relate our ground based observations to more regional photochemical VOC processing.

  19. Mn4+ emission in pyrochlore oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    For the existing Mn4+ activated red phosphors have relatively low emission energies (or long emission wavelengths) and are therefore inefficient for general lighting. Density functional calculations are performed to study Mn4+ emission in rare-earth hafnate, zirconate, and stannate pyrochlore oxides (RE2Hf2O7, RE2Zr2O7, and RE2Sn2O7). We show how the different sizes of the RE3+ cation in these pyrochlores affect the local structure of the distorted MnO6 octahedron, the Mn–O hybridization, and the Mn4+ emission energy. The Mn4+ emission energies of many pyrochlores are found to be higher than those currently known for Mn4+ doped oxides and should be closer to that of Y2O3:Eu3+ (the current commercial red phosphor for fluorescent lighting). The O–Mn–O bond angle distortion in a MnO6 octahedron is shown to play an important role in weakening Mn–O hybridization and consequently increasing the Mn4+ emission energy. Our result shows that searching for materials that allow significant O–Mn–O bond angle distortion in a MnO6 octahedron is an effective approach to find new Mn4+ activated red phosphors with potential to replace the relatively expensive Y2O3:Eu3+ phosphor.

  20. Extreme (13)C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite.

    PubMed

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C (δ13C as light as -69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to -125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  1. Extreme 13C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E.; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C (δ13C as light as −69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to −125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  2. Hydrogen peroxide generation by the Weissberger biogenic oxidative system during hyaluronan degradation.

    PubMed

    Valachová, Katarina; Topoľská, Dominika; Mendichi, Raniero; Collins, Maurice N; Sasinková, Vlasta; Šoltés, Ladislav

    2016-09-01

    By applying the enzyme catalase, our study on hyaluronan degradation confirms the generation of hydrogen peroxide using the Weissberger biogenic oxidative system (WBOS), which is composed of ascorbate and cupric ions. Dynamic viscosities of hyaluronan (HA) solutions influenced by WBOS in the absence and presence of catalase were analysed by rotational viscometry. Molar masses of HAs were determined by size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle laser-light scattering. Our results show that catalase dose-dependently inhibited the degradation of HA macromolecules, which presumably confirms the generation of H2O2 in the reaction system. This has implications in range of biomedical applications such as arthritic joint treatment, tissue engineering, ocular and cosmetic surgery. PMID:27185130

  3. Are Aromatic Hydrocarbons Generated from the Atmospheric Oxidation of Biogenic Hydrocarbons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratien, A.; Johnson, S. N.; Ezell, M. J.; Wingen, L. M.; Perraud, V. M.; Dawson, M.; Bennett, R.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are estimated to account for approximately 90% of total hydrocarbon emissions. When released into the troposphere, these BVOC undergo chemical oxidation, e.g. by hydroxyl radicals (OH) and ozone (O3) during daytime, and by nitrate radicals (NO3) and ozone at night. Anthropogenic sources release into the troposphere a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC), also including aromatic hydrocarbons. Their major source is believed to be the combustion and the evaporation of the fuels. One question is while there are others sources of aromatics in air. For example, an aromatic hydrocarbon, p-cymene, was recently reported in air above a forest canopy that had significant emissions of terpenes (isoprene, α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene…), and its concentration increased as a function of altitude, suggesting its possible formation in the atmosphere. The goal of the present study was to determine whether p-cymene can be generated from reactions of biogenic hydrocarbons in air. The oxidations of isoprene, α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene by O3, NO3 and OH have been studied at 1 atm air under dry conditions, at high relative humidity (70% RH), or with deliquesced sodium bisulfate (acid source) on the walls of a Teflon reaction chamber. A search for the generation of aromatic hydrocarbons products was made using GC-MS and PTR-MS. p-cymene has been observed from the reactions of α-pinene and limonene. Possible mechanisms will be presented and the atmospheric implications discussed.

  4. Water independent SO2 oxidation by Stabilised Criegee Intermediates from Biogenic Alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newland, Mike; Rickard, Andrew; Vereecken, Luc; Evans, Mat; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic VOCs account for about 90% of global VOC emissions and these are dominated by the unsaturated hydrocarbons: isoprene (600 Tg yr-1) and monoterpenes (100 Tg yr-1). Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCI) are thought to be formed in the atmosphere mainly from reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons with ozone. SCI have been shown in laboratory experiments to rapidly oxidise SO2 (k > 2x10-11 cm3 s-1) and NO2 (k = 7x10-12 cm3 s-1), providing a potentially important gas phase oxidation route for these species in the atmosphere. The importance of the SCI reaction with traces gases has been shown in modelling work to be critically dependent on the ratio of the rate constants for the reaction of the SCI with these trace gases and with H2O. Such modelling work has suggested that the SCI + SO2 reaction is only likely to be important in regions with high alkene emissions, e.g. forests, and that elsewhere SCI are likely to be almost entirely quenched by reaction with water, thus negating their importance as trace gas oxidants. However, it has been shown in laboratory experiments with small SCI that the reaction rate of SCI with water is structure dependent, with anti-CH3CHOO reacting fast with H2O (k > 1x10-14 cm3 s-1), and syn-CH3CHOO reacting orders of magnitude slower (k < 2x10-16 cm3 s-1). Here we present results from a series of ozonolysis experiments performed at the EUPHORE atmospheric simulation chamber in Valencia. These experiments measure the loss of SO2, in the presence of various biogenic alkenes (isoprene and three monoterpenes: α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene), as a function of water vapour. The SO2 loss shows a dependence on relative humidity for all systems studied, decreasing with increasing relative humidity. However, for all species, there also appears to be a fraction of the SO2 loss that shows a much lower sensitivity to relative humidity. We quantify the relative rates of reaction of the SCI produced in the ozonolysis of these biogenics with

  5. Ionic Strength-Controlled Mn (Hydr)oxide Nanoparticle Nucleation on Quartz: Effect of Aqueous Mn(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Jung, Haesung; Jun, Young-Shin

    2016-01-01

    The early formation of manganese (hydr)oxide nanoparticles at mineral-water interfaces is crucial in understanding how Mn oxides control the fate and transport of heavy metals and the cycling of nutrients. Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Mn (hydr)oxide under varied ionic strengths (IS; 1-100 mM NaNO3). Experimental conditions (i.e., 0.1 mM Mn(2+) (aq) concentration and pH 10.1) were chosen to be relevant to Mn remediation sites. We found that IS controls Mn(OH)2 (aq) formation, and that the controlled Mn(OH)2 (aq) formation can affect the system's saturation and subsequent Mn(OH)2 (s) and further Mn3O4 (s) nanoparticle formation. In 100 mM IS system, nucleated Mn (hydr)oxide particles had more coverage on the quartz substrate than those in 1 mM and 10 mM IS systems. This high IS also resulted in low supersaturation ratio and thus favor heterogeneous nucleation, having better structural matching between nucleating Mn (hydr)oxides and quartz. The unique information obtained in this work improves our understanding of Mn (hydr)oxide formation in natural as well as engineered aqueous environments, such as groundwater contaminated by natural leachate and acid mine drainage remediation. PMID:26588858

  6. Partially Oxidized Sub-10 nm MnO Nanocrystals with High Activity for Water Oxidation Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chu, Arim; Park, Jimin; Jeong, Donghyuk; Jerng, Sung Eun; Sim, Uk; Jeong, Hui-Yun; Lee, Chan Woo; Park, Yong-Sun; Yang, Ki Dong; Kumar Pradhan, Gajendra; Kim, Donghun; Sung, Nark-Eon; Hee Kim, Sun; Nam, Ki Tae

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is considered a major bottleneck in the overall water electrolysis process. In this work, highly active manganese oxide nano-catalysts were synthesized via hot injection. Facile surface treatment generated Mn(III) species on monodisperse 10 nm MnO nanocrystals (NCs). Size dependency of MnO NCs on OER activity was also investigated. Surprisingly, the partially oxidized MnO NCs only required 530 mV @ 5 mA cm−2 under near neutral conditions. PMID:25998696

  7. Partially Oxidized Sub-10 nm MnO Nanocrystals with High Activity for Water Oxidation Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chu, Arim; Park, Jimin; Jeong, Donghyuk; Jerng, Sung Eun; Sim, Uk; Jeong, Hui-Yun; Lee, Chan Woo; Park, Yong-Sun; Yang, Ki Dong; Kumar Pradhan, Gajendra; Kim, Donghun; Sung, Nark-Eon; Hee Kim, Sun; Nam, Ki Tae

    2015-05-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is considered a major bottleneck in the overall water electrolysis process. In this work, highly active manganese oxide nano-catalysts were synthesized via hot injection. Facile surface treatment generated Mn(III) species on monodisperse 10 nm MnO nanocrystals (NCs). Size dependency of MnO NCs on OER activity was also investigated. Surprisingly, the partially oxidized MnO NCs only required 530 mV @ 5 mA cm-2 under near neutral conditions.

  8. Morphology of biogenic iron oxides records microbial physiology and environmental conditions: toward interpreting iron microfossils.

    PubMed

    Krepski, S T; Emerson, D; Hredzak-Showalter, P L; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

    2013-09-01

    Despite the abundance of Fe and its significance in Earth history, there are no established robust biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. This limits our ability to piece together the history of Fe biogeochemical cycling and, in particular, to determine whether Fe(II)-oxidizers played a role in depositing ancient iron formations. A promising candidate for Fe(II)-oxidizer biosignatures is the distinctive morphology and texture of extracellular Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks produced by mat-forming microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. To establish the stalk morphology as a biosignature, morphologic parameters must be quantified and linked to the microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolism and environmental conditions. Toward this end, we studied an extant model organism, the marine stalk-forming Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. We grew cultures in flat glass microslide chambers, with FeS substrate, creating opposing oxygen/Fe(II) concentration gradients. We used solid-state voltammetric microelectrodes to measure chemical gradients in situ while using light microscopy to image microbial growth, motility, and mineral formation. In low-oxygen (2.7-28 μm) zones of redox gradients, the bacteria converge into a narrow (100 μm-1 mm) growth band. As cells oxidize Fe(II), they deposit Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks in this band; the stalks orient directionally, elongating toward higher oxygen concentrations. M. ferrooxydans stalks display a narrow range of widths and uniquely biogenic branching patterns, which result from cell division. Together with filament composition, these features (width, branching, and directional orientation) form a physical record unique to microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizer physiology; therefore, stalk morphology is a biosignature, as well as an indicator of local oxygen concentration at the time of formation. Observations of filamentous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide microfossils from a ~170 Ma marine Fe

  9. Biogenic copper oxide nanoparticles synthesis using Tabernaemontana divaricate leaf extract and its antibacterial activity against urinary tract pathogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaraj, Rajeshwari; Rahman, Pattanathu K. S. M.; Rajiv, P.; Salam, Hasna Abdul; Venckatesh, R.

    2014-12-01

    This investigation explains the biosynthesis and characterization of copper oxide nanoparticles from an Indian medicinal plant by an eco-friendly method. The main objective of this study is to synthesize copper oxide nanoparticles from Tabernaemontana divaricate leaves through a green chemistry approach. Highly stable, spherical copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by using 50% concentration of Tabernaemontana leaf extract. Formation of copper oxide nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. All the analyses revealed that copper oxide nanoparticles were 48 ± 4 nm in size. Functional groups and chemical composition of copper oxide were also confirmed. Antimicrobial activity of biogenic copper oxide nanoparticles were investigated and maximum zone of inhibition was found in 50 μg/ml copper oxide nanoparticles against urinary tract pathogen (Escherichia coli).

  10. HOMOGENEOUS AIR OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS UTILIZING MN AND CO CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Homogeneous Air Oxidation of Hydrocarbons Utilizing Mn and Co Catalysts

    Thomas M. Becker and Michael A. Gonzalez*, Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Mail Sto...

  11. Nano-sized layered Mn oxides as promising and biomimetic water oxidizing catalysts for water splitting in artificial photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Heidari, Sima; Amini, Emad; Khatamian, Masoumeh; Carpentier, Robert; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-04-01

    One challenge in artificial photosynthetic systems is the development of artificial model compounds to oxidize water. The water-oxidizing complex of Photosystem II which is responsible for biological water oxidation contains a cluster of four Mn ions bridged by five oxygen atoms. Layered Mn oxides as efficient, stable, low cost, environmentally friendly and easy to use, synthesize, and manufacture compounds could be considered as functional and structural models for the site. Because of the related structure of these Mn oxides and the catalytic centre of the active site of the water oxidizing complex of Photosystem II, the study of layered Mn oxides may also help to understand more about the mechanism of water oxidation by the natural site. This review provides an overview of the current status of layered Mn oxides in artificial photosynthesis and discuss the sophisticated design strategies for Mn oxides as water oxidizing catalysts. PMID:24727405

  12. Composition and arsenic-attenuating capacity of biogenic iron (hydr)oxide flocs at the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada County, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, A. L.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Tufano, K.; Brown, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    The Lava Cap Mine Site (LCMS) is on the National Priority List due to the elevated human health risk presented by the catastrophic release of several thousand cubic meters of arsenic (As) enriched tailings (average: 500 ppm As ) from the site. These tailings were released into a creek and lake (former tailings retention pond) in a low-density residential area where ground water is the primary source of drinking water. Although oxidation of iron (Fe) sulfides (pyrite and arsenopyrite) from tailings are the main sources of As and Fe, buffering by carbonate minerals prevents formation of acidic waters. Macroscopic accumulations of fluffy Fe (hydr)oxide are observed suspended in the water column or at the sediment-water interface in creeks, ponds, and seeps of the LCMS. Microscopic analysis indicates that the Fe (hydr)oxide is predominantly associated with the sheaths of bacteria identified as members of the genus Leptothrix, which are known to enzymatically oxidize Fe and manganese (Mn) under oligotrophic, near-neutral, sub oxic conditions. Both Fe- encrusted Leptothrix sheaths (which are largely devoid of cells) and free aggolmerations of Fe hydr(oxide) support morphologically distinct Eubacteria whose identity is currently under investigation. Dried biogenic Fe (hydr)oxide averages 4.4 % organic carbon, 20.2 % Fe, and 0.91% As (9100 ppm), making it attractive as a potential natural biosorbent for As and Fe. Water flow rate is a very important control on the amount of As retained in biogenic Fe (hydr)oxide flocs, based on monitoring of a natural passive bioreactor system. In addition, a pond with nearly stagnant water accumulated approximately one order of magnitude more As (dried) than a seep site with faster-running water, even though there was only a 5-fold difference in their median filtered (0.45 micron) arsenic concentrations. Most Probable Number estimates and analysis of PCR amplicons of Eubacterial DNA indicate that populations of Fe-, As-, and sulfate

  13. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4587 - Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4587 Lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (generic name). (a) Chemical... as lithium manganese oxide (LiMn204) (P-96-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10013 - Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). 721... Substances § 721.10013 Manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (Mn2YO5) (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10009 - Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). 721... Substances § 721.10009 Manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese yttrium oxide (MnYO3) (PMN...

  11. Unraveling the role of animal heme peroxidases in superoxide mediated Mn oxide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Learman, D. R.; Hansel, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Manganese(III,IV) oxides are important in the environment as they can impact the fate of a broad range of nutrients (e.g. carbon and phosphate) and contaminates (e.g. lead and chromium). Bacteria play a valuable role in the production of Mn oxides, yet the mechanisms and physiological reasons remain unclear. Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b, an organism within the abundant and ubiquitous Roseobacter clade, has recently been shown to oxidize Mn(II) via a novel pathway that involves enzymatic extracellular superoxide production. However, in reactions with only Mn(II) and abiotically generated superoxide, we find superoxide alone is not enough to produce Mn(III,IV) oxides. Scavenging of the byproduct hydrogen peroxide (via the addition of catalase) is required to generate Mn oxides via abiotic reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide. Thus, R. AzwK-3b must produce superoxide and also scavenge hydrogen peroxide to form Mn oxides. Further, in-gel Mn(II) oxidation assay revealed a protein band that could generate Mn oxides in the presence of soluble Mn(II). This Mn(II)-oxidizing protein band was excised from the gel and the peptides identified via mass spectrometry. An animal heme peroxidase (AHP) was the predominant protein found in this band. This protein is homologous to the AHPs previously implicated as a Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme within the Alphaproteobacteria, Erythrobacter SD-21 and Aurantimonas manganoxydans strain SI85-9A1. Currently, protein expression of the AHPs in R. AzwK-3b is being examined to determine if expression is correlated with Mn(II) concentration or oxidative stress. Our data suggests that AHPs do not directly oxidize Mn(II) but rather plays a role in scavenging hydrogen peroxide and/or producing an organic Mn(III) ligand that complexes Mn(III) and likely aids in Mn oxide precipitation.

  12. The effects of fire on biogenic emissions of methane and nitric oxide from wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Rhinehart, Robert P.; Winstead, Edward L.; Sebacher, Shirley; Hinkle, C. Ross; Schmalzer, Paul A.; Koller, Albert M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Enhanced emissions of methane (CH4) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured following three controlled burns in a Florida wetlands in 1987 and 1988. Wetlands are the major global source of methane resulting from metabolic activity of methanogenic bacteria. Methanogens require carbon dioxide, acetate, or formate for their growth and the metabolic production of methane. All three water-soluble compounds are produced in large concentrations during biomass burning. Postfire methane emissions exceeded 0.15 g CH 4/sq m per day. Preburn and postburn measurements of soil nutrients indicate significant postburn increases in soil ammonium, from 8.35 to 13.49 parts per million (ppm) in the upper 5 cm of the Juncus marsh and from 8.83 to 23.75 ppm in the upper 5 cm of the Spartina marsh. Soil nitrate concentrations were found to decrease in both marshes after the fire. These measurements indicate that the combustion products of biomass burning exert an important 'fertilizing' effect on the biosphere and on the biogenic production of environmentally significant atmospheric gases.

  13. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation and Organic Nitrate Yield from NO3 Oxidation of Biogenic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields from NO3 oxidation of a series of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), consisting of five monoterpenes and one sesquiterpene (α-pinene, β-pinene, Δ-3-carene, limonene, sabinene, and β-caryophyllene), were investigated in a series of continuous flow experiments in a 10 m3 indoor Teflon chamber. By making in situ measurements of the nitrate radical and employing a kinetics box model, we generate time-dependent yield curves as a function of reacted BVOC. SOA yields varied dramatically among the different BVOCs, from zero for α-pinene to 38–65% for Δ-3-carene and 86% for β-caryophyllene at mass loading of 10 μg m–3, suggesting that model mechanisms that treat all NO3 + monoterpene reactions equally will lead to errors in predicted SOA depending on each location’s mix of BVOC emissions. In most cases, organonitrate is a dominant component of the aerosol produced, but in the case of α-pinene, little organonitrate and no aerosol is formed. PMID:25229208

  14. Evidence for the presence of Mn(III) intermediates in the bacterial oxidation of Mn(II)

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Samuel M.; Dick, Gregory J.; Bargar, John R.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(IV) is believed to drive the oxidative segment of the global biogeochemical Mn cycle and regulates the concentration of dissolved Mn(II) in the oceanic water column, where it is a critical nutrient for planktonic primary productivity. Mn(II) oxidizing activity is expressed by numerous phylogenetically diverse bacteria and fungi, suggesting that it plays a fundamental and ubiquitous role in the environment. This important redox system is believed to be driven by an enzyme or enzyme complex involving a multicopper oxidase, although the biochemical mechanism has never been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we show that Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. strain SG-1 is a result of two sequential one-step electron transfer processes, both requiring the putative multicopper oxidase, MnxG, in which Mn(III) is a transient intermediate. A kinetic model of the oxidation pathway is presented, which shows that the Mn(II) to Mn(III) step is the rate-limiting step. Thus, oxidation of Mn(II) appears to involve a unique multicopper oxidase system capable of the overall two-electron oxidation of its substrate. This enzyme system may serve as a source for environmental Mn(III), a strong oxidant and competitor for siderophore-bound Fe(III) in nutrient-limited environments. That metabolically dormant spores catalyze an important biogeochemical process intimately linked to the C, N, Fe, and S cycles requires us to rethink the role of spores in the environment. PMID:15800042

  15. In vitro studies indicate a quinone is involved in bacterial Mn(II) oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope A.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese(II)-oxidizing bacteria play an integral role in the cycling of Mn as well as other metals and organics. Prior work with Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria suggested that Mn(II) oxidation involves a multicopper oxidase, but whether this enzyme directly catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation is unknown. For a clearer understanding of Mn(II) oxidation, we have undertaken biochemical studies in the model marine α-proteobacterium, Erythrobacter sp. strain SD21. The optimum pH for Mn(II)-oxidizing activity was 8.0 with a specific activity of 2.5 nmol × min−1 × mg−1 and a Km = 204 µM. The activity was soluble suggesting a cytoplasmic or periplasmic protein. Mn(III) was an intermediate in the oxidation of Mn(II) and likely the primary product of enzymatic oxidation. The activity was stimulated by pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), NAD+, and calcium but not by copper. In addition, PQQ rescued Pseudomonas putida MnB1 non Mn(II)-oxidizing mutants with insertions in the anthranilate synthase gene. The substrate and product of anthranilate synthase are intermediates in various quinone biosyntheses. Partially purified Mn(II) oxidase was enriched in quinones and had a UV/VIS absorption spectrum similar to a known quinone requiring enzyme but not to multicopper oxidases. These studies suggest that quinones may play an integral role in bacterial Mn(II) oxidation. PMID:17673976

  16. Biogenic VOC oxidation and organic aerosol formation in an urban nocturnal boundary layer: aircraft vertical profiles in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Brock, C. A.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Atlas, E.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, R.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehshenfeld, F. C.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2013-05-01

    Organic compounds are a large component of aerosol mass, but organic aerosol (OA) sources remain poorly characterized. Recent model studies have suggested nighttime oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons as a potentially large OA source, but analysis of field measurements to test these predictions is sparse. We present nighttime vertical profiles of nitrogen oxides, ozone, VOCs and aerosol composition measured during low approaches of the NOAA P-3 aircraft to airfields in Houston, TX. This region has large emissions of both biogenic hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides. The latter serves as a source of the nitrate radical, NO3, a key nighttime oxidant. Biogenic VOCs (BVOC) and urban pollutants were concentrated within the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), which varied in depth from 100-400 m. Despite concentrated NOx at low altitude, ozone was never titrated to zero, resulting in rapid NO3 radical production rates of 0.2-2.7ppbv h-1 within the NBL. Monoterpenes and isoprene were frequently present within the NBL and underwent rapid oxidation (up to 1ppbv h-1), mainly by NO3 and to a lesser extent O3. Concurrent enhancement in organic and nitrate aerosol on several profiles was consistent with primary emissions and with secondary production from nighttime BVOC oxidation, with the latter equivalent to or slightly larger than the former. Ratios of organic aerosol to CO within the NBL ranged from 14 to 38 μg m-3 OA/ppmv CO. A box model simulation incorporating monoterpene emissions, oxidant formation rates and monoterpene SOA yields suggested overnight OA production of 0.5 to 9 μg m-3.

  17. Biogenic VOC oxidation and organic aerosol formation in an urban nocturnal boundary layer: aircraft vertical profiles in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Brock, C. A.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Atlas, E.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, R.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehshenfeld, F. C.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2013-11-01

    Organic compounds are a large component of aerosol mass, but organic aerosol (OA) sources remain poorly characterized. Recent model studies have suggested nighttime oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons as a potentially large OA source, but analysis of field measurements to test these predictions is sparse. We present nighttime vertical profiles of nitrogen oxides, ozone, VOCs and aerosol composition measured during low approaches of the NOAA P-3 aircraft to airfields in Houston, TX. This region has large emissions of both biogenic hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides. The latter category serves as a source of the nitrate radical, NO3, a key nighttime oxidant. Biogenic VOCs (BVOC) and urban pollutants were concentrated within the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), which varied in depth from 100-400 m. Despite concentrated NOx at low altitude, ozone was never titrated to zero, resulting in rapid NO3 radical production rates of 0.2-2.7 ppbv h-1 within the NBL. Monoterpenes and isoprene were frequently present within the NBL and underwent rapid oxidation (up to 1 ppbv h-1), mainly by NO3 and to a lesser extent O3. Concurrent enhancement in organic and nitrate aerosol on several profiles was consistent with primary emissions and with secondary production from nighttime BVOC oxidation, with the latter equivalent to or slightly larger than the former. Some profiles may have been influenced by biomass burning sources as well, making quantitative attribution of organic aerosol sources difficult. Ratios of organic aerosol to CO within the NBL ranged from 14 to 38 μg m-3 OA/ppmv CO. A box model simulation incorporating monoterpene emissions, oxidant formation rates and monoterpene SOA yields suggested overnight OA production of 0.5 to 9 μg m-3.

  18. Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds and Observations of VOC Oxidation at Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, K. A.; Pho, T.; Vasta, A.; Lee, B. H.

    2009-12-01

    The contribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to oxidant concentrations and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in forested environments depends on the emission rates of these compounds. Recent findings have suggested that the emission rates of BVOCs and the range of species emitted could be larger than previously thought. In this study, Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to obtain fast (<1 Hz) measurements of the predominant BVOC species, including isoprene, monoterpenes, and oxygenated BVOCs, above the canopy at Harvard Forest (Petersham, MA) during the summers of 2005, 2007, and 2008. Together with vertical wind data, these measurements are used to determine fluxes of BVOCs out of the forest using the virtual disjunct eddy covariance method. Concentrations of additional VOCs, including methyl vinyl ketone + methacrolein and terpene oxidation products were also measured. Isoprene is the dominant emitted species, with peak emission rates and midday mixing ratios of ca. 4 mg isoprene m-2 h-1 and ca. 5 ppbv, respectively. Isoprene emission rates are expected to vary with temperature and radiation (PAR) levels, and are compared to standard emission algorithms based on these parameters. Interannual variability in isoprene emission rates is also observed, and contributing factors are explored. In contrast to isoprene, maximum monoterpene concentrations typically were less than 1 ppbv and occurred in the early evening, with a local minimum at midday. Monoterpene fluxes are about an order of magnitude smaller than those of isoprene. The amplitude of the flux diurnal cycle suggests monoterpene emissions at Harvard Forest may exhibit light dependence as well as temperature dependence. Fluxes of oxygenated VOCs, including methanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and oxygenated terpenes that have rarely been observed previously, are also reported, and the dependence of their emission rates on factors such as time of year

  19. Scavenging of Cd through Fe/Mn oxides within natural surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Huang, Guo-he; Zhang, Bai-yu; Guo, Shu-hai

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of Cd scavenging from solutions by Fe/Mn oxides in natural surface coatings (NSCs) was investigated under laboratory conditions. Selective extraction methods were employed to estimate the contributions of Fe/Mn oxides, where hydroxylamine hydrochloride (0.01 mol/L NH2OH x HCl + 0.01 mol/L HNO3), sodium dithionite (0.4 mol/L Na2S2O4) and nitric acid (10% HNO3) were used as extraction reagents. The Cd scavenging was accomplished with developing periods of the NSCs (totally 21 data sets). The resulting process dynamics fitted well to the Elovich equation, demonstrating that the amount of Cd scavenged was proportional to the increments of Fe/Mn oxides that were accumulated in the NSCs. The amount of Cd bound to Fe oxides (M,,) and Mn oxides (MCdMn could be quantified by solving two equations based on the properties of two extraction reagents. The amount of Cd scavenged by Fe/Mn oxides could also be estimated using MCdFe and MCdMn, divided by the total amounts of Fe and Mn oxides in the NSCs, respectively. The results indicated that the Cd scavenging by Fe/Mn oxides was dominated by Fe oxides, with less roles attributed to Mn oxides. The estimated levels of Cd scavenging through Fe and Mn oxides agreed well with those predicted through additive-adsorption and linear-regression models. PMID:17294965

  20. Luminomagnetic bifunctionality of Mn2+-bonded graphene oxide/reduced graphene oxide two dimensional nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amandeep; Kedawat, Garima; Kumar, Pawan; Anshul, Avaneesh; Deshmukh, Abhay D.; Singh, Om Pal; Gupta, R. K.; Amritphale, S. S.; Gupta, Govind; Singh, V. N.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Herein, we report the luminomagnetic bifunctional properties of two-dimensional (2D) Mn2+ bonded graphene oxide (GO)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets synthesized using a facile route of oxidation followed by a solvothermal reduction method. Photoluminescence (PL) studies (excited by different wavelengths) revealed that the resonant energy transfer between Mn2+ and sp3/sp2 clusters of GO/RGO is responsible for the enhancement of emissions. Moreover, pH-sensitive PL behaviors have also been investigated in detail. The ferromagnetic behavior is believed to arise due to defects in Mn2+ bonded GO composites. Thus, present reduction method provides a direct route to tune and enhance the optical properties of GO and RGO nanosheets bonded with Mn2+ ions, which creates an opportunity for various technological applications.Herein, we report the luminomagnetic bifunctional properties of two-dimensional (2D) Mn2+ bonded graphene oxide (GO)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets synthesized using a facile route of oxidation followed by a solvothermal reduction method. Photoluminescence (PL) studies (excited by different wavelengths) revealed that the resonant energy transfer between Mn2+ and sp3/sp2 clusters of GO/RGO is responsible for the enhancement of emissions. Moreover, pH-sensitive PL behaviors have also been investigated in detail. The ferromagnetic behavior is believed to arise due to defects in Mn2+ bonded GO composites. Thus, present reduction method provides a direct route to tune and enhance the optical properties of GO and RGO nanosheets bonded with Mn2+ ions, which creates an opportunity for various technological applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01095k

  1. Microstructural characterizations of different Mn-oxide nanoparticles used as models in toxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotić, Marijan; Jurkin, Tanja; Musić, Svetozar; Unfried, Klaus; Sydlik, Ulrich; Bauer-Šegvić, Anamarija

    2013-07-01

    Mn-oxide microstructures were investigated by XRD, FT-IR, TEM, FE SEM and EDS techniques. The oxidation of the aqueous solutions of manganese (II) chloride by hydrogen peroxide was employed to synthesize pure 20-30-nm pseudospherical hausmannite (Mn3O4) nanoparticles and manganite (γ-MnOOH) nanowires. The α-MnO2 nanotubes and nanorods were hydrothermally synthesized starting from a KMnO4 precursor, then modified with the addition of divalent metal cations Mn2+, Cu2+, Ni2+ and Fe2+. The modification with Mn2+ induced the transformation of α-MnO2 nanotube into 3D β-MnO2 (pyrolusite) prismatic nanoparticles, whereas the low-crystalline α-MnO2 nanorods were transformed into disk-like γ-MnO2 nanoparticles. The modification with Cu2+ and Ni2+ induced the structural transformation of α-MnO2 into a mixture of MnO2 polymorphs. The modification with Cu2+ decreased, whereas the modification with Ni2+ improved the crystallinity of MnO2. The modification with Fe2+ induced the structural transformation of α-MnO2 into γ-MnO2, a decrease in crystallinity and the segregation of α-Fe2O3 (hematite). Thus the modification of MnO2 with Fe2+ (Mn2+) divalent metal cations that can be oxidized into Fe3+ (Mn4+) by a KMnO4 precursor differs significantly in comparison with, in this case, non-oxidizable cations such as Cu2+ and Ni2+. On the other hand, the advantage that the modification of MnO2 with Mn2+ produces chemically identical compounds with different morphology can be used as a model system for toxicity studies. In this work the preliminary measurements of intracellular oxidative stress in epithelial cells induced by manganese oxide nanoparticles are reported.

  2. Constraints on superoxide mediated formation of manganese oxides

    PubMed Central

    Learman, Deric R.; Voelker, Bettina M.; Madden, Andrew S.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive sorbents and oxidants within the environment, where they play a central role in the cycling of nutrients, metals, and carbon. Recent discoveries have identified superoxide (O2−) both of biogenic and abiogenic origin as an effective oxidant of Mn(II) leading to the formation of Mn oxides. Here we examined the conditions under which abiotically produced superoxide led to oxidative precipitation of Mn and the solid-phases produced. Oxidized Mn, as both aqueous Mn(III) and Mn(III/IV) oxides, was only observed in the presence of active catalase, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a product of the reaction of O2− with Mn(II), inhibits the oxidation process presumably through the reduction of Mn(III). Citrate and pyrophosphate increased the yield of oxidized Mn but decreased the amount of Mn oxide produced via formation of Mn(III)-ligand complexes. While complexing ligands played a role in stabilizing Mn(III), they did not eliminate the inhibition of net Mn(III) formation by H2O2. The Mn oxides precipitated were highly disordered colloidal hexagonal birnessite, similar to those produced by biotically generated superoxide. Yet, in contrast to the large particulate Mn oxides formed by biogenic superoxide, abiotic Mn oxides did not ripen to larger, more crystalline phases. This suggests that the deposition of crystalline Mn oxides within the environment requires a biological, or at least organic, influence. This work provides the first direct evidence that, under conditions relevant to natural waters, oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide can occur and lead to formation of Mn oxides. For organisms that oxidize Mn(II) by producing superoxide, these findings may also point to other microbially mediated processes, in particular enzymatic hydrogen peroxide degradation and/or production of organic ligand metabolites, that allow for Mn oxide formation. PMID:24027565

  3. Enhanced Removal of Biogenic Hydrocarbons in Power Plant Plumes Constrains the Dependence of Atmospheric Hydroxyl Concentrations on Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gouw, J. A.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Brown, S. S.; Edwards, P.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Kim, S. W.; Lerner, B. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Wolfe, G.

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the atmosphere provide one of the main chemical mechanisms for the removal of trace gases. OH plays a central role in determining the atmospheric lifetime and radiative forcing of greenhouse gases like methane. OH also plays a major role in the oxidation of organic trace gases, which can lead to formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and PM2.5. Due to its very short atmospheric lifetime of seconds or less, OH concentrations are extremely variable in space and time, which makes measurements and their interpretation very challenging. Several recent measurements have yielded higher than expected OH concentrations. To explain these would require the existence of unidentified, radical recycling processes, but issues with the measurements themselves are also still being discussed. During the NOAA airborne SENEX study in the Southeast U.S., the biogenic hydrocarbons isoprene and monoterpenes were consistently found to have lower mixing ratios in air masses with enhanced nitrogen oxides from power plants. We attribute this to faster oxidation rates of biogenic hydrocarbons due to increased concentrations of OH in the power plant plumes. Measurements at different downwind distances from the Scherer and Harllee Branch coal-fired power plants near Atlanta are used to constrain the dependence of OH on nitrogen oxides. It is found that OH concentrations were highest at nitrogen dioxide concentrations of 1-2 ppbv and decreased at higher and at lower concentrations. These findings agree with the expected dependence of OH on nitrogen oxide concentrations, but do not appear to be consistent with the reports in the literature that have shown high OH concentrations in regions of the atmosphere with high biogenic emissions and low NOx concentrations that would require unidentified radical recycling processes to be explained.

  4. Fertilizer impact on biogenic nitric oxide emissions from agricultural soils of the Taklimakan desert (Xinjiang, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechner, A. D.; Behrendt, T.; Bruse, M.; Mamtimin, B.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.

    2012-04-01

    It is known that soil microbial processes play a crucial role in the production and consumption of atmospheric trace gases worldwide. Soils are mostly a major source of biogenic nitric oxide (NO). The main influencing factors controlling soil NO emissions are soil moisture, soil temperature, as well as nutrient availability. Adding fertilizer to agricultural soils changes the pool of nutrients and impacts the net NO emission from these soils. Irrigated and fertilized oases around the great Central Asian Taklamakan desert form the backbone of the agricultural output (80% of the Chinese cotton production) of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (NW-China). While nowadays 90% of the agricultural output is produced on just 4.3% of Xinjiang's total area, recent and future enlargement of farmland and intensification of agriculture will definitely impact the regional soil NO emission and consequently the budget of nitrogen oxides and ozone. We present a systematic laboratory study of the influence of urea (CH4N2O) and diammonium hydrogen phosphate ((NH4)2HPO4, DAP) fertilizer on NO emissions from Xinjiang soil samples. Urea is the most widely and excessively applied fertilizer in Xinjiang. Typically, about 600 kg ha-1 yr-1(in terms of mass of nitrogen) were applied to a cotton field in four separate events. In the laboratory, the fertilizer was applied accordingly, ranging from one quarter of the field amount within one of the four events (i.e. 37.5 kg ha-1 yr-1) to quadruple of that (150 kg ha-1 yr-1). Two different measurement series have been performed on six sub- samples (each out of a total of three soil samples taken in Xinjiang): the first series was conducted solely with urea fertilizer, the second one with a mixture of urea and DAP (2:1). All sub-samples were prepared in a standardized way: a fixed mass of soil (~0.06 kg, dried in field) was sieved (2 mm) and stored at 4° C. Then it was wetted up to a soil moisture tension of 1.8 pF. Subsequently, fertilizer was

  5. Biogenic oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from a mountain forest site and their similarities to laboratory chamber products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, R. E.; Russell, L. M.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Vlasenko, A.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; MacDonald, A. M.; Li, S. M.; Liggio, J.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2010-06-01

    Submicron particles collected at Whistler, British Columbia, at 1020 m a.s.l. during May and June 2008 on Teflon filters were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques for organic functional groups (OFG) and elemental composition. Organic mass (OM) concentrations ranged from less than 0.5 to 3.1 μg m-3, with a project mean and standard deviation of 1.3±1.0 μg m-3 and 0.21±0.16 μg m-3 for OM and sulfate, respectively. On average, organic hydroxyl, alkane, and carboxylic acid groups represented 34%, 33%, and 23% of OM, respectively. Ketone, amine and organosulfate groups constituted 6%, 5%, and <1% of the average organic aerosol composition, respectively. Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC), including isoprene and monoterpenes from biogenic VOC (BVOC) emissions and their oxidation products (methyl-vinylketone / methacrolein, MVK/MACR), were made using co-located proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We present chemically-specific evidence of OFG associated with BVOC emissions. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis attributed 65% of the campaign OM to biogenic sources, based on the correlations of one factor to monoterpenes and MVK/MACR. The remaining fraction was attributed to anthropogenic sources based on a correlation to sulfate. The functional group composition of the biogenic factor (consisting of 32% alkane, 25% carboxylic acid, 21% organic hydroxyl, 16% ketone, and 6% amine groups) was similar to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) reported from the oxidation of BVOCs in laboratory chamber studies, providing evidence that the magnitude and chemical composition of biogenic SOA simulated in the laboratory is similar to that found in actual atmospheric conditions. The biogenic factor OM is also correlated to dust elements, indicating that dust may act as a non-acidic SOA sink. This role is supported by the organic functional group composition and morphology of single particles

  6. Biogenic oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from a mountain forest site and their similarities to laboratory chamber products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, R. E.; Russell, L. M.; Sjosted, S. J.; Vlasenko, A.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; MacDonald, A. M.; Li, S. M.; Liggio, J.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2010-02-01

    Submicron particles collected at Whistler, British Columbia, at 1020 masl during May and June 2008 on Teflon filters were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques for organic functional groups (OFG) and elemental composition. Organic mass (OM) ranged from less than 0.5 to 3.1μg m-3, with a project mean and standard deviation of 1.3±1.0 μg m-3 and 0.21±0.16 μg m-3 for OM and sulfate, respectively. On average, organic hydroxyl, alkane, and carboxylic acid groups represented 34%, 33%, and 23% of OM, respectively. Ketone, amine and organosulfate groups constituted 6%, 5%, and <1% of the average organic aerosol composition, respectively. Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC), including isoprene and monoterpenes from biogenic VOC (BVOC) emissions and their oxidation products (methyl-vinylketone/methacrolein, MVK/MACR), were made using co-located proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We present chemically-specific evidence of OFG associated with BVOC emissions. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis attributed 65% of the campaign OM to biogenic sources, based on the correlations of one factor to monoterpenes and MVK/MACR. The remaining fraction was attributed to anthropogenic sources based on a correlation to sulfate. The functional group composition of the biogenic factor (consisting of 32% alkane, 25% carboxylic acid, 2% organic hydroxyl, 16% ketone, and 6% amine groups) was similar to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) reported from the oxidation of BVOCs in laboratory chamber studies, providing evidence that the magnitude and chemical composition of biogenic SOA simulated in the laboratory is similar to that found in actual atmospheric conditions. The biogenic factor OM is also correlated to dust elements, indicating that dust may act as a non-acidic SOA sink. This role is supported by the organic functional group composition and morphology of single particles, which were analyzed

  7. Extracellular haem peroxidases mediate Mn(II) oxidation in a marine Roseobacter bacterium via superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Andeer, Peter F; Learman, Deric R; McIlvin, Matt; Dunn, James A; Hansel, Colleen M

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in environmental systems. A number of biotic and abiotic pathways induce the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn oxides. Here, we use a combination of proteomic analyses and activity assays, to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for extracellular superoxide-mediated Mn oxide formation by a bacterium within the ubiquitous Roseobacter clade. We show that animal haem peroxidases (AHPs) located on the outer membrane and within the secretome are responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. These novel peroxidases have previously been implicated in direct Mn(II) oxidation by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Yet, we show that in this Roseobacter species, AHPs mediate Mn(II) oxidation not through a direct reaction but by producing superoxide and likely also by degrading hydrogen peroxide. These findings point to a eukaryotic-like oscillatory oxidative-peroxidative enzymatic cycle by these AHPs that leads to Mn oxide formation by this organism. AHP expression appears unaffected by Mn(II), yet the large energetic investment required to produce and secrete these enzymes points to an as yet unknown physiological function. These findings are further evidence that bacterial peroxidases and secreted enzymes, in general, are unappreciated controls on the cycling of metals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by extension carbon, in natural systems. PMID:25923595

  8. Anthropogenic Sulfur Perturbations on Biogenic Oxidation: SO2 Additions Impact Gas-Phase OH Oxidation Products of α- and β-Pinene.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Beth; Brophy, Patrick; Brune, William H; Farmer, Delphine K

    2016-02-01

    In order to probe how anthropogenic pollutants can impact the atmospheric oxidation of biogenic emissions, we investigated how sulfur dioxide (SO2) perturbations impact the oxidation of two monoterpenes, α-and β-pinene. We used chemical ionization mass spectrometry to examine changes in both individual molecules and gas-phase bulk properties of oxidation products as a function of SO2 addition. SO2 perturbations impacted the oxidation systems of α-and β-pinene, leading to an ensemble of products with a lesser degree of oxygenation than unperturbed systems. These changes may be due to shifts in the OH:HO2 ratio from SO2 oxidation and/or to SO3 reacting directly with organic molecules. Van Krevelen diagrams suggest a shift from gas-phase functionalization by alcohol/peroxide groups to functionalization by carboxylic acid or carbonyl groups, consistent with a decreased OH:HO2 ratio. Increasing relative humidity dampens the impact of the perturbation. This decrease in oxygenation may impact secondary organic aerosol formation in regions dominated by biogenic emissions with nearby SO2 sources. We observed sulfur-containing organic compounds following SO2 perturbations of monoterpene oxidation; whether these are the result of photochemistry or an instrumental artifact from ion-molecule clustering remains uncertain. However, our results demonstrate that the two monoterpene isomers produce unique suites of oxidation products. PMID:26735899

  9. Modelling the effects of vegetation and soil moisture onto biogenic nitrogen oxide emissions from Sahelian soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delon, Claire; Mougin, Eric; Grippa, Manuela; Galy-Lacaux, Corinne; Serça, Dominique; Kergoat, Laurent; Hiernaux, Pierre; Diawara, Mamadou

    2013-04-01

    Natural (biogenic) emissions of nitrogen oxide (NO) from soils are strongly dependent on soil moisture, particularly in Sahelian regions where the soil moisture is very low at the end of the dry season (around 2% in top soil 0-20 cm). When the first rains fall at the beginning of the wet season, soil moisture increases sharply, until reaching a threshold value above which the microbial population can develop, and the microbial activity generating nitrogen within the soil is reactivated. NO emissions to the atmosphere result from the microbial decomposition of organic matter, and present important peaks at the beginning of the wet season. In Sahelian soils, the organic matter decomposition is very efficient at the onset of the wet season because part of the litter has been buried during the dry season by livestock trampling, and is rapidly decomposed when soil moisture is sufficient. The goal of the work presented here is to simulate NO emissions from soils thanks to a parameterization based on a neural network development, coupled to a vegetation model (STEP) and a litter decomposition model (GENDEC), at the Agoufou site (15.1°N, 1.7°W, Gourma, Mali, super site of the AMMA-CATCH observatory). The resulting coupled model (STEP-GENDEC) includes vegetation growth in a dynamic way, and the quantity of nitrogen brought to the soil either as litter and straws or as livestock excretions. Livestock contributes to the N flux either directly trough excretion deposition (faeces and urine) or indirectly through grazing uptake, conversion of standing straw to litter, fragmentation and burying of litter by trampling. A small part of this N available in the soil is released to the atmosphere in the form of different N compounds such as NO. Knowing the quantity of N available in the soil, NO emissions to the atmosphere are calculated for the years 2006-2007-2008, and compared to the few existing measurements. These results show that Sahelian soils emit non negligible quantities

  10. Surface Mn(II) oxidation actuated by a multicopper oxidase in a soil bacterium leads to the formation of manganese oxide minerals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongming; Chen, Hong; Liu, Jin; Liu, Chang; Ni, Hong; Zhao, Changsong; Ali, Muhammad; Liu, Fan; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we report that a bacterial multicopper oxidase (MCO266) catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation on the cell surface, resulting in the surface deposition of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxides and the gradual formation of bulky oxide aggregates. These aggregates serve as nucleation centers for the formation of Mn oxide micronodules and Mn-rich sediments. A soil-borne Escherichia coli with high Mn(II)-oxidizing activity formed Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxide deposit layers and aggregates under laboratory culture conditions. We engineered MCO266 onto the cell surfaces of both an activity-negative recipient and wild-type strains. The results confirmed that MCO266 governs Mn(II) oxidation and initiates the formation of deposits and aggregates. By contrast, a cell-free substrate, heat-killed strains, and intracellularly expressed or purified MCO266 failed to catalyze Mn(II) oxidation. However, purified MCO266 exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity when combined with cell outer membrane component (COMC) fractions in vitro. We demonstrated that Mn(II) oxidation and aggregate formation occurred through an oxygen-dependent biotic transformation process that requires a certain minimum Mn(II) concentration. We propose an approximate electron transfer pathway in which MCO266 transfers only one electron to convert Mn(II) to Mn(III) and then cooperates with other COMC electron transporters to transfer the other electron required to oxidize Mn(III) to Mn(IV). PMID:26039669

  11. Photocatalytic oxidation of chloroform using immobilized-biogenic TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Cho, Y.; Yoo, H.

    2011-12-01

    Although commercial titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles as a suspension in water are one of the most popular photocatalysts for treatment of chlorinated organic compounds, the reuse and recovery of the nanoscale phtocatalyst is a practical challenge for application in water and groundwater treatment system. As part of efforts to overcome this practical limitation, development of immobilized TiO2 is needed. Diatom Pinnularia sp. were found to be capable of producing nanoscale TiO2 in their microscale silica shells. In order to obtain biogenic TiO2 nanoparticles from Pinnularia sp., soluble Ti was fed to the silicon-starved cells, resulting in deposition of titanium on the microscale features of the silica shells. After thermal treatment at 720 oC for 2 hr, the titanium was eventually converted to nanoscale TiO2. In order to determine the physical and chemical properties of the immobilized TiO2, material characterization such as TEM, STEM-EDS, BET and XRD analysis was carried out. In this study, a novel type of immobilized photocatalytic nanoparticles, biogenic TiO2 on silica shells was used for the mineralization of chloroform in water. Batch tests were conducted to evaluate the chloroform removal efficiency of biogenic and commercial TiO2 nanoparticles. Also, the amount of Cl- ions in water during the mineralization was measured to check mineralization of chloroform by biogenic TiO2 nanoparticles. Kinetic models were used to determine the rate of chloroform mineralization. In addition, the effect of UVA (ultraviolet-A) intensity on chloroform mineralization was investigated. The results obtained from this study could provide useful information for practical application of biogenic TiO2 in the groundwater treatment contaminated with some chlorinated organic compounds.

  12. c-Type cytochromes and manganese oxidation in Pseudomonas putida MnB1

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, R.; Tebo, B.M.; Haygood, M.G.

    1998-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida MnB1 is an isolate from an Mn oxide-encrusted pipeline that can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn oxides. The authors used transposon mutagenesis to construct mutants of strain MnB1 that are unable to oxidize manganese, and they characterized some of these mutants. The mutants were divided into three groups: mutants defective in the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes, mutants defective in genes that encode key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and mutants defective in the biosynthesis of tryptophan. The mutants in the first two groups were cytochrome c oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Mn(II) oxidation capability could be recovered in a c-type cytochrome biogenesis-defective mutant by complementation of the mutation.

  13. c-Type Cytochromes and Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida MnB1

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Ron; Tebo, Bradley M.; Haygood, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida MnB1 is an isolate from an Mn oxide-encrusted pipeline that can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn oxides. We used transposon mutagenesis to construct mutants of strain MnB1 that are unable to oxidize manganese, and we characterized some of these mutants. The mutants were divided into three groups: mutants defective in the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes, mutants defective in genes that encode key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and mutants defective in the biosynthesis of tryptophan. The mutants in the first two groups were cytochrome c oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Mn(II) oxidation capability could be recovered in a c-type cytochrome biogenesis-defective mutant by complementation of the mutation. PMID:9758766

  14. Origin of concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides in stream sediments of Maine, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.; McHugh, J.B.; Hessin, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of stream and sediment-pore waters largely explain the genesis of concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides in Maine. Waters of two small streams near Jackman, Maine, were studied in terms of pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved Mn, total dissolved Fe, and ferrous and ferric Fe. Pyrite Creek has profuse concretions and coatings of Mn-Fe-oxides, whereas West Pyrite Creek has only sparse Mn-Fe-oxide stains. Pyrite Creek drains boggy terrain and West Pyrite Creek drains well-drained terrain. In West Pyrite Creek, stream and subjacent pore waters have chemical characteristics that do not differ greatly. However, dissolved Mn, ferrous Fe, dissolved oxygen, and in situ Eh measurements show that a steep Eh gradient exists between stream and subjacent pore waters of Pyrite Creek. The steep Eh gradient is manifested by the common zonation of coatings and stains on rocks in stream sediment. The bottom zone has no deposition of oxides, the middle zone is red and consists mostly of Fe-oxides, and the upper zone is black or dark-brown and consists of Mn-oxides with varying amounts of Fe-oxides. The zonation agrees with theoretical predictions of oxide stability as one moves from a reducing to an oxidizing environment. At locations where concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides form, pore waters are depleted of oxygen because of abundant decaying organic material in the stream sediment. The pore waters are charged with dissolved Mn and Fe because mechanically deposited Mn-Fe-oxides are remobilized due to the low-Eh conditions. Groundwaters also contribute dissolved Mn and Fe. Stream waters, on the other hand, are oxygenated and the high-Eh conditions result in low concentrations of dissolved Mn and Fe in stream waters because of the insolubility of Mn-Fe-oxides in high-Eh environments. Therefore, concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides form at the interface between pore and stream waters because Mn- and Fe-rich pore waters, which are undersaturated with respect to Mn-Fe-oxides, mix with

  15. Epitaxial growth of intermetallic MnPt films on oxides and large exchange bias

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Zhiqi; Biegalski, Michael D.; Hsu, Shang-Lin; Shang, Shunli; Marker, Cassie; Liu, Jian; Li, Li; Fan, Lisha S.; Meyer, Tricia L.; Wong, Anthony T.; et al

    2015-11-05

    High-quality epitaxial growth of intermetallic MnPt films on oxides is achieved, with potential for multiferroic heterostructure applications. Antisite-stabilized spin-flipping induces ferromagnetism in MnPt films, although it is robustly antiferromagnetic in bulk. Thus, highly ordered antiferromagnetic MnPt films exhibit superiorly large exchange coupling with a ferromagnetic layer.

  16. Epitaxial Growth of Intermetallic MnPt Films on Oxides and Large Exchange Bias.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiqi; Biegalski, Michael D; Hsu, Shang-Lin; Shang, Shunli; Marker, Cassie; Liu, Jian; Li, Li; Fan, Lisha; Meyer, Tricia L; Wong, Anthony T; Nichols, John A; Chen, Deyang; You, Long; Chen, Zuhuang; Wang, Kai; Wang, Kevin; Ward, Thomas Z; Gai, Zheng; Lee, Ho Nyung; Sefat, Athena S; Lauter, Valeria; Liu, Zi-Kui; Christen, Hans M

    2016-01-01

    High-quality epitaxial growth of inter-metallic MnPt films on oxides is achieved, with potential for multiferroic heterostructure applications. Antisite-stabilized spin-flipping induces ferromagnetism in MnPt films, although it is robustly antiferromagnetic in bulk. Moreover, highly ordered antiferromagnetic MnPt films exhibit superiorly large exchange coupling with a ferromagnetic layer. PMID:26539758

  17. Coupled Mn(II) Oxidation Pathways by a Planktonic Roseobacter-like Bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C. M.; Francis, C. A.

    2005-12-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Roseobacter clade of the alpha-Proteobacteria are numerically abundant in coastal waters, ecologically significant in the cycling of (in)organic sulfur, and occupy a wide range of environmental niches. Here we reveal that Roseobacter-like bacteria may play a previously unrecognized role in the oxidation and cycling of manganese (Mn) in coastal waters. A diverse array of Mn(II)-oxidizing Roseobacter-like species were isolated from Elkhorn Slough, a coastal estuary adjacent to Monterey Bay, California. One isolate (designated AzwK-3b), in particular, rapidly oxidizes Mn(II) to insoluble Mn(III, IV) oxides. Interestingly, AzwK-3b is 100% identical (at the 16S rRNA level) to a previously reported Pfiesteria-associated Roseobacter-like bacterium, which does not posses the ability to oxidize Mn(II). Manganese(II) oxidation rates by live cultures and cell-free filtrates are substantially higher when incubated in the presence of light. Rates of oxidation by washed cell extracts, however, are light independent, which are actually identical to rates by cell-free filtrates incubated in the dark. Thus, AwwK-3b induces two Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms when incubated in the presence of light as opposed to predominantly direct enzymatic oxidation in the dark. Within the light, production of photochemically-active metabolites is coupled with initial direct enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation, resulting in substantially accelerated Mn(II) oxidation rates. Thus, Roseobacter-like bacteria may not only greatly influence Mn(II) oxidation and cycling within coastal surface waters, but may also induce a novel photo-oxidation pathway providing an alternative means of Mn(II) oxidation within the photic zone.

  18. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Colleen M.; Zeiner, Carolyn A.; Santelli, Cara M.; Webb, Samuel M.

    2012-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems. PMID:22802654

  19. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hansel, C. M.; Zeiner, C. A.; Santelli, C. M.; Webb, S. M.

    2012-07-16

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Finally, given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems.

  20. Coupled Photochemical and Enzymatic Mn(II) Oxidation Pathways of a Planktonic Roseobacter-Like Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Colleen M.; Francis, Chris A.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Roseobacter clade of the α-Proteobacteria occupy a wide range of environmental niches and are numerically abundant in coastal waters. Here we reveal that Roseobacter-like bacteria may play a previously unrecognized role in the oxidation and cycling of manganese (Mn) in coastal waters. A diverse array of Mn(II)-oxidizing Roseobacter-like species were isolated from Elkhorn Slough, a coastal estuary adjacent to Monterey Bay in California. One isolate (designated AzwK-3b), in particular, rapidly oxidizes Mn(II) to insoluble Mn(III, IV) oxides. Interestingly, AzwK-3b is 100% identical (at the 16S rRNA gene level) to a previously described Pfiesteria-associated Roseobacter-like bacterium, which is not able to oxidize Mn(II). The rates of manganese(II) oxidation by live cultures and cell-free filtrates are substantially higher when the preparations are incubated in the presence of light. The rates of oxidation by washed cell extracts, however, are light independent. Thus, AzwK-3b invokes two Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms when it is incubated in the presence of light, in contrast to the predominantly direct enzymatic oxidation in the dark. In the presence of light, production of photochemically active metabolites is coupled with initial direct enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation, resulting in higher Mn(II) oxidation rates. Thus, Roseobacter-like bacteria may not only play a previously unrecognized role in Mn(II) oxidation and cycling in coastal surface waters but also induce a novel photooxidation pathway that provides an alternative means of Mn(II) oxidation in the photic zone. PMID:16672501

  1. Fabrication of MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide through an exfoliation/reassembling and oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiaqi; Liu, Zong-Huai; Qiao, Shanfeng; Ma, Xiangrong; Xu, Naicai

    MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide has been first fabricated by a delamination/reassembling process followed by oxidation reaction and then by heat treatment. The structural evolution of MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide has been characterized by XRD, SEM, DSC-GTA, IR and N 2 adsorption-desorption. MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide shows a relative high thermal stability and mesoporous characteristic. The layered structure with a basal spacing of 0.66 nm could be maintained up to 400 °C. The electrochemical properties of the synthesized MnO 2-pillared layered manganese oxide have been studied using cyclic voltammetry in a mild aqueous electrolyte. Sample MnO 2-BirMO (300 °C) shows good capacitive behavior and cycling stability, and the specific capacitance value is 206 F g -1.

  2. p-type ZnO and ZnMnO by oxidation of Zn(Mn)Te films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przedziecka, E.; Kamiska, E.; Dynowska, E.; Dobrowolski, W.; Jakiea, R.; Kopotowski, .; Sawicki, M.; Kiecana, M.; Kossut, J.

    2006-03-01

    ZnO and ZnMnO doped with N and/or As layers were fabricated by thermal oxidation of ZnTe and ZnMnTe grown by MBE on different substrates. The Hall measurements demonstrated p -type conductivity with the hole concentration of 5 . 1019 cm-3 for ZnO:As and ZnO:As:N on GaAs substrates and 6 . 1017 cm-3 for ZnTe:N on ZnTe substrates. Optical study showed meaningful differences between samples with different acceptor, grown on different substrates. Magnetoptical experiment demonstration Zeeman splitting in ZnMnO samples.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10008 - Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10008 Manganese strontium oxide (MnSrO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as manganese strontium...

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]dichloroethene under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Dinicola, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]dichloroethene to14CO2 under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that oxidative degradation of partially chlorinated solvents like dichloroethene can be significant even under anoxic conditions and demonstrate the potential importance of Mn(IV) reduction for remediation of chlorinated groundwater contaminants.

  9. Kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. SG-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. SG-1 was measured under controlled conditions of the initial Mn(II) concentration, spore concentration, chemical speciation, pH, O2, and temperature. Mn(II) oxidation experiments were performed with spore concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 11 × 109 spores/L, a pH range from 5.8 to 8.1, temperatures between 4 and 58 °C, a range of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 270 μM, and initial Mn(II) concentrations from 1 to 200 μM. The Mn(II) oxidation rates were directly proportional to the spore concentrations over these ranges of concentration. The Mn(II) oxidation rate increased with increasing initial Mn(II) concentration to a critical concentration, as described by the Michaelis-Menten model (Km = ca. 3 μM). Whereas with starting Mn(II) concentrations above the critical concentration, the rate was almost constant in low ionic solution (I = 0.05, 0.08). At high ionic solution (I = 0.53, 0.68), the rate was inversely correlated with Mn(II) concentration. Increase in the Mn(II) oxidation rate with the dissolved oxygen concentration followed the Michaelis-Menten model (Km = 12-19 μM DO) in both a HEPES-buffered commercial drinking (soft) water and in artificial and natural seawater. Overall, our results suggest that the mass transport limitations of Mn(II) ions due to secondary Mn oxide products accumulating on the spores cause a significant decrease of the oxidation rate at higher initial Mn(II) concentration on a spore basis, as well as in more concentrated ionic solutions. The optimum pH for Mn(II) oxidation was approximately 7.0 in low ionic solutions (I = 0.08). The high rates at the alkaline side (pH > 7.5) may suggest a contribution by heterogeneous reactions on manganese bio-oxides. The effect of temperature on the Mn(II) oxidation rate was studied in three solutions (500 mM NaCl, ASW, NSW solutions). Thermal denaturation occurred at 58 °C and spore germination was evident at 40 °C in all three

  10. Secondary organic aerosols formed from oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Thomas M.; Seaman, Vincent Y.; Charles, M. Judith; Holzinger, Rupert; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2006-08-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, such as isoprene and terpenes, can be oxidized to form less volatile carbonyls, acids, and multifunctional oxygenated products that may condense to form secondary organic aerosols (SOA). This research was designed to assess the contribution of oxidized BVOC emissions to SOA in coniferous forests by collecting high-volume particulate samples for 6 days and 5 nights in the summer of 2003. The samples were analyzed for acids, carbonyls, polyols and alkanes to quantify oxidized BVOCs. Terpene and isoprene oxidation products were among the most abundant chemical species detected with the exception of hexadecanoic acid, octadecanoic acid and two butyl esters of unknown origin. The terpene oxidation products of pinonic acid, pinic acid, nopinone and pinonaldehyde showed clear diurnal cycles with concentrations two- to eight-fold higher at night. These cycles resulted from the diurnal cycles in gaseous terpene concentrations and lower temperatures that enhanced condensation of semivolatile chemicals onto aerosols. The terpene-derived compounds averaged 157 ± 118 ng/m3 of particulate organic matter while the isoprene oxidation compounds, namely the 2-methyltetrols and 2-methylglyceric acid, accounted for 53 ± 19 ng/m3. Together, the terpene and isoprene oxidation products represented 36.9% of the identified organic mass of 490 ± 95 ng/m3. PM10 organic matter loadings in the region were approximately 2.1 ± 1.2 μg/m3, so about 23% of the organic matter was identified and at least 8.6% was oxidized BVOCs. The BVOC oxidation products we measured were significant, but not dominant, contributors to the regional SOA only 75 km downwind of the Sacramento urban area.

  11. Interactions of proteins with biogenic iron oxyhydroxides and a new culturing technique to increase biomass yields of neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Roman A.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophilic, bacterial iron-oxidation remains one of the least understood energy-generating biological reactions to date. One of the reasons it remains under-studied is because there are inherent problems with working with iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), including low biomass yields and interference from the iron oxides in the samples. In an effort to circumvent the problem of low biomass, a new large batch culturing technique was developed. Protein interactions with biogenic iron oxides were investigated confirming that such interactions are strong. Therefore, a protein extraction method is described to minimize binding of proteins to biogenic iron oxides. The combination of these two methods results in protein yields that are appropriate for activity assays in gels and for proteomic profiling. PMID:24910632

  12. Kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation by Leptothrix discophora SS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinghao; Lion, Leonard W.; Nelson, Yarrow M.; Shuler, Michael L.; Ghiorse, William C.

    2002-03-01

    The kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation by the bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS1 was investigated in this research. Cells were grown in a minimal mineral salts medium in which chemical speciation was well defined. Mn(II) oxidation was observed in a bioreactor under controlled conditions with pH, O 2, and temperature regulation. Mn(II) oxidation experiments were performed at cell concentrations between 24 mg/L and 35 mg/L, over a pH range from 6 to 8.5, between temperatures of 10°C and 40°C, over a dissolved oxygen range of 0 to 8.05 mg/L, and with L. discophora SS1 cells that were grown in the presence of Cu concentrations ranging from zero to 0.1 μM. Mn(II) oxidation rates were determined when the cultures grew to stationary phase and were found to be directly proportional to O 2 and cell concentrations over the ranges investigated. The optimum pH for Mn(II) oxidation was approximately 7.5, and the optimum temperature was 30°C. A Cu level as low as 0.02 μM was found to inhibit the growth rate and yield of L. discophora SS1 observed in shake flasks, while Cu levels between 0.02 and 0.1 μM stimulated the Mn(II) oxidation rate observed in bioreactors. An overall rate law for Mn(II) oxidation by L. discophora as a function of pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration (D.O.), and Cu concentration is proposed. At circumneutral pH, the rate of biologically mediated Mn(II) oxidation is likely to exceed homogeneous abiotic Mn(II) oxidation at relatively low (≈μg/L) concentrations of Mn oxidizing bacteria.

  13. Nitrogen Oxides from Biogenic Alkyl Nitrates: A Natural Source of Tropospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, J. L.; Lawler, M. J.; Saltzman, E. S.; Prather, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Observations indicate that the tropical and southern oceans are source regions for biogenic emissions of alkyl nitrates. These compounds have lifetimes of several days to a month and are a significant source of reactive odd nitrogen (NOx) in remote regions of the atmosphere. These biogenically produced NOx precursors represent a natural control on atmospheric composition, including the important greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and tropospheric ozone (O3). We present simulations from the UCI global chemical transport model (CTM) using measurement-based fluxes of methyl and ethyl nitrate from their oceanic source regions and examine the contribution of these gases to global atmospheric composition. We also discuss the sensitivity of our results to our representation of two sub-gridscale processes: wet scavenging and photolysis in the presence of broken cloud fields. Quantification of the transport and chemistry of these compounds improves our understanding of natural tropospheric ozone production as well as hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry in both the remote regions of the modern atmosphere and the pre-industrial atmosphere.

  14. The oxidation capacity of Mn3O4 nanoparticles is significantly enhanced by anchoring them onto reduced graphene oxide to facilitate regeneration of surface-associated Mn(III).

    PubMed

    Duan, Lin; Wang, Zhongyuan; Hou, Yan; Wang, Zepeng; Gao, Guandao; Chen, Wei; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxides are often anchored to graphene materials to achieve greater contaminant removal efficiency. To date, the enhanced performance has mainly been attributed to the role of graphene materials as a conductor for electron transfer. Herein, we report a new mechanism via which graphene materials enhance oxidation of organic contaminants by metal oxides. Specifically, Mn3O4-rGO nanocomposites (Mn3O4 nanoparticles anchored to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets) enhanced oxidation of 1-naphthylamine (used here as a reaction probe) compared to bare Mn3O4. Spectroscopic analyses (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) show that the rGO component of Mn3O4-rGO was further reduced during the oxidation of 1-naphthylamine, although rGO reduction was not the result of direct interaction with 1-naphthylamine. We postulate that rGO improved the oxidation efficiency of anchored Mn3O4 by re-oxidizing Mn(II) formed from the reaction between Mn3O4 and 1-naphthylamine, thereby regenerating the surface-associated oxidant Mn(III). The proposed role of rGO was verified by separate experiments demonstrating its ability to oxidize dissolved Mn(II) to Mn(III), which subsequently can oxidize 1-naphthylamine. The role of dissolved oxygen in re-oxidizing Mn(II) was ruled out by anoxic (N2-purged) control experiments showing similar results as O2-sparged tests. Opposite pH effects on the oxidation efficiency of Mn3O4-rGO versus bare Mn3O4 were also observed, corroborating the proposed mechanism because higher pH facilitates oxidation of surface-associated Mn(II) even though it lowers the oxidation potential of Mn3O4. Overall, these findings may guide the development of novel metal oxide-graphene nanocomposites for contaminant removal. PMID:27448035

  15. Mn-Oxide Minerals from a Terrestrial Cave Environment: Biomarkers for the Search for Life on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilde, M. N.; Brearley, A. J.; Papike, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Mn-oxides are promising biomarkers because microbes greatly accelerate Mn-oxide formation rates and produce distinctive oxidation states. Mn minerals in terrestrial caves form subaerially and could conceivably be present in the subsurface of Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Interfacial strain and defects in asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mayence, Arnaud; Wéry, Madeleine; Tran, Dung Trung; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Bergström, Lennart

    2016-08-01

    Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds. PMID:27385323

  17. Mobilization of manganese by basalt associated Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria from the Indian Ridge System.

    PubMed

    Sujith, P P; Mourya, B S; Krishnamurthi, S; Meena, R M; Loka Bharathi, P A

    2014-01-01

    The Indian Ridge System basalt bearing Mn-oxide coatings had todorokite as the major and birnesite as the minor mineral. We posit that microorganisms associated with these basalts participate in the oxidation of Mn and contribute to mineral deposition. We also hypothesized that, the Mn-oxidizing microbes may respond reversibly to pulses of fresh organic carbon introduced into the water column by mobilizing the Mn in Mn-oxides. To test these two hypotheses, we enumerated the number of Mn-oxidizers and -reducers and carried out studies on the mobilization of Mn by microbial communities associated with basalt. In medium containing 100 μM Mn(2+), 10(3) colony forming units (CFU) were recovered with undetectable number of reducers on Mn-oxide amended medium, suggesting that the community was more oxidative. Experiments were then conducted with basalt fragments at 4±2 °C in the presence 'G(+)' and absence 'G(-)' of glucose (0.1%). Controls included set-ups, some of which were poisoned with 15 mM azide and the others of which were heat-killed. The mobilization of Mn in the presence of glucose was 1.76 μg g(-1) d(-1) and in the absence, it was 0.17 μg g(-1) d(-1) after 150 d. Mn mobilization with and without added glucose was 13 and 4 times greater than the corresponding azide treated controls. However, rates in 'G(+)' were 16 times and 'G(-)' 24 times more than the respective heat killed controls. The corresponding total counts in the presence of added glucose increased from 1.63×10(6) to 6.71×10(7) cells g(-1) and from 1.41×10(7) to 3.52×10(7) cells g(-1) in its absence. Thus, the addition of glucose as a proxy for organic carbon changed the community's response from Mn(II)-oxidizing to Mn(IV)-reducing activity. The results confirm the participation of Mn oxidizing bacteria in the mobilization of Mn. Identification of culturable bacteria by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed taxonomic affiliations to Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Staphylococcus, Brevibacterium and

  18. Peroxycarboxylic Nitric Anhydrides as Markers of Anthropogenic and Biogenic VOC Photo-oxidation in the Alberta Oil Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osthoff, H. D.; Huo, J. A.; Tokarek, T. W.; Odame-Ankrah, C. A.; Saowapon, M. T.; Chen, X.

    2014-12-01

    The peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (molecular formula RC(O)O2NO2) are well-known byproducts of the photo-oxidation chemistry between NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that produces ozone (O3) and photochemical smog. More than 43 different PAN species are known; their relative abundances are chemical markers of the types and quantities of the VOCs involved in the O3-formation process. For example, MPAN (R: CH2=C(CH3)-) is primarily derived from isoprene and thus a marker of biogenic VOC oxidation, whereas PPN (R: C2H5-) is a photo-oxidation byproduct of anthropogenic VOCs. In the summer of 2013 an intensive air quality measurement campaign was conducted to investigate the impacts of emissions from the Alberta oil sands mining operations on the chemical composition of ambient air. As part of this effort, several peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides, specifically PAN (R: CH3-), PPN, MPAN, APAN (R: CH2=CH-), and PiBN (R: iC3H7-), were quantified by gas chromatography with electron capture detection at the AMS13 ground site near Fort McKay, Alberta. Furthermore, total peroxyacyl nitrates (ΣPAN) were quantified by thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS). PAN mixing ratios typically peaked in the mid-afternoon (maximum PAN mixing ratio of 0.85 ppbv), constituting up to 25% of total odd nitrogen (NOy), and were usually below detection limits at night. ΣPAN was generally greater than the amount calculated by summation of individually measured PANs (SPANi) suggesting the presence of PAN species not measured by GC. During times of active photo-oxidation chemistry, the PPN:PAN and MPAN:PAN ratios varied considerably between days, depending on air mass origin and VOC composition. A linear combination model (LCM) was used to assess regional O3 production from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons (via MPAN) relative to that of anthropogenic hydrocarbons (via PPN). The relative contribution of anthropogenic VOCs to regional O3 production varied

  19. Aqueous ultracapacitors using amorphous MnO2 and reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mery, Adrien; Ghamouss, Fouad; Autret, Cécile; Farhat, Douaa; Tran-Van, François

    2016-02-01

    Herein, synthesis and characterization of amorphous MnO2 and application in asymmetric aqueous ultracapacitors are reported. Different amorphous manganese oxide (MnO2) materials were synthesized from the reduction of KMnO4 in different media such as ethanol (EtOH) or dimethylformamide (DMF). The electrochemical behavior of amorphous MnO2, labeled MnO2-Et and MnO2-DMF, were studied by using cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic cycling in aqueous electrolyte. XRD, BET, TEM, and SEM characterizations highlighted the amorphous nature and the nanostructuration of these MnO2 materials. BET measurement established that these amorphous MnO2 are mesoporous. In addition, MnO2-Et exhibits a larger specific surface area (168 m2 g-1), a narrower pore diameters distribution with lower diameters compared to MnO2-DMF. These results are in agreement with the electrochemical results. Indeed, MnO2-Et shows a higher specific capacitance and lower impedance in aqueous K2SO4 electrolyte. Furthermore, aqueous asymmetric ultracapacitors were assembled and studied using amorphous MnO2 as positive electrode and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as negative electrode. These asymmetric systems exhibit an electrochemical stability for more than 20,000 galvanostatic cycles at current density of 1 A g-1 with an operating voltage of 2 V.

  20. Interfacial strain and defects in asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayence, Arnaud; Wéry, Madeleine; Tran, Dung Trung; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Bergström, Lennart

    2016-07-01

    Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds.Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials characterization, powder X-ray diffraction, EFTEM images, EELS spectra, HAADF-STEM. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01373b

  1. Selective Alkane Oxidation by Manganese Oxide: Site Isolation of MnOx Chains at the Surface of MnWO4 Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Pfeifer, Verena; Jastak, Mateusz; Nielsen, Pia Kjaer; Girgsdies, Frank; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Rosowski, Frank; Schlögl, Robert; Trunschke, Annette

    2016-03-14

    The electronic and structural properties of vanadium-containing phases govern the formation of isolated active sites at the surface of these catalysts for selective alkane oxidation. This concept is not restricted to vanadium oxide. The deliberate use of hydrothermal techniques can turn the typical combustion catalyst manganese oxide into a selective catalyst for oxidative propane dehydrogenation. Nanostructured, crystalline MnWO4 serves as the support that stabilizes a defect-rich MnOx surface phase. Oxygen defects can be reversibly replenished and depleted at the reaction temperature. Terminating MnOx zigzag chains on the (010) crystal planes are suspected to bear structurally site-isolated oxygen defects that account for the unexpectedly good performance of the catalyst in propane activation. PMID:26913704

  2. Adsorption and oxidation of elemental mercury over Ce-MnOx/Ti-PILCs.

    PubMed

    He, Chuan; Shen, Boxiong; Chen, Jianhong; Cai, Ji

    2014-07-15

    A series of innovative Ce-Mn/Ti-pillared-clay (Ce-Mn/Ti-PILC) catalysts combining the advantages of PILCs and Ce-Mn were investigated for elemental mercury (Hg0) capture at 100-350 °C in the absence of HCl in the flue gas. The fresh and used catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The catalyst characterization indicated that the 6%Ce-6%MnOx/Ti-PILC catalyst possessed a large specific surface area and high dispersion of Ce and Mn on the surface. The experimental results indicated that the 6%Ce-6%MnOx/Ti-PILC catalyst exhibited high Hg0 capture (>90%) at 100-350 °C. During the first stage of the reaction, the main Hg0 capture mechanism for the catalyst was adsorption. As the reaction proceeded, the Hg0 oxidation ability was substantially enhanced. Both the hydroxyl oxygen and the lattice oxygen on the surface of the catalysts participated in Hg0 oxidation. At a low temperature (150 °C), the hydroxyl oxygen and lattice oxygen from Ce4+→Ce3+ and Mn3+→Mn2+ on the surface contributed to Hg0 oxidation. However, at a high temperature (250 °C), the hydroxyl oxygen and lattice oxygen from Mn4+→Mn3+ contributed to Hg0 oxidation. Hg0 oxidation was preferred at a high temperature. The 6%Ce-6%MnOx/Ti-PILC catalyst was demonstrated to a good Hg0 adsorbent and catalytic oxidant in the absence of HCl in the flue gas. PMID:24956201

  3. Protection of Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from UV Radiation by Biogenic Fe(III) Minerals.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Tina; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the lack of an ozone layer in the Archean, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reached early Earth's surface almost unattenuated; as a consequence, a terrestrial biosphere in the form of biological soil crusts would have been highly susceptible to lethal doses of irradiation. However, a self-produced external screen in the form of nanoparticular Fe(III) minerals could have effectively protected those early microorganisms. In this study, we use viability studies by quantifying colony-forming units (CFUs), as well as Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction rates, to show that encrustation in biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) minerals can protect a common soil bacteria such as the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and strain 2AN from harmful UVC radiation. Analysis of DNA damage by quantifying cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) confirmed the protecting effect by Fe(III) minerals. This study suggests that Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, as would have grown in association with mafic and ultramafic soils/outcrops, would have been able to produce their own UV screen, enabling them to live in terrestrial habitats on early Earth. PMID:27027418

  4. Ethylbenzene oxidative dehydrogenation on MnO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Craciun, R.; Dulamita, N.

    1999-04-01

    Supported MnO{sub x} on high surface area SiO{sub 2} (300 m{sup 2}/g) catalysts were successfully used in ethylbenzene oxidative dehydrogenation. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the structure of fresh and used MnO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts. The MnO{sub x} catalysts were prepared using the pore volume impregnation method, with MnO{sub 2} loading varying from 0.7 wt % (Mn/Si = 0.005, atomic ratio) to 30 wt % (Mn/Si = 0.14). The changes in the crystalline structure and dispersion of supported MnO{sub x} were related to the precursor/support interaction and the conditions used during catalyst preparation. A possible mechanism for ethylbenzene conversion to styrene on MnO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts is proposed, where lattice oxygen from crystalline MnO{sub 2} can be used in the oxidation or oxidative dehydrogenation processes. The high selectivity in styrene (at 723 K, 24% conversion with 76% selectivity in styrene) was related to the high concentration in the MnO{sub 2} phase from the MnO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts. The formation of the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase, observed on the used catalysts, supports the proposed mechanism. These findings are of potential use for industrial applications, particularly in optimization of various oxidative dehydrogenation processes.

  5. Impact of microbial Mn oxidation on the remobilization of bioreduced U(IV).

    PubMed

    Plathe, Kelly L; Lee, Sung-Woo; Tebo, Bradley M; Bargar, John R; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2013-04-16

    Effects of Mn redox cycling on the stability of bioreduced U(IV) are evaluated here. U(VI) can be biologically reduced to less soluble U(IV) species and the stimulation of biological activity to that end is a salient remediation strategy; however, the stability of these materials in the subsurface environments where they form remains unproven. Manganese oxides are capable of rapidly oxidizing U(IV) to U(VI) in mixed batch systems where the two solid phases are in direct contact. However, it is unknown whether the same oxidation would take place in a porous medium. To probe that question, U(IV) immobilized in agarose gels was exposed to conditions allowing biological Mn(II) oxidation (HEPES buffer, Mn(II), 5% O2 and Bacillus sp. SG-1 spores). Results show the oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) is due primarily to O2 rather than to MnO2. U(VI) produced is retained within the gel to a greater extent when Mn oxides are present, suggesting the formation of strong surface complexes. The implication for the long-term stability of U in a bioremediated site is that, in the absence of competing ligands, biological Mn(II) oxidation may promote the immobilization of U(VI) produced by the oxidation of U(IV). PMID:23484504

  6. Understanding the anthropogenic influence on formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosols via analysis of organosulfates and related oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. T.; Christensen, M. K.; Cozzi, F.; Zare, A.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Kristensen, K.; Tulinius, T. E.; Madsen, H. H.; Christensen, J. H.; Brandt, J.; Massling, A.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Glasius, M.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) may affect concentration levels and composition of biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOA) through photochemical reactions with biogenic organic precursors to form organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates. We investigated this influence in a field study from 19 May-22 June 2011 at two sampling sites in Denmark. Within the study, we identified a substantial number of organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates in the ambient urban curbside and semi-rural background air. A high degree of correlation in concentrations was found among a group of specific organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates, which may originate from various precursors, suggesting a common mechanism or factor affecting their concentration levels at the sites. It was proposed that the formation of those species most likely occurred on a larger spatial scale with the compounds being long-range transported to the sites on the days with highest concentrations. The origin of the long-range transported aerosols was investigated using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model in addition to modeled emissions of related precursors including isoprene and monoterpenes using the global Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and SO2 emissions using the European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) database. The local impacts were also studied by examining the correlation between selected species which showed significantly enhanced concentrations at the urban curbside site and the local concentrations of various gases including SO2, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), NOx, aerosol acidity and other meteorological conditions. This investigation showed that an inter-play of the local parameters such as the aerosol acidity, NOx, relative humidity (RH), temperature and global radiation seemed to influence the concentration level of those species, via

  7. Oxide Transformation in Cr-Mn-Prealloyed Sintered Steels: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryha, Eduard; Nyborg, Lars

    2014-04-01

    The main obstacle for utilization of Cr and Mn as alloying elements in powder metallurgy is their high oxygen affinity leading to oxidation risk during powder manufacturing, handling, and especially during further consolidation. Despite the high purity of the commercially available Cr- and Mn-prealloyed iron powder grades, the risk of stable oxide formation during the sintering process remains. Thermodynamic and kinetic simulation of the oxide formation/transformation on the former powder surface during heating and sintering stages using thermodynamic modeling tools (Thermo-Calc and HSC Chemistry) was performed. Simulation is based on the results from the analysis of amount, morphology, and composition of the oxide phases inside the inter-particle necks in the specimens from interrupted sintering trials utilizing advanced analysis tools (HRSEM + EDX and XPS). The effect of the processing parameters, such as sintering atmosphere composition, temperature profile as well as graphite addition on the possible scenarios of oxide reduction/formation/transformation for Fe-Cr-Mn-C powder systems, was evaluated. Results indicate that oxide transformation occurs in accordance with the thermodynamic stability of oxides as follows: Fe2O3 → FeO → Fe2MnO4 → Cr2FeO4 → Cr2O3 → MnCr2O4 → MnO/MnSiO x → SiO2. Spinel MnCr2O4 was identified as the most stable oxide phase at applied sintering conditions up to 1393 K (1120 °C). Controlled conditions during the heating stage minimize the formation of stable oxide products and produce oxide-free sintered parts.

  8. Seeded growth of ferrite nanoparticles from Mn oxides: observation of anomalies in magnetic transitions.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyon-Min; Zink, Jeffrey I; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-07-28

    A series of magnetically active ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared by using Mn oxide NPs as seeds. A Verwey transition is identified in Fe3O4 NPs with an average diameter of 14.5 nm at 96 K, where a sharp drop of magnetic susceptibility occurs. In MnFe2O4 NPs, a spin glass-like state is observed with the decrease in magnetization below the blocking temperature due to the disordered spins during the freezing process. From these MnFe2O4 NPs, MnFe2O4@Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O core-shell NPs are prepared by seeded growth. The structure of the core is cubic spinel (Fd3¯m), and the shell is composed of iron-manganese oxide (Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O) with a rock salt structure (Fm3¯m). Moiré fringes appear perpendicular to the 〈110〉 directions on the cubic shape NPs through the plane-matched epitaxial growth. These fringes are due to the difference in the lattice spacings between MnFe2O4 and Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O. Exchange bias is observed in these MnFe2O4@Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O core-shell NPs with an enhanced coercivity, as well as the shift of hysteresis along the field direction. PMID:26123580

  9. Cu-Mn-Ce ternary mixed-oxide catalysts for catalytic combustion of toluene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hanfeng; Kong, Xianxian; Huang, Haifeng; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Yinfei

    2015-06-01

    Cu-Mn, Cu-Mn-Ce, and Cu-Ce mixed-oxide catalysts were prepared by a citric acid sol-gel method and then characterized by XRD, BET, H2-TPR and XPS analyses. Their catalytic properties were investigated in the toluene combustion reaction. Results showed that the Cu-Mn-Ce ternary mixed-oxide catalyst with 1:2:4 mole ratios had the highest catalytic activity, and 99% toluene conversion was achieved at temperatures below 220°C. In the Cu-Mn-Ce catalyst, a portion of Cu and Mn species entered into the CeO2 fluorite lattice, which led to the formation of a ceria-based solid solution. Excess Cu and Mn oxides existed on the surface of the ceria-based solid solution. The coexistence of Cu-Mn mixed oxides and the ceria-based solid solution resulted in a better synergetic interaction than the Cu-Mn and Cu-Ce catalysts, which promoted catalyst reducibility, increased oxygen mobility, and enhanced the formation of abundant active oxygen species. PMID:26040736

  10. Site Determination and Magnetism of Mn Doping in Protein Encapsulated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, V.; Klem, M.; Jolley, J.; Arenholz, E.A.; Douglas, T.; Young, M.; Idzerda, Y.U.

    2010-01-11

    Soft-X-ray absorption spectroscopy, soft-X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and alternating current magnetic susceptibility were performed on 6.7 nm iron oxide nanoparticles doped with (5-33%) Mn grown inside the horse-spleen ferritin protein cages and compared to similarly protein encapsulated pure Fe-oxide and Mn-oxide nanoparticles to determine the site of the Mn dopant and to quantify the magnetic behavior with varying Mn concentration. The Mn dopant is shown to substitute preferentially as Mn{sup +2} and prefers the octahedral site in the defected spinel structure. The Mn multiplet structure for the nanoparticles is simpler than for the bulk standards, suggesting that the nanoparticle lattices are relaxed from the distortions present in the bulk. Addition of Mn is found to alter the host Fe-oxide lattice from a defected ferrimagnetic spinel structure similar to {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to an non-ferromagnetic spinel structure with a local Fe environment similar to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}.

  11. Oxidation behavior of cubic phases formed by alloying Al3Ti with Cr and Mn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, L. J.; Nic, J. P.; Mikkola, D. E.; Smialek, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Gravimetric, SEM, and XRD data are presented which document the significant improvement obtainable in the oxidation resistance of Al3Ti-containing alloys through additions of Cr. The L1(2) Al(67)Cr(8)Ti25 alloy exhibited excellent cyclic oxidation resistance at 1473 K, with the primary oxide formed being the ideally protective alpha-Al2O3. The Al(67)Mn(8)Ti(25) alloy also tested for comparison exhibited poor cyclic oxidation resistance, with substantial occurrence of TiO2 in the protective scales. Catastrophic oxidation was also encountered in the quaternary alloy Al(67)Mn(8)Ti(22)V(3).

  12. MnOx-CeO2-Al2O3 mixed oxides for soot oxidation: activity and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodong; Liu, Shuang; Weng, Duan; Lin, Fan; Ran, Rui

    2011-03-15

    MnO(x)-CeO(2)-Al(2)O(3) mixed oxides were prepared by impregnating manganese acetate and cerium nitrate on alumina powders using the sol-gel method. The thermal stabilities of MnO(x)-CeO(2) and Al(2)O(3)-modified mixed oxides were evaluated by treating at 800 °C in dry air flow for 20h. The introduction of Al(2)O(3) markedly increases the textural stability of the catalyst with a relatively high dispersion of MnO(x) and CeO(2), remaining a strong synergistic effect between these two oxides. The NO oxidation activity of the ternary oxides experiences a smaller loss after high-temperature calcination, and a low soot oxidation temperature is attained in the presence of NO. PMID:21276659

  13. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn (4) Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.; /SLAC

    2012-08-17

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a Mn(II)-oxidizing Bacillus strain from the demosponge Suberites domuncula.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Wiens, Matthias; Divekar, Mugdha; Grebenjuk, Vladislav A; Schröder, Heinz C; Batel, Renato; Müller, Werner E G

    2011-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that the demosponge Suberites domuncula harbors a Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium, a Bacillus strain, termed BAC-SubDo-03. Our studies showed that Mn(II) stimulates bacterial growth and induces sporulation. Moreover, we show that these bacteria immobilize manganese on their cell surface. Comparison of the 16S rDNA sequence allowed the grouping of BAC-SubDo-03 to the Mn-precipitating bacteria. Analysis of the spore cell wall revealed that it contains an Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme. Co-incubation studies of BAC-SubDo-03 with 100 μM MnCl(2) and >1 μM of CuCl(2) showed an increase in their Mn(II)-oxidizing capacity. In order to prove that a multicopper oxidase-like enzyme(s) (MCO) exists in the cell wall of the S. domuncula-associated BAC-SubDo-03 Bacillus strain, the gene encoding this enzyme was cloned (mnxG-SubDo-03). Sequence alignment of the deduced MCO protein (MnxG-SubDo-03) revealed that the sponge bacterium clusters together with known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The expression of the mnxG-SubDo-03 gene is under strong control of extracellular Mn(II). Based on these findings, we assume that BAC-SubDo-03 might serve as a Mn reserve in the sponge providing the animal with the capacity to detoxify Mn in the environment. Applying the in vitro primmorph cell culture system we could demonstrate that sponge cells, that were co-incubated with BAC-SubDo-03 in the presence of Mn(II), show an increased proliferation potential. PMID:21339943

  15. Isolation and Characterization of a Mn(II)-Oxidizing Bacillus Strain from the Demosponge Suberites domuncula

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Wiens, Matthias; Divekar, Mugdha; Grebenjuk, Vladislav A.; Schröder, Heinz C.; Batel, Renato; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that the demosponge Suberites domuncula harbors a Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium, a Bacillus strain, termed BAC-SubDo-03. Our studies showed that Mn(II) stimulates bacterial growth and induces sporulation. Moreover, we show that these bacteria immobilize manganese on their cell surface. Comparison of the 16S rDNA sequence allowed the grouping of BAC-SubDo-03 to the Mn-precipitating bacteria. Analysis of the spore cell wall revealed that it contains an Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme. Co-incubation studies of BAC-SubDo-03 with 100 μM MnCl2 and >1 μM of CuCl2 showed an increase in their Mn(II)-oxidizing capacity. In order to prove that a multicopper oxidase-like enzyme(s) (MCO) exists in the cell wall of the S. domuncula-associated BAC-SubDo-03 Bacillus strain, the gene encoding this enzyme was cloned (mnxG-SubDo-03). Sequence alignment of the deduced MCO protein (MnxG-SubDo-03) revealed that the sponge bacterium clusters together with known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The expression of the mnxG-SubDo-03 gene is under strong control of extracellular Mn(II). Based on these findings, we assume that BAC-SubDo-03 might serve as a Mn reserve in the sponge providing the animal with the capacity to detoxify Mn in the environment. Applying the in vitro primmorph cell culture system we could demonstrate that sponge cells, that were co-incubated with BAC-SubDo-03 in the presence of Mn(II), show an increased proliferation potential. PMID:21339943

  16. Mycogenic Mn(II) oxidation promotes remediation of acid mine drainage and other anthropogenically impacted environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santelli, C. M.; Chaput, D.; Hansel, C. M.; Burgos, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Manganese is a pollutant in worldwide environments contaminated with metals and organics, such as acid mine drainage (AMD), freshwater ponds, and agricultural waste storage sites. Microorganisms contribute to the removal of dissolved Mn compounds in the environment by promoting Mn(II) oxidation reactions. The oxidation of Mn(II) results in the precipitation of sparingly soluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, effectively removing the metal from the aqueous milieu (e.g., groundwater or wastewater streams). In recent years, our research has identified a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi inhabiting these polluted environments, however their overall contribution to the remediation process in situ remains poorly understood. Here we present results of culture-based and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies in AMD treatment systems actively remediating Mn and other metals where we profile the bacterial, fungal, algal and archaeal communities to determine the overall community diversity and to establish the relative abundance of known Mn(II) oxidizers. A variety of treatment systems with varying Mn-removal efficiencies were sampled to understand the relationship between remediation efficiency and microbial community composition and activity. Targeted-amplicon sequencing of DNA and RNA of the 16S rRNA genes (bacteria and archaea), 23S rRNA genes (algae) and ITS region (fungi) was performed using both 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina platforms. Results showed that only the fungal taxonomic profiles significantly differed between sites that removed the majority of influent Mn and those that did not. Specifically, Ascomycota (which include known Mn(II) oxidizers isolated from these treatment systems) dominated greater efficiency systems whereas less efficient systems were dominated by Basidiomycota. Furthermore, known Mn(II) oxidizers accounted for only a minor proportion of bacterial sequences but a far greater proportion of fungal sequences. These culture-independent studies lend

  17. Indirect Oxidation of Co(II) in the Presence of the Marine Mn(II)-Oxidizing Bacterium Bacillus Sp. Strain SG-1

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.J.; Webb, S.M.; Bargar, J.R.; Tebo, B.M.; /Scripps Inst. Oceanography /SLAC, SSRL /Oregon Health Sci. U.

    2009-04-29

    Cobalt(II) oxidation in aquatic environments has been shown to be linked to Mn(II) oxidation, a process primarily mediated by bacteria. This work examines the oxidation of Co(II) by the spore-forming marine Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Bacillus sp. strain SG-1, which enzymatically catalyzes the formation of reactive nanoparticulate Mn(IV) oxides. Preparations of these spores were incubated with radiotracers and various amounts of Co(II) and Mn(II), and the rates of Mn(II) and Co(II) oxidation were measured. Inhibition of Mn(II) oxidation by Co(II) and inhibition of Co(II) oxidation by Mn(II) were both found to be competitive. However, from both radiotracer experiments and X-ray spectroscopic measurements, no Co(II) oxidation occurred in the complete absence of Mn(II), suggesting that the Co(II) oxidation observed in these cultures is indirect and that a previous report of enzymatic Co(II) oxidation may have been due to very low levels of contaminating Mn. Our results indicate that the mechanism by which SG-1 oxidizes Co(II) is through the production of the reactive nanoparticulate Mn oxide.

  18. Manganese(IV) Oxide Production by Acremonium sp. Strain KR21-2 and Extracellular Mn(II) Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Naoyuki; Tani, Yukinori; Maruo, Kanako; Tsuno, Hiroshi; Sakata, Masahiro; Iwahori, Keisuke

    2006-01-01

    Ascomycetes that can deposit Mn(III, IV) oxides are widespread in aquatic and soil environments, yet the mechanism(s) involved in Mn oxide deposition remains unclear. A Mn(II)-oxidizing ascomycete, Acremonium sp. strain KR21-2, produced a Mn oxide phase with filamentous nanostructures. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy showed that the Mn phase was primarily Mn(IV). We purified to homogeneity a laccase-like enzyme with Mn(II) oxidase activity from cultures of strain KR21-2. The purified enzyme oxidized Mn(II) to yield suspended Mn particles; XANES spectra indicated that Mn(II) had been converted to Mn(IV). The pH optimum for Mn(II) oxidation was 7.0, and the apparent half-saturation constant was 0.20 mM. The enzyme oxidized ABTS [2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] (pH optimum, 5.5; Km, 1.2 mM) and contained two copper atoms per molecule. Moreover, the N-terminal amino acid sequence (residues 3 to 25) was 61% identical with the corresponding sequence of an Acremonium polyphenol oxidase and 57% identical with that of a Myrothecium bilirubin oxidase. These results provide the first evidence that a fungal multicopper oxidase can convert Mn(II) to Mn(IV) oxide. The present study reinforces the notion of the contribution of multicopper oxidase to microbially mediated precipitation of Mn oxides and suggests that Acremonium sp. strain KR21-2 is a good model for understanding the oxidation of Mn in diverse ascomycetes. PMID:17021194

  19. Comparison of daytime and nighttime oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs along the New England coast in summer during New England Air Quality Study 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Goldan, P. D.; Kuster, W. C.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Jakoubek, R.; Brown, S. S.; Stark, H.; Aldener, M.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Marchewka, M.; Bertman, S.; Sueper, D. T.; McKeen, S. A.; Meagher, J. F.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2004-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and some of their oxidants (O3, NO3) were measured on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research ship R/V Ronald H. Brown along the coast of New England, downwind of New York, Boston, and Portsmouth and large forested areas in New Hampshire, Maine, and Massachusetts in July and August 2002. The diurnal variations of isoprene, monoterpenes, and aromatics were mainly dependent on their emissions and the abundance of the oxidants OH and NO3. Elevated mixing ratios of short-lived VOCs were only encountered at the ship, which was about 1-6 hours downwind of the sources, when the concentrations of the oxidants were low. For the biogenic compounds this was generally the case during morning and evening hours, when the lifetime of the biogenics was long because of low OH and NO3 concentrations. Most anthropogenic VOCs do not react with NO3, and therefore their mixing ratios remained elevated during the night. The products of isoprene oxidation, methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and peroxymethacrylic nitric anhydride (MPAN) were, on average, more abundant than isoprene itself. Only during the transition periods from day to night, when oxidation rates were at a minimum, could isoprene exceed its products. The loss of the biogenic VOCs was dominated by reactions with NO3, whereas the loss of anthropogenics came mostly from reactions with OH. The oxygenated VOCs are the major contributor to the OH loss, except in close vicinity of emission sources. The total loss of biogenic compounds during the night was so effective that after one night of transport they were in most cases completely reacted away, whereas the mixing ratios of the anthropogenic compounds remained high during the night. The pool of reactive hydrocarbons at sunrise was thus typically dominated by anthropogenic VOCs.

  20. Catalytic oxidation of benzene with ozone over Mn/KIT-6.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hwa; Kim, Ji Man; Jurng, Jongsoo; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Park, Sung Hoon; Kim, Sang Chai; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Park, Young-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Benzene is one of the target compounds to be removed from air owing to its carcinogenicity. In this study, benzene oxidation with ozone over a MnOx/KIT-6 catalyst was carried out for the first time. MnOx/KIT-6 was synthesized using two different Mn precursors: Mn acetate and Mn nitrate. The characteristics of the synthesized catalysts were examined by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and N2 adsorption-desorption. The catalytic activity was found to be dependent on the amount of ozone consumed and the dispersion and reducibility of MnOx on the catalyst surface. PMID:23646749

  1. Photochemistry of biogenic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere is examined, emphasizing the composition and photochemistry and chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere. The reactions of oxygen, ozone, and hydroxyl are reviewed and the fate of the biogenic gases ammonia, methane, reduced sulfur species, reduced halogen species, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide are described. A list is given of the concentration and sources of the various gases.

  2. Secondary aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons by chlorine atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xuyi; Griffin, Robert J.

    2006-07-01

    The chlorine atom (Cl) is a potential oxidant of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere and is hypothesized to lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in coastal and industrialized areas. The purpose of this paper is to test this hypothesis and to quantify the SOA formation potentials of the common monoterpenes α-pinene, β-pinene, and d-limonene when oxidized by Cl in laboratory chamber experiments. Results indicate that the oxidation of these monoterpenes generates significant amounts of aerosol. The SOA yields of α-pinene, β-pinene, and d-limonene in this study are comparable to those when they are oxidized by ozone, by nitrate radical, and in photooxidation scenarios. For aerosol mass up to 30.0 μg m-3, their yields reach approximately 0.20, 0.20, and 0.30, respectively. For d-limonene, data indicate two yield curves that depend on the initial concentration ratio of Cl precursor to d-limonene. It is argued theoretically that multiple SOA yield curves may be common for VOCs, depending on the initial concentration ratio of oxidant to VOC. SOA formation from the three typical monoterpenes when oxidized by Cl in the marine boundary layer, coastal areas, and inland industrialized areas could be a source of organic aerosol in the early morning.

  3. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn4Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2007-08-03

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn4Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (Si-states, i =0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn4(III2,IV2) and Mn4(III,IV3) for S1 and S2 states, while it is still controversial for the S0 and S3 states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn4Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mncomplexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p3/2 RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S0 to S1, and S1 to S2 transitions is twice as large as that during the S2 to S3 transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  4. Mixed-Valent Mn16-Containing Heteropolyanions: Tuning of Oxidation State and Associated Physicochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ali; Ibrahim, Masooma; Bassil, Bassem S; Carey, Akina M; Viet, Anh Nguyen; Xing, Xiaolin; Ayass, Wassim W; Miñambres, Juan F; Liu, Rongji; Zhang, Guangjin; Keita, Bineta; Mereacre, Valeriu; Powell, Annie K; Balinski, Kamil; N'Diaye, Alpha T; Küpper, Karsten; Chen, Han-Yi; Stimming, Ulrich; Kortz, Ulrich

    2016-03-21

    The two 16-manganese-containing, Keggin-based 36-tungsto-4-silicates [Mn(III)10Mn(II)6O6(OH)6(PO4)4(A-α-SiW9O34)4](28-) (1) and [Mn(III)4Mn(II)12(OH)12(PO4)4(A-α-SiW9O34)4](28-) (2) have been prepared by reaction of the trilacunary Keggin precursor [A-α-SiW9O34](10-) with either Mn(OOCCH3)3·2H2O (for 1) or MnCl2·4H2O (for 2), in aqueous phosphate solution at pH 9. Polyanions 1 and 2 comprise mixed-valent, cationic {Mn(III)10Mn(II)6O6(OH)6}(24+) and {Mn(III)4Mn(II)12(OH)12}(24+) cores, respectively, encapsulated by four phosphate groups and four {SiW9} units in a tetrahedral fashion. Both polyanions were structurally and compositionally characterized by single-crystal XRD, IR, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, studies were performed probing the magnetic, electrochemical, oxidation catalytic, and Li-ion battery performance of 1 and 2. PMID:26931312

  5. [XPS and UPS characterization for Cr and Mn in high-temperature oxide films of bulk nanocrystalline 304 stainless steel].

    PubMed

    Xu, Song-Ning; Wang, Sheng-Gang; Han, Hai-Bao; Sun, Nai-Kun

    2013-03-01

    The authors studied the binding energies of valence electrons of two oxide scales, the atomic percentages of Cr and Mn elements in two oxide films, the work function of two oxide films on bulk nanocrystalline 304 stainless steel (BN-SS304) and conventional polycrystalline 304 stainless steel (CP-SS304). BN-SS304 was prepared by severe rolling technique, and the two oxide films were formed in atmosphere at 900 degrees C for 24 hours oxidation on BN-SS304 and CP-SS304 surfaces. In the two oxide films, Cr and Mn elements exist in the forms of Cr3+, Cr0, Mn4+ and Mn0. The atomic percentage ratios of Cr+ / (Cr3+ + Cr0) and Mn4+ / (Mn4+ + Mn0) in the oxide film on BN-SS304 are lower than those in the oxide film on CP-SS304. The interactions of the two oxides and the valence electrons of elements are Mn-O, Cr-O,3d and 4s of Mn0 and Cr0. The binding energies of the valence electrons in the oxide film on BN-SS304 are larger than those in the oxide film on CP-SS304, the work function of the oxide film on BN-SS304 is 0.07 eV larger than that on CP-SS304. PMID:23705465

  6. Revealing biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion in sludge digesters: detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria within full-scale digesters.

    PubMed

    Huber, B; Drewes, J E; Lin, K C; König, R; Müller, E

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion (BSA) is a costly problem affecting both sewerage infrastructure and sludge handling facilities such as digesters. The aim of this study was to verify BSA in full-scale digesters by identifying the microorganisms involved in the concrete corrosion process, that is, sulfate-reducing (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). To investigate the SRB and SOB communities, digester sludge and biofilm samples were collected. SRB diversity within digester sludge was studied by applying polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) targeting the dsrB-gene (dissimilatory sulfite reductase beta subunit). To reveal SOB diversity, cultivation dependent and independent techniques were applied. The SRB diversity studies revealed different uncultured SRB, confirming SRB activity and H2S production. Comparable DGGE profiles were obtained from the different sludges, demonstrating the presence of similar SRB species. By cultivation, three pure SOB strains from the digester headspace were obtained including Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Thiomonas intermedia and Thiomonas perometabolis. These organisms were also detected with PCR-DGGE in addition to two new SOB: Thiobacillus thioparus and Paracoccus solventivorans. The SRB and SOB responsible for BSA were identified within five different digesters, demonstrating that BSA is a problem occurring not only in sewer systems but also in sludge digesters. In addition, the presence of different SOB species was successfully associated with the progression of microbial corrosion. PMID:25353947

  7. Novel Solar Energy Conversion Materials by Design of Mn(II) Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Lany, S.; Peng, H.; Ndione, P.; Zakutayev, A.; Ginley, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy conversion materials need to fulfill simultaneously a number of requirements in regard of their band-structure, optical properties, carrier transport, and doping. Despite their desirable chemical properties, e.g., for photo-electrocatalysis, transition-metal oxides usually do not have desirable semiconducting properties. Instead, oxides with open cation d-shells are typically Mott or charge-transfer insulators with notoriously poor transport properties, resulting from large effective electron/hole masses or from carrier self-trapping. Based on the notion that the electronic structure features (p-d interaction) supporting the p-type conductivity in d10 oxides like Cu2O and CuAlO2 occurs in a similar fashion also in the d5 (high-spin) oxides, we recently studied theoretically the band-structure and transport properties of the prototypical binary d5 oxides MnO and Fe2O3 [PRB 85, 201202(R)]. We found that MnO tends to self-trap holes by forming Mn+III, whereas Fe2O3 self-traps electrons by forming Fe+II. However, the self-trapping of holes is suppressed by when Mn is tetrahedrally coordinated, which suggests specific routes to design novel solar conversion materials by considering ternary Mn(II) oxides or oxide alloys. We are presenting theory, synthesis, and initial characterization for these novel energy materials.

  8. Microbial Communities Associated with Biogenic Iron Oxide Mineralization in Circumneutral pH Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. S.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Lithotrophic growth on iron is a metabolism that has been found in a variety of neutral pH environments and is likely important in sustaining life in microaerophilic solutions, especially those low in organics. The composition of the microbial communities, especially the organisms that are responsible for iron oxidation, and carbon and nitrogen fixation, are not known, yet the ability to recognize these contributions is vital to our understanding of iron cycling in natural environments. Our approach has been to study the microbial community structure, mineralogy, and geochemistry of ~20 cm thick, 100's meters long, fluffy iron oxide-encrusted biological mats growing in the Piquette Mine tunnel, and to compare the results to those from geochemically similar environments. In situ measurements (Hydrolab) and geochemical characterization of bulk water samples and peepers (dialysis sampling vials) indicate that the environment is microaerobic, with micromolar levels of iron, high carbonate and sulfate, and typical groundwater nitrate and nitrite concentrations. 16S rDNA clone libraries show that the microbial mat and water contain communities with considerable diversity within the Bacterial domain, a large proportion of Nitrospira and Betaproteobacteria, and no Archaea. Because clone library data are not necessarily indicative of actual abundance, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was performed on water, mat, and sediment samples from the Piquette mine and two circumneutral iron- and carbonate-rich springs in the Oregon Cascade Range. Domain- and phylum-level probes were chosen based on the clone library results (Nitrospira, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomyces). FISH data reveal spatial associations between specific microbial groups and mineralized structures. The organisms responsible for making the mineralized sheaths that compose the bulk of the iron oxide mat are Betaproteobacteria (probably Leptothrix

  9. In situ DRIFTS investigation for the oxidation of toluene by ozone over Mn/HZSM-5, Ag/HZSM-5 and Mn-Ag/HZSM-5 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiao; Na, Hongbo; Zeng, Xiaolan; Zhu, Tianle; Liu, Zhiming

    2014-08-01

    The mechanism of toluene oxidation at room temperature over Mn/HZSM-5, Ag/HZSM-5 and Mn-Ag/HZSM-5 catalysts was investigated by in situ DRIFTS. The results show that only a little toluene can be partially oxidized into benzyl alcohol in the absence of O3, while it can be further oxidized into benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, maleic anhydride, and ultimately mineralized to CO2 in the presence of O3. The lattice oxygen is the oxygen species of oxidizing toluene into benzyl alcohol, and the active oxygen species generated from ozone decomposition on the oxygen vacancy over the catalysts are responsible for its complete oxidation. Compared with Mn/HZSM-5 and Ag/HZSM-5 catalysts, the Mn-Ag/HZSM-5 catalyst shows higher catalytic activity for toluene oxidation by ozone, which is attributed to more oxygen vacancy in this catalyst, based on the XPS characterization results.

  10. Contemporary and projected biogenic fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide in North American terrestrial ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in determining global climate change has been increasingly recognized, but terrestrial CH4 and N2O budgets and the underlying mechanisms remain far from certain. Accurate estimation of terrestrial CH4 and N2O budgets would be a critical step fo...

  11. Area integrated emission of biogenic nitric oxide by Lagrangian dispersion modeling (LASAT): Milan oasis, Taklimakan desert (Xinjiang, PR China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, M.; Wu, Z.; Behrendt, T.; Fechner, A. D.; Meixner, F. X.; Andreae, M. O.; Mamtimin, B.

    2012-04-01

    Today's knowledge of soil biogenic NO emission rates from arid and hyper-arid land is based on a total of about 20 experimental studies. Nevertheless, biogenic NO emissions even from non-managed arid and hyper-arid soils are significant and may range between 1-10 ng m-2 s-1 (in terms of nitrogen, if conditions for soil NO production are favourable (optimum soil moisture, high soil temperatures). Irrigated and fertilized oases, ranging about 3000 km long around the great Central Asian Taklimakan desert form the backbone of the agricultural output (80% of the Chinese cotton production) of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (NW-China). Recent and future development of farmland and intensification of agriculture will definitely impact the regional soil NO emission and consequently the budget of nitrogen oxides and ozone. Up to today, only a few studies have preliminarily addressed soil biogenic NO emissions from the Taklimakan desert. In our contribution, we will focus on the quantification of the area integrated NO emission from the Milan oasis located on the most southern fringe of the Takalimkan desert (39.26° N, 88.91° E). At a first step, the 3D distribution of ambient NO concentration is calculated using a state-of-the-art commercially available dispersion model (LASAT 3.2, Lagrange Simulation of Aerosol-Transport). Performing the dispersion simulation, transport and turbulent diffusion are simulated for a group of representative "simulation particles" by means of a stochastic process (Lagrange simulation). Surface sources (individual cotton fields, Jujube orchards) are known: their geographical location as well as their areal extent, their stage of vegetation growth as well as irrigation and fertilization events and amounts, soil temperatures and soil water contents. This information is used to up-scale our results of field specific potential net NO emission, which has been parameterized in terms of soil temperature, soil water content, and soil nutrient

  12. Ozone reactivity of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions during the Southeast Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Guenther, A. B.; Helmig, D.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies on atmospheric chemistry in the forest environment showed that the total reactivity by biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission is still not well understood. During summer 2013, an intensive field campaign (Southeast Oxidant and Aerosol Study - SOAS) took place in Alabama, U.S.A. In this study, an ozone reactivity measurement system (ORMS) was deployed for the direct determination of the reactivity of foliage emissions. The ORMS is a newly developed measurement approach, in which a known amount of ozone is added to the ozone-free air sample stream, with the ORMS measuring ozone concentration difference between before and after a glass flask flow tube reaction vessel (2-3 minutes of residence time). Emissions were also collected onto adsorbent cartridges to investigate the discrepancy between total ozone reactivity observation and reactivity calculated from identified BVOC. Leaf and canopy level experiments were conducted by deploying branch enclosures on the three dominant tree species at the site (i.e. liquidambar, white oak, loblolly pine) and by sampling ambient air above the forest canopy. For the branch enclosure experiments, BVOC emissions were sampled from a 70 L Teflon bag enclosure, purged with air scrubbed for ozone, nitrogen oxides. Each branch experiment was performed for 3-5 days to collect at least two full diurnal cycle data. In addition, BVOCs were sampled using glass tube cartridges for 2 hours during daytime and 3 - 4 hours at night. During the last week of campaign, the inlet for the ORMS was installed on the top of scaffolding tower (~30m height). The ozone loss in the reactor showed distinct diurnal cycle for all three tree species investigated, and ozone reactivity followed patterns of temperature and light intensity.

  13. Virus Removal by Biogenic Cerium

    SciTech Connect

    De Gusseme, B.; Du Laing, G; Hennebel, T; Renard, P; Chidambaram, D; Fitts, J; Bruneel, E; Van Driessche, I; Verbeken, K; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    The rare earth element cerium has been known to exert antifungal and antibacterial properties in the oxidation states +III and +IV. This study reports on an innovative strategy for virus removal in drinking water by the combination of Ce(III) on a bacterial carrier matrix. The biogenic cerium (bio-Ce) was produced by addition of aqueous Ce(III) to actively growing cultures of either freshwater manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) Leptothrix discophora or Pseudomonas putida MnB29. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicated that Ce remained in its trivalent state on the bacterial surface. The spectra were consistent with Ce(III) ions associated with the phosphoryl groups of the bacterial cell wall. In disinfection assays using a bacteriophage as model, it was demonstrated that bio-Ce exhibited antiviral properties. A 4.4 log decrease of the phage was observed after 2 h of contact with 50 mg L{sup -1} bio-Ce. Given the fact that virus removal with 50 mg L{sup -1} Ce(III) as CeNO{sub 3} was lower, the presence of the bacterial carrier matrix in bio-Ce significantly enhanced virus removal.

  14. Virus removal by biogenic cerium.

    PubMed

    De Gusseme, Bart; Du Laing, Gijs; Hennebel, Tom; Renard, Piet; Chidambaram, Dev; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Bruneel, Els; Van Driessche, Isabel; Verbeken, Kim; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2010-08-15

    The rare earth element cerium has been known to exert antifungal and antibacterial properties in the oxidation states +III and +IV. This study reports on an innovative strategy for virus removal in drinking water by the combination of Ce(III) on a bacterial carrier matrix. The biogenic cerium (bio-Ce) was produced by addition of aqueous Ce(III) to actively growing cultures of either freshwater manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) Leptothrix discophora or Pseudomonas putida MnB29. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicated that Ce remained in its trivalent state on the bacterial surface. The spectra were consistent with Ce(III) ions associated with the phosphoryl groups of the bacterial cell wall. In disinfection assays using a bacteriophage as model, it was demonstrated that bio-Ce exhibited antiviral properties. A 4.4 log decrease of the phage was observed after 2 h of contact with 50 mg L(-1) bio-Ce. Given the fact that virus removal with 50 mg L(-1) Ce(III) as CeNO(3) was lower, the presence of the bacterial carrier matrix in bio-Ce significantly enhanced virus removal. PMID:20704235

  15. Oxidation products of biogenic emissions contribute to nucleation of atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Riccobono, Francesco; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Dommen, Josef; Ortega, Ismael K; Rondo, Linda; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; David, André; Downard, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hansel, Armin; Junninen, Heikki; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kvashin, Alexander N; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Nieminen, Tuomo; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Seinfeld, John H; Sipilä, Mikko; Spracklen, Dominick V; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vaattovaara, Petri; Viisanen, Yrjö; Vrtala, Aron; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wex, Heike; Wimmer, Daniela; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-16

    Atmospheric new-particle formation affects climate and is one of the least understood atmospheric aerosol processes. The complexity and variability of the atmosphere has hindered elucidation of the fundamental mechanism of new-particle formation from gaseous precursors. We show, in experiments performed with the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN, that sulfuric acid and oxidized organic vapors at atmospheric concentrations reproduce particle nucleation rates observed in the lower atmosphere. The experiments reveal a nucleation mechanism involving the formation of clusters containing sulfuric acid and oxidized organic molecules from the very first step. Inclusion of this mechanism in a global aerosol model yields a photochemically and biologically driven seasonal cycle of particle concentrations in the continental boundary layer, in good agreement with observations. PMID:24833386

  16. Organosulfates and oxidation products from biogenic hydrocarbons in fine aerosols from a forest in North West Europe during spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Glasius, Marianne

    2011-09-01

    Organosulfates of monoterpenes and isoprene, as well as their oxidation products have been identified in biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOA) from both laboratory and field studies. Organosulfates provide an interesting coupling between air pollution and formation of low-volatility BSOA. HPLC quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to study polar acidic monoterpene and isoprene oxidation products including pinic acid, pinonic and terpenylic acid along with organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates in aerosols from ambient air. The method was first validated by analysis of spiked quartz filters, which showed acceptable recoveries >74% for pinic acid, pinonic acid, camphor sulphonic acid and adipic acid. Acetonitrile was identified as a better solvent than methanol for extraction and analysis of pinonic acid and adipic acid, due to improved analytical sensitivity and prevention of methyl ester formation during sample extraction. PM 1 (i.e, aerosols with an aerodynamic diameter ≤1 μm) were collected during spring 2008 in a forest in Denmark with mixed deciduous and coniferous trees. Average concentrations of the most abundant compounds were: pinic acid: 1.5 ng m -3, pinonic acid: 3.0 ng m -3, terpenylic acid: 0.8 ng m -3 and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid: 3.0 ng m -3. Organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates were identified in a majority of the daily samples and the highest levels were observed during a warm period in late spring. As a first approach, due to the lack of authentic standards, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates were tentatively quantified based on the analytical response of camphor sulphonic acid. Generally the concentrations of organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates were lower than first generation oxidation products. The maximum concentration of a total of 10 organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates were found to be about three times lower than pinonic acid with a maximum concentration of 8 ng m -3. A

  17. Influences of graphene oxide support on the electrochemical performances of graphene oxide-MnO2 nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    MnO2 supported on graphene oxide (GO) made from different graphite materials has been synthesized and further investigated as electrode materials for supercapacitors. The structure and morphology of MnO2-GO nanocomposites are characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption. As demonstrated, the GO fabricated from commercial expanded graphite (denoted as GO(1)) possesses more functional groups and larger interplane gap compared to the GO from commercial graphite powder (denoted as GO(2)). The surface area and functionalities of GO have significant effects on the morphology and electrochemical activity of MnO2, which lead to the fact that the loading amount of MnO2 on GO(1) is much higher than that on GO(2). Elemental analysis performed via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy confirmed higher amounts of MnO2 loading on GO(1). As the electrode of supercapacitor, MnO2-GO(1) nanocomposites show larger capacitance (307.7 F g-1) and better electrochemical activity than MnO2-GO(2) possibly due to the high loading, good uniformity, and homogeneous distribution of MnO2 on GO(1) support. PMID:21951643

  18. Biogenic synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles using Ruta graveolens (L.) and their antibacterial and antioxidant activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingaraju, K.; Raja Naika, H.; Manjunath, K.; Basavaraj, R. B.; Nagabhushana, H.; Nagaraju, G.; Suresh, D.

    2015-08-01

    In the present investigation, green synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by biological method using aqueous stem extract of Ruta graveolens act as reducing agent. Formation of ZnO nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were subjected to biological properties such as antibacterial and antioxidant studies. The PXRD pattern reveals that ZnO sample belongs to hexagonal phase with Wurtzite structure. The UV-vis absorption spectrum shows an absorption band at 355 nm due to ZnO nanoparticles. SEM images show that the particles have spherical like structure with large surface area and the average crystallite sizes were found to be in the range ~28 nm. These observations were confirmed by TEM analysis. The ZnO nanoparticles are found to inhibit the antioxidant activity of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radicals effectively. ZnO Nps exhibit significant bactericidal activity against Gram -ve bacterial strains such as Klebsiella aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Gram +ve Staphylococcus aureus by agar well diffusion method.

  19. Oxidation of a new Biogenic VOC: Chamber Studies of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Methyl Chavicol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloss, William; Alam, Mohammed; Adbul Raheem, Modinah; Rickard, Andrew; Hamilton, Jacqui; Pereira, Kelly; Camredon, Marie; Munoz, Amalia; Vazquez, Monica; Vera, Teresa; Rodenas, Mila

    2013-04-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to formation of ozone and SOA, with consequences for air quality, health, crop yields, atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer. Recent observations have identified Methyl Chavicol ("MC": Estragole; 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene, C10H12O) as a major BVOC above pine forests in the USA, and oil palm plantations in Malaysian Borneo. Palm oil cultivation, and hence MC emissions, may be expected to increase with societal food and bio fuel demand. We present the results of a series of simulation chamber experiments to assess the atmospheric fate of MC. Experiments were performed in the EUPHORE facility, monitoring stable product species, radical intermediates, and aerosol production and composition. We determine rate constants for reaction of MC with OH and O3, and ozonolysis radical yields. Stable product measurements (FTIR, PTRMS, GC-SPME) are used to determine the yields of stable products formed from OH- and O3- initiated oxidation, and to develop an understanding of the initial stages of the MC degradation chemistry. A surrogate mechanism approach is used to simulate MC degradation within the MCM, evaluated in terms of ozone production measured in the chamber experiments, and applied to quantify the role of MC in the real atmosphere.

  20. Biogenic synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles using Ruta graveolens (L.) and their antibacterial and antioxidant activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingaraju, K.; Raja Naika, H.; Manjunath, K.; Basavaraj, R. B.; Nagabhushana, H.; Nagaraju, G.; Suresh, D.

    2016-06-01

    In the present investigation, green synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by biological method using aqueous stem extract of Ruta graveolens act as reducing agent. Formation of ZnO nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were subjected to biological properties such as antibacterial and antioxidant studies. The PXRD pattern reveals that ZnO sample belongs to hexagonal phase with Wurtzite structure. The UV-vis absorption spectrum shows an absorption band at 355 nm due to ZnO nanoparticles. SEM images show that the particles have spherical like structure with large surface area and the average crystallite sizes were found to be in the range ~28 nm. These observations were confirmed by TEM analysis. The ZnO nanoparticles are found to inhibit the antioxidant activity of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radicals effectively. ZnO Nps exhibit significant bactericidal activity against Gram -ve bacterial strains such as Klebsiella aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Gram +ve Staphylococcus aureus by agar well diffusion method.

  1. Biological low pH Mn(II) oxidation in a manganese deposit influenced by metal-rich groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohu, Tsing; Akob, Denise M.; Abratis, Michael; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms, key organisms, and geochemical significance of biological low-pH Mn(II) oxidation are largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the structure of indigenous Mn(II)-oxidizing microbial communities in a secondary subsurface Mn oxide deposit influenced by acidic (pH 4.8) metal-rich groundwater in a former uranium mining area. Microbial diversity was highest in the Mn deposit compared to the adjacent soil layers and included the majority of known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and two genera of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (MOF). Electron X-ray microanalysis showed that romanechite [(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10] was conspicuously enriched in the deposit. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that certain fungal, bacterial, and archaeal groups were firmly associated with the autochthonous Mn oxides. Eight MOB within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and one MOF strain belonging to Ascomycota were isolated at pH 5.5 or 7.2 from the acidic Mn deposit. Soil-groundwater microcosms demonstrated 2.5-fold-faster Mn(II) depletion in the Mn deposit than adjacent soil layers. No depletion was observed in the abiotic controls, suggesting that biological contribution is the main driver for Mn(II) oxidation at low pH. The composition and species specificity of the native low-pH Mn(II) oxidizers were highly adapted to in situ conditions, and these organisms may play a central role in the fundamental biogeochemical processes (e.g., metal natural attenuation) occurring in the acidic, oligotrophic, and metalliferous subsoil ecosystems.

  2. Treated Nanolayered Mn Oxide by Oxidizable Compounds: A Strategy To Improve the Catalytic Activity toward Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mahdi Najafpour, Mohammad; Jafarian Sedigh, Davood; Maedeh Hosseini, Seyedeh; Zaharieva, Ivelina

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we investigate the effect of post-treatment of nanolayered manganese oxide by different inorganic and organic compounds. We use the fact that nanolayered manganese oxides are among the strongest naturally occurring oxidants, capable of oxidizing a wide range of organic molecules. Post-treatment of the synthetic Mn oxides with oxidizable compounds increases the cerium(IV)-driven water oxidation catalyzed by treated layered manganese oxides more than 25 times. On the basis of X-ray absorption investigations, we attribute this effect to the increased amount of manganese(III) ions. This finding can explain some puzzles in water oxidation by manganese oxides and may help to advance toward an efficient design strategy of water-oxidizing catalyst in artificial photosynthetic systems. PMID:27537432

  3. Layered Li-Mn-M-oxides as cathodes for Li-ion batteries:. Recent trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaju, K. M.; Subba Rao, G. V.; Chowdari, B. V. R.

    2002-12-01

    There is an increasing demand for manganese (Mn) based mixed oxides which can effectively replace the presently used LiCoO2 as cathode in Li-ion batteries (LIB). The well-studied spinel, LiMn2O4 and its doped derivatives give a capacity of 100-120 mAh/g, but show capacity-fading on cycling especially above 55°C. The layered LiMnO2, isostructural to LiCoO2 (so called O3-structure) can be a viable cathode. However, studies have shown that it undergoes conversion to spinel structure on cycling and thus gives capacity-fading. Other alternative systems recently studied are: O2-structured layered Li-M-Mn-oxides with the general formula Li(2/3)+x(MyMn1-y)O2, M = Li, Ni, Co; x ≤ 0.33 and y = 0.1-0.67, O3-Li(Ni1/2Mn1/2)O2, Li(NixCo1-2xMnx)O2, and M'-substituted Li2MnO3 (M' = Ni, Co, Cr). Some of them are shown to have stable cycling performance, good rate-capability and structural stability over charge-discharge cycling in the 2.5-4.6 V region. Further, the electrochemical processes in the above mixed oxides have been shown to involve Ni2+/4+ or Cr3+/6+ redox couple, thus invoking novel ideas to develop new cathode materials. A brief review of the work done on the above O2- and O3-layered Li-Mn-M-oxides (M = metal) as cathodes for LIB is presented.

  4. Seasonal variation of nitrogen oxides, ozone and biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations and fluxes at Norway spruce forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juran, Stanislav; Vecerova, Kristyna; Holisova, Petra; Zapletal, Milos; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Guidolotti, Gabriele; Calfapietra, Carlo; Vecera, Zbynek; Cudlin, Pavel; Urban, Otmar

    2015-04-01

    Dynamics of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone concentration and their depositions were investigated on the Norway spruce forest at Bily Kriz experimental station at the Silesian Beskydy Mountains (north-eastern part of the Czech Republic). Both NOx and ozone concentration and fluxes were modelled for the whole season and covering thus different climate conditions. Data were recorded for three consecutive years and therefore deeper analyses were performed. During the summer 2014 BVOC field campaign was carried out using proton-transfer-reaction-time-of-flight-mass-spectrometry (PTR-TOF, Ionicon Analytik GmbH, Innsbruck, Austria) and volatile organic compound of biogenic origin (BVOC) were measured at the different levels of tree canopies. By the same time BVOC were trapped into the Tenax tubes (Markes International Ltd., UK) and put afterwards for thermal desorption (Markes Unity System 2, Markes International Ltd., UK) to GS-MS analysis (TSQ Quntum XLS triple Quadrupole, Thermo Scientific, USA). Thus data of different levels of canopies together with different spectra of monoterpenes were obtained. Interesting comparison of both methods will be shown. It was the first BVOC field campaign using PTR technique at any of the forest in the Czech Republic. Highest fluxes and concentrations were recorded around the noon hours, represented particularly by monoterpenes, especially α-pinen and limonene. Other BVOCs than monoterpenes were negligible. Variation of fluxes between different canopies levels was observed, highlighting difference in shaded and sun exposed leaves. Sun leaves emitted up to 2.4 nmol m-2 s-1 of monoterpenes, while shaded leaves emitted only up to 0.6 nmol m-2 s-1 when measured under standard conditions (irradiance 1000 µmol m-2 s-1; temperature 30°C). We discuss here the importance of the most common Norway spruce tree forests in the Czech Republic in bi-directional exchanges of important secondary pollutant such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, their

  5. Thermodynamic Modeling of Oxide Phases in the Mn-O System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Youn-Bae; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-06-01

    A critical evaluation and thermodynamic modeling for thermodynamic properties of all oxide phases and phase diagrams in the Mn-O system are presented. Optimized Gibbs energy parameters for the thermodynamic models of the oxide phases were obtained which reproduce all available and reliable experimental data within error limits from 298 K (25 °C) to above the liquidus temperature at compositions covering from MnO to MnO2, and oxygen partial pressure from 10-15 to 102 (bar). The optimized thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams are believed to be the best estimates presently available. Two spinel phases (α - and β -Mn3O4) were modeled using Compound Energy Formalism (CEF) with the use of physically meaningful parameters. Valence states of the spinels are interpreted based on the available thermopower measurement, for which Mn4+ was considered in the cubic spinel (β -Mn3O4). The present Mn3O4 spinel solutions can be integrated into a larger spinel solution database, which has been already developed. The database of the model parameters can be used along with a software for Gibbs energy minimization in order to calculate any type of phase diagram sections and thermodynamic properties.

  6. High-temperature oxidation behavior of a wrought Ni-Cr-W-Mn-Si-La alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Tawancy, H.M.

    1996-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to study the kinetics and products of oxidation of a wrought Ni-Cr-W-Mn-Si-La alloy at temperatures in the range of 950 to 1150{degrees}C. Oxidation kinetics were evaluated from measurements of weight change, metal loss, and internal penetration. Analytical electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the scale microstructure. Initially, La was observed to segregate within a surface layer of about 5 {mu}m thick, which promoted selective oxidation of Cr and Mn. Oxidation kinetics were found to follow a parabolic-rate law with an activation energy of about 232 kJ/mol. During steady-state oxidation, the scale consisted of an inner adherent layer of {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} modified by the presence of La and Si, and shielded by an outer layer of MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Most of the La was segregated to grain boundaries of the {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, however, Si was homogeneously distributed. It was concluded that the characteristic oxidation resistance of the alloy was related to the synergistic effects of Ni and Cr and to the effective minor additions of La, Si, and Mn; however, the useful life of the scale was limited by rupture and surface depletion in Cr, leading to accelerated internal oxidation.

  7. Investigation of the low-affinity oxidation site for exogenous electron donors in the Mn-depleted photosystem II complexes.

    PubMed

    Kurashov, V N; Lovyagina, E R; Shkolnikov, D Yu; Solntsev, M K; Mamedov, M D; Semin, B K

    2009-12-01

    In the manganese-depleted photosystem II (PSII[-Mn]) preparations, oxidation of exogenous electron donors is carried out through the high-affinity (HA) and the low-affinity (LA) sites. This paper investigates the LA oxidation site in the PSII(-Mn) preparations where the HA, Mn-binding site was blocked with ferric cations [[11] B.K. Semin, M.L. Ghirardi, M. Seibert, Blocking of electron donation by Mn(II) to Y(Z)(*) following incubation of Mn-depleted photosystem II membranes with Fe(II) in the light, Biochemistry 41 (2002) 5854-5864.]. In blocked (PSII[-Mn,+Fe]) preparations electron donation by Mn(II) cations to Y(Z)(*) was not detected at Mn(II) concentration 10 microM (corresponds to K(m) for Mn(II) oxidation at the HA site), but detected at Mn concentration 100 microM (corresponds to K(m) for the LA site) by fluorescence measurements. Comparison of pH-dependencies of electron donation by Mn(II) through the HA and the LA sites revealed the similar pK(a) equal to 6.8. Comparison of K(m) for diphenylcarbazide (DPC) oxidation at the LA site and K(d) for A(T) thermoluminescence band suppression by DPC in PSII(-Mn,+Fe) samples suggests that there is relationship between the LA site and A(T) band formation. The role of D1-His190 as an oxidant of exogenous electron donors at the LA site is discussed. In contrast to electrogenic electron transfer from Mn(II) at the HA site to Y(Z)(*), photovoltage due to Mn(II) oxidation in iron-blocked PSII(-Mn) core particles was not detected. PMID:19616503

  8. Biogenic concrete protection driven by the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP

    PubMed Central

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Wang, Jianyun; Ramos, Jose A.; Derluyn, Hannelore; Rahier, Hubert; Cnudde, Veerle; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Microbiologically Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) from the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP as an alternative process for concrete protection was investigated. MICP was induced on Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC), the model material, by immersing the material in 109 M. parvus cells mL−1 containing 5 g L−1 of calcium formate. A 2 days immersion of the material gave the maximum weight increase of the specimens (38 ± 19 mg) and this was likely due to the deposition of calcium carbonate, biomass, and unconverted calcium formate. The solid deposition mainly occurred in the micropores of the specimen, close to the outer surface. A significantly lower water absorption was observed in the bacterially treated specimens compared to the non-treated ones (up to 2.92 ± 0.91 kg m−2) and this could be attributed to the solid deposition. However, the sonication test demonstrated that the bacterial treatment did not give a consolidating effect to the material. Overall, compared to the currently employed urea hydrolysis process, the formate-based MICP by M. parvus offers a more environmentally friendly approach for the biotechnological application to protect concrete. PMID:26284061

  9. Biogenic concrete protection driven by the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP.

    PubMed

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Wang, Jianyun; Ramos, Jose A; Derluyn, Hannelore; Rahier, Hubert; Cnudde, Veerle; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Microbiologically Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) from the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP as an alternative process for concrete protection was investigated. MICP was induced on Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC), the model material, by immersing the material in 10(9) M. parvus cells mL(-1) containing 5 g L(-1) of calcium formate. A 2 days immersion of the material gave the maximum weight increase of the specimens (38 ± 19 mg) and this was likely due to the deposition of calcium carbonate, biomass, and unconverted calcium formate. The solid deposition mainly occurred in the micropores of the specimen, close to the outer surface. A significantly lower water absorption was observed in the bacterially treated specimens compared to the non-treated ones (up to 2.92 ± 0.91 kg m(-2)) and this could be attributed to the solid deposition. However, the sonication test demonstrated that the bacterial treatment did not give a consolidating effect to the material. Overall, compared to the currently employed urea hydrolysis process, the formate-based MICP by M. parvus offers a more environmentally friendly approach for the biotechnological application to protect concrete. PMID:26284061

  10. Molecular orbital (SCF-X-α-SW) theory of Fe2+-Mn3+, Fe3+-Mn2+, and Fe3+-Mn3+ charge transfer and magnetic exchange in oxides and silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Metal-metal charge-transfer and magnetic exchange interactions have important effects on the optical spectra, crystal chemistry, and physics of minerals. Previous molecular orbital calculations have provided insight on the nature of Fe2+-Fe3+ and Fe2+-Ti4+ charge-transfer transitions in oxides and silicates. In this work, spin-unrestricted molecular orbital calculations on (FeMnO10) clusters are used to study the nature of magnetic exchange and electron delocalization (charge transfer) associated with Fe3+-Mn2+, Fe3+-Mn3+, and Fe2+-Mn3+ interactions in oxides and silicates. 

  11. Effect of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Producing Bacteria on In vitro Rumen Fermentation, Biogenic Amine Production and Anti-oxidation Using Corn Meal as Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bum Seung; Mamuad, Lovelia L.; Kim, Seon-Ho; Jeong, Chang Dae; Soriano, Alvin P.; Lee, Ho-Il; Nam, Ki-Chang; Ha, Jong K.; Lee, Sang Suk

    2013-01-01

    The effects and significance of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) producing bacteria (GPB) on in vitro rumen fermentation and reduction of biogenic amines (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine, and tyramine) using corn meal as a substrate were determined. Ruminal samples collected from ruminally fistulated Holstein cows served as inoculum and corn was used as substrate at 2% dry matter (DM). Different inclusion rates of GPB and GABA were evaluated. After incubation, addition of GPB had no significant effect on in vitro fermentation pH and total gas production, but significantly increased the ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration and reduced the total biogenic amines production (p<0.05). Furthermore, antioxidation activity was improved as indicated by the significantly higher concentration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) among treated samples when compared to the control (p<0.05). Additionally, 0.2% GPB was established as the optimum inclusion level. Taken together, these results suggest the potential of utilizing GPB as feed additives to improve growth performance in ruminants by reducing biogenic amines and increasing anti-oxidation. PMID:25049853

  12. Thallium Isotopes Tracking Mn-Oxide Burial - A Proxy for Deoxygenation During Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrander, C.; Owens, J. D.; Nielsen, S.

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) is proving to be a useful paleoredox proxy given that the Tl isotope composition of seawater is highly dependent on the magnitude of manganese (Mn) oxide burial in the ocean. In turn, Mn oxides require oxygen at the sediment-water interface to precipitate, linking the Tl isotope cycle to ocean oxygenation. Currently, the marine residence time of Tl is ~20kyrs and the Tl isotope composition of seawater is invariant, which suggests Tl isotopes could be a global tracer of marine Mn-oxide burial. Importantly, recent research suggests sediments deposited under a euxinic water column faithfully record the Tl isotope value of the overlying oxic water column (e.g. Black Sea and Cariaco Basin). Therefore, analysis of organic-rich black shales may prove useful in evaluating the seawater Tl isotope composition of past oceans and, hence, large-scale burial of Mn-oxides and the extent of bottom water ocean oxygenation. A logical test for this proxy is during the well-studied Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event termed Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE-2) at ~94 Ma. It is known that the global extent of anoxia and euxinia increased during this event, however, to what extent global bottom water deoxygenation occured is unconstrained. If deep water deoxygenation occurred, it would be hypothesized that Mn-oxide precipitation would decrease, resulting in a positive Tl isotope excursion during OAE-2. We have analyzed the Tl isotope composition of organic-rich black shales from Site 1258 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) spanning the period before, during, and after OAE-2. Based on Fe redox proxies, the entire section is euxinic and thus no Mn-oxides are present (i.e. no local redox changes). Before the event, Tl isotope compositions are similar or slightly heavier than modern seawater values. Just prior to the onset of OAE-2, a positive shift occurs and is maintained until recovery, slightly before the termination of the event. The shift to heavier values and subsequent

  13. Promotion of Mn(II) Oxidation and Remediation of Coal Mine Drainage in Passive Treatment Systems by Diverse Fungal and Bacterial Communities ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Santelli, Cara M.; Pfister, Donald H.; Lazarus, Dana; Sun, Lu; Burgos, William D.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Biologically active, passive treatment systems are commonly employed for removing high concentrations of dissolved Mn(II) from coal mine drainage (CMD). Studies of microbial communities contributing to Mn attenuation through the oxidation of Mn(II) to sparingly soluble Mn(III/IV) oxide minerals, however, have been sparse to date. This study reveals a diverse community of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi and bacteria existing in several CMD treatment systems. PMID:20495049

  14. Catalytic combustion of chlorobenzene over Mn-Ce-La-O mixed oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dai; Xingyi, Wang; Dao, Li; Qiguang, Dai

    2011-04-15

    A series of Mn(x)-CeLa mixed oxide catalysts with different compositions prepared by sol-gel method were tested for the catalytic combustion of chlorobenzene (CB), as a model of chlorinated aromatics. Mn(x)-CeLa catalysts with the ratios of Mn/(Mn + Ce + La) in the range from 0.69 to 0.8 were found to possess high catalytic activity in the catalytic combustion of CB. The stability and deactivation of Mn(x)-CeLa catalysts were studied by other assistant experiments. Mn(x)-CeLa catalysts can deactivate below 330 °C, due to the strong adsorption of Cl species produced during the decomposition of CB. Nevertheless, the increase in oxygen concentration can enhance the resistance to Cl poisoning through the reaction of surface oxygen species with residual chlorine. At 350 °C, high activity, good selectivity and desired stability were observed over Mn(x)-CeLa catalysts. PMID:21320750

  15. Direct hydrothermal synthesis of ternary Li-Mn-O oxide ion-sieves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin-Hui; Sun, Shu-Ying; Li, Shao-Peng; Yin, Xian-Sheng; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2009-04-01

    Spinel-type ternary LiMn(2)O(4) oxide precursor was synthesized by direct hydrothermal synthesis of Mn(NO(3))(2), LiOH, and H(2)O(2) at 383 K for 8 h, a better technique for controlling the nanocrystalline structure with well-defined pore size distribution and high surface area than the traditional solid state reaction method. The final low-dimensional MnO(2) nanorod ion-sieve with a lithium ion selective adsorption property was further prepared by an acid treatment process to completely extract lithium ions from the Li-Mn-O lattice. The effects of hydrothermal reaction conditions on the nanostructure, chemical stability, and ion-exchange property of the LiMn(2)O(4) precursor and MnO(2) ion-sieve were systematically examined via powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and lithium ion selective adsorption measurements. The results show that this new kind of low-dimensional MnO(2) nanorod can be used for lithium extraction from aqueous environments, including brine, seawater, and waste water. PMID:19426343

  16. Manganese carbonates as possible biogenic relics in Archean settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón-Tomás, Blanca; Khonsari, Bahar; Mühlen, Dominik; Wickbold, Christian; Schäfer, Nadine; Hause-Reitner, Dorothea; Hoppert, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate minerals such as dolomite, kutnahorite or rhodochrosite are frequently, but not exclusively generated by microbial processes. In recent anoxic sediments, Mn(II)carbonate minerals (e.g. rhodochrosite, kutnahorite) derive mainly from the reduction of Mn(IV) compounds by anaerobic respiration. The formation of huge manganese-rich (carbonate) deposits requires effective manganese redox cycling in an oxygenated atmosphere. However, putative anaerobic pathways such as microbial nitrate-dependent manganese oxidation, anoxygenic photosynthesis and oxidation in ultraviolet light may facilitate manganese cycling even in an early Archean environment, without the availability of oxygen. In addition, manganese carbonates precipitate by microbially induced processes without change of the oxidation state, e.g. by pH shift. Hence, there are several ways how these minerals could have been formed biogenically and deposited in Precambrian sediments. We will summarize microbially induced manganese carbonate deposition in the presence and absence of atmospheric oxygen and we will make some considerations about the biogenic deposition of manganese carbonates in early Archean settings.

  17. Microwave synthesis and electrochemical characterization of Mn/Ni mixed oxide for supercapacitor application

    SciTech Connect

    Prasankumar, T.; Jose, Sujin P.; Ilangovan, R.; Venkatesh, K. S.

    2015-06-24

    Nanostructured Mn/Ni mixed metal oxide was synthesized at ambient temperature by facile microwave irradiation technique. The crystal structure and surface morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of Mn/Ni mixed oxide in rhombohedral phase and the grain size calculated was found to be 87 nm. The irregular spherical morphology of the prepared sample was exhibited by the SEM images. The characteristic peaks of FTIR at about 630 cm{sup −1} and 749 cm{sup −1} were attributed to the Mn-O and Ni-O stretching vibrations respectively. The presence of both Mn and Ni in the prepared sample was validated by the EDS spectra which in turn confirmed the formation of mixed oxide. Cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic chargedischarge measurements were employed to investigate the electrochemical performance of the mixed oxide. The cyclic voltammetry curves demonstrated good capacitive performance of the sample in the potential window −0.2V to 0.9V. The charge discharge study revealed the suitability of the prepared mixed oxide for the fabrication of supercapacitor electrode.

  18. Design and Preparation of MnO2/CeO2-MnO2 Double-Shelled Binary Oxide Hollow Spheres and Their Application in CO Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Cao, Yidan; Wang, Chang-An; Ran, Rui

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we designed an extremely facile method to prepare well-defined MnO2@CeO2-MnO2 ball-in-ball binary oxide hollow spheres by employing carbon spheres (CSs) as sacrificial templates. The synthesis process involves a novel self-assembled approach to prepare core-shell CSs@CeO2 precursor, which would directly react with KMnO4 aqueous solution to form yolk-shell CSs@MnO2/CeO2-MnO2 precursor in the following step. Well-dispersed Ce-Mn binary oxide with double-shelled hollow sphere structure could be achieved after annealing the precursor in air. The evolution process and formation mechanism of this novel structure were thoroughly studied in this paper. Especially the as-prepared double-shell MnO2/CeO2-MnO2 hollow spheres exhibited enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation compared with the pure MnO2 hollow spheres and pure CeO2 hollow spheres. We believe the high surface area, hierarchical porous structures, and strong synergistic interaction between CeO2 and MnO2 contribute to the excellent catalytic activity. Most importantly, this method could be extended to prepare other transition metal oxides. As an example, triple-shelled Co-Mn composite hollow spheres assembled by ultrathin nanoplates were successfully prepared. PMID:26998672

  19. Identification of a Two-Component Regulatory Pathway Essential for Mn(II) Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1▿

    PubMed Central

    Geszvain, Kati; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial manganese(II) oxidation has a profound impact on the biogeochemical cycling of Mn and the availability of the trace metals adsorbed to the surfaces of solid Mn(III, IV) oxides. The Mn(II) oxidase enzyme was tentatively identified in Pseudomonas putida GB-1 via transposon mutagenesis: the mutant strain GB-1-007, which fails to oxidize Mn(II), harbors a transposon insertion in the gene cumA. cumA encodes a putative multicopper oxidase (MCO), a class of enzymes implicated in Mn(II) oxidation in other bacterial species. However, we show here that an in-frame deletion of cumA did not affect Mn(II) oxidation. Through complementation analysis of the oxidation defect in GB-1-007 with a cosmid library and subsequent sequencing of candidate genes we show the causative mutation to be a frameshift within the mnxS1 gene that encodes a putative sensor histidine kinase. The frameshift mutation results in a truncated protein lacking the kinase domain. Multicopy expression of mnxS1 restored Mn(II) oxidation to GB-1-007 and in-frame deletion of mnxS1 resulted in a loss of oxidation in the wild-type strain. These results clearly demonstrated that the oxidation defect of GB-1-007 is due to disruption of mnxS1, not cumA::Tn5, and that CumA is not the Mn(II) oxidase. mnxS1 is located upstream of a second sensor histidine kinase gene, mnxS2, and a response regulator gene, mnxR. In-frame deletions of each of these genes also led to the loss of Mn(II) oxidation. Therefore, we conclude that the MnxS1/MnxS2/MnxR two-component regulatory pathway is essential for Mn(II) oxidation in P. putida GB-1. PMID:20038702

  20. Manganese Oxides: Parallels between Abiotic and Biotic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Saratovksy, Ian; Wightman, Peter G.; Pasten, Pablo A.; Gaillard, Jean-Francois; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    2008-10-06

    A large number of microorganisms are responsible for the oxidation of Mn{sub (aq)}{sup 2+} to insoluble Mn{sup 3+/4+} oxides (MnO{sub x}) in natural aquatic systems. This paper reports the structure of the biogenic MnO{sub x}, including a quantitative analysis of cation vacancies, formed by the freshwater bacterium Leptothrix discophora SP6 (SP6-MnO{sub x}). The structure and the morphology of SP6-MnO{sub x} were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), including full multiple-scattering analysis, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The biogenic precipitate consists of nanoparticles that are approximately 10 nm by 100 nm in dimension with a fibrillar morphology that resembles twisted sheets. The results demonstrate that this biogenic MnO{sub x} is composed of sheets of edge-sharing of Mn{sup 4+}O{sub 6} octahedra that form layers. The detailed analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicate that 12 {+-} 4% of the Mn{sup 4+} layer cation sites in SP6-MnO{sub x} are vacant, whereas the analysis of the XANES suggests that the average oxidation state of Mn is 3.8 {+-} 0.3. Therefore, the average chemical formula of SP6-MnO{sub x} is Mn{sub y}{sup n+}Mn{sub 0.12}{sup 3+}[{open_square}{sub 0.12}Mn{sub 0.88}{sup 4+}]O{sub 2} {center_dot} zH{sub 2}O, where M{sub y}{sup n+} represents hydrated interlayer cations, {open_square}{sub 0.12} represents Mn{sup 4+} cation vacancies within the layer, and Mn{sub 0.12}{sup 3+} represents hydrated cations that occupy sites above/below these cation vacancies.

  1. EMISSIONS OF BIOGENIC OXIDANT AND PM PRECURSORS: VERY HIGH REACTIVITY VOCS AND SURFACE LAYER CHEMISTRY ABOVE FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) -- chemicals emitted naturally by the green foliage of a forest, for example -- have been repeatedly shown to be important contributors to ozone pollution levels in many parts of the country. Recently, both the National Rese...

  2. EMISSIONS OF BIOGENIC OXIDANT AND PM PRECURSORS- VERY HIGH REACTIVITY VOCS AND SURFACE LAYER CHEMISTRY ABOVE FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent analysis of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has found that significant portions of the organic matter contained therein are of biogenic origin. Radiocarbon (C-14) measurements of the bulk organic matter in fine particles collected near Nashville, TN, found that 40...

  3. Oxidation Characteristics of Fe–18Cr–18Mn-Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James

    2010-10-01

    Air oxidation studies of Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steels were conducted at 525°C, 625°C, and 725°C. Alloys were evaluated with respect to changes in oxidation properties as a result of interstitial additions of nitrogen and carbon and of minor solute additions of silicon, molybdenum, and nickel. Interstitial concentrations possibly had a small, positive effect on oxidation resistance. Minor solute additions significantly improved oxidation resistance but could also reduce interstitial solubility resulting in formation of chromium carbides. Loss of solute chromium resulted in a slight reduction in oxidation protection. Oxidation lasting over 500 hours produced a manganese rich, duplex oxide structure: an outer sesquioxide and an inner spinel oxide.

  4. Magnetic properties of Mn-oxide nanoparticles dispersed in an amorphous SiO2 matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milivojević, D.; Babić-Stojić, B.; Jokanović, V.; Jagličić, Z.; Makovec, D.

    2011-03-01

    Samples of Mn-oxide nanoparticles dispersed in an amorphous SiO2 matrix with manganese concentration 0.7 and 3 at% have been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Transmission electron microscopy analysis has shown that the samples contain agglomerates of amorphous silica particles 10-20 nm in size. In silica matrix two types of Mn-rich particles are dispersed, smaller nanoparticles with dimensions between 3 and 10 nm, and larger crystalline areas consisting of aggregates of the smaller nanoparticles. High-temperature magnetic susceptibility study reveals that dominant magnetic phase at higher temperatures is λ-MnO2. At temperatures below TC=43 K strong ferrimagnetism originating from the minor Mn3O4 phase masks the relatively weak magnetism of λ-MnO2 with antiferromagnetic interactions. Magnetic field dependence of the maximum in the zero-field-cooled magnetization for both the samples in the vicinity of 40 K, and a frequency shift of the real component of the ac magnetic susceptibility in the sample with 3 at% Mn suggest that the magnetic moments of the smaller Mn3O4 nanoparticles with dimensions below 10 nm are exposed to thermally activated blocking process just below the Curie temperature TC. Appearance of a maximum in the zero-field-cooled magnetization for both the samples below 10 K indicates possible spin glass freezing of the magnetic moments at low temperatures which might occur in the geometrically frustrated Mn sublattice of the λ-MnO2 crystal structure.

  5. Preparation of a novel graphene oxide/Fe-Mn composite and its application for aqueous Hg(II) removal.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingchun; Huang, Yao; Gong, Yanyan; Lyu, Honghong; Wang, Qilin; Ma, Jianli

    2016-10-01

    A novel graphene oxide/Fe-Mn (GO/Fe-Mn) composite was synthesized (molar ratio of Fe/Mn=3/1 and mass ratio of Fe/GO=1/7.5) and investigated for the sorption characteristics and mechanisms of aqueous mercury (Hg(2+)) as well as the biological effects to wheat and rice. Characterization tests showed that Fe-Mn oxides were impregnated onto GO sheets in an amorphous form through oxygen-containing functional groups (i.e., CO, epoxy COC, carboxyl OCO, and CO) and π-π interactions. GO/Fe-Mn possessed large surface area, surface enhanced Raman scattering with more sp(3) defects, and greater thermal stability than GO. XPS analysis revealed that Fe2O3, FeOOH, MnO2, MnOOH, and MnO were the dominant metal oxides in GO/Fe-Mn. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Sips isotherm model fitted well with the sorption kinetic and isotherm data. The maximum sorption capacity for mercury was 32.9mg/g. Ligand exchange and surface complexation were the dominant mechanisms for mercury removal. GO/Fe-Mn greatly reduced the bioavailability of mercury to wheat and rice, even promoted the seedling growth. This work suggests that GO/Fe-Mn can be used as an effective and environmental-friendly adsorbent in heavy metal remediation. PMID:27232726

  6. Barley beta-glucan promotes MnSOD expression and enhances angiogenesis under oxidative microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Silvia; Chiavacci, Elena; Matteucci, Marco; Torelli, Michele; Pitto, Letizia; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a foremost antioxidant enzyme, plays a key role in angiogenesis. Barley-derived (1.3) β-d-glucan (β-d-glucan) is a natural water-soluble polysaccharide with antioxidant properties. To explore the effects of β-d-glucan on MnSOD-related angiogenesis under oxidative stress, we tested epigenetic mechanisms underlying modulation of MnSOD level in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Long-term treatment of HUVECs with 3% w/v β-d-glucan significantly increased the level of MnSOD by 200% ± 2% compared to control and by 50% ± 4% compared to untreated H2O2-stressed cells. β-d-glucan-treated HUVECs displayed greater angiogenic ability. In vivo, 24 hrs-treatment with 3% w/v β-d-glucan rescued vasculogenesis in Tg (kdrl: EGFP) s843Tg zebrafish embryos exposed to oxidative microenvironment. HUVECs overexpressing MnSOD demonstrated an increased activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), reduced load of superoxide anion (O2−) and an increased survival under oxidative stress. In addition, β-d-glucan prevented the rise of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)1-α under oxidative stress. The level of histone H4 acetylation was significantly increased by β-d-glucan. Increasing histone acetylation by sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs I), did not activate MnSOD-related angiogenesis and did not impair β-d-glucan effects. In conclusion, 3% w/v β-d-glucan activates endothelial expression of MnSOD independent of histone acetylation level, thereby leading to adequate removal of O2−, cell survival and angiogenic response to oxidative stress. The identification of dietary β-d-glucan as activator of MnSOD-related angiogenesis might lead to the development of nutritional approaches for the prevention of ischemic remodelling and heart failure. PMID:25388628

  7. A possible evolutionary origin for the Mn4 cluster of the photosynthetic water oxidation complex from natural MnO2 precipitates in the early ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-04-30

    The photosynthetic water oxidation complex consists of a cluster of 4 Mn atoms bridged by O atoms, associated with Ca2+ and Cl- and incorporated into protein. The structure is similar in higher plants and algae, as well as in cyanobacteria of more ancient lineage, dating back more than 2.5 Ga on Earth. It has been proposed that the proto-enzyme derived from a component of a natural early marine manganese precipitate that contained a CaMn4O9 cluster. A variety of MnO2 minerals is found in nature. Three major classes are spinels, sheet-like layered structures and 3-dimensional networks that contain parallel tunnels. These relatively open structures readily incorporate cations (Na+, Li+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, H+ and even Mn2+) and water. The minerals have different ratios of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) octahedrally coordinated to oxygens. Using X-ray spectroscopy we compare the chemical structures of Mn in the minerals with what is known about the arrangement in the water-oxidation complex to define the parameters of a structural model for the photosynthetic catalytic site. This comparison provides for the structural model a set of candidate Mn4 clusters -- some previously proposed and considered and others entirely novel.

  8. An uncertain role for Cu(II) in stimulating Mn(II) oxidation by Leptothrix discophora SS-1.

    PubMed

    El Gheriany, Iman A; Bocioaga, Daniela; Hay, Anthony G; Ghiorse, William C; Shuler, Michael L; Lion, Leonard W

    2011-02-01

    In an effort to improve understanding of the role of Cu(II) in bacterial Mn(II) oxidation, a model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Leptothrix discophora SS-1, was grown in presence of toxic and non-toxic concentrations of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II). Mn(II)-oxidizing activity increased by 40% when cells were grown in the presence of 0.05 microM of Cu(II) and increased twofold at 0.18 microM Cu(II). Toxic levels of Cd(II) did not stimulate Mn(II) oxidizing activity, indicating that Mn(II) oxidation is not a response to metal toxicity. Stimulation by Cu(II) confirms the specific role of Cu(II) in Mn(II) oxidation. Comparison of transcript levels of the multicopper oxidase mofA gene in the presence and absence of added Cu(II) do not indicate a statistically significant change in mofA transcript levels in cultures supplemented with Cu(II). Thus, the exact role of Cu(II) in Mn(II) oxidation and its affect on mofA gene expression remain uncertain. PMID:21063867

  9. Surface and Structural Investigation of a MnOx Birnessite-Type Water Oxidation Catalyst Formed under Photocatalytic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Deibert, Benjamin J; Zhang, Jingming; Smith, Paul F; Chapman, Karena W; Rangan, Sylvie; Banerjee, Debasis; Tan, Kui; Wang, Hao; Pasquale, Nicholas; Chen, Feng; Lee, Ki-Bum; Dismukes, G Charles; Chabal, Yves J; Li, Jing

    2015-09-28

    Catalytically active MnOx species have been reported to form in situ from various Mn-complexes during electrocatalytic and solution-based water oxidation when employing cerium(IV) ammonium ammonium nitrate (CAN) oxidant as a sacrificial reagent. The full structural characterization of these oxides may be complicated by the presence of support material and lack of a pure bulk phase. For the first time, we show that highly active MnOx catalysts form without supports in situ under photocatalytic conditions. Our most active (4)MnOx catalyst (∼0.84 mmol O2  mol Mn(-1) s(-1)) forms from a Mn4O4 bearing a metal-organic framework. (4)MnOx is characterized by pair distribution function analysis (PDF), Raman spectroscopy, and HR-TEM as a disordered, layered Mn-oxide with high surface area (216 m(2) g(-1)) and small regions of crystallinity and layer flexibility. In contrast, the (S)MnOx formed from Mn(2+) salt gives an amorphous species of lower surface area (80 m(2) g(-1)) and lower activity (∼0.15 mmol O2  mol Mn(-1) s(-1)). We compare these catalysts to crystalline hexagonal birnessite, which activates under the same conditions. Full deconvolution of the XPS Mn2p3/2 core levels detects enriched Mn(3+) and Mn(2+) content on the surfaces, which indicates possible disproportionation/comproportionation surface equilibria. PMID:26263021

  10. SERUM CHEMISTRIES OF COTURNIX JAPONICA GIVEN DIETARY MANGANESE OXIDE (MN3O4)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma creatinine and inorganic phosphorus were increased in manganese oxide (Mn3O4)-treated adult male Coturnix quail, but BUN, BUN/creatinine ratio, uric acid, and total calcium were decreased. 2. Serum enzymes (alkaline phosphatase glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic p...