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Sample records for bioimpedance estimation theoretical

  1. Effects of Intense Physical Activity with Free Water Replacement on Bioimpedance Parameters and Body Fluid Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, E. B.; Ulbricht, L.; Krueger, E.; Romaneli, E. F. R.; Souza, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    Authors have emphasized the need for previous care in order to perform reliable bioimpedance acquisition. Despite of this need some authors have reported that intense physical training has little effect on Bioimpedance Analysis (BIA), while other ones have observed significant effects on bioimpedance parameters in the same condition, leading to body composition estimates considered incompatible with human physiology. The aim of this work was to quantify the changes in bioimpedance parameters, as well as in body fluids estimates by BIA, after four hours of intense physical activity with free water replacement in young males. Xitron Hydra 4200 equipment was used to acquire bioimpedance data before and immediately after the physical training. After data acquisition body fluids were estimates from bioimpedance parameters. Height and weight of all subjects were also acquired to the nearest 0.1 cm and 0.1 kg, respectively. Results point that among the bioimpedance parameter, extracellular resistance presented the most coherent behavior, leading to reliable estimates of the extracellular fluid and part of the total body water. Results also show decreases in height and weight of the participants, which were associated to the decrease in body hydration and in intervertebral discs.

  2. Lead field theoretical approach in bioimpedance measurements: towards more controlled measurement sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P K; Hyttinen, J A; Kööbi, T; Malmivuo, J

    1999-04-20

    This study was conducted to demonstrate the potentiality of lead field theoretical approach in analyzing bioimpedance (BI) measurements. Anatomically accurate computer models and the lead field theory were used to develop BI measurement configurations capable of detecting more localized BI changes in the human body. The methods were applied to assess the measurement properties of conventional impedance cardiography (ICG) and such BI measurement configurations as can be derived using (i) the 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) and (ii) the international 10-20 electroencephalography (EEG) electrode systems. Information as to how various electrode configurations are sensitive to detecting conductivity changes in different tissues and organs was thus obtained. Theoretical results with the 12-lead system suggested that, compared to conventional ICGs, significantly more selective ICG configurations can be derived for cardiovascular structures. In addition to theoretical investigations, clinical test measurements were made with the 12-lead system to establish whether characteristic waveforms are available. Sensitivity distributions obtained with the 10-20 electrode system give promise of the possibility of monitoring noninvasively cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) impedance changes related to impending epileptic seizures. PMID:10372161

  3. CAP waveform estimation from the measured electrical bioimpedance values: Patient's heart rate variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Krivoshei, A; Uuetoa, H; Min, M; Annus, P; Uuetoa, T; Lamp, J

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents analysis of the generic transfer function (TF) between Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) measured non-invasively on the wrist and Central Aortic Pressure (CAP) invasively measured at the aortic root. Influence of the Heart Rate (HR) variations on the generic TF and on reconstructed CAP waveforms is investigated. The HR variation analysis is provided on a single patient data to exclude inter-patient influences at the current research stage. A new approach for the generic TF estimating from a data ensemble is presented as well. Moreover, an influence of the cardiac period beginning point selection is analyzed and empirically optimal solution for its selection is proposed. PMID:26736870

  4. Estimation of limb adiposity by bioimpedance spectroscopy in lymphoedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, L. C.; Essex, T.; Gaw, R.; Czerniec, S.; Dylke, E.; Abell, B.; Kilbreath, S. L.

    2013-04-01

    Lymphoedema is a chronic debilitating condition that may occur in approximately 25% of women treated for breast cancer. As the condition progresses, accumulated lymph fluid becomes fibrotic with infiltration of adipose tissue. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy is the preferred method for early detection of lymphoedema based on the measurement of impedance of extracellular fluid. The present study assessed whether these impedance measurements could also be used to estimate the adipose tissue content of the arm based on a model previously used to predict whole body composition. Estimates of arm adipose tissue in a cohort of women with lymphoedema were found to be highly correlated (r > 0.82) with measurements of adipose tissue obtained using the reference method of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Paired t-tests confirmed that there was no significant difference between the adipose tissue volumes obtained by the two methods. These results support the view that the method shows promise for the estimation of arm adiposity in lymphoedema.

  5. Towards an accurate bioimpedance identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, B.; Louarroudi, E.; Bragos, R.; Pintelon, R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the local polynomial method (LPM) for estimating the time-invariant bioimpedance frequency response function (FRF) considering both the output-error (OE) and the errors-in-variables (EIV) identification framework and compare it with the traditional cross— and autocorrelation spectral analysis techniques. The bioimpedance FRF is measured with the multisine electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. To show the overwhelming accuracy of the LPM approach, both the LPM and the classical cross— and autocorrelation spectral analysis technique are evaluated through the same experimental data coming from a nonsteady-state measurement of time-varying in vivo myocardial tissue. The estimated error sources at the measurement frequencies due to noise, σnZ, and the stochastic nonlinear distortions, σZNL, have been converted to Ω and plotted over the bioimpedance spectrum for each framework. Ultimately, the impedance spectra have been fitted to a Cole impedance model using both an unweighted and a weighted complex nonlinear least square (CNLS) algorithm. A table is provided with the relative standard errors on the estimated parameters to reveal the importance of which system identification frameworks should be used.

  6. The Theory and Fundamentals of Bioimpedance Analysis in Clinical Status Monitoring and Diagnosis of Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Sami F.; Mohktar, Mas S.; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Bioimpedance analysis is a noninvasive, low cost and a commonly used approach for body composition measurements and assessment of clinical condition. There are a variety of methods applied for interpretation of measured bioimpedance data and a wide range of utilizations of bioimpedance in body composition estimation and evaluation of clinical status. This paper reviews the main concepts of bioimpedance measurement techniques including the frequency based, the allocation based, bioimpedance vector analysis and the real time bioimpedance analysis systems. Commonly used prediction equations for body composition assessment and influence of anthropometric measurements, gender, ethnic groups, postures, measurements protocols and electrode artifacts in estimated values are also discussed. In addition, this paper also contributes to the deliberations of bioimpedance analysis assessment of abnormal loss in lean body mass and unbalanced shift in body fluids and to the summary of diagnostic usage in different kinds of conditions such as cardiac, pulmonary, renal, and neural and infection diseases. PMID:24949644

  7. BMI and an Anthropometry-Based Estimate of Fat Mass Percentage Are Both Valid Discriminators of Cardiometabolic Risk: A Comparison with DXA and Bioimpedance

    PubMed Central

    Völgyi, Eszter; Savonen, Kai; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Alén, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether categories of obesity based on BMI and an anthropometry-based estimate of fat mass percentage (FM% equation) have similar discriminative ability for markers of cardiometabolic risk as measurements of FM% by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) or bioimpedance analysis (BIA). Design and Methods. A study of 40–79-year-old male (n = 205) and female (n = 388) Finns. Weight, height, blood pressure, triacylglycerols, HDL cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose were measured. Body composition was assessed by DXA and BIA and a FM%-equation. Results. For grade 1 hypertension, dyslipidaemia, and impaired fasting glucose >6.1 mmol/L, the categories of obesity as defined by BMI and the FM% equation had 1.9% to 3.7% (P < 0.01) higher discriminative power compared to DXA. For grade 2 hypertension the FM% equation discriminated 1.2% (P = 0.05) lower than DXA and 2.8% (P < 0.01) lower than BIA. Receiver operation characteristics confirmed BIA as best predictor of grade 2 hypertension and the FM% equation as best predictor of grade 1 hypertension. All other differences in area under curve were small (≤0.04) and 95% confidence intervals included 0. Conclusions. Both BMI and FM% equations may predict cardiometabolic risk with similar discriminative ability as FM% measured by DXA or BIA. PMID:24455216

  8. Sound velocity estimation: A system theoretic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1993-07-30

    A system-theoretic approach is proposed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing a sound velocity profile (SVP) from acoustical hydrophone measurements. This problem is based on a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model. It is shown that this representation can be utilized to investigate the so-called observability of the SVP from noisy measurement data. A model-based processor is developed to extract this information and it is shown that even in cases where limited SVP information is available, the SVP can be estimated using this approach.

  9. Theoretical uncertainties in proton lifetime estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolešová, Helena; Malinský, Michal; Mede, Timon

    2016-06-01

    We recapitulate the primary sources of theoretical uncertainties in proton lifetime estimates in renormalizable, four-dimensional & non-supersymmetric grand unifications that represent the most conservative framework in which this question may be addressed at the perturbative level. We point out that many of these uncertainties are so severe and often even irreducible that there are only very few scenarios in which an NLO approach, as crucial as it is for a real testability of any specific model, is actually sensible. Among these, the most promising seems to be the minimal renormalizable SO(10) GUT whose high-energy gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken by the adjoint and the five-index antisymmetric irreducible representations.

  10. Theoretical Estimate of Maximum Possible Nuclear Explosion

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bethe, H. A.

    1950-01-31

    The maximum nuclear accident which could occur in a Na-cooled, Be moderated, Pu and power producing reactor is estimated theoretically. (T.R.H.) 2O82 Results of nuclear calculations for a variety of compositions of fast, heterogeneous, sodium-cooled, U-235-fueled, plutonium- and power-producing reactors are reported. Core compositions typical of plate-, pin-, or wire-type fuel elements and with uranium as metal, alloy, and oxide were considered. These compositions included atom ratios in the following range: U-23B to U-235 from 2 to 8; sodium to U-235 from 1.5 to 12; iron to U-235 from 5 to 18; and vanadium to U-235 from 11 to 33. Calculations were performed to determine the effect of lead and iron reflectors between the core and blanket. Both natural and depleted uranium were evaluated as the blanket fertile material. Reactors were compared on a basis of conversion ratio, specific power, and the product of both. The calculated results are in general agreement with the experimental results from fast reactor assemblies. An analysis of the effect of new cross-section values as they became available is included. (auth)

  11. Electromagnetic holographic imaging of bioimpedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Dexter G.; Ko, Harvey W.; Lee, Benjamin R.; Partin, Alan W.

    1998-05-01

    The electromagnetic bioimpedance method has successfully measured the very subtle conductivity changes associated with brain edema and prostate tumor. This method provides noninvasive measurements using non-ionizing magnetic fields applied with a small coil that avoids the use of contact electrodes. This paper introduces results from combining a holographic signal processing algorithm and a low power coil system that helps provide the 3D image of impedance contrast that should make the noninvasive electromagnetic bioimpedance method useful in health care.

  12. Potential benefits of remote sensing: Theoretical framework and empirical estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisgruber, L. M.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical framwork is outlined for estimating social returns from research and application of remote sensing. The approximate dollar magnitude is given of a particular application of remote sensing, namely estimates of corn production, soybeans, and wheat. Finally, some comments are made on the limitations of this procedure and on the implications of results.

  13. Modeling sleep apnea severity using bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Gavrilovic, Bojan; Popovic, Milos R; Yadollahi, Azadeh

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder in adults characterized by repetitive collapse of the pharynx. OSA prevalence increases in fluid retaining patients such as those with heart or renal failure, and worsens with overnight fluid accumulation in the neck. The objective of this study was to develop a new method of measuring changes in intracellular water (ICW) in the neck, and investigate metrics that represent total neck impedance and their relationship to sleep apnea severity. In 18 non-obese men, neck fluid volume (NFV) was measured before and after sleep using bioelectrical impedance at 50 kHz. For each participant, resistance and reactance was extracted from the impedance measurements. A model was developed to estimate the cell membrane capacitance which could represent changes in intracellular fluid in the neck. OSA severity was assessed using polysomnography to estimate the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) as well as the obstructive AHI (OAHI). Our results showed a strong correlation between the changes in NFV from before to after sleep with the changes in cell membrane capacitance from before to after sleep, indicating an increase in ICW in the neck during sleep. Using linear stepwise regression we were also able to develop models to accurately predict AHI and OAHI using baseline anthropometric and bioimpedance measurements. These promising results demonstrate that non-invasive measurements of bioimpedance can be used to develop a novel biomarker to model sleep apnea severity, and assess patients at high risk of OSA. PMID:26737658

  14. Bioimpedance spectroscopy in haemodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MCullagh, W. A.; Ward, L. C.

    2010-04-01

    Venous insufficiency is estimated to affect between 10% and 35% of the population in the US with symptoms ranging from mild discomfort to chronic ulceration which may reduce quality of life. Early diagnosis is the key to pre-emptive treatment. We have previously reported [5] an impedance technique for measurement of calf muscle pump function although it was noted that the results could be confounded by change in limb geometry during the exercise protocol. We report here a modified protocol to account for change in limb geometry. Impedance of a 20 cm segment of the calf was continuously recorded using an SFB7 bioimpedance spectrometer whilst subjects performed a sequence of manoeuvres: a) supine with leg raised (for 10 min); b) standing (4 s); c) plantar flexion (tiptoe, 4 s); d) standing elevated on one leg removing tension on the measured leg with the foot horizontal (4 s); e) with the leg relaxed (4 s) and then the sequence repeated. The impedance ratio, k = (e-d)/(c-b), was the proportion of the impedance change, occurring during calf muscle pumping, due primarily to change in limb shape only, i.e. independent of the impedance change due to ejection of blood as a function of calf muscle pump action. Thus (1-k) can be used to correct the ejection fraction (%) calculated as (c-b)/(a-b)*100 for the confounding effect of change in limb geometry. Ejection fractions calculated by this method in 10 control subjects were 51.5 ± 30.1% with no values greater than 100% as found previously.

  15. Small Sample Effects on Information-Theoretic Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Andrew; Tracy, Eugene; Weaver, Dennis

    2001-10-01

    Symbolic time-series methods have received some significant attention recently due to their robustness to noise, numerical efficiency, and ability to use low-resolution sensor data. Given a symbolic time-series, one often proceeds to estimate information-theoretic quantities as measures of information content (Shannon Entropy), correlation between two symbolic processes (Mutual Information), and information transfer (transfer entropy[1]). If the dynamical system under study is weakly non-stationary, or the real-time monitoring of the system requires rapid decision making (e.g. early detection of a plasma instability for control purposes), then the amount of symbolic data in the observation window will be severely restricted. In this poster, we examine the problem of estimating these information-theoretic quantities using limited samples of data. 9 s T. Schreiber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 461 (2000) thebibliography

  16. Some Basic Techniques in Bioimpedance Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsen, Ørjan G.

    2004-09-01

    Any physiological or anatomical changes in a biological material will also change its electrical properties. Hence, bioimpedance measurements can be used for diagnosing or classification of tissue. Applications are numerous within medicine, biology, cosmetics, food industry, sports, etc, and different basic approaches for the development of bioimpedance techniques are discussed in this paper.

  17. Estimating the theoretical semivariogram from finite numbers of measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Lingyun; Silliman, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate from a theoretical basis the impacts of the number, location, and correlation among measurement points on the quality of an estimate of the semivariogram. The unbiased nature of the semivariogram estimator ??/(r) is first established for a general random process Z(x). The variance of ??z(r) is then derived as a function of the sampling parameters (the number of measurements and their locations). In applying this function to the case of estimating the semivariograms of the transmissivity and the hydraulic head field, it is shown that the estimation error depends on the number of the data pairs, the correlation among the data pairs (which, in turn, are determined by the form of the underlying semivariogram ??(r)), the relative locations of the data pairs, and the separation distance at which the semivariogram is to be estimated. Thus design of an optimal sampling program for semivariogram estimation should include consideration of each of these factors. Further, the function derived for the variance of ??z(r) is useful in determining the reliability of a semivariogram developed from a previously established sampling design.

  18. Bioimpedance spectroscopy as technique of hematological and biochemical analysis of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malahov, M. V.; Smirnov, A. V.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Melnikov, A. A.; Vikulov, A. D.

    2010-04-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy may become a useful method for the express analysis and monitoring of blood parameters. The aim of this study was to identify biochemical and hematological parameters of blood that can be accurately predicted by means of bioimpedance technique. Hematological (red blood cell and white blood cell parameters) and biochemical (total proteins, albumins, fibrinogen, sodium, potassium, chloride ion concentrations in plasma) parameters were measured with a hematological analyzer and routine methods. Bioimpedance spectroscopy of the whole blood (1.5 ml) in frequency range 5-500 kHz (31 frequencies) was performed using BIA analyzer ABC-01 "Medass". Frequency relationships of resistance and reactance of the whole blood and the parameters of the Cole model were investigated. Close simple and multiple correlations of bioimpedance indices were observed only with erythrocyte parameters (Ht, Hb, RBC). Thus bioimpedance analysis of the whole blood can accurately predict red cell parameters but it is less effective for estimation of plasma biochemical and white cell parameters.

  19. On theoretical pricing of options with fuzzy estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysafis, Konstantinos A.; Papadopoulos, Basil K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an application of a new method of constructing fuzzy estimators for the parameters of a given probability distribution function, using statistical data. This application belongs to the financial field and especially to the section of financial engineering. In financial markets there are great fluctuations, thus the element of vagueness and uncertainty is frequent. This application concerns Theoretical Pricing of Options and in particular the Black and Scholes Options Pricing formula. We make use of fuzzy estimators for the volatility of stock returns and we consider the stock price as a symmetric triangular fuzzy number. Furthermore we apply the Black and Scholes formula by using adaptive fuzzy numbers introduced by Thiagarajah et al. [K. Thiagarajah, S.S. Appadoo, A. Thavaneswaran, Option valuation model with adaptive fuzzy numbers, Computers and Mathematics with Applications 53 (2007) 831-841] for the stock price and the volatility and we replace the fuzzy volatility and the fuzzy stock price by possibilistic mean value. We refer to both cases of call and put option prices according to the Black & Scholes model and also analyze the results to Greek parameters. Finally, a numerical example is presented for both methods and a comparison is realized based on the results.

  20. Frequency Synchronization Analysis in Digital lock-in Methods for Bio-impedance Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brajkovič, Robert; Žagar, Tomaž; Križaj, Dejan

    2014-12-01

    The lock-in method is one of the most frequently used methods for reconstruction of measured signals and as such frequently applied in the (bio)impedance method to determine the modulus and phase of the (bio)impedance. In implementation of the method in a (bio)impedance measurement device one has to consider possible non synchronized frequencies of the reference and the analyzed signals as well as potential sources of noise. In this work we analyzed these errors theoretically and experimentally. We show that both amplitude and phase errors depend on the relative difference of the frequencies of the reference and investigated signal as well as the number of integration periods. Theoretically, these errors vanish during the determination of the (bio)impedance modulus and phase. In practical implementation the inaccuracies appear at points of very low determined signal amplitudes due to the limited accuracy of analog to digital converters and are distributed around these points due to other sources of noise inherent in implementation of the measurement device.

  1. Electrical Bioimpedance-Controlled Surgical Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Brendle, Christian; Rein, Benjamin; Niesche, Annegret; Korff, Alexander; Radermacher, Klaus; Misgeld, Berno; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    A bioimpedance-controlled concept for bone cement milling during revision total hip replacement is presented. Normally, the surgeon manually removes bone cement using a hammer and chisel. However, this procedure is relatively rough and unintended harm may occur to tissue at any time. The proposed bioimpedance-controlled surgical instrumentation improves this process because, for example, most risks associated with bone cement removal are avoided. The electrical bioimpedance measurements enable online process-control by using the milling head as both a cutting tool and measurement electrode at the same time. Furthermore, a novel integrated surgical milling tool is introduced, which allows acquisition of electrical bioimpedance data for online control; these data are used as a process variable. Process identification is based on finite element method simulation and on experimental studies with a rapid control prototyping system. The control loop design includes the identified process model, the characterization of noise as being normally distributed and the filtering, which is necessary for sufficient accuracy ( ±0.5 mm). Also, in a comparative study, noise suppression is investigated in silico with a moving average filter and a Kalman filter. Finally, performance analysis shows that the bioimpedance-controlled surgical instrumentation may also performs effectively at a higher feed rate (e.g., 5 mm/s). PMID:25423656

  2. Bioimpedance can solve problems of fluid overload.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Samer R; Zhu, Fansan; Levin, Nathan W

    2015-03-01

    Bioimpedance (BI) techniques for measuring normal hydration status (NHS) can be generally classified as (1) by frequency as single frequency at 50 kHz, BI analysis, and multifrequency BI spectroscopy and (2) by method as whole body (wrist to ankle) measurement and calf BI spectroscopy. The aim of this article was to review current BI methods for clinical practice in patients with end-stage of kidney disease. BI vector analysis using whole-body single-frequency BI at 50 kHz may be useful for population studies to indicate a range of degree of fluid loading and of nutritional status. Whole body multifrequency BI spectroscopy is used to estimate extracellular (ECV), intracellular fluid volume, and total body water in dialysis patients. The whole-body BI model is used in the body composition monitor (BCM). The whole-body BI model is established with ECV, intracellular fluid volume, and body weight based on parameters from regression analysis in healthy subjects to calculate fluid overload in dialysis patients. Calf BI methods have been developed to measure NHS by 2 ways: (1) continuous measurement of the intradialytic resistance curve until flattening occurs; (2) calf normalized resistivity in the range of healthy subjects (18.5 × 10(-2) Ω m(3)/kg in male and 19.1 × 10(-2) Ω m(3)/kg in female). In general, for population studies, BI vector analysis or ECV/total body water may be useful; BCM is a commercially available device that can certainly guide volume reduction safely over time. For more exact measure of fluid overload, calf BI methods appear to be most accurate, but these are at present research tools. BI techniques are not only useful in assessing NHS but also in the study of nutrition and body composition. PMID:25556307

  3. Theoretical estimation of surface Debye temperature of nano structured material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Bijan Kumar; Sarkar, A.

    2016-05-01

    The estimation of Debye temperature (TD) exploiting phonon is very important. In this work an attempt has been made to estimate TD for solids in a simple phenomenological approach. The ultimate goal is to estimate TD for nano structured material. The objective of this present work is to extend Debye model for nano-structured material and hence to extract the contribution to surface specific heat and surface Debye temperature. An empirical relation between TD and surface Debye temperature (TDS) is proposed. Lindemann melting criterion is also extended towards nano structure. The overall results obtained are compared and found to be in good agreement.

  4. Submarine gas hydrate estimation: Theoretical and empirical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, G.D.; Soloviev, V.A.

    1995-12-01

    The published submarine gas hydrate resource estimates are based on the concepts of their continuous extent over large areas and depth intervals and/or the regionally high hydrate concentrations in sediments. The observational data are in conflict with these concepts. At present such estimates cannot be made to an accuracy better than an order of magnitude. The amount of methane in shallow subbottom (seepage associated) gas-hydrate accumulations is estimated at 10{sup 14} m{sup 3} STP, and in deep-seated hydrates at 10{sup 15} m{sup 3} according to observational data. From the genetic standpoint for the time being gas hydrate potential could be only assessed as far less than 10{sup 17} m{sup 3} because rates of related hydrogeological and geochemical processes have not been adequately studied.

  5. Theoretical estimation of the aqueous pKas of thiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Nora E.; Seybold, Paul G.

    2014-02-01

    The ionisation state of a compound is a key parameter influencing the compound's activity as a drug, metabolite, pollutant, or other active chemical agent. Sulfhydrol compounds (thiols) tend to be considerably more acidic than their hydroxyl (alcohol) analogues. In this report, quantum chemical approaches previously used for the estimation of the aqueous pKas of alcohols are applied to the estimation of the acidities of thiols. Acidity estimates obtained from the general-purpose SPARC calculational programme (S.H. Hilal, S.W. Karickhoff, and L.A. Carreira, Quant. Struct.-Act. Relat. 14, 348 (1995)) and the ACD/Labs PhysChem Suite v12 programme package are employed as benchmarks. Quantum chemical calculations were performed using both the semiempirical RM1 method and the density functional theory B3LYP/6-31+G* method. The effectiveness of the SM5.4 and SM8 solvent models in estimating the aqueous-phase acidities was also evaluated. All of the approaches examined demonstrated strong correlations with the experimental acidity values.

  6. Improved theoretical estimation of mechanical reliability of optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikura, Masao; Kurosawa, Yoshinori; Namekawa, Yoshikazu

    2005-01-01

    We propose an enhanced theory that can be commonly applied to fiber reliability evaluations under various stress and failure probability levels, under prolonged stress and in stressed fiber distribution conditions. In the theory, the inert strength distribution of fibers is composed of two types of Weibull distributions with different slope parameters. We included proof-test conditions that adhere to Mitsunaga's theory in the calculations. New parameters that express the high-strength distribution can be obtained from the tensile strength data using a theoretical equation. We analyzed the static fatigue characteristics under uniform bending and two-point bending using this theory. The experimental results agreed well with the calculated results for bent fibers. We believe that the theory will play a vital role in the design of optical fiber cords for sharp-bending uses and in the minimization of various optical packages.

  7. Theoretical Formalism To Estimate the Positron Scattering Cross Section.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suvam; Dutta, Sangita; Naghma, Rahla; Antony, Bobby

    2016-07-21

    A theoretical formalism is introduced in this article to calculate the total cross sections for positron scattering. This method incorporates positron-target interaction in the spherical complex optical potential formalism. The study of positron collision has been quite subtle until now. However, recently, it has emerged as an interesting area due to its role in atomic and molecular structure physics, astrophysics, and medicine. With the present method, the total cross sections for simple atoms C, N, and O and their diatomic molecules C2, N2, and O2 are obtained and compared with existing data. The total cross section obtained in the present work gives a more consistent shape and magnitude than existing theories. The characteristic dip below 10 eV is identified due to the positronium formation. The deviation of the present cross section with measurements at energies below 10 eV is attributed to the neglect of forward angle-discrimination effects in experiments, the inefficiency of additivity rule for molecules, empirical treatment of positronium formation, and the neglect of annihilation reactions. In spite of these deficiencies, the present results show consistent behavior and reasonable agreement with previous data, wherever available. Besides, this is the first computational model to report positron scattering cross sections over the energy range from 1 to 5000 eV. PMID:27333337

  8. Normal Values for Segmental Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Maria Laura; Ward, Leigh C.; Feldman, Brian M.; Montoya, Madeline I.; Stinson, Jennifer; Kiss, Alex; Brandão, Leonardo R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Localized limb edema is a clinically relevant sign in diseases such as post-thrombotic syndrome and lymphedema. Quantitative evaluation of localized edema in children is mainly done by measuring the absolute difference in limb circumference, which includes fat and fat-free mass. Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) provides information on the fluid volume of a body segment. Our objective was to determine normal ranges for segmental (arm and leg) BIS measurements in healthy children. Additionally, we determined the normal ranges for the difference in arm and ankle circumference and explored the influence of handedness and the correlation between techniques. Methods Healthy children aged 1-18 years were recruited. The ratio of extracellular fluid content between contralateral limbs (estimated as the inter-arm and inter-leg extracellular impedance ratio), and the ratio of extracellular to intracellular fluid content for each limb (estimated as the intracellular to extracellular impedance ratio) were determined with a bioimpedance spectrometer. Arm and ankle circumference was determined with a Gulick II tape. Results We recruited 223 healthy children (48 infants, 54 preschoolers, 66 school-aged children, and 55 teenagers). Normal values for arm and leg BIS measurements, and for the difference in arm and ankle circumference were estimated for each age category. No influence of handedness was found. We found a statistically significant correlation between extracellular impedance ratio and circumference difference for arms among teenagers. Conclusion We determined normal BIS ranges for arms and legs and for the difference in circumference between arms and between ankles in children. There was no statistically significant correlation between extracellular impedance ratio and difference in circumference, except in the case of arms in adolescents. This may indicate that limb circumference measures quantities other than fluid, challenging the adequacy of this

  9. Theoretical estimates of equilibrium chlorine-isotope fractionations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, Edwin A.; Rossman, George R.; Taylor, H. P.

    2003-09-01

    Equilibrium chlorine-isotope ( 37Cl/ 35Cl) fractionations have been determined by using published vibrational spectra and force-field modeling to calculate reduced partition function ratios for Cl-isotope exchange. Ab initio force fields calculated at the HF/6-31G(d) level are used to estimate unknown vibrational frequencies of 37Cl-bearing molecules, whereas crystalline phases are modeled by published lattice-dynamics models. Calculated fractionations are principally controlled by the oxidation state of Cl and its bond partners. Molecular mass (or the absence of C-H bonds) also appears to play a role in determining relative fractionations among simple Cl-bearing organic species. Molecules and complexes with oxidized Cl (i.e., Cl 0, Cl +, etc.) will concentrate 37Cl relative to chlorides (substances with Cl -). At 298 K, ClO 2 (containing Cl 4+) and [ClO 4] - (containing Cl 7+) will concentrate 37Cl relative to chlorides by as much as 27‰ and 73‰, respectively, in rough agreement with earlier calculations. Among chlorides, 37Cl will be concentrated in substances where Cl is bonded to +2 cations (i.e., FeCl 2, MnCl 2, micas, and amphiboles) relative to substances where Cl is bonded to +1 cations (such as NaCl) by ˜2 to 3‰ at 298 K; organic molecules with C-Cl bonds will be even richer in 37Cl (˜5 to 9‰ at 298 K). Precipitation experiments, in combination with our results, provide an estimate for Cl-isotope partitioning in brines and suggest that silicates (to the extent that their Cl atoms are associated with nearest-neighbor +2 cations analogous with FeCl 2 and MnCl 2) will have higher 37Cl/ 35Cl ratios than coexisting brine (by ˜2 to 3‰ at room temperature). Calculated fractionations between HCl and Cl 2, and between brines and such alteration minerals, are in qualitative agreement with both experimental results and systematics observed in natural samples. Our results suggest that Cl-bearing organic molecules will have markedly higher 37Cl/ 35Cl

  10. Improved extraction of information in bioimpedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Mart; Paavle, Toivo

    2013-04-01

    A wideband bioimpedance measurement method is proposed, which can enhance the interpretation of measurement results due to the improved resolution of monitoring. On the other hand, the corresponding measurement system uses a binary chirp waveform for excitation signal, which simplifies the signal processing hardware and does not require sophisticated software. It is shown that the binary chirp excitation has some essential advantages compared to its counterpart - the maximum length sequence (MLS) excitation.

  11. Comparing geophysical measurements to theoretical estimates for soil mixtures at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wildenschild, D; Berge, P A; Berryman, K G; Bonner, B P; Roberts, J J

    1999-01-15

    The authors obtained good estimates of measured velocities of sand-peat samples at low pressures by using a theoretical method, the self-consistent theory of Berryman (1980), using sand and porous peat to represent the microstructure of the mixture. They were unable to obtain useful estimates with several other theoretical approaches, because the properties of the quartz, air and peat components of the samples vary over several orders of magnitude. Methods that are useful for consolidated rock cannot be applied directly to unconsolidated materials. Instead, careful consideration of microstructure is necessary to adapt the methods successfully. Future work includes comparison of the measured velocity values to additional theoretical estimates, investigation of Vp/Vs ratios and wave amplitudes, as well as modeling of dry and saturated sand-clay mixtures (e.g., Bonner et al., 1997, 1998). The results suggest that field data can be interpreted by comparing laboratory measurements of soil velocities to theoretical estimates of velocities in order to establish a systematic method for predicting velocities for a full range of sand-organic material mixtures at various pressures. Once the theoretical relationship is obtained, it can be used to estimate the soil composition at various depths from field measurements of seismic velocities. Additional refining of the method for relating velocities to soil characteristics is useful for development inversion algorithms.

  12. Evaluation of a multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy tensor probe to detect the anisotropic conductivity spectra of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Bishal; Wi, Hun; McEwan, Alistair; Kwon, Hyeuknam; In Oh, Tong; Woo, Eung Je; Seo, Jin Keun

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements of anisotropic tissues using a 16 electrode probe and reconstruction method of estimating the anisotropic impedance spectrum in a local region just underneath the center of the probe. This may enable in-vivo surface bioimpedance measurements with similar performance to the ex-vivo gold standard that requires excising and placing the entire tissue sample in a unit measurement cell with uniform electric field. The multiple surface electrodes enable us to create a focused current pattern so that the resulting measured voltage is more sensitive to a local region and less sensitive to other areas. This is exploited in a reconstruction method to provide improved bioimpedance and anisotropy measurements. In this paper, we describe the current pattern for localized electrical energy concentration, performance with the spring loaded pin electrodes, data calibration and experimental results on anisotropic agar phantoms and different tissue types. The anisotropic conductivity spectra are able to differentiate insulating films of different thickness and detect their orientation. Bioimpedance spectra of biological tissues are in agreement with published data and reference instruments. The anisotropy expressed as the ratio of eigenvalues and the orientation of eigenfunctions were reconstructed at 45° intervals. This information is used to predict the underlying anisotropy of the region under the probe. Tissue measurements clearly demonstrate the expected higher anisotropy of muscle tissue compared to liver tissue and spectral changes.

  13. Design of a wideband excitation source for fast bioimpedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Kang, Minhang; Lu, Yong; Wang, Jian; Yue, Jing; Gao, Zonghai

    2011-01-01

    Multi-frequency-one-time (MFOT) measurement of bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) can greatly reduce measurement time and grasp the transient physiological status of a living body compared with the traditional one-frequency-one-time (OFOT) measurement technology, and a wideband excitation source mixed with multiple frequencies is a crucial part of MFOT measurement of BIS. This communication describes a design of a wideband excitation source. Firstly, a multi-frequency mixed (MFM) signal containing seven primary harmonics is synthesized based on Walsh functions, which is a periodical and rectangular signal and whose 68.9% of the energy is homogeneously distributed on its seven 2nth primary harmonics. Then the MFM signal is generated by a field programmable gate array (FPGA), and a unipolar-to-bipolar convertor (UBC) is designed to convert the unipolar signal into bipolar signal. Finally, the bipolar MFM signal is driven by a voltage-controlled current source (VCCS). A 2R-1C series model is adopted as the load of the VCCS, and the simulated voltage response on the load is obtained based on the theoretical analysis. Experiments show that the practical waveform on the load matches well with the theoretical analysis, which indicates that the VCCS has a good performance on the MFM signal. The design of the wideband excitation source establishes a good foundation for fast measurement of BIS.

  14. Heart rate detection from plantar bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    González Landaeta, R; Casas, O; Pallàs-Areny, R

    2006-01-01

    The heart rate is a basic health indicator, useful in both clinical measurements and home health care. Current home care systems often require the attachment of electrodes or other sensors to the body, which can be cumbersome to the patient. Moreover, some measurements are sensitive to movement artifacts, are not user-friendly and require a specialized supervision. In this paper, a novel technique for heart rate measurement for a standing subject is proposed, which is based on plantar bioimpedance measurements, such as those performed by some bathroom weighting scales for body composition analysis. Because of the low level of heart-related impedance variations, the measurement system has a gain of 1400. We have implemented a fully differential AC amplifier with a common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) of 105 dB at 10 kHz. Coherent demodulation based on synchronous sampling yields a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 55 dB. The system has a sensitivity of 1.9 V/Omega. The technique has been demonstrated on 18 volunteers, whose bioimpedance signal and ECG were simultaneously measured to validate the results. The average cross-correlation coefficient between the heart rates determined from these two signals was 0.998 (std. dev. 0.001). PMID:17946677

  15. PREFACE: International Conference on Electrical Bioimpedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadleir, Rosalind; Woo, Eung Je

    2010-04-01

    logo The XIVth International Conference on Electrical Bioimpedance, held in conjunction with the 11th Conference on Biomedical Applications of EIT (ICEBI & EIT 2010), took place from 4-8 April 2010 in the Reitz Union of the University of Florida, in Gainesville, USA. This was the first time since its inception in 1969 that the ICEBI was held in the United States. As in the last three conferences (Graz 2007, Gdansk 2004 and Oslo 2001) the ICEBI was combined with the Conference on Biomedical Applications of EIT - a mutually beneficial approach for those interested in the biophysics of tissue electrical properties and those developing imaging methods and measurement systems based thereon. This year's conference was particularly notable for the many papers presented on hybrid and emerging imaging techniques such as Electric Property Tomography (EPT), Magneto Acoustic Tomography using Magnetic Induction (MAT-MI) and Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT); sessions on Cell Scale Impedance, Cardiac Impedance and Imaging Neural Activity. About 180 scientists from all over the world attended, including keynote speakers on topics of fundamental electromagnetic principles (Jaakko Malmivuo), Electrical Source and Impedance Imaging (Bin He), Bioimpedance applications in Nephrology, (Nathan Levin), and Lung EIT (Gerhard Wolf). The papers in this volume are peer-reviewed four-page works selected from over 150 presented in oral and poster sessions at the conference. The complete program is available from the conference website.

  16. Bioimpedance Detection of Oral Lichen Planus Used as Preneoplastic Model

    PubMed Central

    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Amantea, Massimiliano; Paduano, Francesco; Santacroce, Luigi; Gentile, Stefano; Scacco, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bioimpedance is a measure of the electrical properties of biological tissues. In the last two decades bioimpedance has been successfully introduced in clinical diagnosis of cancer. It has been demonstrated that tumoral tissues often show lower bioimpedance values than healthy tissues. The aim of this work is to assess the bioimpedentiometric differences between healthy and Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) affected oral mucosa, taking attention to the erosive form which may represent a potential pre-cancerous condition. Methods: 52 patients affected by OLP were recruited for bioimpedance examination of oral mucosa. Four electrical properties, resistance (R), reactance (Xc), phase angle (θ) and impedance (Z) of the tongue and of the intraoral mucosa, were measured. Results: We observed a significant increase of Z and a significant decrease of θ values in correspondence of OLP lesions compared to healthy oral mucosa, and a marked decrease of Z values in correspondence of erosive OLP lesions. Conclusions: These results provide evidence of the usefulness of bioimpedance assay for the characterization of healthy and clinically OLP affected mucosa. Bioimpedance is a valid aid in the early detection and clinical monitoring of the suspicious lesions which could lead to a potentially malignant evolution. The present research article is a valuable addition to the scientific literature of cancer prevention, and our findings can be considered extremely encouraging as they represent the initial step for a more wide clinical study for better define the different cut-off values in the different precancerous conditions occurring in the oral mucosa. PMID:26366210

  17. AD5933-based spectrometer for electrical bioimpedance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, J.; Seoane, F.; Ansede, A.; Bragos, R.

    2010-04-01

    To build an Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) spectrometer using the Impedance Measurement System-On-Chip AD5933 together with a 4-Electrode Analog Front End (4E-AFE) has been proven practicable. Such small measurement devices can make possible several new applications of EBI technology, especially when combined with functional textiles, which can enable wearable applications for personal health and home monitoring. After the implementation and functional validation of the 4E-AFE-enabled spectrometer, the next natural step is to validate for which EBI applications the 4E-AFE-enabled system is suitable. To test the applicability of this novel spectrometer on several EBI applications, 2R1C equivalent models have been experimentally obtained and impedance spectroscopy measurements have been performed with the system under study and with the SFB7 EBI spectrometer manufactured by ImpediMed. The 2R1C circuit parameters have been estimated with the BioImp software from the spectra obtained with both EBI spectrometers and the estimated values have been compared with the original values used in each circuit model implementation. The obtained results indicated that the 4E-AFE-enabled system cannot beat the performance of the SFB7 in accuracy but it performs better in preciseness. In any case the overall performance indicates that the 4E-AFE-enabled system can perform spectroscopy measurements in the frequency range from 5 to 100 kHz.

  18. Depth-map and albedo estimation with superior information-theoretic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Adam P.; Joseph, Dileepan

    2015-02-01

    Lambertian photometric stereo (PS) is a seminal computer vision method. However, using depth maps in the image formation model, instead of surface normals as in PS, reduces model parameters by a third, making it preferred from an information-theoretic perspective. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) quantifies this trade-off between goodness of fit and overfitting. Obtaining superior AIC values requires an effective maximum likelihood (ML) depth-map & albedo estimation method. Recently, the authors published an ML estimation method that uses a two-step approach based on PS. While effective, approximations of noise distributions and decoupling of depth-map & albedo estimation have limited its accuracy. Overcoming these limitations, this paper presents an ML method operating directly on images. The previous two-step ML method provides a robust initial solution, which kick starts a new nonlinear estimation process. An innovative formulation of the estimation task, including a separable nonlinear least-squares approach, reduces the computational burden of the optimization process. Experiments demonstrate visual improvements under noisy conditions by avoiding overfitting. As well, a comprehensive analysis shows that refined depth maps & albedos produce superior AIC metrics and enjoy better predictive accuracy than with literature methods. The results indicate that the new method is a promising means for depth-map & albedo estimation with superior information-theoretic performance.

  19. Implantable bioimpedance monitor using ZigBee.

    PubMed

    Bogónez-Franco, P; Bragós, R; Bayés-Genis, A; Rosell-Ferrer, J

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a novel implantable bioimpedance monitor using a free ZigBee protocol for the transmission of the measured data is described. The application field is the tissue and organ monitoring through electrical impedance spectroscopy in the 100 Hz - 200 kHz range. The specific application is the study of the viability and evolution of engineered tissue in cardiac regeneration. Additionally to the telemetric feature, the measured data are stored in a memory for backup purposes and can be downloaded at any time after an RF link break. In the debugging prototype, the system autonomy exceeds 1 month when a 14 frequencies impedance spectrum is acquired every 5 minutes. In the current implementation, the effective range of the RF link is reduced and needs for a range extender placed near the animal. Current work deals with improving this range. PMID:19963630

  20. Theoretical and experimental investigations of sensor location for optimal aeroelastic system state estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, G.

    1985-01-01

    One of the major concerns in the design of an active control system is obtaining the information needed for effective feedback. This involves the combination of sensing and estimation. A sensor location index is defined as the weighted sum of the mean square estimation errors in which the sensor locations can be regarded as estimator design parameters. The design goal is to choose these locations to minimize the sensor location index. The choice of the number of sensors is a tradeoff between the estimation quality based upon the same performance index and the total costs of installing and maintaining extra sensors. An experimental study for choosing the sensor location was conducted on an aeroelastic system. The system modeling which includes the unsteady aerodynamics model developed by Stephen Rock was improved. Experimental results verify the trend of the theoretical predictions of the sensor location index for different sensor locations at various wind speeds.

  1. Estimation of ozone with total ozone portable spectroradiometer instruments. I. Theoretical model and error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Lawrence E.; Labow, Gordon J.; Beach, Robert A.; Rawlins, Michael A.; Flittner, David E.

    1996-10-01

    Inexpensive devices to measure solar UV irradiance are available to monitor atmospheric ozone, for example, total ozone portable spectroradiometers (TOPS instruments). A procedure to convert these measurements into ozone estimates is examined. For well-characterized filters with 7-nm FWHM bandpasses, the method provides ozone values (from 304- and 310-nm channels) with less than 0.4 error attributable to inversion of the theoretical model. Analysis of sensitivity to model assumptions and parameters yields estimates of 3 bias in total ozone results with dependence on total ozone and path length. Unmodeled effects of atmospheric constituents and instrument components can result in additional 2 errors.

  2. Theoretical and Experimental Estimations of Volumetric Inductive Phase Shift in Breast Cancer Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, C. A.; Lozano, L. M.; Uscanga, M. C.; Silva, J. G.; Polo, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Impedance measurements based on magnetic induction for breast cancer detection has been proposed in some studies. This study evaluates theoretical and experimentally the use of a non-invasive technique based on magnetic induction for detection of patho-physiological conditions in breast cancer tissue associated to its volumetric electrical conductivity changes through inductive phase shift measurements. An induction coils-breast 3D pixel model was designed and tested. The model involves two circular coils coaxially centered and a human breast volume centrally placed with respect to the coils. A time-harmonic numerical simulation study addressed the effects of frequency-dependent electrical properties of tumoral tissue on the volumetric inductive phase shift of the breast model measured with the circular coils as inductor and sensor elements. Experimentally; five female volunteer patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma previously diagnosed by the radiology and oncology departments of the Specialty Clinic for Women of the Mexican Army were measured by an experimental inductive spectrometer and the use of an ergonomic inductor-sensor coil designed to estimate the volumetric inductive phase shift in human breast tissue. Theoretical and experimental inductive phase shift estimations were developed at four frequencies: 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 MHz. The theoretical estimations were qualitatively in agreement with the experimental findings. Important increments in volumetric inductive phase shift measurements were evident at 0.01MHz in theoretical and experimental observations. The results suggest that the tested technique has the potential to detect pathological conditions in breast tissue associated to cancer by non-invasive monitoring. Further complementary studies are warranted to confirm the observations.

  3. Online bioimpedance feedback for in vivo electroporated tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, J.; Rey, J. I.; Connolly, R. J.; Anderson, A.; Jaroszeski, M.; Gitlin, R.

    2010-04-01

    Electroporation in vivo is a biotechnology method that uses short-duration high intensity electric fields to enhance plasma membrane permeability in living cells in order to facilitate the uptake of drugs, DNA, genes and proteins into the cytoplasm. The degree of permeability is related to the tissue's bioimpedance; hence, accurate impedance evaluation throughout electroporation treatment is essential to 1) avoid over-treating tissues resulting in excessive cell death and 2) under-treating tissues resulting in poor permeability. Cell viability and membrane permeability is based on a number of factors, including: time elapsed after electroporation, electroporation pulse amplitude, tissue type, and so on; thus, efficient feedback protocols must minimize delays between treatment and impedance readings. Current methods of bioimpedance feedback are often cumbersome and impedance analysis devices can be expensive, bulky, and immobile. Emerging technologies facilitate economical methods, fast protocols, and portability to realize bioimpedance measurement and feedback online (i.e. realtime). Consequently, this research uses automation software, logic-biased protocols, an inexpensive commercially available impedance analyzer microchip, and a custom-built hexagonal electrode probe to measure dynamic bioimpedance changes. This work demonstrates how this novel system measures tissue bioimpedance instantly and efficiently before and after electroporation. Additionally this system allows for the comparison of electrode geometries as well as electric field' magnitudes and distributions. Follow up work will pursue the optimization of plasma membrane permeability for several tissue/cell types.

  4. Bioimpedance Analysis: A Guide to Simple Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Aroom, Kevin R.; Harting, Matthew T.; Cox, Charles S.; Radharkrishnan, Ravi S.; Smith, Carter; Gill, Brijesh S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bioimpedance analysis has found utility in many fields of medical research, yet instrumentation can be expensive and/or complicated to build. Advancements in electronic component design and equipment allow for simple bioimpedance analysis using equipment now commonly found in an engineering lab, combined with a few components exclusive to impedance analysis. Materials and methods A modified Howland bridge circuit was designed on a small circuit board with connections for power and bioimpedance probes. A programmable function generator and an oscilloscope were connected to a laptop computer and were tasked to drive and receive data from the circuit. The software then parsed the received data and inserted it into a spreadsheet for subsequent data analysis. The circuit was validated by testing its current output over a range of frequencies and comparing measured values of impedance across a test circuit to expected values. Results The system was validated over frequencies between 1 and 100 kHz. Maximum fluctuation in current was on the order of micro-Amperes. Similarly, the measured value of impedance in a test circuit followed the pattern of actual impedance over the range of frequencies measured. Conclusions Contemporary generation electronic measurement equipment provides adequate levels of connectivity and programmability to rapidly measure and record data for bioimpedance research. These components allow for the rapid development of a simple but accurate bioimpedance measurement system that can be assembled by individuals with limited knowledge of electronics or programming. PMID:18805550

  5. A theoretical estimation for the optimal network robustness measure R against malicious node attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liangliang; Liu, Jing; Duan, Boping; Zhou, Mingxing

    2015-07-01

    In a recent work (Schneider C. M. et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108 (2011) 3838), Schneider et al. introduced an effective measure R to evaluate the network robustness against malicious attacks on nodes. Take R as the objective function, they used a heuristic algorithm to optimize the network robustness. In this paper, a theoretical analysis is conducted to estimate the value of R for different types of networks, including regular networks, WS networks, ER networks, and BA networks. The experimental results show that the theoretical value of R is approximately equal to that of optimized networks. Furthermore, the theoretical analysis also shows that regular networks are the most robust than other networks. To validate this result, a heuristic method is proposed to optimize the network structure, in which the degree distribution can be changed and the number of nodes and edges remains invariant. The optimization results show that the degree of most nodes in the optimal networks is close to the average degree, and the optimal network topology is close to regular networks, which confirms the theoretical analysis.

  6. Preprocessing and parameterizing bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements by singular value decomposition.

    PubMed

    Nejadgholi, Isar; Caytak, Herschel; Bolic, Miodrag; Batkin, Izmail; Shirmohammadi, Shervin

    2015-05-01

    In several applications of bioimpedance spectroscopy, the measured spectrum is parameterized by being fitted into the Cole equation. However, the extracted Cole parameters seem to be inconsistent from one measurement session to another, which leads to a high standard deviation of extracted parameters. This inconsistency is modeled with a source of random variations added to the voltage measurement carried out in the time domain. These random variations may originate from biological variations that are irrelevant to the evidence that we are investigating. Yet, they affect the voltage measured by using a bioimpedance device based on which magnitude and phase of impedance are calculated.By means of simulated data, we showed that Cole parameters are highly affected by this type of variation. We further showed that singular value decomposition (SVD) is an effective tool for parameterizing bioimpedance measurements, which results in more consistent parameters than Cole parameters. We propose to apply SVD as a preprocessing method to reconstruct denoised bioimpedance measurements. In order to evaluate the method, we calculated the relative difference between parameters extracted from noisy and clean simulated bioimpedance spectra. Both mean and standard deviation of this relative difference are shown to effectively decrease when Cole parameters are extracted from preprocessed data in comparison to being extracted from raw measurements.We evaluated the performance of the proposed method in distinguishing three arm positions, for a set of experiments including eight subjects. It is shown that Cole parameters of different positions are not distinguishable when extracted from raw measurements. However, one arm position can be distinguished based on SVD scores. Moreover, all three positions are shown to be distinguished by two parameters, R0/R∞ and Fc, when Cole parameters are extracted from preprocessed measurements. These results suggest that SVD could be considered as an

  7. Theoretical optimal modulation frequencies for scattering parameter estimation and ballistic photon filtering in diffusing media.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Fade, Julien; Ramachandran, Hema; Alouini, Mehdi

    2016-07-11

    The efficiency of using intensity modulated light for the estimation of scattering properties of a turbid medium and for ballistic photon discrimination is theoretically quantified in this article. Using the diffusion model for modulated photon transport and considering a noisy quadrature demodulation scheme, the minimum-variance bounds on estimation of parameters of interest are analytically derived and analyzed. The existence of a variance-minimizing optimal modulation frequency is shown and its evolution with the properties of the intervening medium is derived and studied. Furthermore, a metric is defined to quantify the efficiency of ballistic photon filtering which may be sought when imaging through turbid media. The analytical derivation of this metric shows that the minimum modulation frequency required to attain significant ballistic discrimination depends only on the reduced scattering coefficient of the medium in a linear fashion for a highly scattering medium. PMID:27410875

  8. Multiple lead recordings improve accuracy of bio-impedance plethysmographic technique.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P K; Hyttinen, J A; Kööbi, T; Malmivuo, J

    1999-06-01

    We have developed the theory and instrumentation of multiple multi-electrode bio-impedance (BI) measurements based on lead field theoretical approach. To derive reliable information based on BI data, a quantity of measurements should be taken with electrode configurations possessing regional measurement sensitivity. An apparatus has been developed with an eye to the requirements imposed by the theoretical aspects of achieving multiple multi-electrode BI measurements. It has features compensating electrode-contact related errors and errors due to imbalance between the conductive pathways when multiple electrodes are utilised for BI measurement. The proposed design allows simultaneous multi-electrode BI and bioelectric recording with the same electrode system. Initial operation experiences in clinical environment indicate that the device functions as intended, and allows user-friendly utilisation of multiple BI measurements. Contributions presented to BI methodology and instrumentation improve the reliability of BI measurements. PMID:10576427

  9. Theoretical estimates of exposure timescales of protein binding sites on DNA regulated by nucleosome kinetics.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jyotsana J; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-02-29

    It is being increasingly realized that nucleosome organization on DNA crucially regulates DNA-protein interactions and the resulting gene expression. While the spatial character of the nucleosome positioning on DNA has been experimentally and theoretically studied extensively, the temporal character is poorly understood. Accounting for ATPase activity and DNA-sequence effects on nucleosome kinetics, we develop a theoretical method to estimate the time of continuous exposure of binding sites of non-histone proteins (e.g. transcription factors and TATA binding proteins) along any genome. Applying the method to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the exposure timescales are determined by cooperative dynamics of multiple nucleosomes, and their behavior is often different from expectations based on static nucleosome occupancy. Examining exposure times in the promoters of GAL1 and PHO5, we show that our theoretical predictions are consistent with known experiments. We apply our method genome-wide and discover huge gene-to-gene variability of mean exposure times of TATA boxes and patches adjacent to TSS (+1 nucleosome region); the resulting timescale distributions have non-exponential tails. PMID:26553807

  10. Theoretical kinetic estimates for the recombination of hydrogen atoms with propargyl and allyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2000-01-12

    Ab initio quantum chemical simulations are coupled with variational transition state theory in estimating rate constants for the H+C{sub 3}H{sub 3} and H+C{sub 3}H{sub 5} recombination reactions. The energy of interaction between the H atom and each of the radicals is evaluated at the CAS+1+2 level for the range of separations and relative orientations spanning the transition state region. An analytic representation of these interaction energies is then implemented in variable reaction coordinate transition state theory calculations of the high pressure limit recombination rate constant for temperatures ranging from 200 to 2000 K. For the propargyl reaction the overall addition rate is separated into contributions correlating with the initial formation of allene and propyne. These theoretical results are compared with the available experimental data as well as with corresponding theoretical estimates for the H+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} and H+C{sub 2}H{sub 5} reactions. The H+propargyl and H+allyl total recombination rates are remarkably similar, with both being greater than the H+vinyl and H+ethyl rates, due to the presence of twice as many addition channels.

  11. Probability Density Estimation Using Isocontours and Isosurfaces: Application to Information-Theoretic Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Rajwade, Ajit; Banerjee, Arunava; Rangarajan, Anand

    2010-01-01

    We present a new geometric approach for determining the probability density of the intensity values in an image. We drop the notion of an image as a set of discrete pixels and assume a piecewise-continuous representation. The probability density can then be regarded as being proportional to the area between two nearby isocontours of the image surface. Our paper extends this idea to joint densities of image pairs. We demonstrate the application of our method to affine registration between two or more images using information-theoretic measures such as mutual information. We show cases where our method outperforms existing methods such as simple histograms, histograms with partial volume interpolation, Parzen windows, etc., under fine intensity quantization for affine image registration under significant image noise. Furthermore, we demonstrate results on simultaneous registration of multiple images, as well as for pairs of volume data sets, and show some theoretical properties of our density estimator. Our approach requires the selection of only an image interpolant. The method neither requires any kind of kernel functions (as in Parzen windows), which are unrelated to the structure of the image in itself, nor does it rely on any form of sampling for density estimation. PMID:19147876

  12. A new theoretical basis for the bandwidth method and optimal power ratios for the damping estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H. P.

    2008-11-01

    Using the well-known bandwidth formula and the half power bandwidth formula [R.E.D. Bishop, G.M.L. Gladwell, An investigation into the theory of resonance testing, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London A 255 (1963) 241-280], in particular, is the simplest way to estimate modal damping for engineers. By using the half power bandwidth formula, the damping factor is estimated to be approximately the half bandwidth at the half power points. One of the major limitations that restrict the use of this method is the coupling effect between closely spaced modes. In this paper, the dependence of the damping estimation accuracy on the selected power ratios is studied with both analytical and experimental data of frequency response functions. The results show that by selecting adequate power ratio values, the coupling effect can be minimized and the estimation accuracy can be significantly improved for closely spaced modes. A further improvement of accuracy can be obtained by applying the algorithm of mode isolation [H.P. Yin, D. Duhamel, Substraction technique and finite difference formulas for modal parameter estimation, Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing 18 (2004) 1497-1503; M.S. Allen, J.H. Ginsberg, A global, single-input-multi-output (SIMO) implementation of the algorithm of mode isolation and application to analytical and experimental data, Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing 20 (2006) 1090-1111]. Also an exact bandwidth formula in case of a single degree of freedom system is presented and the link between the exact formula and the classical approximated formula is indicated. The exact bandwidth formula provides a new theoretical basis of the bandwidth method for the damping estimation from frequency response functions.

  13. Does a theoretical estimation of the dust size distribution at emission suggest more bioavailable iron deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, A; Kok, J; Feng, Y; Penner, J

    2012-01-01

    Global models have been used to deduce atmospheric iron supply to the ocean, but the uncertainty remains large. We used a global chemical transport model to investigate the effect of the estimated size distribution of dust on the bioavailable iron deposition. Simulations are performed with six different size distributions for dust aerosols at emission using similar aerosol optical depths (AODs) to constrain the total emission flux of dust. The global dust emission rate using a recent theoretical estimate for the dust size distribution at emission (2116 Tg yr{sup -1}) is about two times larger than the average of estimates using the other four empirical size distributions (1089 {+-} 469 Tg yr{sup -1}). In contrast to the large differences in total emissions, the emission of fine dust (diameter < 2.5 {mu}m) is relatively robust (176 {+-} 34 Tg yr{sup -1}), due to the strong constraint of AOD on fine dust emission. Our model results indicate that soluble iron (SFe) deposition is relatively invariant to the dust size distribution at emission in regions where most soluble iron is provided by acid mobilization of fine dust. In contrast, the use of the theoretical size distribution suggests a larger deposition of SFe (by a factor of 1.2 to 5) in regions where the concentration of acidic gases is insufficient to promote iron dissolution in dust particles, such as the South Atlantic. These results could have important implications for the projection of marine ecosystem feedbacks to climate change and highlight the necessity to improve the dust size distribution.

  14. Graph theoretic framework based cooperative control and estimation of multiple UAVs for target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mousumi

    Designing the control technique for nonlinear dynamic systems is a significant challenge. Approaches to designing a nonlinear controller are studied and an extensive study on backstepping based technique is performed in this research with the purpose of tracking a moving target autonomously. Our main motivation is to explore the controller for cooperative and coordinating unmanned vehicles in a target tracking application. To start with, a general theoretical framework for target tracking is studied and a controller in three dimensional environment for a single UAV is designed. This research is primarily focused on finding a generalized method which can be applied to track almost any reference trajectory. The backstepping technique is employed to derive the controller for a simplified UAV kinematic model. This controller can compute three autopilot modes i.e. velocity, ground heading (or course angle), and flight path angle for tracking the unmanned vehicle. Numerical implementation is performed in MATLAB with the assumption of having perfect and full state information of the target to investigate the accuracy of the proposed controller. This controller is then frozen for the multi-vehicle problem. Distributed or decentralized cooperative control is discussed in the context of multi-agent systems. A consensus based cooperative control is studied; such consensus based control problem can be viewed from the algebraic graph theory concepts. The communication structure between the UAVs is represented by the dynamic graph where UAVs are represented by the nodes and the communication links are represented by the edges. The previously designed controller is augmented to account for the group to obtain consensus based on their communication. A theoretical development of the controller for the cooperative group of UAVs is presented and the simulation results for different communication topologies are shown. This research also investigates the cases where the communication

  15. Theoretic Fit and Empirical Fit: The Performance of Maximum Likelihood versus Generalized Least Squares Estimation in Structural Equation Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, Ulf Henning; Troye, Sigurd Villads; Howell, Roy D.

    1999-01-01

    Used simulation to compare the ability of maximum likelihood (ML) and generalized least-squares (GLS) estimation to provide theoretic fit in models that are parsimonious representations of a true model. The better empirical fit obtained for GLS, compared with ML, was obtained at the cost of lower theoretic fit. (Author/SLD)

  16. Annual Rainfall Maxima: Theoretical Estimation of the GEV Shape Parameter k Using Multifractal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziano, D.; Langousis, A.; Lepore, C.

    2009-12-01

    The annual maximum of the average rainfall intensity in a period of duration d, Iyear(d), is typically assumed to have generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution. The shape parameter k of that distribution is especially difficult to estimate from either at-site or regional data, making it important to constraint k using theoretical arguments. In the context of multifractal representations of rainfall, we observe that standard theoretical estimates of k from extreme value (EV) and extreme excess (EE) theories do not apply, while estimates from large deviation (LD) theory hold only for very small d. We then propose a new theoretical estimator based on fitting GEV models to the numerically calculated distribution of Iyear(d). A standard result from EV and EE theories is that k depends on the tail behavior of the average rainfall in d, I(d). This result holds if Iyear(d) is the maximum of a sufficiently large number n of variables, all distributed like I(d); therefore its applicability hinges on whether n = 1yr/d is large enough and the tail of I(d) is sufficiently well known. One typically assumes that at least for small d the former condition is met, but poor knowledge of the upper tail of I(d) remains an obstacle for all d. In fact, in the case of multifractal rainfall, also the first condition is not met because, irrespective of d, 1yr/d is too small (Veneziano et al., 2009, WRR, in press). Applying large deviation (LD) theory to this multifractal case, we find that, as d → 0, Iyear(d) approaches a GEV distribution whose shape parameter kLD depends on a region of the distribution of I(d) well below the upper tail, is always positive (in the EV2 range), is much larger than the value predicted by EV and EE theories, and can be readily found from the scaling properties of I(d). The scaling properties of rainfall can be inferred also from short records, but the limitation remains that the result holds under d → 0 not for finite d. Therefore, for different reasons

  17. Cell growth characterization using multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Yu; Huang, Ji-Jer; Huang, Yu-Jie; Cheng, Kuo-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Cell growth characterization during culturing is an important issue in a variety of biomedical applications. In this study an electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy-based multi-electrode culture monitoring system was developed to characterize cell growth. A PC12 cell line was cultured for the cell growth study. The bioimpedance variations for PC12 cell growth within the initial 12 h were measured over a range between 1 kHz and 4 MHz at three different medium concentrations. Within this frequency range, the largest bioimpedance value was 1.9 times the smallest bioimpedance value. The phase angle decreased over the range from 1 to 10 kHz when cells were growing. Then, the phase angle approached a constant over the frequency range between 10 kHz and 2 MHz. Thereafter, the phase angle increased rapidly from 20 to 52 degrees during cell culturing between 8 and 12 h at 4 MHz. The maximum cell number after culturing for 12 h increased by 25.8% for the control sites with poly-D-lysine (PDL) pastes. For the normal growth factor, the cell number increased up to 4.78 times from 8 to 12 h, but only 0.96 and 1.60 times for the other two medium growth factors. The correlation coefficients between impedance and cell number were 0.868 (coating with PDL), and 0.836 (without PDL) for the normal concentration medium. Thus, impedance may be used as an index for cell growth characterization.

  18. Detection of questionable occlusal carious lesions using an electrical bioimpedance method with fractional electrical model.

    PubMed

    Morais, A P; Pino, A V; Souza, M N

    2016-08-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the diagnostic performance of an alternative electric bioimpedance spectroscopy technique (BIS-STEP) detect questionable occlusal carious lesions. Six specialists carried out the visual (V), radiography (R), and combined (VR) exams of 57 sound or non-cavitated occlusal carious lesion teeth classifying the occlusal surfaces in sound surface (H), enamel caries (EC), and dentinal caries (DC). Measurements were based on the current response to a step voltage excitation (BIS-STEP). A fractional electrical model was used to predict the current response in the time domain and to estimate the model parameters: Rs and Rp (resistive parameters), and C and α (fractional parameters). Histological analysis showed caries prevalence of 33.3% being 15.8% hidden caries. Combined examination obtained the best traditional diagnostic results with specificity = 59.0%, sensitivity = 70.9%, and accuracy = 60.8%. There were statistically significant differences in bioimpedance parameters between the H and EC groups (p = 0.016) and between the H and DC groups (Rs, p = 0.006; Rp, p = 0.022, and α, p = 0.041). Using a suitable threshold for the Rs, we obtained specificity = 60.7%, sensitivity = 77.9%, accuracy = 73.2%, and 100% of detection for deep lesions. It can be concluded that BIS-STEP method could be an important tool to improve the detection and management of occlusal non-cavitated primary caries and pigmented sites. PMID:27587136

  19. Magnitude estimation and categorical rating scaling in social sciences: a theoretical and psychometric controversy.

    PubMed

    Beltyukova, Svetlana A; Stone, Gregory E; Fox, Christine M

    2008-01-01

    This paper revisits a half-century long theoretical controversy associated with the use of magnitude estimation scaling (MES) and category rating scaling (CRS) procedures in measurement. The MES procedure in this study involved instructing participants to write a number that matched their impression of difficulty of a test item. Participants were not restricted in the range of numbers they could choose for their scale. They also had the choice of disclosing their individual scale. After the MES task was completed, participants were given a blank copy of the test to rate the perceived difficulty of each item using a researcher-imposed categorical rating scale from 1 (very easy) to 6 (very difficult). The MES and CRS data were both analyzed using Rasch Rating scale model. Additionally, the MES data were examined with Rasch Partial Credit model. Results indicate that knowing each person's scale is associated with smaller errors of measurement. PMID:18480511

  20. Fecundity estimation by oocyte packing density formulae in determinate and indeterminate spawners: Theoretical considerations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Yutaka; Kjesbu, Olav S.

    2009-02-01

    This paper explores why the 'Auto-diametric method', currently used in many laboratories to quickly estimate fish fecundity, works well on marine species with a determinate reproductive style but much less so on species with an indeterminate reproductive style. Algorithms describing links between potentially important explanatory variables to estimate fecundity were first established, and these were followed by practical observations in order to validate the method under two extreme situations: 1) straightforward fecundity estimation in a determinate, single-batch spawner: Atlantic herring (AH) Clupea harengus and 2) challenging fecundity estimation in an indeterminate, multiple-batch spawner: Japanese flounder (JF) Paralichthys olivaceus. The Auto-diametric method relies on the successful prediction of the number of vitellogenic oocytes (VTO) per gram ovary (oocyte packing density; OPD) from the mean VTO diameter. Theoretically, OPD could be reproduced by the following four variables; OD V (volume-based mean VTO diameter, which deviates from arithmetic mean VTO diameter), VFvto (volume fraction of VTO in the ovary), ρo (specific gravity of the ovary) and k (VTO shape, i.e. ratio of long and short oocyte axes). VF vto, ρ o and k were tested in relation to growth in OD V. The dynamic range throughout maturation was clearly highest in VF vto. As a result, OPD was mainly influenced by OD V and secondly by VFvto. Log (OPD) for AH decreased as log (OD V) increased, while log (OPD) for JF first increased during early vitellogenesis, then decreased during late vitellogenesis and spawning as log (OD V) increased. These linear regressions thus behaved statistically differently between species, and associated residuals fluctuated more for JF than for AH. We conclude that the OPD-OD V relationship may be better expressed by several curves that cover different parts of the maturation cycle rather than by one curve that cover all these parts. This seems to be particularly

  1. Theoretical Estimation of Cannulation Methods for Left Ventricular Assist Device Support as a Bridge to Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ki Moo; Lee, Jeong Sang; Song, Jin-Ho; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support under cannulation connected from the left atrium to the aorta (LA-AA) is used as a bridge to recovery in heart failure patients because it is non-invasive to ventricular muscle. However, it has serious problems, such as valve stenosis and blood thrombosis due to the low ejection fraction of the ventricle. We theoretically estimated the effect of the in-series cannulation, connected from ascending aorta to descending aorta (AA-DA), on ventricular unloading as an alternative to the LA-AA method. We developed a theoretical model of a LVAD-implanted cardiovascular system that included coronary circulation. Using this model, we compared hemodynamic responses according to various cannulation methods such as LA-AA, AA-DA, and a cannulation connected from the left ventricle to ascending aorta (LV-AA), under continuous and pulsatile LVAD supports. The AA-DA method provided 14% and 18% less left ventricular peak pressure than the LA-AA method under continuous and pulsatile LVAD conditions, respectively. The LA-AA method demonstrated higher coronary flow than AA-DA method. Therefore, the LA-AA method is more advantageous in increasing ventricular unloading whereas the AA-DA method is a better choice to increase coronary perfusion. PMID:22147996

  2. A theoretical estimate for nucleotide sugar demand towards Chinese Hamster Ovary cellular glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Ioscani Jimenez; Polizzi, Karen M.; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation greatly influences the safety and efficacy of many of the highest-selling recombinant therapeutic proteins (rTPs). In order to define optimal cell culture feeding strategies that control rTP glycosylation, it is necessary to know how nucleotide sugars (NSs) are consumed towards host cell and rTP glycosylation. Here, we present a theoretical framework that integrates the reported glycoproteome of CHO cells, the number of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosylation sites on individual host cell proteins (HCPs), and the carbohydrate content of CHO glycosphingolipids to estimate the demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation. We have identified the most abundant N-linked and O-GalNAc CHO glycoproteins, obtained the weighted frequency of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosites across the CHO cell proteome, and have derived stoichiometric coefficients for NS consumption towards CHO cell glycosylation. By combining the obtained stoichiometric coefficients with previously reported data for specific growth and productivity of CHO cells, we observe that the demand of NSs towards glycosylation is significant and, thus, is required to better understand the burden of glycosylation on cellular metabolism. The estimated demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation can be used to rationally design feeding strategies that ensure optimal and consistent rTP glycosylation. PMID:27345611

  3. A theoretical estimate for nucleotide sugar demand towards Chinese Hamster Ovary cellular glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Del Val, Ioscani Jimenez; Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation greatly influences the safety and efficacy of many of the highest-selling recombinant therapeutic proteins (rTPs). In order to define optimal cell culture feeding strategies that control rTP glycosylation, it is necessary to know how nucleotide sugars (NSs) are consumed towards host cell and rTP glycosylation. Here, we present a theoretical framework that integrates the reported glycoproteome of CHO cells, the number of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosylation sites on individual host cell proteins (HCPs), and the carbohydrate content of CHO glycosphingolipids to estimate the demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation. We have identified the most abundant N-linked and O-GalNAc CHO glycoproteins, obtained the weighted frequency of N-linked and O-GalNAc glycosites across the CHO cell proteome, and have derived stoichiometric coefficients for NS consumption towards CHO cell glycosylation. By combining the obtained stoichiometric coefficients with previously reported data for specific growth and productivity of CHO cells, we observe that the demand of NSs towards glycosylation is significant and, thus, is required to better understand the burden of glycosylation on cellular metabolism. The estimated demand of NSs towards CHO cell glycosylation can be used to rationally design feeding strategies that ensure optimal and consistent rTP glycosylation. PMID:27345611

  4. Effect of osmotic pressure to bioimpedance indexes of erythrocyte suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Malahov, M. V.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    In the paper we studied effects of osmotic modification of red blood cells on bioimpedance parameters of erythrocyte suspension. The Cole parameters: the extracellular (Re) and intracellular (Ri) fluid resistance, the Alpha parameter, the characteristic frequency (Fchar) and the cell membranes capacitance (Cm) of concentrated erythrocyte suspensions were measured by bioimpedance analyser in the frequency range 5 - 500 kHz. Erythrocytes were incubated in hypo-, hyper- and isoosmotic solutions to achieve changes in cell volume. It was found that Re and Alpha increased in the suspensions with low osmolarity and decreased in the hypertonic suspensions. Ri, Fchar and Cm were higher in the hyperosmotic and were lower in the hypoosmotic suspensions. Correlations of all BIS parameters with MCV were obtained, but multiple regression analysis showed that only Alpha parameter was independently related to MCV (β=0.77, p=0.01). Thus Alpha parameter may be related the mean corpuscular volume of cells.

  5. Effect of Influenza-Induced Fever on Human Bioimpedance Values

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Elisabetta; Buffa, Roberto; Contreras, Monica; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Sanchez, Wilmer; Ortiz, Vanessa; Urbaez, Maryluz; Cabras, Stefano; Blaser, Martin J.; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a widely used technique to assess body composition and nutritional status. While bioelectrical values are affected by diverse variables, there has been little research on validation of BIA in acute illness, especially to understand prognostic significance. Here we report the use of BIA in acute febrile states induced by influenza. Methods Bioimpedance studies were conducted during an H1N1 influenza A outbreak in Venezuelan Amerindian villages from the Amazonas. Measurements were performed on 52 subjects between 1 and 40 years of age, and 7 children were re-examined after starting Oseltamivir treatment. Bioelectrical Impedance Vector Analysis (BIVA) and permutation tests were applied. Results For the entire sample, febrile individuals showed a tendency toward greater reactance (p=0.058) and phase angle (p=0.037) than afebrile individuals, while resistance and impedance were similar in the two groups. Individuals with repeated measurements showed significant differences in bioimpedance values associated with fever, including increased reactance (p<0.001) and phase angle (p=0.007), and decreased resistance (p=0.007) and impedance (p<0.001). Conclusions There are bioelectrical variations induced by influenza that can be related to dehydration, with lower extracellular to intracellular water ratio in febrile individuals, or a direct thermal effect. Caution is recommended when interpreting bioimpedance results in febrile states. PMID:25915945

  6. An efficient analysis of nanomaterial cytotoxicity based on bioimpedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Choi, Cheol Soo; Kim, Sanghyo

    2010-09-01

    In the emerging nanotechnology field, there is an urgent need for the development of a significant and sensitive method that can be used to analyse and compare the cytotoxicities of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), since such materials can be applied as contrast agents or drug delivery carriers. The bioimpedance system possesses great potential in many medical research fields including nanotechnology. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) is a particular bioimpedance system that offers a real-time, non-invasive, and quantitative measurement method for the cytotoxicity of various materials. The present work compared the cytotoxicity of AuNPs to that of purchased single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The size-controlled and monodispersed AuNPs were synthesized under autoclaved conditions and reduced by ascorbic acid (AA) whereas the purchased SWCNTs were used without any surface modifications. Bioimpedance results were validated by conventional WST-1 and trypan blue assays, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were performed to examine nanomaterials inside the VERO cells. This research evaluates the ability of the ECIS system compared to those of conventional methods in analyzing the cytotoxicity of AuNPs and SWCNTs with higher sensitivity under real-time conditions.

  7. Bioimpedance spectroscopy for clinical assessment of fluid distribution and body cell mass.

    PubMed

    Earthman, Carrie; Traughber, Diana; Dobratz, Jennifer; Howell, Wanda

    2007-08-01

    Body composition assessment has been used to evaluate clinical interventions in research trials, and has the potential to improve patient care in the clinical setting. Body cell mass (BCM) is an important indicator of nutrition status; however, its measurement in the clinic has been limited. BCM can be estimated by the measurement of intracellular water (ICW). The assessment of extracellular water (ECW) is also important because many clinical populations undergo alterations in fluid distribution, particularly individuals with wasting, those receiving dialysis, and obese individuals. Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is a unique bioimpedance approach that differs in underlying basis from the more readily recognized single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (SF-BIA) in that it does not require the use of statistically derived, population-specific prediction equations. It has the potential advantage of not only measuring total body water (TBW), as does SF-BIA, but also offering the unique capacity to differentiate between ECW and ICW and, thus, to provide an estimate of BCM. This literature review was conducted to compare available BIS devices to multiple dilution for measuring fluid compartments or BCM in a number of populations. Variable results regarding the ability of BIS to measure absolute volumes, as well as the observation of wide limits of variation, make BIS problematic for individual assessment in the clinic, particularly in populations with abnormal fluid distribution or body geometry. BIS has been found to be more accurate for measuring changes in fluid volumes or BCM, particularly in post-surgical and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. It is certainly possible that population-specific adjustments may improve the accuracy of BIS for assessing individuals in the clinical setting; however, additional research and development is needed before the method can be accepted for routine clinical use. PMID:17644693

  8. Theoretical estimation of 13C-D clumped isotope effects in methyl of several organic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Q.; Yin, X.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in mass spectrometry and tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy make it possible to measure 13C-D clumped isotope effects of methane. These techniques can be further applied to determine 13C-D clumped isotope effects of methyl fragments, therefore need accurate equilirbium Δi values to calibrate experimental measurements. In this study, we calculate temperature depandences of 13C-D clumped isotope signatures in methyl of several organic compounds including ethane, propane, acetic acid, etc. Our calculation are performed at CCSD/6-311+G(3df,3pd) by using Gaussian 03 program with no scale treament. Our results show that the Δi values of 13C-D clumping in methyl fragments of different organic compounds yield similar signals (~5.5‰ at 25˚C, slightly lower than Δi value of 13C-D clumping in methane). For testing the calculated accuracy, theoretical treaments beyond the harmonic level by including several higher-order corrections to the Bigeleisen-Mayer equation are used. Contributions from higher-order corrections (e.g., AnZPE, AnEXC, VrZPE, VrEXC, QmCorr and CenDist) are estimated to repire the ignorings of the Bigeleisen-Mayer equation (the anharmonic effects of vibration, vibration-rotation coupling, quantum mechanics and centrifugal distortion for rotation, etc.) for the calculation of partition function ratios. The results show that the higher-order corrections contribute ~0.05‰ at 25˚C, which is similar to the contribution for calculating 13C-D clumped isotope signature of methane. By comparing our calculated frequencies to the measured ones, the uncertainty of our calculation of Δi values 13C-D clumping in methyl fragments is considered to be within ~0.05‰ at room temperature.

  9. Theoretical Estimation of the Acoustic Energy Generation and Absorption Caused by Jet Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Iwagami, Sho; Kobayashi, Taizo; Takami, Toshiya

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the energy transfer between the fluid field and acoustic field caused by a jet driven by an acoustic particle velocity field across it, which is the key to understanding the aerodynamic sound generation of flue instruments, such as the recorder, flute, and organ pipe. Howe's energy corollary allows us to estimate the energy transfer between these two fields. For simplicity, we consider the situation such that a free jet is driven by a uniform acoustic particle velocity field across it. We improve the semi-empirical model of the oscillating jet, i.e., exponentially growing jet model, which has been studied in the field of musical acoustics, and introduce a polynomially growing jet model so as to apply Howe's formula to it. It is found that the relative phase between the acoustic oscillation and jet oscillation, which changes with the distance from the flue exit, determines the quantity of the energy transfer between the two fields. The acoustic energy is mainly generated in the downstream area, but it is consumed in the upstream area near the flue exit in driving the jet. This theoretical examination well explains the numerical calculation of Howe's formula for the two-dimensional flue instrument model in our previous work [Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 061411 (2014)] as well as the experimental result of Yoshikawa et al. [J. Sound Vib. 331, 2558 (2012)].

  10. Theoretical estimation of the temperature and pressure within collapsing acoustical bubbles.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2014-01-01

    Formation of highly reactive species such as OH, H, HO2 and H2O2 due to transient collapse of cavitation bubbles is the primary mechanism of sonochemical reaction. The crucial parameters influencing the formation of radicals are the temperature and pressure achieved in the bubble during the strong collapse. Experimental determinations estimated a temperature of about 5000 K and pressure of several hundreds of MPa within the collapsing bubble. In this theoretical investigation, computer simulations of chemical reactions occurring in an O2-bubble oscillating in water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave have been performed for diverse combinations of various parameters such as ultrasound frequency (20-1000 kHz), acoustic amplitude (up to 0.3 MPa), static pressure (0.03-0.3 MPa) and liquid temperature (283-333 K). The aim of this series of computations is to correlate the production of OH radicals to the temperature and pressure achieved in the bubble during the strong collapse. The employed model combines the dynamic of bubble collapse in acoustical field with the chemical kinetics of single bubble. The results of the numerical simulations revealed that the main oxidant created in an O2 bubble is OH radical. The computer simulations clearly showed the existence of an optimum bubble temperature of about 5200±200 K and pressure of about 250±20 MPa. The predicted value of the bubble temperature for the production of OH radicals is in excellent agreement with that furnished by the experiments. The existence of an optimum bubble temperature and pressure in collapsing bubbles results from the competitions between the reactions of production and those of consumption of OH radicals at high temperatures. PMID:23769748

  11. The limits of crop productivity: validating theoretical estimates and determining the factors that limit crop yields in optimal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.

    1992-01-01

    Plant scientists have sought to maximize the yield of food crops since the beginning of agriculture. There are numerous reports of record food and biomass yields (per unit area) in all major crop plants, but many of the record yield reports are in error because they exceed the maximal theoretical rates of the component processes. In this article, we review the component processes that govern yield limits and describe how each process can be individually measured. This procedure has helped us validate theoretical estimates and determine what factors limit yields in optimal environments.

  12. [A novel respiratory detecting system based on bio-impedance].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-bo; Deng, Qin-kai; Guo, Jin-song; Feng, Xue-ji

    2009-03-01

    This paper introduces the design and implementation of a novel respiratory detecting system based on bio-impedance method. By increasing electrodes in space, the system make multi-channel respiratory signals be superpositioned and filtered (SNR); Traditional filter methods by both hardware and software are also used to further increase anti-interference ability. A low consumption and portable instrument is designed based on MSP430 Micro Controller Unit (MCU), The experiment shows a better performance in the reduction of interference noises of heartbeat and blood flow especially the motion artifact. Also the system works stably. PMID:19565791

  13. The view within: the emerging technology of thoracic electrical bioimpedance.

    PubMed

    Lasater, M

    1998-11-01

    With the increasing incidence of catheter-related sepsis and recognition of increased mortality and cost of care with pulmonary artery catheters, the need for a safe, cost-effective, and clinically accurate means of obtaining hemodynamic data has become evident. Through the technology of thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB), non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring is now possible with the BioZ.com, manufactured by CardioDynamics International Corporation. The BioZ.com provides continuous hemodynamic readings safely, accurately, and inexpensively. TEB is proving to be a valuable adjunct to patient assessment and treatment across multiple health care settings. PMID:10646425

  14. New Theoretical Results on Channelized Hotelling Observer Performance Estimation with Known Difference of Class Means.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frédéric

    2013-01-11

    Task-based assessments of image quality constitute a rigorous, principled approach to the evaluation of imaging system performance. To conduct such assessments, it has been recognized that mathematical model observers are very useful, particularly for purposes of imaging system development and optimization. One type of model observer that has been widely applied in the medical imaging community is the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). Since estimates of CHO performance typically include statistical variability, it is important to control and limit this variability to maximize the statistical power of image-quality studies. In a previous paper, we demonstrated that by including prior knowledge of the image class means, a large decrease in the bias and variance of CHO performance estimates can be realized. The purpose of the present work is to present refinements and extensions of the estimation theory given in our previous paper, which was limited to point estimation with equal numbers of images from each class. Specifically, we present and characterize minimum-variance unbiased point estimators for observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that allow for unequal numbers of lesion-absent and lesion-present images. Building on this SNR point estimation theory, we then show that confidence intervals with exactly-known coverage probabilities can be constructed for commonly-used CHO performance measures. Moreover, we propose simple, approximate confidence intervals for CHO performance, and we show that they are well-behaved in most scenarios of interest. PMID:24436497

  15. Differentiation of fast and slow muscle fibers by bioimpedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, M.-V.; Khider, N.; Ribbe, E.; Damez, J.-L.

    2010-04-01

    The differentiation of fast and slow muscle fibers in vivo still requires constraining equipment (ergometer, biopsy ...) and invasive techniques. These fibers conduct the electrical current differently. Therefore the aim of this study is to see if it is possible to differentiate quickly, by bioimpedance, fast and slow fibers, and firstly muscles which are typical composed by slow or fast fibers. To do this, we used a multifrequency impedancemeter Z-Metrix® (BioparHom© Company, France). We collected the electrical characteristics (Longitudinal and Transversal, from 1 to 1000 kHz) for a population of 20 rats aged 70 days, on Soleus muscles (composed principally of slow fibers) and Extensor Digitroum Longus (EDL) muscles (composed principally of fast fibers). We compared the means of alpha (L/T), R (L/T) and X (L/T) with Wilcoxon tests. We obtained non significant differences between electrical data obtained on EDL and Soleus muscles, but we could see differences on graphics representation and with the example of one rat. Therefore, we can assume that differentiation, by bioimpedance, of muscles typed slow and fast fibers, could be possible.

  16. Detection and Classification of Measurement Errors in Bioimpedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Pita, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurement errors may be caused by parasitic stray capacitance, impedance mismatch, cross-talking or their very likely combination. An accurate detection and identification is of extreme importance for further analysis because in some cases and for some applications, certain measurement artifacts can be corrected, minimized or even avoided. In this paper we present a robust method to detect the presence of measurement artifacts and identify what kind of measurement error is present in BIS measurements. The method is based on supervised machine learning and uses a novel set of generalist features for measurement characterization in different immittance planes. Experimental validation has been carried out using a database of complex spectra BIS measurements obtained from different BIS applications and containing six different types of errors, as well as error-free measurements. The method obtained a low classification error (0.33%) and has shown good generalization. Since both the features and the classification schema are relatively simple, the implementation of this pre-processing task in the current hardware of bioimpedance spectrometers is possible. PMID:27362862

  17. A Bioimpedance Analysis Platform for Amputee Residual Limb Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, JE; Moehring, MM; Rothlisberger, TM; Phillips, RH; Hartley, T; Dietrich, CR; Redd, CB; Gardner, DW; Cagle, JC

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this research was to develop a bioimpedance platform for monitoring fluid volume in residual limbs of people with trans-tibial limb loss using prostheses. Methods A customized multi-frequency current stimulus profile was sent to thin flat electrodes positioned on the thigh and distal residual limb. The applied current signal and sensed voltage signals from four pairs of electrodes located on the anterior and posterior surfaces were demodulated into resistive and reactive components. An established electrical model (Cole) and segmental limb geometry model were used to convert results to extracellular and intracellular fluid volumes. Bench tests and testing on amputee participants were conducted to optimize the stimulus profile and electrode design and layout. Results The proximal current injection electrode needed to be at least 25 cm from the proximal voltage sensing electrode. A thin layer of hydrogel needed to be present during testing to ensure good electrical coupling. Using a burst duration of 2.0 ms, intermission interval of 100 μs, and sampling delay of 10 μs at each of 24 frequencies except 5 kHz which required a 200 μs sampling delay, the system achieved a sampling rate of 19.7 Hz. Conclusion The designed bioimpedance platform allowed system settings and electrode layouts and positions to be optimized for amputee limb fluid volume measurement. Significance The system will be useful towards identifying and ranking prosthetic design features and participant characteristics that impact residual limb fluid volume. PMID:26595906

  18. A Batteryless Sensor ASIC for Implantable Bio-Impedance Applications.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Saul; Ollmar, Stig; Waqar, Muhammad; Rusu, Ana

    2016-06-01

    The measurement of the biological tissue's electrical impedance is an active research field that has attracted a lot of attention during the last decades. Bio-impedances are closely related to a large variety of physiological conditions; therefore, they are useful for diagnosis and monitoring in many medical applications. Measuring living tissues, however, is a challenging task that poses countless technical and practical problems, in particular if the tissues need to be measured under the skin. This paper presents a bio-impedance sensor ASIC targeting a battery-free, miniature size, implantable device, which performs accurate 4-point complex impedance extraction in the frequency range from 2 kHz to 2 MHz. The ASIC is fabricated in 150 nm CMOS, has a size of 1.22 mm × 1.22 mm and consumes 165 μA from a 1.8 V power supply. The ASIC is embedded in a prototype which communicates with, and is powered by an external reader device through inductive coupling. The prototype is validated by measuring the impedances of different combinations of discrete components, measuring the electrochemical impedance of physiological solution, and performing ex vivo measurements on animal organs. The proposed ASIC is able to extract complex impedances with around 1 Ω resolution; therefore enabling accurate wireless tissue measurements. PMID:26372646

  19. Detection of fruit quality based on bioimpedance using probe electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qunhe; Wang, Jianping; Ye, Zunzhong; Ying, Yibin; Li, Yanbin

    2005-11-01

    The fruit impedance is related to fruit internal quality. Differences in impedance of various quality of apples were measured by use of solartron 1294 impedance interface and solartron 1260 impedance analyzer instrument, four brass-wire probes electrodes, personal computer and the software of bioimpedance measurement of fruits. Apples as examples were experimented at frequency range (1 Hz ~ 1M Hz), and the relation between their impedance parameters and their quality was studied. The results of experiment indicate that the increasing of the frequency could constantly lead to the decreasing of the impedance. When the frequency was increased from 1Hz to 1MHz, the two points impedance of apples' surface decreased 12-15 times. The impedance of good quality apples was nearly constant at both low and high frequency. When detected the rot apples, the impedance was similar to the good apples' at high frequency, and different at low frequency. It was 60-100 ohm lower than normal for the rot apple detection of various rot area. At 1Hz frequency, the impedance measured of 10cm2 rot area was 397ohm, which was about 200ohm lower than normal. The conclusion is it feasible that the bioimpedance can be adopted to distinguishing the internal quality of fruit.

  20. Detection and Classification of Measurement Errors in Bioimpedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, David; Gil-Pita, Roberto; Seoane, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurement errors may be caused by parasitic stray capacitance, impedance mismatch, cross-talking or their very likely combination. An accurate detection and identification is of extreme importance for further analysis because in some cases and for some applications, certain measurement artifacts can be corrected, minimized or even avoided. In this paper we present a robust method to detect the presence of measurement artifacts and identify what kind of measurement error is present in BIS measurements. The method is based on supervised machine learning and uses a novel set of generalist features for measurement characterization in different immittance planes. Experimental validation has been carried out using a database of complex spectra BIS measurements obtained from different BIS applications and containing six different types of errors, as well as error-free measurements. The method obtained a low classification error (0.33%) and has shown good generalization. Since both the features and the classification schema are relatively simple, the implementation of this pre-processing task in the current hardware of bioimpedance spectrometers is possible. PMID:27362862

  1. Uncertainty in Multifractal Estimates : a Bottleneck for Applications and a Stimulating Theoretical Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Lojveoy, S.

    2009-05-01

    A fundamental and attractive feature of multifractal fields is that they are extremely variable over a wide range of scale and have long range dependencies. They are therefore at odd with the usual statistical estimator framework and this may explain the limited achievements in defining robust and accurate multifractal estimators. We believe that the lack of the latter has become a stronger and stronger bottleneck for practical applications of multifractals. For instance, rather inconsistent estimates of multifractal parameters of geophysical fields can be easily pointed out. Nevertheless, we also point out the irrelevance of hasty claims that the uncertainty of multifractal attributes should be definitively large. We recall a few general and non parametric results, e.g. non gaussian convergence of the estimators, limitations induced by the length, number and resolution of samples, which have been obtained by various authors in somewhat different frameworks. We then focus on the parametric case study of the universal multifractals and more particularly the Double Trace Moment technique to estimate their parameters. We illustrate a few possible numerical pitfalls, such as those induced by number representation limitations, which depend on the used programming language. We present optimization procedures to take care of the above mentioned limitations, which otherwise may lead to paradoxical results, e.g. parameters of a weakly multifractal field would be harder to estimate than those of a strongly multifractal field. Finally, we discuss and quantify the intrinsic variability of the "best estimates", in particular in relationship with the notion of equifinality, which has been often used in hydrology.

  2. PREFACE: First Latin-American Conference on Bioimpedance (CLABIO 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertemes Filho, Pedro

    2012-12-01

    The past decade has witnessed an unprecedented growth in medical technologies and a new generation of diagnostics, characterized by mobility, virtualization, homecare and costs. The ever growing demand and the rapid need for low cost tools for characterizing human tissue, and supporting intelligence and technologies for non-invasive tissue cancer investigation raise unique and evolving opportunities for research in Electrical Bioimpedance. The CLABIO2012 - First Latin American Conference on Bioimpedance is a premier Latin-American conference on Bioimpedance for research groups working on Electrical Bioimpedance. It allows Latin American researchers to share their experiences with other groups from all over the world by presenting scientific work and potential innovations in this research area and also in the social events promoting informal get togethers in the Brazilian style. The work covers a broad range including Biomedical Engineering and Computing, Medical Physics and Medical Sciences, Environment, Biology and Chemistry. Also, the Conference is intended to give students and research groups the opportunity to learn more about Bioimpedance as an important tool in biological material characterization and also in diagnosis. The conference is designed to showcase cutting edge research and accomplishments, and to enrich the educational and industrial experience in this field. It also represents a unique opportunity to meet colleagues and friends, exchanging ideas, and learning about new developments and best practice, while working to advance the understanding of the knowledge base that we will collectively draw upon in the years ahead to meet future challenges. Participants will attend presentations by scholars representing both institutes and academia. The CLABIO2012 proceedings include over 25 papers selected via a peer review process. The conference program features tutorial talks by world-leading scholars and five sessions for regular paper oral presentations

  3. The MOM tunneling diode - Theoretical estimate of its performance at microwave and infrared frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, A.; Davis, C. F., Jr.; Liu, K. C.; Javan, A.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the metal-oxide-metal (MOM) antenna/diode as a detector of microwave and infrared radiation is presented with the experimental verification conducted in the far infrared. It is shown that the detectivity at room temperature can be as high as 10 to the 10th per W Hz exp 1/2 at frequencies of 10 to the 14th Hz in the infrared. As a result, design guidelines are obtained for the lithographic fabrication of thin-film MOM structures that are to operate in the 10-micron region of the infrared spectrum.

  4. Theoretical estimates of photoproduction cross sections for neutral subthreshold pions in carbon-carbon collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Using the Weizsacher-Williams method of virtual quanta, total cross section estimates for the photoproduction of neutral subthreshold pins in carbon-carbon collisions at incident energies below 300 MeV/nucleon are made. Comparisons with recent experimental data indicate that the photoproduction mechanism makes an insignificant contribution to these measured cross sections.

  5. Estimation of acoustical streaming: theoretical model, Doppler measurements and optical visualisation.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Kowalewski, T; Secomski, W; Wójcik, J

    1998-02-01

    An approximate solution for the streaming velocity generated by flat and weakly focused transducers was derived by directly solving the Dirichlet boundary conditions for the Poisson equation, the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for the axial components of the streaming velocity. The theoretical model was verified experimentally using a 32 MHz pulsed Doppler unit. The experimental acoustical fields were produced by three different 4 mm diameter flat and focused transducers driven by the transmitter generating the average acoustic power within the range from 1 microW to 6 mW. The streaming velocity was measured along the ultrasonic beam from 0 to 2 cm. Streaming was induced in a solution of water and corn starch. The experimental results showed that for a given acoustic power the streaming velocity was independent of the starch density in water, changed from 0.3 to 40 grams of starch in 1 l of distilled water. For applied acoustic powers, the streaming velocity changed linearly from 0.2 to 40 mm/s. Both, the theoretical solutions for plane and focused waves and the experimental results were in good agreement. The streaming velocity field was also visualised using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and two different evaluation methods. The first based on the FFT-based cross-correlation analysis between small sections for each pair of images and the second employing the algorithm of searching for local displacements between several images. PMID:9614292

  6. Experimental validation of theoretical methods to estimate the energy radiated by elastic waves during an impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Rosny, Julien de; Toussaint, Renaud; Sainte-Marie, Jacques; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the energy lost in elastic waves during an impact is an important problem in seismology and in industry. We propose three complementary methods to estimate the elastic energy radiated by bead impacts on thin plates and thick blocks from the generated vibration. The first two methods are based on the direct wave front and are shown to be equivalent. The third method makes use of the diffuse regime. These methods are tested for laboratory experiments of impacts and are shown to give the same results, with error bars of 40 percent and 300 percent for impacts on a smooth plate and on a rough block, respectively. We show that these methods are relevant to establish the energy budget of an impact. On plates of glass and PMMA, the radiated elastic energy increases from 2 percent to almost 100 percent of the total energy lost as the bead diameter approaches the plate thickness. The rest of the lost energy is dissipated by viscoelasticity. For beads larger than the plate thickness, plastic deformation occurs and reduces the amount of energy radiated in the form of elastic waves. On a concrete block, the energy dissipation during the impact is principally inelastic because only 0.2-2 percent of the energy lost by the bead is transported by elastic waves. The radiated elastic energy estimated with the presented methods is quantitatively validated by Hertz's model of elastic impact.

  7. Theoretical and experimental study of DOA estimation using AML algorithm for an isotropic and non-isotropic 3D array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Shadnaz; Ali, Andreas M.; Collier, Travis C.; Yao, Yuan; Hudson, Ralph E.; Yao, Kung; Taylor, Charles E.

    2007-09-01

    The focus of most direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation problems has been based mainly on a two-dimensional (2D) scenario where we only need to estimate the azimuth angle. But in various practical situations we have to deal with a three-dimensional scenario. The importance of being able to estimate both azimuth and elevation angles with high accuracy and low complexity is of interest. We present the theoretical and the practical issues of DOA estimation using the Approximate-Maximum-Likelihood (AML) algorithm in a 3D scenario. We show that the performance of the proposed 3D AML algorithm converges to the Cramer-Rao Bound. We use the concept of an isotropic array to reduce the complexity of the proposed algorithm by advocating a decoupled 3D version. We also explore a modified version of the decoupled 3D AML algorithm which can be used for DOA estimation with non-isotropic arrays. Various numerical results are presented. We use two acoustic arrays each consisting of 8 microphones to do some field measurements. The processing of the measured data from the acoustic arrays for different azimuth and elevation angles confirms the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  8. Application of longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurements in peritoneal dialysis at 50 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nescolarde, L.; Doñate, T.; Casañas, R.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2010-04-01

    More relevant information of the fluid changes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) might be obtained with segmental bioimpedance measurements rather than whole-body measurement, who hidden information of body composition. Whole-body and segmental bioimpedance measurements were obtained using 5 configurations (whole-body or right-side (RS), longitudinal-leg (L-LEG), longitudinal-abdomen (L-AB), transversal-abdomen (T-AB), and transversal-leg (T-LEG)) in 20 patients: 15 males (56.5 ± 9.4 yr, 24.2 ± 4.2 kg/m2) and 5 females (58.4 ± 7.1 yr, 28.2 ± 5.9 kg/m2) in peritoneal dialysis (PD). The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between whole-body, longitudinal-segmental (L-LEG and L-AB) and transversal-segmental (TAB and TLEG) bioimpedance measurement at 50 kHz, with clinical parameters of cardiovascular risk, dyslipidemia, nutrition and hydration. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used for the normality test of all variables. Longitudinal bioimpedance parameters were normalized by the height of the patients. The Spearman correlation was used to analyze the correlation between bioimpedance and clinical parameters. The statistical significance was considered with P < 0.05. Transversal bioimpedance measurements have higher correlation with clinical parameters than longitudinal measurements.

  9. Theoretical, observational, and isotopic estimates of the lifetime of the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, Frank A.; Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    There are a variety of isotopic data for meteorites which suggest that the protostellar nebula existed and was involved in making planetary materials for some 10(exp 7) yr or more. Many cosmochemists, however, advocate alternative interpretations of such data in order to comply with a perceived constraint, from theoretical considerations, that the nebula existed only for a much shorter time, usually stated as less than or equal to 10(exp 6) yr. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to solar nebula duration which is available through three different disciplines: theoretical modeling of star formation, isotopic data from meteorites, and astronomical observations of T Tauri stars. Theoretical models based on observations of present star-forming regions indicate that stars like the Sun form by dynamical gravitational collapse of dense cores of cold molcular clouds in the interstellar clouds in the interstellar medium. The collapse to a star and disk occurs rapidly, on a time scale of the order 10(exp 5) yr. Disks evolve by dissipating energy while redistributing angular momentum, but it is difficult to predict the rate of evolution, particularly for low mass (compared to the star) disks which nonetheless still contain enough material to account for the observed planetary system. There is no compelling evidence, from available theories of disk structure and evolution, that the solar nebula must have evolved rapidly and could not have persisted for more than 1 Ma. In considering chronoloically relevant isotopic data for meteorites, we focus on three methodologies: absolute ages by U-Pb/Pb-Pb, and relative ages by short-lived radionuclides (especially Al-26) and by evolution of Sr-87/Sr-86. Two kinds of meteoritic materials-refractory inclusions such as CAIs and differential meteorites (eucrites and augrites) -- appear to have experienced potentially dateable nebular events. In both cases, the most straightforward interpretations of the available data indicate

  10. Theoretical, observational, and isotopic estimates of the lifetime of the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, Frank A.; Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    There are a variety of isotopic data for meteorites which suggest that the protostellar nebula existed and was involved in making planetary materials for some 10(exp 7) yr or more. Many cosmochemists, however, advocate alternative interpretations of such data in order to comply with a perceived constraint, from theoretical considerations, that the nebula existed only for a much shorter time, usually stated as less than or = 10(exp 6) yr. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to solar nebula duration which is available through three different disciplines: theoretical modelling of star formation, isotopic data from meteorites, and astronomical observations of T Tauri stars. Theoretical models based on observations of present star-forming regions indicate that stars like the Sun form by dynamical gravitational collapse of dense cores of cold molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. The collapse to a star and disk occurs rapidly on a time scale of the order 10(exp 5) yr. Disks evolve by dissipating energy while redistributing angular momentum, but it is difficult to predict the rate of evolution, particularly for low mass (compared to the star) disks which nonetheless still contain enough material to account for the observed planetary system. There is no compelling evidence, from available theories of disk structure and evolution, that the solar nebula must have evolved rapidly and could not have persisted for more than 1 Ma. In considering chronologically relevant isotopic data for meteorites, we focus on three methodologies: absolute ages by U-Pb/Pb-Pb, and relative ages by short-lived radionuclides (especially Al-26) and by evolution of Sr-87/Sr-86. Two kinds of meteoritic materials-refractory inclusions such as CAIs and differentiated meteorites (eucrites and angrites) - appear to have experience potentially dateable nebular events. In both case, the most straightforward interpretations of the available data indicate nebular events spanning several Ma. We

  11. SU-E-J-188: Theoretical Estimation of Margin Necessary for Markerless Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R; Block, A; Harkenrider, M; Roeske, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the margin necessary to adequately cover the target using markerless motion tracking (MMT) of lung lesions given the uncertainty in tracking and the size of the target. Methods: Simulations were developed in Matlab to determine the effect of tumor size and tracking uncertainty on the margin necessary to achieve adequate coverage of the target. For simplicity, the lung tumor was approximated by a circle on a 2D radiograph. The tumor was varied in size from a diameter of 0.1 − 30 mm in increments of 0.1 mm. From our previous studies using dual energy markerless motion tracking, we estimated tracking uncertainties in x and y to have a standard deviation of 2 mm. A Gaussian was used to simulate the deviation between the tracked location and true target location. For each size tumor, 100,000 deviations were randomly generated, the margin necessary to achieve at least 95% coverage 95% of the time was recorded. Additional simulations were run for varying uncertainties to demonstrate the effect of the tracking accuracy on the margin size. Results: The simulations showed an inverse relationship between tumor size and margin necessary to achieve 95% coverage 95% of the time using the MMT technique. The margin decreased exponentially with target size. An increase in tracking accuracy expectedly showed a decrease in margin size as well. Conclusion: In our clinic a 5 mm expansion of the internal target volume (ITV) is used to define the planning target volume (PTV). These simulations show that for tracking accuracies in x and y better than 2 mm, the margin required is less than 5 mm. This simple simulation can provide physicians with a guideline estimation for the margin necessary for use of MMT clinically based on the accuracy of their tracking and the size of the tumor.

  12. Simple voltage-controlled current source for wideband electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy: circuit dependences and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoane, F.; Macías, R.; Bragós, R.; Lindecrantz, K.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, the single Op-Amp with load-in-the-loop topology as a current source is revisited. This circuit topology was already used as a voltage-controlled current source (VCCS) in the 1960s but was left unused when the requirements for higher frequency arose among the applications of electrical bioimpedance (EBI). The aim of the authors is not only limited to show that with the currently available electronic devices it is perfectly viable to use this simple VCCS topology as a working current source for wideband spectroscopy applications of EBI, but also to identify the limitations and the role of each of the circuit components in the most important parameter of a current for wideband applications: the output impedance. The study includes the eventual presence of a stray capacitance and also an original enhancement, driving with current the VCCS. Based on the theoretical analysis and experimental measurements, an accurate model of the output impedance is provided, explaining the role of the main constitutive elements of the circuit in the source's output impedance. Using the topologies presented in this work and the proposed model, any electronic designer can easily implement a simple and efficient current source for wideband EBI spectroscopy applications, e.g. in this study, values above 150 kΩ at 1 MHz have been obtained, which to the knowledge of the authors are the largest values experimentally measured and reported for a current source in EBI at this frequency.

  13. The impact of theoretical errors on velocity estimation and accuracy of duplex grading of carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nicholas; Taylor, Peter; Padayachee, Soundrie

    2002-02-01

    Two potential errors in velocity estimation, Doppler angle misalignment and intrinsic spectral broadening (ISB), were determined and used to correct recorded blood velocities obtained from 20 patients (38 bifurcations). The recorded and corrected velocities were used to grade stenoses of greater than 70% using two duplex classification schemes. The first scheme used a peak systolic velocity (PSV) of > 250 cm/s in the internal carotid artery (ICA), and the second a PSV ratio of > 3.4 (ICA PSV/common carotid artery PSV). The "gold standard" was digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The maximum error in velocity estimation due to Doppler angle misalignment was 33 cm/s, but this did not alter sensitivity of stenosis detection. ISB correction caused a reduction in PSV that decreased the sensitivity of the PSV scheme from 65% to 45%. The PSV ratio classification was not affected by ISB errors. Centres using a PSV criterion for grading stenosis should use a fixed Doppler angle and should establish velocity thresholds in-house. PMID:11937281

  14. Detection and localization of internal haemorrhaging using electrical bioimpedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J.; Fenech, M.

    2013-04-01

    Electrical bioimpedance is an effective measuring tool to provide quick, non-invasive, real-time results which will be applied to the detection of internal haemorrhaging. Experiments were performed on female Fancy Rats weighing 333±44g, and 10mL of porcine blood was injected abdominally over 3 minutes. Data was collected using an 8×8 needle electrode array at 5 kHz, and 95 kHz and sent to the BioParHom Z-Flow. A strong correlation was found between the electrode paths crossing directly through the blood injection site, showing a decrease of about -0.17±0.1Ω/mL for the 5 kHz frequency. This correlation allows us to quickly detect internal haemorrhaging and also localize it with the current path set-up in the electrode array.

  15. Circular motion analysis of time-varying bioimpedance.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, B; Louarroudi, E; Rutkove, S B; Pintelon, R

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a step forward towards the analysis of a linear periodically time-varying (PTV) bioimpedance ZPTV(jw, t), which is an important subclass of a linear time-varying (LTV) bioimpedance. Similarly to the Fourier coefficients of a periodic signal, a PTV impedance can be decomposed into frequency dependent impedance phasors, [Formula: see text], that are rotating with an angular speed of wr = 2πr/TZ. The vector length of these impedance phasors corresponds to the amplitude of the rth-order harmonic impedance |Zr( jw)| and the initial phase is given by Φr(w, t0) = [Symbol: see text]Zr( jw) + 2πrt0/TZ, with t0∈[0, T] being a time instant within the measurement time T. The impedance period TZ stands for the cycle length of the bio-system under investigation; for example, the elapsed time between two consecutive R-waves in the electrocardiogram or the breathing periodicity in case of the heart or lungs, respectively. First, it is demonstrated that the harmonic impedance phasor [Formula: see text], at a particular measured frequency k, can be represented by a rotating phasor, leading to the so-called circular motion analysis technique. Next, the two dimensional (2D) representation of the harmonic impedance phasors is then extended to a three-dimensional (3D) coordinate system by taking into account the frequency dependence. Finally, we introduce a new visualizing tool to summarize the frequency response behavior of ZPTV( jw, t) into a single 3D plot using the local Frenet-Serret frame. This novel 3D impedance representation is then compared with the 3D Nyquist representation of a PTV impedance. The concepts are illustrated through real measurements conducted on a PTV RC-circuit. PMID:26489699

  16. Theoretical estimation of the radiative cooling rate in the Jovian troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuto; Hashimoto, George L.; Ishiwatari, Masaki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki O.; Sugiyama, Ko-ichiro; Onishi, Masanori; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    Jupiter exhibits characteristic cloud activities but their physical mechanism remains poorly understood. Recently, Sugiyama et al. (2014) demonstrated that the Jovian cloud convection may have a significant intermittency in the generation of cumulonimbus clouds with the typical interval length controlled by the radiative cooling rate in the upper troposphere. In spite of such importance as a controlling factor of cloud activity, the tropospheric radiative cooling rate profile has never been systematically quantified for the Jovian system. In the Jovian troposphere, condensable species (NH3, H2S, H2O) and their condensates might significantly contribute to radiative transfer.Here we show numerical estimates of radiative cooling rate profile under Jovian troposphere condition by using our non-gray radiative transfer model that contains optical properties of gas species (H2, He, H2O, CH4, NH3, H2S, and PH3) and cloud layers made of H2O, NH4SH, and NH3 ice particles. The temperature profile is determined by the radiative-convective equilibrium state satisfying an observed potential temperature of Jovian troposphere. The mean vertical distributions of gas and cloud are given on the basis of the latest hydrodynamic simulation of Jovian cloud convection (Sugiyama et al., 2014) and cosmochemical consideration.The modeled atmosphere has the tropopause at ~0.38 bar level. The radiative cooling rate reaches the maximum 15 x 10-3 K/Jovian day at ~0.5 bar level, then decreases with depth and approaches zero below 5 bar level. This profile is largely determined by the thermal absorption and emission due to gaseous NH3 and H2 with a slight modification by solar heating due to CH4. The cloud layers are found to have only a weak effect on either radiative cooling or heating because their opacities in the longwave radiation are estimated to be very small, which agrees with the observed 5-micron spectrum with high brightness temperatures. The uncertainty in H2O abundance in deep

  17. GENDER FEATURES OF THE ANTHROPOMETRIC, CEPHALOMETRIC AND BIOIMPEDANCE PARAMETERS IN THE STUDENTS OF YAKUTIA.

    PubMed

    Guryeva, A B; Alekseyeva, V A; Petrova, P G

    2015-01-01

    To establish the anthropo-ecological portrait of the current population of Yakutia, it is necessary to study the regularities of the variability of physical status in different gender groups and develop regional standards of the physical development of different age-sex groups of the population with regard to the peculiarities of the environment. The aim of this study is to do research on the gender features of anthropometric, cephalometric and bioimpedance parameters in the students of Yakut ethnicity. The measures of 228 Yakut girls and 168 Yakut youths born and permanently resident in Yakutia were analyzed. Anthropometric measurements were performed using the method of V.V. Bunak (1941), somatotyping--using the Rees-Eysenck index (1945). Head type was determined by the cephalic index, face type--by the upper facial index. Bioelectrical impedance analysis with the use of ABC--01 Medass analyzer was performed to estimate body composition. Adipose tissue mass (AM), skeletal muscle mass (SMM), lean mass (LM), active cell mass (ACM) and phase angle (PA) were determined. Obtained material was processed by the method of variation statistics with the use of SPSS 17.0 software package. Overall measures of the soma of the examined groups have gender features of body organization that are expressed in the significantly higher values of all measured parameters in the youths of Yakutia. In our study, the sexual dimorphism in the distribution of somatotypes by the Rees-Eysenck index has not been identified. The analysis of cephalometric measures has revealed reliably higher parameters of absolute head sizes in the youths. Gender differences in the distribution of head and face types have not been found in the examined ethno-age group. Significantly larger absolute amount of AM has been established in the girls. The measures of SMM, ACM and LM are reliably higher in the youths. The values of active and reactive tissue resistance are reliably higher in the girls. Gender

  18. On differences in radiosensitivity estimation: TCP experiments versus survival curves. A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrev, Pavel; Stavreva, Nadejda; Ruggieri, Ruggero; Nahum, Alan

    2015-08-01

    We have compared two methods of estimating the cellular radiosensitivity of a heterogeneous tumour, namely, via cell-survival and via tumour control probability (TCP) pseudo-experiments. It is assumed that there exists intra-tumour variability in radiosensitivity and that the tumour consists predominantly of radiosensitive cells and a small number of radio-resistant cells. Using a multi-component, linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell kill, a pseudo-experimental cell-survival versus dose curve is derived. This curve is then fitted with a mono-component LQ model describing the response of a homogeneous cell population. For the assumed variation in radiosensitivity it is shown that the composite pseudo-experimental survival curve is well approximated by the survival curve of cells with uniform radiosensitivity. For the same initial cell radiosensitivity distribution several pseudo-experimental TCP curves are simulated corresponding to different fractionation regimes. The TCP model used accounts for clonogen proliferation during a fractionated treatment. The set of simulated TCP curves is then fitted with a mono-component TCP model. As in the cell survival experiment the fit with a mono-component model assuming uniform radiosensitivity is shown to be highly acceptable. However, the best-fit values of cellular radiosensitivity produced via the two methods are very different. The cell-survival pseudo-experiment yields a high radiosensitivity value, while the TCP pseudo-experiment shows that the dose-response is dominated by the most resistant sub-population in the tumour, even when this is just a small fraction of the total.

  19. An implantable bioimpedance monitor using 2.45 GHz band for telemetry.

    PubMed

    Bogónez-Franco, Paco; Nescolarde, Lexa; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bragós, Ramon; Rosell-Ferrer, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a multi-frequency single-channel electrical implantable bioimpedance monitor (35 mm × 35 mm × 10 mm, weight 52 g) powered by a NiMH battery. By using the tetrapolar method and injecting 10 µA(peak), the monitor is capable of measuring at 14 different frequencies, from 100 Hz to 200 kHz. It contains a ZigBee transceiver to monitor the measurements performed, and has an embedded memory for backing up the data. RC networks and in-situ heart excised tissues were used to test the system. When measuring a full spectrum every 5 min, 35 days of autonomy are possible due to the low power consumption of the monitor. Temperature drift was estimated by short-term and long-term measurements. Temperature cycling was used to measure modulus and phase angle stability. The result was a very low effect on a modulus decrease of 2.34 Ω, with respect to an impedance of 322 Ω, at 100 Hz and a phase angle increase of 1.1°, at 200 kHz. In addition, measurement errors were bigger at low frequencies because of the high impedance of the electrodes used, which was higher than 10 kΩ at frequencies below 1 kHz. PMID:23242166

  20. Software Tool for Analysis of Breathing-Related Errors in Transthoracic Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abtahi, F.; Gyllensten, I. C.; Lindecrantz, K.; Seoane, F.

    2012-12-01

    During the last decades, Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) has been applied in a range of different applications and mainly using the frequency sweep-technique. Traditionally the tissue under study is considered to be timeinvariant and dynamic changes of tissue activity are ignored and instead treated as a noise source. This assumption has not been adequately tested and could have a negative impact and limit the accuracy for impedance monitoring systems. In order to successfully use frequency-sweeping EBIS for monitoring time-variant systems, it is paramount to study the effect of frequency-sweep delay on Cole Model-based analysis. In this work, we present a software tool that can be used to simulate the influence of respiration activity in frequency-sweep EBIS measurements of the human thorax and analyse the effects of the different error sources. Preliminary results indicate that the deviation on the EBIS measurement might be significant at any frequency, and especially in the impedance plane. Therefore the impact on Cole-model analysis might be different depending on method applied for Cole parameter estimation.

  1. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  2. A theoretical model to estimate the oil burial depth on sandy beaches: A new oil spill management tool.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Ana M; Fernández-Fernández, Sandra; Rey, Daniel

    2016-08-15

    In oiled sandy beaches, unrecovered fuel can be buried up to several metres. This study proposes a theoretical approach to oil burial estimation along the intertidal area. First, our results revealed the existence of two main patterns in seasonal beach profile behaviour. Type A is characterized by intertidal slopes of time-constant steepness which advance/recede parallel to themselves in response to changing wave conditions. Type B is characterized by slopes of time-varying steepness which intersect at a given point in the intertidal area. This finding has a direct influence on the definition of oil depth. Type A pattern exhibits oil burial along the entire intertidal area following decreasing wave energy, while the type B pattern combines burial in high intertidal and exhumation in mid and/or low intertidal zones, depending on the position of the intersection point. These outcomes should be incorporated as key tools in future oil spill management programs. PMID:27241880

  3. A game-theoretic framework for estimating a health purchaser's willingness-to-pay for health and for expansion.

    PubMed

    Yaesoubi, Reza; Roberts, Stephen D

    2010-12-01

    A health purchaser's willingness-to-pay (WTP) for health is defined as the amount of money the health purchaser (e.g. a health maximizing public agency or a profit maximizing health insurer) is willing to spend for an additional unit of health. In this paper, we propose a game-theoretic framework for estimating a health purchaser's WTP for health in markets where the health purchaser offers a menu of medical interventions, and each individual in the population selects the intervention that maximizes her prospect. We discuss how the WTP for health can be employed to determine medical guidelines, and to price new medical technologies, such that the health purchaser is willing to implement them. The framework further introduces a measure for WTP for expansion, defined as the amount of money the health purchaser is willing to pay per person in the population served by the health provider to increase the consumption level of the intervention by one percent without changing the intervention price. This measure can be employed to find how much to invest in expanding a medical program through opening new facilities, advertising, etc. Applying the proposed framework to colorectal cancer screening tests, we estimate the WTP for health and the WTP for expansion of colorectal cancer screening tests for the 2005 US population. PMID:20703814

  4. Non-invasive determination of cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography and electrical bioimpedance.

    PubMed Central

    Northridge, D B; Findlay, I N; Wilson, J; Henderson, E; Dargie, H J

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac output measured by thermodilution in 25 patients within 24 hours of acute myocardial infarction was compared with cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography (24 patients) and electrical bioimpedance (25 patients). The mean (range) cardiac outputs measured by Doppler (4.03 (2.2-6.0) 1/min) and electrical bioimpedance (3.79 (1.1-6.2) 1/min) were similar to the mean thermodilution value (3.95 (2.1-6.2) 1/min). Both non-invasive techniques agreed closely with thermodilution in most patients. None the less, three results with each method disagreed with thermodilution by more than 1 1/min. Both non-invasive techniques were reproducible and accurate in most patients with acute myocardial infarction. Doppler echocardiography was time consuming and technically demanding. Electrical bioimpedance was simple to use and had the additional advantage of allowing continuous monitoring of the cardiac output. PMID:2317415

  5. Ex vivo discrimination between normal and pathological tissues in human breast surgical biopsies using bioimpedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, N; Hamzaoui, L; Rochaix, P; Rigaud, B; Voigt, J J; Morucci, J P

    1999-04-20

    Ex vivo bioimpedance data measured on normal and cancerous female breast tissues are reported. They clearly show that the electrical properties of normal tissues, surrounding tissues, and carcinoma are different. These differences lie in the conductivity, in the characteristic frequency (frequency of the maximum of the imaginary part of the bioimpedance), and also in the shape of the Bode plots. Modeling using an R-S-Zcpe model is reported as well as indexes extracted from the real and imaginary parts of the bioimpedance. Even if a classification of the different types of tissues remains a difficult task and leads to much less precise diagnosis than microscopic examination, the electrical behavior of mammary tissue could be used to develop a noninvasive technique for early breast cancer detection. PMID:10372148

  6. Mirrored Modified Howland Circuit for Bioimpedance Applications: Analytical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertemes-Filho, P.; Negri, L. H.; Felipe, A.; Vincence, V. C.

    2012-12-01

    Multifrequency Electrical Bioimpedance (MEB) has been widely used as a non-invasive technique for characterizing tissues. Most MEB systems use wideband current sources for injecting current to load and instrumentation amplifiers for measuring the resultant potential. Current sources should present intrinsically high output impedance in a very wide frequency range. The objective of this work is to investigate the performance of the Mirrored Modified Howland Current Source (MMHCS) by comparing the analytical solution with the SPICE simulation. It was implemented four MMHCS circuits by using four different operational amplifiers each one. The output current was set to 1 mAp (peak) in the frequency from 1 Hz to 100 MHz. Both techniques presented similar results at lower frequencies. It can be concluded that the output impedance of the circuit is highly dependent of the open-loop gain of the operation amplifier. The analytical solution showed that it is possible to project a current source by using only theirs output current and impedance equations.

  7. Bioimpedance Measurement of Segmental Fluid Volumes and Hemodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Leslie D.; Wu, Yi-Chang; Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Gerth, Wayne A.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Bioimpedance has become a useful tool to measure changes in body fluid compartment volumes. An Electrical Impedance Spectroscopic (EIS) system is described that extends the capabilities of conventional fixed frequency impedance plethysmographic (IPG) methods to allow examination of the redistribution of fluids between the intracellular and extracellular compartments of body segments. The combination of EIS and IPG techniques was evaluated in the human calf, thigh, and torso segments of eight healthy men during 90 minutes of six degree head-down tilt (HDT). After 90 minutes HDT the calf and thigh segments significantly (P < 0.05) lost conductive volume (eight and four percent, respectively) while the torso significantly (P < 0.05) gained volume (approximately three percent). Hemodynamic responses calculated from pulsatile IPG data also showed a segmental pattern consistent with vascular fluid loss from the lower extremities and vascular engorgement in the torso. Lumped-parameter equivalent circuit analyses of EIS data for the calf and thigh indicated that the overall volume decreases in these segments arose from reduced extracellular volume that was not completely balanced by increased intracellular volume. The combined use of IPG and EIS techniques enables noninvasive tracking of multi-segment volumetric and hemodynamic responses to environmental and physiological stresses.

  8. Multi-frequency bioimpedance in human muscle assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Else Marie; Sørensen, Emma Rudbæk; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2015-01-01

    Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is a well-known and tested method for body mass and muscular health assessment. Multi-frequency BIA (mfBIA) equipment now makes it possible to assess a particular muscle as a whole, as well as looking at a muscle at the fiber level. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mfBIA can be used to assess the anatomical, physiological, and metabolic state of skeletal muscles. mfBIA measurements focusing on impedance, resistance, reactance, phase angle, center frequency, membrane capacitance, and both extracellular and intracellular resistance were carried out. Eight healthy human control subjects and three selected cases were examined to demonstrate the extent to which this method may be used clinically, and in relation to training in sport. The electrode setup is shown to affect the mfBIA parameters recorded. Our recommendation is the use of noble metal electrodes in connection with a conductance paste to accommodate the typical BIA frequencies, and to facilitate accurate impedance and resistance measurements. The use of mfBIA parameters, often in conjunction with each other, can be used to reveal indications of contralateral muscle loss, extracellular fluid differences, contracted state, and cell transport/metabolic activity, which relate to muscle performance. Our findings indicate that mfBIA provides a noninvasive, easily measurable and very precise momentary assessment of skeletal muscles. PMID:25896978

  9. Bioimpedance for the spot measurement of tissue density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dylke, E. S.; Ward, L. C.; Stannard, C.; Leigh, A.; Kilbreath, S. L.

    2013-04-01

    Long-standing lymphoedema is characterised by tissues changes which are currently not detectable using bioimpedance spectroscopy. It has been suggested that a combination of bipolar and tetrapolar measurements may be used to detect these tissues changes for a single site in the transverse direction. This was technique was trialled in a group of control participants with no history of lymphoedema or recent upper limb trauma. Repeated spot measurements were done without removal of electrodes to determine biological variability as well as with removal of electrodes to determine technical reproducibility. The inter-limb spot ratio of the controls was then compared to that of a number of women previously diagnosed with secondary lymphoedema in the forearm. Biological variability was not found to greatly influence repeated measures but only moderate technical reliability was found despite excellent co-efficient of variation for the majority of the measurements. A difference was seen between those with more severe swelling and the controls. This novel technique shows promise in detecting tissue changes associated with long-standing lymphoedema.

  10. Estimating the local geometry of magnetic field lines with Cluster: a theoretical discussion of physical and geometrical errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteur, Gerard

    A multi-spacecraft mission with at least four spacecraft, like CLUSTER, MMS, or Cross-Scales, can determine the local geometry of the magnetic field lines when the size of the cluster of spacecraft is small enough compared to the gradient scale lengths of the magnetic field. Shen et al. (2003) and Runov et al. (2003 and 2005) used CLUSTER data to estimate the normal and the curvature of magnetic field lines in the terrestrial current sheet: the two groups used different approaches. Reciprocal vectors of the tetrahedron formed by four spacecraft are a powerful tool for estimating gradients of fields (Chanteur, 1998 and 2000). Considering a thick and planar current sheet model and making use of the statistical properties of the reciprocal vectors allows to discuss theoretically how physical and geometrical errors affect these estimations. References Chanteur, G., Spatial Interpolation for Four Spacecraft: Theory, in Analysis Methods for Multi-Spacecraft Data, ISSI SR-001, pp. 349-369, ESA Publications Division, 1998. Chanteur, G., Accuracy of field gradient estimations by Cluster: Explanation of its dependency upon elongation and planarity of the tetrahedron, pp. 265-268, ESA SP-449, 2000. Runov, A., Nakamura, R., Baumjohann, W., Treumann, R. A., Zhang, T. L., Volwerk, M., V¨r¨s, Z., Balogh, A., Glaßmeier, K.-H., Klecker, B., R‘eme, H., and Kistler, L., Current sheet oo structure near magnetic X-line observed by Cluster, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30, 33-1, 2003. Runov, A., Sergeev, V. A., Nakamura, R., Baumjohann, W., Apatenkov, S., Asano, Y., Takada, T., Volwerk, M.,V¨r¨s, Z., Zhang, T. L., Sauvaud, J.-A., R‘eme, H., and Balogh, A., Local oo structure of the magnetotail current sheet: 2001 Cluster observations, Ann. Geophys., 24, 247-262, 2006. Shen, C., Li, X., Dunlop, M., Liu, Z. X., Balogh, A., Baker, D. N., Hapgood, M., and Wang, X., Analyses on the geometrical structure of magnetic field in the current sheet based on cluster measurements, J. Geophys. Res

  11. THEORETICAL ESTIMATES OF STELLAR e {sup -} CAPTURES. I. THE HALF-LIFE OF {sup 7}Be IN EVOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Simonucci, S.; Taioli, S.; Busso, M.; Palmerini, S. E-mail: taioli@fbk.eu

    2013-02-20

    The enrichment of Li in the universe is still unexplained, presenting various puzzles to astrophysics. One open issue is that of obtaining reliable estimates for the rate of e {sup -} captures on {sup 7}Be for T and {rho} conditions that are different from the solar ones. This is of crucial importance for modeling the Galactic nucleosynthesis of Li. In this framework, we present here a new theoretical method for calculating the e {sup -} capture rate in typical conditions for evolved stars. Furthermore, we show how our approach compares with state-of-the-art techniques for solar conditions, where various estimates are available. Our computations include (1) 'traditional' calculations of the electronic density at the nucleus, to which the e {sup -} capture rate for {sup 7}Be is proportional, for different theoretical approaches including the Thomas-Fermi, Poisson-Boltzmann, and Debye-Hueckel (DH) models of screening; and (2) a new computation, based on a formalism that goes beyond the previous ones, adopting a mean-field 'adiabatic' approximation to the scattering process. The results obtained with the new approach as well as with traditional ones and their differences are discussed in some detail, starting from solar conditions, where our approach and the DH model essentially converge to the same solution. We then analyze the applicability of both our method and the DH model to a rather broad range of T and {rho} values, embracing those typical of red giant stars, where both bound and continuum states contribute to the capture. We find that over a wide region of the parameter space explored, the DH approximation does not really stand, so that the more general method we suggest should be preferred. As a first application, we briefly reanalyze the {sup 7}Li abundances in red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch stars of the Galactic disk in light of a revision in the Be decay only; however, we emphasize that the changes we find in the electron density at the

  12. Bio-Impedance Characterization Technique with Implantable Neural Stimulator Using Biphasic Current Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Kai; Chang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Wentai

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the bio-impedance and its equivalent circuit model at the electrode-electrolyte/tissue interface is important in the application of functional electrical stimulation. Impedance can be used as a merit to evaluate the proximity between electrodes and targeted tissues. Understanding the equivalent circuit parameters of the electrode can further be leveraged to set a safe boundary for stimulus parameters in order not to exceed the water window of electrodes. In this paper, we present an impedance characterization technique and implement a proof-of-concept system using an implantable neural stimulator and an off-the-shelf microcontroller. The proposed technique yields the parameters of the equivalent circuit of an electrode through large signal analysis by injecting a single low-intensity biphasic current stimulus with deliberately inserted inter-pulse delay and by acquiring the transient electrode voltage at three well-specified timings. Using low-intensity stimulus allows the derivation of electrode double layer capacitance since capacitive charge-injection dominates when electrode overpotential is small. Insertion of the inter-pulse delay creates a controlled discharge time to estimate the Faradic resistance. The proposed method has been validated by measuring the impedance of a) an emulated Randles cells made of discrete circuit components and b) a custom-made platinum electrode array in-vitro, and comparing estimated parameters with the results derived from an impedance analyzer. The proposed technique can be integrated into implantable or commercial neural stimulator system at low extra power consumption, low extra-hardware cost, and light computation. PMID:25569999

  13. Mesh generation and computational modeling techniques for bioimpedance measurements: an example using the VHP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, A. A.; Salamatova, V. Yu; Vassilevski, Yu V.

    2012-12-01

    Here, a workflow for high-resolution efficient numerical modeling of bioimpedance measurements is suggested that includes 3D image segmentation, adaptive mesh generation, finite-element discretization, and the analysis of simulation results. Using the adaptive unstructured tetrahedral meshes enables to decrease significantly a number of mesh elements while keeping model accuracy. The numerical results illustrate current, potential, and sensitivity field distributions for a conventional Kubicek-like scheme of bioimpedance measurements using segmented geometric model of human torso based on Visible Human Project data. The whole body VHP man computational mesh is constructed that contains 574 thousand vertices and 3.3 million tetrahedrons.

  14. A multichannel bioimpedance monitor for full-body blood flow monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vondra, Vlastimil; Jurak, Pavel; Viscor, Ivo; Halamek, Josef; Leinveber, Pavel; Matejkova, Magdalena; Soukup, Ladislav

    2016-02-01

    The design, properties, and possible diagnostic contribution of a multichannel bioimpedance monitor (MBM) with three independent current sources are presented in this paper. The simultaneous measurement of bioimpedance at 18 locations (the main part of the body, legs, arms, and neck) provides completely new information, on the basis of which more precise haemodynamic parameters can be obtained. The application of the MBM during various haemodynamic stages, such as resting in a supine position, tilting, exercise stress, and various respiration manoeuvres, is demonstrated. Statistical analysis on a group of 34 healthy volunteers is presented for demonstration of blood flow monitoring by using the proposed method. PMID:25992508

  15. Bioimpedance based monitoring system for people with neurogenic dysfunction of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Palla, Alessandro; Rossi, Stefano; Fanucci, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with impaired bladder volume sensation have the necessity to monitor bladder level in order to avoid urinary tract infections and urinary reflux that can lead to renal failure. In this paper the the effectiveness of an embedded and wearable solution for bladder volume monitoring using the bioimpedance measurement is tested. Data are streamed real-time using Bluetooth wireless technology. The bioimpedance measurements on a healthy subject prove the effectiveness of the proposed solution. In the future the system will be evaluated in real world scenarios with patients affected by spinal paralysis and bladder neurogenic dysfunction. PMID:26294580

  16. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy to estimate fluid balance in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Dewitte, Antoine; Carles, Pauline; Joannès-Boyau, Olivier; Fleureau, Catherine; Roze, Hadrien; Combe, Christian; Ouattara, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    Fluid management is a crucial issue in intensive-care medicine. This study evaluated the feasibility and reproducibility of bioimpedance spectroscopy to measure body-water composition in critically ill patients, and compared fluid balance and daily changes in total body water (TBW) measured by bioimpedance. This observational study included 25 patients under mechanical ventilation. Fluid balance and bioimpedance measurements were recorded on 3 consecutive days. Whole-body bioimpedance spectroscopy was performed with exact or ideal body weights entered into the device, and with or without ICU monitoring. Reproducibility of bioimpedance spectroscopy was very good in all conditions despite ICU monitoring and mechanical ventilation. Bioimpedance measurements using an ideal body weight varied significantly, making the weighing procedure necessary. Comparison of fluid balance and daily changes in body weight provided the best correlation (ρ = 0.74; P < 0.0001). Daily changes in TBW were correlated with fluid balance (Spearman coefficient ρ = 0.31; P = 0.003) and this correlation was improved after exclusion of patients with a SOFA score >10 (ρ = 0.36; P = 0.05) and with extracorporeal circulation (ρ = 0.50; P = 0.005). Regardless of the technique used to estimate volume status, important limits of agreement were observed. Non-invasive determination of body-water composition using bioimpedance spectroscopy is feasible in critically ill patients but requires knowledge of the patient's weight. The best method to assess volume status after fluid resuscitation and the value gained from information about body composition provided by bioimpedance techniques needs further evaluation. PMID:26018457

  17. A theoretical analysis to estimate the hydraulic properties of a loam soil from a capillary-evaporation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Sancho, Carolina; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Latorre, Borja; Moret-Fernández, David

    2015-04-01

    The determination of the water retention curve (WRC) parameters and the hydraulic conductivity (K) is of paramount importance in many scientific fields such as hydrology or environmental science. Their direct characterization, however, is typically cumbersome and time consuming. This work analyze the viability to estimate the α and n Van Genuchten (VG) WRC parameters and K from following processes: a capillary wetting process at saturation, an evaporation process and a capillary wetting at saturation followed by an evaporation process. The theoretical analysis was carried out on a 5 cm high and 5 cm diameter cylinder filled with loam soil using numerically generated data with the HYDRUS 2D code. The error maps for the above mentioned processes and the n-K, α-n and K-α planes were generated from the RMSE calculated between the original and the simulated cumulative curves. The deviation (%) between the optimal and original hydraulic parameters was also calculated. Results showed that the capillary plus evaporation method applied on the n-K and α-n planes was the unique process that allowed a unique and well defined minimum. For this last case, the deviation for the α and n parameter were 6'67 and 0'88%, respectively. Taking into account that K can be easy measured from the same soil cylinder by means of Darcy's law, we conclude the capillary + evaporation process can be a simple and effective alternative to estimate the WRC parameters. To this end, the hysteresis phenomena due to the wetting-evaporation process should be taking into account.

  18. The Detection Rate of Early UV Emission from Supernovae: A Dedicated Galex/PTF Survey and Calibrated Theoretical Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganot, Noam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran. O.; Sagiv, Ilan; Waxman, Eli; Lapid, Ofer; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; The ULTRASAT Science Team; Chelouche, Doron; Rafter, Stephen; Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari; Poznanski, Dovi; Nakar, Ehud; Maoz, Dan; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; WTTH Consortium, The; Neill, James D.; Barlow, Thomas A.; Martin, Christofer D.; Gezari, Suvi; the GALEX Science Team; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S.; Nugent, Peter E.; Sullivan, Mark; Palomar Transient Factory, The

    2016-03-01

    The radius and surface composition of an exploding massive star, as well as the explosion energy per unit mass, can be measured using early UV observations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We present the first results from a simultaneous GALEX/PTF search for early ultraviolet (UV) emission from SNe. Six SNe II and one Type II superluminous SN (SLSN-II) are clearly detected in the GALEX near-UV (NUV) data. We compare our detection rate with theoretical estimates based on early, shock-cooling UV light curves calculated from models that fit existing Swift and GALEX observations well, combined with volumetric SN rates. We find that our observations are in good agreement with calculated rates assuming that red supergiants (RSGs) explode with fiducial radii of 500 R⊙, explosion energies of 1051 erg, and ejecta masses of 10 M⊙. Exploding blue supergiants and Wolf-Rayet stars are poorly constrained. We describe how such observations can be used to derive the progenitor radius, surface composition, and explosion energy per unit mass of such SN events, and we demonstrate why UV observations are critical for such measurements. We use the fiducial RSG parameters to estimate the detection rate of SNe during the shock-cooling phase (<1 day after explosion) for several ground-based surveys (PTF, ZTF, and LSST). We show that the proposed wide-field UV explorer ULTRASAT mission is expected to find >85 SNe per year (˜0.5 SN per deg2), independent of host galaxy extinction, down to an NUV detection limit of 21.5 mag AB. Our pilot GALEX/PTF project thus convincingly demonstrates that a dedicated, systematic SN survey at the NUV band is a compelling method to study how massive stars end their life.

  19. Mass balance approaches for estimating the intestinal absorption and metabolism of peptides and analogues: theoretical development and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinko, P. J.; Leesman, G. D.; Amidon, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for estimating the extent of intestinal peptide and peptide analogue absorption was developed on the basis of a mass balance approach that incorporates convection, permeability, and reaction. The macroscopic mass balance analysis (MMBA) was extended to include chemical and enzymatic degradation. A microscopic mass balance analysis, a numerical approach, was also developed and the results compared to the MMBA. The mass balance equations for the fraction of a drug absorbed and reacted in the tube were derived from the general steady state mass balance in a tube: [formula: see text] where M is mass, z is the length of the tube, R is the tube radius, Pw is the intestinal wall permeability, kr is the reaction rate constant, C is the concentration of drug in the volume element over which the mass balance is taken, VL is the volume of the tube, and vz is the axial velocity of drug. The theory was first applied to the oral absorption of two tripeptide analogues, cefaclor (CCL) and cefatrizine (CZN), which degrade and dimerize in the intestine. Simulations using the mass balance equations, the experimental absorption parameters, and the literature stability rate constants yielded a mean estimated extent of CCL (250-mg dose) and CZN (1000-mg dose) absorption of 89 and 51%, respectively, which was similar to the mean extent of absorption reported in humans (90 and 50%). It was proposed previously that 15% of the CCL dose spontaneously degraded systematically; however, our simulations suggest that significant CCL degradation occurs (8 to 17%) presystemically in the intestinal lumen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  20. Landfill mining: Development of a theoretical method for a preliminary estimate of the raw material potential of landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Wolfsberger, Tanja; Nispel, Jörg; Sarc, Renato; Aldrian, Alexia; Hermann, Robert; Höllen, Daniel; Pomberger, Roland; Budischowsky, Andreas; Ragossnig, Arne

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the rising need for raw materials by emerging economies (e.g. China) has led to a change in the availability of certain primary raw materials, such as ores or coal. The accompanying rising demand for secondary raw materials as possible substitutes for primary resources, the soaring prices and the global lack of specific (e.g. metallic) raw materials pique the interest of science and economy to consider landfills as possible secondary sources of raw materials. These sites often contain substantial amounts of materials that can be potentially utilised materially or energetically. To investigate the raw material potential of a landfill, boreholes and excavations, as well as subsequent hand sorting have proven quite successful. These procedures, however, are expensive and time consuming as they frequently require extensive construction measures on the landfill body or waste mass. For this reason, this article introduces a newly developed, affordable, theoretical method for the estimation of landfill contents. The article summarises the individual calculation steps of the method and demonstrates this using the example of a selected Austrian sanitary landfill. To assess the practicality and plausibility, the mathematically determined raw material potential is compared with the actual results from experimental studies of excavated waste from the same landfill (actual raw material potential). PMID:26185166

  1. Lean body mass estimation by creatinine kinetics.

    PubMed

    Keshaviah, P R; Nolph, K D; Moore, H L; Prowant, B; Emerson, P F; Meyer, M; Twardowski, Z J; Khanna, R; Ponferrada, L; Collins, A

    1994-01-01

    A new technique for estimating lean body mass (LBM) from creatinine kinetics has been developed. It is based on the principle that creatinine production is proportional to LBM and that, in the steady state, creatinine production is equal to the sum of creatinine excretion (urinary and dialytic) and metabolic degradation. This technique was applied to 17 normal subjects, 26 stable, chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients, and 71 stable, chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. In the HD group, LBM was also determined by bioimpedance in 11 patients and calculated from total body water, measured as the volume of urea distribution of a sterile urea infusion, in 15 patients. In normal subjects and in the PD group, LBM was assessed by creatinine kinetics as well as by bioimpedance, near infrared, and anthropometric techniques. In the HD patients, LBM by creatinine kinetics correlated significantly with LBM from total body water and the bioimpedance technique. There was no statistical difference between the total body water and creatinine kinetics techniques, but the bioimpedance values were systematically higher than those obtained by the kinetic technique. In the PD group and in normal volunteers, LBM values by creatinine kinetics correlated significantly with the other methods but were lower. Forty-seven percent of the HD patients and 66% of the PD patients had significantly lower LBM by creatinine kinetics than expected for their sex and age. Estimation of LBM by creatinine kinetics is proposed as a simple and convenient technique for the routine nutritional assessment of dialysis patients. PMID:8161729

  2. Effects of muscle injury severity on localized bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Nescolarde, L; Yanguas, J; Lukaski, H; Alomar, X; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Rodas, G

    2015-01-01

    Muscle injuries in the lower limb are common among professional football players. Classification is made according to severity and is diagnosed with radiological assessment as: grade I (minor strain or minor injury), grade II (partial rupture, moderate injury) and grade III (complete rupture, severe injury). Tetrapolar localized bioimpedance analysis (BIA) at 50 kHz made with a phase-sensitive analyzer was used to assess damage to the integrity of muscle structures and the fluid accumulation 24 h after injury in 21 injuries in the quadriceps, hamstring and calf, and was diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to identify the pattern of change in BIA variables as indicators of fluid [resistance (R)] and cell structure integrity [reactance (Xc) and phase angle (PA)] according to the severity of the MRI-defined injury. The % difference compared to the non-injured contralateral muscle also measured 24-h after injury of R, Xc and PA were respectively: grade I (n = 11; -10.4, -17.5 and -9.0%), grade II (n = 8; -18.4, -32.9 and -16.6%) and grade III (n = 2; -14.1, -52.9 and -43.1%), showing a greater significant decrease in Xc (p < 0.001). The greatest relative changes were in grade III injuries. However, decreases in R, that indicate fluid distribution, were not proportional to the severity of the injury. Disruption of the muscle structure, demonstrated by the localized determination of Xc, increased with the severity of muscle injury. The most significant changes 24 h after injury was the sizeable decrease in Xc that indicates a pattern of disrupted soft tissue structure, proportional to the severity of the injury. PMID:25500910

  3. In vivo characterization of ischemic small intestine using bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Strand-Amundsen, R J; Tronstad, C; Kalvøy, H; Gundersen, Y; Krohn, C D; Aasen, A O; Holhjem, L; Reims, H M; Martinsen, Ø G; Høgetveit, J O; Ruud, T E; Tønnessen, T I

    2016-02-01

    The standard clinical method for the assessment of viability in ischemic small intestine is still visual inspection and palpation. This method is non-specific and unreliable, and requires a high level of clinical experience. Consequently, viable tissue might be removed, or irreversibly damaged tissue might be left in the body, which may both slow down patient recovery. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The physical changes in the tissue at the cellular and structural levels after the onset of ischemia lead to time-variant changes in the electrical properties. We aimed to investigate the use of bioimpedance measurement to assess if the tissue is ischemic, and to assess the ischemic time duration. Measurements were performed on pigs (n = 7) using a novel two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. After induction of anaesthesia, an ischemic model with warm, full mesenteric arterial and venous occlusion on 30 cm of the jejunum was implemented. Electrodes were placed on the serosal surface of the ischemic jejunum, applying a constant voltage, and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. As a control, measurements were done on a fully perfused part of the jejunum in the same porcine model. The changes in tan δ (dielectric parameter), measured within a 6 h period of warm, full mesenteric occlusion ischemia in seven pigs, correlates with the onset and duration of ischemia. Tan δ measured in the ischemic part of the jejunum differed significantly from the control tissue, allowing us to determine if the tissue was ischemic or not (P < 0.0001, F = (1,75.13) 188.19). We also found that we could use tan δ to predict ischemic duration. This opens up the possibility of real-time monitoring and assessment of the presence and duration of small intestinal ischemia. PMID:26805916

  4. Effects of Ventilation on Segmental Bioimpedance Spectroscopy Measures Using Generalizability Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, A. Allan; Lozano-Nieto, Albert; Bouffard, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of three ventilation conditions (i.e., normal, regimented, and no-ventilation) on the reproducibility of bioimpedance scores in humans for the forearm and trunk segments. One hundred able-bodied North American men and women, from 18 to 71 years of age, volunteered as participants. The…

  5. Bioimpedance Vector Analysis in Diagnosing Severe and Non-Severe Dengue Patients.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Sami F; Mohktar, Mas S; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2016-01-01

    Real-time monitoring and precise diagnosis of the severity of Dengue infection is needed for better decisions in disease management. The aim of this study is to use the Bioimpedance Vector Analysis (BIVA) method to differentiate between healthy subjects and severe and non-severe Dengue-infected patients. Bioimpedance was measured using a 50 KHz single-frequency bioimpedance analyzer. Data from 299 healthy subjects (124 males and 175 females) and 205 serologically confirmed Dengue patients (123 males and 82 females) were analyzed in this study. The obtained results show that the BIVA method was able to assess and classify the body fluid and cell mass condition between the healthy subjects and the Dengue-infected patients. The bioimpedance mean vectors (95% confidence ellipse) for healthy subjects, severe and non-severe Dengue-infected patients were illustrated. The vector is significantly shortened from healthy subjects to Dengue patients; for both genders the p-value is less than 0.0001. The mean vector of severe Dengue patients is significantly shortened compare to non-severe patients with a p-value of 0.0037 and 0.0023 for males and females, respectively. This study confirms that the BIVA method is a valid method in differentiating the healthy, severe and non-severe Dengue-infected subjects. All tests performed had a significance level with a p-value less than 0.05. PMID:27322285

  6. Bioimpedance Vector Analysis in Diagnosing Severe and Non-Severe Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Sami F.; Mohktar, Mas S.; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2016-01-01

    Real-time monitoring and precise diagnosis of the severity of Dengue infection is needed for better decisions in disease management. The aim of this study is to use the Bioimpedance Vector Analysis (BIVA) method to differentiate between healthy subjects and severe and non-severe Dengue-infected patients. Bioimpedance was measured using a 50 KHz single-frequency bioimpedance analyzer. Data from 299 healthy subjects (124 males and 175 females) and 205 serologically confirmed Dengue patients (123 males and 82 females) were analyzed in this study. The obtained results show that the BIVA method was able to assess and classify the body fluid and cell mass condition between the healthy subjects and the Dengue-infected patients. The bioimpedance mean vectors (95% confidence ellipse) for healthy subjects, severe and non-severe Dengue-infected patients were illustrated. The vector is significantly shortened from healthy subjects to Dengue patients; for both genders the p-value is less than 0.0001. The mean vector of severe Dengue patients is significantly shortened compare to non-severe patients with a p-value of 0.0037 and 0.0023 for males and females, respectively. This study confirms that the BIVA method is a valid method in differentiating the healthy, severe and non-severe Dengue-infected subjects. All tests performed had a significance level with a p-value less than 0.05. PMID:27322285

  7. A Thorax Simulator for Complex Dynamic Bioimpedance Measurements With Textile Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Mark; Muhlsteff, Jens; Teichmann, Daniel; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2015-06-01

    Bioimpedance measurements on the human thorax are suitable for assessment of body composition or hemodynamic parameters, such as stroke volume; they are non-invasive, easy in application and inexpensive. When targeting personal healthcare scenarios, the technology can be integrated into textiles to increase ease, comfort and coverage of measurements. Bioimpedance is generally measured using two electrodes injecting low alternating currents (0.5-10 mA) and two additional electrodes to measure the corresponding voltage drop. The impedance is measured either spectroscopically (bioimpedance spectroscopy, BIS) between 5 kHz and 1 MHz or continuously at a fixed frequency around 100 kHz (impedance cardiography, ICG). A thorax simulator is being developed for testing and calibration of bioimpedance devices and other new developments. For the first time, it is possible to mimic the complete time-variant properties of the thorax during an impedance measurement. This includes the dynamic real part and dynamic imaginary part of the impedance with a peak-to-peak value of 0.2 Ω and an adjustable base impedance (24.6 Ω ≥ Z0 ≥ 51.6 Ω). Another novelty is adjustable complex electrode-skin contact impedances for up to 8 electrodes to evaluate bioimpedance devices in combination with textile electrodes. In addition, an electrocardiographic signal is provided for cardiographic measurements which is used in ICG devices. This provides the possibility to generate physiologic impedance changes, and in combination with an ECG, all parameters of interest such as stroke volume (SV), pre-ejection period (PEP) or extracellular resistance (Re) can be simulated. The speed of all dynamic signals can be altered. The simulator was successfully tested with commercially available BIS and ICG devices and the preset signals are measured with high correlation (r = 0.996). PMID:25148671

  8. Body Fat Equations and Electrical Bioimpedance Values in Prediction of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Eutrophic and Overweight Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Franciane Rocha; Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Cecon, Roberta Stofeles; Barbosa Júnior, Djalma Adão; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo Gouveia; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz; Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral; Cecon, Paulo Roberto; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze body fat anthropometric equations and electrical bioimpedance analysis (BIA) in the prediction of cardiovascular risk factors in eutrophic and overweight adolescents. 210 adolescents were divided into eutrophic group (G1) and overweight group (G2). The percentage of body fat (% BF) was estimated using 10 body fat anthropometric equations and 2 BIA. We measured lipid profiles, uric acid, insulin, fasting glucose, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and blood pressure. We found that 76.7% of the adolescents exhibited inadequacy of at least one biochemical parameter or clinical cardiovascular risk. Higher values of triglycerides (TG) (P = 0.001), insulin, and HOMA-IR (P < 0.001) were observed in the G2 adolescents. In multivariate linear regression analysis, the % BF from equation (5) was associated with TG, diastolic blood pressure, and insulin in G1. Among the G2 adolescents, the % BF estimated by (5) and (9) was associated with LDL, TG, insulin, and the HOMA-IR. Body fat anthropometric equations were associated with cardiovascular risk factors and should be used to assess the nutritional status of adolescents. In this study, equation (5) was associated with a higher number of cardiovascular risk factors independent of the nutritional status of adolescents. PMID:23762051

  9. Bioimpedence to Assess Breast Density as a Risk Factor for Breast Cancer in Adult Women and Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Morimoto, Yukiko; Laguana, Michelle B; Novotny, Rachel; Leon Guerrero, Rachael T

    2016-01-01

    Although high mammographic density is one of the strongest predictors of breast cancer risk, X-ray based mammography cannot be performed before the recommended screening age, especially not in adolescents and young women. Therefore, new techniques for breast density measurement are of interest. In this pilot study in Guam and Hawaii, we evaluated a radiation-free, bioimpedance device called Electrical Breast DensitometerTM (EBD; senoSENSE Medical Systems, Inc., Ontario, Canada) for measuring breast density in 95 women aged 31-82 years and 41 girls aged 8-18 years. Percent density (PD) was estimated in the women's most recent mammogram using a computer-assisted method. Correlation coefficients and linear regression were applied for statistical analysis. In adult women, mean EBD and PD values of the left and right breasts were 230±52 and 226±50 Ω and 23.7±15.1 and 24.2±15.2%, respectively. The EBD measurements were inversely correlated with PD (rSpearman=-0.52, p<0.0001); the correlation was stronger in Caucasians (rSpearman=-0.70, p<0.0001) than Asians (rSpearman=-0.54, p<0.01) and Native Hawaiian/Chamorro/Pacific Islanders (rSpearman=-0.34, p=0.06). Using 4 categories of PD (<10, 10-25, 26-50, 51-75%), the respective mean EBD values were 256±32, 249±41, 202±46, and 178±43 Ω (p<0.0001). In girls, the mean EBD values in the left and right breast were 148±40 and 155±54 Ω; EBD values decreased from Tanner stages 1 to 4 (204±14, 154±79, 136±43, and 119±16 Ω for stages 1-4, respectively) but were higher at Tanner stage 5 (165±30 Ω). With further development, this bioimpedance method may allow for investigations of breast development among adolescent, as well as assessment of breast cancer risk early in life and in populations without access to mammography. PMID:26838256

  10. Bioimpedence to Assess Breast Density as a Risk Factor for Breast Cancer in Adult Women and Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Morimoto, Yukiko; Laguaña, Michelle B; Novotny, Rachel; Guerrero, Rachael T Leon

    2016-01-01

    Although high mammographic density is one of the strongest predictors of breast cancer risk, X-ray based mammography cannot be performed before the recommended screening age, especially not in adolescents and young women. Therefore, new techniques for breast density measurement are of interest. In this pilot study in Guam and Hawaii, we evaluated a radiation-free, bioimpedance device called Electrical Breast Densitometer™ (EBD; senoSENSE Medical Systems, Inc., Ontario, Canada) for measuring breast density in 95 women aged 31–82 years and 41 girls aged 8–18 years. Percent density (PD) was estimated in the women’s most recent mammogram using a computer-assisted method. Correlation coefficients and linear regression were applied for statistical analysis. In adult women, mean EBD and PD values of the left and right breasts were 230±52 and 226±50 Ω and 23.7±15.1 and 24.2±15.2%, respectively. The EBD measurements were inversely correlated with PD (rSpearman=−0.52, p<0.0001); the correlation was stronger in Caucasians (rSpearman=−0.70, p<0.0001) than Asians (rSpearman=−0.54, p<0.01) and Native Hawaiian/Chamorro/Pacific Islanders (rSpearman=−0.34, p=0.06). Using 4 categories of PD (<10, 10–25, 26–50, 51–75%), the respective mean EBD values were 256±32, 249±41, 202±46, and 178±43 Ω (p<0.0001). In girls, the mean EBD values in the left and right breast were 148±40 and 155±54 Ω; EBD values decreased from Tanner stages 1 to 4 (204±14, 154±79, 136±43, and 119±16 Ω for stages 1–4, respectively) but were higher at Tanner stage 5 (165±30 Ω). With further development, this bioimpedance method may allow for investigations of breast development among adolescent, as well as assessment of breast cancer risk early in life and in populations without access to mammography. PMID:26838256

  11. Time dependence of electrical bioimpedance on porcine liver and kidney under a 50 Hz ac current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spottorno, J.; Multigner, M.; Rivero, G.; Álvarez, L.; de la Venta, J.; Santos, M.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the changes of the bioimpedance from its 'in vivo' value to the values measured in a few hours after the excision from the body. The evolution of electrical impedance with time after surgical extraction has been studied on two porcine organs: the liver and the kidney. Both in vivo and ex vivo measurements of electrical impedance, measuring its real and imaginary components, have been performed. The in vivo measurements have been carried out with the animal anaesthetized. The ex vivo measurements have been made more than 2 h after the extraction of the organ. The latter experiment has been carried out at two different stabilized temperatures: at normal body temperature and at the standard preservation temperature for transplant surgery. The measurements show a correlation between the biological evolution and the electrical bioimpedance of the organs, which increases from its in vivo value immediately after excision, multiplying its value by 2 in a few hours.

  12. A programmable low power current source for bioimpedance measurement: Towards a wearable personalized health assistant.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Zaid; Tenhunen, Hannu; Yang, Geng

    2015-08-01

    Bioimpedance is a noninvasive measurement method that facilitates body composition analysis, besides being indicative of many other health parameters. In this work a novel programmable, low complexity, high output impedance, high voltage compliance and wideband current source for bioimpedance applications is presented. Previously, we designed, fabricated and tested in vivo a bio-patch for acquisition of multiple bio-signals. Upon integration with our previous work, this circuit is envisioned to constitute part of a personalized health assistant. Simulation at worst case corners and real operation conditions was carried out using UMC-180 nm 1 poly 6 metal CMOS process. Full duty cycle, shortened or stepped square waves can be generated. Amplitude control of 8 different current levels is supported. Frequency can be tuned up to 1 MHz and an output impedance of 2.8 MO @ 250 KHz is achieved at full current capacity. Total current consumption is comparable to the injected current, making the circuit highly efficient. PMID:26736687

  13. Studying the Performance of Conductive Polymer Films as Textile Electrodes for Electrical Bioimpedance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunico, F. J.; Marquez, J. C.; Hilke, H.; Skrifvars, M.; Seoane, F.

    2013-04-01

    With the goal of finding novel biocompatible materials suitable to replace silver in the manufacturing of textile electrodes for medical applications of electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy, three different polymeric materials have been investigated. Films have been prepared from different polymeric materials and custom bracelets have been confectioned with them. Tetrapolar total right side electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy (EBIS) measurements have been performed with polymer and with standard gel electrodes. The performance of the polymer films was compared against the performance of the gel electrodes. The results indicated that only the polypropylene 1380 could produce EBIS measurements but remarkably tainted with high frequency artefacts. The influence of the electrode mismatch, stray capacitances and large electrode polarization impedance are unclear and they need to be clarified with further studies. If sensorized garments could be made with such biocompatible polymeric materials the burden of considering textrodes class III devices could be avoided.

  14. Automated non-invasive measurement of cardiac output: comparison of electrical bioimpedance and carbon dioxide rebreathing techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S A; Russell, A E; West, M J; Chalmers, J

    1988-01-01

    Two commercial automated, non-invasive systems for estimation of cardiac output were evaluated. Values of cardiac output obtained by electrical bioimpedance cardiography (BoMed NCCOM3 machine) were compared with values derived from an indirect Fick technique that uses carbon dioxide rebreathing (Gould 9000 IV system) during 103 simultaneous measurements made at rest in 19 randomly selected subjects and on exercise in 11 subjects. Cardiac output values obtained with impedance cardiography were significantly correlated with those measured by the indirect Fick method, although there was a wide scatter with over 73% of the readings lying outside the limits defined by the line of identity +/- 20%. This correlation was greatly reduced when stroke volume index was used instead of cardiac output. Indirect Fick results were linearly related to oxygen uptake both at rest and on exercise, while impedance cardiography results did not correlate with oxygen uptake. Impedance cardiography gave consistently lower results for cardiac output than indirect Fick at all levels of exercise. Both machines were easy to use and produced acceptable mean (SE) coefficients of variation (BoMed NCCOM3 7.7 (1.0)%, Gould 9000 IV 10.6 (1.4)%). Further validation is required before either of these machines can be recommended as an alternative to invasive monitoring in clinical practice. PMID:3128316

  15. Microelectrode bioimpedance analysis distinguishes basal and claudin-low subtypes of triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasaraghavan, Vaishnavi; Strobl, Jeannine; Agah, Masoud

    2015-08-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is highly aggressive and has a poor prognosis when compared to other molecular subtypes. In particular, the claudin-low subtype of TNBC exhibits tumor-initiating/cancer stem cell like properties. Here, we seek to find new biomarkers to discriminate different forms of TNBC by characterizing their bioimpedance. A customized bioimpedance sensor with four identical branched microelectrodes with branch widths adjusted to accommodate spreading of individual cells was fabricated on silicon and pyrex/glass substrates. Cell analyses were performed on the silicon devices which showed somewhat improved inter-electrode and intra-device reliability. We performed detailed analysis of the bioimpedance spectra of four TNBC cell lines, comparing the peak magnitude, peak frequency and peak phase angle between claudin-low TNBC subtype represented by MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T with that of two basal cells types, the TNBC MDA-MB-468, and an immortalized non-malignant basal breast cell line, MCF-10A. The claudin-low TNBC cell lines showed significantly higher peak frequencies and peak phase angles than the properties might be useful in distinguishing the clinically significant claudin-low subtype of TNBC. PMID:26216474

  16. An evaluation of the influence of a magnetic field on a human subject with the use of bio-impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papezova, S.; Papez, V.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of a magnetic field on a living human organism was monitored using a bio-impedance evaluation of vasodilatation effects. A quantitative evaluation of the influence of a magnetic field on a human being was implemented by means of a quantitative evaluation of changes in the bio-impedance of the tissue. The pulse of the magnetic field was controlled by a pseudo-random impulse signal using a power switch that controlled the current of the applicator coil. The peak magnetic field flux density was approximately 60 mT. The bio-impedance was measured by a four-electrode method by means of a radiofrequency narrow band vector bioimpedance meter. Experiments were performed on the magnetic exposure of the forearm of an exposed human subject. During exposure to a magnetic field, the bio-impedance change signal level increases above the normal level, and reaches the maximum level after about 10 minutes. The maximum value is approximately 50 % higher than the normal level.

  17. The use of radiation surveys to estimate the radiation effective dose to visitors of hospitalized patients--a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Sherbini, Sami S; DeCicco, Joseph E

    2005-09-01

    Members of the public visiting hospitalized patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures or brachytherapy are exposed to radiation emanating from the patient. The radiation protection staff at the hospital is responsible for ensuring that the doses to these visitors are kept as low as is reasonably achievable and are maintained below applicable regulatory limits. These limits are normally expressed in terms of the effective dose to the visitor. Direct measurement of the effective dose, however, is not feasible, and the use of a quantity that provides a reasonable estimate, referred to as a surrogate, is required. This study used Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations to examine the feasibility of using bedside survey results, in units of roentgens per hour, as a surrogate for estimating the effective dose to a person who may be present at the survey location. The Monte Carlo code used in this work was MCNP Version 5. In these calculations, both the patient and the visitor were modeled using modified Medical Internal Radiation Dose anthropomorphic phantoms. Radioactive material that emitted monoenergetic photons was located in several of the patient's organs in turn, and the bedside exposure rates and the effective doses at the same location were calculated. The calculations were repeated for several visitor locations, both at bedside along the length of the bed, and at increasing distances from the bed. The ratios of the exposure rates to the effective dose rates at each location gave an indication of the utility of the exposure rate measurements in providing a reasonable estimate of the effective dose. The results indicated that the survey data provided estimates of the effective dose within recommended accuracy for many exposure situations, but underestimated the effective dose to the visitor for other situations, especially locations close to bedside and for lower energy radiations. Use of appropriate correction factors based on this work could improve

  18. Theoretical geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Kosek, Wiesław

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents a summary of research activities concerning theoretical geodesy performed in Poland in the period of 2011-2014. It contains the results of research on new methods of the parameter estimation, a study on robustness properties of the M-estimation, control network and deformation analysis, and geodetic time series analysis. The main achievements in the geodetic parameter estimation involve a new model of the M-estimation with probabilistic models of geodetic observations, a new Shift-Msplit estimation, which allows to estimate a vector of parameter differences and the Shift-Msplit(+) that is a generalisation of Shift-Msplit estimation if the design matrix A of a functional model has not a full column rank. The new algorithms of the coordinates conversion between the Cartesian and geodetic coordinates, both on the rotational and triaxial ellipsoid can be mentioned as a highlights of the research of the last four years. New parameter estimation models developed have been adopted and successfully applied to the control network and deformation analysis. New algorithms based on the wavelet, Fourier and Hilbert transforms were applied to find time-frequency characteristics of geodetic and geophysical time series as well as time-frequency relations between them. Statistical properties of these time series are also presented using different statistical tests as well as 2nd, 3rd and 4th moments about the mean. The new forecasts methods are presented which enable prediction of the considered time series in different frequency bands.

  19. Evaluation of bioimpedance for the measurement of physiologic variables as related to hemodynamic studies in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Bruce C.

    1993-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance, following space flight, has received substantial attention because of the possibility that it compromises astronaut safety and reduces the ability of astronauts to function at peak performance levels upon return to a one-g environment. Many pre- and post-flight studies are performed to evaluate changes in hemodynamic responses to orthostatic challenges after shuttle missions. The purpose of this present project is to validate bioimpedance as a means to acquire stroke volume and other hemodynamic information in these studies. In this study, ten male and ten female subjects were subjected to simultaneous measurements of thoracic bioimpedance and Doppler ultrasonic velocimetry under supine, 10 degree head down and 30 degree head up conditions. Paired measurements were made during six periods of five seconds breath holding, over a two minute period, for each of the three positions. Stroke volume was calculated by three bioimpedance techniques and ultrasonic Doppler.

  20. Bioimpedance-based respiratory gating method for oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with first clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivumäki, T.; Vauhkonen, M.; Teuho, J.; Teräs, M.; Hakulinen, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory motion may cause significant image artefacts in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. This study introduces a new bioimpedance-based gating method for minimizing respiratory artefacts. The method was studied in 12 oncologic patients by evaluating the following three parameters: maximum metabolic activity of radiopharmaceutical accumulations, the size of these targets as well as their target-to-background ratio. The bioimpedance-gated images were compared with non-gated images and images that were gated with a reference method, chest wall motion monitoring by infrared camera. The bioimpedance method showed clear improvement as increased metabolic activity and decreased target volume compared to non-gated images and produced consistent results with the reference method. Thus, the method may have great potential in the future of respiratory gating in nuclear medicine imaging.

  1. Data-based theoretical identification of subcellular calcium compartments and estimation of calcium dynamics in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Livshitz, Leonid; Acsai, Karoly; Antoons, Gudrun; Sipido, Karin; Rudy, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    In cardiac cells, Ca2+ release flux (Jrel) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) has a complex effect on the action potential (AP). Coupling between Jrel and the AP occurs via L-type Ca2+ channels (ICa) and the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (INCX). We used a combined experimental and modelling approach to study interactions between Jrel, ICa and INCX in porcine ventricular myocytes. We tested the hypothesis that during normal uniform Jrel, the interaction between these fluxes can be represented as occurring in two myoplasmic subcompartments for Ca2+ distribution, one (T-space) associated with RyR and enclosed by the junctional portion of the SR membrane and corresponding T-tubular portion of the sarcolemma, the other (M-space) encompassing the rest of the myoplasm. ICa and INCX were partitioned into subpopulations in the T-space and M-space sarcolemma. We denoted free Ca2+ concentrations in T-space and M-space Cat and Cam, respectively. Experiments were designed to allow separate measurements of ICa and INCX as a function of Jrel. Inclusion of T-space in the model allowed us to reproduce in silico the following important experimental results: (1) hysteresis of INCX dependence on Cam; (2) delay between peak INCX and peak Cam during caffeine application protocol; (3) delay between INCX and Cam during Ca2+-induced-Ca2+-release; (4) rapid ICa inactivation (within 2 ms) due to Jrel, with magnitude graded as a function of the SR Ca2+ content; (5) time delay between ICa inactivation due to Jrel and Cam. Partition of 25% NCX in T-space and 75% in M-space provided the best fit to the experimental data. Measured Cam and ICa or INCX were used as input to the model for estimating Cat. The actual model-computed Cat, obtained by simulating specific experimental protocols, was used as a gold standard for comparison. The model predicted peak Cat in the range of 6–25 μm, with time to equilibrium of Cat with Cam of ∼350 ms. These Cat values are in the range

  2. Approach to theoretical estimation of the activation energy of particle aggregation taking ionic nonclassic polarization into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinyi; Tang, Ying; He, Xinhua; Li, Hang

    2015-10-01

    The activation energy of particle aggregation in suspensions is a very important kinetic parameter in a wide range of science and engineering applications. At present, however, there is no theory that can theoretically predict the activation energy. Because the activation energy is often less than 10 kT (where k is the Boltzmann constant and T is the temperature), it is difficult to experimentally measure. In this study, a theory for calculating the activation energy is established. Experimental measurements of the activation energy of montmorillonite aggregation were performed with different electrolyte and particle concentrations using the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. The validity of the theory was verified by the experiments. This study confirmed that both the method for activation energy measurements by DLS and the theory for its calculation can be applied to suspensions of polydisperse nonspherical particles. The average kinetic energy at the moment of particle collision in the aggregation process was found to be 0.2 kT, which is less than the instantaneous kinetic energy of a Brownian particle (0.5 kT) because of the viscous resistance of the water medium. This study also shows that adsorbed Na+ is strongly polarized in the electric field near the particle surface, and the polarization increases the effective charge of Na+ from +1 to +1.18.

  3. Theoretical estimation of the rate of photoinduced charge transfer reactions in triphenylamine C60 donor-acceptor conjugate.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Juan Pablo; Solà, Miquel; Voityuk, Alexander A

    2016-06-01

    Fullerene-based molecular heterojunctions such as the [6,6]-pyrrolidine-C60 donor-acceptor conjugate containing triphenylamine (TPA) are potential materials for high-efficient dye-sensitized solar cells. In this work, we estimate the rate constants for the photoinduced charge separation and charge recombination processes in TPA-C60 using the unrestricted and time-dependent DFT methods. Different schemes are applied to evaluate excited state properties and electron transfer parameters (reorganization energies, electronic couplings, and Gibbs energies). The use of open-shell singlet or triplet states, several density functionals, and continuum solvation models is discussed. Strengths and limitations of the computational approaches are highlighted. The present benchmark study provides an overview of the expected performance of DFT-based methodologies in the description of photoinduced charge transfer reactions in fullerene heterojunctions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26992355

  4. Data-based theoretical identification of subcellular calcium compartments and estimation of calcium dynamics in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Livshitz, Leonid; Acsai, Karoly; Antoons, Gudrun; Sipido, Karin; Rudy, Yoram

    2012-09-15

    In cardiac cells, Ca(2+) release flux (J(rel)) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) has a complex effect on the action potential (AP). Coupling between J(rel) and the AP occurs via L-type Ca(2+) channels (I(Ca)) and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (I(NCX)). We used a combined experimental and modelling approach to study interactions between J(rel), I(Ca) and I(NCX) in porcine ventricular myocytes.We tested the hypothesis that during normal uniform J(rel), the interaction between these fluxes can be represented as occurring in two myoplasmic subcompartments for Ca(2+) distribution, one (T-space) associated with RyR and enclosed by the junctional portion of the SR membrane and corresponding T-tubular portion of the sarcolemma, the other (M-space) encompassing the rest of the myoplasm. I(Ca) and I(NCX) were partitioned into subpopulations in the T-space and M-space sarcolemma. We denoted free Ca(2+) concentrations in T-space and M-space Ca(t) and Ca(m), respectively. Experiments were designed to allow separate measurements of I(Ca) and I(NCX) as a function of J(rel). Inclusion of T-space in themodel allowed us to reproduce in silico the following important experimental results: (1) hysteresis of I(NCX) dependence on Ca(m); (2) delay between peak I(NCX) and peak Ca(m) during caffeine application protocol; (3) delay between I(NCX) and Ca(m) during Ca(2+)-induced-Ca(2+)-release; (4) rapid I(Ca) inactivation (within 2 ms) due to J(rel), with magnitude graded as a function of the SR Ca(2+) content; (5) time delay between I(Ca) inactivation due to J(rel) and Ca(m). Partition of 25% NCX in T-space and 75% in M-space provided the best fit to the experimental data. Measured Ca(m) and I(Ca) or I(NCX) were used as input to the model for estimating Ca(t). The actual model-computed Ca(t), obtained by simulating specific experimental protocols, was used as a gold standard for comparison. The model predicted peak Ca(t) in the range of 6–25 μM, with time

  5. Consistency of aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity estimates with respect to the Bramwell-Hill theoretical model: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is considered as an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality, and is increasingly used in clinical practice. This study aimed at evaluating the consistency of the automated estimation of regional and local aortic stiffness indices from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) data. Results Forty-six healthy subjects underwent carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements (CF_PWV) by applanation tonometry and CMR with steady-state free-precession and phase contrast acquisitions at the level of the aortic arch. These data were used for the automated evaluation of the aortic arch pulse wave velocity (Arch_PWV), and the ascending aorta distensibility (AA_Distc, AA_Distb), which were estimated from ascending aorta strain (AA_Strain) combined with either carotid or brachial pulse pressure. The local ascending aorta pulse wave velocity AA_PWVc and AA_PWVb were estimated respectively from these carotid and brachial derived distensibility indices according to the Bramwell-Hill theoretical model, and were compared with the Arch_PWV. In addition, a reproducibility analysis of AA_PWV measurement and its comparison with the standard CF_PWV was performed. Characterization according to the Bramwell-Hill equation resulted in good correlations between Arch_PWV and both local distensibility indices AA_Distc (r = 0.71, p < 0.001) and AA_Distb (r = 0.60, p < 0.001); and between Arch_PWV and both theoretical local indices AA_PWVc (r = 0.78, p < 0.001) and AA_PWVb (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). Furthermore, the Arch_PWV was well related to CF_PWV (r = 0.69, p < 0.001) and its estimation was highly reproducible (inter-operator variability: 7.1%). Conclusions The present work confirmed the consistency and robustness of the regional index Arch_PWV and the local indices AA_Distc and AA_Distb according to the theoretical model, as well as to the well established measurement of CF_PWV, demonstrating the relevance of the regional and local CMR indices. PMID

  6. High spatial and temporal resolution 4D FEM simulation of the thoracic bioimpedance using MRI scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Mark; Marleaux, Bastian; Mühlsteff, Jens; Schoth, Felix; Koos, Ralf; Teichmann, Daniel; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    In this work, a finite element model was created using MRI scans of the main author to analyze sources of the dynamic thoracic bioimpedance. This model can be used to identify limitations of impedance cardiography (ICG) in practice. Heart beat (8.3 ms temporal resolution) and aortic wave propagation (2.6 ms temporal resolution) were implemented. The static volume contains all major organs of the thorax in high spatial resolution. Simulations were successfully conducted and a high correlation (r = 0.9) between the simulated aortic ICG signal and a measured signal of the same subject was obtained.

  7. Reduction of anisotropy influence and contacting effects in in-vitro bioimpedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guermazi, M.; Kanoun, O.; Derbel, N.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental procedure is a decisive part in in-vitro bioimpedance measurement in order to get reproducible measurements. An electrode configuration is proposed to avoid several disadvantages produced by needle electrodes and circular non-penetrating electrode. The proposed electrode geometry reduces the influence of anisotropy and allows simultaneously a good probe contacting. We propose an experimental method to avoid the appearance of bacteria and to reduce water loss in meat during experiment post-mortem. The results show that electrode configuration with the developed experimental method have ensured reproducible measurements during a long period of 14 days post-mortem.

  8. Theoretical estimation for equilibrium Mo isotope fractionations between dissolved Mo species and the adsorbed complexes on (Fe,Mn)-oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Liu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Although Mo isotopes have been increasingly used as a paleoredox proxy in the study of paleo-oceanographic condition changes (Barling et al., 2001; Siebert et al., 2003, 2005,2006; Arnold et al., 2004; Poulson et al., 2006), some very basic aspects of Mo isotopes geochemistry have not been obtained yet. First, although there are several previous studies on equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation factors(Tossell,2005; Weeks et al.,2007; Wasylenki et al.,2008), these studies were dealing with situations in vacuum and we find unfortunately the solvation effects for Ge species in solution cannot be ignored. Therefore, accurate Ge fractionation factors are actually not determined yet. Second, except the dominant dissolved Mo species in seawater which is known as molybdate ion (MoO42-), the forms of possible other minor species remain elusive. Third, the Mo removal mechanisms from seawater are only known for the anoxia and euxinic conditions (e.g. Helz et al., 1996; Zheng et al., 2000), the Mo removal mechanism under oxic condition are still arguing. Fourth, the adsorption effects on Mo isotope fractionation are almost completely unknown. Especially, without the adsorption fractionation knowledge, it is difficult to understand many distinct fractionations found in a number of geologic systems and it is difficult to explain the exceptionally long residence time of Mo in seawater. Urey model or Bigeleisen-Mayer equation based theoretical method and the super-molecule clusters are used to precisely evaluate the fractionation factors. The B3LYP/(6-311+G(2df,p),LANL2DZ) level method is used for frequencies calculation. 24 water molecules are used to form the supermolecues surrounding the Mo species. At least 4 different conformers for each supermolecule are used to prevent the errors from the diversity of configurations in solution. This study provides accurate equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation factors between possible dissolved Mo species and the adsorbed Mo species on the

  9. Capture-recapture and multiple-record systems estimation I: History and theoretical development. International Working Group for Disease Monitoring and Forecasting.

    PubMed

    1995-11-15

    This paper reviews the historical background and the theoretical development of models for the analysis of data from capture-recapture or multiple-record systems for estimating the size of closed populations. The models and methods were originally developed for use in fisheries and wildlife biology and were later adapted for use in connection with human populations. Application to epidemiology came much later. The simplest capture-recapture model involves two lists or samples and has four key assumptions: that the population is closed, that individuals can be matched from capture to recapture, that capture in the second sample is independent of capture in the first sample, and that the capture probabilities are homogeneous across all individuals in the population. Log-linear models provide a convenient representation for this basic capture-recapture model and its extensions to K lists. The paper provides an overview for these models and illustrates how they allow for dependency among the lists and heterogeneity in the population. The use of log-linear models for estimation in the presence of both dependence and heterogeneity is illustrated on a four-list example involving ascertainment of diabetes using data gathered in 1988 from residents of Casale Monferrato, Italy. The final section of the paper discusses techniques for model selection in the context of models for estimating the size of populations. PMID:7485050

  10. A theoretical estimate of O 3 and H 2O 2 dry deposition over the northeast United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walcek, C. J.

    Estimates of short-term, regional-scale spatial distributions of ozone (O 3) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) dry deposition over the northeast U.S. are presented. Dry deposition fluxes to surfaces are computed using a regional tropospheric chemistry model with deposition velocities which vary with local meteorology, land type, insolation, seasonal factors and surface wetness. A compilation of O 3 surface resistances is presented based on a survey of O 3 dry deposition measurements. The surface resistance for H 2O 2 is assumed to be small under most conditions, causing H 2O 2 to dry deposit at a rate which is frequently limited by surface-layer turbulence. Regional patterns of dry deposition velocities for these oxidants over the northeast U.S. are computed using landuse data and meteorological information predicted using a mesoscale meteorology model. Domain-averaged O 3 deposition velocities during a spring period reach a mid-day peak of 0.7-0.8 cm s -1 and drop to 0.1-0.2 cm s -1 at night. Domain-averaged H 2O 2 deposition velocities at a height of approximately 80 m are predicted to reach a mid-day peak of 1.6-2.0cm s -1, and fall to 0.6-0.9 cm s -1 at night. Time-averaged surface-layer H 2O 2 concentrations show a latitude dependence, with higher concentrations in the south. H 2O 2 concentrations are significantly reduced due to efficient wet removal and chemical destruction during the passage of a cyclonic frontal system. In contrast, O 3 concentrations are predicted to rise during the passage of a frontal system due to efficient vertical exchange of midtropospheric air into the boundary layer during convective conditions, followed by synoptic-scale subsidence occurring in the high pressure airmass following a cyclone. Maximum O 3 deposition during this 3-day springtime period occurs in polluted agricultural areas. In contrast, H 2O 2 dry deposition exhibits a latitude dependence with maximum 3-day accumulations occurring in the south. Domain-averaged mid

  11. Prediction of limb lean tissue mass from bioimpedance spectroscopy in persons with chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cirnigliaro, Christopher M.; La Fountaine, Michael F.; Emmons, Racine; Kirshblum, Steven C.; Asselin, Pierre; Spungen, Ann M.; Bauman, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is a non-invasive, simple, and inexpensive modality that uses 256 frequencies to determine the extracellular volume impedance (ECVRe) and intracellular volume impedance (ICVRi) in the total body and regional compartments. As such, it may have utility as a surrogate measure to assess lean tissue mass (LTM). Objective To compare the relationship between LTM from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and BIS impedance values in spinal cord injury (SCI) and able-bodied (AB) control subjects using a cross-sectional research design. Methods In 60 subjects (30 AB and 30 SCI), a total body DXA scan was used to obtain total body and leg LTM. BIS was performed to measure the impedance quotient of the ECVRe and ICVRi in the total body and limbs. Results BIS-derived ECVRe yielded a model for LTM in paraplegia, tetraplegia, and control for the right leg (RL) (R2 = 0.75, standard errors of estimation (SEE) = 1.02 kg, P < 0.0001; R2 = 0.65, SEE = 0.91 kg, P = 0.0006; and R2 = 0.54, SEE = 1.31 kg, P < 0.0001, respectively) and left leg (LL) (R2 = 0.76, SEE = 1.06 kg, P < 0.0001; R2 = 0.64, SEE = 0.83 kg, P = 0.0006; and R2 = 0.54, SEE = 1.34 kg, P < 0.0001, respectively). The ICVRi was similarly predictive of LTM in paraplegia, tetraplegia, and AB controls for the RL (R2 = 0.85, SEE = 1.31 kg, P < 0.0001; R2 = 0.52, SEE = 0.95 kg, P = 0.003; and R2 = 0.398, SEE = 1.46 kg, P = 0.0003, respectively) and LL (R2 = 0.62, SEE = 1.32 kg, P = 0.0003; R2 = 0.57, SEE = 0.91 kg, P = 0.002; and R2 = 0.42, SEE = 1.31 kg, P = 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Findings demonstrate that the BIS-derived impedance quotients for ECVRe and ICVRi may be used as surrogate markers to track changes in leg LTM in persons with SCI. PMID:23941792

  12. Non-contact multi-frequency magnetic induction spectroscopy system for industrial-scale bio-impedance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, M. D.; Marsh, L. A.; Davidson, J. L.; Tan, Y. M.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    Biological tissues have a complex impedance, or bio-impedance, profile which changes with respect to frequency. This is caused by dispersion mechanisms which govern how the electromagnetic field interacts with the tissue at the cellular and molecular level. Measuring the bio-impedance spectra of a biological sample can potentially provide insight into the sample’s properties and its cellular structure. This has obvious applications in the medical, pharmaceutical and food-based industrial domains. However, measuring the bio-impedance spectra non-destructively and in a way which is practical at an industrial scale presents substantial challenges. The low conductivity of the sample requires a highly sensitive instrument, while the demands of industrial-scale operation require a fast high-throughput sensor of rugged design. In this paper, we describe a multi-frequency magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) system suitable for industrial-scale, non-contact, spectroscopic bio-impedance measurement over a bandwidth of 156 kHz-2.5 MHz. The system sensitivity and performance are investigated using calibration and known reference samples. It is shown to yield rapid and consistently sensitive results with good long-term stability. The system is then used to obtain conductivity spectra of a number of biological test samples, including yeast suspensions of varying concentration and a range of agricultural produce, such as apples, pears, nectarines, kiwis, potatoes, oranges and tomatoes.

  13. Systematic estimation of theoretical uncertainties in the calculation of the pion-photon transition form factor using light-cone sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, S. V.; Pimikov, A. V.; Stefanis, N. G.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the calculation of the pion-photon transition form factor Fγ*γπ0(Q2) within light-cone sum rules focusing attention to the low-mid region of momenta. The central aim is to estimate the theoretical uncertainties which originate from a wide variety of sources related to (i) the relevance of next-to-next-to-leading order radiative corrections (ii) the influence of the twist-four and the twist-six term (iii) the sensitivity of the results on auxiliary parameters, like the Borel scale M2, (iv) the role of the phenomenological description of resonances, and (v) the significance of a small but finite virtuality of the quasireal photon. Predictions for Fγ*γπ0(Q2) are presented which include all these uncertainties and found to comply within the margin of experimental error with the existing data in the Q2 range between 1 and 5 GeV2 , thus justifying the reliability of the applied calculational scheme. This provides a solid basis for confronting theoretical predictions with forthcoming data bearing small statistical errors.

  14. Extraction of Cole parameters from the electrical bioimpedance spectrum using stochastic optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Gholami-Boroujeny, Shiva; Bolic, Miodrag

    2016-04-01

    Fitting the measured bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) data to the Cole model and then extracting the Cole parameters is a common practice in BIS applications. The extracted Cole parameters then can be analysed as descriptors of tissue electrical properties. To have a better evaluation of physiological or pathological properties of biological tissue, accurate extraction of Cole parameters is of great importance. This paper proposes an improved Cole parameter extraction based on bacterial foraging optimization (BFO) algorithm. We employed simulated datasets to test the performance of the BFO fitting method regarding parameter extraction accuracy and noise sensitivity, and we compared the results with those of a least squares (LS) fitting method. The BFO method showed better robustness to the noise and higher accuracy in terms of extracted parameters. In addition, we applied our method to experimental data where bioimpedance measurements were obtained from forearm in three different positions of the arm. The goal of the experiment was to explore how robust Cole parameters are in classifying position of the arm for different people, and measured at different times. The extracted Cole parameters obtained by LS and BFO methods were applied to different classifiers. Two other evolutionary algorithms, GA and PSO were also used for comparison purpose. We showed that when the classifiers are fed with the extracted feature sets by BFO fitting method, higher accuracy is obtained both when applying on training data and test data. PMID:26215520

  15. Bioimpedance Harmonic Analysis as a Diagnostic Tool to Assess Regional Circulation and Neural Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudraya, I. S.; Revenko, S. V.; Khodyreva, L. A.; Markosyan, T. G.; Dudareva, A. A.; Ibragimov, A. R.; Romich, V. V.; Kirpatovsky, V. I.

    2013-04-01

    The novel technique based on harmonic analysis of bioimpedance microvariations with original hard- and software complex incorporating a high-resolution impedance converter was used to assess the neural activity and circulation in human urinary bladder and penis in patients with pelvic pain, erectile dysfunction, and overactive bladder. The therapeutic effects of shock wave therapy and Botulinum toxin detrusor injections were evaluated quantitatively according to the spectral peaks at low 0.1 Hz frequency (M for Mayer wave), respiratory (R) and cardiac (C) rhythms with their harmonics. Enhanced baseline regional neural activity identified according to M and R peaks was found to be presumably sympathetic in pelvic pain patients, and parasympathetic - in patients with overactive bladder. Total pulsatile activity and pulsatile resonances found in the bladder as well as in the penile spectrum characterised regional circulation and vascular tone. The abnormal spectral parameters characteristic of the patients with genitourinary diseases shifted to the norm in the cases of efficient therapy. Bioimpedance harmonic analysis seems to be a potent tool to assess regional peculiarities of circulatory and autonomic nervous activity in the course of patient treatment.

  16. Gastric Tissue Damage Analysis Generated by Ischemia: Bioimpedance, Confocal Endomicroscopy, and Light Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Nohra E.; Garcia, Laura E.; Garcia-Lorenzana, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The gastric mucosa ischemic tissular damage plays an important role in critical care patients' outcome, because it is the first damaged tissue by compensatory mechanism during shock. The aim of the study is to relate bioimpedance changes with tissular damage level generated by ischemia by means of confocal endomicroscopy and light microscopy. Bioimpedance of the gastric mucosa and confocal images were obtained from Wistar male rats during basal and ischemia conditions. They were anesthetized, and stain was applied (fluorescein and/or acriflavine). The impedance spectroscopy catheter was inserted and then confocal endomicroscopy probe. After basal measurements and biopsy, hepatic and gastric arteries clamping induced ischemia. Finally, pyloric antrum tissue was preserved in buffered formaldehyde (10%) for histology processing using light microscopy. Confocal images were equalized, binarized, and boundary defined, and infiltrations were quantified. Impedance and infiltrations increased with ischemia showing significant changes between basal and ischemia conditions (P < 0.01). Light microscopy analysis allows detection of general alterations in cellular and tissular integrity, confirming gastric reactance and confocal images quantification increments obtained during ischemia. PMID:23841094

  17. Decomposition method of an electrical bio-impedance signal into cardiac and respiratory components.

    PubMed

    Krivoshei, A; Kukk, V; Min, M

    2008-06-01

    The paper presents a method for adaptive decomposition of an electrical bio-impedance (BI) signal into two components: cardiac and respiratory. The decomposition of a BI signal is not a trivial process because of the non-stationarity of the signal components and overlapping of their harmonic spectra. An application specific orthonormal basis (ASOB) was designed to solve the decomposition task using the Jacobi weighting function in the standard Gram-Schmidt process. The key element of the bio-impedance signal decomposer (BISD) is a model of the cardiac BI signal, which is constructed from the components of the ASOB and is intended for use in the BISD for on-line tracking of the cardiac BI signal. It makes it possible to separate the cardiac and respiratory components of the total BI signal in non-stationary conditions. In combination with the signal-shape locked loop (SSLL), the BISD allows us to decompose the BI signals with partially overlapping spectra. The proposed BISD based method is accomplished as a PC software digital system, but it is oriented towards applications in portable and stationary cardiac devices and in clinical settings. PMID:18544800

  18. Bioimpedance analysis for the characterization of breast cancer cells in suspension.

    PubMed

    Guofeng Qiao; Wei Wang; Wei Duan; Fan Zheng; Sinclair, A J; Chatwin, C R

    2012-08-01

    The bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) technique is potentially a useful tool to differentiate malignancy based on the variation of electrical properties presented by different tissues and cells. The different tissues and cells present variant electrical resistance and reactance when excited at different frequencies. The main purpose of this area of research is to use impedance measurements over a low-frequency bandwidth ranging from 1 kHz to 3 MHz to 1) differentiate the pathological stages of cancer cells under laboratory conditions and 2) permit the extraction of electrical parameters related to cellular information for further analysis. This provides evidence to form the basis of bioimpedance measurement at the cellular level and aids the potential future development of rapid diagnostics from biopsy materials. Three cell lines, representing normal breast epithelia and different pathological stages of breast cancer, have been measured using a standard impedance analyzer driving a four-electrode chamber filled with different cell suspensions. We identify the specific BIS profile for each cell type and determine whether these can be differentiated. In addition, the electrical parameters, e.g., the intracellular conductivity, membrane capacitance/capacity, characteristic frequency, are extracted by the use of equivalent circuit models and physical models to provide details of the cell electric signatures for further analysis of cancer cell pathology. PMID:22692870

  19. Flexible Bioimpedance Sensor for Label-Free Detection of Cell Viability and Biomass.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Renny Edwin; Lebiga, Elise; Koklu, Anil; Sabuncu, Ahmet Can; Beskok, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a flexible microfluidic bioimpedance sensor that is capable of detecting biomass and cell viability variations in a cell suspension. The sensor is developed on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate and is devoid of gold, silicon, PDMS, or glass. In conjugation with a custom built PCB read-out module, the impedance characteristics of a cell suspension can be measured within one minute of sample introduction using liquid volumes less than 5 μL. The portable sensor system occupies very little bench space and has the potential to be developed as a disposable electrical bioimpedance probe for rapid detection of dielectric variations in a biological suspension. The sensor is designed to generate a differential impedance spectra exclusive to a cell suspension with a dual-electrode-pair system. The potential of the sensor to discriminate between live and heat treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae is demonstrated in this study. The disposable sensor along with the distance variation technique is touted to be an inexpensive alternative to some of the existing online disposable biomass detection probes and electrochemical sensors. PMID:26415205

  20. Visualizing transplanted muscle flaps using minimally invasive multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R.; Zorkova, V.; Min, M.; Rätsep, I.

    2010-04-01

    We describe here an imaging system that uses bioimpedance spectroscopy with multi-electrode array to indicate the state of muscle flap regions under the array. The system is able to differentiate between different health states in the tissue and give early information about the location and size of ischemic sub-regions. The array will be 4*8 electrodes with the spacing of 5mm between the electrodes (the number of electrodes and the spacing may vary). The electrodes are minimally invasive short stainless steel needles, that penetrate 0.3 mm into the tissue with the goal of achieving a wet electric contact. We combine 32 configurations of 4-electrode multi-frequency impedance measurements to derive a health-state map for the transplanted flap. The imaging method is tested on a model consisting of 2 tissues and FEM software (Finite Element Method -COMSOL Multiphysics based) is used to conduct the measurements virtually. Dedicated multichannel bioimpedance measurement equipment has already been developed and tested, that cover the frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz.

  1. Longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurements in addition to diagnosis of heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, N.; Nescolarde, L.; Domingo, M.; Gastelurrutia, P.; Bayés-Genis, A.; Rosell-Ferrer, J.

    2010-04-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome characterised by signs of systemic and pulmonary fluid retention, shortness of breath and/or fatigue. There is a lack of reliable indicators of disease state. Benefits and applicability of non-invasive bioimpedance measurement in the hydration state of soft tissues have been validated, fundamentally, in dialysis patients. Four impedance configurations (2 longitudinal and 2 transversal) were analyzed in 48 HF patients (M=28, F=20) classified according to a clinical disease severity score (CDSS) derived from the Framingham criteria: CDSS<=2 (G1: M = 23, F = 14) and CDSS>2 (G2: M = 5, F = 6). The aim of this study is to analyze longitudinal and transversal bioimpedance measurement at 50 kHz, in addition to clinical diagnosis parameters of heart failure, including: clinical disease severity score (CDSS) and a biomarker concentrations (NT-proBNP). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used for the normality test of all variables. The CDSS, NTproBNP and impedance parameters between groups (G1 and G2) were compared by mean of Mann Withney U-test. The statistical significance was considered with P < 0.05. Whole-body impedance measured was analyzed using RXc graph.

  2. Theoretical study on the amplitude ratio of the seismoelectric field to the Stoneley wave and the formation tortuosity estimation from seismoelectric logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Wei; Yin, Chenggang; Wang, Jun; Cui, Naigang; Hu, Hengshan; Wang, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Seismoelectric logging has potential applications in exploring the porous formation characteristics. In this study, we theoretically address how the amplitudes of the Stoneley wave and its accompanying borehole seismoelectric field depend on the porous formation parameters such as porosity, permeability and tortuosity. We calculate the ratio of the electric field amplitude to the pressure amplitude (REP amplitude) for the low-frequency Stoneley wave of different formations and find that the REP amplitude is sensitive to porosity and tortuosity but insensitive to permeability. To confirm this conclusion, we derive the approximate expression of the REP amplitude in the wavenumber-frequency domain which shows that the REP amplitude is dependent on tortuosity but independent of permeability. This contradicts the result concluded by previous researchers from experiments that the REP amplitude is directly proportional to the permeability. The reason is probably attributed to the fact that the rock samples with different permeabilities typically have different tortuosities. Since the REP amplitude is sensitive to tortuosity, we propose a method of estimating formation tortuosity from seismoelectric logs. It is implemented by using the REP amplitude and the wavenumber of the Stoneley wave at a given frequency when the porosity and the pore fluid viscosity and salinity are known. We test the method by estimating the tortuosities from the synthetic seismoelectric waveforms in different formations. The result shows that the errors relative to the input tortuosities are lower than 5.0 per cent without considering the uncertainties of other input parameters.

  3. Bioimpedance in monitoring of effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alexeev, Vasiliy Grigorievich; Kuznecova, Ludmila Vasilievna

    2011-01-01

    Background Bioimpedance has been shown to be a safe technique when used in a number of biomedical applications. In this study, we used the Electro Interstitial Scan (EIS) to perform bioimpedance measurements to follow up the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in subjects diagnosed to have major depressive disorder. Methods We recruited 59 subjects (38 women, 21 men) aged 17–76 (mean 47) years diagnosed with major depressive disorder by psychiatric assessment at the Botkin Hospital according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). Baseline Clinical Global Impression scores and EIS (electrical conductivity and dispersion α parameter) measurements were done before starting SSRI therapy. Treatment follow-up was undertaken using EIS bioimpedance measurements and by treatment response based on the Hamilton Depression Scale and Clinical Global Impression, every 15 days for 60 days. At day 45, we classified the patients into two groups, ie, Group 1, including treatment responders, and Group 2, including nonresponders. At day 60, patients were classified into two further groups, ie, Group 3, comprising treatment responders, and Group 4, comprising nonresponders. Results Comparing Group 1 and Group 2, electrical conductivity measurement of the pathway between the two forehead electrodes had a specificity of 72% and a sensitivity of 85.3% (P < 0.0001), with a cutoff >4.32. Comparing Group 3 and Group 4, electrical conductivity measurements in the same pathway had a specificity of 47.6% and a sensitivity of 76.3% (P < 0.16), with a cutoff >5.92. Comparing Group 1 and Group 2, the electrical dispersion α parameter of the pathway between the two disposable forehead electrodes had a specificity of 80% and a sensitivity of 85.2% (P < 0.0001) with a cutoff >0.678. Comparing Group 3 and Group 4, the electrical dispersion α parameter of the same pathway had a specificity of 100%, a sensitivity of 89

  4. Cooperative dry-electrode sensors for multi-lead biopotential and bioimpedance monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rapin, M; Proença, M; Braun, F; Meier, C; Solà, J; Ferrario, D; Grossenbacher, O; Porchet, J-A; Chételat, O

    2015-04-01

    Cooperative sensors is a novel measurement architecture that allows the acquiring of biopotential signals on patients in a comfortable and easy-to-integrate manner. The novel sensors are defined as cooperative in the sense that at least two of them work in concert to measure a target physiological signal, such as a multi-lead electrocardiogram or a thoracic bioimpedance.This paper starts by analysing the state-of-the-art methods to simultaneously measure biopotential and bioimpedance signals, and justifies why currently (1) passive electrodes require the use of shielded or double-shielded cables, and (2) active electrodes require the use of multi-wired cabled technologies, when aiming at high quality physiological measurements.In order to overcome the limitations of the state-of-the-art, a new method for biopotential and bioimpedance measurement using the cooperative sensor is then presented. The novel architecture allows the acquisition of the aforementioned biosignals without the need of shielded or multi-wire cables by splitting the electronics into separate electronic sensors comprising each of two electrodes, one for voltage measurement and one for current injection. The sensors are directly in contact with the skin and connected together by only one unshielded wire. This new configuration requires one power supply per sensor and all sensors need to be synchronized together to allow them to work in concert.After presenting the working principle of the cooperative sensor architecture, this paper reports first experimental results on the use of the technology when applied to measuring multi-lead ECG signals on patients. Measurements performed on a healthy patient demonstrate the feasibility of using this novel cooperative sensor architecture to measure biopotential signals and compliance with common mode rejection specification accordingly to international standard (IEC 60601-2-47) has also been assessed.By reducing the need of using complex wiring setups, and

  5. Removing respiratory artefacts from transthoracic bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuba-Gyllensten, I.; Abtahi, F.; Bonomi, A. G.; Lindecrantz, K.; Seoane, F.; Amft, O.

    2013-04-01

    Transthoracic impedance spectroscopy (TIS) measurements from wearable textile electrodes provide a tool to remotely and non-invasively monitor patient health. However, breathing and cardiac processes inevitably affect TIS measurements, since they are sensitive to changes in geometry and air or fluid volumes in the thorax. This study aimed at investigating the effect of respiration on Cole parameters extracted from TIS measurements and developing a method to suppress artifacts. TIS data were collected from 10 participants at 16 frequencies (range: 10 kHz - 1 MHz) using a textile electrode system (Philips Technologie Gmbh). Simultaneously, breathing volumes and frequency were logged using an electronic spirometer augmented with data from a breathing belt. The effect of respiration on TIS measurements was studied at paced (10 and 16 bpm) deep and shallow breathing. These measurements were repeated for each subject in three different postures (lying down, reclining and sitting). Cole parameter estimation was improved by assessing the tidal expiration point thus removing breathing artifacts. This leads to lower intra-subject variability between sessions and a need for less measurements points to accurately assess the spectra. Future work should explore algorithmic artifacts compensation models using breathing and posture or patient contextual information to improve ambulatory transthoracic impedance measurements.

  6. Bioimpedance modeling to monitor astrocytic response to chronically implanted electrodes.

    PubMed

    McConnell, G C; Butera, R J; Bellamkonda, R V

    2009-10-01

    The widespread adoption of neural prosthetic devices is currently hindered by our inability to reliably record neural signals from chronically implanted electrodes. The extent to which the local tissue response to implanted electrodes influences recording failure is not well understood. To investigate this phenomenon, impedance spectroscopy has shown promise for use as a non-invasive tool to estimate the local tissue response to microelectrodes. Here, we model impedance spectra from chronically implanted rats using the well-established Cole model, and perform a correlation analysis of modeled parameters with histological markers of astroglial scar, including glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and 4',6-diamidino-2- phenylindole (DAPI). Correlations between modeled parameters and GFAP were significant for three parameters studied: Py value, R(o) and |Z|(1 kHz), and in all cases were confined to the first 100 microm from the interface. Py value was the only parameter also correlated with DAPI in the first 100 microm. Our experimental results, along with computer simulations, suggest that astrocytes are a predominant cellular player affecting electrical impedance spectra. The results also suggest that the largest contribution from reactive astrocytes on impedance spectra occurs in the first 100 microm from the interface, where electrodes are most likely to record electrical signals. These results form the basis for future approaches where impedance spectroscopy can be used to evaluate neural implants, evaluate strategies to minimize scar and potentially develop closed-loop prosthetic devices. PMID:19721187

  7. Bioimpedance modeling to monitor astrocytic response to chronically implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, G. C.; Butera, R. J.; Bellamkonda, R. V.

    2009-10-01

    The widespread adoption of neural prosthetic devices is currently hindered by our inability to reliably record neural signals from chronically implanted electrodes. The extent to which the local tissue response to implanted electrodes influences recording failure is not well understood. To investigate this phenomenon, impedance spectroscopy has shown promise for use as a non-invasive tool to estimate the local tissue response to microelectrodes. Here, we model impedance spectra from chronically implanted rats using the well-established Cole model, and perform a correlation analysis of modeled parameters with histological markers of astroglial scar, including glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and 4',6-diamidino-2- phenylindole (DAPI). Correlations between modeled parameters and GFAP were significant for three parameters studied: Py value, Ro and |Z|1 kHz, and in all cases were confined to the first 100 µm from the interface. Py value was the only parameter also correlated with DAPI in the first 100 µm. Our experimental results, along with computer simulations, suggest that astrocytes are a predominant cellular player affecting electrical impedance spectra. The results also suggest that the largest contribution from reactive astrocytes on impedance spectra occurs in the first 100 µm from the interface, where electrodes are most likely to record electrical signals. These results form the basis for future approaches where impedance spectroscopy can be used to evaluate neural implants, evaluate strategies to minimize scar and potentially develop closed-loop prosthetic devices.

  8. Frequency of fluid overload and usefulness of bioimpedance in patients requiring intensive care for sepsis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurbir; Velocci, Victor; Nasser, Mohamed; McCullough, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Guideline-directed therapy for sepsis calls for early fluid resuscitation. Often patients receive large volumes of intravenous fluids. Bioimpedance vector analysis (BIVA) is a noninvasive technique useful for measuring total body water. In this prospective observational study, we enrolled 18 patients admitted to the intensive care unit for the treatment of sepsis syndromes. Laboratory data, clinical parameters, and BIVA were recorded daily. All but one patient experienced volume overload during the course of treatment. Two patients had >20 L of excess volume. Volume overload is clinically represented by tissue edema. Edema is not a benign condition, as it impairs tissue oxygenation, obstructs capillary blood flow, disrupts metabolite clearance, and alters cell-to-cell interactions. Specifically, volume overload has been shown to impair pulmonary, cardiac, and renal function. A positive fluid balance is a predictor of hospital mortality. As septic patients recover, volume excess should be aggressively treated with the use of targeted diuretics and renal replacement therapies if necessary. PMID:26722156

  9. Frequency of fluid overload and usefulness of bioimpedance in patients requiring intensive care for sepsis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Timothy R; Singh, Gurbir; Velocci, Victor; Nasser, Mohamed; McCullough, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Guideline-directed therapy for sepsis calls for early fluid resuscitation. Often patients receive large volumes of intravenous fluids. Bioimpedance vector analysis (BIVA) is a noninvasive technique useful for measuring total body water. In this prospective observational study, we enrolled 18 patients admitted to the intensive care unit for the treatment of sepsis syndromes. Laboratory data, clinical parameters, and BIVA were recorded daily. All but one patient experienced volume overload during the course of treatment. Two patients had >20 L of excess volume. Volume overload is clinically represented by tissue edema. Edema is not a benign condition, as it impairs tissue oxygenation, obstructs capillary blood flow, disrupts metabolite clearance, and alters cell-to-cell interactions. Specifically, volume overload has been shown to impair pulmonary, cardiac, and renal function. A positive fluid balance is a predictor of hospital mortality. As septic patients recover, volume excess should be aggressively treated with the use of targeted diuretics and renal replacement therapies if necessary. PMID:26722156

  10. Bio-impedance detector for Staphylococcus aureus exposed to magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younis Yacoob Aldosky, Haval; Barwari, Waleed Jameel Omar; Salih Al-mlaly, Janan M.

    2012-12-01

    Rapid detection of viability and growth of pathogenic microorganisms is very important in many applications such as food and drug production, health care, and national defense. Measurements on the electrical characteristics of cells have been used successfully in the past to detect many different physiological events. The effect of electromagnetic fields on the growth of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) was studied with the bio-impedance technique. The growth situations of bacteria in the absence and presence of different intensities of static and alternative magnetic fields were examined and analyzed. The results show that the impedance of bacteria fell in the presence of DC magnetic fields. In contrast the impedance increased when the bacteria were exposed to AC magnetic fields. Based on these results the bacterial growth indicated by the change in the impedance is inhibited under DC magnetic fields and enhanced under AC fields.

  11. Design and characterization of a multi-frequency bioimpedance measurement prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia Neto, O. E.; Porto, R. W.; Aya, J. C. C.

    2012-12-01

    A multi-frequency bioimpedance measurement prototype is proposed, validated and characterized. It consists of an Improved Howland Current Source controlled by voltage, a load voltage sensing scheme through a discrete 3-opamp instrumentation amplifier, a phase and quadrature demodulation setup through analog multipliers, and digitization and processing of the signals using a digital benchtop multimeter. The electrical characterization of the measurement channel was done for resistive loads only, on four different circuits. Measurements were made on 10 frequencies, from 100 kHz to 1 MHz, with 10 load resistances, from 100 Ω to 1 kΩ, to obtain linearity, absolute error and frequency response. The best performance among the four circuits was a maximum absolute error of 5.55 %, and -1.93 % of load current variation at the worst case scenario.

  12. Evaluation of an EMG bioimpedance measurement system for recording and analysing the pharyngeal phase of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, Corinna; Schauer, Thomas; Nahrstaedt, Holger; Seidl, Rainer O

    2013-07-01

    A neuroprosthetic device for treating swallowing disorders requires an implantable measurement system capable to analysing the timing and quality of the swallowing process in real time. A combined EMG bioimpedance (EMBI) measurement system was developed and is evaluated here. The study was planned and performed as a case-control study. The studies were approved by the Charité Berlin ethics committee in votes EA1/160/09 and EA1/161/09. Investigations were carried out on healthy volunteers in order to examine the usefulness and reproducibility of measurements, the ability to distinguish between swallowing and head movements and the effect of different food consistencies. The correlation between bioimpedance and anatomical and functional changes occurring during the pharyngeal phase of swallowing in non-healthy patients was examined using videofluoroscopy (VFSS). 31 healthy subjects (15♂, 16♀) were tested over the course of 1350 swallows and 19 (17♂, 2♀) non-healthy patients over the course of 54 swallows. The signal curves obtained from both transcutaneous and subcutaneous measurement were similar, characteristic and reproducible (r > 0.5) and correlated with anatomical and functional changes during the pharyngeal phase of swallowing observed using VFSS. Statistically significant differences between head movements and swallowing movements, food volumes and consistencies were found. Neither the conductivity of the food, the sex of the test subject nor the position of the measurement electrodes exerted a statistically significant effect on the measured signal. EMBI is able to reproducibly map the pharyngeal phase of swallowing and changes associated with it both transcutaneously and subcutaneously. The procedure therefore appears to be suitable for use in performing automated evaluation of the swallowing process and for use as a component of an implant. PMID:23440435

  13. Bioimpedance monitoring of 3D cell culturing--complementary electrode configurations for enhanced spatial sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Høyum, Per; Pettersen, Fred-Johan; Hemmingsen, Mette; Wolff, Anders; Dufva, Martin; Martinsen, Ørjan Grøttem; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-01-15

    A bioimpedance platform is presented as a promising tool for non-invasive real-time monitoring of the entire process of three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing in a hydrogel scaffold. In this study, the dynamics involved in the whole process of 3D cell culturing, starting from polymerisation of a bare 3D gelatin scaffold, to human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) encapsulation and proliferation, was monitored over time. The platform consists of a large rectangular culture chamber with four embedded vertical gold plate electrodes that were exploited in two- and three terminal (2T and 3T) measurement configurations. By switching between the different combinations of electrode couples, it was possible to generate a multiplexing-like approach, which allowed for collecting spatially distributed information within the 3D space. Computational finite element (FE) analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) characterisation were used to determine the configurations' sensitivity field localisation. The 2T setup gives insight into the interfacial phenomena at both electrode surfaces and covers the central part of the 3D cell culture volume, while the four 3T modes provide focus on the dynamics at the corners of the 3D culture chamber. By combining a number of electrode configurations, complementary spatially distributed information on a large 3D cell culture can be obtained with maximised sensitivity in the entire 3D space. The experimental results show that cell proliferation can be monitored within the tested biomimetic environment, paving the way to further developments in bioimpedance tracking of 3D cell cultures and tissue engineering. PMID:25058941

  14. Effect of psychological stress on gastric motility assessed by electrical bio-impedance

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Franco, María Raquel; Vargas-Luna, Miguel; Montes-Frausto, Juana Berenice; Morales-Mata, Ismael; Ramirez-Padilla, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate gastric motility using electrical bio-impedance (EBI) and gastric changes as a result of stress induced by psychological tests. METHODS: A group of 57 healthy women, aged 40-60 years, was recruited, and a clinical history and physical examination were performed. The women were free from severe anxiety, chronic or acute stress, severe depression, mental diseases and conditions that affect gastric activity. The women were evaluated under fasting conditions, and using a four-electrode configuration, the gastric signals were obtained through a BIOPAC MP-150 system. The volunteers were evaluated using the following paradigm: basal state, recording during the Stroop Test, intermediate resting period, recording during the Raven Test, and a final resting period. We analyzed the relative areas of the frequency spectrum: A1 (1-2 cpm), A2 (2-4 cpm), A3 (4-8 cpm), and A4 (8-12 cpm), as well as the median of area A2 + A3. The data were analyzed by an autoregressive method using a Butterworth filter with MatLab and Origin. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Friedman ANOVA (for nonparametric variables) were performed; in addition, pairs of groups were compared using the T dependent and Wilcoxon T tests. RESULTS: The results of the main values of area A2 were not significantly different comparing the five steps of the experimental paradigm. Nevertheless, there was a tendency of this A2 region to decrease during the stress tests, with recuperation at the final resting step. When an extended gastric region was considered (1-4 cpm), significant differences with the psychological stress tests were present (F = 3.85, P = 0.005). The A3 region also showed significant changes when the stress psychological tests were administered (F = 7.25, P < 0.001). These differences were influenced by the changes in the adjacent gastric region of A2. The parameter that we proposed in previous studies for the evaluation of gastric motility by electrical bio-impedance (EBI) was the median

  15. Design and construction of the artificial patient module for testing bioimpedance measuring devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Młyńczak, Marcel; Pariaszewska, Katarzyna; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Cybulski, Gerard

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the design of the electronic module for testing bioimpedance measuring devices, for example impedance cardiographs or impedance pneumographs. Artificial Patient was conceived as an electronic equivalent of the impedance of skin-electrode interface and the impedance between electrodes - measured one. Different approaches in imitating a resistance of skin and an impedance of electrode-skin connection were presented. The module was adapted for frequently applied tetrapolar electrode configuration. Therefore the design do not enclose the elements simulating impedance between skin and receiver electrodes due to negligible effect of this impedance on the current flow through the receiver. The Artificial Patient enables testing either application generators, or receiver parts, particularly the level of noise and distortions of the signal. Use of digitally controlled potentiometer allows simulating different tissue resistances changes such as constant values, very-low-frequency and low-frequency changes corresponding to those caused by breathing or heart activity. Also it allows distorting signals in order to test algorithms of artifacts attenuation.

  16. Multi-frequency simultaneous measurement of bioimpedance spectroscopy based on a low crest factor multisine excitation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuxiang; Zhang, Fu; Tao, Kun; Wang, Lianhuan; Wen, He; Teng, Zhaosheng

    2015-03-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is becoming a powerful diagnostic tool for a wide variety of medical applications, and the multi-frequency simultaneous (MFS) measurement of BIS can greatly reduce measurement time and record the transient physiological status of a living body compared with traditional frequency-sweep measurement technology. This paper adopts the Van der Ouderaa's multisine, which has 31 equidistant and flat amplitude spectra and a low crest factor of 1.405 as the broadband excitation, and realizes the MFS measurement of BIS by means of spectral analysis using the fast Fourier transform algorithm. The approach to implement the multisine based on a field-programmable gate array and a digital to analog converter is described in detail, and impedance measurement experiments are performed on three resistance-capitance three-element phantoms. Experimental results show a commendable accuracy with a mean relative error of 0.55% for the impedance amplitudes, and a mean absolute error of 0.20° for the impedance phases on the 31 frequencies ranging linearly from 32 to 992 kHz. This paper validates the feasibility of the MFS technology for BIS measurement based on the multisine excitation. PMID:25679488

  17. Pulse wave detection method based on the bio-impedance of the wrist.

    PubMed

    He, Jianman; Wang, Mengjun; Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    The real-time monitoring of pulse rate can evaluate the heart health to some extent, and the measurement of bio-impedance has the potential in wearable health monitoring system. In this paper, an effective method, which contains self-balancing bridge, flexible electrode, and high-speed digital lock-in algorithm (DLIA) with over-sampling, was designed to detect the impedance pulse wave at the wrist. By applying the self-balancing bridge, the basic impedance can be compensated as much as possible, and the low amplitude of impedance variation related to heart pulse can be obtained more easily. And the flexible conductive rubber electrode used in our experiment is human-friendly. Besides, the over-sampling method and high-speed DLIA are used to enhance the effective resolution of the existing data sampled by analog to digital converter. With the high-speed data process and simple circuit above, this proposed method has the potential in wrist-band wearable systems and it can satisfy quests of small volume and low power consumption. PMID:27250460

  18. Ventilation and Heart Rate Monitoring in Drivers using a Contactless Electrical Bioimpedance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, R.; García, M. A.; Ramos, J.; Bragós, R.; Fernández, M.

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, the road safety is one of the most important priorities in the automotive industry. Many times, this safety is jeopardized because of driving under inappropriate states, e.g. drowsiness, drugs and/or alcohol. Therefore several systems for monitoring the behavior of subjects during driving are researched. In this paper, a device based on a contactless electrical bioimpedance system is shown. Using the four-wire technique, this system is capable of obtaining the heart rate and the ventilation of the driver through multiple textile electrodes. These textile electrodes are placed on the car seat and the steering wheel. Moreover, it is also reported several measurements done in a controlled environment, i.e. a test room where there are no artifacts due to the car vibrations or the road state. In the mentioned measurements, the system response can be observed depending on several parameters such as the placement of the electrodes or the number of clothing layers worn by the driver.

  19. Stroke Damage Detection Using Classification Trees on Electrical Bioimpedance Cerebral Spectroscopy Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Atefi, Seyed Reza; Seoane, Fernando; Thorlin, Thorleif; Lindecrantz, Kaj

    2013-01-01

    After cancer and cardio-vascular disease, stroke is the third greatest cause of death worldwide. Given the limitations of the current imaging technologies used for stroke diagnosis, the need for portable non-invasive and less expensive diagnostic tools is crucial. Previous studies have suggested that electrical bioimpedance (EBI) measurements from the head might contain useful clinical information related to changes produced in the cerebral tissue after the onset of stroke. In this study, we recorded 720 EBI Spectroscopy (EBIS) measurements from two different head regions of 18 hemispheres of nine subjects. Three of these subjects had suffered a unilateral haemorrhagic stroke. A number of features based on structural and intrinsic frequency-dependent properties of the cerebral tissue were extracted. These features were then fed into a classification tree. The results show that a full classification of damaged and undamaged cerebral tissue was achieved after three hierarchical classification steps. Lastly, the performance of the classification tree was assessed using Leave-One-Out Cross Validation (LOO-CV). Despite the fact that the results of this study are limited to a small database, and the observations obtained must be verified further with a larger cohort of patients, these findings confirm that EBI measurements contain useful information for assessing on the health of brain tissue after stroke and supports the hypothesis that classification features based on Cole parameters, spectral information and the geometry of EBIS measurements are useful to differentiate between healthy and stroke damaged brain tissue. PMID:23966181

  20. Development of a Stair-Step Multifrequency Synchronized Excitation Signal for Fast Bioimpedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bian, He; Du, Fangling; Sun, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Wideband excitation signal with finite prominent harmonic components is desirable for fast bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurements. This work introduces a simple method to synthesize and realize a type of periodical stair-step multifrequency synchronized (MFS) signal. The Fourier series analysis shows that the p-order MFS signal f(p, t) has constant 81.06% energy distributed equally on its p  2nth primary harmonics. The synthesis principle is described firstly and then two examples of the 4-order and 5-order MFS signals, f(4, t) and f(5, t), are synthesized. The method to implement the MFS waveform based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) and a digital to analog converter (DAC) is also presented. Both the number and the frequencies of the expected primary harmonics can be adjusted as needed. An impedance measurement experiment on a RC three-element equivalent model is performed, and results show acceptable precision, which validates the feasibility of the MFS excitation. PMID:24701563

  1. Electrical bioimpedance and other techniques for gastric emptying and motility evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Franco, María Raquel; Vargas-Luna, Miguel; Montes-Frausto, Juana Berenice; Flores-Hernández, Corina; Morales-Mata, Ismael

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to identify non-invasive, inexpensive, highly sensitive and accurate techniques for evaluating and diagnosing gastric diseases. In the case of the stomach, there are highly sensitive and specific methods for assessing gastric motility and emptying (GME). However, these methods are invasive, expensive and/or not technically feasible for all clinicians and patients. We present a summary of the most relevant international information on non-invasive methods and techniques for clinically evaluating GME. We particularly emphasize the potential of gastric electrical bioimpedance (EBI). EBI was initially used mainly in gastric emptying studies and was essentially abandoned in favor of techniques such as electrogastrography and the gold standard, scintigraphy. The current research evaluating the utility of gastric EBI either combines this technique with other frequently used techniques or uses new methods for gastric EBI signal analysis. In this context, we discuss our results and those of other researchers who have worked with gastric EBI. In this review article, we present the following topics: (1) a description of the oldest methods and procedures for evaluating GME; (2) an explanation of the methods currently used to evaluate gastric activity; and (3) a perspective on the newest trends and techniques in clinical and research GME methods. We conclude that gastric EBI is a highly effective non-invasive, easy to use and inexpensive technique for assessing GME. PMID:22368782

  2. Frequency and temperature dependence of skin bioimpedance during a contralateral cold test.

    PubMed

    Podtaev, S; Nikolaev, D; Samartsev, V; Gavrilov, V; Tsiberkin, K

    2015-03-01

    A study of the α- and β-dispersion of skin bioimpedance dependence on temperature and micro-hemodynamics is presented. The vascular tone changes during the cold test are verified by the wavelet-analysis of skin temperature signals obtained simultaneously with impedance measurements. Thirty three normal healthy subjects of 28  ±  7 years old were entered into the study. The tetra-polar electrode system was used to record the resistance and reactance; measurements were carried out at 67 frequencies, in a frequency range from 2 Hz to 50 kHz. It has been found that the impedance decreases with vasodilation and increases with vasoconstriction. The high values of correlation among thermal oscillation amplitudes and Nyquist diagram parameters prove the impedance dependence on blood flow in three frequency bands corresponding to the myogenic, neurogenic and endothelial vascular tone regulation mechanisms. Using an equivalent RC circuit, we obtained the changes in the Nyquist diagram matching the experimental data. The proposed descriptive α-dispersion model can be used to study mechanisms responsible for intercellular interaction. PMID:25690397

  3. Pulse wave detection method based on the bio-impedance of the wrist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianman; Wang, Mengjun; Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    The real-time monitoring of pulse rate can evaluate the heart health to some extent, and the measurement of bio-impedance has the potential in wearable health monitoring system. In this paper, an effective method, which contains self-balancing bridge, flexible electrode, and high-speed digital lock-in algorithm (DLIA) with over-sampling, was designed to detect the impedance pulse wave at the wrist. By applying the self-balancing bridge, the basic impedance can be compensated as much as possible, and the low amplitude of impedance variation related to heart pulse can be obtained more easily. And the flexible conductive rubber electrode used in our experiment is human-friendly. Besides, the over-sampling method and high-speed DLIA are used to enhance the effective resolution of the existing data sampled by analog to digital converter. With the high-speed data process and simple circuit above, this proposed method has the potential in wrist-band wearable systems and it can satisfy quests of small volume and low power consumption.

  4. Process techniques for human thoracic electrical bio-impedance signal in remote healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Muhammad Zia Ur; Mirza, Shafi Shahsavar

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of thoracic electrical bio-impedance (TEB) facilitates heart stroke volume in sudden cardiac arrest. This Letter proposes several efficient and computationally simplified adaptive algorithms to display high-resolution TEB component. In a clinical environment, TEB signal encounters with various physiological and non-physiological phenomenon, which masks the tiny features that are important in identifying the intensity of the stroke. Moreover, computational complexity is an important parameter in a modern wearable healthcare monitoring tool. Hence, in this Letter, the authors propose a new signal conditioning technique for TEB enhancement in remote healthcare systems. For this, the authors have chosen higher order adaptive filter as a basic element in the process of TEB. To improve filtering capability, convergence speed, to reduce computational complexity of the signal conditioning technique, the authors apply data normalisation and clipping the data regressor. The proposed implementations are tested on real TEB signals. Finally, simulation results confirm that proposed regressor clipped normalised higher order filter is suitable for a practical healthcare system. PMID:27382481

  5. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jinzhen; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo

    2014-05-15

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  6. Towards intraoperative surgical margin assessment and visualization using bioimpedance properties of the tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shadab; Mahara, Aditya; Hyams, Elias S.; Schned, Alan; Halter, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) has a high 10-year recurrence rate, making PCa the second leading cause of cancer-specific mortality among men in the USA. PCa recurrences are often predicted by assessing the status of surgical margins (SM) with positive surgical margins (PSM) increasing the chances of biochemical recurrence by 2-4 times. To this end, an SM assessment system using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was developed with a microendoscopic probe. This system measures the tissue bioimpedance over a range of frequencies (1 kHz to 1MHz), and computes a Composite Impedance Metric (CIM). CIM can be used to classify tissue as benign or cancerous. The system was used to collect the impedance spectra from excised prostates, which were obtained from men undergoing radical prostatectomy. The data revealed statistically significant (p<0.05) differences in the impedance properties of the benign and tumorous tissues, and between different tissue morphologies. To visualize the results of SM-assessment, a visualization tool using da Vinci stereo laparoscope is being developed. Together with the visualization tool, the EIS-based SM assessment system can be potentially used to intraoperatively classify tissues and display the results on the surgical console with a video feed of the surgical site, thereby augmenting a surgeon's view of the site and providing a potential solution to the intraoperative SM assessment needs.

  7. [A Digital System for Bioimpedance and Electrical Impedance Tomography Measurement System].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Gao, Nana; Huang, Huafang

    2015-06-01

    A digital system for bioimpedance and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) measurement controlled by an ATmega16 microcontroller was constructed in our laboratory. There are eight digital electrodes using AD5933 to measure the impedance of the targets, and the data is transmitted to the computer wirelessly through nRF24L01. The structure of the system, circuit design, system testing, vitro measurements of animals' tissues and electrical impedance tomography are introduced specifically in this paper. The experimental results showed that the system relative error was 0.42%, and the signal noise ratio was 76.3 dB. The system not only can be used to measure the impedance by any two electrodes within the frequency of 1-100 kHz in a sweep scanning, but also can reconstruct the images of EIT. The animal experiments showed that the data was valid and plots were fitting with Cole-Cole theory. The testing verified the feasibility and effectiveness of the system. The images reconstructed of a salt-water tank are satisfactory and match with the actual distribution of the tank. The system improves the effectiveness of the front-end measuring signal and the stability of the system greatly. PMID:26485981

  8. A wireless multi-channel bioimpedance measurement system for personalized healthcare and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Javier; Ausín, José Luis; Lorido, Antonio Manuel; Redondo, Francisco; Duque-Carrillo, Juan Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Miniaturized, noninvasive, wearable sensors constitute a fundamental prerequisite for pervasive, predictive, and preventive healthcare systems. In this sense, this paper presents the design, realization, and evaluation of a wireless multi-channel measurement system based on a cost-effective high-performance integrated circuit for electrical bioimpedance (EBI) measurements in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The resulting on-chip spectrometer provides high measuring EBI capabilities and together with a low-cost, commercially available radio frequency transceiver device. It provides reliable wireless communication, constitutes the basic node to build EBI wireless sensor networks (EBI-WSNs). The proposed EBI-WSN behaves as a high-performance wireless multi-channel EBI spectrometer, where the number of channels is completely scalable and independently configurable to satisfy specific measurement requirements of each individual. A prototype of the EBI node leads to a very small printed circuit board of approximately 8 cm2 including chip-antenna, which can operate several years on one 3-V coin cell battery and make it suitable for long-term preventive healthcare monitoring. PMID:23739358

  9. Dynamic Limb Bioimpedance and Inferior Vena Cava Ultrasound in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Tiba, Mohamad H; Belmont, Barry; Heung, Michael; Theyyunni, Nik; Huang, Robert D; Fung, Christopher M; Pennington, Amanda J; Cummings, Brandon C; Draucker, Gerard T; Shih, Albert J; Ward, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of volume status in critically ill patients poses a challenge to clinicians. Measuring changes in the inferior vena cava (IVC) diameter using ultrasound is becoming a standard tool to assess volume status. Ultrasound requires physicians with significant training and specialized expensive equipment. It would be of significant value to be able to obtain this measurement continuously without physician presence. We hypothesize that dynamic changes in limb's bioimpedance in response to respiration could be used to predict changes in IVC. Forty-six subjects were tested a hemodialysis session. Impedance was measured via electrodes placed on the arm. Simultaneously, the IVC diameter was assessed by ultrasound. Subjects were asked to breathe spontaneously and perform respiratory maneuvers using a respiratory training device. Impedance (dz) was determined and compared with change in IVC diameter (dIVC; r = 0.76, p < 0.0001). There was significant relationship between dz and dIVC (p< 0.0001). Receiver-operator curves for dz at thresholds of dIVC (20% to70%) demonstrated high predictive power with areas under the curves (0.87-0.99, p < 0.0001). This evaluation suggests that real-time dynamic changes in limb impedance are capable of tracking a wide range of dynamic dIVC. This technique might be a suitable surrogate for monitoring real-time changes in dIVC to assess intravascular volume status. PMID:26919184

  10. Portable Bioimpedance Spectroscopy device and textile electrodes for mobile monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, L.; Jacob, M.; Hoog Antink, C.; Cordes, A.; Pikkemaat, R.; Jungbecker, N.; Gries, T.; Leonhardt, S.

    2010-04-01

    A balanced body composition is necessary for a person's health and performance. Therefore, it is important to control the body composition continuously since complications and diseases due to dehydration often appear gradually. Based on these facts a miniaturized mobile Bioimpedance Spectroscopy device was developed that can be integrated into clothing and allows the continuous monitoring of a person's body water. The implemented system has been tested using different body models. The first measurements showed very precise and stable results. Besides the portable measurement system, textile electrodes are needed for continuous long term monitoring. Therefore, special textile electrodes were developed, tested and evaluated. The electrodes are structured in a specific way leading to a rougher surface. Such a surface improves the interface impedance and therefore optimizes the connection between electronic hardware and body. For comparison, five different structured electrodes were manufactured and tested on a special test setup that allows reproducible interface-impedance measurements using a dummy made of agar-agar to simulate the skin. It could be shown that the surface structure significantly influences the interface impedance in a positive way as compared to standard plane textile electrodes. In the future, a combination of the miniaturized BIS electronic and the structured textile electrodes could allow reproducible long term monitoring of a person's body composition.

  11. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhen; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2014-05-01

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  12. A wireless, compact, and scalable bioimpedance measurement system for energy-efficient multichannel body sensor solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J.; Ausín, J. L.; Lorido, A. M.; Redondo, F.; Duque-Carrillo, J. F.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present the design, realization and evaluation of a multichannel measurement system based on a cost-effective high-performance integrated circuit for electrical bioimpedance (EBI) measurements in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz, and a low-cost commercially available radio frequency transceiver device, which provides reliable wireless communication. The resulting on-chip spectrometer provides high measuring EBI capabilities and constitutes the basic node to built EBI wireless sensor networks (EBI-WSNs). The proposed EBI-WSN behaves as a high-performance wireless multichannel EBI spectrometer where the number of nodes, i.e., number of channels, is completely scalable to satisfy specific requirements of body sensor networks. One of its main advantages is its versatility, since each EBI node is independently configurable and capable of working simultaneously. A prototype of the EBI node leads to a very small printed circuit board of approximately 8 cm2 including chip-antenna, which can operate several years on one 3-V coin cell battery. A specifically tailored graphical user interface (GUI) for EBI-WSN has been also designed and implemented in order to configure the operation of EBI nodes and the network topology. EBI analysis parameters, e.g., single-frequency or spectroscopy, time interval, analysis by EBI events, frequency and amplitude ranges of the excitation current, etc., are defined by the GUI.

  13. Multifrequency simultaneous bioimpedance measurements using multitone burst signals for dynamic tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, B.; Bragos, R.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present the keypoints to perform multifrequency simultaneous bioimpedance measurements using multitone signals. Concerning the frequency distribution, tones are spread over 1kHz to 1MHz range using a custom frequency distribution which we called Bilateral Quasi Logarithmic (BQL). BQL concentrates a higher number of tones around the impedance relaxation and contains a frequency plan algorithm. It minimizes the intermodulation effects due to non-linearities behaviours of the DUT and electrodes by slightly shifting the original tones in order to guarantee a guard bandwith. Regarding the multitone phase distribution, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) has been developed to minimize multitone Crest Factor (CF). This allow us to maximize the resultant Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the acquisition system. This paper also presents the relation between parameters such as sampling frequency and ADC bits with the SNR and the effect in the overall amplitude and phase error when using multitone signals as excitation waveforms. Finally, we present characterization results from a measurement system based on a modular PXI architecture.

  14. Design of tri-level excitation signals for broadband bioimpedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuxiang; Wang, Lianhuan; Wang, Peipei; Yang, Xiufang; Zhang, Fu; Wen, He; Teng, Zhaosheng

    2015-09-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurement methods have been evolving from the traditional frequency-sweep approach to the multi-frequency simultaneous measurement technique which can drastically reduce measuring time and will be increasingly attractive for time-varying biological applications. Multi-frequency mixed (MFM) signals with sparsely distributed spectra are desirable for broadband BIS measurement. This paper proposes a synthesis method to design a series of tri-level MFM signals which contain only three values (+1, 0, -1), and has majority energy distributed on its (2(n))th primary harmonics. Tri-level MFM signals have both high energy efficiency and a low crest factor. An impedance measurement experiment excited by an 8th-order tri-level MFM signal on a RC three-element equivalent model has been performed, and the results on 8 primary harmonic frequencies ranging from 8 to 1024 kHz show a high accuracy with the mean amplitude relative error of 0.41% and mean phase absolute error of 0.18°, which has validated the feasibility of the tri-level MFM signals for broadband BIS measurement. PMID:26261063

  15. Influence of ambient temperature on whole body and segmental bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, G.; Bausch, R.; Ismail, A. H.; Cordes, A.; Pikkemaat, R.; Leonhardt, S.

    2010-04-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurements are easy to implement and could be used for continuous monitoring. However, several factors (e.g. environment temperature) influence the measurements limiting the accuracy of the technology. Changes in skin temperature produced by changes in ambient temperature are related with changes in skin blood flow and skin impedance. It is assumed that skin impedance change is responsible for the error observed in whole body and segmental measurements. Measurements including body parts more distant from the torso seem to be more affected. In the present article skin and segment impedance have been performed on healthy subjects under extreme changes in environment temperature (13-39 °C). A commercial BIS device with a range between 5 kHz and 1 MHz has been used for the measurements. The results indicate that not only skin impedance, but also impedance of deeper tissue (e.g. muscle) may be responsible for the influence of environment temperature on BIS measurements. Segmental (knee-to-knee) BIS measurements show a relative change of only 2 %, while forearm and whole body impedance changed 14 % and 8 % respectively.

  16. Four probe architecture using high spatial resolution single multi-walled carbon nanotube electrodes for electrophysiology and bioimpedance monitoring of whole tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Asis, Edward D.; Leung, Joseph; Wood, Sally; Nguyen, Cattien V.

    2010-03-01

    We report the application of a sensor with a multielectrode architecture consisting of four single multiwalled carbon nanotube electrodes (sMWNT electrodes) with nanotube tip diameters of approximately 30 nm to stimulation, recording, and bioimpedance characterization of whole muscle. Parallel pairs of sMWNT electrodes achieve improved stimulation efficiency from a reduction in electrode impedance and enhanced signal-to-noise ratio by detecting endogenic signals from a larger population of electrically active cells. The sensor with a four sMWNT electrode configuration can monitor changes in whole tissue bioimpedance.

  17. Body composition measurements using bioimpedance analysis in peritoneal dialysis patients are affected by the presence of dialysate.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok Hui; Cho, Kyu Hyang; Park, Jong Won; Yoon, Kyung Woo; Do, Jun Young

    2014-11-01

    The presence of peritoneal dialysate when performing bioimpedance analysis may affect body composition measurements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of dialysate on body composition measurements in Asians. Forty-one patients undergoing maintenance peritoneal dialysis in our hospital peritoneal dialysis unit were included in this study. Dialysate was drained from the abdomen prior to measurement, and bioimpedance analysis was performed using multi-frequency bioimpedance analysis, with each subject in a standing position (D-). Dialysate was then administered and the measurement was repeated (D+). The presence of peritoneal dialysate led to an increase in intracellular water (ICW), extracellular water (ECW), and total body water (D-: 20.33 ± 3.72 L for ICW and 13.53 ± 2.54 L for ECW; D+: 20.96 ± 3.78 L for ICW and 14.10 ± 2.59 L for ECW; P < 0.001 for both variables). Total and trunk oedema indices were higher in the presence of peritoneal dialysate. In addition, the presence of peritoneal dialysate led to an overestimation of mineral content and free fat mass (FFM) for the total body; but led to an underestimation of body fat (D-: 45.80 ± 8.26 kg for FFM and 19.30 ± 6.27 kg for body fat; D+: 47.51 ± 8.38 kg for FFM and 17.59 ± 6.47 kg for body fat; P < 0.001 for both variables). Our results demonstrate that the presence of peritoneal dialysate leads to an overestimation of FFM and an underestimation of fat mass. An empty abdomen is recommended when evaluating body composition using bioimpedance analysis. PMID:25307155

  18. Prediction of body fat percentage from skinfold and bio-impedance measurements in Indian school children

    PubMed Central

    Kehoe, Sarah H.; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V.; Lubree, Himangi G.; Wills, Andrew K.; Guntupalli, Aravinda M.; Veena, Sargoor R.; Bhat, Dattatray S.; Kishore, Ravi; Fall, Caroline H.D.; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Kurpad, Anura

    2011-01-01

    Background Few equations for calculating body fat percentage (BF%) from field methods have been developed in South Asian children. Objective To assess agreement between BF% derived from primary reference methods and that from skinfold equations and bio-impedance analysis (BIA) in Indian children. Methods We measured BF% in two groups of Indian children. In Pune, 570 rural children aged 6-8 years underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans. In Mysore 18O was administered to 59 urban children aged 7-9 years. We conducted BIA at 50kHz and anthropometry including subscapular and triceps skinfold thicknesses. We used the published equations of Wickramasinghe, Shaikh, Slaughter and Dezenburg to calculate BF% from anthropometric data and the manufacturer’s equation for BIA measurements. We assessed agreement with values derived from DXA and DLW using Bland Altman analysis. Results Children were light and thin compared to international standards. There was poor agreement between the reference BF% values and those from all equations. Assumptions for Bland Altman analysis were not met for Wickramasinghe, Shaikh and Slaughter equations. The Dezenberg equations under-predicted BF% for most children (mean difference in Pune −13.4, LOA −22.7, −4.0 and in Mysore −7.9, LOA −13.7 and −2.2). The mean bias for the BIA equation in Pune was +5.0% and in Mysore +1.95% and the LOA were wide; −5.0, 15.0 and −7.8, 11.7 respectively. Conclusions Currently available skinfold equations do not accurately predict BF% in Indian children. We recommend development of BIA equations in this population using a 4-compartment model. PMID:21731039

  19. Intradialytic hypertension during chronic haemodialysis and subclinical fluid overload assessed by bioimpedance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Sajith; Filmalter, Christelle; Harvey, Justin; Chothia, Mogamat-Yazied

    2016-01-01

    Background Intradialytic hypertension (IDH) increases morbidity and mortality. The prevalence in South Africa is unknown. The pathogenesis is unclear, but it has been suggested that IDH may be due to subclinical fluid overload. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of IDH and to evaluate its association with fluid overload using bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS). Methods A cross-sectional study involving 190 chronic haemodialysis patients in the Western Cape province of South Africa was conducted between January 2013 and May 2014. IDH was defined as a >10 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure in at least four of six prior consecutive haemodialysis sessions. Results The prevalence of IDH was 28.4% (n = 54). There was a trend towards pre-dialysis overhydration in the IDH group when compared with controls {2.6 L [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7–3.4] versus 1.8 L [95% CI 1.4–2.1], respectively; P = 0.06} as measured by BIS, but no difference in mean ultrafiltration (UF) volume (2.4 versus 2.6 L; P = 0.30). A trend towards greater use of antihypertensive drugs was noted in the IDH group [2.5 drugs (95% CI 2.15–2.87) versus 2.1 (95% CI 1.82–2.30); P = 0.05]. More participants in the IDH group received calcium channel blockers (54 versus 36; P = 0.03). Conclusions The prevalence of IDH in our treatment centres is much higher than previously reported. Subclinical fluid overload may be a major contributing factor to the mechanism of this condition. The use of BIS identifies patients who may benefit from additional UF. PMID:27478611

  20. Comparison of dry-textile electrodes for electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, J. C.; Seoane, F.; Välimäki, E.; Lindecrantz, K.

    2010-04-01

    Textile Electrodes have been widely studied for biopotentials recordings, specially for monitoring the cardiac activity. Commercially available applications, such as Adistar T-shirt and Textronics Cardioshirt, have proved a good performance for heart rate monitoring and are available worldwide. Textile technology can also be used for Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy measurements enabling home and personalized health monitoring applications however solid ground research about the measurement performance of the electrodes must be done prior to the development of any textile-enabled EBI application. In this work a comparison of the measurement performance of two different types of dry-textile electrodes and manufacturers has been performed against standardized RedDot 3M Ag/AgCl electrolytic electrodes. 4-Electrode, whole body, Ankle-to-Wrist EBI measurements have been taken with the Impedimed spectrometer SFB7 from healthy subjects in the frequency range of 3kHz to 500kHz. Measurements have been taken with dry electrodes at different times to study the influence of the interaction skin-electrode interface on the EBI measurements. The analysis of the obtained complex EBI spectra shows that the measurements performed with textile electrodes produce constant and reliable EBI spectra. Certain deviation can be observed at higher frequencies and the measurements obtained with Textronics and Ag/AgCl electrodes present a better resemblance. Textile technology, if successfully integrated it, may enable the performance of EBI measurements in new scenarios allowing the rising of novel wearable monitoring applications for home and personal care as well as car safety.

  1. Assessment of degree of hydration in dialysis patients using whole body and calf bioimpedance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, F.; Kotanko, P.; Handelman, G. J.; Raimann, J.; Liu, L.; Carter, M.; Kuhlmann, M. K.; Siebert, E.; Leonard, E. F.; Levin, N. W.

    2010-04-01

    Prescription of an appropriate post hemodialysis (HD) dialysis target weight requires accurate evaluation of the degree of hydration. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a state of normal hydration as defined by calf bioimpedance spectroscopy (cBIS) could be characterized in HD and normal subjects (NS). cBIS was performed in 62 NS (33 m/29 f) and 30 HD patients (16 m /14 f) pre- and post-dialysis to measure extracellular resistance. Normalized calf resistivity at 5 kHz (ρN,5) was defined as resistivity divided by body mass index. Measurements were made at baseline (BL) and at a state of normal hydration (NH) established following the progressive reduction of post-HD weight over successive dialysis treatments until the ρN,5 was in the range of NS. Blood pressures were measured pre- and post-HD treatment. ρN,5 in males and females differed significantly in NS (20.5±1.99 vs 21.7±2.6 10-2 Ωm3/kg, p>0.05). In patients, ρN,5 notably increased and reached NH range due to progressive decrease in body weight, and systolic blood pressure (SBP) significantly decreased pre- and post-HD between BL and NBH respectively. This establishes the use of ρN,5 as a new comparator allowing the clinician to incrementally monitor the effect of removal of extracellular fluid from patients over a course of dialysis treatments.

  2. Experimental validation of a method for removing the capacitive leakage artifact from electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendia, R.; Seoane, F.; Gil-Pita, R.

    2010-11-01

    Often when performing electrical bioimpedance (EBI) spectroscopy measurements, the obtained EBI data present a hook-like deviation, which is most noticeable at high frequencies in the impedance plane. The deviation is due to a capacitive leakage effect caused by the presence of stray capacitances. In addition to the data deviation being remarkably noticeable at high frequencies in the phase and the reactance spectra, the measured EBI is also altered in the resistance and the modulus. If this EBI data deviation is not properly removed, it interferes with subsequent data analysis processes, especially with Cole model-based analyses. In other words, to perform any accurate analysis of the EBI spectroscopy data, the hook deviation must be properly removed. Td compensation is a method used to compensate the hook deviation present in EBI data; it consists of multiplying the obtained spectrum, Zmeas(ω), by a complex exponential in the form of exp(-jωTd). Although the method is well known and accepted, Td compensation cannot entirely correct the hook-like deviation; moreover, it lacks solid scientific grounds. In this work, the Td compensation method is revisited, and it is shown that it should not be used to correct the effect of a capacitive leakage; furthermore, a more developed approach for correcting the hook deviation caused by the capacitive leakage is proposed. The method includes a novel correcting expression and a process for selecting the proper values of expressions that are complex and frequency dependent. The correctness of the novel method is validated with the experimental data obtained from measurements from three different EBI applications. The obtained results confirm the sufficiency and feasibility of the correcting method.

  3. A novel approach for removing the hook effect artefact from Electrical Bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendia, R.; Seoane, F.; Gil-Pita, R.

    2010-04-01

    Very often in Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) spectroscopy measurements the presence of stray capacitances creates a measurement artefact commonly known as Hook Effect. Such an artefact creates a hook-alike deviation of the EBI data noticeable when representing the measurement on the impedance plane. Such Hook Effect is noticeable at high frequencies but it also causes a data deviation at lower measurement frequencies. In order to perform any accurate analysis of the EBI spectroscopy data, the influence of the Hook Effect must be removed. An established method to compensate the hook effect is the well known Td compensation, which consists on multiplying the obtained spectrum, Zmeas(ω) by a complex exponential in the form of exp[jωTd]. Such a method cannot correct entirely the Hook Effect since the hook-alike deviation occurs a broad frequency range in both magnitude and phase of the measured impedance, and by using a scalar value for Td. First a scalar only modifies the phase of the measured impedance and second, a single value can truly corrects the Hook Effect only at a single frequency. In addition, the process to select a value for the scalar Td by an iterative process with the aim to obtain the best Cole fitting lacks solid scientific grounds. In this work the Td compensation method is revisited and a modified approach for correcting the Hook Effect including a novel method for selecting the correcting values is proposed. The initial validation results confirm that the proposed method entirely corrects the Hook Effect at all frequencies.

  4. Wavelet-based multiscale analysis of bioimpedance data measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing for classification of cancerous and normal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debanjan; Shiladitya, Kumar; Biswas, Karabi; Dutta, Pranab Kumar; Parekh, Aditya; Mandal, Mahitosh; Das, Soumen

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents a study to differentiate normal and cancerous cells using label-free bioimpedance signal measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. The real-time-measured bioimpedance data of human breast cancer cells and human epithelial normal cells employs fluctuations of impedance value due to cellular micromotions resulting from dynamic structural rearrangement of membrane protrusions under nonagitated condition. Here, a wavelet-based multiscale quantitative analysis technique has been applied to analyze the fluctuations in bioimpedance. The study demonstrates a method to classify cancerous and normal cells from the signature of their impedance fluctuations. The fluctuations associated with cellular micromotion are quantified in terms of cellular energy, cellular power dissipation, and cellular moments. The cellular energy and power dissipation are found higher for cancerous cells associated with higher micromotions in cancer cells. The initial study suggests that proposed wavelet-based quantitative technique promises to be an effective method to analyze real-time bioimpedance signal for distinguishing cancer and normal cells.

  5. Theoretical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-04-01

    The theoretical issues in the interpretation of the precision measurements of the nucleon-to-Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes are highlighted. The results of these measurements are confronted with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD, and QCD-inspired models. The link of the nucleon-to-Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed.

  6. Experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) and theoretical (HF and DFT) investigation, IR intensity, Raman activity and frequency estimation analyses on 1-bromo-4-chlorobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayakumar, V.; Periandy, S.; Ramalingam, S.

    2011-09-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 1-bromo-4-chlorobenzene (1-Br-4-CB) have been recorded using Bruker IFS 66V spectrometer in the region of 4000-100 cm -1. Ab-initio-HF (HF/6-311+G (d, p)) and DFT (B3LYP/6-31++G (d, p)/6-311++G (d, p)) calculations have been performed giving energies, optimized structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, depolarization ratios, IR intensities, Raman activities. The vibrational frequencies are calculated and scaled values are compared with FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental values. Comparison of simulated spectra with the experimental spectra provides important information, the computational method have the ability to describe the vibrational methods. The frequency estimation analysis on HF and DFT is made. The impact of di-substituted halogens on the benzene molecule has also been discussed.

  7. Experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) and theoretical (HF and DFT) investigation, IR intensity, Raman activity and frequency estimation analyses on 1-bromo-4-chlorobenzene.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, V; Periandy, S; Ramalingam, S

    2011-09-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 1-bromo-4-chlorobenzene (1-Br-4-CB) have been recorded using Bruker IFS 66V spectrometer in the region of 4000-100 cm(-1). Ab-initio-HF (HF/6-311+G (d, p)) and DFT (B3LYP/6-31++G (d, p)/6-311++G (d, p)) calculations have been performed giving energies, optimized structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, depolarization ratios, IR intensities, Raman activities. The vibrational frequencies are calculated and scaled values are compared with FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental values. Comparison of simulated spectra with the experimental spectra provides important information, the computational method have the ability to describe the vibrational methods. The frequency estimation analysis on HF and DFT is made. The impact of di-substituted halogens on the benzene molecule has also been discussed. PMID:21550298

  8. PREFACE: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliquett, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Over recent years advanced measurement methods have facilitated outstanding achievements not only in medical instrumentation but also in biotechnology. Impedance measurement is a simple and innocuous way to characterize materials. For more than 40 years biological materials, most of them based on cells, have been characterized by means of electrical impedance for quality control of agricultural products, monitoring of biotechnological or food processes or in health care. Although the list of possible applications is long, very few applications successfully entered the market before the turn of the century. This was, on the one hand, due to the low specificity of electrical impedance with respect to other material properties because it is influenced by multiple factors. On the other hand, equipment and methods for many potential applications were not available. With the appearance of microcontrollers that could be easily integrated in applications at the beginning of the 1980s, impedance measurement advanced as a valuable tool in process optimization and lab automation. However, established methods and data processing were mostly used in a new environment. This has changed significantly during the last 10 years with a dramatic growth of the market for medical instrumentation and also for biotechnological applications. Today, advanced process monitoring and control require fast and highly parallel electrical characterization which in turn yields incredible data volumes that must be handled in real time. Many newer developments require miniaturized but precise sensing methods which is one of the main parts of Lab-on-Chip technology. Moreover, biosensors increasingly use impedometric transducers, which are not compatible with the large expensive measurement devices that are common in the laboratory environment. Following the achievements in the field of bioimpedance measurement, we will now witness a dramatic development of new electrode structures and electronics

  9. Effects of elevated vacuum on in-socket residual limb fluid volume: Case study results using bioimpedance analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, JE; Harrison, DS; Myers, TR; Allyn, KJ

    2015-01-01

    Bioimpedance analysis was used to measure residual limb fluid volume on seven trans-tibial amputee subjects using elevated vacuum sockets and non-elevated vacuum sockets. Fluid volume changes were assessed during sessions with the subjects sitting, standing, and walking. In general, fluid volume losses during 3 or 5 min walks and losses over the course of the 30-min test session were less for elevated vacuum than for suction. A number of variables including the time of day data were collected, soft tissue consistency, socket-to-limb size differences and shape differences, and subject health may have affected the results and had an equivalent or greater impact on limb fluid volume compared with elevated vacuum. Researchers should well consider these variables in study design of future investigations on the effects of elevated vacuum on residual limb volume. PMID:22234667

  10. PREFACE: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliquett, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Over recent years advanced measurement methods have facilitated outstanding achievements not only in medical instrumentation but also in biotechnology. Impedance measurement is a simple and innocuous way to characterize materials. For more than 40 years biological materials, most of them based on cells, have been characterized by means of electrical impedance for quality control of agricultural products, monitoring of biotechnological or food processes or in health care. Although the list of possible applications is long, very few applications successfully entered the market before the turn of the century. This was, on the one hand, due to the low specificity of electrical impedance with respect to other material properties because it is influenced by multiple factors. On the other hand, equipment and methods for many potential applications were not available. With the appearance of microcontrollers that could be easily integrated in applications at the beginning of the 1980s, impedance measurement advanced as a valuable tool in process optimization and lab automation. However, established methods and data processing were mostly used in a new environment. This has changed significantly during the last 10 years with a dramatic growth of the market for medical instrumentation and also for biotechnological applications. Today, advanced process monitoring and control require fast and highly parallel electrical characterization which in turn yields incredible data volumes that must be handled in real time. Many newer developments require miniaturized but precise sensing methods which is one of the main parts of Lab-on-Chip technology. Moreover, biosensors increasingly use impedometric transducers, which are not compatible with the large expensive measurement devices that are common in the laboratory environment. Following the achievements in the field of bioimpedance measurement, we will now witness a dramatic development of new electrode structures and electronics

  11. A model-based approach for analysis of intracellular resistance variations due to body posture on bioimpedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, Sören; Ulbrich, Mark; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy is a known option for measuring body fluid volume. However, it is prone to a variety of influence factors which prevent a wider use. One of these influencing factors is the body posture. It could be shown that the average intracellular resistance percentage changes when the subject changes position from lying to standing. Most authors explain this phenomenon by fluid shifts. Another possible reason is the stray capacitance between the body and the ground, because if a certain fraction of the injected current follows other paths than between the potential electrodes, the result will be wrong. This paper analyses the influence of different body postures on the measured intracellular resistance and the posture depending capacity. For this purpose, FEM simulations are used. Subsequently, an electrical equivalent model with capacitances was developed. With this model, it is possible to correct the measured impedance and to neglect the influence of the stray capacitance.

  12. The importance of bioimpedance (BIA) analysis and Cardio Tens (24-h ABPM and ECG) monitoring in the dialysis programme.

    PubMed

    Löcsey, L; Szlanka, B; Ménes, I; Kövér, A; Vitai, E; Malkócs, Z; Keresztes, P; Paragh, G

    1999-01-01

    The authors performed bioimpedance analysis and Cardio Tens (24-h ABPM and ECG) monitoring in 66 patients (28 males, 38 females) treated in the chronic haemodialysis programme. They investigated the correlations between the body weights before, during and after dialysis, the changes of the water compartments and fat body weight, and the recorded values of blood pressure and ECG alterations. On the basis of the measurements by this non-invasive method it is concluded that, as a result of dialysis and ultrafiltration, the total body weight and total body water are decreasing in a greater extent in men than in women. By gradually decreasing the body weight, the optimal dry weight could be attained, which resulted in the reduction of blood pressure or even normotension. In the course of dialysis the values of bioimpedance and bioreactance increase. The intradialytic hypotensive indispositions were accompanied by a significant reduction of bioreactance (n = 16). The BMI, total body weight and total body water hyperlipidaemic, hypalbuminic patients with treatment-resistant hypertension are considerably larger than those of the patients with normal blood pressure (p<0.01). During Cardio Tens monitoring 53% of the patients proved to be dippers, 47% of whom had ST depression, while in 73% of the non-dippers ischaemic alterations were encountered together with high hyperbaric impact values. The total body weights and total water compartments of patients returning to dialysis with an excess body weight of more than 3.5 kg were significantly larger than of patients who were cooperative and had no oedemas. In the last hour of dialysis and during the following few hours, arrhythmias and ST depressions of the cardiovascularly instable patients appeared more frequently. The total water compartments of these patients are significantly larger than normotensive, normolipaemic patients with appropriate serum albumin concentrations. The importance of the BIA and Cardio Tens monitoring

  13. Theoretical geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Theoretical geology Present day geology is mostly empirical of nature. I claim that geology is by nature complex and that the empirical approach is bound to fail. Let's consider the input to be the set of ambient conditions and the output to be the sedimentary rock record. I claim that the output can only be deduced from the input if the relation from input to output be known. The fundamental question is therefore the following: Can one predict the output from the input or can one predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? If one can, than the empirical/deductive method has changes, if one can't than that method is bound to fail. The fundamental problem to solve is therefore the following: How to predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? It is interesting to observe that this question is never asked and many a study is conducted by the empirical/deductive method; it seems that the empirical method has been accepted as being appropriate without question. It is, however, easy to argument that a sedimentary system is by nature complex and that several input parameters vary at the same time and that they can create similar output in the rock record. It follows trivially from these first principles that in such a case the deductive solution cannot be unique. At the same time several geological methods depart precisely from the assumption, that one particular variable is the dictator/driver and that the others are constant, even though the data do not support such an assumption. The method of "sequence stratigraphy" is a typical example of such a dogma. It can be easily argued that all the interpretation resulting from a method that is built on uncertain or wrong assumptions is erroneous. Still, this method has survived for many years, nonwithstanding all the critics it has received. This is just one example of the present day geological world and is not unique. Even the alternative methods criticising sequence stratigraphy actually depart from the same

  14. Theoretical Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöltzner, Michael

    Answering to the double-faced influence of string theory on mathematical practice and rigour, the mathematical physicists Arthur Jaffe and Frank Quinn have contemplated the idea that there exists a `theoretical' mathematics (alongside `theoretical' physics) whose basic structures and results still require independent corroboration by mathematical proof. In this paper, I shall take the Jaffe-Quinn debate mainly as a problem of mathematical ontology and analyse it against the backdrop of two philosophical views that are appreciative towards informal mathematical development and conjectural results: Lakatos's methodology of proofs and refutations and John von Neumann's opportunistic reading of Hilbert's axiomatic method. The comparison of both approaches shows that mitigating Lakatos's falsificationism makes his insights about mathematical quasi-ontology more relevant to 20th century mathematics in which new structures are introduced by axiomatisation and not necessarily motivated by informal ancestors. The final section discusses the consequences of string theorists' claim to finality for the theory's mathematical make-up. I argue that ontological reductionism as advocated by particle physicists and the quest for mathematically deeper axioms do not necessarily lead to identical results.

  15. Comparison of hydration and nutritional status between young and elderly hemodialysis patients through bioimpedance analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Eun; Jo, In Young; Lee, Song Mi; Kim, Woo Jeong; Choi, Hoon Young; Ha, Sung Kyu; Kim, Hyung Jong; Park, Hyeong Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of elderly people on dialysis is increasing rapidly. Fluid overload and malnutrition status are serious problems in elderly dialysis patients. We aimed to compare the hydration and nutritional status through bioimpedance analysis (BIA) between young and elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients and to analyze risk factors related to fluid overload and malnutrition status in these patients. Method We conducted a cross-sectional study, in which 82 HD (males 42, mean age 58.7±12.9 years) patients were enrolled. We collected different types of data: laboratory data, such as serum creatinine, albumin, total iron-binding capacity, hemoglobin, total cholesterol; anthropometric data, such as hand grip strength (HGS); BIA data, such as intracellular water, skeletal muscle mass, body cell mass, bone mineral content, phase angle (PhA), extra cellular water (ECW)/total body water (TBW) ratio; and malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS), which is a traditional nutritional parameter for dialysis patients. All patients were stratified into two groups according to their age: young (<65 years [n=54]) and elderly (≥65 years [n=28]). Results Total iron-binding capacity and HGS were significantly lower in elderly HD patients than in young HD patients (198.9±35.6 vs 221.4±52.1 mcg/dL; and 22.4±10.3 vs 36.4±23.2 kg, respectively) (P<0.05). Also, intracellular water and PhA measured by BIA were significantly lower (18.3±4.0 vs 20.3±4.2 L [P=0.043]; and 4.0±1.0 vs 4.9±1.2° [P=0.002], respectively), and ECW/TBW were higher in elderly HD patients (0.40±0.01 vs 0.39±0.01 [P=0.001]). ECW/TBW was positively associated with age (P<0.001) and the presence of diabetes (P<0.001) and was negatively associated with sex (P=0.001), albumin (P<0.001), urine volume (P=0.042), HGS (P<0.001), and PhA by BIA (P<0.001). MIS was negatively related to sex (P=0.001), albumin (P<0.001), HGS (P=0.001), and PhA (P<0.001) in HD patients. On multivariate analysis, older age (P=0.031), the

  16. Mean Expected Error in Prediction of Total Body Water: A True Accuracy Comparison between Bioimpedance Spectroscopy and Single Frequency Regression Equations

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Shirin; Abtahi, Farhad; Ellegård, Lars; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Bosaeus, Ingvar

    2015-01-01

    For several decades electrical bioimpedance (EBI) has been used to assess body fluid distribution and body composition. Despite the development of several different approaches for assessing total body water (TBW), it remains uncertain whether bioimpedance spectroscopic (BIS) approaches are more accurate than single frequency regression equations. The main objective of this study was to answer this question by calculating the expected accuracy of a single measurement for different EBI methods. The results of this study showed that all methods produced similarly high correlation and concordance coefficients, indicating good accuracy as a method. Even the limits of agreement produced from the Bland-Altman analysis indicated that the performance of single frequency, Sun's prediction equations, at population level was close to the performance of both BIS methods; however, when comparing the Mean Absolute Percentage Error value between the single frequency prediction equations and the BIS methods, a significant difference was obtained, indicating slightly better accuracy for the BIS methods. Despite the higher accuracy of BIS methods over 50 kHz prediction equations at both population and individual level, the magnitude of the improvement was small. Such slight improvement in accuracy of BIS methods is suggested insufficient to warrant their clinical use where the most accurate predictions of TBW are required, for example, when assessing over-fluidic status on dialysis. To reach expected errors below 4-5%, novel and individualized approaches must be developed to improve the accuracy of bioimpedance-based methods for the advent of innovative personalized health monitoring applications. PMID:26137489

  17. Mean Expected Error in Prediction of Total Body Water: A True Accuracy Comparison between Bioimpedance Spectroscopy and Single Frequency Regression Equations.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Fernando; Abtahi, Shirin; Abtahi, Farhad; Ellegård, Lars; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Bosaeus, Ingvar; Ward, Leigh C

    2015-01-01

    For several decades electrical bioimpedance (EBI) has been used to assess body fluid distribution and body composition. Despite the development of several different approaches for assessing total body water (TBW), it remains uncertain whether bioimpedance spectroscopic (BIS) approaches are more accurate than single frequency regression equations. The main objective of this study was to answer this question by calculating the expected accuracy of a single measurement for different EBI methods. The results of this study showed that all methods produced similarly high correlation and concordance coefficients, indicating good accuracy as a method. Even the limits of agreement produced from the Bland-Altman analysis indicated that the performance of single frequency, Sun's prediction equations, at population level was close to the performance of both BIS methods; however, when comparing the Mean Absolute Percentage Error value between the single frequency prediction equations and the BIS methods, a significant difference was obtained, indicating slightly better accuracy for the BIS methods. Despite the higher accuracy of BIS methods over 50 kHz prediction equations at both population and individual level, the magnitude of the improvement was small. Such slight improvement in accuracy of BIS methods is suggested insufficient to warrant their clinical use where the most accurate predictions of TBW are required, for example, when assessing over-fluidic status on dialysis. To reach expected errors below 4-5%, novel and individualized approaches must be developed to improve the accuracy of bioimpedance-based methods for the advent of innovative personalized health monitoring applications. PMID:26137489

  18. Game-theoretic Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colburn, Christopher; Bewley, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    The Kalman Filter (KF) is celebrated as the optimal estimator for systems with linear dynamics and gaussian uncertainty. Although most systems of interest do not have linear dynamics and are not forced by gaussian noise, the KF is used ubiquitously within industry. Thus, we present a novel estimation algorithm, the Game-theoretic Kalman Filter (GKF), which intelligently hedges between competing sequential filters and does not require the assumption of gaussian statistics to provide a "best" estimate.

  19. Simulating Non-Specific Influences of Body Posture and Temperature on Thigh-Bioimpedance Spectroscopy during Continuous Monitoring Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A. H.; Leonhardt, S.

    2013-04-01

    Application of bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) for continuous monitoring of body fluid volumes is gaining considerable importance in personal health care. Unless laboratory conditions are applied, both whole-body or segmental BIS configurations are subject to nonspecific influences (e.g. temperature and change in body position) reducing the method's accuracy and reproducibility. In this work, a two-compartment mathematical model, which describes the thigh segment, has been adapted to simulate fluid and solute kinetics during change in body position or variation in skin temperature. The model is an improved version of our previous one offering a good tradeoff between accuracy and simplicity. It represents the kinetics of fluid redistribution, sodium-, potassium-, and protein-concentrations based on simple equations to predict the time course of BIS variations. Validity of the model was verified in five subjects (following a sequence of 7 min supine, 20 min standing, and 40 min supine). The output of the model may reduce possible influences on BIS by up to 80%.

  20. Revealing membrane potential by advanced impedance spectroscopy: theoretical and experimental aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, M.; Bratu, D.; Olaru, A.; Polonschii, C.; Gheorghiu, E.

    2013-04-01

    In spite of recent advancement of novel optical and electrical techniques, availability of non-invasive, label-free methods to assess membrane potential of living cells is still an open issue. The theory linking membrane potential to the low frequency α dispersion exhibited by suspensions of spherical shelled particles (presenting a net charge distribution on the inner side of the shell) has been pioneered in our previous studies with emphasis on the permittivity spectra. We now report on both theoretical and experimental aspects showing that whereas α dispersion is related to a rather large variation exhibited by the permittivity spectrum the decrement presented by impedance magnitude spectrum is either extremely small, or occurs (for large cells) at very low frequencies (~mHz) explaining the lack of experimental bioimpedance data on the matter. Based on the microscopic model we indicate that an appropriate design of the experiment may enable access to membrane potential as well as to other relevant parameters when investigating living cells and charged lipid vesicles. We discuss the effect on the low frequency of permittivity and impedance spectra of: I. Parameters pertaining to cell membrane i.e. (i) membrane potential, (ii) size of the cells/vesicles, (iii) conductivity; II. Conductivity of the outer medium. A novel measuring set-up has recently been developed within the International Centre of Biodynamics allowing for sensitive low frequency (~10mHz) four point (bio)impedance assays. Its capability to test theoretical predictions is reported as well. The far reaching implications of this study applicability for life sciences (noninvasive access to the dynamics of relevant cell parameters) as well as for biosensing applications, e.g. assess the cytotoxicity of a wide range of stimuli, will be outlined.

  1. Detecting Heart Failure Decompensation by Measuring Transthoracic Bioimpedance in the Outpatient Setting: Rationale and Design of the SENTINEL-HF Study

    PubMed Central

    Saczynski, Jane S; Darling, Chad E; Riistama, Jarno; Sert Kuniyoshi, Fatima; Meyer, Theo; Goldberg, Robert; McManus, David D

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent hospital admissions are common among patients admitted for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), but identification of patients at risk for rehospitalization remains challenging. Contemporary heart failure (HF) management programs have shown modest ability to reduce readmissions, partly because they monitor signs or symptoms of HF worsening that appear late during decompensation. Detecting early stages of HF decompensation might allow for immediate application of effective HF therapies, thereby potentially reducing HF readmissions. One of the earliest indicators of HF decompensation is intrathoracic fluid accumulation, which can be assessed using transthoracic bioimpedance. Objective The SENTINEL-HF study is a prospective observational study designed to test a novel, wearable HF monitoring system as a predictor of HF decompensation among patients discharged after hospitalization for ADHF. Methods SENTINEL-HF tests the hypothesis that a decline in transthoracic bioimpedance, as assessed daily with the Philips fluid accumulation vest (FAV) and transmitted using a mobile phone, is associated with HF worsening and rehospitalization. According to pre-specified power calculations, 180 patients admitted with ADHF are enrolled. Participants transmit daily self-assessments using the FAV-mobile phone dyad for 45 days post-discharge. The primary predictor is the deviation of transthoracic bioimpedance for 3 consecutive days from a patient-specific normal variability range. The ADHF detection algorithm is evaluated in relation with a composite outcome of HF readmission, diuretic up-titration, and self-reported HF worsening (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire) during a 90-day follow-up period. Here, we provide the details and rationale of SENTINEL-HF. Results Enrollment in the SENTINEL-HF study is complete and the 90-days follow-up is currently under way. Once data collection is complete, the study dataset will be used to evaluate our ADHF

  2. Extracellular and intracellular volume variations during postural change measured by segmental and wrist-ankle bioimpedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Marianne; Jaffrin, Michel Y

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular (ECW) and intracellular (ICW) volumes were measured using both segmental and wrist-ankle (W-A) bioimpedance spectroscopy (5-1000 kHz) in 15 healthy subjects (7 men, 8 women). In the 1st protocol, the subject, after sitting for 30 min, laid supine for at least 30 min. In the second protocol, the subject, who had been supine for 1 hr, sat up in bed for 10 min and returned to supine position for another hour. Segmental ECW and ICW resistances of legs, arms and trunk were measured by placing four voltage electrodes on wrist, shoulder, top of thigh and ankle and using Hanai's conductivity theory. W-A resistances were found to be very close to the sum of segmental resistances. When switching from sitting to supine (protocol 1), the mean ECW leg resistance increased by 18.2%, that of arm and W-A by 12.4%. Trunk resistance also increased but not significantly by 4.8%. Corresponding increases in ICW resistance were smaller for legs (3.7%) and arm (-0.7%) but larger for the trunk (21.4%). Total body ECW volumes from segmental measurements were in good agreement with W-A and Watson anthropomorphic correlation. The decrease in total ECW volume (when supine) calculated from segmental resistances was at 0.79 l less than the W-A one (1.12 l). Total ICW volume reductions were 3.4% (segmental) and 3.8% (W-A). Tests of protocol 2 confirmed that resistance and fluid volume values were not affected by a temporary position change. PMID:14723506

  3. Overhydration measured by bioimpedance analysis and the survival of patients on maintenance hemodialysis: a single-center study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ye Jin; Jeon, Hong Jae; Kim, Yoo Hyung; Jeon, Jaewoong; Ham, Young Rok; Chung, Sarah; Choi, Dae Eun; Na, Ki Ryang; Lee, Kang Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) helps measuring the constituents of the body noninvasively. Prior studies suggest that BIA-guided fluid assessment helps to predict survival in dialysis patients. We aimed to evaluate the clinical usefulness of BIA for predicting the survival rate of hemodialysis patients in Korea. Methods We conducted a single-center retrospective study. All patients were diagnosed with end-stage renal disorder and started maintenance hemodialysis between June 2009 and April 2014. BIA was performed within the 1st week from the start of hemodialysis. The patients were classified into 2 groups based on volume status measured by the body composition monitor (BCM; Fresenius): an overhydrated group [OG; overhydration/extracellular water (OH/ECW) >15%] and a nonoverhydrated group (NOG; OH/ECW ≤15%). Results A total of 344 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 252 patients (73.3%) were categorized into the OG and 92 patients (26.7%) into the NOG. Age- and sex-matching patients were selected with a rate of 2:1. Finally, 160 overhydrated patients and 80 nonoverhydrated patients were analyzed. Initial levels of hemoglobin and serum albumin were significantly lower in the OG. During follow-up, 43 patients from the OG and 7 patients from the NOG died (median follow-up duration, 24.0 months). The multivariate-adjusted all-cause mortality was significantly increased in the OG (odds ratio, 2.569; P = 0.033) and older patients (odds ratio, 1.072/y; P < 0.001). No significant difference of all-cause or disease-specific admission rate was observed between the 2 groups. Conclusion The ratio of OH/ECW volume measured with body composition monitor is related to the overall survival of end-stage renal disorder patients who started maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:26779424

  4. A Robust System for Longitudinal Knee Joint Edema and Blood Flow Assessment Based on Vector Bioimpedance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Hersek, Sinan; Töreyin, Hakan; Inan, Omer T

    2016-06-01

    We present a robust vector bioimpedance measurement system for longitudinal knee joint health assessment, capable of acquiring high resolution static (slowly varying over the course of hours to days) and dynamic (rapidly varying on the order of milli-seconds) bioresistance and bioreactance signals. Occupying an area of 78×90 mm(2) and consuming 0.25 W when supplied with ±5 V, the front-end achieves a dynamic range of 345 Ω and noise floor of 0.018 mΩrms (resistive) and 0.055 mΩrms (reactive) within a bandwidth of 0.1-20 Hz. A microcontroller allows real-time calibration to minimize errors due to environmental variability (e.g., temperature) that can be experienced outside of lab environments, and enables data storage on a micro secure digital card. The acquired signals are then processed using customized physiology-driven algorithms to extract musculoskeletal (edema) and cardiovascular (local blood volume pulse) features from the knee joint. In a feasibility study, we found statistically significant differences between the injured and contralateral static knee impedance measures for two subjects with recent unilateral knee injury compared to seven controls. Specifically, the impedance was lower for the injured knees, supporting the physiological expectations for increased edema and damaged cell membranes. In a second feasibility study, we demonstrate the sensitivity of the dynamic impedance measures with a cold-pressor test, with a 20 mΩ decrease in the pulsatile resistance associated with increased downstream peripheral vascular resistance. The proposed system will serve as a foundation for future efforts aimed at quantifying joint health status continuously during normal daily life. PMID:26841413

  5. Time-invariant measurement of time-varying bioimpedance using vector impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, B; Louarroudi, E; Pintelon, R

    2015-03-01

    When stepped-sine impedance spectroscopy measurements are carried out on (periodically) time-varying bio-systems, the inherent time-variant (time-periodic) parts are traditionally ignored or mitigated by filtering. The latter, however, lacks theoretical foundation and, in this paper, it is shown that it only works under certain specific conditions. Besides, we propose an alternative method, based on multisine signals, that exploits the non-stationary nature in time-varying bio-systems with a dominant periodic character, such as cardiovascular and respiratory systems, or measurements interfered with by their physiological activities. The novel method extracts the best—in a mean square sense—linear time-invariant (BLTI) impedance approximation ZBLTI(jω) of a periodically time-varying (PTV) impedance ZPTV(jω, t) as well as its time-periodic part. Relying on the geometrical interpretation of the BLTI concept, a new impedance analysis tool, called vector impedance analysis (VIA), is also presented. The theoretical and practical aspects are validated through measurements performed on a PTV dummy circuit and on an in vivo myocardial tissue. PMID:25700023

  6. Assessment of Postresuscitation Volume Status by Bioimpedance Analysis in Patients with Sepsis in the Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ribic, Christine M.; Lalji, Faraz; Clarke, France J.; Gantareddy, Susheel; Ranganath, Nischal; Walele, Aziz; McDonald, Ellen; Meade, Maureen O.; Cook, Deborah J.; Wilkieson, Trevor T.; Clase, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is a novel method of assessing a patient's volume status. Objective. We sought to determine the feasibility of using vector length (VL), derived from bioimpedance analysis (BIA), in the assessment of postresuscitation volume status in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with sepsis. Method. This was a prospective observational single-center study. Our primary outcome was feasibility. Secondary clinical outcomes included ventilator status and acute kidney injury. Proof of concept was sought by correlating baseline VL measurements with other known measures of volume status. Results. BIA was feasible to perform in the ICU. We screened 655 patients, identified 78 eligible patients, and approached 64 for consent. We enrolled 60 patients (consent rate of 93.8%) over 12 months. For each 50-unit increase in VL, there was an associated 22% increase in the probability of not requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) (p = 0.13). Baseline VL correlated with other measures of volume expansion including serum pro-BNP levels, peripheral edema, and central venous pressure (CVP). Conclusion. It is feasible to use BIA to predict postresuscitation volume status and patient-important outcomes in septic ICU patients. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT01379404 registered on June 7, 2011. PMID:27597811

  7. Assessment of Postresuscitation Volume Status by Bioimpedance Analysis in Patients with Sepsis in the Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Rochwerg, Bram; Cheung, Jason H; Ribic, Christine M; Lalji, Faraz; Clarke, France J; Gantareddy, Susheel; Ranganath, Nischal; Walele, Aziz; McDonald, Ellen; Meade, Maureen O; Cook, Deborah J; Wilkieson, Trevor T; Clase, Catherine M; Margetts, Peter J; Gangji, Azim S

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is a novel method of assessing a patient's volume status. Objective. We sought to determine the feasibility of using vector length (VL), derived from bioimpedance analysis (BIA), in the assessment of postresuscitation volume status in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with sepsis. Method. This was a prospective observational single-center study. Our primary outcome was feasibility. Secondary clinical outcomes included ventilator status and acute kidney injury. Proof of concept was sought by correlating baseline VL measurements with other known measures of volume status. Results. BIA was feasible to perform in the ICU. We screened 655 patients, identified 78 eligible patients, and approached 64 for consent. We enrolled 60 patients (consent rate of 93.8%) over 12 months. For each 50-unit increase in VL, there was an associated 22% increase in the probability of not requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) (p = 0.13). Baseline VL correlated with other measures of volume expansion including serum pro-BNP levels, peripheral edema, and central venous pressure (CVP). Conclusion. It is feasible to use BIA to predict postresuscitation volume status and patient-important outcomes in septic ICU patients. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT01379404 registered on June 7, 2011. PMID:27597811

  8. Early Indication of Decompensated Heart Failure in Patients on Home-Telemonitoring: A Comparison of Prediction Algorithms Based on Daily Weight and Noninvasive Transthoracic Bio-impedance

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Alberto G; Goode, Kevin M; Reiter, Harald; Habetha, Joerg; Amft, Oliver; Cleland, John GF

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart Failure (HF) is a common reason for hospitalization. Admissions might be prevented by early detection of and intervention for decompensation. Conventionally, changes in weight, a possible measure of fluid accumulation, have been used to detect deterioration. Transthoracic impedance may be a more sensitive and accurate measure of fluid accumulation. Objective In this study, we review previously proposed predictive algorithms using body weight and noninvasive transthoracic bio-impedance (NITTI) to predict HF decompensations. Methods We monitored 91 patients with chronic HF for an average of 10 months using a weight scale and a wearable bio-impedance vest. Three algorithms were tested using either simple rule-of-thumb differences (RoT), moving averages (MACD), or cumulative sums (CUSUM). Results Algorithms using NITTI in the 2 weeks preceding decompensation predicted events (P<.001); however, using weight alone did not. Cross-validation showed that NITTI improved sensitivity of all algorithms tested and that trend algorithms provided the best performance for either measurement (Weight-MACD: 33%, NITTI-CUSUM: 60%) in contrast to the simpler rules-of-thumb (Weight-RoT: 20%, NITTI-RoT: 33%) as proposed in HF guidelines. Conclusions NITTI measurements decrease before decompensations, and combined with trend algorithms, improve the detection of HF decompensation over current guideline rules; however, many alerts are not associated with clinically overt decompensation. PMID:26892844

  9. Towards the development of a wearable Electrical Impedance Tomography system: A study about the suitability of a low power bioimpedance front-end.

    PubMed

    Menolotto, Matteo; Rossi, Stefano; Dario, Paolo; Della Torre, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Wearable systems for remote monitoring of physiological parameter are ready to evolve towards wearable imaging systems. The Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) allows the non-invasive investigation of the internal body structure. The characteristics of this low-resolution and low-cost technique match perfectly with the concept of a wearable imaging device. On the other hand low power consumption, which is a mandatory requirement for wearable systems, is not usually discussed for standard EIT applications. In this work a previously developed low power architecture for a wearable bioimpedance sensor is applied to EIT acquisition and reconstruction, to evaluate the impact on the image of the limited signal to noise ratio (SNR), caused by low power design. Some anatomical models of the chest, with increasing geometric complexity, were developed, in order to evaluate and calibrate, through simulations, the parameters of the reconstruction algorithms provided by Electrical Impedance Diffuse Optical Reconstruction Software (EIDORS) project. The simulation results were compared with experimental measurements taken with our bioimpedance device on a phantom reproducing chest tissues properties. The comparison was both qualitative and quantitative through the application of suitable figures of merit; in this way the impact of the noise of the low power front-end on the image quality was assessed. The comparison between simulation and measurement results demonstrated that, despite the limited SNR, the device is accurate enough to be used for the development of an EIT based imaging wearable system. PMID:26736956

  10. Use of Multifrequency Bioimpedance Analysis in Male Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Who Are Undergoing Continuous Veno-Venous Hemodiafiltration

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Harin; Jang, Keum Sook; Shin, Min Ji; Lee, Jang Won; Kim, Il Young; Song, Sang Heon; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Soo Bong; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Seong, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fluid overload is a well-known predictor of mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Multifrequency bioimpedance analysis (MF-BIA) is a promising tool for quantifying volume status. However, few studies have analyzed the effect of MF-BIA-defined volume status on the mortality of critically ill patients with AKI. This retrospective medical research study aimed to investigate this issue. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with AKI who underwent continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) from Jan. 2013 to Feb. 2014. Female patients were excluded to control for sex-based differences. Volume status was measured using MF-BIA (Inbody S20, Seoul, Korea) at the time of CVVHDF initiation, and volume parameters were adjusted with height squared (H2). Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to test independent factors for prediction of in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 208 male patients were included in this study. The mean age was 65.19±12.90 years. During the mean ICU stay of 18.29±27.48 days, 40.4% of the patients died. The in-hospital mortality rate increased with increasing total body water (TBW)/H2 quartile. In the multivariable analyses, increased TBW/H2 (OR 1.312(1.009-1.705), p=0.043) and having lower serum albumin (OR 0.564(0.346-0.919, p=0.022) were independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality. When the intracellular water (ICW)/H2 or extracellular water (ECW)/H2 was adjusted instead of the TBW/H2, only excess ICW/H2 was independently associated with increased mortality (OR 1.561(1.012-2.408, p=0.044). Conclusions MF-BIA-defined excess TBW/H2 and ICW/H2 are independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality in male patients with AKI undergoing CVVHDF. PMID:26186370

  11. Theoretical Foundation for Weld Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traugott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Differential equations describe physics of tungsten/inert-gas and plasma-arc welding in aluminum. Report collects and describes necessary theoretical foundation upon which numerical welding model is constructed for tungsten/inert gas or plasma-arc welding in aluminum without keyhole. Governing partial differential equations for flow of heat, metal, and current given, together with boundary conditions relevant to welding process. Numerical estimates for relative importance of various phenomena and required properties of 2219 aluminum included

  12. Equivalence of information from single frequency v. bioimpedance spectroscopy in bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Antonio; Pastori, Giordano; Codognotto, Marta; Paoli, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS), it is assumed that the current path is only extracellular at the lowest frequencies and that it is both extra- and intracellular at the highest frequencies. We tested validity of BIS assumptions in bodybuilders who have an increased intracellular volume due to hypertrophy of muscle fibres. The study was observational cross-sectional in a study group of thirty professional bodybuilders compared with thirty control subjects. Resistance (R) and reactance (Xc) vector components fitting the Cole's arc with BIS (SFB3 analyser) were compared with components at 50 kHz frequency. The average Cole's arc in bodybuilders was significantly smaller and shifted to the left in the R-Xc plane (both R and Xc values were smaller at any individual frequency). The ratio of Xc at 5 kHz and Xc at the characteristic frequency was 70% in bodybuilders and 64% in control subjects, indicating a huge intracellular flow of the electric current at low frequencies in both groups (expected ratio close to 0 if the current path was extracellular). As a consequence of a common path, the correlation coefficient between R values at 50 kHz and at other frequencies (from 0 to infinity) was 0.94 to 1.00. The correlation between total body water estimated with BIS or with R at 50 kHz was 0.98. Hence, there was equivalence between information provided by the vector components R and Xc at 50 kHz and that provided by 496 correlated vectors that were measured with BIS. PMID:17217575

  13. Bioimpedance as a tool for evaluating the body composition of suruvi (Steindachneridion scriptum).

    PubMed

    Zaniboni-Filho, E; Hermes-Silva, S; Weingartner, M; Jimenez, J E; Borba, M R; Fracalossi, D M

    2015-11-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is regarded as an important tool for evaluating the body composition of different animals in a rapid, non-destructive, and low-cost manner. A South American fish species, Steindachneridion scriptum, known as suruvi, was selected for study in this investigation. A protocol to produce fish with different body composition was used to allow BIA to adequately predict the body composition of suruvi. The fish were fed twice each day with two different diets; a low lipid diet (8.90%), and a high lipid diet (18.68%). These dietary differences allowed suruvi specimens with different body compositions to be produced. The BIA readings were determined using a Quantum X Bioelectrical Body Composition Analyzer. Two readings (dorsal and ventral) were obtained for each fish. After BIA readings were obtained, the proximate composition of the fish bodies for each individual was determined. All of the study data were used to establish correlation equations between proximate analyses and BIA values. Strong correlations were found for S. scriptum. The highest correlations were obtained for the following pairs of quantities, using BIA data from dorsal readings: moisture and resistance in series (R2 = 0.87); protein and resistance in series (R2 = 0.87); and ash and reactance in parallel (R2 = 0.82). We conclude that BIA is an effective method in determining the body composition of S. scriptum without sacrificing the fish. However, to expand the use of this new technology it is important to define strict BIA protocols to guarantee accurate estimates. PMID:26602350

  14. Agreement of single- and multi-frequency Bioimpedance Measurements in hemodialysis patients: An Ancillary Study of the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) Daily Trial

    PubMed Central

    Raimann, Jochen G.; Abbas, Samer R.; Liu, Li; Zhu, Fansan; Larive, Brett; Kotanko, Peter; Levin, Nathan W.; Kaysen, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is well established to assess body composition. Agreements between single- and multi-frequency bioimpedance (SF-BIA, MF-BIS) assessments in subjects undergoing 6 or 3 times per week hemodialysis (HD) were analyzed. Methods Total body water (TBW), intra- and extracellular fluid (ICF, ECF) of subjects enrolled in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) Daily Trial (www.clinicaltrials.gov # NCT00264758) were measured with a Hydra 4200 at baseline (BL) and at 5 months (M5). Volumes were computed using SF (at 50 kHz) and MF approaches. Agreement was assessed by means of Linear Regression and Bland-Altman analysis and treatment effects by T-Test. Results 35 subjects (17 on the more frequent regimen, 26 male, 20 blacks, 48±9 years, pre-HD weight 84±19 kg) were studied. Assessments with SF-BIA and MF-BIS correlated significantly at BL and M5 in both arms. No proportional errors, but systematic biases over the entire range of values were found at BL and M5. Agreement did not differ between subjects randomized to either HD treatment arm at both time points. MF-BIS appears to have better precision than SF-BIA allowing the observation of a significant treatment effect by the intervention [−1.5 (95% CI −2.5 to −0.5) L] on ECF, not found for ECF SF-BIA. Precision also affected the statistical power of the SF-BIA data in the current analysis. Conclusion Both methods showed agreement without significant proportional errors regardless of HD frequency and can be used for longitudinal analyses. SF-BIA has lower precision which needs thorough consideration in the design of future trials with similar outcomes. PMID:25402657

  15. Experimental (FT-IR, NMR and UV) and theoretical (M06-2X and DFT) investigation, and frequency estimation analyses on (E)-3-(4-bromo-5-methylthiophen-2-yl)acrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, Yusuf; Balakit, Asim A.; Öztürk, Nuri; Ucun, Fatih; El-Hiti, Gamal A.

    2014-10-01

    The spectroscopic properties of (E)-3-(4-bromo-5-methylthiophen-2-yl)acrylonitrile have been investigated by FT-IR, UV, 1H and 13C NMR techniques. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and angles) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr) and DFT/M06-2X (the highly parameterized, empirical exchange correlation function) quantum chemical methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 03 software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been carried out by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies were in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and with the results in the literature. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strength wavelengths were performed by B3LYP methods. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and the other related molecular energy values have been calculated and depicted.

  16. Disagreement between standard transthoracic impedance cardiography and the automated transthoracic electrical bioimpedance method in estimating the cardiovascular responses to phenylephrine and isoprenaline in healthy man.

    PubMed Central

    De Mey, C; Enterling, D

    1993-01-01

    1. Impedance cardiography is a well-established noninvasive method to assess within-subject changes of cardiovascular function. We compared the standard approach (ZCG) which requires tedious signal analysis with an automated approach (TEB: NCCOM 3) with its own specific equipment, algorithms and equations in order to assess agreement of the method-specific measurements and calculations. 2. Ten healthy men were studied on two occasions with either ZCG or TEB, at rest and at the end of 5 min i.v.-infusions with 1 microgram min-1 isoprenaline and 100 micrograms min-1 phenylephrine. 3. There was good agreement for the method-independent changes (HR, SBP/DBP), but there were large differences for method-specific measurements: dZ/dtmax [TEB-ZCG] = -0.68, CI: -0.83 to -0.53 ohm s-1, PEP [TEB-ZCG] = -22.1, CI: -35.0 to -9.2 ms and QS2c [TEB-ZCG] = -16.5, CI: -32.4 to -0.6 ms and for the calculated stroke volume SV [TEB-ZCG] = 30.3, CI: 15.5 to 45.2 ml. The responses of dZ/dtmax and SV to isoprenaline and phenylephrine, although qualitatively similar, reached no quantitative agreement either. A substantial disagreement was evident for the STI responses to isoprenaline where TEB failed to detect the expected reduction of VETc and thus grossly underestimated the shortening of QS2c. 4. It is concluded that TEB-measurements and -calculations did not agree with standard ZCG, that the methods, albeit related, cannot be considered as interchangeable and that suspicion is justified that TEB might yield erroneous results under specific circumstances. PMID:8485014

  17. A current-excited triple-time-voltage oversampling method for bio-impedance model for cost-efficient circuit system.

    PubMed

    Yan Hong; Yong Wang; Wang Ling Goh; Yuan Gao; Lei Yao

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a mathematic method and a cost-efficient circuit to measure the value of each component of the bio-impedance model at electrode-electrolyte interface. The proposed current excited triple-time-voltage oversampling (TTVO) method deduces the component values by solving triple simultaneous electric equation (TSEE) at different time nodes during a current excitation, which are the voltage functions of time. The proposed triple simultaneous electric equations (TSEEs) allows random selections of the time nodes, hence numerous solutions can be obtained during a single current excitation. Following that, the oversampling approach is engaged by averaging all solutions of multiple TSEEs acquired after a single current excitation, which increases the practical measurement accuracy through the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In addition, a print circuit board (PCB) that consists a switched current exciter and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is designed for signal acquisition. This presents a great cost reduction when compared against other instrument-based measurement data reported [1]. Through testing, the measured values of this work is proven to be in superb agreements on the true component values of the electrode-electrolyte interface model. This work is most suited and also useful for biological and biomedical applications, to perform tasks such as stimulations, recordings, impedance characterizations, etc. PMID:26736442

  18. Bibliography for aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Maine, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    An extensive bibliography in the field of aircraft parameter estimation has been compiled. This list contains definitive works related to most aircraft parameter estimation approaches. Theoretical studies as well as practical applications are included. Many of these publications are pertinent to subjects peripherally related to parameter estimation, such as aircraft maneuver design or instrumentation considerations.

  19. Building an Integrated System to Routinely Estimate PM2.5 and Visibility Using 3-D Observations of Aerosols from DISCOVER-AQ: Theoretical Basis for Satellite Remote Sensing Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Welton, E. J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Szykman, J.; Hair, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    The first of a series of DISCOVER-AQ field campaigns held in July 2011 over Baltimore-Washington region employed airborne HSRL and in-situ instruments together with ground networks of micro-pulse lidar and sunphotometer for mapping vertical as well as horizontal distribution of aerosols. These unique data sets are analyzed to incorporate into systematic evaluation of surface PM2.5 and visibility uncertainties. The system is based upon an approximation of uniform vertical distribution within haze layer height, which is the sum of planetary layer height and scale height. The scale height is derived assuming an exponential decrease of aerosol extinction with altitude above boundary layer height. The normalization of AOD/HLH achieves correlation greater than 0.96 with mean PBL extinction in autumn and summer seasons, followed by spring (0.95) and winter (0.93). The estimated PM2.5 values are found within 2 RMSE (~9.6 ug/m3) of linear fit with correlation ~0.9 in the DISCOVER-AQ B-W region (mean PM2.5 ~25 and maximum ~50 ug/m3). The extensive coverage of sunphotometer measurements from 44 locations enable us to assess spatial variability of aerosol optical depth by an increment of 10 km. Augmented with HSRL flight paths, spatial variability further extends to nearly 200 km. For the summertime environment of aerosols, steeper decrease in correlation is found within 50 km (0.98 to 0.94) as opposed to outside 50 km range (0.94 to 0.92) over B-W area. The gradient of AOD is useful to the aggregation of AOD retrievals from satellite measurements in order to better capture local variability of pollutants. On the other hand, the normalization of AOD by HLH that results in better correlation with surface PM2.5 also lead to better representation of visual range at surface which is because uncertainties are reduced through normalization. Furthermore, the system of meteorological parameters that least and most affect the relationship between columnar AOD and surface PM2.5 as well

  20. A Theoretical Trombone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    What follows is a description of a theoretical model designed to calculate the playing frequencies of the musical pitches produced by a trombone. The model is based on quantitative treatments that demonstrate the effects of the flaring bell and cup-shaped mouthpiece sections on these frequencies and can be used to calculate frequencies that…

  1. Estimating Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-01-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions…

  2. Comparison of multi-frequency bioimpedance with perometry for the early detection and intervention of lymphoedema after axillary node clearance for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bundred, Nigel J; Stockton, Charlotte; Keeley, Vaughan; Riches, Katie; Ashcroft, Linda; Evans, Abigail; Skene, Anthony; Purushotham, Arnie; Bramley, Maria; Hodgkiss, Tracey

    2015-05-01

    The importance of early detection of lymphoedema by arm volume measurements before surgery and repeated measurements after surgery in women undergoing axillary node clearance (ANC) in order to enable early intervention is recognised. A prospective multi-centre study was performed which studied the difference between multi-frequency bioimpedance electrical analysis (BIS) and perometer arm measurement in predicting the development of lymphoedema. Women undergoing ANC underwent pre-operative and regular post-operative measurements of arm volume by both methods. The primary endpoint is the incidence of lymphoedema (≥10 % arm volume increase compared to contralateral arm by perometer) at 2 and 5 years after ANC. The threshold for intervention in lymphoedema was also assessed. Out of 964 patients recruited, 612 had minimum 6 months follow-up data. Using 1-month post-operative measurements as baseline, perometer detected 31 patients with lymphoedema by 6 months (BIS detected 53). By 6 months, 89 % of those with no lymphoedema reported at least one symptom. There was moderate correlation between perometer and BIS at 3 months (r = 0.40) and 6 months (r = 0.60), with a sensitivity of 73 % and specificity of 84 %. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed a threshold for early intervention of ≥5 to <10 % (p = 0.03). Threshold for early intervention to prevent progression to lymphoedema is ≥5 to <10 % but symptoms alone do not predict lymphoedema. The modest correlation between methods at 6 months indicates arm volume measurements remain gold standard, although longer term follow-up is required. PMID:25850535

  3. Theoretical Approaches to Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof

    Nanoparticles can be viewed as wave resonators. Involved waves are, for example, carrier waves, plasmon waves, polariton waves, etc. A few examples of successful theoretical treatments that follow this approach are given. In one, an effective medium theory of a nanoparticle composite is presented. In another, plasmon polaritonic solutions allow to extend concepts of radio technology, such as an antenna and a coaxial transmission line, to the visible frequency range.

  4. Maternal filicide theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Mugavin, Marie

    2008-01-01

    The maternal filicide theoretical framework (MFTF) was developed to enrich the understanding of how traumatic experiences during formative years can affect a woman's relationship with her own child. Exposure to a known set of vulnerabilities can foster triggers that predispose a woman to respond impulsively and violently toward her child. Comprehensive assessment of vulnerable families is essential for the prevention of fatal and nonfatal abuse. The MFTF may be applied to both crimes. PMID:18522605

  5. ALICE physics --- Theoretical overview

    SciTech Connect

    Alessandro, B.; Aurenche, P.; Baier, R.; Becattini, F.; Botje, M.; Csorgo, T.; de Cataldo, G.; Foka, Y.; Giovannini, A.; Giubellino, P.; Guillet, J.Ph.; Heinz, U.; Hencken, K.; Iancu, E.; Kaidalov, A.B.; Kajantie, K.; Karsch, F.; Koch, V.; Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Kurepin, A.B.; Laine, M.; Lednicky, R.; Mangano, M.; Monteno, M.; Paic, G.; Pilon, E.; Pshenichnov, I.A.; Redlich, K.; Revol, J.-P.; Riggi, F.; Safarik, K.; Salgado, C.A.; Schukraft, J.; Sinyukov, Y.; Tomasik, B.; Treleani, D.; Ugoccioni, R.; Venugopalan, R.; Vogt, R.; Wiedemann, U.A.

    2002-09-15

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy ion experiment at the LHC. This note summarizes theoretical developments in the field of hot and dense matter and their relevance for observables accessible to ALICE in nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions. In addition, aspects of specific interest for proton-proton, proton-nucleus, ultraperipheral collisions and cosmic ray physics, which can be addressed by ALICE, are also discussed.

  6. A theoretical trombone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2014-09-01

    What follows is a description of a theoretical model designed to calculate the playing frequencies of the musical pitches produced by a trombone. The model is based on quantitative treatments that demonstrate the effects of the flaring bell and cup-shaped mouthpiece sections on these frequencies and can be used to calculate frequencies that compare well to both the desired frequencies of the musical pitches and those actually played on a real trombone.

  7. Panorama of theoretical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimouni, J.

    2012-06-01

    We shall start this panorama of theoretical physics by giving an overview of physics in general, this branch of knowledge that has been taken since the scientific revolution as the archetype of the scientific discipline. We shall then proceed in showing in what way theoretical physics from Newton to Maxwell, Einstein, Feynman and the like, in all modesty, could be considered as the ticking heart of physics. By its special mode of inquiry and its tantalizing successes, it has capturing the very spirit of the scientific method, and indeed it has been taken as a role model by other disciplines all the way from the "hard" ones to the social sciences. We shall then review how much we know today of the world of matter, both in term of its basic content and in the way it is structured. We will then present the dreams of today's theoretical physics as a way of penetrating into its psyche, discovering in this way its aspirations and longing in much the same way that a child's dreams tell us about his yearning and craving. Yet our understanding of matter has been going in the past decades through a crisis of sort. As a necessary antidote, we shall thus discuss the pitfalls of dreams pushed too far….

  8. Theoretical Developments in SUSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifman, M.

    2009-01-01

    I am proud that I was personally acquainted with Julius Wess. We first met in 1999 when I was working on the Yuri Golfand Memorial Volume (The Many Faces of the Superworld, World Scientific, Singapore, 2000). I invited him to contribute, and he accepted this invitation with enthusiasm. After that, we met many times, mostly at various conferences in Germany and elsewhere. I was lucky to discuss with Julius questions of theoretical physics, and hear his recollections on how supersymmetry was born. In physics Julius was a visionary, who paved the way to generations of followers. In everyday life he was a kind and modest person, always ready to extend a helping hand to people who were in need of his help. I remember him telling me how concerned he was about the fate of theoretical physicists in Eastern Europe after the demise of communism. His ties with Israeli physicists bore a special character. I am honored by the opportunity to contribute an article to the Julius Wess Memorial Volume. I will review theoretical developments of the recent years in non-perturbative supersymmetry.

  9. DXA, bioelectrical impedance, ultrasonography and biometry for the estimation of fat and lean mass in cats during weight loss

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Few equations have been developed in veterinary medicine compared to human medicine to predict body composition. The present study was done to evaluate the influence of weight loss on biometry (BIO), bioimpedance analysis (BIA) and ultrasonography (US) in cats, proposing equations to estimate fat (FM) and lean (LM) body mass, as compared to dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as the referenced method. For this were used 16 gonadectomized obese cats (8 males and 8 females) in a weight loss program. DXA, BIO, BIA and US were performed in the obese state (T0; obese animals), after 10% of weight loss (T1) and after 20% of weight loss (T2). Stepwise regression was used to analyze the relationship between the dependent variables (FM, LM) determined by DXA and the independent variables obtained by BIO, BIA and US. The better models chosen were evaluated by a simple regression analysis and means predicted vs. determined by DXA were compared to verify the accuracy of the equations. Results The independent variables determined by BIO, BIA and US that best correlated (p < 0.005) with the dependent variables (FM and LM) were BW (body weight), TC (thoracic circumference), PC (pelvic circumference), R (resistance) and SFLT (subcutaneous fat layer thickness). Using Mallows’Cp statistics, p value and r2, 19 equations were selected (12 for FM, 7 for LM); however, only 7 equations accurately predicted FM and one LM of cats. Conclusions The equations with two variables are better to use because they are effective and will be an alternative method to estimate body composition in the clinical routine. For estimated lean mass the equations using body weight associated with biometrics measures can be proposed. For estimated fat mass the equations using body weight associated with bioimpedance analysis can be proposed. PMID:22781317

  10. Theoretical Astrophysics at Fermilab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Theoretical Astrophysics Group works on a broad range of topics ranging from string theory to data analysis in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The group is motivated by the belief that a deep understanding of fundamental physics is necessary to explain a wide variety of phenomena in the universe. During the three years 2001-2003 of our previous NASA grant, over 120 papers were written; ten of our postdocs went on to faculty positions; and we hosted or organized many workshops and conferences. Kolb and collaborators focused on the early universe, in particular and models and ramifications of the theory of inflation. They also studied models with extra dimensions, new types of dark matter, and the second order effects of super-horizon perturbations. S tebbins, Frieman, Hui, and Dodelson worked on phenomenological cosmology, extracting cosmological constraints from surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also worked on theoretical topics such as weak lensing, reionization, and dark energy. This work has proved important to a number of experimental groups [including those at Fermilab] planning future observations. In general, the work of the Theoretical Astrophysics Group has served as a catalyst for experimental projects at Fennilab. An example of this is the Joint Dark Energy Mission. Fennilab is now a member of SNAP, and much of the work done here is by people formerly working on the accelerator. We have created an environment where many of these people made transition from physics to astronomy. We also worked on many other topics related to NASA s focus: cosmic rays, dark matter, the Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect, the galaxy distribution in the universe, and the Lyman alpha forest. The group organized and hosted a number of conferences and workshop over the years covered by the grant. Among them were: