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Sample records for biological materials involving

  1. NASA Sponsored Research Involving Crystallization of Biological Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, James Patton

    2000-01-01

    An overview of NASA's plans for the performing experiments involving the crystallization of biological materials on the International Space Station (ISS) is presented. In addition, a brief overview of past work is provided as background. Descriptions of flight hardware currently available for use on the ISS are given and projections of future developments are discussed. In addition, experiment selection and funding is described. As of the flight of STS-95, these crystallization projects have proven to be some of the most successful in the history of microgravity research. The NASA Microgravity Research Division alone has flown 185 different proteins, nucleic acids, viruses, and complexes on 43 different missions. 37 of the 185 have resulted, in, diffraction patterns with higher resolution than was obtained in all previous ground based experiments. This occurred despite the fact that an average of only 41 samples per protein were flown. A number of other samples have shown improved signal to noise characteristics, i.e. relative Wilson plots, when compared to the best ground experiments. In addition, a number of experiments investigating the effects of microgravity conditions on the crystallization of biological material have been conducted.

  2. Biological materials by design.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhao; Dimas, Leon; Adler, David; Bratzel, Graham; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-02-19

    In this topical review we discuss recent advances in the use of physical insight into the way biological materials function, to design novel engineered materials 'from scratch', or from the level of fundamental building blocks upwards and by using computational multiscale methods that link chemistry to material function. We present studies that connect advances in multiscale hierarchical material structuring with material synthesis and testing, review case studies of wood and other biological materials, and illustrate how engineered fiber composites and bulk materials are designed, modeled, and then synthesized and tested experimentally. The integration of experiment and simulation in multiscale design opens new avenues to explore the physics of materials from a fundamental perspective, and using complementary strengths from models and empirical techniques. Recent developments in this field illustrate a new paradigm by which complex material functionality is achieved through hierarchical structuring in spite of simple material constituents. PMID:24451343

  3. Active Biological Materials

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2011-01-01

    Cells make use of dynamic internal structures to control shape and create movement. By consuming energy to assemble into highly organized systems of interacting parts, these structures can generate force and resist compression, as well as adaptively change in response to their environment. Recent progress in reconstituting cytoskeletal structures in vitro has provided an opportunity to characterize the mechanics and dynamics of filament networks formed from purified proteins. Results indicate that a complex interplay between length scales and timescales underlies the mechanical responses of these systems and that energy consumption, as manifested in molecular motor activity and cytoskeletal filament growth, can drive transitions between distinct material states. This review discusses the basic characteristics of these active biological materials that set them apart from conventional materials and that create a rich array of unique behaviors. PMID:18999991

  4. Electrophoresis of biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The selection of biological products was studied for electrophoresis in space. Free flow electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and isotachophoresis are described. The candidates discussed include: immunoglobulins and gamma globulins; isolated islet of langerhans from pancreas; bone marrow; tumor cells; kidney cells, cryoprecipitate; and column separated cultures.

  5. Liquid Crystalline Materials for Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Aaron M.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid crystals have a long history of use as materials that respond to external stimuli (e.g., electrical and optical fields). More recently, a series of investigations have reported the design of liquid crystalline materials that undergo ordering transitions in response to a range of biological interactions, including interactions involving proteins, nucleic acids, viruses, bacteria and mammalian cells. A central challenge underlying the design of liquid crystalline materials for such applications is the tailoring of the interface of the materials so as to couple targeted biological interactions to ordering transitions. This review describes recent progress toward design of interfaces of liquid crystalline materials that are suitable for biological applications. Approaches addressed in this review include the use of lipid assemblies, polymeric membranes containing oligopeptides, cationic surfactant-DNA complexes, peptide-amphiphiles, interfacial protein assemblies and multi-layer polymeric films. PMID:22563142

  6. 37 CFR 1.801 - Biological material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Biological material. 1.801... Biological Material § 1.801 Biological material. For the purposes of these regulations pertaining to the deposit of biological material for purposes of patents for inventions under 35 U.S.C. 101, the...

  7. 37 CFR 1.801 - Biological material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Biological material. 1.801... Biological Material § 1.801 Biological material. For the purposes of these regulations pertaining to the deposit of biological material for purposes of patents for inventions under 35 U.S.C. 101, the...

  8. Biologically inspired dynamic material systems.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2015-03-01

    Numerous examples of material systems that dynamically interact with and adapt to the surrounding environment are found in nature, from hair-based mechanoreceptors in animals to self-shaping seed dispersal units in plants to remodeling bone in vertebrates. Inspired by such fascinating biological structures, a wide range of synthetic material systems have been created to replicate the design concepts of dynamic natural architectures. Examples of biological structures and their man-made counterparts are herein revisited to illustrate how dynamic and adaptive responses emerge from the intimate microscale combination of building blocks with intrinsic nanoscale properties. By using top-down photolithographic methods and bottom-up assembly approaches, biologically inspired dynamic material systems have been created 1) to sense liquid flow with hair-inspired microelectromechanical systems, 2) to autonomously change shape by utilizing plantlike heterogeneous architectures, 3) to homeostatically influence the surrounding environment through self-regulating adaptive surfaces, and 4) to spatially concentrate chemical species by using synthetic microcompartments. The ever-increasing complexity and remarkable functionalities of such synthetic systems offer an encouraging perspective to the rich set of dynamic and adaptive properties that can potentially be implemented in future man-made material systems. PMID:25583299

  9. Biological materials for dynamic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, Nikolai M.

    1997-02-01

    Intrinsic properties of biological materials making them outstanding candidates for technical applications are briefly summarized in the paper. The origin of the light- driven optical non-linearity of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) is demonstrated. The fields of the most effective application of BR are analyzed on the basis of the last year's scientific publications. Attention is attracted to adaptive measuring interferometers with dynamic holographic beamscouplers based on BR. Several examples of such interferometers are discussed introducing one of the most promising BR application.

  10. 78 FR 16472 - Deposit of Biological Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Deposit of Biological Materials ACTION: Proposed collection....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The deposit of biological materials as part of a patent application is... use the invention as specified by 35 U.S.C. 112. The term ``biological material'' is defined by 37...

  11. 75 FR 6348 - Deposit of Biological Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Deposit of Biological Materials ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request....Fawcett@uspto.gov . Include ``0651-0022 Deposit of Biological Materials comment'' in the subject line of....Hanlon@uspto.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The deposit of biological materials as part...

  12. Biological issues in materials science and engineering: Interdisciplinarity and the bio-materials paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murr, L. E.

    2006-07-01

    Biological systems and processes have had, and continue to have, important implications and applications in materials extraction, processing, and performance. This paper illustrates some interdisciplinary, biological issues in materials science and engineering. These include metal extraction involving bacterial catalysis, galvanic couples, bacterial-assisted corrosion and degradation of materials, biosorption and bioremediation of toxic and other heavy metals, metal and material implants and prostheses and related dental and medical biomaterials developments and applications, nanomaterials health benefits and toxicity issue, and biomimetics and biologically inspired materials developments. These and other examples provide compelling evidence and arguments for emphasizing biological sicences in materials science and engineering curricula and the implementation of a bio-materials paradigm to facilitate the emergence of innovative interdisciplinarity involving the biological sciences and materials sciences and engineering.

  13. Bioinspired materials: Boosting plant biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, Gregory D.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2014-04-01

    Chloroplasts with extended photosynthetic activity beyond the visible absorption spectrum, and living leaves that perform non-biological functions, are made possible by localizing nanoparticles within plant organelles.

  14. Immune Response to Biologic Scaffold Materials

    PubMed Central

    Badylak, Stephen F.; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Biologic scaffold materials composed of mammalian extracellular matrix are commonly used in regenerative medicine and in surgical procedures for the reconstruction of numerous tissue and organs. These biologic materials are typically allogeneic or xenogeneic in origin and are derived from tissues such as small intestine, urinary bladder, dermis, and pericardium. The innate and acquired host immune response to these biologic materials and the effect of the immune response upon downstream remodeling events has been largely unexplored. Variables that affect the host response include manufacturing processes, the rate of scaffold degradation, and the presence of cross species antigens. This manuscript provides an overview of studies that have evaluated the immune response to biologic scaffold materials and variables that affect this response. PMID:18083531

  15. Dielectric constant microscopy for biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valavade, A. V.; Kothari, D. C.; Löbbe, C.

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the work on the development of Dielectric Constant Microscopy for biological materials using double pass amplitude modulation method. The dielectric constant information can be obtained at nanometer scales using this technique. Electrostatic force microscopy images of biological materials are presented. The images obtained from the EFM technique mode clearly show inversion contrast and gives the spatial variation of tip-sample capacitance. The EFM images are further processed to obtain dielectric constant information at nanometer scales.

  16. Additive manufacturing of biologically-inspired materials.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2016-01-21

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies offer an attractive pathway towards the fabrication of functional materials featuring complex heterogeneous architectures inspired by biological systems. In this paper, recent research on the use of AM approaches to program the local chemical composition, structure and properties of biologically-inspired materials is reviewed. A variety of structural motifs found in biological composites have been successfully emulated in synthetic systems using inkjet-based, direct-writing, stereolithography and slip casting technologies. The replication in synthetic systems of design principles underlying such structural motifs has enabled the fabrication of lightweight cellular materials, strong and tough composites, soft robots and autonomously shaping structures with unprecedented properties and functionalities. Pushing the current limits of AM technologies in future research should bring us closer to the manufacturing capabilities of living organisms, opening the way for the digital fabrication of advanced materials with superior performance, lower environmental impact and new functionalities. PMID:26750617

  17. Biological Potential of Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.; Conner, Anthony J.; Killham, Kenneth; Deamer, David W.

    1997-09-01

    Meteoritic materials are investigated as potential early planetary nutrients. Aqueous extracts of the Murchison C2 carbonaceous meteorite are utilized as a sole carbon source by microorganisms, as demonstrated by the genetically modifiedPseudomonas fluorescenceequipped with theluxgene. Nutrient effects are observed also with the soil microorganismsNocardia asteroidesandArthrobacter pascensthat reach populations up to 5 × 107CFU/ml in meteorite extracts, similar to populations in terrestrial soil extracts. Plant tissue cultures ofAsparagus officinalisandSolanum tuberosum(potato) exhibit enhanced pigmentation and some enhanced growth when meteorite extracts are added to partial nutrient media, but inhibited growth when added to full nutrient solution. The meteorite extracts lead to large increases in S, Ca, Mg, and Fe plant tissue contents as shown by X-ray fluorescence, while P, K, and Cl contents show mixed effects. In both microbiological and plant tissue experiments, the nutrient and inhibitory effects appear to be best balanced for growth at about 1:20 (extracted solid:H2O) ratios. The results suggest that solutions in cavities in meteorites can provide efficient concentrated biogenic and early nutrient environments, including high phosphate levels, which may be the limiting nutrient. The results also suggest that carbonaceous asteroid resources can sustain soil microbial activity and provide essential macronutrients for future space-based eco- systems.

  18. The Structural Biology of Enzymes Involved in Natural Product Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shanteri; Phillips, George N.

    2012-01-01

    The glycosylation of microbial natural products often dramatically influences the biological and/or pharmacological activities of the parental metabolite. Over the past decade, crystal structures of several enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and attachment of novel sugars found appended to natural products have emerged. In many cases, these studies have paved the way to a better understanding of the corresponding enzyme mechanism of action and have served as a starting point for engineering variant enzymes to facilitate to production of differentially-glycosylated natural products. This review specifically summarizes the structural studies of bacterial enzymes involved in biosynthesis of novel sugar nucleotides. PMID:22688446

  19. 37 CFR 1.801 - Biological material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Biological material. 1.801 Section 1.801 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Deposit...

  20. 37 CFR 1.801 - Biological material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Biological material. 1.801 Section 1.801 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Deposit...

  1. 37 CFR 1.801 - Biological material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biological material. 1.801 Section 1.801 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Deposit...

  2. Using Raman spectroscopy to characterize biological materials.

    PubMed

    Butler, Holly J; Ashton, Lorna; Bird, Benjamin; Cinque, Gianfelice; Curtis, Kelly; Dorney, Jennifer; Esmonde-White, Karen; Fullwood, Nigel J; Gardner, Benjamin; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Walsh, Michael J; McAinsh, Martin R; Stone, Nicholas; Martin, Francis L

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the chemical composition of a sample, which can in turn be used to extract biological information. Many materials have characteristic Raman spectra, which means that Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an effective analytical approach in geology, semiconductor, materials and polymer science fields. The application of Raman spectroscopy and microscopy within biology is rapidly increasing because it can provide chemical and compositional information, but it does not typically suffer from interference from water molecules. Analysis does not conventionally require extensive sample preparation; biochemical and structural information can usually be obtained without labeling. In this protocol, we aim to standardize and bring together multiple experimental approaches from key leaders in the field for obtaining Raman spectra using a microspectrometer. As examples of the range of biological samples that can be analyzed, we provide instructions for acquiring Raman spectra, maps and images for fresh plant tissue, formalin-fixed and fresh frozen mammalian tissue, fixed cells and biofluids. We explore a robust approach for sample preparation, instrumentation, acquisition parameters and data processing. By using this approach, we expect that a typical Raman experiment can be performed by a nonspecialist user to generate high-quality data for biological materials analysis. PMID:26963630

  3. Structural biological materials: Overview of current research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.-Y.; Lin, A. Y.-M.; Stokes, A. G.; Seki, Y.; Bodde, S. G.; McKittrick, J.; Meyers, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    Through specific biological examples this article illustrates the complex designs that have evolved in nature to address strength, toughness, and weight optimization. Current research is reviewed, and the structure of some shells, bones, antlers, crab exoskeletons, and avian feathers and beaks is described using the principles of materials science and engineering by correlating the structure with mechanical properties. In addition, the mechanisms of deformation and failure are discussed.

  4. Cells and materials involved in guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, R; Wang, H L; MacNeil, R L; Somerman, M J

    1994-01-01

    Just over 10 years ago a group of imaginative periodontal researchers reported that tissues lost to the destructive mechanisms of inflammatory periodontal disease could be regenerated either in part or whole by the use of a surgical technique that would become universally known as guided tissue regeneration. Since then, tremendous progress has been made in adapting these early research principles into a clinical treatment modality that is now recognized as a viable component of contemporary periodontal therapy. However, many questions remain as to the mechanisms involved in regenerative tissue formation and how to design surgical procedures and materials to best harness the regenerative capacities of the periodontium. This article reviews current concepts and controversies regarding the biologic basis of periodontal regeneration and biomaterials used in guided tissue regeneration therapy. Pros and cons related to regenerative techniques currently in use are discussed along with future directions in the field of periodontal regeneration. PMID:8032455

  5. Quantification of DNA in Biologic Scaffold Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Thomas W.; Freund, John; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Biologic scaffold materials composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) are routinely used for a variety of clinical applications ranging from the treatment of chronic skin ulcers to hernia repair and orthopaedic soft tissue reconstruction. The tissues and species from which the ECM is harvested vary widely as do the methods used to remove the cellular component of the source tissues. The efficacy of decellularization procedures can be quantified by examination of the DNA that remains in the ECM. The objective of the present study was to determine the DNA content and fragment length in both laboratory produced and commercially available ECM scaffold materials. Results showed that the majority of DNA is removed from ECM devices but that small amounts remained in most tested materials. PMID:18619621

  6. Learning from systems biology: An ``Omics'' approach to materials design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Krishna

    2008-03-01

    An understanding of systems biology provides an excellent paradigm for the materials scientist. Ultimately one would like to take an “atoms-applications” approach to materials design. This paper describes how the concepts of genomics, proteomics, and other biological behavior which form the foundations of modern biology can be applied to materials design through materials informatics.

  7. Viscoelastic characterization of soft biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayar, Vinod Timothy

    Progressive and irreversible retinal diseases are among the primary causes of blindness in the United States, attacking the cells in the eye that transform environmental light into neural signals for the optic pathway. Medical implants designed to restore visual function to afflicted patients can cause mechanical stress and ultimately damage to the host tissues. Research shows that an accurate understanding of the mechanical properties of the biological tissues can reduce damage and lead to designs with improved safety and efficacy. Prior studies on the mechanical properties of biological tissues show characterization of these materials can be affected by environmental, length-scale, time, mounting, stiffness, size, viscoelastic, and methodological conditions. Using porcine sclera tissue, the effects of environmental, time, and mounting conditions are evaluated when using nanoindentation. Quasi-static tests are used to measure reduced modulus during extended exposure to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), as well as the chemical and mechanical analysis of mounting the sample to a solid substrate using cyanoacrylate. The less destructive nature of nanoindentation tests allows for variance of tests within a single sample to be compared to the variance between samples. The results indicate that the environmental, time, and mounting conditions can be controlled for using modified nanoindentation procedures for biological samples and are in line with averages modulus values from previous studies but with increased precision. By using the quasi-static and dynamic characterization capabilities of the nanoindentation setup, the additional stiffness and viscoelastic variables are measured. Different quasi-static control methods were evaluated along with maximum load parameters and produced no significant difference in reported reduced modulus values. Dynamic characterization tests varied frequency and quasi-static load, showing that the agar could be modeled as a linearly

  8. [Placebo effect: clinical, biological and therapeutical involvements in depression].

    PubMed

    Gourion, D; Mouchabac, S

    2016-02-01

    The placebo effect is an excellent model for understanding the mechanisms underlying the interaction between a subjective and complex mental activity (beliefs, expectations, hopes, learning, patient-physician relationship, socio-cultural context .) with different neural and biological systems. Initially, research on the placebo effect has focused on the mechanisms of pain and analgesia. The cognitive processes of conditioning and reward anticipation (hope of a relief) were highlighted. The involvement of different neurobiological pathways has been clearly shown: endogenous opioids, CCK, dopaminergic pathways, endocannabinoids, immunological factors… More recently, the field has open towards new perspectives: depression and anxiety, motor disorders, immune system, endocrine system. Intensive research in the field emerges because of its fundamental implications in neuroscience research but also because of the ethical, clinical and therapeutical issues. Moreover, the placebo effect is considered as a main methodological mean issue in clinical trials that allows the demonstration of the efficacy and tolerance of new drugs. In the field of psychiatry, depression is a placebo highly-sensitive disorder: placebo response rates in clinical trials are of the order of 30 % to 40 %. The identification of biological markers of placebo response, such as neuroimaging and quantitative electroencephalography may lead to develop more efficient models in clinical research. PMID:26879253

  9. The cutting edge: Sharp biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, M. A.; Lin, A. Y. M.; Lin, Y. S.; Olevsky, E. A.; Georgalis, S.

    2008-03-01

    Through hundreds of millions of years of evolution, organisms have developed a myriad of ingenious solutions to ensure and optimize survival and success. Biological materials that comprise organisms are synthesized at ambient temperature and pressure and mostly in aqueous environments. This process, mediated by proteins, limits the range of materials at the disposal of nature and therefore the design plays a pivotal role. This article focuses on sharp edges and serrations as important survival and predating mechanisms in a number of plants, insects, fishes, and mammals. Some plants have sharp edges covered with serrations. The proboscis of mosquitoes and stinger of bees are examples in insects. Serrations are a prominent feature in many fish teeth, and rodents have teeth that are sharpened continuously, ensuring their sharpness and efficacy. Some current bioinspired applications will also be reviewed.

  10. Curriculum and course materials for a forensic DNA biology course.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M

    2014-01-01

    The Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission (FEPAC) requires accredited programs offer a "coherent curriculum" to ensure each student gains a "thorough grounding of the natural…sciences." Part of this curriculum includes completion of a minimum of 15 semester-hours forensic science coursework, nine of which can involve a class in forensic DNA biology. Departments that have obtained or are pursuing FEPAC accreditation can meet this requirement by offering a stand-alone forensic DNA biology course; however, materials necessary to instruct students are often homegrown and not standardized; in addition, until recently, the community lacked commercially available books, lab manuals, and teaching materials, and many of the best pedagogical resources were scattered across various peer-reviewed journals. The curriculum discussed below is an attempt to synthesize this disparate information, and although certainly not the only acceptable methodology, the below discussion represents "a way" for synthesizing and aggregating this information into a cohesive, comprehensive whole. PMID:24591042

  11. Solid freeform fabrication of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiwen

    This thesis investigates solid freeform fabrication of biological materials for dental restoration and orthopedic implant applications. The basic approach in this study for solid freeform fabrication of biological materials is micro-extrusion of single or multiple slurries for 3D components and inkjet color printing of multiple suspensions for functionally graded materials (FGMs). Common issues associated with micro-extrusion and inkjet color printing are investigated. These common issues include (i) formulation of stable slurries with a pseudoplastic property, (ii) cross-sectional geometry of the extrudate as a function of the extrusion parameters, (iii) fabrication path optimization for extrusion process, (iv) extrusion optimization for multi-layer components, (v) composition control in functionally graded materials, and (vi) sintering optimization to convert the freeform fabricated powder compact to a dense body for biological applications. The present study clearly shows that the rheological and extrusion behavior of dental porcelain slurries depend strongly on the pH value of the slurry and extrusion conditions. A slurry with pseudoplastic properties is a basic requirement for obtaining extruded lines with rectangular cross-sections. The cross-sectional geometry of the extrudate is also strongly affected by extrusion parameters including the extrusion nozzle height, nozzle moving speed, extrusion rate, and critical nozzle height. Proper combinations of these extrusion parameters are necessary in order to obtain single line extrudates with near rectangular cross-sections and 3D objects with dimensional accuracy, uniform wall thickness, good wall uprightness, and no wall slumping. Based on these understandings, single-wall, multi-wall, and solid teeth have been fabricated via micro-extrusion of the dental slurry directly from a CAD digital model in 30 min. Inkjet color printing using stable Al2O3 and ZrO 2 aqueous suspensions has been developed to fabricate

  12. Femtosecond laser patterning of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Jeon, Hojeong; Hidai, Hirofumi; Hwang, David J.

    2011-03-01

    This paper aims at presenting a review of work at the Laser Thermal Laboratory on the microscopic laser modification of biological materials using ultrafast laser pulses. We have devised a new method for fabricating high aspect ratio patterns of varying height by using two-photon polymerization process in order to study contact guidance and directed growth of biological cells. Studies using NIH-3T3 and MDCK cells indicate that cell morphology on fiber scaffolds is influenced by the pattern of actin microfilament bundles. Cells experienced different strength of contact guidance depending on the ridge height. Cell morphology and motility was investigated on micronscale anisotropic cross patterns and parallel line patterns having different aspect ratios. A significant effect on cell alignment and directionality of migration was observed. Cell morphology and motility were influenced by the aspect ratio of the cross pattern, the grid size, and the ridge height. Cell contractility was examined microscopically in order to measure contractile forces generated by individual cells on self-standing fiber scaffolds.

  13. Mechanisms of and facility types involved in hazardous materials incidents.

    PubMed Central

    Kales, S N; Polyhronopoulos, G N; Castro, M J; Goldman, R H; Christiani, D C

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically investigate hazardous materials (hazmat) releases and determine the mechanisms of these accidents, and the industries/activities and chemicals involved. We analyzed responses by Massachusetts' six district hazmat teams from their inception through May 1996. Information from incident reports was extracted onto standard coding sheets. The majority of hazardous materials incidents were caused by spills, leaks, or escapes of hazardous materials (76%) and occurred at fixed facilities (80%). Transportation-related accidents accounted for 20% of incidents. Eleven percent of hazardous materials incidents were at schools or health care facilities. Petroleum-derived fuels were involved in over half of transportation-related accidents, and these accounted for the majority of petroleum fuel releases. Chlorine derivatives were involved in 18% of all accidents and were associated with a wide variety of facility types and activities. In conclusion, systematic study of hazardous materials incidents allows the identification of preventable causes of these incidents. PMID:9300926

  14. Programmable temperature control system for biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Harrison, R. G.; Rinfret, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    A system was constructed which allows programmable temperature-time control for a 5 cu cm sample volume of arbitrary biological material. The system also measures the parameters necessary for the determination of the sample volume specific heat and thermal conductivity as a function of temperature, and provides a detailed measurement of the temperature during phase change and a means of calculating the heat of the phase change. Steady-state and dynamic temperature control is obtained by supplying heat to the sample volume through resistive elements constructed as an integral part of the sample container. For cooling purposes, this container is totally immersed into a cold heat sink. Using a mixture of dry ice and alcohol at 79 C, the sample volume can be controlled from +40 to -60 C at rates from steady state to + or - 65 C/min. Steady-state temperature precision is better than 0.2 C, while the dynamic capability depends on the temperature rate of change as well as the mass of both the sample and the container.

  15. Fathers' Involvement with Their Nonresident Children and Material Hardship

    PubMed Central

    Nepomnyaschy, Lenna; Garfinkel, Irwin

    2011-01-01

    Children in single-parent families, particularly children born to unmarried parents, are at high risk for experiencing material hardship. Previous research based on cross-sectional data suggests that father involvement, especially visitation, diminishes hardship. This article uses longitudinal data to examine the associations between nonresident fathers' involvement with their children and material hardship in the children's households. Results suggest that fathers' formal and informal child support payments and contact with their children independently reduce the number of hardships in the mothers' households; however, only the impact of fathers' contact with children is robust in models that include lagged dependent variables or individual fixed effects. Furthermore, cross-lagged models suggest that material hardship decreases future father involvement, but future hardship is not diminished by father involvement (except in-kind contributions). These results point to the complexity of these associations and to the need for future research to focus on heterogeneity of effects within the population. PMID:21822335

  16. Method and apparatus for biological material separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Donna L.

    2005-05-10

    There has been invented an apparatus comprising a separation barrier for excluding denser cell materials from less dense cell materials after centrifuging of the cells so that selected materials can be withdrawn from the less dense cell materials without inclusion of the denser cell materials or clogging of sampling equipment with denser cell materials. Cells from which selected material is to be withdrawn are centrifuged, either as cells or cells in media. Once the denser cell materials are isolated in a layer by centrifugal force, an invention screen or seive is submerged in the less dense cell material to a level above the layer of denser cell materials to isolate the denser cell materials from the less dense cell materials, preventing mixing of the denser cell materials back into the less dense cell materials when the cells or the cells in media are no longer being centrifuged and to prevent clogging of sampling equipment with denser cell materials. In a particularly useful application of the invention method and apparatus, plasmid DNA can be withdrawn from less dense cell materials without contamination or interference with denser cell materials.

  17. BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY AND POTENTIAL REMEDIATION INVOLVING GEOTEXTILE LANDFILL LEACHATE FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results of a biological growth study in geotextile filters used in landfill leachate collection systems. fter reviewing the first year's activity, a completely new experimental approach has been taken. sing 100 mm diameter columns for the experimental incu...

  18. Using Spreadsheets to Teach Aspects of Biology Involving Mathematical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Kevin; Nicholls, Mike; Ponsonby, David

    2004-01-01

    Some aspects of biology, for example the Hardy-Weinberg simulation of population genetics or modelling heat flow in lizards, have an undeniable mathematical basis. Students can find the level of mathematical skill required to deal with such concepts to be an insurmountable hurdle to understanding. If not used effectively, spreadsheet models…

  19. Reversibly immobilized biological materials in monolayer films on electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, P.F.; Frank, A.J.

    1993-05-04

    Methods and techniques are described for reversibly binding charged biological particles in a fluid medium to an electrode surface. The methods are useful in a variety of applications. The biological materials may include microbes, proteins, and viruses. The electrode surface may consist of reversibly electroactive materials such as polyvinylferrocene, silicon-linked ferrocene or quinone.

  20. Reversibly immobilized biological materials in monolayer films on electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Paul F.; Frank, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    Methods and techniques are described for reversibly binding charged biological particles in a fluid medium to an electrode surface. The methods are useful in a variety of applications. The biological materials may include microbes, proteins, and viruses. The electrode surface may consist of reversibly electroactive materials such as polyvinylferrocene, silicon-linked ferrocene or quinone.

  1. The effect of material hardship on child protective service involvement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mi-Youn

    2015-03-01

    This study employs four waves of survey data on 1,135 families from the Illinois Families Study, a longitudinal panel study of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in Illinois. This study explores the following issues within this low-income population: (1) whether material hardships are associated with child protective services (CPS) investigations, (2) whether the effect of material hardship on CPS differs by the type of child maltreatment investigated, and (3) whether psychological distress mediates the association between material hardship and CPS involvement. Results from pooled and fixed effects logistic regressions suggest that caregivers who experience material hardship are more likely to become involved in CPS. In general, investigated neglect reports are responsive to particular types of hardship such as housing and food, while investigated physical abuse reports are responsive to levels of hardship regardless of specific types. The association between material hardship and CPS involvement is not fully explained by depressive symptoms or parenting stress. The study results suggest that in order to prevent child maltreatment, it may be necessary to address a family's unmet material needs through economic support interventions. PMID:24908518

  2. The acquisition of dangerous biological materials :

    SciTech Connect

    Aceto, Donato Gonzalo; Astuto-Gribble, Lisa M.; Gaudioso, Jennifer M.

    2007-11-01

    Numerous terrorist organizations have openly expressed interest in producing and deploying biological weapons. However, a limiting factor for many terrorists has been the acquisition of dangerous biological agents, as evidenced by the very few successful instances of biological weapons use compared to the number of documented hoaxes. Biological agents vary greatly in their ability to cause loss of life and economic damage. Some agents, if released properly, can kill many people and cause an extensive number of secondary infections; other agents will sicken only a small number of people for a short period of time. Consequently, several biological agents can potentially be used to perpetrate a bioterrorism attack but few are likely capable of causing a high consequence event. It is crucial, from a US national security perspective, to more deeply understand the likelihood that terrorist organizations can acquire the range of these agents. Few studies have attempted to comprehensively compile the technical information directly relevant to the acquisition of dangerous bacteria, viruses and toxins. In this report, technical fact sheets were assembled for 46 potentially dangerous biological agents. Much of the information was taken from various research sources which could ultimately and significantly expedite and improve bioterrorism threat assessments. By systematically examining a number of specific agent characteristics included in these fact sheets, it may be possible to detect, target, and implement measures to thwart future terrorist acquisition attempts. In addition, the information in these fact sheets may be used as a tool to help laboratories gain a rudimentary understanding of how attractive a method laboratory theft is relative to other potential acquisition modes.

  3. Identification of Inhibitors of Biological Interactions Involving Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, Daniela; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions involving disordered partners have unique features and represent prominent targets in drug discovery processes. Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in cellular regulation, signaling and control: they bind to multiple partners and these high-specificity/low-affinity interactions play crucial roles in many human diseases. Disordered regions, terminal tails and flexible linkers are particularly abundant in DNA-binding proteins and play crucial roles in the affinity and specificity of DNA recognizing processes. Protein complexes involving IDPs are short-lived and typically involve short amino acid stretches bearing few “hot spots”, thus the identification of molecules able to modulate them can produce important lead compounds: in this scenario peptides and/or peptidomimetics, deriving from structure-based, combinatorial or protein dissection approaches, can play a key role as hit compounds. Here, we propose a panoramic review of the structural features of IDPs and how they regulate molecular recognition mechanisms focusing attention on recently reported drug-design strategies in the field of IDPs. PMID:25849651

  4. Management of Biological Materials in Wastewater from Research & Development Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Raney, Elizabeth A.; Moon, Thomas W.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2011-04-01

    PNNL has developed and instituted a systematic approach to managing work with biological material that begins in the project planning phase and carries through implementation to waste disposal. This paper describes two major processes used at PNNL to analyze and mitigate the hazards associated with working with biological materials and evaluate them for disposal to the sewer, ground, or surface water in a manner that protects human health and the environment. The first of these processes is the Biological Work Permit which is used to identify requirements for handling, storing, and working with biological materials and the second is the Sewer Approval process which is used to evaluate discharges of wastewaters containing biological materials to assure they meet industrial wastewater permits and other environmental regulations and requirements.

  5. Functionalized apertures for the detection of chemical and biological materials

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia E.; van Buuren, Anthony W.; Terminello, Louis J.; Thelen, Michael P.; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J.; Hart, Bradley R.

    2010-12-14

    Disclosed are nanometer to micron scale functionalized apertures constructed on a substrate made of glass, carbon, semiconductors or polymeric materials that allow for the real time detection of biological materials or chemical moieties. Many apertures can exist on one substrate allowing for the simultaneous detection of numerous chemical and biological molecules. One embodiment features a macrocyclic ring attached to cross-linkers, wherein the macrocyclic ring has a biological or chemical probe extending through the aperture. Another embodiment achieves functionalization by attaching chemical or biological anchors directly to the walls of the apertures via cross-linkers.

  6. Materiomics: biological protein materials, from nano to macro

    PubMed Central

    Cranford, Steven; Buehler, Markus J

    2010-01-01

    Materiomics is an emerging field of science that provides a basis for multiscale material system characterization, inspired in part by natural, for example, protein-based materials. Here we outline the scope and explain the motivation of the field of materiomics, as well as demonstrate the benefits of a materiomic approach in the understanding of biological and natural materials as well as in the design of de novo materials. We discuss recent studies that exemplify the impact of materiomics – discovering Nature’s complexity through a materials science approach that merges concepts of material and structure throughout all scales and incorporates feedback loops that facilitate sensing and resulting structural changes at multiple scales. The development and application of materiomics is illustrated for the specific case of protein-based materials, which constitute the building blocks of a variety of biological systems such as tendon, bone, skin, spider silk, cells, and tissue, as well as natural composite material systems (a combination of protein-based and inorganic constituents) such as nacre and mollusk shells, and other natural multiscale systems such as cellulose-based plant and wood materials. An important trait of these materials is that they display distinctive hierarchical structures across multiple scales, where molecular details are exhibited in macroscale mechanical responses. Protein materials are intriguing examples of materials that balance multiple tasks, representing some of the most sustainable material solutions that integrate structure and function despite severe limitations in the quality and quantity of material building blocks. However, up until now, our attempts to analyze and replicate Nature’s materials have been hindered by our lack of fundamental understanding of these materials’ intricate hierarchical structures, scale-bridging mechanisms, and complex material components that bestow protein-based materials their unique properties

  7. Survey of techniques used to preserve biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinler, E. J.; Hubbard, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The techniques used to preserve biological materials are documented and summarized. The report is presented in a handbook format that categorizes the most important preservation techniques available, and includes a representative sampling of the thousands of applications of these techniques to biological materials and organisms. Details of the information coverage and method of approach are outlined. Data are given in tabular form, and an index and extensive bibliography are included.

  8. Millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric properties of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Usman Ansar

    Broadband dielectric properties of materials can be employed to identify, detect, and characterize materials through their unique spectral signatures. In this study, millimeter wave, submillimeter wave, and terahertz dielectric properties of biological substances inclusive of liquids, solids, and powders were obtained using Dispersive Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DFTS). Two broadband polarizing interferometers were constructed to test materials from 60 GHz to 1.2 THz. This is an extremely difficult portion of the frequency spectrum to obtain a material's dielectric properties since neither optical nor microwave-based techniques provide accurate data. The dielectric characteristics of liquids such as cyclohexane, chlorobenzene, benzene, ethanol, methanol, 1,4 dioxane, and 10% formalin were obtained using the liquid interferometer. Subsequently the solid interferometer was utilized to determine the dielectric properties of human breast tissues, which are fixed and preserved in 10% formalin. This joint collaboration with the Tufts New England Medical Center demonstrated a significant difference between the dielectric response of tumorous and non-tumorous breast tissues across the spectrum. Powders such as anthrax, flour, talc, corn starch, dry milk, and baking soda have been involved in a number of security threats and false alarms around the globe in the last decade. To be able to differentiate hoax attacks and serious security threats, the dielectric properties of common household powders were also examined using the solid interferometer to identify the powders' unique resonance peaks. A new sample preparation kit was designed to test the powder specimens. It was anticipated that millimeter wave and terahertz dielectric characterization will enable one to clearly distinguish one powder from the other; however most of the powders had relatively close dielectric responses and only Talc had a resonance signature recorded at 1.135 THz. Furthermore, due to

  9. [Constitution of a bank of biological material. Practical aspects].

    PubMed

    Henny, J

    2003-02-01

    A bank of biological materials (Biorepositories) aims to collect and preserve in a variable time period (from few days to several years) various biological samples (serum, plasma, cells, DNA, etc) with a view to make subsequent analysis associated with a powerful information management system, enabling the storage of data related to the biological specimens. The bioprocessing of Biorepositories is complex and include: specimen collection, processing issues, identification process, design equipment: liquid nitrogen and mechanical freezers, storage techniques, bioclinical information and biological specimens inventory management systems, quality assurance programs, ethical and legal problems. PMID:12684569

  10. Mesoporous silicates: Materials science and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggers, Robert Anthony

    This thesis dissertation presents the collective research into the advancement of mesoporous silicate particles as biointerface devices, the development of new materials and the application of these particles as solid supports for heterogeneous catalysis. Mesoporous silica has been utilized in the aforementioned applications due to several reasons; the first being the ability to achieve high surface areas (500 - 1000 m2 g-1) with controlled pore sizes and particle morphology. Another reason for their popularity is their robustness in applications of heterogeneous catalysis and the ability to functionalize the surface with a wide variety of organic functional groups. In the field of biointerface devices, mesoporous silica nanoparticles represent a class of materials that exhibit high biocompatibility. In addition, the ability to functionalize the surfaces (outer surface and pore interiors) allows the particles to be targeted to specific cell types as well as the ability to release many different therapeutic molecules under specific stimuli. A unique particle coating consisting of a chemically cleavable lipid bilayer that allows for the encapsulation of a fluorescent molecule and increases the biocompatibility of the particle has been developed. The lipid bilayer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (LB-MSN) was characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen `sorption isotherms. The finished LB-MSN was then incubated with mammalian cells in order to prove their biocompatibility. Confocal micrographs demonstrate the endocytosis of the particles into the cells. In addition the micrographs also show that the LB-MSNs are separate from the endosomal compartments, however due to the lipophilic nature of the dye used to label the endosome there is some debate regarding this conclusion. The lipid bilayer coating was then applied to a large pore MSN (l-MSN) which had been previously shown to cause lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) at low

  11. Wear and abrasion resistance selection maps of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Amini, Shahrouz; Miserez, Ali

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical design of biological materials has generated widespread interest in recent years, providing many insights into their intriguing structure-property relationships. A critical characteristic of load-bearing materials, which is central to the survival of many species, is their wear and abrasion tolerance. In order to be fully functional, protective armors, dentitious structures and dynamic appendages must be able to tolerate repetitive contact loads without significant loss of materials or internal damage. However, very little is known about this tribological performance. Using a contact mechanics framework, we have constructed materials selection charts that provide general predictions about the wear performance of biological materials as a function of their fundamental mechanical properties. One key assumption in constructing these selection charts is that abrasion tolerance is governed by the first irreversible damage at the contact point. The maps were generated using comprehensive data from the literature and encompass a wide range of materials, from heavily mineralized to fully organic materials. Our analysis shows that the tolerance of biological materials against abrasion depends on contact geometry, which is ultimately correlated to environmental and selective pressures. Comparisons with experimental data from nanoindentation experiments are also drawn in order to verify our predictions. With the increasing amount of data available for biological materials also comes the challenge of selecting relevant model systems for bioinspired materials engineering. We suggest that these maps will be able to guide this selection by providing an overview of biological materials that are predicted to exhibit the best abrasion tolerance, which is of fundamental interest for a wide range of applications, for instance in restorative implants and protective devices. PMID:23643608

  12. [Species and group classification of putrefied biological material].

    PubMed

    Kulhányová, V

    1994-05-01

    The author analyzes some experience in serological examinations of biological material which undergoes putrefaction. The aim of the examinations was to evaluate how long is it possible to assess species and group specific properties in material altered by putrefaction. PMID:8023197

  13. Benefit evaluation of space processing of biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A rational analytical basis for the evaluation of potential benefits of space processing of biological materials is described. A preliminary evaluation of three candidate space processed biological materials was accomplished. Materials investigated were human lymphocytes, urokinase, and Beta cells. Separation of lymphocyte groups was considered in order to improve the matching of donors and recipients for kidney transplantation, while urokinase was examined in regard to treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Separation of Beta cells was studied since it could provide a highly effective means for the treatment of juvenile-onset diabetes.

  14. Mesoporous silicates: Materials science and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggers, Robert Anthony

    This thesis dissertation presents the collective research into the advancement of mesoporous silicate particles as biointerface devices, the development of new materials and the application of these particles as solid supports for heterogeneous catalysis. Mesoporous silica has been utilized in the aforementioned applications due to several reasons; the first being the ability to achieve high surface areas (500 - 1000 m2 g-1) with controlled pore sizes and particle morphology. Another reason for their popularity is their robustness in applications of heterogeneous catalysis and the ability to functionalize the surface with a wide variety of organic functional groups. In the field of biointerface devices, mesoporous silica nanoparticles represent a class of materials that exhibit high biocompatibility. In addition, the ability to functionalize the surfaces (outer surface and pore interiors) allows the particles to be targeted to specific cell types as well as the ability to release many different therapeutic molecules under specific stimuli. A unique particle coating consisting of a chemically cleavable lipid bilayer that allows for the encapsulation of a fluorescent molecule and increases the biocompatibility of the particle has been developed. The lipid bilayer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (LB-MSN) was characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen `sorption isotherms. The finished LB-MSN was then incubated with mammalian cells in order to prove their biocompatibility. Confocal micrographs demonstrate the endocytosis of the particles into the cells. In addition the micrographs also show that the LB-MSNs are separate from the endosomal compartments, however due to the lipophilic nature of the dye used to label the endosome there is some debate regarding this conclusion. The lipid bilayer coating was then applied to a large pore MSN (l-MSN) which had been previously shown to cause lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) at low

  15. Nanomechanical strength mechanisms of hierarchical biological materials and tissues.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Markus J; Ackbarow, Theodor

    2008-12-01

    Biological protein materials (BPMs), intriguing hierarchical structures formed by assembly of chemical building blocks, are crucial for critical functions of life. The structural details of BPMs are fascinating: They represent a combination of universally found motifs such as alpha-helices or beta-sheets with highly adapted protein structures such as cytoskeletal networks or spider silk nanocomposites. BPMs combine properties like strength and robustness, self-healing ability, adaptability, changeability, evolvability and others into multi-functional materials at a level unmatched in synthetic materials. The ability to achieve these properties depends critically on the particular traits of these materials, first and foremost their hierarchical architecture and seamless integration of material and structure, from nano to macro. Here, we provide a brief review of this field and outline new research directions, along with a review of recent research results in the development of structure-property relationships of biological protein materials exemplified in a study of vimentin intermediate filaments. PMID:18803059

  16. The host response to allogeneic and xenogeneic biological scaffold materials.

    PubMed

    Keane, Timothy J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-05-01

    The clinical use of biological scaffold materials has become commonplace. Such scaffolds are composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), or components of ECM, derived from allogeneic or xenogeneic tissues. Such scaffold materials vary widely in their source tissue, processing methods and sterilization methods. The success or failure of an ECM scaffold for a given application is dependent on the host response following implantation; a response that is largely mediated by the innate immune system and which is influenced by a numerous factors, including the processing methods used in the preparation of biological scaffolds. The present paper reviews various aspects of the host response to biological scaffolds and factors that affect this response. In addition, some of the logistical, regulatory and reconstructive implications associated with the use of biological scaffolds are discussed. PMID:24668694

  17. Flexible Organic Electronics in Biology: Materials and Devices.

    PubMed

    Liao, Caizhi; Zhang, Meng; Yao, Mei Yu; Hua, Tao; Li, Li; Yan, Feng

    2015-12-01

    At the convergence of organic electronics and biology, organic bioelectronics attracts great scientific interest. The potential applications of organic semiconductors to reversibly transmit biological signals or stimulate biological tissues inspires many research groups to explore the use of organic electronics in biological systems. Considering the surfaces of movable living tissues being arbitrarily curved at physiological environments, the flexibility of organic bioelectronic devices is of paramount importance in enabling stable and reliable performances by improving the contact and interaction of the devices with biological systems. Significant advances in flexible organic bio-electronics have been achieved in the areas of flexible organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), polymer electrodes, smart textiles, organic electrochemical ion pumps (OEIPs), ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs) and chemiresistors. This review will firstly discuss the materials used in flexible organic bioelectronics, which is followed by an overview on various types of flexible organic bioelectronic devices. The versatility of flexible organic bioelectronics promises a bright future for this emerging area. PMID:25393596

  18. Materials Manufactured from 3D Printed Synthetic Biology Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Diana; Micks, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Many complex, biologically-derived materials have extremely useful properties (think wood or silk), but are unsuitable for space-related applications due to production, manufacturing, or processing limitations. Large-scale ecosystem-based production, such as raising and harvesting trees for wood, is impractical in a self-contained habitat such as a space station or potential Mars colony. Manufacturing requirements, such as the specialized equipment needed to harvest and process cotton, add too much upmass for current launch technology. Cells in nature are already highly specialized for making complex biological materials on a micro scale. We envision combining these strengths with the recently emergent technologies of synthetic biology and 3D printing to create 3D-structured arrays of cells that are bioengineered to secrete different materials in a specified three-dimensional pattern.

  19. Near-Infrared Fluorescent Materials for Sensing of Biological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Amiot, Carrie L.; Xu, Shuping; Liang, Song; Pan, Lingyun; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) materials are promising labeling reagents for sensitive determination and imaging of biological targets. In the near-infrared region biological samples have low background fluorescence signals, providing high signal to noise ratio. Meanwhile, near-infrared radiation can penetrate into sample matrices deeply due to low light scattering. Thus, in vivo and in vitro imaging of biological samples can be achieved by employing the NIRF probes. To take full advantage of NIRF materials in the biological and biomedical field, one of the key issues is to develop intense and biocompatible NIRF probes. In this review, a number of NIRF materials are discussed including traditional NIRF dye molecules, newly developed NIRF quantum dots and single-walled carbon nanotubes, as well as rare earth metal compounds. The use of some NIRF materials in various nanostructures is illustrated. The enhancement of NIRF using metal nanostructures is covered as well. The fluorescence mechanism and bioapplications of each type of the NIRF materials are discussed in details.

  20. Digestion of titanium bearing geologic materials involving microwaves.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anju; Chattopadhyay, Partha

    2007-10-01

    An environmentally friendly and rapid digestion procedure involving 10 mL of acid mixture (HNO3 : HCl : HF = 2:2:1) for 0.1 g of sample in closed vessel microwave digester following heating program : 250W for 10 min., hold time 2 min., 600 W for 17 min, and Ventilation time 10 min was developed. The operating parameters were varied and optimized by factorial design approach using "Steepest Ascent" method. The validity of the recommended digestion procedure were examined by analyzing several well characterized standard reference materials such as diabase (W2), basalt (BIR-1, JB-3, BHVO-1), granite (G2), gabbro (JGb-1), Mn-nodule (Nod-A-1, Nod-P-1), sediment (STSD-4, LKSD-2), limestone (KH-2), soil (SAu-1), ilmenite (IGS-31), rutile (IGS-32), Zircon (IGS-35) and titanium dioxide (SRM-154b) employing both inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and well known spectrophotometric method. An excellent agreement between the methods and the certified values of standard reference materials suggest that the digestion procedure can be used for quality control and allied purposes. PMID:18153999

  1. Health Physics Code System for Evaluating Accidents Involving Radioactive Materials.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-10-01

    Version 03 The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculational tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes provide a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. The developer's website is: http://www.llnl.gov/nhi/hotspot/. Four general programs, PLUME, EXPLOSION, FIRE, and RESUSPENSION, calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosivemore » release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Additional programs deal specifically with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. The FIDLER program can calibrate radiation survey instruments for ground survey measurements and initial screening of personnel for possible plutonium uptake in the lung. The HOTSPOT codes are fast, portable, easy to use, and fully documented in electronic help files. HOTSPOT supports color high resolution monitors and printers for concentration plots and contours. The codes have been extensively used by the DOS community since 1985. Tables and graphical output can be directed to the computer screen, printer, or a disk file. The graphical output consists of dose and ground contamination as a function of plume centerline downwind distance, and radiation dose and ground contamination contours. Users have the option of displaying scenario text on the plots. HOTSPOT 3.0.1 fixes three significant Windows 7 issues: � Executable installed properly under "Program Files/HotSpot 3.0". Installation package now smaller: removed dependency on older Windows DLL files which previously needed to \\ � Forms now properly scale based on DPI instead of font for users who change their screen resolution to something other than 100%. This is a more common feature in Windows 7

  2. Health Physics Code System for Evaluating Accidents Involving Radioactive Materials.

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-01

    Version 03 The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculational tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes provide a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. The developer's website is: http://www.llnl.gov/nhi/hotspot/. Four general programs, PLUME, EXPLOSION, FIRE, and RESUSPENSION, calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Additional programs deal specifically with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. The FIDLER program can calibrate radiation survey instruments for ground survey measurements and initial screening of personnel for possible plutonium uptake in the lung. The HOTSPOT codes are fast, portable, easy to use, and fully documented in electronic help files. HOTSPOT supports color high resolution monitors and printers for concentration plots and contours. The codes have been extensively used by the DOS community since 1985. Tables and graphical output can be directed to the computer screen, printer, or a disk file. The graphical output consists of dose and ground contamination as a function of plume centerline downwind distance, and radiation dose and ground contamination contours. Users have the option of displaying scenario text on the plots. HOTSPOT 3.0.1 fixes three significant Windows 7 issues: � Executable installed properly under "Program Files/HotSpot 3.0". Installation package now smaller: removed dependency on older Windows DLL files which previously needed to \\ � Forms now properly scale based on DPI instead of font for users who change their screen resolution to something other than 100%. This is a more common feature in Windows 7.

  3. Electron Microscopy of Biological Materials at the Nanometer Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourkoutis, Lena Fitting; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    Electron microscopy of biological matter uses three different imaging modalities: (a) electron crystallography, (b) single-particle analysis, and (c) electron tomography. Ideally, these imaging modalities are applied to frozen-hydrated samples to ensure an optimal preservation of the structures under scrutiny. Cryo-electron microscopy of biological matter has made important advances in the past decades. It has become a research tool that further expands the scope of structural research into unique areas of cell and molecular biology, and it could augment the materials research portfolio in the study of soft and hybrid materials. This review addresses how researchers using transmission electron microscopy can derive structural information at high spatial resolution from fully hydrated specimens, despite their sensitivity to ionizing radiation, despite the adverse conditions of high vacuum for samples that have to be kept in aqueous environments, and despite their low contrast resulting from weakly scattering building blocks.

  4. Occupational Orientation: Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations. Experimental Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These experimental curriculum materials, from one of five clusters developed for the occupational orientation program in Illinois, include a series of learning activity packages (LAPs) designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of occupational choices available in the applied biological and agricultural occupations. The 30 LAPs, each…

  5. Reversibly immobilized biological materials in monolayer films on electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, P.F.; Frank, A.J.

    1991-04-08

    A method is provided for reversibly binding charged biological particles in a fluid medium to an electrode surface. The method comprises treating (e.g., derivatizing) the electrode surface with an electrochemically active material; connecting the electrode to an electrical potential; and exposing the fluid medium to the electrode surface in a manner such that the charged particles become adsorbed on the electrode surface.

  6. Overview of light interaction with food and biological materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter presents the basic phenomena occurring during the interaction of light with biological and food materials, which form the foundation for different light scattering techniques that have been developed for property, quality and safety assessment of food and agricultural products. We first...

  7. Theory of light transfer in food and biological materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this chapter, we first define the basic radiometric quantities that are needed for describing light propagation in food and biological materials. Radiative transfer theory is then derived, according to the principle of the conservation of energy. Because the radiative transfer theory equation is ...

  8. Quantitation and detection of vanadium in biologic and pollution materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of special considerations and methodology for determining vanadium in biological and air pollution materials. In addition to descriptions of specific analysis procedures, general sections are included on quantitation of analysis procedures, sample preparation, blanks, and methods of detection of vanadium. Most of the information presented is applicable to the determination of other trace elements in addition to vanadium.

  9. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Paul F.; Maness, Pin-Ching

    1993-01-01

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer.

  10. Photoconversion of gasified organic materials into biologically-degradable plastics

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, P.F.; Pinching Maness.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for converting organic materials (such as biomass wastes) into a bioplastic suitable for use as a biodegradable plastic. In a preferred embodiment the process involves thermally gasifying the organic material into primarily carbon monoxide and hydrogen, followed by photosynthetic bacterial assimilation of the gases into cell material. The process is ideally suited for waste recycling and for production of useful biodegradable plastic polymer. 3 figures.

  11. On optimal hierarchy of load-bearing biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gao, Huajian

    2011-01-01

    Load-bearing biological materials such as shell, mineralized tendon and bone exhibit two to seven levels of structural hierarchy based on constituent materials (biominerals and proteins) of relatively poor mechanical properties. A key question that remains unanswered is what determines the number of hierarchical levels in these materials. Here we develop a quasi-self-similar hierarchical model to show that, depending on the mineral content, there exists an optimal level of structural hierarchy for maximal toughness of biocomposites. The predicted optimal levels of hierarchy and cooperative deformation across multiple structural levels are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. PMID:20810437

  12. Structure and mechanics of interfaces in biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelat, Francois; Yin, Zhen; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-04-01

    Hard biological materials — for example, seashells, bone or wood — fulfil critical structural functions and display unique and attractive combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness, owing to their intricate architectures, which are organized over several length scales. The size, shape and arrangement of the ‘building blocks’ of which these materials are made are essential for defining their properties and their exceptional performance, but there is growing evidence that their deformation and toughness are also largely governed by the interfaces that join these building blocks. These interfaces channel nonlinear deformations and deflect cracks into configurations in which propagation is more difficult. In this Review, we discuss comparatively the composition, structure and mechanics of a set of representative biological interfaces in nacre, bone and wood, and show that these interfaces possess unusual mechanical characteristics, which can encourage the development of advanced bioinspired composites. Finally, we highlight recent examples of synthetic materials inspired from the mechanics and architecture of natural interfaces.

  13. Aluminum analysis in biological reference material by nondestructive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Arendt, A.; Keck, B.; Glascock, M.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the determination of aluminum in biological materials has become the subject of many research projects. This interest stems from an increasing knowledge of the toxicity of aluminum to both aquatic and human life. Unfortunately, the detection of aluminum in biological materials has proven troublesome. The use of traditional chemical determinations has been shown to be very long and somewhat complicated. Several attempts have been made using neutron activation analysis, but an interfering reaction must be taken into account. In this experiment the rabbit irradiation facilities at the University of Missouri Research Reactor were used. The aluminum concentrations for eight certified reference materials are shown. When US National Bureau of Standards (NBS) value is given as certified or as an information value, results agree very well. The results for NBS 1572 citrus leaves agree, and NBS 1577 results agree very well with that of Glascock et al.

  14. Synthetic Self-Assembled Materials in Biological Environments.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Frank; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic self-assembly has long been recognized as an excellent approach for the formation of ordered structures on the nanoscale. Although the development of synthetic self-assembling materials has often been inspired by principles observed in nature (e.g., the assembly of lipids, DNA, proteins), until recently the self-assembly of synthetic molecules has mainly been investigated ex vivo. The past few years however, have witnessed the emergence of a research field in which synthetic, self-assembling systems are used that are capable of operating as bioactive materials in biological environments. Here, this up-and-coming field, which has the potential of becoming a key area in chemical biology and medicine, is reviewed. Two main categories of applications of self-assembly in biological environments are identified and discussed, namely therapeutic and imaging agents. Within these categories key concepts, such as triggers and molecular constraints for in vitro/in vivo self-assembly and the mode of interaction between the assemblies and the biological materials will be discussed. PMID:27042774

  15. Fluid–structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration. PMID:24415796

  16. Fluid-structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration. PMID:24415796

  17. Biologically-Derived Photonic Materials for Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Squire, Thomas H.; Lawson, John W.; Gusman, Michael; Lau, K.-H.; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Space vehicles entering a planetary atmosphere at high velocity can be subject to substantial radiative heating from the shock layer in addition to the convective heating caused by the flow of hot gas past the vehicle surface. The radiative component can be very high but of a short duration. Approaches to combat this effect include investigation of various materials to reflect the radiation. Photonic materials can be used to reflect radiation. The wavelengths reflected depend on the length scale of the ordered microstructure. Fabricating photonic structures, such as layers, can be time consuming and expensive. We have used a biologically-derived material as the template for forming a high temperature photonic material that could be incorporated into a heatshield thermal protection material.

  18. Systems analysis of gene ontology and biological pathways involved in post-myocardial infarction responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Pathway analysis has been widely used to gain insight into essential mechanisms of the response to myocardial infarction (MI). Currently, there exist multiple pathway databases that organize molecular datasets and manually curate pathway maps for biological interpretation at varying forms of organization. However, inconsistencies among different databases in pathway descriptions, frequently due to conflicting results in the literature, can generate incorrect interpretations. Furthermore, although pathway analysis software provides detailed images of interactions among molecules, it does not exhibit how pathways interact with one another or with other biological processes under specific conditions. Methods We propose a novel method to standardize descriptions of enriched pathways for a set of genes/proteins using Gene Ontology terms. We used this method to examine the relationships among pathways and biological processes for a set of condition-specific genes/proteins, represented as a functional biological pathway-process network. We applied this algorithm to a set of 613 MI-specific proteins we previously identified. Results A total of 96 pathways from Biocarta, KEGG, and Reactome, and 448 Gene Ontology Biological Processes were enriched with these 613 proteins. The pathways were represented as Boolean functions of biological processes, delivering an interactive scheme to organize enriched information with an emphasis on involvement of biological processes in pathways. We extracted a network focusing on MI to demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) protein, positive regulation of collagen metabolic process, coagulation, and positive/negative regulation of blood coagulation have immediate impacts on the MI response. Conclusions Our method organized biological processes and pathways in an unbiased approach to provide an intuitive way to identify biological properties of pathways under specific

  19. Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2011-01-25

    In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

  20. Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2012-09-25

    In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

  1. Accurate determination of cobalt traces in several biological reference materials.

    PubMed

    Dybczyński, R; Danko, B

    1994-01-01

    A newly devised, very accurate ("definitive") method for the determination of trace amounts of cobalt in biological materials was validated by the analysis of several certified reference materials. The method is based on a combination of neutron activation and selective and quantitative postirradiation isolation of radiocobalt from practically all other radionuclides by ion-exchange and extraction chromatography followed by gamma-ray spectrometric measurement. The significance of criteria that should be fulfilled in order to accept a given result as obtained by the "definitive method" is emphasized. In view of the demonstrated very good accuracy of the method, it is suggested that our values for cobalt content in those reference materials in which it was originally not certified (SRM 1570 spinach, SRM 1571 orchard leaves, SRM 1577 bovine liver, and Czechoslovak bovine liver 12-02-01) might be used as provisional certified values. PMID:7710879

  2. Microdosimetry of fast neutrons in selected biological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Microdosimetric quantities for selected neutron beams have been determined in muscle, brain, bone, and fat tissue equivalent materials. The quantities of interest were the dose distribution in lineal energy, frequency average lineal energy, dose average lineal energy, and dose average quality factor. A dose response factor was defined to combine the lineal energy dose spectrum with a response function per unit KERMA for an acute biological endpoint in prototype cells in vitro. The dependence of each quantity on material composition and neutron energy was investigated by theoretical calculation and separated into primary and scatter neutron fluence components. Neutron fluences in phantoms were calculated using a standard Monte Carlo code (MCNP). The charged particle fluences and lineal energy dose spectra were obtained using the continuous slowing-down approximation. Calculated microdosimetric spectra agreed with those measured in muscle-equivalent materials. The microdosimetry of primary and scattered neutrons in a large tissue phantom was calculated for three representative uncollimated neutron sources.

  3. Classification of organic and biological materials with deep ultraviolet excitation.

    PubMed

    Bhartia, Rohit; Hug, Willam F; Salas, Everett C; Reid, Ray D; Sijapati, Kripa K; Tsapin, Alexandre; Abbey, William; Nealson, Kenneth H; Lane, Arthur L; Conrad, Pamela G

    2008-10-01

    We show that native fluorescence can be used to differentiate classes or groups of organic molecules and biological materials when excitation occurs at specific excitation wavelengths in the deep ultraviolet (UV) region. Native fluorescence excitation-emission maps (EEMs) of pure organic materials, microbiological samples, and environmental background materials were compared using excitation wavelengths between 200-400 nm with emission wavelengths from 270 to 500 nm. These samples included polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing organic heterocycles, bacterial spores, and bacterial vegetative whole cells (both Gram positive and Gram negative). Each sample was categorized into ten distinct groups based on fluorescence properties. Emission spectra at each of 40 excitation wavelengths were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). Optimum excitation wavelengths for differentiating groups were determined using two metrics. We show that deep UV excitation at 235 (+/-2) nm optimally separates all organic and biological groups within our dataset with >90% confidence. For the specific case of separation of bacterial spores from all other samples in the database, excitation at wavelengths less than 250 nm provides maximum separation with >6sigma confidence. PMID:18926014

  4. DNASU plasmid and PSI:Biology-Materials repositories: resources to accelerate biological research

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Catherine Y.; Park, Jin G.; Sharma, Amit; Hunter, Preston; Surapaneni, Padmini; Sedillo, Casey; Field, James; Algar, Rhys; Price, Andrea; Steel, Jason; Throop, Andrea; Fiacco, Michael; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the DNASU Plasmid Repository is to accelerate research by providing high-quality, annotated plasmid samples and online plasmid resources to the research community through the curated DNASU database, website and repository (http://dnasu.asu.edu or http://dnasu.org). The collection includes plasmids from grant-funded, high-throughput cloning projects performed in our laboratory, plasmids from external researchers, and large collections from consortia such as the ORFeome Collaboration and the NIGMS-funded Protein Structure Initiative: Biology (PSI:Biology). Through DNASU, researchers can search for and access detailed information about each plasmid such as the full length gene insert sequence, vector information, associated publications, and links to external resources that provide additional protein annotations and experimental protocols. Plasmids can be requested directly through the DNASU website. DNASU and the PSI:Biology-Materials Repositories were previously described in the 2010 NAR Database Issue (Cormier, C.Y., Mohr, S.E., Zuo, D., Hu, Y., Rolfs, A., Kramer, J., Taycher, E., Kelley, F., Fiacco, M., Turnbull, G. et al. (2010) Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository: an open shared public resource of structural genomics plasmids for the biological community. Nucleic Acids Res., 38, D743–D749.). In this update we will describe the plasmid collection and highlight the new features in the website redesign, including new browse/search options, plasmid annotations and a dynamic vector mapping feature that was developed in collaboration with LabGenius. Overall, these plasmid resources continue to enable research with the goal of elucidating the role of proteins in both normal biological processes and disease. PMID:24225319

  5. A comparison of form processing involved in the perception of biological and nonbiological movements.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Steven M; Lu, Hongjing

    2016-01-01

    Although there is evidence for specialization in the human brain for processing biological motion per se, few studies have directly examined the specialization of form processing in biological motion perception. The current study was designed to systematically compare form processing in perception of biological (human walkers) to nonbiological (rotating squares) stimuli. Dynamic form-based stimuli were constructed with conflicting form cues (position and orientation), such that the objects were perceived to be moving ambiguously in two directions at once. In Experiment 1, we used the classification image technique to examine how local form cues are integrated across space and time in a bottom-up manner. By comparing with a Bayesian observer model that embodies generic principles of form analysis (e.g., template matching) and integrates form information according to cue reliability, we found that human observers employ domain-general processes to recognize both human actions and nonbiological object movements. Experiments 2 and 3 found differential top-down effects of spatial context on perception of biological and nonbiological forms. When a background does not involve social information, observers are biased to perceive foreground object movements in the direction opposite to surrounding motion. However, when a background involves social cues, such as a crowd of similar objects, perception is biased toward the same direction as the crowd for biological walking stimuli, but not for rotating nonbiological stimuli. The model provided an accurate account of top-down modulations by adjusting the prior probabilities associated with the internal templates, demonstrating the power and flexibility of the Bayesian approach for visual form perception. PMID:26746875

  6. Inverse Algorithm Optimization for Determining Optical Properties of Biological Materials from Spatially-Resolved Diffuse Reflectance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical characterization of biological materials is useful in many scientific and industrial applications like biomedical diagnosis and nondestructive quality evaluation of food and agricultural products. However, accurate determination of the optical properties from intact biological materials base...

  7. Analytical chemistry at the interface between materials science and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Janese Christine

    This work describes several research efforts that lie at the new interfaces between analytical chemistry and other disciplines, namely materials science and biology. In the materials science realm, the search for new materials that may have useful or unique chromatographic properties motivated the synthesis and characterization of electrically conductive sol-gels. In the biology realm, the search for new surface fabrication schemes that would permit or even improve the detection of specific biological reactions motivated the design of miniaturized biological arrays. Collectively, this work represents some of analytical chemistry's newest forays into these disciplines. This dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 is an introductory chapter that provides background information pertinent to several key aspects of the work contained in this dissertation. Chapter 2 describes the synthesis and characterization of electrically conductive sol-gels derived from the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a vanadium alkoxide. Specifically, this chapter describes our attempts to increase the conductivity of vanadium sol-gels by optimizing the acidic and drying conditions used during synthesis. Chapter 3 reports the construction of novel antigenic immunosensing platforms of increased epitope density using Fab'-SH antibody fragments on gold. Here, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thin-layer cell (TLC) and confocal fluorescence spectroscopies, and scanning force microscopy (SFM) are employed to characterize the fragment-substrate interaction, to quantify epitope density, and to demonstrate fragment viability and specificity. Chapter 4 presents a novel method for creating and interrogating double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) microarrays suitable for screening protein:dsDNA interactions. Using the restriction enzyme ECoR1, we demonstrate the ability of the atomic force microscope (AFM) to detect changes in topography that result from the enzymatic cleavage of dsDNA microarrays

  8. Structural instabilities involving time dependent materials : theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minahen, Timothy M.

    The creep buckling of viscoelastic structures is studied analytically and experimentally to investigate structural stability in the presence of time dependent materials. The theory of linear viscoelasticity is used to model polymeric column specimens subjected to constant compressive end loads. A strength of materials approach (Euler-Bernoulli beam theory) is employed to model the moment-curvature relation for the column. The growth of initial imperfections is calculated using the hereditary integral formulation. Solution techniques are developed for small displacements and then generalized to include the effects of large displacements and rotations. A failure criterion based on maximum deformation allows the column life to be estimated directly from the material relaxation modulus. A discussion generalizing the results to include plates and shells is presented.Rectangular cross-section polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) specimens with hinged boundary conditions are used to study viscoelastic buckling experimentally. Constant compressive end loads are applied using a servo-controlled load frame while the specimens are kept in a temperature cabinet at elevated temperatures (accelerating the creep behavior). Specimen shortening and out-of-plane deflections are monitored during the tests. The relaxation modulus of PMMA is approximated by a Prony-Dirichlet series and the model is used to simulate the laboratory experiments. Model and experimental results show good agreement during the "glassy" and slow growth phases of the column response. As the growth rate increases some deviations between theory and experiment are seen. It is shown that the deviations are not a result of geometric nonlinearities, but may, in part, be explained by material nonlinearities not accounted for in the model.

  9. Biology Teacher and Expert Opinions about Computer Assisted Biology Instruction Materials: A Software Entitled Nucleic Acids and Protein Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasenekoglu, Ismet; Timucin, Melih

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to collect and evaluate opinions of CAI experts and biology teachers about a high school level Computer Assisted Biology Instruction Material presenting computer-made modelling and simulations. It is a case study. A material covering "Nucleic Acids and Protein Synthesis" topic was developed as the "case". The goal of the…

  10. Investigating accidents involving aircraft manufactured from polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Leigh

    This study looks into the examination of polymer composite wreckage from the perspective of the aircraft accident investigator. It develops an understanding of the process of wreckage examination as well as identifying the potential for visual and macroscopic interpretation of polymer composite aircraft wreckage. The in-field examination of aircraft wreckage, and subsequent interpretations of material failures, can be a significant part of an aircraft accident investigation. As the use of composite materials in aircraft construction increases, the understanding of how macroscopic failure characteristics of composite materials may aid the field investigator is becoming of increasing importance.. The first phase of this research project was to explore how investigation practitioners conduct wreckage examinations. Four accident investigation case studies were examined. The analysis of the case studies provided a framework of the wreckage examination process. Subsequently, a literature survey was conducted to establish the current level of knowledge on the visual and macroscopic interpretation of polymer composite failures. Relevant literature was identified and a compendium of visual and macroscopic characteristics was created. Two full-scale polymer composite wing structures were loaded statically, in an upward bending direction, until each wing structure fractured and separated. The wing structures were subsequently examined for the existence of failure characteristics. The examination revealed that whilst characteristics were present, the fragmentation of the structure destroyed valuable evidence. A hypothetical accident scenario utilising the fractured wing structures was developed, which UK government accident investigators subsequently investigated. This provided refinement to the investigative framework and suggested further guidance on the interpretation of polymer composite failures by accident investigators..

  11. Agricultural biological reference materials for analytical quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Ihnat, M.

    1986-01-01

    Cooperative work is under way at Agriculture Canada, US Department of Agriculture, and US National Bureau of Standards in an attempt to fill some of the gaps in the world repertoire of reference materials and to provide much needed control materials for laboratories' day to day operations. This undertaking involves the preparation and characterization of a number of agricultural and food materials for data quality control for inorganic constituents. Parameters considered in the development of these materials were material selection based on importance in commerce and analysis; techniques of preparation, processing, and packaging; physical and chemical characterization; homogeneity testing and quantitation (certification). A large number of agricultural/food products have been selected to represent a wide range of not only levels of sought-for constituents (elements) but also a wide range of matrix components such as protein, carbohydrate, dietary fiber, fat, and ash. Elements whose concentrations are being certified cover some two dozen major, minor, and trace elements of nutritional, toxicological, and environmental significance.

  12. Comparison of different sample and target preparation procedures for PIXE analysis of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, W.; De Reu, L.; Vandenhaute, J.

    1984-04-01

    Four different methods for preparing PIXE targets from biological samples were compared. All methods involved doping with an internal standard and preparing target deposits of 1-4 mg/cm 2 on a thin substrate. In method A targets were prepared using powdered freeze-dried material. Methods B and C both included a low temperature ashing preconcentration step and method D involved an acid digestion in a teflon bomb. The procedures were applied to reference materials (e.g. NBS standards) and to "real" samples such as human kidneys and a liver, which had been analyzed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). For most elements good agreement was observed between the results of the four target preparation methods and the reference values or the NAA results. Exceptions, however, were Br, Se and Cd, which were lost in some methods. The detection limits in the different methods are compared.

  13. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in diverse biological processes in Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Li, Delong; Lv, Binna; Tan, Lingling; Yang, Qianqian; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and highly conserved post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects of cell metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Phytophthora sojae is one of the most important plant pathogens due to its huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this Phytopthora. Here, we conducted a lysine acetylome in P. sojae. Overall, 2197 lysine acetylation sites in 1150 proteins were identified. The modified proteins are involved in diverse biological processes and are localized to multiple cellular compartments. Importantly, 7 proteins involved in the pathogenicity or the secretion pathway of P. sojae were found to be acetylated. These data provide the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of P. sojae and serve as an important resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in plant pathogens. PMID:27412925

  14. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in diverse biological processes in Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Delong; Lv, Binna; Tan, Lingling; Yang, Qianqian; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and highly conserved post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects of cell metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Phytophthora sojae is one of the most important plant pathogens due to its huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this Phytopthora. Here, we conducted a lysine acetylome in P. sojae. Overall, 2197 lysine acetylation sites in 1150 proteins were identified. The modified proteins are involved in diverse biological processes and are localized to multiple cellular compartments. Importantly, 7 proteins involved in the pathogenicity or the secretion pathway of P. sojae were found to be acetylated. These data provide the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of P. sojae and serve as an important resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in plant pathogens. PMID:27412925

  15. The High-Strain Rate Loading of Structural Biological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proud, W. G.; Nguyen, T.-T. N.; Bo, C.; Butler, B. J.; Boddy, R. L.; Williams, A.; Masouros, S.; Brown, K. A.

    2015-10-01

    The human body can be subjected to violent acceleration as a result of explosion caused by military ordinance or accident. Blast waves cause injury and blunt trauma can be produced by violent impact of objects against the human body. The long-term clinical manifestations of blast injury can be significantly different in nature and extent to those suffering less aggressive insult. Similarly, the damage seen in lower limbs from those injured in explosion incidents is in general more severe than those falling from height. These phenomena increase the need for knowledge of the short- and long-term effect of transient mechanical loading to the biological structures of the human body. This paper gives an overview of some of the results of collaborative investigation into blast injury. The requirement for time-resolved data, appropriate mechanical modeling, materials characterization and biological effects is presented. The use of a range of loading platforms, universal testing machines, drop weights, Hopkinson bars, and bespoke traumatic injury simulators are given.

  16. [Analysis of etofenamate. Particular determination in biological material (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dell, H D; Fiedler, J; Wäsche, B

    1977-01-01

    The determination of 2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-ethyl-N-(a,a,a-trifluoro-m-tolyl)-anthranilate (etofenamate, active principle of Rheumon gel) following its isolation from biological material is reported. Depending on the method of extraction etofenamate, free and alkali-labile conjugated flufenamic acid, total conjugates or the sum of CF3-containing compounds (sum of metabolites) are isolated. Separation is achieved by TLC, quantitative determination is made by degradation to flufenamic acid and fluorimetric measurement in CCl4/trichloracetic acid at 372/445 nm. Etofenamate can be identified by TLC, derivatisation, UV- and fluorescence spectroscopy and differentiated from its metabolites. It is demonstrated that etofenamate is the main component of fenamates in inflamed tissue. PMID:579119

  17. Clinical treatment adherence of health care workers and students exposed to potentially infectious biological material.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria Cristina Mendes de; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; Reis, Renata Karina; Toffano, Silmara Elaine Malaguti; Pereira, Fernanda Maria Vieira; Gir, Elucir

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess adherence to clinical appointments by health care workers (HCW) and students who suffered accidents with potentially infectious biological material. METHOD A retrospective cross-sectional study that assessed clinical records of accidents involving biological material between 2005 and 2010 in a specialized unit. RESULTS A total of 461 individuals exposed to biological material were treated, of which 389 (84.4%) were HCWs and 72 (15.6%) students. Of the 461 exposed individuals, 307 (66.6%) attended a follow-up appointment. Individuals who had suffered an accident with a known source patient were 29 times more likely to show up to their scheduled follow-up appointments (OR: 29.98; CI95%: 16.09-55.83). CONCLUSION The predictor in both univariate and multivariate analyses for adherence to clinical follow-up appointment was having a known source patient with nonreactive serology for the human immunodeficiency virus and/or hepatitis B and C. PMID:25992825

  18. Some Recent Advances of Ultrasonic Diagnostic Methods Applied to Materials and Structures (Including Biological Ones)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Lucio; Nobile, Stefano

    This paper gives an overview of some recent advances of ultrasonic methods applied to materials and structures (including biological ones), exploring typical applications of these emerging inspection technologies to civil engineering and medicine. In confirmation of this trend, some results of an experimental research carried out involving both destructive and non-destructive testing methods for the evaluation of structural performance of existing reinforced concrete (RC) structures are discussed in terms of reliability. As a result, Ultrasonic testing can usefully supplement coring thus permitting less expensive and more representative evaluation of the concrete strength throughout the whole structure under examination.

  19. Imaging of nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism: biological materials, nonbiological materials, and foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Restrepo, Carlos Santiago; Abbas, Jasmin; Villanueva, Alberto; Lorenzo Dus, María José; Schöpf, Reinhard; Imanaka, Hideaki; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Tsang, Flora Hau Fung; Saad, Fathinul Fikri Ahmad; Lau, Eddie; Rubio Alvarez, Jose; Battal, Bilal; Behrmann, Curd; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Surov, Alexey

    2013-03-01

    Nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism is defined as embolization to the pulmonary circulation caused by a wide range of substances of endogenous and exogenous biological and nonbiological origin and foreign bodies. It is an underestimated cause of acute and chronic embolism. Symptoms cover the entire spectrum from asymptomatic patients to sudden death. In addition to obstruction of the pulmonary vasculature there may be an inflammatory cascade that deteriorates vascular, pulmonary and cardiac function. In most cases the patient history and radiological imaging reveals the true nature of the patient's condition. The purpose of this article is to give the reader a survey on pathophysiology, typical clinical and radiological findings in different forms of nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism. The spectrum of forms presented here includes pulmonary embolism with biological materials (amniotic fluid, trophoblast material, endogenous tissue like bone and brain, fat, Echinococcus granulosus, septic emboli and tumor cells); nonbiological materials (cement, gas, iodinated oil, glue, metallic mercury, radiotracer, silicone, talc, cotton, and hyaluronic acid); and foreign bodies (lost intravascular objects, bullets, catheter fragments, intraoperative material, radioactive seeds, and ventriculoperitoneal shunts). PMID:23102488

  20. Biological effects of menadione photochemistry: effects of menadione on biological systems may not involve classical oxidant production.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, M L; Denning, G M; Reszka, K J; Bilski, P; Buettner, G R; Rasmussen, G T; Railsback, M A; Britigan, B E

    2000-01-01

    Because cell-mediated reduction of menadione leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), this quinone is widely used to investigate the effects of ROS on cellular functions. We report that A549 human lung epithelial cells exposed to menadione demonstrate a dose-dependent increase in both intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and ROS formation. The concentrations of menadione required to initiate these two events are markedly different, with ROS detection requiring higher levels of menadione. Modulators of antioxidant defences (e.g. buthionine sulphoximine, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole) have little effect on the [Ca(2+)](i) response to menadione, suggesting that ROS formation does not account for menadione-dependent alterations in [Ca(2+)](i). Additional evidence suggests that menadione photochemistry may be responsible for the observed [Ca(2+)](i) effects. Specifically: (a) EPR studies with the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) show that light exposure (maximum effect at 340 nm) stimulates menadione-dependent formation of the DMPO/(.)OH spin adduct that was not sensitive to antioxidant interventions; (b) DMPO inhibits menadione and light-dependent increases in [Ca(2+)](i); and (c) light (maximum effect at 340 nm) augments the deleterious effects of menadione on cell viability as determined by (51)Cr release. These photo effects do not appear to involve formation of singlet oxygen by menadione, but rather are the result of the oxidizing chemistry initiated by menadione in the triplet state. This work demonstrates that menadione species generated by photo-irradiation can exert biological effects on cellular functions and points to the potential importance of photochemistry in studies of menadione-mediated cell damage. PMID:10970795

  1. Biological effects of menadione photochemistry: effects of menadione on biological systems may not involve classical oxidant production.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M L; Denning, G M; Reszka, K J; Bilski, P; Buettner, G R; Rasmussen, G T; Railsback, M A; Britigan, B E

    2000-09-15

    Because cell-mediated reduction of menadione leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), this quinone is widely used to investigate the effects of ROS on cellular functions. We report that A549 human lung epithelial cells exposed to menadione demonstrate a dose-dependent increase in both intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and ROS formation. The concentrations of menadione required to initiate these two events are markedly different, with ROS detection requiring higher levels of menadione. Modulators of antioxidant defences (e.g. buthionine sulphoximine, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole) have little effect on the [Ca(2+)](i) response to menadione, suggesting that ROS formation does not account for menadione-dependent alterations in [Ca(2+)](i). Additional evidence suggests that menadione photochemistry may be responsible for the observed [Ca(2+)](i) effects. Specifically: (a) EPR studies with the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) show that light exposure (maximum effect at 340 nm) stimulates menadione-dependent formation of the DMPO/(.)OH spin adduct that was not sensitive to antioxidant interventions; (b) DMPO inhibits menadione and light-dependent increases in [Ca(2+)](i); and (c) light (maximum effect at 340 nm) augments the deleterious effects of menadione on cell viability as determined by (51)Cr release. These photo effects do not appear to involve formation of singlet oxygen by menadione, but rather are the result of the oxidizing chemistry initiated by menadione in the triplet state. This work demonstrates that menadione species generated by photo-irradiation can exert biological effects on cellular functions and points to the potential importance of photochemistry in studies of menadione-mediated cell damage. PMID:10970795

  2. Microchip electrophoresis for the analysis of biological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, S.C.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Development of instrumentation for biological and chemical analyses is geared toward extracting more information in a shorter time period at a lower cost. One avenue to achieve these ends is the miniaturization of instrumentation using microfabrication techniques. The primary advantage of such miniaturized devices is the integration of multiple functions required for a complete analysis into a single monolithic unit. Also, by using microfabrication techniques, planar devices with compact geometries enable design of parallel architectures which would handle multiple samples and necessary redundancies. Microfabricated devices that have been demonstrated primarily involve electrically driven separation techniques including capillary electrophoresis, open channel electrochromatography, and capillary gel electrophoresis. Devices that integrate chemical reactions with analysis include capillary electrophoresis with pre- and postseparation derivatization, and restriction digestions of plasmid DNA followed by size analysis of the fragments. The most notable feature of these miniaturized chemical separation devices is the speed with which analyses are performed. These devices have precise fluid control of picoliter volumes simply by proper selection of applied potentials and without the use of mechanical valves. Further motivations for miniaturization and integration of chemical analysis procedures include low void volume connections, reduction of sample and reagent volumes, and rapid diffusional mixing of reagents.

  3. Alaska Native people's perceptions, understandings, and expectations for research involving biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y.; Brown, Jennifer K.; Hoeft, Theresa J.; Dillard, Denise A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Members of racially and ethnically diverse groups have been persistently underrepresented in biomedical research in general, possibly due to mistrust with the medical and research community. This article describes the perceptions, understandings, and expectations of Alaska Native people about research involving the collection and storage of biological specimens. Study design Stratified focus groups. Methods Twenty-nine focus groups with Alaska Native people (n = 178) were held in 14 locations using a semi-structured moderator guide. ATLAS.ti was used for thematic analysis through iterative readings and coding. Alaska Native peoples’ perceptions, understandings, and expectations of researcher beneficence, informed consent processes, and provision of research findings were elicited. Results and conclusions Alaska Native people desired extensive disclosure of information beyond that typically provided in consent and results dissemination processes. Information germane to the motivation and intent of researchers and specifics of specimen storage and destruction were specifically requested. A clear and extensive process of informed consent and continued improvements in sharing results may enhance the transparency of research intent, conduct, and use of obtained results among Alaska Native people. Meeting expectations may improve relationships between researchers and the Alaska Native population which could result in increased research participation. Our findings offer a guide for researchers and communities when planning and implementing research with biological specimens. PMID:22663942

  4. Redox chemistry of molybdenum in natural waters and its involvement in biological evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deli

    2012-01-01

    The transition element molybdenum (Mo) possesses diverse valances (+II to +VI), and is involved in forming cofactors in more than 60 enzymes in biology. Redox switching of the element in these enzymes catalyzes a series of metabolic reactions in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and the element therefore plays a fundamental role in the global carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycling. In the present oxygenated waters, oxidized Mo(VI) predominates thermodynamically, whilst reduced Mo species are mainly confined within specific niches including cytoplasm. Only recently has the reduced Mo(V) been separated from Mo(VI) in sulfidic mats and even in some reducing waters. Given the presence of reduced Mo(V) in contemporary anaerobic habitats, it seems that reduced Mo species were present in the ancient reducing ocean (probably under both ferruginous and sulfidic conditions), prompting the involvement of Mo in enzymes including nitrogenase and nitrate reductase. During the global transition to oxic conditions, reduced Mo species were constrained to specific anaerobic habitats, and efficient uptake systems of oxidized Mo(VI) became a selective advantage for current prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Some prokaryotes are still able to directly utilize reduced Mo if any exists in ambient environments. In total, this mini-review describes the redox chemistry and biogeochemistry of Mo over the Earth’s history. PMID:23267355

  5. Giant and universal magnetoelectric coupling in soft materials and concomitant ramifications for materials science and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2013-10-01

    Magnetoelectric coupling—the ability of a material to magnetize upon application of an electric field and, conversely, to polarize under the action of a magnetic field—is rare and restricted to a rather small set of exotic hard crystalline materials. Intense research activity has recently ensued on materials development, fundamental scientific issues, and applications related to this phenomenon. This tantalizing property, if present in adequate strength at room temperature, can be used to pave the way for next-generation memory devices such as miniature magnetic random access memories and multiple state memory bits, sensors, energy harvesting, spintronics, among others. In this Rapid Communication, we prove the existence of an overlooked strain mediated nonlinear mechanism that can be used to universally induce the giant magnetoelectric effect in all (sufficiently) soft dielectric materials. For soft polymer foams—which, for instance, may be used in stretchable electronics—we predict room-temperature magnetoelectric coefficients that are comparable to the best known (hard) composite materials created. We also argue, based on a simple quantitative model, that magnetoreception in some biological contexts (e.g., birds) most likely utilizes this very mechanism.

  6. Giant and universal magnetoelectric coupling in soft materials and concomitant ramifications for materials science and biology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2013-10-01

    Magnetoelectric coupling-the ability of a material to magnetize upon application of an electric field and, conversely, to polarize under the action of a magnetic field-is rare and restricted to a rather small set of exotic hard crystalline materials. Intense research activity has recently ensued on materials development, fundamental scientific issues, and applications related to this phenomenon. This tantalizing property, if present in adequate strength at room temperature, can be used to pave the way for next-generation memory devices such as miniature magnetic random access memories and multiple state memory bits, sensors, energy harvesting, spintronics, among others. In this Rapid Communication, we prove the existence of an overlooked strain mediated nonlinear mechanism that can be used to universally induce the giant magnetoelectric effect in all (sufficiently) soft dielectric materials. For soft polymer foams-which, for instance, may be used in stretchable electronics-we predict room-temperature magnetoelectric coefficients that are comparable to the best known (hard) composite materials created. We also argue, based on a simple quantitative model, that magnetoreception in some biological contexts (e.g., birds) most likely utilizes this very mechanism. PMID:24229099

  7. Thermoelectric needle probe for temperature measurements in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Korn, U; Rav-Noy, Z; Shtrikman, S; Zafrir, M

    1980-04-01

    In certain biological and medical applications it is important to measure and follow temperature changes inside a body or tissue. Any probe inserted into a tissue causes damage to tissue and distortion to the initial temperature distribution. To minimize this interference, a fine probe is needed. Thus, thin film technology is advantageous and was utilized by us to produce sensitive probes for these applications. The resulting probe is a small thermocouple at the tip of a thin needle (acupuncture stainless steel needle, approximately 0.26 mm in diameter and length in the range 5-10 cm was used). The junction was produced at the needle's tip by coating the needle with thin layers of insulating and thermoelectric materials. The first layer is an insulating one and is composed of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and polymide produced by plasma polymerization and dip-coating respectively. This layer covers all the needle except the tip. The second layer is a vacuum deposited thermoelectric thin layer of Bi-5% Sb alloy coating also the tip. The third layer is for insulation and protection and is composed of PAN and polyimide. In this arrangement the junction is at the needle's tip, the needle is one conductor, the thermoelectric layer is the other and they are isolated by the plastic layer. The probe is handy and mechanically sturdy. The sensitivity is typically 77 microV/degrees C at room temperature and is constant to within 2% up to 90 degrees C. The response is fast (less than 1 sec) the noise is small, (less than 0.05 degrees C) and because of the small dimension, damage to tissue and disturbance to the measured temperature field are minimal. PMID:7382928

  8. Organization and diffusion in biological and material fabrication problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangan, Niall Mari

    This thesis is composed of two problems. The first is a systems level analysis of the carbon concentrating mechanism in cyanobacteria. The second presents a theoretical analysis of femtosecond laser melting for the purpose of hyperdoping silicon with sulfur. While these systems are very distant, they are both relevant to the development of alternative energy (production of biofuels and methods for fabricating photovoltaics respectively). Both problems are approached through analysis of the underlying diffusion equations. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic bacteria with a unique carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM) which enhances carbon fixation. A greater understanding of this mechanism would offer new insights into the basic biology and methods for bioengineering more efficient biochemical reactions. The molecular components of the CCM have been well characterized in the last decade, with genetic analysis uncovering both variation and commonalities in CCMs across cyanobacteria strains. Analysis of CCMs on a systems level, however, is based on models formulated prior to the molecular characterization. We present an updated model of the cyanobacteria CCM, and analytic solutions in terms of the various molecular components. The solutions allow us to find the parameter regime (expression levels, catalytic rates, permeability of carboxysome shell) where carbon fixation is maximized and oxygenation is minimized. Saturation of RuBisCO, maximization of the ratio of CO2 to O2, and staying below or at the saturation level for carbonic anhydrase are all needed for maximum efficacy. These constraints limit the parameter regime where the most effective carbon fixation can occur. There is an optimal non-specific carboxysome shell permeability, where trapping of CO2 is maximized, but HCO3 - is not detrimentally restricted. The shell also shields carbonic anhydrase activity and CO2 → HCO3- conversion at the thylakoid and cell membrane from one another. Co-localization of carbonic

  9. Digital Learning Material for Model Building in Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Janssen, Fred; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton

    2005-01-01

    Building models to describe processes forms an essential part of molecular biology research. However, in molecular biology curricula little attention is generally being paid to the development of this skill. In order to provide students the opportunity to improve their model building skills, we decided to develop a number of digital cases about…

  10. Distinguishability of Biological Material Using Ultraviolet Multi-Spectral Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.C.; Heinen, R.J.; Rigdon, L.D.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Shokair, I.R.; Siragusa, G.R.; Tisone, G.C.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-14

    Recent interest in the detection and analysis of biological samples by spectroscopic methods has led to questions concerning the degree of distinguishability and biological variability of the ultraviolet (W) fluorescent spectra from such complex samples. We show that the degree of distinguishability of such spectra is readily determined numerically.

  11. Evolutionary Design in Biological Physics and Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Park, J.-M.; Deem, M. W.

    In this chapter we provide a thorough discussion of the theoretical description of the multi-site approach to cancer vaccination. The discussion is somewhat demanding from a biological point of view. References to primary biological publications are given. A general reference on immunology is [1].

  12. Mechanics of dynamic needle insertion into a biological material.

    PubMed

    Mahvash, Mohsen; Dupont, Pierre E

    2010-04-01

    During needle-based procedures, transitions between tissue layers often lead to rupture events that involve large forces and tissue deformations and produce uncontrollable crack extensions. In this paper, the mechanics of these rupture events is described, and the effect of insertion velocity on needle force, tissue deformation, and needle work is analyzed. Using the J integral method from fracture mechanics, rupture events are modeled as sudden crack extensions that occur when the release rate J of strain energy concentrated at the tip of the crack exceeds the fracture toughness of the material. It is shown that increasing the velocity of needle insertion will reduce the force of the rupture event when it increases the energy release rate. A nonlinear viscoelastic Kelvin model is then used to predict the relationship between the deformation of tissue and the rupture force at different velocities. The model predicts that rupture deformation and work asymptotically approach minimum values as needle velocity increases. Consequently, most of the benefit of using a higher needle velocity can be achieved using a finite velocity that is inversely proportional to the relaxation time of the tissue. Experiments confirm the analytical predictions with multilayered porcine cardiac tissue. PMID:19932986

  13. An Experimental Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Special Materials Approach to Teaching Biology to the Slow Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welford, John Mack

    Students (comparable in intelligence and ability) in slow-learning classes using either "Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) Special Materials" or some other slow-learner biology materials, were compared on the basis of scores on the "Nelson Biology Test", the "Biological Sciences; Patterns and Processes Final Examination", and two short…

  14. Ultrafast Spectroscopy in Conjugated Organic and Biological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ming

    The dynamics of two kinds of conjugated materials, the visual pigment rhodopsin and the organic polymer poly(p -phenylene vinylene), have been studied utilizing femtosecond spectroscopy. The 11-cis to all-trans torsional isomerization of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin for both protonated and deuterated aqueous environments have been studied by time-resolved absorption measurements at room temperature. The kinetic results are well modeled by rate equations based on the scheme which involves the isomerization along the torsional coordinate of the 11-cis bond of the retinal chromophore. A metastable intermediate 90 degree twisted state is formed within 200 fs on the excited state surface by rotation around the C_{11} -C_{12} double bond, and it takes 3 ps to form the fully isomerized all -trans photoproduct known as bathorhodopsin and to repopulate the ground state rhodopsin. These results agree well with the semiempirical energy level and molecular dynamics calculations. The observed dynamics are insensitive to deuteration of the exchangeable protons which suggest that proton translocation is unimportant at physiological temperatures. The conjugated polymer, Poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) in a stretch oriented film, has been studied using polarized time-resolved absorption with subpicosecond resolution and transient luminescence measurements. Excitations are generated by photoexcitation near the band edge (500nm -540nm) with a 200 fs pulse and the resulting spectral changes are probed with a white light pulse. Lattice stabilized (singlet) self-trapped excitons are formed within 200 fs which are observed by measuring the stimulated gain in their emission band which decay at 10 ps. The agreement of the photoinduced exciton gain spectrum (<1ps), the transient luminescence spectrum (10 ps) and the steady state luminescence spectrum suggest that the singlet excitons are not further trapped after 200fs of their formation time. Excitation wavelength dependence

  15. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2003-05-06

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. A low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively.

  16. Trends in United States Biological Materials Oversight and Institutional Biosafety Committees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Biological materials oversight in life sciences research in the United States is a challenging endeavor for institutions and the scientific, regulatory compliance, and federal communities. In order to assess biological materials oversight at Institutional Biosafety Committees (IBCs) registered with the United States National Institutes of Health,…

  17. Patients’ Attitudes toward the Donation of Biological Materials for the Derivation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Ishan; Bollinger, Juli; Mathews, Debra J.H.; Neumann, Neil M.; Rattani, Abbas; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Although academics have raised ethical issues with iPSCs, patients’ perspectives on them and their attitudes toward donating biological materials for iPSC research are unclear. Here, we provide such information to aid in developing policies for consent, collection, and use of biological materials for deriving iPSCs based on patient focus groups. PMID:24388172

  18. Involvement of Nitric Oxide on Bothropoides insularis Venom Biological Effects on Murine Macrophages In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    de Menezes, Ramon R. P. P. B.; Mello, Clarissa P.; Lima, Dânya B.; Tessarolo, Louise D.; Sampaio, Tiago Lima; Paes, Lívia C. F.; Alves, Natacha T. Q.; Assis Junior, Eudmar M.; Lima Junior, Roberto C. P.; Toyama, Marcos H.; Martins, Alice M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Viperidae venom has several local and systemic effects, such as pain, edema, inflammation, kidney failure and coagulopathy. Additionally, bothropic venom and its isolated components directly interfere on cellular metabolism, causing alterations such as cell death and proliferation. Inflammatory cells are particularly involved in pathological envenomation mechanisms due to their capacity of releasing many mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). NO has many effects on cell viability and it is associated to the development of inflammation and tissue damage caused by Bothrops and Bothropoides venom. Bothropoides insularis is a snake found only in Queimada Grande Island, which has markedly toxic venom. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the biological effects of Bothropoides insularis venom (BiV) on RAW 264.7 cells and assess NO involvement. The venom was submitted to colorimetric assays to identify the presence of some enzymatic components. We observed that BiV induced H2O2 production and showed proteolytic and phospholipasic activities. RAW 264.7 murine macrophages were incubated with different concentrations of BiV and then cell viability was assessed by MTT reduction assay after 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours of incubation. A time- and concentration-dependent effect was observed, with a tendency to cell proliferation at lower BiV concentrations and cell death at higher concentrations. The cytotoxic effect was confirmed after lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) measurement in the supernatant from the experimental groups. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that necrosis is the main cell death pathway caused by BiV. Also, BiV induced NO release. The inhibition of both proliferative and cytotoxic effects with L-NAME were demonstrated, indicating that NO is important for these effects. Finally, BiV induced an increase in iNOS expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that B. insularis venom have proliferative and cytotoxic effects on macrophages, with necrosis participation

  19. Using near infrared measurement of water content as a cue for detecting biological materials.

    PubMed

    McGunnigle, Gerald

    2012-09-01

    This paper uses the spectral characteristics of water as a cue to detect biological materials in a scene. The spectra of a wide variety of materials were measured; most of the biological materials showed a spectral feature corresponding to the absorption peak of water at 962 nm. A machine vision system that used two narrowband near infrared light sources and a conventional CCD camera is described. The ability of the system to detect biological material is demonstrated in a series of examples. Water content is not an infallible indicator that a material is biological-wet inanimate surfaces will give a false positive, and some tissues are surrounded by highly scattering, impermeable layers that conceal internal water. Nonetheless, in this paper, we will show that many tissues do give a strong response to this feature and dry, nonbiological materials do not. PMID:22945156

  20. EFFECT OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL SPILLS ON BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of over 250 chemical substances on biological treatment processes are presented in a format which permits its use as an operations handbook. The information, arranged in a matrix form with the chemical substances presented in alphabetical order, includes descriptions ...

  1. A paradigm for the integration of biology in materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, Ryan K.

    2010-07-01

    The integration of biology in materials science and engineering can be complicated by the lack of a common framework and common language between otherwise disparate disciplines. History may offer a valuable lesson as modern materials science and engineering itself resulted from the integration of traditionally disparate disciplines that were delineated by classes of materials. The integration of metallurgy, ceramics, and polymers into materials science and engineering was facilitated, in large part, by a unifying paradigm based upon processing-structure-property relationships that is now well-accepted. Therefore, a common paradigm might also help unify the vast array of perspectives and challenges present in the interdisciplinary study of biomaterials, biological materials, and biomimetic materials. The traditional materials science and engineering paradigm was modified to account for the adaptive and hierarchical nature of biological materials. Various examples of application to research and education are considered.

  2. An outlook review: mechanochromic materials and their potential for biological and healthcare applications.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying

    2014-12-01

    Macroscopic mechanical perturbations have been observed to result in optical changes for certain compounds and composite materials. This phenomenon could originate from chemical and physical changes across various length scales, from the rearrangement of chemical bonds to alteration of molecular domains on the order of several hundred nanometers. This review classifies the mechanisms and surveys of how each class of mechanochromic materials has been, and can potentially be applied in biological and healthcare innovations. The study of cellular and molecular responses to mechanical forces in biological systems is an emerging field; there is potential in applying mechanochromic principles and material systems for probing biological systems. On the other hand, application of mechanochromic materials for medical and healthcare consumer products has been described in a wide variety of concepts and inventions. It is hopeful that further understanding of mechanochromism and material innovations would initiate concrete, impactful studies in biological systems soon. PMID:25491877

  3. Bioreceptivity evaluation of cementitious materials designed to stimulate biological growth.

    PubMed

    Manso, Sandra; De Muynck, Willem; Segura, Ignacio; Aguado, Antonio; Steppe, Kathy; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2014-05-15

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC), the most used binder in construction, presents some disadvantages in terms of pollution (CO2 emissions) and visual impact. For this reason, green roofs and façades have gain considerable attention in the last decade as a way to integrate nature in cities. These systems, however, suffer from high initial and maintenance costs. An alternative strategy to obtain green facades is the direct natural colonisation of the cementitious construction materials constituting the wall, a phenomenon governed by the bioreceptivity of such material. This work aims at assessing the suitability of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) materials to allow a rapid natural colonisation taking carbonated OPC samples as a reference material. For that, the aggregate size, the w/c ratio and the amount of cement paste of mortars made of both binders were modified. The assessment of the different bioreceptivities was conducted by means of an accelerated algal fouling test. MPC samples exhibited a faster fouling compared to OPC samples, which could be mainly attributed to the lower pH of the MPC binder. In addition to the binder, the fouling rate was governed by the roughness and the porosity of the material. MPC mortar with moderate porosity and roughness appears to be the most feasible material to be used for the development of green concrete walls. PMID:24602907

  4. Using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to analyze biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew J; Trevisan, Júlio; Bassan, Paul; Bhargava, Rohit; Butler, Holly J; Dorling, Konrad M; Fielden, Peter R; Fogarty, Simon W; Fullwood, Nigel J; Heys, Kelly A; Hughes, Caryn; Lasch, Peter; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Obinaju, Blessing; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Strong, Rebecca J; Walsh, Michael J; Wood, Bayden R; Gardner, Peter; Martin, Francis L

    2015-01-01

    IR spectroscopy is an excellent method for biological analyses. It enables the nonperturbative, label-free extraction of biochemical information and images toward diagnosis and the assessment of cell functionality. Although not strictly microscopy in the conventional sense, it allows the construction of images of tissue or cell architecture by the passing of spectral data through a variety of computational algorithms. Because such images are constructed from fingerprint spectra, the notion is that they can be an objective reflection of the underlying health status of the analyzed sample. One of the major difficulties in the field has been determining a consensus on spectral pre-processing and data analysis. This manuscript brings together as coauthors some of the leaders in this field to allow the standardization of methods and procedures for adapting a multistage approach to a methodology that can be applied to a variety of cell biological questions or used within a clinical setting for disease screening or diagnosis. We describe a protocol for collecting IR spectra and images from biological samples (e.g., fixed cytology and tissue sections, live cells or biofluids) that assesses the instrumental options available, appropriate sample preparation, different sampling modes as well as important advances in spectral data acquisition. After acquisition, data processing consists of a sequence of steps including quality control, spectral pre-processing, feature extraction and classification of the supervised or unsupervised type. A typical experiment can be completed and analyzed within hours. Example results are presented on the use of IR spectra combined with multivariate data processing. PMID:24992094

  5. Modulating material interfaces through biologically-inspired intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazar, Melis; Steward, Robert L.; Chang, Chia-Jung; Orndoff, Cynthia J.; Zeng, Yukai; Ho, Mon-Shu; LeDuc, Philip R.; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2011-12-01

    This letter describes the control of molecular filament organization through biologically inspired intermediates, enabling us to obtain large-area regular nanopatterns. We first studied cultured single filamentous actins on an unmodified glass surface (hydrophilic surface) and introduced myosin-II to modify the control. We then utilized an inorganic salt crystallization approach on the response of these two proteins, actin filament and myosin-II, to analyze the resultant spatially localized patterns. Through the utilization of myosin-II and the salt crystallization approach, we were able to induce the filament orientation of 63°; while without myosin-II, we induced an orientation of 90°.

  6. Method And System For Examining Biological Materials Using Low Power Cw Excitation Raman Spectroscopy.

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Wang, Wubao

    2000-11-21

    A method and system for examining biological materials using low-power cw excitation Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with the teachings of the invention, a low-power continuous wave (cw) pump laser beam and a low-power cw Stokes (or anti-Stokes) probe laser beam simultaneously illuminate a biological material and traverse the biological material in collinearity. The pump beam, whose frequency is varied, is used to induce Raman emission from the biological material. The intensity of the probe beam, whose frequency is kept constant, is monitored as it leaves the biological material. When the difference between the pump and probe excitation frequencies is equal to a Raman vibrational mode frequency of the biological material, the weak probe signal becomes amplified by one or more orders of magnitude (typically up to about 10.sup.4 -10.sup.6) due to the Raman emission from the pump beam. In this manner, by monitoring the intensity of the probe beam emitted from the biological material as the pump beam is varied in frequency, one can obtain an excitation Raman spectrum for the biological material tested. The present invention may be applied to in the in vivo and/or in vitro diagnosis of diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, cancers and other diseases by measuring the characteristic excitation Raman lines of blood glucose, cholesterol, serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT)/serum glutamic pyruvic tansaminase (SGPT), tissues and other corresponding Raman-active body constituents, respectively. For example, it may also be used to diagnose diseases associated with the concentration of Raman-active constituents in urine, lymph and saliva It may be used to identify cancer in the breast, cervix, uterus, ovaries and the like by measuring the fingerprint excitation Raman spectra of these tissues. It may also be used to reveal the growing of tumors or cancers by measuring the levels of nitric oxide in tissue.

  7. Analysis of biological materials using a nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    The use of nuclear microprobe techniques including: Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) for elemental analysis and quantitative elemental imaging of biological samples is especially useful in biological and biomedical research because of its high sensitivity for physiologically important trace elements or toxic heavy metals. The nuclear microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) has been used to study the enhancement in metal uptake of two different plants. The roots of corn (Zea mays) have been analyzed to study the enhancement of iron uptake by adding Fe (II) or Fe(III) of different concentrations to the germinating medium of the seeds. The Fe uptake enhancement effect produced by lacing the germinating medium with carbon nanotubes has also been investigated. The aim of this investigation is to ensure not only high crop yield but also Fe-rich food products especially from calcareous soil which covers 30% of world's agricultural land. The result will help reduce iron deficiency anemia, which has been identified as the leading nutritional disorder especially in developing countries by the World Health Organization. For the second plant, Mexican marigold (Tagetes erecta ), the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices ) for the improvement of lead phytoremediation of lead contaminated soil has been investigated. Phytoremediation provides an environmentally safe technique of removing toxic heavy metals (like lead), which can find their way into human food, from lands contaminated by human activities like mining or by natural disasters like earthquakes. The roots of Mexican marigold have been analyzed to study the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in enhancement of lead uptake from the contaminated rhizosphere.

  8. Biological potential of extraterrestrial materials - 1. Nutrients in carbonaceous meteorites, and effects on biological growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    1997-06-01

    Soil nutrient analysis of the Murchison C2 carbonaceous chondrite shows biologically available S, P, Ca, Mg, Na, K and Fe and cation exchange capacity (CEC) at levels comparable with terrestrial agricultural soils. Weathering, and aqueous, hydrothermal (121°C, 15 min) and high-temperature (550°C, 3 h) processing increase the extractable nutrients. Extractable phosphorus (by 0.3 M NH 4F + 0.1 M HCl) content, which may be growth-limiting, is 6.3 μg g -1 in the unprocessed meteorite, but increases to 81 μg g -1 by hydrothermal processing and weathering, and to 130 μg g -1 by high temperature processing. The cation exchange capacity (CEC), attributed mainly to the organic fraction, corresponds responds to 345 meq per 100 g of the polymer, suggesting one ionizable COOH or OH group per 3-4 aromatic rings. The Allende C3(V) meteorite has low extractable Ca, Mg and K, in parallel to its low organic content and CEC, but high extractable P levels (160 μg g -1). Biological effects are observed on growth of the soil microorganisms Flavobacterium oryzihabitans and Nocardia asteroides in meteorite extracts, and the population levels suggest that P is the limiting nutrient. Effects on plant growth are examined on Solanum tuberosum (potato), where extracts of the Murchison meteorite lead to enhanced growth and pigmentation. The biologically available organic and inorganic nutrients in carbonaceous chondrites can provide concentrated solutions for prebiotic and early life processes, and serve as soils and fertilizers for future space-based biological expansion.

  9. Large-scale study of the interactions between proteins involved in type IV pilus biology in Neisseria meningitidis: characterization of a subcomplex involved in pilus assembly.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Michaella; Castagnini, Marta; Karimova, Gouzel; Ladant, Daniel; Pelicic, Vladimir

    2012-06-01

    The functionally versatile type IV pili (Tfp) are one of the most widespread virulence factors in bacteria. However, despite generating much research interest for decades, the molecular mechanisms underpinning the various aspects of Tfp biology remain poorly understood, mainly because of the complexity of the system. In the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis for example, 23 proteins are dedicated to Tfp biology, 15 of which are essential for pilus biogenesis. One of the important gaps in our knowledge concerns the topology of this multiprotein machinery. Here we have used a bacterial two-hybrid system to identify and quantify the interactions between 11 Pil proteins from N. meningitidis. We identified 20 different binary interactions, many of which are novel. This represents the most complex interaction network between Pil proteins reported to date and indicates, among other things, that PilE, PilM, PilN and PilO, which are involved in pilus assembly, indeed interact. We focused our efforts on this subset of proteins and used a battery of assays to determine the membrane topology of PilN and PilO, map the interaction domains between PilE, PilM, PilN and PilO, and show that a widely conserved N-terminal motif in PilN is essential for both PilM-PilN interactions and pilus assembly. Finally, we show that PilP (another protein involved in pilus assembly) forms a complex with PilM, PilN and PilO. Taken together, these findings have numerous implications for understanding Tfp biology and provide a useful blueprint for future studies. PMID:22486968

  10. Low cost materials of construction for biological processes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-13

    The workshop was held, May 1993 in conjunction with the 15th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals. The purpose of this workshop was to present information on the biomass to ethanol process in the context of materials selection and through presentation and discussion, identify promising avenues for future research. Six technical presentations were grouped into two sessions: process assessment and technology assessment. In the process assessment session, the group felt that the pretreatment area would require the most extensive materials research due the complex chemical, physical and thermal environment. Discussion centered around the possibility of metals being leached into the process stream and their effect on the fermentation mechanics. Linings were a strong option for pretreatment assuming the economics were favorable. Fermentation was considered an important area for research also, due to the unique complex of compounds and dual phases present. Erosion in feedstock handling equipment was identified as a minor concern. In the technology assessment session, methodologies in corrosion analysis were presented in addition to an overview of current coatings/linings technology. Widely practiced testing strategies, including ASTM methods, as well as novel procedures for micro-analysis of corrosion were discussed. Various coatings and linings, including polymers and ceramics, were introduced. The prevailing recommendations for testing included keeping the testing simple until the problem warranted a more detailed approach and developing standardized testing procedures to ensure the data was reproducible and applicable. The need to evaluate currently available materials such as coatings/linings, carbon/stainless steels, or fiberglass reinforced plastic was emphasized. It was agreed that economic evaluation of each material candidate must be an integral part of any research plan.

  11. Sound and Faulty Arguments Generated by Preservice Biology Teachers When Testing Hypotheses Involving Unobservable Entities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Anton E.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the responses of a sample of preservice biology teachers enrolled in a teaching methods course to a casual question about why water rose in a jar inverted over a burning candle placed in a pan of water by formulating and testing six hypotheses. (Contains 43 references.) (Author/YDS)

  12. Formative Assessment and Increased Student Involvement Increase Grades in an Upper Secondary School Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granbom, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that formative methods and increased student participation has a positive influence on learning measured as grades. The study was conducted during the course Biology A in a Swedish Upper Secondary School. The students constructed grade criteria and defined working methods and type of examination within a given topic, Gene…

  13. Propulsion of swimming microrobots inspired by metachronal waves in ciliates: from biology to material specifications.

    PubMed

    Palagi, Stefano; Jager, Edwin W H; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia

    2013-12-01

    The quest for swimming microrobots originates from possible applications in medicine, especially involving navigation in bodily fluids. Swimming microorganisms have become a source of inspiration because their propulsion mechanisms are effective in the low-Reynolds number regime. In this study, we address a propulsion mechanism inspired by metachronal waves, i.e. the spontaneous coordination of cilia leading to the fast swimming of ciliates. We analyse the biological mechanism (referring to its particular embodiment in Paramecium caudatum), and we investigate the contribution of its main features to the swimming performance, through a three-dimensional finite-elements model, in order to develop a simplified, yet effective artificial design. We propose a bioinspired propulsion mechanism for a swimming microrobot based on a continuous cylindrical electroactive surface exhibiting perpendicular wave deformations travelling longitudinally along its main axis. The simplified propulsion mechanism is conceived specifically for microrobots that embed a micro-actuation system capable of executing the bioinspired propulsion (self-propelled microrobots). Among the available electroactive polymers, we select polypyrrole as the possible actuation material and we assess it for this particular embodiment. The results are used to appoint target performance specifications for the development of improved or new electroactive materials to attain metachronal-waves-like propulsion. PMID:24103844

  14. Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

    2000-03-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

  15. Cellular responses to implant materials: biological, physical and chemical factors.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, H

    1983-12-01

    Adhesion of bone and epithelial cells to the dental implant are vital to its retention in alveolar bone and to the prevention of infection via its 'gingival' margin. Studies of cytotoxicity, tissue irritability and carcinogenicity of implantable polymers, metals and ceramics and of tissue adhesion to them have been carried out in tissue culture and in animal experiments. The more similar the polymeric materials are chemically to living tissue the more easily are they dissolved and digested in the host. Therefore, implant materials having a molecular structure similar to protein or polysaccharide, e.g. Nylon, cannot be expected to function. On the other hand, silicones, polyethylene and Teflon (polytetrafluroethylene), which have molecular structures completely different from living substances, are generally more stable in the tissues. However, these polymers are hydrophobic and have little adhesion to living cells in spite of their high stability. They are not, therefore, suitable materials for the construction of implants. Studies on antithrombotic polymers have demonstrated the possibility of creating implantable polymers which have high stability as well as strong adhesion to the surrounding tissues. These properties may be conferred by grafting a hydrophilic polymer on to the surface of a hydrophobic polymer. Of the metals, Ti, Zr and Ta are fairly stable in living tissue, and allow cells to adhere strongly. Alloys of Co-Cr-Mo, Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo, Ti-Al-V, Ti-Mo, Ti-Pd and Ti-Pt deserve to be better evaluated because they are low in density, have high mechanical strength, stability and corrosion resistance in living tissue, and there is direct adhesion to the surrounding tissues. Biodegradable or bioactive ceramics which induce bone formation around the implant do not have sufficient mechanical strength. Implant ceramics have to be stable, e.g. crystal alumina, vitreous carbon, synthetic hydroxypatite and silicon nitrate. These exhibit high biocompatibility and

  16. Comparison of the biological NH3 removal characteristics among four inorganic packing materials.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Kamamoto, M; Yani, M; Shoda, M

    2001-01-01

    Four inorganic packing materials were evaluated in terms of their availability as a packing material of a packed tower deodorization apparatus (biofilter) from the viewpoints of biological NH3 removal characteristics and some physical properties. Porous ceramics (A), calcinated cristobalite (B), calcinated and formed obsidian (C), granulated and calculated soil (D) were used. The superiority of these packing materials determined based on the values of non-biological removal per unit weight or unit volume of packing material, complete removal capacity of NH3 per unit weight of packing material per day or unit volume of packing material per day and pressure drop of the packed bed was in the order of A approximately = C > B > or = D. Packing materials A and C with high porosity, maximum water content, and suitable mean pore diameter showed excellent removal capacity. PMID:16233018

  17. [Issues involved with supply of medical and hygienic materials to home care patients].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shuko; Mizushima, Yukari; Takiuti, Takako

    2006-12-01

    Questionnaires were mailed to doctors and nurses who are involved in home care to survey their observations on medical and hygienic materials and its supply to home care patients. Some of the survey items, such as problems encountered frequently, areas where an improvement was needed most and concerns that are often raised in suppling of medical and hygienic materials for home care patients, were analyzed by the Berelson's content analysis method to observe problems in suppling adequate medical and hygienic materials. As a result, 5 categories and 17 subcategories were formed. The recognized future issues were: policies concerning support extended to medical organizations and disseminate information of the system, which medical and hygienic materials supplied to home care patients. PMID:17469358

  18. Model of heterogeneous material dissolution in simulated biological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazeva, A. G.; Gutmanas, E. Y.

    2015-11-01

    In orthopedic research, increasing attention is being paid to bioresorbable/biodegradable implants as an alternative to permanent metallic bone healing devices. Biodegradable metal based implants possessing high strength and ductility potentially can be used in load bearing sites. Biodegradable Mg and Fe are ductile and Fe possess high strength, but Mg degrades too fast and Fe degrades too slow, Ag is a noble metal and should cause galvanic corrosion of the more active metallic iron - thus, corrosion of Fe can be increased. Nanostructuring should results in higher strength and can result in higher rate of dissolution/degradation from grain boundaries. In this work, a simple dissolution model of heterogeneous three phase nanocomposite material is considered - two phases being metal Fe and Ag and the third - nanopores. Analytical solution for the model is presented. Calculations demonstrate that the changes in the relative amount of each phase depend on mass exchange and diffusion coefficients. Theoretical results agree with preliminary experimental results.

  19. The Effects of Linear and Modified Linear Programed Materials on the Achievement of Slow Learners in Tenth Grade BSCS Special Materials Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, John Charles

    Assessed were the effects of linear and modified linear programed materials on the achievement of slow learners in tenth grade Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) Special Materials biology. Two hundred and six students were randomly placed into four programed materials formats: linear programed materials, modified linear program with…

  20. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Lampson, M. A.; Greathouse, D. V.; Koeppe, R. E., II; Andersen, O. S.

    2006-07-01

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)—Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly—alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  1. A planar transmission-line sensor for measuring microwave permittivity of liquid and semisolid biological materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An accurate technique for determining the permittivity of biological materials with coplanar waveguide transmission line is presented. The technique utilizes closed-form approximations that relate the material permittivity to the line propagation constant. A thru-reflect-line calibration procedure i...

  2. Insolubilisation of biologically active materials with novel radiation graft copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, J. L.; Jankiewicz, S. V.; Levot, R.; Sangster, D. F.

    The use of radiation grafting to immobilise a typical enzyme, trypsin, is reported. The technique involves radiation grafting to a backbone polymer a monomer containing an appropriate functional group to which the enzyme is bonded. In the present work, p-nitrostyrene has been grafted to representative trunk polymers, polypropylene and PVC, the nitro group in the resulting copolymer converted to the isothiocyanato derivative to which trypsin is attached. Of importance to this insolubilisation process, especially for radiation sensitive backbone polymers, is the inclusion of additives which enhance grafting. A new class of additives which increase the grafting yields is reported using as representative backbone polymers, naturally occurring cellulose and synthetic low density polyethylene. The new additives are specific metal salts such as LiClO 4. The reactivity of these salts in grafting enhancement has been compared with that of mineral acid which has previously been used as an additive to increase grafting yields in both preirradiation and simultaneous techniques. A new model for grafting enhancement in the presence of the metal salts as well as acids is proposed whereby increased grafting yields are attributed to increased partitioning of monomer into the graft region in the presence of ionic solutes. The value of these additives in preparing copolymers suitable for general reagent insolubilisation reactions is discussed.

  3. Nano-FTIR chemical mapping of minerals in biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Amarie, Sergiu; Zaslansky, Paul; Kajihara, Yusuke; Griesshaber, Erika; Schmahl, Wolfgang W

    2012-01-01

    Summary Methods for imaging of nanocomposites based on X-ray, electron, tunneling or force microscopy provide information about the shapes of nanoparticles; however, all of these methods fail on chemical recognition. Neither do they allow local identification of mineral type. We demonstrate that infrared near-field microscopy solves these requirements at 20 nm spatial resolution, highlighting, in its first application to natural nanostructures, the mineral particles in shell and bone. "Nano-FTIR" spectral images result from Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). On polished sections of Mytilus edulis shells we observe a reproducible vibrational (phonon) resonance within all biocalcite microcrystals, and distinctly different spectra on bioaragonite. Surprisingly, we discover sparse, previously unknown, 20 nm thin nanoparticles with distinctly different spectra that are characteristic of crystalline phosphate. Multicomponent phosphate bands are observed on human tooth sections. These spectra vary characteristically near tubuli in dentin, proving a chemical or structural variation of the apatite nanocrystals. The infrared band strength correlates with the mineral density determined by electron microscopy. Since nano-FTIR sensitively responds to structural disorder it is well suited for the study of biomineral formation and aging. Generally, nano-FTIR is suitable for the analysis and identification of composite materials in any discipline, from testing during nanofabrication to even the clinical investigation of osteopathies. PMID:22563528

  4. Nano-FTIR chemical mapping of minerals in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Amarie, Sergiu; Zaslansky, Paul; Kajihara, Yusuke; Griesshaber, Erika; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Keilmann, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Methods for imaging of nanocomposites based on X-ray, electron, tunneling or force microscopy provide information about the shapes of nanoparticles; however, all of these methods fail on chemical recognition. Neither do they allow local identification of mineral type. We demonstrate that infrared near-field microscopy solves these requirements at 20 nm spatial resolution, highlighting, in its first application to natural nanostructures, the mineral particles in shell and bone. "Nano-FTIR" spectral images result from Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). On polished sections of Mytilus edulis shells we observe a reproducible vibrational (phonon) resonance within all biocalcite microcrystals, and distinctly different spectra on bioaragonite. Surprisingly, we discover sparse, previously unknown, 20 nm thin nanoparticles with distinctly different spectra that are characteristic of crystalline phosphate. Multicomponent phosphate bands are observed on human tooth sections. These spectra vary characteristically near tubuli in dentin, proving a chemical or structural variation of the apatite nanocrystals. The infrared band strength correlates with the mineral density determined by electron microscopy. Since nano-FTIR sensitively responds to structural disorder it is well suited for the study of biomineral formation and aging. Generally, nano-FTIR is suitable for the analysis and identification of composite materials in any discipline, from testing during nanofabrication to even the clinical investigation of osteopathies. PMID:22563528

  5. [THE ROLE OF MATERNAL DIET IN METABOLIC AND BEHAVIOURAL PROGRAMMING: REVIEW OF BIOLOGIC MECHANISMS INVOLVED].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Vázquez Berrios, Mariam; Arco González, Rocío; Blanco Velilla, Rosario Noemí; Decara Del Olmo, Juan; Suárez Pérez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Gómez de Heras, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, a considerable amount of studies have focused on the effect of undernutrition and overnutrition during critical periods of offspring development and their risk of developing metabolic diseases later in life. Additionally, inadequate maternal diets have been involved in the malprogramming of brain functions and some behaviours. Several mechanisms have been associated with the process of malprogramming such as epigenetics modifications, excessive oxidative stress or hypothalamic alterations. This evidence supports the idea that nutritional prevention strategies must be considered for offspring during early development stages that include the preconceptional period. Additionally, studying involved mechanisms could be particularly useful in the search of efficient therapies against malprogramming. PMID:26667690

  6. Comparison of the biological H2S removal characteristics among four inorganic packing materials.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Kamamoto, M; Yani, M; Shoda, M

    2001-01-01

    Four inorganic packing materials were evaluated in terms of their availability as packing materials of a packed tower deodorization apparatus (biofilter) from the viewpoints of biological H2S removal characteristics and some physical properties. Among porous ceramics (A), calcinated cristobalite (B), calcinated and formed obsidian (C), granulated and calcinated soil (D), the superiority of these packing materials determined based on the values of non-biological removal per unit weight or unit volume of packing material, complete removal capacity of H2S per unit weight of packing material per day or unit volume of packing material per day and pressure drop of the packed bed was in the order of A approximately equal to C > D approximately equal to B, which is correlated with the maximum water content, porosity, and mean pore diameter. PMID:16233011

  7. Adverse reactions after cosmetic lip augmentation with permanent biologically inert implant materials.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, C; Schuller-Petrovic, S; Soyer, H P; Kerl, H

    1999-01-01

    Augmentation of lips is a common aesthetic procedure that is mostly performed with alloplastic materials or autologous tissue. Various alloplastic injectable implants have been developed for soft tissue augmentation without surgery. Most biologic materials are resorbed within a few months, fluid silicone may migrate, and autologous fat is not ideal for fine contouring of the lips. The search for a biocompatible, permanent, nontoxic, and biologically inert filler material led to the development of some new materials for subdermal or intradermal implantation. Recently Bioplastique, Artecoll, and Gore-Tex have been well established and recommended by many authors. Although these materials meet most of the characteristics that constitute an ideal injectable prosthetic material, we describe 3 examples of adverse reactions after their implantation into lips. PMID:9922021

  8. Finite element simulation for the mechanical characterization of soft biological materials by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Valero, C; Navarro, B; Navajas, D; García-Aznar, J M

    2016-09-01

    The characterization of the mechanical properties of soft materials has been traditionally performed through uniaxial tensile tests. Nevertheless, this method cannot be applied to certain extremely soft materials, such as biological tissues or cells that cannot be properly subjected to these tests. Alternative non-destructive tests have been designed in recent years to determine the mechanical properties of soft biological tissues. One of these techniques is based on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to perform nanoindentation tests. In this work, we investigated the mechanical response of soft biological materials to nanoindentation with spherical indenters using finite element simulations. We studied the responses of three different material constitutive laws (elastic, isotropic hyperelastic and anisotropic hyperelastic) under the same process and analyzed the differences thereof. Whereas linear elastic and isotropic hyperelastic materials can be studied using an axisymmetric simplification, anisotropic hyperelastic materials require three-dimensional analyses. Moreover, we established the limiting sample size required to determine the mechanical properties of soft materials while avoiding boundary effects. Finally, we compared the results obtained by simulation with an estimate obtained from Hertz theory. Hertz theory does not distinguish between the different material constitutive laws, and thus, we proposed corrections to improve the quantitative measurement of specific material properties by nanoindentation experiments. PMID:27214690

  9. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  10. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and related techniques in studies of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Thomas; Sebesta, Aleksandar; Stadler, Johannes; Opilik, Lothar; Balabin, Roman M.; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-02-01

    Biological materials can be highly heterogeneous at the nanometer scale. The investigation of nanostructures is often hampered by the low spatial resolution (e.g. spectroscopic techniques) or very little chemical information (e.g. atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)) provided by analytical techniques. Our research focuses on combined instruments, which allow the analysis of the exactly same area of a sample by complementary techniques, such as AFM and Raman spectroscopy. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) combines the high spatial resolution of AFM or STM with the chemical information provided by Raman spectroscopy. The technique is based on enhancement effects known from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In TERS the enhancing metallic nanostructure is brought to the sample by an AFM or STM tip. With a TERS-active tip, enhanced Raman signals can be generated from a sample area as small as 10-50 nm in diameter. AFM analysis of bacterial biofilms has demonstrated their heterogeneity at the nanometer scale, revealing a variety of nanostructures such as pili, flagella, and extracelullar polymers. TERS measurements of the biopolymers alginate and cytochrome c have yielded spectroscopic fingerprints even of such weak Raman scatterers, which in future can allow their localization in complex matrices. Furthermore, biofilms of the bacterium Halomonas meridiana were studied, which was found to be involved in the generation of the mineral dolomite. Only combined AFM-Raman analysis was able to identify the nanoglobules found in laboratory cultures of H. meridiana as dolomite nanoparticles. Our combined setups are and will be applied to the investigation of biofilms, fish spermatozoa as well as biological membranes.

  11. Triage, monitoring, and treatment of mass casualty events involving chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear agents

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Aruna C.; Kumar, S.

    2010-01-01

    In a mass casualty situation due to chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) event, triage is absolutely required for categorizing the casualties in accordance with medical care priorities. Dealing with a CBRN event always starts at the local level. Even before the detection and analysis of agents can be undertaken, zoning, triage, decontamination, and treatment should be initiated promptly. While applying the triage system, the available medical resources and maximal utilization of medical assets should be taken into consideration by experienced triage officers who are most familiar with the natural course of the injury presented and have detailed information on medical assets. There are several triage systems that can be applied to CBRN casualties. With no one standardized system globally or nationally available, it is important for deploying a triage and decontamination system which is easy to follow and flexible to the available medical resources, casualty number, and severity of injury. PMID:21829319

  12. Evaluation of geologic materials to limit biological intrusion into low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hakonson, T.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes the results of a three-year research program to evaluate the performance of selected soil and rock trench cap designs in limiting biological intrusion into simulated waste. The report is divided into three sections including a discussion of background material on biological interactions with waste site trench caps, a presentation of experimental data from field studies conducted at several scales, and a final section on the interpretation and limitations of the data including implications for the user.

  13. Involvement of Intermediate Sulfur Species in Biological Reduction of Elemental Sulfur under Acidic, Hydrothermal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Druschel, Gregory K.

    2013-01-01

    The thermoacidophile and obligate elemental sulfur (S80)-reducing anaerobe Acidilobus sulfurireducens 18D70 does not associate with bulk solid-phase sulfur during S80-dependent batch culture growth. Cyclic voltammetry indicated the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as well as polysulfides after 1 day of batch growth of the organism at pH 3.0 and 81°C. The production of polysulfide is likely due to the abiotic reaction between S80 and the biologically produced H2S, as evinced by a rapid cessation of polysulfide formation when the growth temperature was decreased, inhibiting the biological production of sulfide. After an additional 5 days of growth, nanoparticulate S80 was detected in the cultivation medium, a result of the hydrolysis of polysulfides in acidic medium. To examine whether soluble polysulfides and/or nanoparticulate S80 can serve as terminal electron acceptors (TEA) supporting the growth of A. sulfurireducens, total sulfide concentration and cell density were monitored in batch cultures with S80 provided as a solid phase in the medium or with S80 sequestered in dialysis tubing. The rates of sulfide production in 7-day-old cultures with S80 sequestered in dialysis tubing with pore sizes of 12 to 14 kDa and 6 to 8 kDa were 55% and 22%, respectively, of that of cultures with S80 provided as a solid phase in the medium. These results indicate that the TEA existed in a range of particle sizes that affected its ability to diffuse through dialysis tubing of different pore sizes. Dynamic light scattering revealed that S80 particles generated through polysulfide rapidly grew in size, a rate which was influenced by the pH of the medium and the presence of organic carbon. Thus, S80 particles formed through abiological hydrolysis of polysulfide under acidic conditions appeared to serve as a growth-promoting TEA for A. sulfurireducens. PMID:23335768

  14. Microbial communities involved in biological ammonium removal from coal combustion wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Fisher, L Suzanne; Brodie, Greg A; Phelps, Tommy J

    2013-07-01

    The efficiency of a novel integrated treatment system for biological removal of ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, and heavy metals from fossil power plant effluent was evaluated. Microbial communities were analyzed using bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (Sanger sequences) and 454 pyrosequencing technology. While seasonal changes in microbial community composition were observed, the significant (P = 0.001) changes in bacterial and archaeal communities were consistent with variations in ammonium concentration. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed an increase of potential ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), Nitrosomonas, Nitrosococcus, Planctomycetes, and OD1, in samples with elevated ammonium concentration. Other bacteria, such as Nitrospira, Nitrococcus, Nitrobacter, Thiobacillus, ε-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Acidobacteria, which play roles in nitrification and denitrification, were also detected. The AOB oxidized 56 % of the ammonium with the concomitant increase in nitrite and ultimately nitrate in the trickling filters at the beginning of the treatment system. Thermoprotei within the phylum Crenarchaeota thrived in the splitter box and especially in zero-valent iron extraction trenches, where an additional 25 % of the ammonium was removed. The potential ammonium-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) (Candidatus Nitrosocaldus) were detected towards the downstream end of the treatment system. The design of an integrated treatment system consisting of trickling filters, zero-valent iron reaction cells, settling pond, and anaerobic wetlands was efficient for the biological removal of ammonium and several other contaminants from wastewater generated at a coal burning power plant equipped with selective catalytic reducers for nitrogen oxide removal. PMID:23314095

  15. The Widespread Prevalence and Functional Significance of Silk-Like Structural Proteins in Metazoan Biological Materials.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Carmel; Woodcroft, Ben J; Degnan, Bernard M

    2016-01-01

    In nature, numerous mechanisms have evolved by which organisms fabricate biological structures with an impressive array of physical characteristics. Some examples of metazoan biological materials include the highly elastic byssal threads by which bivalves attach themselves to rocks, biomineralized structures that form the skeletons of various animals, and spider silks that are renowned for their exceptional strength and elasticity. The remarkable properties of silks, which are perhaps the best studied biological materials, are the result of the highly repetitive, modular, and biased amino acid composition of the proteins that compose them. Interestingly, similar levels of modularity/repetitiveness and similar bias in amino acid compositions have been reported in proteins that are components of structural materials in other organisms, however the exact nature and extent of this similarity, and its functional and evolutionary relevance, is unknown. Here, we investigate this similarity and use sequence features common to silks and other known structural proteins to develop a bioinformatics-based method to identify similar proteins from large-scale transcriptome and whole-genome datasets. We show that a large number of proteins identified using this method have roles in biological material formation throughout the animal kingdom. Despite the similarity in sequence characteristics, most of the silk-like structural proteins (SLSPs) identified in this study appear to have evolved independently and are restricted to a particular animal lineage. Although the exact function of many of these SLSPs is unknown, the apparent independent evolution of proteins with similar sequence characteristics in divergent lineages suggests that these features are important for the assembly of biological materials. The identification of these characteristics enable the generation of testable hypotheses regarding the mechanisms by which these proteins assemble and direct the construction of

  16. The Widespread Prevalence and Functional Significance of Silk-Like Structural Proteins in Metazoan Biological Materials

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Carmel; Woodcroft, Ben J.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, numerous mechanisms have evolved by which organisms fabricate biological structures with an impressive array of physical characteristics. Some examples of metazoan biological materials include the highly elastic byssal threads by which bivalves attach themselves to rocks, biomineralized structures that form the skeletons of various animals, and spider silks that are renowned for their exceptional strength and elasticity. The remarkable properties of silks, which are perhaps the best studied biological materials, are the result of the highly repetitive, modular, and biased amino acid composition of the proteins that compose them. Interestingly, similar levels of modularity/repetitiveness and similar bias in amino acid compositions have been reported in proteins that are components of structural materials in other organisms, however the exact nature and extent of this similarity, and its functional and evolutionary relevance, is unknown. Here, we investigate this similarity and use sequence features common to silks and other known structural proteins to develop a bioinformatics-based method to identify similar proteins from large-scale transcriptome and whole-genome datasets. We show that a large number of proteins identified using this method have roles in biological material formation throughout the animal kingdom. Despite the similarity in sequence characteristics, most of the silk-like structural proteins (SLSPs) identified in this study appear to have evolved independently and are restricted to a particular animal lineage. Although the exact function of many of these SLSPs is unknown, the apparent independent evolution of proteins with similar sequence characteristics in divergent lineages suggests that these features are important for the assembly of biological materials. The identification of these characteristics enable the generation of testable hypotheses regarding the mechanisms by which these proteins assemble and direct the construction of

  17. High-performance liquid chromatographic-fluorescence determination of traces of selenium in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, W C; Kutnink, M A

    1996-10-15

    An improved method for the determination of selenium in biological materials has been developed. This work both extends and validates the procedure of Vézina and Bleau (J. Chromatog. 426, 385-391, 1988) which is based on high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of the fluorophore formed by reaction of Se(IV) with 2,3-diaminonaphthalene. The mass detection limit is 48 pg selenium (3 sigma) and the concentration detection limits are 48 parts per trillion in biological fluids and 120 to 480 parts per trillion in dried biological materials. The linear dynamic range of the method has been extended up to approximately 800 ng. Relative standard deviations of 9.4 to 2.7% were observed in repeated analyses of standards in the range of 0.5 to 500 ng. The proposed method was validated with respect to 23 biological reference materials spanning an 1800-fold range of selenium concentrations and was found to be free of significant constant or proportional biases despite greatly different matrix compositions. This method offers an unsurpassed combination of sensitivity, accuracy, linear dynamic range, and freedom from matrix interferences and may be considered a reference method for the reliable determination of selenium in biological materials. PMID:8921189

  18. A chirality-based search for extraterrestrial biological and prebiological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Lioudmila; Sparks, William; Nagdimunov, Lev

    2013-04-01

    Important evidence relevant to extraterrestrial life is the existence in space of organic molecules of prebiological or biological significance. Such molecules are often characterized by a special type of asymmetry called "homochirality" (domination of molecules of a specific handedness). This results in optical activity of the material that contains those molecules. Due to optical activity, the light scattered by such materials is characterized by non-zero circular polarization. We review laboratory measurements of light scattered by biological (e.g. bacteria, leaves) and non-biological (minerals) samples. These have revealed distinctive features in the circular polarization spectra in absorption bands for the biological samples. We present theoretical simulations of light scattering by homochiral materials made with the superposition T-matrix code for clusters of optically-active spheres. This allowed us to simulate light scattering by biological objects, e.g. colonies of bacteria, and by materials of prebiological value, e.g. cometary dust. We explore how circular polarization depends on the porosity and size of aggregates. Based on this, we provide some recommendations for observing signs of life in space, specifically, on exoplanets. This study was supported by the NASA Exobiology and Astrobiology Program.

  19. The present and future of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces and materials.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Carrie E; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2012-01-31

    The natural world provides many examples of robust, permanent adhesive platforms. Synthetic adhesive interfaces and materials inspired by mussels of genus Mytulis have been extensively applied, and it is expected that characterization and adaptation of several other biological adhesive strategies will follow the Mytilus edulis model. These candidate species will be introduced, along with a discussion of the adhesive behaviors that make them attractive for synthetic adaptation. While significant progress has been made in the development of biologically inspired adhesive interfaces and materials, persistent questions, current challenges, and emergent areas of research will be also be discussed. PMID:22224862

  20. Population dynamics of bacteria involved in enhanced biological phosphorus removal in Danish wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Mielczarek, Artur Tomasz; Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2013-03-15

    The enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is increasingly popular as a sustainable method for removal of phosphorus (P) from wastewater. This study consisted of a comprehensive three-year investigation of the identity and population dynamics of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) in 28 Danish municipal wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to quantify ten probe-defined populations of PAO and GAO that in total constituted a large fraction (30% on average) of the entire microbial community targeted by the EUBmix probes. Two PAO genera, Accumulibacter and Tetrasphaera, were very abundant in all EBPR plants (average of 3.7% and 27% of all bacteria, respectively), and their abundance was relatively stable in the Danish full-scale plants without clear temporal variations. GAOs were occasionally present in some plants (Competibacter in 11 plants, Defluviicoccus in 6 plants) and were consistent in only a few plants. This shows that these were not core species in the EBPR communities. The total GAO abundance was always lower than that of Accumulibacter. In plants without EBPR design, the abundance of PAO and GAO was significantly lower. Competibacter correlated in general with high fraction of industrial wastewater. In specific plants Accumulibacter correlated with high C/P ratio of the wastewater and Tetrasphaera with high organic loading. Interestingly, the relative microbial composition of the PAO/GAO species was unique to each plant over time, which gives a characteristic plant-specific "fingerprint". PMID:23317522

  1. Melanopsin: a novel photopigment involved in the photoentrainment of the brain's biological clock?

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2002-01-01

    The brain's biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generates circadian rhythms of physiology and behaviour of approximately 24 hours. The clock needs, however, like a watch that runs too fast or too slow, daily adjustment and the most important stimulus for this adjustment is the environmental light/dark cycle, a process know as photoentrainment. It is well established that the eye contains a separate anatomical and functional system mediating light information to the clock. Until recently, the photopigment responsible for light entrainment of the circadian system has been elusive but recent studies have provided evidence that melanopsin, a recently identified opsin, could be the circadian photopigment. This conclusion is based on the observation that melanopsin is expressed exclusively in retinal ganglion cells projecting to the SCN, a projection known as the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT) and that these ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive. Melanopsin is present in the plasma membrane of soma, dendrites and axons forming an extensive photoreceptive network in the entire retina. Although these findings make melanopsin a strong candidate as a circadian photopigment, a number of functional experiments are needed before the role of melanopsin is finally proven. PMID:12452484

  2. Membrane materials for storing biological samples intended for comparative nanotoxicological testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelkin, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The study is aimed at identifying the samples of most promising membrane materials for storing dry specimens of biological fluids (Dried Blood Spots, DBS technology). Existing sampling systems using cellulose fiber filter paper have a number of drawbacks such as uneven distribution of the sample spot, dependence of the spot spreading area on the individual biosample properties, incomplete washing-off of the sample due to partially inconvertible sorption of blood components on cellulose fibers, etc. Samples of membrane materials based on cellulose, polymers and glass fiber with applied biosamples were studied using methods of scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and surface-wetting measurement. It was discovered that cellulose-based membrane materials sorb components of biological fluids inside their structure, while membranes based on glass fiber display almost no interaction with the samples and biological fluid components dry to films in the membrane pores between the structural fibers. This characteristic, together with the fact that membrane materials based on glass fiber possess sufficient strength, high wetting properties and good storage capacity, attests them as promising material for dry samples of biological fluids storage systems.

  3. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer.

  4. Karyopherins: potential biological elements involved in the delayed graft function in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediately after renal transplantation, patients experience rapid and significant improvement of their clinical conditions and undergo considerable systemic and cellular modifications. However, some patients present a slow recovery of the renal function commonly defined as delayed graft function (DGF). Although clinically well characterized, the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition are not totally defined, thus, we are currently missing specific clinical markers to predict and to make early diagnosis of this event. Methods We investigated, using a pathway analysis approach, the transcriptomic profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from renal transplant recipients with DGF and with early graft function (EGF), before (T0) and 24 hours (T24) after transplantation. Results Bioinformatics/statistical analysis showed that 15 pathways (8 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated) and 11 pathways (5 up-regulated and 6 down-regulated) were able to identify DGF patients at T0 and T24, respectively. Interestingly, the most up-regulated pathway at both time points was NLS-bearing substrate import into nucleus, which includes genes encoding for several subtypes of karyopherins, a group of proteins involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) utilize karyopherins-alpha (KPNA) for their passage from cytoplasm into the nucleus. In vitro functional analysis demonstrated that in PBMCs of DGF patients, there was a significant KPNA-mediated nuclear translocation of the phosphorylated form of STAT3 (pSTAT3) after short-time stimulation (2 and 5 minutes) with interleukin-6. Conclusions Our study suggests the involvement, immediately before transplantation, of karyopherin-mediated nuclear transport in the onset and development of DGF. Additionally, it reveals that karyopherins could be good candidates as potential DGF predictive clinical biomarkers and targets for pharmacological interventions in renal

  5. A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will describe a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in October 1990, is focused on prototyping a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed and easily operated by HAZMAT Team personnel allowing remote entry and exploration of a hazardous material incident site. The close involvement of JPL Fire Department personnel has been critical in establishing system requirements as well as evaluating the system. The current robot, called HAZBOT III, has been especially designed for operation in environments that may contain combustible gases. Testing of the system with the Fire Department has shown that teleoperated robots can successfully gain access to incident sites allowing hazardous material spills to be remotely located and identified. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through enhancement of the operator interface and by allowing tetherless operation.

  6. 45 CFR 46.206 - Research involving, after delivery, the placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Research involving, after delivery, the placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material. 46.206 Section 46.206 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material. (a) Research involving, after delivery, the placenta; the...

  7. 45 CFR 46.206 - Research involving, after delivery, the placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Research involving, after delivery, the placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material. 46.206 Section 46.206 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material. (a) Research involving, after delivery, the placenta; the...

  8. 45 CFR 46.206 - Research involving, after delivery, the placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Research involving, after delivery, the placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material. 46.206 Section 46.206 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human... placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material. (a) Research involving, after delivery, the placenta; the...

  9. 45 CFR 46.206 - Research involving, after delivery, the placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Research involving, after delivery, the placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material. 46.206 Section 46.206 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material. (a) Research involving, after delivery, the placenta; the...

  10. 45 CFR 46.206 - Research involving, after delivery, the placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Research involving, after delivery, the placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material. 46.206 Section 46.206 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... placenta, the dead fetus or fetal material. (a) Research involving, after delivery, the placenta; the...

  11. Invited review liquid crystal models of biological materials and silk spinning.

    PubMed

    Rey, Alejandro D; Herrera-Valencia, Edtson E

    2012-06-01

    A review of thermodynamic, materials science, and rheological liquid crystal models is presented and applied to a wide range of biological liquid crystals, including helicoidal plywoods, biopolymer solutions, and in vivo liquid crystals. The distinguishing characteristics of liquid crystals (self-assembly, packing, defects, functionalities, processability) are discussed in relation to biological materials and the strong correspondence between different synthetic and biological materials is established. Biological polymer processing based on liquid crystalline precursors includes viscoelastic flow to form and shape fibers. Viscoelastic models for nematic and chiral nematics are reviewed and discussed in terms of key parameters that facilitate understanding and quantitative information from optical textures and rheometers. It is shown that viscoelastic modeling the silk spinning process using liquid crystal theories sheds light on textural transitions in the duct of spiders and silk worms as well as on tactoidal drops and interfacial structures. The range and consistency of the predictions demonstrates that the use of mesoscopic liquid crystal models is another tool to develop the science and biomimetic applications of mesogenic biological soft matter. PMID:21994072

  12. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C; Pfister, Stefan M; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer. PMID:24892285

  13. Waste-Activated Sludge Fermentation for Polyacrylamide Biodegradation Improved by Anaerobic Hydrolysis and Key Microorganisms Involved in Biological Polyacrylamide Removal

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaohu; Luo, Fan; Zhang, Dong; Dai, Lingling; Chen, Yinguang; Dong, Bin

    2015-01-01

    During the anaerobic digestion of dewatered sludge, polyacrylamide (PAM), a chemical conditioner, can usually be consumed as a carbon and nitrogen source along with other organic matter (e.g., proteins and carbohydrates in the sludge). However, a significant accumulation of acrylamide monomers (AMs) was observed during the PAM biodegradation process. To improve the anaerobic hydrolysis of PAM, especially the amide hydrolysis process, and to avoid the generation of the intermediate product AM, a new strategy is reported herein that uses an initial pH of 9, 200 mg COD/L of PAM and a fermentation time of 17 d. First, response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize PAM removal in the anaerobic digestion of the sludge. The biological hydrolysis of PAM reached 86.64% under the optimal conditions obtained from the RSM. Then, the mechanisms for the optimized parameters that significantly improved the biological hydrolysis of PAM were investigated by the synergistic effect of the main organic compounds in the sludge, the floc size distribution, and the enzymatic activities. Finally, semi-continuous-flow experiments for a microbial community study were investigated based on the determination of key microorganisms involved in the biological hydrolysis of PAM. PMID:26144551

  14. Waste-Activated Sludge Fermentation for Polyacrylamide Biodegradation Improved by Anaerobic Hydrolysis and Key Microorganisms Involved in Biological Polyacrylamide Removal.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaohu; Luo, Fan; Zhang, Dong; Dai, Lingling; Chen, Yinguang; Dong, Bin

    2015-01-01

    During the anaerobic digestion of dewatered sludge, polyacrylamide (PAM), a chemical conditioner, can usually be consumed as a carbon and nitrogen source along with other organic matter (e.g., proteins and carbohydrates in the sludge). However, a significant accumulation of acrylamide monomers (AMs) was observed during the PAM biodegradation process. To improve the anaerobic hydrolysis of PAM, especially the amide hydrolysis process, and to avoid the generation of the intermediate product AM, a new strategy is reported herein that uses an initial pH of 9, 200 mg COD/L of PAM and a fermentation time of 17 d. First, response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize PAM removal in the anaerobic digestion of the sludge. The biological hydrolysis of PAM reached 86.64% under the optimal conditions obtained from the RSM. Then, the mechanisms for the optimized parameters that significantly improved the biological hydrolysis of PAM were investigated by the synergistic effect of the main organic compounds in the sludge, the floc size distribution, and the enzymatic activities. Finally, semi-continuous-flow experiments for a microbial community study were investigated based on the determination of key microorganisms involved in the biological hydrolysis of PAM. PMID:26144551

  15. New biological reference materials - in vivo incorporated toxic metals in water hyacinth tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.R.; Simon, S.J.; Williams, L.R.; Beckert, W.F.

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that high-quality reference materials, containing high levels of multiple toxic elements, can be produced with in vivo incorporation procedures. The approach taken was to produce water hyacinth tissue materials - leaves and stems containing high levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury - as follows: apply a hydroponic feeding procedure for the in vivo incorporation of toxic elements into water hyacinths; dry, blend, and homogenize the plant materials and determine the levels of the incorporated elements and the homogeneity of the generated plant material; demonstrate that low-level control materials can be successfully blended with high-level materials to yield a homogeneous material with intermediate toxicant levels; evaluate the precision of the analytical methods used to determine toxic element levels in the materials; and evaluate the stability of the resulting materials. Sufficient quantities of the parent materials were produced so that characterized reference materials can now be made available on request. Levels of the toxic elements incorporated in water hyacinth leaves were 100, 300, 60, and 27 times the levels present in the control leaves for arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury, respectively. Overall precision of sampling, subsampling, and digestion, and chemical analysis of the treated materials, ranged from 3 to 10% relative standard deviation and was generally comparable to that of three NBS biological reference materials tested. 3 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  16. A Rodent Model to Evaluate the Tissue Response to a Biological Scaffold When Adjacent to a Synthetic Material.

    PubMed

    Dearth, Christopher L; Keane, Timothy J; Scott, Jeffrey R; Daly, Kerry A; Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-10-01

    The use of biologic scaffold materials adjacent to synthetic meshes is commonplace. A prevalent clinical example is two-staged breast reconstruction, where biologic scaffolds are used to provide support and coverage for the inferior aspect of the synthetic expander. However, limited data exist regarding either the kinetics of biologic scaffold integration or the host tissue response to the biologic scaffold materials used for this application or other applications in which such scaffold materials are used. The present study evaluated the temporal host response to a biological scaffold when placed adjacent to a synthetic material. Evaluation criteria included quantification of material contracture and characterization of the host cell response and tissue remodeling events. Results show a decreased thickness of the collagenous tissue layer at biologic scaffold/silicone interface compared to the abdominal wall/silicone interface during the 12-week experimental time course. All test materials were readily incorporated into surrounding host tissue. PMID:26176992

  17. Environmental impacts of post-consumer material managements: recycling, biological treatments, incineration.

    PubMed

    Valerio, F

    2010-11-01

    The environmental impacts of recycling, mechanical biological treatments (MBT) and waste-to-energy incineration, the main management strategies to respond to the increasing production of post-consumer materials are reviewed and compared. Several studies carried out according to life-cycle assessment (LCA) confirm that the lowest environmental impact, on a global scale, is obtained by recycling and by biological treatments (composting and anaerobic fermentations) if compost is used in agriculture. The available air emission factors suggest that, on a local scale, mechanical biological treatments with energy recovery of biogas, may be intrinsically safer than waste-to-energy incinerators. Several studies confirm the capability of biological treatments to degrade many toxic xenobiotic contaminating urban wastes such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, an important property to be improved, for safe agricultural use of compost. Further LCA studies to compare the environmental impact of MBTs and of waste-to-energy incinerators are recommended. PMID:20573498

  18. Evaluation of precision and accuracy of selenium measurements in biological materials using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials has become increasingly important in view of the essential nature of this element for human nutrition and its possible role as a protective agent against cancer. Unfortunately, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials is often difficult for most analytical techniques for a variety of reasons, including interferences, complicated selenium chemistry due to the presence of this element in multiple oxidation states and in a variety of different organic species, stability and resistance to destruction of some of these organo-selenium species during acid dissolution, volatility of some selenium compounds, and potential for contamination. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be one of the best analytical techniques for selenium determinations in biological materials for a number of reasons. Currently, precision at the 1% level (1s) and overall accuracy at the 1 to 2% level (95% confidence interval) can be attained at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) for selenium determinations in biological materials when counting statistics are not limiting (using the {sup 75}Se isotope). An example of this level of precision and accuracy is summarized. Achieving this level of accuracy, however, requires strict attention to all sources of systematic error. Precise and accurate results can also be obtained after radiochemical separations.

  19. Measuring the complex permittivity tensor of uniaxial biological materials with coplanar waveguide transmission line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple and accurate technique is described for measuring the uniaxial permittivity tensor of biological materials with a coplanar waveguide transmission-line configuration. Permittivity tensor results are presented for several chicken and beef fresh meat samples at 2.45 GHz....

  20. Emergency communication and information issues in terrorist events involving radioactive materials.

    PubMed

    Becker, Steven M

    2004-01-01

    With the threat posed by terrorism involving radioactive materials now high on the nation's agenda, local, state, and federal agencies are moving to enhance preparedness and response capabilities. Crucial to these efforts is the development of effective risk communication strategies. This article reports findings from an ongoing study of risk communication issues in nuclear/radiological terrorism situations. It is part of a larger CDC-funded effort that aims to better understand communication challenges associated with weapons of mass destruction terrorism incidents. Presented here are formative research findings from 16 focus groups (n = 163) in which a multi-part, hypothetical radioactive materials terrorism situation was discussed. Twelve of the focus groups were carried out with members of the general public (drawn from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and geographic locations), and four groups were composed of first responders, hospital emergency department personnel, and public health professionals. One aim of the focus groups was to elicit detailed information on people's knowledge, views, perceptions, reactions, and concerns related to a nuclear/radiological terrorism event, and to better understand people's specific information needs and preferred information sources. A second aim was to pretest draft informational materials prepared by CDC and NIOSH. Key findings for the public and professional groups are presented, and the implications of the research for developing messages in radiological/nuclear terrorism situations are explored. PMID:15588058

  1. Proposed framework for cleanup and site restoration following a terrorist incident involving radioactive material.

    PubMed

    Conklin, W Craig

    2005-11-01

    Cleanup following a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or improvised nuclear device (IND) is likely to be technically challenging, costly, and politically charged. Lessons learned from the Top Officials 2 exercise and the increased threat of terrorist use of an RDD or IND have driven federal officials to push for an agreed-upon process for determining appropriate cleanup levels. State and local authorities generally have the ultimate responsibility for final public health decisions in their jurisdictions. In response to terrorist attacks, local authorities are likely to request federal assistance in assessing the risk and establishing appropriate cleanup levels. It is realistic to expect local and state requests for significant federal assistance in planning and implementing recovery operations. State and local authorities may desire "shared accountability" with the federal government in setting the appropriate cleanup levels. Government officials at all levels will face pressure to say how clean is clean enough and how quickly people can re-enter affected areas. Issues arising include (1) the nature of the relationship between the federal, state, and local leadership involved in the recovery efforts and (2) where the funding for recovery comes from. Many agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have long been involved in cleanup activities involving radioactive materials. These agencies have recognized the need for a participatory process and realize the need to remain flexible when faced with possible unprecedented environmental challenges following a terrorist attack. Currently, the Department of Homeland Security has a committee process underway, with participation of the EPA, NRC, DOE, and other federal agencies, to try to resolve these issues and to begin engaging state, local, and tribal governments, and others as

  2. Enhanced stability and local structure in biologically relevant amorphous materials containing pyrophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin; Laurencin, Danielle; Burnell, Victoria; Smith, Mark E.; Grover, Liam M.; Hriljac, Joseph A.; Wright, Adrian J.

    2012-10-25

    There is increasing evidence that amorphous inorganic materials play a key role in biomineralisation in many organisms, however the inherent instability of synthetic analogues in the absence of the complex in vivo matrix limits their study and clinical exploitation. To address this, we report here an approach that enhances long-term stability to >1 year of biologically relevant amorphous metal phosphates, in the absence of any complex stabilizers, by utilizing pyrophosphates (P{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 4-}); species themselves ubiquitous in vivo. Ambient temperature precipitation reactions were employed to synthesise amorphous Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}.nH{sub 2}O and Sr{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}.nH{sub 2}O (3.8 < n < 4.2) and their stability and structure were investigated. Pair distribution functions (PDF) derived from synchrotron X-ray data indicated a lack of structural order beyond 8 {angstrom} in both phases, with this local order found to resemble crystalline analogues. Further studies, including {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P solid state NMR, suggest the unusually high stability of these purely inorganic amorphous phases is partly due to disorder in the P-O-P bond angles within the P{sub 2}O{sub 7} units, which impede crystallization, and to water molecules, which are involved in H-bonds of various strengths within the structures and hamper the formation of an ordered network. In situ high temperature powder X-ray diffraction data indicated that the amorphous nature of both phases surprisingly persisted to 450 C. Further NMR and TGA studies found that above ambient temperature some water molecules reacted with P{sub 2}O{sub 7} anions, leading to the hydrolysis of some P-O-P linkages and the formation of HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} anions within the amorphous matrix. The latter anions then recombined into P{sub 2}O{sub 7} ions at higher temperatures prior to crystallization. Together, these findings provide important new materials with unexplored potential for enzyme

  3. Evaluation of Natural Materials as Exogenous Carbon Sources for Biological Treatment of Low Carbon-to-Nitrogen Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Godínez, Juan; Beltrán-Hernández, Icela; Álvarez-Hernández, Alejandro; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Contreras-López, Elizabeth; Quezada-Cruz, Maribel; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    In the bacterial processes involved in the mitigation of nitrogen pollution, an adequately high carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N) ratio is key to sustain denitrification. We evaluated three natural materials (woodchips, barley grains, and peanut shells) as carbon sources for low C : N wastewater. The amount of organic matter released from these materials to aqueous media was evaluated, as well as their pollution swapping potential by measuring the release of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, N-NH4+, NO2−, and NO3−, and total phosphorous. Barley grains yielded the highest amount of organic matter, which also showed to be the most easily biodegradable. Woodchips and peanut shells released carbon rather steadily and so they would not require frequent replenishment from biological reactors. These materials produced eluates with lower concentrations of nutrients than the leachates from barley grains. However, as woodchips yielded lower amounts of suspended solids, they constitute an adequate exogenous source for the biological treatment of carbon-deficient effluents. PMID:26495313

  4. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  5. Evaluation of a fungal collection as certified reference material producer and as a biological resource center.

    PubMed

    Forti, Tatiana; Souto, Aline da S S; do Nascimento, Carlos Roberto S; Nishikawa, Marilia M; Hubner, Marise T W; Sabagh, Fernanda P; Temporal, Rosane Maria; Rodrigues, Janaína M; da Silva, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Considering the absence of standards for culture collections and more specifically for biological resource centers in the world, in addition to the absence of certified biological material in Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate a Fungal Collection from Fiocruz, as a producer of certified reference material and as Biological Resource Center (BRC). For this evaluation, a checklist based on the requirements of ABNT ISO GUIA34:2012 correlated with the ABNT NBR ISO/IEC17025:2005, was designed and applied. Complementing the implementation of the checklist, an internal audit was performed. An evaluation of this Collection as a BRC was also conducted following the requirements of the NIT-DICLA-061, the Brazilian internal standard from Inmetro, based on ABNT NBR ISO/IEC 17025:2005, ABNT ISO GUIA 34:2012 and OECD Best Practice Guidelines for BRCs. This was the first time that the NIT DICLA-061 was applied in a culture collection during an internal audit. The assessments enabled the proposal for the adequacy of this Collection to assure the implementation of the management system for their future accreditation by Inmetro as a certified reference material producer as well as its future accreditation as a Biological Resource Center according to the NIT-DICLA-061. PMID:26991280

  6. Remote time-resolved filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. L.; Liu, W.; Chin, S. L.

    2006-05-01

    We report, for what we believe to be the first time, on the feasibility of remote time-resolved filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy (FIBS) of biological materials. The fluorescence from egg white and yeast powder, induced by femtosecond laser pulse filamentation in air, was detected in the backward direction with targets located 3.5 m away from the detection system. The remarkably distinct spectra of egg white and yeast allow us to propose that this technique, time-resolved FIBS, could be potentially useful for remote detection and identification of harmful biological agents.

  7. [Constitution of a bank of biological material in the French Gazel cohort: logistical and practical aspects].

    PubMed

    Zins, M; Ozguler, A; Bonenfant, S; Henny, J; Goldberg, M

    2003-02-01

    The Gazel cohort was launched in January 1989 among workers of the French national electricity and gas company to form an open and general purpose epidemiological laboratory. More than 20.000 workers (15.000 men, 5.000 women), aged from 35 to 50 volunteered to participate. One of the objectives of this cohort was the constitution of a bank of biological material aiming to collect and preserve various biological samples (serum, plasma, DNA, etc). This paper details the organisation of the bank and presents a feasability study concerning 2.000 volunteers. PMID:12684571

  8. Nanoscale Imaging of Mineral Crystals inside Biological Composite Materials Using X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huaidong; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; Song, Changyong; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Nishino, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Yukio; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Miao, Jianwei

    2008-01-01

    We for the first time applied x-ray diffraction microscopy to the imaging of mineral crystals inside biological composite materials—intramuscular fish bone—at the nanometer scale resolution. We identified mineral crystals in collagen fibrils at different stages of mineralization. Based on the experimental results and biomineralization analyses, we suggested a dynamic model to account for the nucleation and growth of mineral crystals in the collagen matrix. The results obtained from this study not only further our understanding of the complex structure of bone, but also demonstrate that x-ray diffraction microscopy will become an important tool to study biological materials.

  9. Searching for biological traces on different materials using a forensic light source and infrared photography.

    PubMed

    Sterzik, V; Panzer, S; Apfelbacher, M; Bohnert, M

    2016-05-01

    Because biological traces often play an important role in the investigation process of criminal acts, their detection is essential. As they are not always visible to the human eye, tools like a forensic light source or infrared photography can be used. The intention of the study presented was to give advice how to visualize biological traces best. Which wavelengths and/or filters give the best results for different traces on different fabrics of different colors? Therefore, blood (undiluted and diluted), semen, urine, saliva, and perspiration have been examined on 29 different materials. PMID:26500091

  10. Accidental exposure to biological material in healthcare workers at a university hospital: Evaluation and follow-up of 404 cases.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Eliana Battaggia; Lopes, Marta Heloísa; Yasuda, Maria Aparecida Shikanai

    2005-01-01

    The care and follow-up provided to healthcare workers (HCWs) from a large teaching hospital who were exposed to biological material between 1 August 1998 and 31 January 2002 is described here. After exposure, the HCW is evaluated by a nurse and doctor in an emergency consultation and receives follow-up counselling. The collection of 10 ml of blood sample from each HCW and its source patient, when known, is made for immunoenzymatic testing for HIV, HBV and HCV. Evaluation and follow-up of 404 cases revealed that the exposures were concentrated in only a few areas of the hospital; 83% of the HCWs exposed were seen by a doctor responsible for the prophylaxis up to 3 h after exposure. Blood was involved in 76.7% (309) of the exposures. The patient source of the biological material was known in 80.7% (326) of the exposed individuals studied; 80 (24.5%) sources had serological evidence of infection with 1 or more agents: 16.2% were anti-HCV positive, 3.8% were HAgBs positive and 10.9% were anti-HIV positive. 67% (273) of the study population completed the proposed follow-up. No confirmed seroconversion occurred. In conclusion, the observed adherence to the follow-up was quite low, and measures to improve it must be taken. Surprisingly, no difference in adherence to the follow-up was observed among those exposed HCW at risk, i.e. those with an infected or unknown source patient. Analysis of post-exposure management revealed excess prescription of antiretroviral drugs, vaccine and immunoglobulin. Infection by HCV is the most important risk of concern, in our hospital, in accidents with biological material. PMID:15804666

  11. A general framework for application of prestrain to computational models of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Maas, Steve A; Erdemir, Ahmet; Halloran, Jason P; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2016-08-01

    It is often important to include prestress in computational models of biological tissues. The prestress can represent residual stresses (stresses that exist after the tissue is excised from the body) or in situ stresses (stresses that exist in vivo, in the absence of loading). A prestressed reference configuration may also be needed when modeling the reference geometry of biological tissues in vivo. This research developed a general framework for representing prestress in finite element models of biological materials. It is assumed that the material is elastic, allowing the prestress to be represented via a prestrain. For prestrain fields that are not compatible with the reference geometry, the computational framework provides an iterative algorithm for updating the prestrain until equilibrium is satisfied. The iterative framework allows for enforcement of two different constraints: elimination of distortion in order to address the incompatibility issue, and enforcing a specified in situ fiber strain field while allowing for distortion. The framework was implemented as a plugin in FEBio (www.febio.org), making it easy to maintain the software and to extend the framework if needed. Several examples illustrate the application and effectiveness of the approach, including the application of in situ strains to ligaments in the Open Knee model (simtk.org/home/openknee). A novel method for recovering the stress-free configuration from the prestrain deformation gradient is also presented. This general purpose theoretical and computational framework for applying prestrain will allow analysts to overcome the challenges in modeling this important aspect of biological tissue mechanics. PMID:27131609

  12. PSI:Biology-Materials Repository: A Biologist’s Resource for Protein Expression Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Cormier, Catherine Y.; Park, Jin G.; Fiacco, Michael; Steel, Jason; Hunter, Preston; Kramer, Jason; Singla, Rajeev; LaBaer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    The Protein Structure Initiative:Biology-Materials Repository (PSI:Biology-MR; MR; http://psimr.asu.edu) sequence-verifies, annotates, stores, and distributes the protein expression plasmids and vectors created by the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). The MR has developed an informatics and sample processing pipeline that manages this process for thousands of samples per month from nearly a dozen PSI centers. DNASU (http://dnasu.asu.edu), a freely searchable database, stores the plasmid annotations, which include the full-length sequence, vector information, and associated publications for over 130,000 plasmids created by our laboratory, by the PSI and other consortia, and by individual laboratories for distribution to researchers worldwide. Each plasmid links to external resources, including the PSI Structural Biology Knowledgebase (http://sbkb.org), which facilitates cross-referencing of a particular plasmid to additional protein annotations and experimental data. To expedite and simplify plasmid requests, the MR uses an expedited material transfer agreement (EP-MTA) network, where researchers from network institutions can order and receive PSI plasmids without institutional delays. Currently over 39,000 protein expression plasmids and 78 empty vectors from the PSI are available upon request from DNASU. Overall, the MR’s repository of expression-ready plasmids, its automated pipeline, and the rapid process for receiving and distributing these plasmids more effectively allows the research community to dissect the biological function of proteins whose structures have been studied by the PSI. PMID:21360289

  13. Classification of the biological material with use of FTIR spectroscopy and statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Bombalska, Aneta; Mularczyk-Oliwa, Monika; Kwaśny, Mirosław; Włodarski, Maksymilian; Kaliszewski, Miron; Kopczyński, Krzysztof; Szpakowska, Małgorzata; Trafny, Elżbieta A

    2011-04-01

    Rapid detection and discrimination of dangerous biological materials such as bacteria and their spores has become a security aim of considerable importance. Various analytical methods, including FTIR spectroscopy combined with statistical analysis have been used to identify vegetative bacteria, bacterial spores and background interferants. The present work discusses the application of FTIR technique performed in reflectance mode using Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance accessory (HATR) to the discrimination of biological materials. In comparison with transmission technique the HATR is more rapid and do not require the sample destruction, simultaneously giving similar absorbance bands. HATR-FTIR results combined with statistical analysis PCA and HCA demonstrate that this combination provides novel and accurate microbial identification technique. PMID:21257340

  14. Classification of the biological material with use of FTIR spectroscopy and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombalska, Aneta; Mularczyk-Oliwa, Monika; Kwaśny, Mirosław; Włodarski, Maksymilian; Kaliszewski, Miron; Kopczyński, Krzysztof; Szpakowska, Małgorzata; Trafny, Elżbieta A.

    2011-04-01

    Rapid detection and discrimination of dangerous biological materials such as bacteria and their spores has become a security aim of considerable importance. Various analytical methods, including FTIR spectroscopy combined with statistical analysis have been used to identify vegetative bacteria, bacterial spores and background interferants. The present work discusses the application of FTIR technique performed in reflectance mode using Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance accessory (HATR) to the discrimination of biological materials. In comparison with transmission technique the HATR is more rapid and do not require the sample destruction, simultaneously giving similar absorbance bands. HATR-FTIR results combined with statistical analysis PCA and HCA demonstrate that this combination provides novel and accurate microbial identification technique.

  15. The spectral applications of Beer-Lambert law for some biological and dosimetric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Içelli, Orhan; Yalçin, Zeynel; Karakaya, Vatan; Ilgaz, Işıl P.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis of biological and dosimetric materials which contain organic and inorganic materials and to make the determination by using the spectral theorem Beer-Lambert law. Beer-Lambert law is a system of linear equations for the spectral theory. It is possible to solve linear equations with a non-zero coefficient matrix determinant forming linear equations. Characteristic matrix of the linear equation with zero determinant is called point spectrum at the spectral theory.

  16. Determination of trace metals in marine biological reference materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchemin, D.; McLaren, J.W.; Willie, S.N.; Berman, S.S.

    1988-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for the analysis of two marine biological reference materials (dogfish liver tissue (DOLT-1) and dogfish muscle tissue (DORM-1)). The materials were put into solution by digestion in a nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide mixture. Thirteen elements (Na, Mg, Cr, Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, and Pb) were then determined. Accurate results were obtained by standard additions or isotope dilution techniques for all of these elements in DORM-1 and for all but Cr in DOLT-1.

  17. NMR of group 2 element quadrupolar nuclei and some applications in materials science and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohua

    1999-11-01

    For many years, NMR has provided an easy access for chemists to perform structural and kinetic studies on a whole variety of systems. To a great extent, these investigations have been restricted to non-quadrupolar nuclei. The study of quadrupolar nuclei (I > 1/2) offers the potential to gain insight into important problems in material science and biology. In addition to the large quadrupole moment associated with the spin active nuclei of interest, several of the most interesting species also possess an extremely low natural abundance. My recent research focuses on 87Sr NMR, which has been cited by earlier workers as being limited to only ionic species. Several strontium-containing compounds have been synthesized and characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction. 87Sr NMR signals were determined for these compounds in a series of aprotic polar solvents. The chemical shift variation was found to be consistent with linen free energy relationship, which can be very useful in helping to elucidate mechanism, in predicting reaction rates, and the extent of reaction at equilibrium, and in discovering under what conditions a change in mechanism occurs. Control over symmetry of the compound was found to be the key to obtain the good NMR signals. One application of the new technique that has been developed was in the area of material science. An observation relative to sol-gel derived ionic conductors (La0.8Sr0.2Co0.8Fe0.2O 3.2) was that films often formed cracks upon pyrolysis. By careful examination of the sol-gel process by 87Sr NMR, a model for the structure of the sol was developed. Through the relaxation rate study of the strontium sites, the polymerization mechanism was determined to be predominantly bimolecular within the concentration region studied. The kinetic study of the fast cation exchange between two strontium sites indicated that the inhomogeneity of the polymeric network lads to the film cracking during pyrolysis. As a consequence of understanding the

  18. Novel microwave near-field sensors for material characterization, biology, and nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, R.; Kamenetskii, E. O.; Shavit, R.

    2013-02-01

    The wide range of interesting electromagnetic behavior of contemporary materials requires that experimentalists working in this field master many diverse measurement techniques and have a broad understanding of condensed matter physics and biophysics. Measurement of the electromagnetic response of materials at microwave frequencies is important for both fundamental and practical reasons. In this paper, we propose a novel near-field microwave sensor with application to material characterization, biology, and nanotechnology. The sensor is based on a subwavelength ferrite-disk resonator with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations. Strong energy concentration and unique topological structures of the near fields originated from the MDM resonators allow effective measuring material parameters in microwaves, both for ordinary structures and objects with chiral properties.

  19. [Accident with biological material at the prehospital mobile care: reality for health and non-healthcare workers].

    PubMed

    Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Silva, Elisangelo Aparecido Costa; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Mendonça, Katiane Martins; Souza, Adenícia Custódia Silva E; Melo, Dulcelene Sousa

    2013-01-01

    Analytical transversal study that was conducted with the objectives of identifying the prevalence and characterizing the accidents with biological material among professionals in pre-hospital service (PHS) and comparing the risk behaviors adopted by healthcare and non-healthcare groups that can affect the occurrence and seriousness of such accidents. Data were obtained by questionnaire applied to all PHS workers in Goiânia-GO. The study revealed a high prevalence of accidents involving biological material which, although higher for the healthcare group, also affected the non-healthcare group. There were significant (p < 0.05) risk behaviors for these accidents in both groups: not using gloves, masks or eye protectors; inappropriate disposal of sharps; inadequate dress; re-capping of needles; and a lack of immunization against hepatitis B. The results underscore the importance of both groups in adhering to preventive measures, and further point to the need to structure and implement vigilance and control system for this type of accident. PMID:23887787

  20. (abstract) A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will report the status of the Emergency Response Robotics project, a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in 1991, has been focused on developing a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed by HAZMAT Team personnel for first entry into an incident site. The primary goals of the system are to gain access to the site, locate and identify the hazard, and aid in its mitigation. The involvement of JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team personnel has been critical in guiding the design and evaluation of the system. A unique feature of the current robot, called HAZBOT III, is its special design for operation in combustible environments. This includes the use of all solid state electronics, brushless motors, and internal pressurization. Demonstration and testing of the system with HAZMAT Team personnel has shown that teleoperated robots, such as HAZBOT III, can successfully gain access to incident sites locating and identifying hazardous material spills. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through the addition of appropriate sensor technology and enhancement of the operator interface.

  1. Biological and chemical-physical properties of root-end filling materials: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco; Colombo, Marco; Poggio, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the study is to evaluate and compare the biological and chemical-physical properties of four different root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxicity towards murine odontoblasts cells (MDPC-23) was evaluated using the Transwell insert methodology by Alamar blue test. Streptococcus salivarius, S. sanguis, and S. mutans strains were selected to evaluate the antimicrobial activity by agar disc diffusion test. Solubility was determined after 24 h and 2 months. pH values were measured after 3 and 24 h. To evaluate radiopacity, all materials were scanned on a GE Healthcare Lunar Prodigy. Results: Excellent percentage of vitality were obtained by mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-based materials and Biodentine. MTA-Angelus, ProRoot MTA, and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM) showed the highest values for the inhibition zones when tested for S. mutans, while Biodentine showed the largest inhibition zone when tested for S. sanguis. All the materials fulfilled the requirements of the International Standard 6876, demonstrating low solubility with a weight loss of less than 3%. No significant reduction in pH value was demonstrated after 24 h. ProRoot MTA and MTA-Angelus showed the highest values of radiographic density. Conclusions: The differences showed by the root-end filling materials tested do not cover completely the ideal clinical requests. PMID:25829684

  2. Determination of perfluorinated alkyl acid concentrations in biological standard reference materials.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Jessica L; O'Connell, Steven G; Butt, Craig M; Mabury, Scott A; Small, Jeff M; De Silva, Amila O; Muir, Derek C G; Delinsky, Amy D; Strynar, Mark J; Lindstrom, Andrew B; Reagen, William K; Malinsky, Michelle; Schäfer, Sandra; Kwadijk, Christiaan J A F; Schantz, Michele M; Keller, Jennifer M

    2012-11-01

    Standard reference materials (SRMs) are homogeneous, well-characterized materials used to validate measurements and improve the quality of analytical data. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a wide range of SRMs that have mass fraction values assigned for legacy pollutants. These SRMs can also serve as test materials for method development, method validation, and measurement for contaminants of emerging concern. Because inter-laboratory comparison studies have revealed substantial variability of measurements of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), future analytical measurements will benefit from determination of consensus values for PFAAs in SRMs to provide a means to demonstrate method-specific performance. To that end, NIST, in collaboration with other groups, has been measuring concentrations of PFAAs in a variety of SRMs. Here we report levels of PFAAs and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) determined in four biological SRMs: fish tissue (SRM 1946 Lake Superior Fish Tissue, SRM 1947 Lake Michigan Fish Tissue), bovine liver (SRM 1577c), and mussel tissue (SRM 2974a). We also report concentrations for three in-house quality-control materials: beluga whale liver, pygmy sperm whale liver, and white-sided dolphin liver. Measurements in SRMs show an array of PFAAs, with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) being the most frequently detected. Reference and information values are reported for PFAAs measured in these biological SRMs. PMID:22476786

  3. Designing and Developing Online Materials for Molecular Biology: Building Online Programs for Science

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    A well-accepted form of educational training offered in molecular biology is internships in research laboratories. However, the number of available research laboratories severely limits access by most students. Addressing this need, the University of Hawaii launched a project to expand this model to include newly developed online training materials in addition to a hands-on laboratory experience. This paper explores the design and development process of the online learning materials. This case study looks at the roles of the instructional designer, multimedia specialist, and research faculty who were the subject matter experts. The experiences of the design teams are shared in an effort to gain insight on how the collaborative efforts of the project group led to a successful deployment of the online learning materials. PMID:24319699

  4. Development and Applications Of Photosensitive Device Systems To Studies Of Biological And Organic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, Sol

    2012-01-20

    The primary focus of the grant is the development of new x-ray detectors for biological and materials work at synchrotron sources, especially Pixel Array Detectors (PADs), and the training of students via research applications to problems in biophysics and materials science using novel x-ray methods. This Final Progress Report provides a high-level overview of the most important accomplishments. These major areas of accomplishment include: (1) Development and application of x-ray Pixel Array Detectors; (2) Development and application of methods of high pressure x-ray crystallography as applied to proteins; (3) Studies on the synthesis and structure of novel mesophase materials derived from block co-polymers.

  5. Enhanced Removal of Lead by Chemically and Biologically Treated Carbonaceous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E.; Osman, Maher M.; Ahmed, Somia B.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid sorbents and biosorbents were synthesized via chemical and biological treatment of active carbon by simple and direct redox reaction followed by surface loading of baker's yeast. Surface functionality and morphology of chemically and biologically modified sorbents and biosorbents were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared analysis and scanning electron microscope imaging. Hybrid carbonaceous sorbents and biosorbents were characterized by excellent efficiency and superiority toward lead(II) sorption compared to blank active carbon providing a maximum sorption capacity of lead(II) ion as 500 μmol g−1. Sorption processes of lead(II) by these hybrid materials were investigated under the influence of several controlling parameters such as pH, contact time, mass of sorbent and biosorbent, lead(II) concentration, and foreign ions. Lead(II) sorption mechanisms were found to obey the Langmuir and BET isotherm models. The potential applications of chemically and biologically modified-active carbonaceous materials for removal and extraction of lead from real water matrices were also studied via a double-stage microcolumn technique. The results of this study were found to denote to superior recovery values of lead (95.0–99.0 ± 3.0–5.0%) by various carbonaceous-modified-bakers yeast biosorbents. PMID:22629157

  6. Integration of biological data by kernels on graph nodes allows prediction of new genes involved in mitotic chromosome condensation.

    PubMed

    Hériché, Jean-Karim; Lees, Jon G; Morilla, Ian; Walter, Thomas; Petrova, Boryana; Roberti, M Julia; Hossain, M Julius; Adler, Priit; Fernández, José M; Krallinger, Martin; Haering, Christian H; Vilo, Jaak; Valencia, Alfonso; Ranea, Juan A; Orengo, Christine; Ellenberg, Jan

    2014-08-15

    The advent of genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi)-based screens puts us in the position to identify genes for all functions human cells carry out. However, for many functions, assay complexity and cost make genome-scale knockdown experiments impossible. Methods to predict genes required for cell functions are therefore needed to focus RNAi screens from the whole genome on the most likely candidates. Although different bioinformatics tools for gene function prediction exist, they lack experimental validation and are therefore rarely used by experimentalists. To address this, we developed an effective computational gene selection strategy that represents public data about genes as graphs and then analyzes these graphs using kernels on graph nodes to predict functional relationships. To demonstrate its performance, we predicted human genes required for a poorly understood cellular function-mitotic chromosome condensation-and experimentally validated the top 100 candidates with a focused RNAi screen by automated microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the images demonstrated that the candidates were indeed strongly enriched in condensation genes, including the discovery of several new factors. By combining bioinformatics prediction with experimental validation, our study shows that kernels on graph nodes are powerful tools to integrate public biological data and predict genes involved in cellular functions of interest. PMID:24943848

  7. Integration of biological data by kernels on graph nodes allows prediction of new genes involved in mitotic chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Hériché, Jean-Karim; Lees, Jon G.; Morilla, Ian; Walter, Thomas; Petrova, Boryana; Roberti, M. Julia; Hossain, M. Julius; Adler, Priit; Fernández, José M.; Krallinger, Martin; Haering, Christian H.; Vilo, Jaak; Valencia, Alfonso; Ranea, Juan A.; Orengo, Christine; Ellenberg, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The advent of genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi)–based screens puts us in the position to identify genes for all functions human cells carry out. However, for many functions, assay complexity and cost make genome-scale knockdown experiments impossible. Methods to predict genes required for cell functions are therefore needed to focus RNAi screens from the whole genome on the most likely candidates. Although different bioinformatics tools for gene function prediction exist, they lack experimental validation and are therefore rarely used by experimentalists. To address this, we developed an effective computational gene selection strategy that represents public data about genes as graphs and then analyzes these graphs using kernels on graph nodes to predict functional relationships. To demonstrate its performance, we predicted human genes required for a poorly understood cellular function—mitotic chromosome condensation—and experimentally validated the top 100 candidates with a focused RNAi screen by automated microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the images demonstrated that the candidates were indeed strongly enriched in condensation genes, including the discovery of several new factors. By combining bioinformatics prediction with experimental validation, our study shows that kernels on graph nodes are powerful tools to integrate public biological data and predict genes involved in cellular functions of interest. PMID:24943848

  8. The Role of Synthetic and Biologic Materials in the Treatment of Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ramon A.; Ellis, C. Neal

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is a significant medical problem that poses a diagnostic and management dilemma. These diseases cause serious morbidity in those affected and treatment is sought for relief of pelvic pain, rectal bleeding, chronic constipation, obstructed defecation, and fecal incontinence. Numerous procedures have been proposed to treat these conditions; however, the search continues as colorectal surgeons attempt to find the procedure that would optimally treat these conditions. The use of prosthetics in the repair of pelvic organ prolapse has become prevalent as the benefits of their use are realized. While advances in biologic mesh and new surgical techniques promise improved functional outcomes with decreased complication rates without de novo symptoms, the debate concerning the best prosthetic material, synthetic or biologic, remains controversial. Furthermore, laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy has emerged as a procedure that could potentially fill this role and is rapidly becoming the procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:25435827

  9. Observation of the freeze-drying process of biological materials with a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Nei, T; Fujikawa, S

    1976-10-01

    Over the past few decades, numerous studies have been done on the freeze-drying of biological materials from a physical, chemical and biological point of view. Morphological observation of the freeze-drying process of specimens, however, has been tried by only a few investigators. In those studies, thin-layered aqueous specimens, which were sandwiched between two cover slips, were mostly observed with an optical microscope. For ultrastructural and stereoscopic observation, the scanning electron microscope has a great advantage, unlike that of the optical microscope. A specially designed cryo-scanning electron microscope, employed in the present study, made it possible to observe the freezing patterns of the specimens and also the sublimation process of ice in frozen specimens under vacuum. With this specially designed microscope, shrinkage of some specimens due to dehydration during the freeze-drying process was revealed and the extent of such shrinkage was quantitatively determined. PMID:1036327

  10. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be ‘safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope. PMID:26961578

  11. Swabs as DNA collection devices for sampling different biological materials from different substrates.

    PubMed

    Verdon, Timothy J; Mitchell, Robert J; van Oorschot, Roland A H

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there is a variety of swabs for collection of biological evidence from crime scenes, but their comparative efficiency is unknown. Here, we report the results of an investigation into the efficiency of different swab types to collect blood, saliva and touch DNA from a range of substrates. The efficiency of extracting blood and saliva from each swab type was also tested. Some swabs were significantly more effective than others for sampling biological materials from different substrates. Swabs with the highest sampling efficiency, however, often did not have the highest extraction efficiency. Observations were recorded regarding practicality of each swab in a variety of situations. Our study demonstrates that selection of sampling device impacts greatly upon successful collection and extraction of DNA. We present guidelines to assist in evaluation of swab choice. PMID:24502761

  12. Marketing the use of the space environment for the processing of biological and pharmaceutical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The perceptions of U.S. biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies concerning the potential use of the space environment for the processing of biological substances was examined. Physical phenomena that may be important in space-base processing of biological materials are identified and discussed in the context of past and current experiment programs. The capabilities of NASA to support future research and development, and to engage in cooperative risk sharing programs with industry are discussed. Meetings were held with several biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to provide data for an analysis of the attitudes and perceptions of these industries toward the use of the space environment. Recommendations are made for actions that might be taken by NASA to facilitate the marketing of the use of the space environment, and in particular the Space Shuttle, to the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries.

  13. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an `aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be `safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C-H, N-H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.

  14. Development of Standards for NanoSIMS Analyses of Biological Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davission, M L; Weber, P K; Pett-Ridge, J; Singer, S

    2008-07-31

    NanoSIMS is a powerful analytical technique for investigating element distributions at the nanometer scale, but quantifying elemental abundances requires appropriate standards, which are not readily available for biological materials. Standards for trace element analyses have been extensively developed for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in the semiconductor industry and in the geological sciences. The three primary approaches for generating standards for SIMS are: (1) ion implantation (2) using previously characterized natural materials, and (3) preparing synthetic substances. Ion implantation is a reliable method for generating trace element standards, but it is expensive, which limits investigation of the analytical issues discussed above. It also requires low background levels of the elements of interest. Finding or making standard materials has the potential to provide more flexibility than ion implantation, but realizing homogeneity at the nano-scale is in itself a significant challenge. In this study, we experiment with all three approaches, but with an emphasis toward synthetic organic polymers in order to reduce costs, increase flexibility, and achieve a wide dynamic concentration range. This emphasis serves to meet the major challenge for biological samples of identifying matrix matched, homogeneous material. Biological samples themselves are typically heterogeneous at the scale of microns to 100s of microns, and therefore they are poor SIMS standards. Therefore, we focused on identifying 'biological-like' materials--either natural or synthetic--that can be used for standards. The primary criterion is that the material be as compositionally similar to biological samples as possible (primarily C, H, O, and N). For natural material we adsorbed organic colloids consisting of peptidoglycan (i.e., amino sugars), activated charcoal, and humic acids. Experiments conducted with Si on peptidoglycan showed low affinity as SiO{sub 2}, yet its distribution in

  15. Molecular-level engineering of THz/IR-sensitive materials for future biological sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolard, Dwight; Recine, Gregory; Bykhovski, Alexei; Zhang, Weidong

    2010-08-01

    While the unique spectral information associated with chemical and biological molecules within the terahertz frequency regime (~ 3.0-3.0 millimeters) motivates its use for practical sensing applications, limiting factors at the macroscale (weak spectral absorption, broad line widths and masking geometrical effects introduced by the samples) provides motivation for man-engineered sensing materials that allow for the transduction of the spectral information about target molecules from the nanoscale. This brief letter will overview work being performed by our research group to define molecular-level functionality that will be useful for realizing "THz/IR-sensitive" materials. Here the goal is to define switchable molecular components that when incorporated into larger DNA-based nanoscaffolds lead to THz and/or IR regime electronic and/or photonic material properties that are dictated in a predictable manner by novel functionality paradigms. In particular, theoretical modeling and design studies are being performed to engineer organic and biological switches that can be incorporated into DNA-based architectures that enable the precise extraction of nanoscale information (e.g., composition, dynamics, conformation) through electronic/photonic transformations to the macroscale. Hence, these studies seek to define new spectral-based sensing modalities useful for characterizing bio-molecules

  16. Interpreting atomic force microscopy nanoindentation of hierarchical biological materials using multi-regime analysis.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, M R; Stokes, J R; Gidley, M J; Yakubov, G E

    2015-02-01

    We present a novel Multi-Regime Analysis (MRA) routine for interpreting force indentation measurements of soft materials using atomic force microscopy. The MRA approach combines both well established and semi-empirical theories of contact mechanics within a single framework to deconvolute highly complex and non-linear force-indentation curves. The fundamental assumption in the present form of the model is that each structural contribution to the mechanical response acts in series with other 'mechanical resistors'. This simplification enables interpretation of the micromechanical properties of materials with hierarchical structures and it allows automated processing of large data sets, which is particularly indispensable for biological systems. We validate the algorithm by demonstrating for the first time that the elastic modulus of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films is accurately predicted from both approach and retraction branches of force-indentation curves. For biological systems with complex hierarchical structures, we show the unique capability of MRA to map the micromechanics of live plant cells, revealing an intricate sequence of mechanical deformations resolved with precision that is unattainable using conventional methods of analysis. We recommend the routine use of MRA to interpret AFM force-indentation measurements for other complex soft materials including mammalian cells, bacteria and nanomaterials. PMID:25569139

  17. Biomolecular Interactions and Biological Responses of Emerging Two-Dimensional Materials and Aromatic Amino Acid Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Shannahan, Jonathan; Raghavendra, Achyut J; Rao, Apparao M; Brown, Jared M; Podila, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalnine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Graphene and GO were found to interact strongly with aromatic amino acids through π-π stacking, charge transfer, and H-bonding. Particularly, it was observed that both physi and chemisorption are prominent in the interactions of GO/graphene with phenylalanine and tryptophan while tyrosine exhibited strong chemisorption on graphene and GO. In contrast, BN exhibited little or no interactions, which could be attributed to localized π-electron clouds around N atoms in BN lattice. Lastly, the adsorption of amino acids on 2D materials was observed to considerably change their biological response in terms of reactive oxygen species generation. More importantly, these changes in the biological response followed the same trends observed in the physi and chemisorption measurements. PMID:27281436

  18. "Rinse and trickle": a protocol for TEM preparation and investigation of inorganic fibers from biological material.

    PubMed

    Vigliaturo, Ruggero; Capella, Silvana; Rinaudo, Caterina; Belluso, Elena

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to define a sample preparation protocol that allows inorganic fibers and particulate matter extracted from different biological samples to be characterized morphologically, crystallographically and chemically by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS). The method does not damage or create artifacts through chemical attacks of the target material. A fairly rapid specimen preparation is applied with the aim of performing as few steps as possible to transfer the withdrawn inorganic matter onto the TEM grid. The biological sample is previously digested chemically by NaClO. The salt is then removed through a series of centrifugation and rinse cycles in deionized water, thus drastically reducing the digestive power of the NaClO and concentrating the fibers for TEM analysis. The concept of equivalent hydrodynamic diameter is introduced to calculate the settling velocity during the centrifugation cycles. This technique is applicable to lung tissues and can be extended to a wide range of organic materials. The procedure does not appear to cause morphological damage to the fibers or modify their chemistry or degree of crystallinity. The extrapolated data can be used in interdisciplinary studies to understand the pathological effects caused by inorganic materials. PMID:27151190

  19. Problems Involved in the Choice and Use of Materials in Airplane Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Paul

    1932-01-01

    The present state of the problem of materials in airplane construction is studied on the basis of data giving the principal characteristics of different materials and showing how they affect the form of airplane parts.

  20. Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L; Boatright, Connie J; Hancock, John A; Denny, Frank J; Teeter, David S; Kahn, Christopher A; Schultz, Carl H

    2008-01-01

    Since the US terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, concern regarding use of chemical, biological, or radiological weapons is heightened. Many victims of such an attack would present directly to health care facilities without first undergoing field decontamination. This article reviews basic tenets and recommendations for health care facility-based decontamination, including regulatory concerns, types of contaminants, comprehensive decontamination procedures (including crowd control, triage, removal of contaminated garments, cleaning of body contaminants, and management of contaminated materials and equipment), and a discussion of methods to achieve preparedness. PMID:18082785

  1. Development and application of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, S.M.; Reynolds, G.T.

    1992-05-15

    This report describes progress as of the third year of a 3-year DoE grant for 1/1/92 to 12/31/92. Because this is the last year of a 3- year grant cycle, this report will summarize progress over the entire 3-year period. The overall goals of the grant are to develop novel instrumentation and techniques for the performance of biological and materials research, and especially for the development of x-ray detectors suitable for use at storage ring sources. Research progress has been excellent and the overall goals, as well as most of the specific goals have been successfully met.

  2. Choice of Biological Source Material Supersedes Oxidative Stress in Its Influence on DJ-1 in Vivo Interactions with Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Knobbe, Christiane B.; Revett, Timothy J.; Bai, Yu; Chow, Vinca; Jeon, Amy Hye Won; Böhm, Christopher; Ehsani, Sepehr; Kislinger, Thomas; Mount, Howard T.; Mak, Tak W.; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    DJ-1 is a small but relatively abundant protein of unknown function that may undergo stress-dependent cellular translocation and has been implicated in both neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. As such, DJ-1 may be an excellent study object to elucidate the relative influence of the cellular context on its interactome and for exploring whether acute exposure to oxidative stressors alters its molecular environment. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we conducted comparative DJ-1 interactome analyses from in vivo cross-linked brains or livers and from hydrogen peroxide-treated or naïve embryonic stem cells. The analysis identified a subset of glycolytic enzymes, heat shock proteins 70 and 90, and peroxiredoxins as interactors of DJ-1. Consistent with a role of DJ-1 in Hsp90 chaperone biology, we document destabilization of Hsp90 clients in DJ-1 knockout cells. We further demonstrate the existence of a C106 sulfinic acid modification within DJ-1 and thereby establish that this previously inferred modification also exists in vivo. Our data suggest that caution has to be exerted in interpreting interactome data obtained from a single biological source material and identify a role of DJ-1 as an oxidative stress sensor and partner of a molecular machinery notorious for its involvement in cell fate decisions. PMID:21819105

  3. Simple views on different problems in physics: from drag friction to tough biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Ko

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the dynamics of bubbles and liquid drops in quasi two dimensions, i.e. in the Hele-Shaw cell, confirming different scaling laws for viscous drag friction, together with scaling laws for a number of related phenomena. Motivated by the study on viscous drag friction, we describe an experiment on drag friction in a granular medium, which reveals a length scale that diverges towards the jamming transition. These examples in the dynamics of viscous fluid and granular materials underscore the importance of the scaling concept in understanding physical phenomena, often vindicated by a clear data collapse by virtue of a corresponding scaling law. To demonstrate the universal usefulness of the strategy, we discuss another different example from the strength of biological materials. To stress a wide applicability of the scaling approach, we introduce the robustness of scaling laws and justify frequent emergence of the robustness.

  4. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Luis

    2010-09-01

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  5. Removal of lipid soluble process chemicals from biological materials by extraction with naturally occurring oils or synthetic substitutes thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, K.R.; Orme, T.W.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a method of removing lipid soluble process chemicals from biological materials comprising blood plasma and fractions thereof containing the lipid soluble process chemicals. The lipid soluble process chemical is a virus attenuating solvent having a high flash point, a detergent, or a mixture thereof. It comprises bringing the biological materials containing the lipid soluble process chemicals into contact with an effective amount of a naturally occurring oil extracted from a plant or an animal or a synthetic compound of similar chemical structure. Also described is a method of removing lymphokine inducing phorbol esters from lympholkine-containing biological material. It comprises bringing the biological materials containing the phorbol esters into contact with an effective amount of a naturally occurring oil extracted from a plant or an animal or a synthetic compound of similar chemical structure so as to remove 80% or more of the phorbol esters.

  6. Optimization of the Inverse Algorithm for Estimating the Optical Properties of Biological Materials Using Spatially-resolved Diffuse Reflectance Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of the optical properties from intact biological materials based on diffusion approximation theory is a complicated inverse problem, and it requires proper implementation of inverse algorithm, instrumentation, and experiment. This work was aimed at optimizing the procedure of estimatin...

  7. The exoskeleton of the lobster Homarus americanus as an example of a smart anisotropic biological material.

    PubMed

    Romano, Patricia; Fabritius, Helge; Raabe, Dierk

    2007-05-01

    Many biological materials are composed of fibrils arranged according to well-ordered three-dimensional patterns. These materials often show a strong anisotropy in their properties. An essential characteristic of biological structures is their hierarchical organization from the nanometer to the millimeter scale. Lobster cuticle is a good example of this and a suitable model for studying these properties. In this study the structure of untreated as well as chemically and physically treated cuticle from the exoskeleton of the American lobster (Homarus americanus) was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Fresh samples have been chemically decalcified and deproteinated and thermally treated to evaluate their resistance to degradation. Results showed that their structure is more complex than the commonly assumed model for arthropod cuticles. Stacked chitin-protein planes create the characteristic twisted plywood pattern found in arthropod cuticles. However, due to a well-developed pore canal system these planes are not simple arrays of parallel chitin-protein fibers. In lobster cuticle, interconnected fibers bend around the continuous lenticellate cavities of the pore canals to form a planar honeycomb-like structure. The chemically and thermally treated samples showed that the organic matrix retains its shape and structure despite the attack of chemical compounds or heat. It was also possible to study the distribution of the biominerals after the removal of the organic matrix. The observed residual structure gives a good impression of how the minerals (mainly calcite) are distributed inside the polymeric network. PMID:17208527

  8. Independent Study of Collegiate Biological Science as a General Education Course: Involving Achievement and Understanding the Processes of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavick, Lloyd Clair

    The "Test on Understanding Science, Form W" and the "Nelson Biology Test, Form E", were administered before and after a college general biology course to a random selection of students who had chosen to take an individualized study program and to a random group of students who had chosen to follow the lecture-laboratory alternative. There were no…

  9. Closing the Loop: Involving Faculty in the Assessment of Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning Skills of Biology Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurney, Carol A.; Brown, Justin; Griscom, Heather Peckham; Kancler, Erika; Wigtil, Clifton J.; Sundre, Donna

    2011-01-01

    The development of scientific and quantitative reasoning skills in undergraduates majoring in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is an objective of many courses and curricula. The Biology Department at James Madison University (JMU) assesses these essential skills in graduating biology majors by using a multiple-choice exam…

  10. New Method for Monitoring the Process of Freeze Drying of Biological Materials.

    PubMed

    Alkeev, Nikolay; Averin, Stanislav; von Gratowski, Svetlana

    2015-12-01

    A capacitive sensor was proposed and tested for the monitoring and control of a freeze drying process of a vaccine against the Newcastle disease of birds. The residual moisture of the vaccine was measured by the thermogravimetric method. The vaccine activity was determined by titration in chicken embryos. It was shown that, at the stages of freezing and primary drying, a capacitive sensor measured the fraction of unfrozen liquid phase in a material and allowed one to control the sublimation stage of drying in an optimal way. This prevented the foaming of the material and shortened the total drying time approximately twice. The control range at the sublimation stage of drying expanded up to -70°C. It was found at the final stage of drying that the signal of a capacitive sensor passed through a maximum value. We supposed that this maximum corresponds to the minimum of intramolecular mobility of biological macromolecules and hence to the optimal residual moisture of the material, which ensures long-term preservation of its activity. We also suppose that using the capacitive sensor at the final stage of drying allows one to more precisely detect the time when the residual moisture of dried material reaches the optimal value. PMID:26022547

  11. Method of producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen by gasification of solid carbonaceous material involving microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, J.L. Jr.

    1984-03-06

    A process is claimed for the gasification of carbon of solid carbonaceous material to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting the material with superheated steam and irradiating the product of said contacting with an amount of microwave energy sufficient to gasify said carbon, and apparatus therefor.

  12. Femtosecond pulse laser ablation of metallic, semiconducting, ceramic, and biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautek, Wolfgang; Krueger, Joerg

    1994-09-01

    Production of holes and grooves of < 30 micrometers diameter with high aspect ratio value is a delicate task either for mechanical tools, or for conventional nanosecond pulse lasers like e.g. pulsed Nd:YAG or excimer lasers. They later tend to cause microcracks extending from an annular melting zone, or substantial disruption, respectively. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that the development of intense ultrashort pulse laser systems (>> 1012 W cm-2, (tau) < 1 ps) opens up possibilities for materials processing by cold plasma generation and ablation of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, composites, and biological materials. A femtosecond and a nanosecond dye laser with pulse durations of 300 fs (< 200 (mu) J) and 7 ns (< 10 mJ), and center wavelengths at 612 and 600 nm, respectively, both focused on an area of the order of 10-5 cm2, have been applied either to absorbing substrates, like polycrystalline gold, silicon (111), aluminum nitride ceramics, or transparent materials, like synthetic and human dental hydroxyapatite composites, bone material, and human cornea transplants. The fs-laser generates its own absorption in transparent materials by a multiphoton absorption process, and thus forces the absorption of visible radiation. Because the time is too short (< ps) for significant transport of mass and energy, the beam interaction generally results in the formation of a thin plasma layer of approximately solid state density. Only after the end of the subpicosecond laser pulse, it expands rapidly away from the surface without any light absorption and further plasma heating. Therefore, energy transfer (heat and impulse) to the target material, and thermal and mechanical disruption are minimized. In contrast to heat- affected zones (HAZ's) generated by conventional nanosecond pulse lasers of the order of 1 - 10 micrometers , HAZ's of less than 0.02 micrometers were observed.

  13. Assembling new technologies at the interface of materials science and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stendahl, John C.

    Molecular self-assembly can be used to construct advanced materials by taking cues from nature and harnessing noncovalent interactions. This bottom-up approach affords molecular level precision that can cultivate pathways to improved materials function. The graduate research presented in this thesis integrates molecular self-assembly with traditional concepts in chemistry and materials science, with the ultimate goal of developing innovative solutions in technology and medicine. In the field of polymer engineering, self-assembly was used to create supramolecular nanoribbons that, when incorporated into polystyrene, modify its microstructure and significantly enhance its toughness and ductility. In medicine, self-assembly was used to create ordered, chemically functional materials to improve interactions with cells and other constituents of the biological environment. One system that was investigated is based on a triblock molecule in which cholesterol is connected to a lysine dendron by a flexible oligo-(L-lactic acid) spacer. These molecules self-assemble into polar surface coatings on fibrous poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds that improve the scaffold's wettability and increase its retention of cells during seeding. Another self-assembling system that was investigated for biomedical applications is a family of molecules referred to as peptide amphiphiles (PA's). PA's consist of hydrophobic alkyl tails connected to short, hydrophilic peptides that incorporate biological signaling epitopes. These molecules spontaneously assemble into networks of well-defined nanofibers in aqueous environments, with the signaling epitopes presented in high density on the nanofiber exteriors. Nanofiber assembly is triggered by charge screening on the peptides and is able to produce self-supporting gels in concentrations of less than 1.0 wt.-%. The assembly process and mechanical properties of PA gels was investigated in detail with vibrational spectroscopy and oscillatory rheology. PA

  14. 25 CFR 170.904 - Who responds to an accident involving a radioactive or hazardous materials shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who responds to an accident involving a radioactive or hazardous materials shipment? 170.904 Section 170.904 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste Transportation § 170.904 Who...

  15. 25 CFR 170.904 - Who responds to an accident involving a radioactive or hazardous materials shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who responds to an accident involving a radioactive or hazardous materials shipment? 170.904 Section 170.904 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste Transportation § 170.904...

  16. 25 CFR 170.904 - Who responds to an accident involving a radioactive or hazardous materials shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who responds to an accident involving a radioactive or hazardous materials shipment? 170.904 Section 170.904 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste Transportation § 170.904...

  17. 25 CFR 170.904 - Who responds to an accident involving a radioactive or hazardous materials shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who responds to an accident involving a radioactive or hazardous materials shipment? 170.904 Section 170.904 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste Transportation § 170.904...

  18. 25 CFR 170.904 - Who responds to an accident involving a radioactive or hazardous materials shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who responds to an accident involving a radioactive or hazardous materials shipment? 170.904 Section 170.904 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste Transportation § 170.904...

  19. Evaluation of flow injection analysis for determination of cholinesterase activities in biological material.

    PubMed

    Cabal, Jiri; Bajgar, Jiri; Kassa, Jiri

    2010-09-01

    The method for automatic continual monitoring of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in biological material is described. It is based on flexible system of plastic pipes mixing samples of biological material with reagents for enzyme determination; reaction product penetrates through the semipermeable membrane and it is spectrophotometrically determined (Ellman's method). It consists of sampling (either in vitro or in vivo), adding the substrate and flowing to dialyzer; reaction product (thiocholine) is dialyzed and mixed with 5,5'-dithio-bis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) transported to flow spectrophotometer. Flowing of all materials is realised using peristaltic pump. The method was validated: time for optimal hydratation of the cellophane membrane; type of the membrane; type of dialyzer; conditions for optimal permeation of reaction components; optimization of substrate and DTNB concentrations (linear dependence); efficacy of peristaltic pump; calibration of analytes after permeation through the membrane; excluding of the blood permeation through the membrane. Some examples of the evaluation of the effects of AChE inhibitors are described. It was demonstrated very good uniformity of peaks representing the enzyme activity (good reproducibility); time dependence of AChE inhibition caused by VX in vitro in the rat blood allowing to determine the half life of inhibition and thus, bimolecular rate constants of inhibition; reactivation of inhibited AChE by some reactivators, and continual monitoring of the activity in the whole blood in vivo in intact and VX-intoxicated rats. The method is simple and not expensive, allowing automatic determination of AChE activity in discrete or continual samples in vitro or in vivo. It will be evaluated for further research of cholinesterase inhibitors. PMID:20188079

  20. Effects of chemical and biological warfare remediation agents on the materials of museum objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solazzo, C.; Erhardt, D.; Marte, F.; von Endt, D.; Tumosa, C.

    In the fall of 2001, anthrax-contaminated letters were sent to public figures in the United States. Chemical and radiation treatments were employed to decontaminate exposed buildings, objects, and materials. These treatments are effective, but potentially damaging to exposed objects and materials. The recommended surface chemical treatments include solutions, gels, and foams of oxidizing agents such as peroxides or chlorine bleaching agents. Such oxidizing agents are effective against a wide range of hazardous chemical and biological agents. Knowing how these reagents affect various substrates would help to anticipate and to minimize any potential damage. We are examining the effects on typical museum materials of reagents likely to be used, including hydrogen peroxide, sodium hypochlorite, and potassium peroxymonosulfate. Results so far show significant changes in a number of materials. Surface corrosion was observed on metals such as copper, silver, iron, and brass. Color changes occurred with at least one reagent in about one-fourth of the dyed fabric swatches tested, and about half of the inks. Samples of aged yellowed paper are bleached. Effects varied with both the substrate and the tested reagent. The observed changes were generally less drastic than might have been expected. Enough materials were affected, though, to preclude the use of these reagents on museum objects unless no less drastic alternative is available. It appears that many objects of lesser intrinsic value can be treated without severe loss of properties or usefulness. For example, most documents should remain legible if the appropriate reagent is used. This work will provide a basis for determining which treatment is most appropriate for a specific situation and what consequences are to be expected from other treatments.

  1. Extraction of proteins and membrane lipids during low temperature embedding of biological material for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weibull, C; Christiansson, A

    1986-04-01

    The extraction of proteins and membrane lipids from biological materials during embedding procedures for electron microscopy carried out at temperatures down to 223 K was studied. Glutaraldehyde-fixed cells of Acholeplasma laidlawii mainly served as test material. More than 99% of the protein and 88% of the lipid of these cells were retained after dehydration with ethanol or acetone between 277 and 223 K and infiltration with methacrylate at 223 K. When methanol was used for dehydration, only 54% of the lipid was retained. The amount of extracted lipid was essentially independent of the ratio between volume of extraction liquid and amount of material subjected to extraction. The cytoplasmic membrane of sectioned Acholeplasma-cells dehydrated and infiltrated as described above appeared more diffuse than that of cells fixed with glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide in epoxy resin at room temperature. Glutaraldehyde-fixed erythrocyte ghosts retained 85% of their phospholipid content when dehydrated with ethanol between 277 and 223 K and infiltrated with methacrylate at 223 K. Spinach chloroplasts and thylakoid vesicles retained 61% and 35%, respectively, of their chlorophyll content. PMID:3712423

  2. Department Involvement in Instructional Materials Development for ODL Study at the Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanyanyiwa, Vincent Itai; Mutambanengwe, Betty

    2015-01-01

    The teaching and designing of modules at Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) is the principal responsibility of a single body of teaching staff, although some authors and content reviewers could be sourced from elsewhere if they are not available in ZOU. This survey, through a case study, examines the involvement of lecturers and staff in the…

  3. Transient analysis of a thermal storage unit involving a phase change material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griggs, E. I.; Pitts, D. R.; Humphries, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    The transient response of a single cell of a typical phase change material type thermal capacitor has been modeled using numerical conductive heat transfer techniques. The cell consists of a base plate, an insulated top, and two vertical walls (fins) forming a two-dimensional cavity filled with a phase change material. Both explicit and implicit numerical formulations are outlined. A mixed explicit-implicit scheme which treats the fin implicity while treating the phase change material explicitly is discussed. A band algorithmic scheme is used to reduce computer storage requirements for the implicit approach while retaining a relatively fine grid. All formulations are presented in dimensionless form thereby enabling application to geometrically similar problems. Typical parametric results are graphically presented for the case of melting with constant heat input to the base of the cell.

  4. Interaction of Materials and Biology in Total Joint Replacement – Successes, Challenges and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Yao, Z; Goodman, SB

    2014-01-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR) has revolutionized the treatment of end-stage arthritic disorders. This success is due, in large part, to a clear understanding of the important interaction between the artificial implant and the biology of the host. All surgical procedures in which implants are placed in the body evoke an initial inflammatory reaction, which generally subsides over several weeks. Thereafter, a series of homeostatic events occur leading to progressive integration of the implant within bone and the surrounding musculoskeletal tissues. The eventual outcome of the operation is dependent on the characteristics of the implant, the precision of the surgical technique and operative environment, and the biological milieu of the host. If these factors and events are not optimal, adverse events can occur such as the development of chronic inflammation, progressive bone loss due to increased production of degradation products from the implant (periprosthetic osteolysis), implant loosening or infection. These complications can lead to chronic pain and poor function of the joint reconstruction, and may necessitate revision surgery or removal of the prosthesis entirely. Recent advances in engineering, materials science, and the immunological aspects associated with orthopaedic implants have fostered intense research with the hope that joint replacements will last a lifetime, and facilitate pain-free, normal function. PMID:25541591

  5. Targeting the finite-deformation response of wavy biological tissues with bio-inspired material architectures.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqiong; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm driven by a homogenized-based model is employed to target the response of three types of heart-valve chordae tendineae with different stiffening characteristics due to different degrees of waviness of collagen fibril/fiber bundles. First, geometric and material parameters are identified through an extensive parametric study that produce excellent agreement of the simulated response based on simplified unit cell architectures with the actual response of the complex biological tissue. These include amplitude and wavelength of the crimped chordae microstructure, elastic moduli of the constituent phases, and degree of microstructural refinement of the stiff phase at fixed volume fraction whose role in the stiffening response is elucidated. The study also reveals potential non-uniqueness of bio-inspired wavy microstructures in attaining the targeted response of certain chordae tendineae crimp configurations. The homogenization-based Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm, whose predictions are validated through the parametric study, is then shown to be an excellent tool in identifying optimal unit cell architectures in the design space that exhibits very steep gradients. Finally, defect criticality of optimal unit cell architectures is investigated in order to assess their feasibility in replacing actual biological tendons with stiffening characteristics. PMID:24018396

  6. Evaluation of analytical methods for fluorine in biological and related materials.

    PubMed

    Venkateswarlu, P

    1990-02-01

    During the past two decades, some major pitfalls in fluorine analysis have been recognized and overcome. Therefore, it is important that facts be separated from fallacies in published literature on levels and forms of fluorine (ionic, bound, covalent, etc.) in biological materials, in order that correct perceptions of physiological, biochemical, and toxicological aspects of inorganic as well as organic fluorine compounds can be formed. Trace amounts of inorganic fluoride in biological samples can now be accurately determined with the fluoride electrode either directly or following diffusion, adsorption, or reverse extraction of fluoride (when necessary). The aluminum monofluoride molecular absorption technique provides an excellent rapid method for determination of trace amounts of inorganic fluoride (in the absence of organic fluorine). Fluorine in most organic fluorine compounds is not available for distillation, diffusion, or reverse-extraction. The sample needs to be ashed (open ashing) or combusted (oxygen flask, oxygen bomb, pyrohydrolysis) for covalently bound fluorine to be converted to fluoride ions. This can now be readily accomplished at room temperature by the reductive cleavage of the C-F bond with the sodium biphenyl reagent. Some recommendations for future research have been made. PMID:2179310

  7. Graphene-based platform for nano-scale infrared near-field spectroscopy of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatib, Omar; Wood, Joshua D.; Doidge, Gregory P.; Damhorst, Gregory L.; Rangarajan, Aniruddh; Bashir, Rashid; Pop, Eric; Lyding, Joseph W.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2014-03-01

    In biological and life sciences, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy serves as a noninvasive probe of vibrational fingerprints used to identify chemical and molecular species. Near-field spectroscopy, based on the illumination of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip with an infrared laser, allows for determination of IR properties of a material at nanometer length scales. However, application of near-field IR spectroscopy to most biological systems has thus far been elusive. Physiological conditions required for experimentation are incompatible with typical implementations of nano-FTIR. Recently it became possible to trap water and small biomolecules underneath large-area graphene sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The graphene layer serves as an IR-transparent cover that allows for a near-field interrogation of the underlying layers. We present near-field nano-imaging and spectroscopy data of unencapsulated Tobacco Mosaic Viruses (TMV), compared to those sandwiched between two large-area graphene sheets, and discuss the applicability of near-field IR spectroscopy to trapped biomolecules in aqueous environments.

  8. Chemical imaging of biological materials by NanoSIMS using isotopic and elemental labels

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Fallon, S J; Pett-Ridge, J; Ghosal, S; Hutcheon, I D

    2006-04-10

    The NanoSIMS 50 combines unprecedented spatial resolution (as good as 50 nm) with ultra-high sensitivity (minimum detection limit of {approx}200 atoms). The NanoSIMS 50 incorporates an array of detectors, enabling simultaneous collection of 5 species originating from the same sputtered volume of a sample. The primary ion beam (Cs{sup +} or O{sup -}) can be scanned across the sample to produce quantitative secondary ion images. This capability for multiple isotope imaging with high spatial resolution provides a novel new approach to the study of biological materials. Studies can be made of sub-regions of tissues, mammalian cells, and bacteria. Major, minor and trace element distributions can be mapped on a submicron scale, growth and metabolism can be tracked using stable isotope labels, and biogenic origin can be determined based on composition. We have applied this technique extensively to mammalian and prokaryotic cells and bacterial spores. The NanoSIMS technology enables the researcher to interrogate the fate of molecules of interest within cells and organs through elemental and isotopic labeling. Biological applications at LLNL will be discussed.

  9. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof’ electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies o1 eV can be ‘safely’ investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with nomore » observable radiation damage. Furthermore, the technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.« less

  10. Collection of biological materials in biodiversity prospecting in India: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, B N

    1996-04-01

    Forests are the chief resource for the collection and exploration of biological materials. The past few decades have witnessed a large scale deforestation in India due to substantial pressures generated by population growth, leading to demand for more land for agriculture, urbanization and industrial activities, in addition to increased demand for fuel wood and timber. This has resulted in the loss of soil cover, habitat destruction, environmental degradation and ecological imbalance. This scenario has created a progressive awareness for the conservation and restoration of habitats and, thus, the declaration of many forest areas into protected zones, such as national parks, biosphere reserves, etc., including the protection of some marine areas, by both the National and State Governments. Normally, permission for biological collecting is not granted in these protected areas. In India, forests are a State subject and grant for collection permission is vested with the State Forest Departments. In the absence of any rules, regulations and guidelines, either from National or State Governments, forest authorities impose their terms and conditions, which are arbitrary and even contradictory at times, in the process of granting collecting permits. A set of new rules to be applied throughout the country is needed. PMID:9213611

  11. Alkaline and ultrasonic dissolution of biological materials for trace silicon determination

    PubMed Central

    Viveros, Robert D.; Liberman, Alexander; Trogler, William C.; Kummel, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    A simple method for trace elemental determination in biological tissue has been developed. Novel nanomaterials with biomedical applications necessitate the determination of the in vivo fate of the materials to understand their toxicological profile. Hollow iron-doped calcined silica nanoshells have been used as a model to demonstrate that potassium hydroxide and bath sonication at 50 °C can extract elements from alkaline-soluble nanomaterials. After alkali digestion, nitric acid is used to adjust the pH into a suitable range for analysis using techniques such as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry which require neutral or acidic analytes. In chicken liver phantoms injected with the nanoshells, 96% of the expected silicon concentration was detected. This value was in good agreement with the 94% detection efficiency of nanoshells dissolved in aqueous solution as a control for potential sample matrix interference. Nanoshell detection was further confirmed in a mouse 24 h after intravenous administration; the measured silica above baseline was 35 times greater or more than the standard deviations of the measurements. This method provides a simple and accurate means to quantify alkaline-soluble nanomaterials in biological tissue. PMID:25909037

  12. [Use of aluminum foil baths for embedding biological materials in epoxide resins].

    PubMed

    Agaev, Iu M; Merkulov, V A

    1975-11-01

    The baths intended for embedding the biological material into epoxide resins are made of aluminium foil, 0.1 mm thick, cut in the form of rectangles (13 X 18 mm). The rectangular foil plates are placed on a soft microporous rubber separator 30--40 mm thick and by means of a form with the base equal to 5 X 10 mm the baths are pressed down by 4 mm deep. The baths are stuck to the paper stripes by rubber cement to ensure easy handling and numeration. In the process of embedding and polymerization the paper stripes having the baths are placed in the exsiccator with P2O5 and thermostate on special aluminium stands. PMID:775710

  13. Ferromagnetic resonance for the quantification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Gamarra, Lionel F; daCosta-Filho, Antonio J; Mamani, Javier B; de Cassia Ruiz, Rita; Pavon, Lorena F; Sibov, Tatiana T; Vieira, Ernanni D; Silva, André C; Pontuschka, Walter M; Amaro, Edson

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present work is the presentation of a quantification methodology for the control of the amount of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) administered in biological materials by means of the ferromagnetic resonance technique (FMR) applied to studies both in vivo and in vitro. The in vivo study consisted in the analysis of the elimination and biodistribution kinetics of SPIONs after intravenous administration in Wistar rats. The results were corroborated by X-ray fluorescence. For the in vitro study, a quantitative analysis of the concentration of SPIONs bound to the specific AC133 monoclonal antibodies was carried out in order to detect the expression of the antigenic epitopes (CD133) in stem cells from human umbilical cord blood. In both studies FMR has proven to be an efficient technique for the SPIONs quantification per volume unit (in vivo) or per labeled cell (in vitro). PMID:20463936

  14. Chromium(III) sorption enhancement through NTA - modification of biological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.S.; Lee, C.K.; Lee, P.L.

    1997-03-01

    The use of low-cost biological materials for the removal and recovery of heavy metals from solution has been investigated extensively in recent times. To enhance their sorption capacities various chemical modifications on the sorbents were attempted. Freer et al. showed that bark from the Pinus radiata (D. Don) had a greater sorption capacity for metals after treatment with both inorganic acid and formaldehyde. Apple wastes treated with phosphorus oxychloride improved the efficiency of removing metal ions. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)-modified groundnut, Arachis hypogea, was reported to improve the sorption of cadmium and lead ions. Modifications with the aid of dyes also enhanced metal sorption. Moss and coconut husk (CH) are readily obtainable in Malaysia. Their sorption potential for metals has been reported. This paper reports on the metal sorption enhancement of these two biosorbents after chemical modification with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA). 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Preparation and antibacterial performance testing of Ag nanoparticles embedded biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyun; Gao, Guanhui; Sun, Chengjun; Zhu, Yaoyao; Qu, Lingyun; Jiang, Fenghua; Ding, Haibing

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we developed an environmentally friendly chemistry strategy to synthesize Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) embedded biological material, powdered mussel shell (PMS). With the PMS as scaffolds and surfactant, Ag nanoparticles of controllable size dispersed uniformly on it via liquid chemical reduction approach. Morphologies and characteristics of synthesized Ag-NPs/PMS hybrids were analyzed with TEM, SEM and XPS. Antibacterial properties were investigated with Gram-positive bacteria (Arthrobacter sulfureus (A. sulfureus) YACS14, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)) and Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio anguillarum (V. anguillarum) MVM425, Escherichia coli (E. coli)). The antimicrobial results illustrated that Ag-NPs/PMS composites have antibacterial effect on both sea water and fresh water bacteria with a better effect on sea water bacteria. The degree of antibacterial effect is directly related to the amount of Ag released from Ag-NPs/PMS.

  16. A controlled rate freeze/thaw system for cryopreservation of biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Harrison, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    A system which allows programmable temperature-time control for a 5 cc sample volume of an arbitrary biological material was constructed. Steady state and dynamic temperature control was obtained by supplying heat to the sample volume through resistive elements constructed as an integral part of the sample container. For cooling purposes, this container was totally immersed into a cold heat sink. Sample volume thermodynamic property data were obtained by measurements of heater power and heat flux through the container walls. Using a mixture of dry ice and alcohol at -79 C, sample volume was controlled from +40 C to -60 C at rates from steady state to + or - 65 C/min. Steady state temperature precision was better than 0.2 C while the dynamic capability depends on the temperature rate of change as well as the thermal mass of the sample and the container.

  17. Measuring Spatially- and Directionally-varying Light Scattering from Biological Material

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Todd Alan; Bostwick, Kimberly S.; Marschner, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Light interacts with an organism's integument on a variety of spatial scales. For example in an iridescent bird: nano-scale structures produce color; the milli-scale structure of barbs and barbules largely determines the directional pattern of reflected light; and through the macro-scale spatial structure of overlapping, curved feathers, these directional effects create the visual texture. Milli-scale and macro-scale effects determine where on the organism's body, and from what viewpoints and under what illumination, the iridescent colors are seen. Thus, the highly directional flash of brilliant color from the iridescent throat of a hummingbird is inadequately explained by its nano-scale structure alone and questions remain. From a given observation point, which milli-scale elements of the feather are oriented to reflect strongly? Do some species produce broader "windows" for observation of iridescence than others? These and similar questions may be asked about any organisms that have evolved a particular surface appearance for signaling, camouflage, or other reasons. In order to study the directional patterns of light scattering from feathers, and their relationship to the bird's milli-scale morphology, we developed a protocol for measuring light scattered from biological materials using many high-resolution photographs taken with varying illumination and viewing directions. Since we measure scattered light as a function of direction, we can observe the characteristic features in the directional distribution of light scattered from that particular feather, and because barbs and barbules are resolved in our images, we can clearly attribute the directional features to these different milli-scale structures. Keeping the specimen intact preserves the gross-scale scattering behavior seen in nature. The method described here presents a generalized protocol for analyzing spatially- and directionally-varying light scattering from complex biological materials at multiple

  18. Wood-Derived Materials for Green Electronics, Biological Devices, and Energy Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Wei; Ciesielski, Peter N; Fang, Zhiqiang; Zhu, J Y; Henriksson, Gunnar; Himmel, Michael E; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-08-24

    goal of this study is to review the fundamental structures and chemistries of wood and wood-derived materials, which are essential for a wide range of existing and new enabling technologies. The scope of the review covers multiscale materials and assemblies of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin as well as other biomaterials derived from wood, in regard to their major emerging applications. Structure-properties-application relationships will be investigated in detail. Understanding the fundamental properties of these structures is crucial for designing and manufacturing products for emerging applications. Today, a more holistic understanding of the interplay between the structure, chemistry, and performance of wood and wood-derived materials is advancing historical applications of these materials. This new level of understanding also enables a myriad of new and exciting applications, which motivate this review. There are excellent reviews already on the classical topic of woody materials, and some recent reviews also cover new understanding of these materials as well as potential applications. This review will focus on the uniqueness of woody materials for three critical applications: green electronics, biological devices, and energy storage and bioenergy. PMID:27459699

  19. Effects of addictive substances during pregnancy and infancy and their analysis in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Płotka, Justyna; Narkowicz, Sylwia; Polkowska, Zaneta; Biziuk, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The use of addictive substances during pregnancy is a serious social problem, not only because of effects on the health of the woman and child, but also because drug or alcohol dependency detracts from child care and enhances the prospect of child neglect and family breakdown. Developing additive substance abuse treatment programs for pregnant women is socially important and can help ensure the health of babies, prevent subsequent developmental and behavioral problems (i.e., from intake of alcohol or other additive substances such as methamphetamine, cocaine,or heroine) and can reduce addiction costs to society. Because women of childbearing age often abuse controlled substances during their pregnancy, it is important to undertake biomonitoring of these substances in biological samples taken from the pregnant or nursing mother (e.g., blood, urine,hair, breast milk, sweat, oral fluids, etc.), from the fetus and newborn (e.g., meconium,cord blood, neonatal hair and urine) and from both the mother and fetus (i.e.,amniotic fluids and placenta). The choice of specimens to be analyzed is determined by many factors; however, the most important is knowledge of the chemical and physical characteristics of a substance and the route of it administration. Maternal and neonatal biological materials reflect exposures that occur over a specific time period, and each of these biological specimens has different advantages and disadvantages,in terms of accuracy, time window of exposure and cost/benefit ratio.Sampling the placenta may be the most important biomonitoring choice for assessing in utero exposure to addictive substances. The use of the placenta in scientific research causes a minimum of ethical problems, partly because its sampling is noninvasive, causes no harm to mother or child, and partly because, in any case,placentas are discarded and incinerated after birth. Such samples, when properly analyzed, may provide key essential information about fetal exposure to toxic

  20. Materials design considerations involved in the fabrication of implantable bionics by metallization of ceramic substrates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunil; Guenther, Thomas; Dodds, Christopher W D; Kolke, Sergej; Privat, Karen L; Matteucci, Paul B; Suaning, Gregg J

    2013-01-01

    The Pt metallization of co-fired Al2O3/SiO2 substrates containing Pt feedthroughs was shown to be a suitable means to construct implantable bionics. The use of forge welding to join an electrode to such a metallized feedthrough was demonstrated and subsequently evaluated through the use of metallography and electron microscopy. Metallurgical phenomena involved in forge welding relevant to the fabrication of all types of biomedical implants are discussed within this paper. The affect of thermal profiles used in brazing or welding to build implantable devices from metal components is analysed and the case for considered selection of alloys in implant design is put forward. PMID:24109798

  1. Designing Laboratory Exercises for the Undergraduate Molecular Biology/Biochemistry Student: Techniques and Ethical Implications Involved in Personalized Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinlander, Kenneth M.; Hall, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine refers to medical care that involves genetically screening patients for their likelihood to develop various disorders. Commercial genome screening only involves identifying a consumer's genotype for a few single nucleotide polymorphisms. A phenotype (such as an illness) is greatly influenced by three factors: genes, gene…

  2. Water regime of mechanical-biological pretreated waste materials under fast-growing trees.

    PubMed

    Rüth, Björn; Lennartz, Bernd; Kahle, Petra

    2007-10-01

    In this study mechanical-biological pre-treated waste material (MBP) was tested for suitability to serve as an alternative surface layer in combination with fast-growing and water-consumptive trees for final covers at landfill sites. The aim was to quantify evapotranspiration and seepage losses by numerical model simulations for two sites in Germany. In addition, the leaf area index (LAI) of six tree species over the growing season as the driving parameter for transpiration calculations was determined experimentally. The maximum LAI varied between 3.8 and 6.1 m2 m(-2) for poplar and willow clones, respectively. The evapotranspiration calculations revealed that the use of MBP waste material for re-cultivation enhanced evapotranspiration by 40 mm year(-1) (10%) over an 11 year calculation period compared to a standard mineral soil. Between 82% (for LAI(max) = 3.8) and 87% (for LAI(max) = 6.1) of the average annual precipitation (506 mm) could be retained from the surface layer assuming eastern German climate conditions, compared with a retention efficiency between 79 and 82% for a mineral soil. Although a MBP layer in conjunction with water-consumptive trees can reduce vertical water losses as compared to mineral substrates, the effect is not sufficient to meet legal regulations. PMID:17985666

  3. Evaluation of radiochemical neutron activation analysis methods for determination of arsenic in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rick L

    2011-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) with retention on hydrated manganese dioxide (HMD) has played a key role in the certification of As in biological materials at NIST. Although this method provides very high and reproducible yields and detection limits at low microgram/kilogram levels, counting geometry uncertainties may arise from unequal distribution of As in the HMD, and arsenic detection limits may not be optimal due to significant retention of other elements. An alternate RNAA procedure with separation of arsenic by solvent extraction has been investigated. After digestion of samples in nitric and perchloric acids, As(III) is extracted from 2 M sulfuric acid solution into a solution of zinc diethyldithiocarbamate in chloroform. Counting of (76)As allows quantitation of arsenic. Addition of an (77)As tracer solution prior to dissolution allows correction for chemical yield and counting geometries, further improving reproducibility. The HMD and solvent extraction procedures for arsenic were compared through analysis of SRMs 1577c (bovine liver), 1547 (peach leaves), and 1575a (pine needles). Both methods gave As results in agreement with certified values with comparable reproducibility. However, the solvent extraction method yields a factor of 3 improvement in detection limits and is less time-consuming than the HMD method. The new method shows great promise for use in As certification in reference materials. PMID:21133431

  4. Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents with a single multi-functional material.

    PubMed

    Amitai, Gabi; Murata, Hironobu; Andersen, Jill D; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J

    2010-05-01

    We report the synthesis of new polymers based on a dimethylacrylamide-methacrylate (DMAA-MA) co-polymer backbone that support both chemical and biological agent decontamination. Polyurethanes containing the redox enzymes glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase can convert halide ions into active halogens and exert striking bactericidal activity against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. New materials combining those biopolymers with a family of N-alkyl 4-pyridinium aldoxime (4-PAM) halide-acrylate co-polymers offer both nucleophilic activity for the detoxification of organophosphorus nerve agents and internal sources of halide ions for generation of biocidal activity. Generation of free bromine and iodine was observed in the combined material resulting in bactericidal activity of the enzymatically formed free halogens that caused complete kill of E. coli (>6 log units reduction) within 1 h at 37 degrees C. Detoxification of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) by the polyDMAA MA-4-PAM iodide component was dose-dependent reaching 85% within 30 min. A subset of 4-PAM-halide co-polymers was designed to serve as a controlled release reservoir for N-hydroxyethyl 4-PAM (HE 4-PAM) molecules that reactivate nerve agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Release rates for HE 4-PAM were consistent with hydrolysis of the HE 4-PAM from the polymer backbone. The HE 4-PAM that was released from the polymer reactivated DFP-inhibited AChE at a similar rate to the oxime antidote 4-PAM. PMID:20199807

  5. THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ethan W. Brown

    2001-09-01

    Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials. Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities. Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex. Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis. Interstate waste and materials shipments. Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the period from April 1, 2001 through June 30, 2001, under the NGA grant.

  6. Free radicals: how do we stand them? Anaerobic and aerobic free radical (chain) reactions involved in the use of fluorogenic probes and in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Liochev, Stefan I

    2014-01-01

    Biologically significant conclusions have been based on the use of fluorogenic and luminogenic probes for the detection of reactive species. The basic mechanisms of the processes involved have not been satisfactorily elucidated. In the present work, the mechanism of the enzyme and photosensitized oxidation of NAD(P)H by resorufin is analyzed and appears to involve both aerobic and anaerobic free radical chain reactions. There are two major fallouts of this analysis. Many of the conclusions about the participation of radicals based on the use of probes such as resorufin and Amplex red need reevaluation. It is also concluded that anaerobic free radical reactions may be biologically significant, and the possible existence of enzymatic systems to eliminate certain free radicals is discussed. PMID:24356000

  7. Environmental routes for platinum group elements to biological materials--a review.

    PubMed

    Ek, Kristine H; Morrison, Gregory M; Rauch, Sebastien

    2004-12-01

    The increased use of platinum group elements (PGE) in automobile catalysts has led to concern over potential environmental and biological accumulation. Platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh) concentrations have increased in the environment since the introduction of automobile catalysts. This review summarises current knowledge concerning the environmental mobility, speciation and bioavailability of Pt, Pd and Rh. The greater proportion of PGE emissions is from automobile catalysts, in the form of nanometer-sized catalyst particles, which deposit on roadside surfaces, as evidenced in samples of road dust, grass and soil. In soil, PGE can be transformed into more mobile species through complexation with organic matter and can be solubilised in low pH rainwater. There are indications that environmentally formed Pd species are more soluble and hence more mobile in the environment than Rh and Pt. PGE can reach waterbodies through stormwater transport and deposition in sediments. Besides external contamination of grass close to roads, internal PGE uptake has been observed for plants growing on soil contaminated with automobile catalyst PGE. Fine particles of PGE were also detected on the surface of feathers sampled from passerines and raptors in their natural habitat, and internal organs of these birds also contained PGE. Uptake has been observed in sediment-dwelling invertebrates, and laboratory studies have shown an uptake of PGE in eel and fish exposed to water containing road dust. The available evidence indicates that the PGE, especially Pd, are transported to biological materials through deposition in roots by binding to sulphur-rich low molecular weight species in plants. PGE uptake to exposed animals have uptake rates in the following order: Pd>Pt>Rh. The liver and kidney accumulate the highest levels of PGE, especially Pd. Urinary Pd and Rh, but not Pt, levels are correlated with traffic intensity. Dental alloys may lead to elevated urinary Pt levels

  8. Near-infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging: non-destructive analysis of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Manley, Marena

    2014-12-21

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has come of age and is now prominent among major analytical technologies after the NIR region was discovered in 1800, revived and developed in the early 1950s and put into practice in the 1970s. Since its first use in the cereal industry, it has become the quality control method of choice for many more applications due to the advancement in instrumentation, computing power and multivariate data analysis. NIR spectroscopy is also increasingly used during basic research performed to better understand complex biological systems, e.g. by means of studying characteristic water absorption bands. The shorter NIR wavelengths (800-2500 nm), compared to those in the mid-infrared (MIR) range (2500-15 000 nm) enable increased penetration depth and subsequent non-destructive, non-invasive, chemical-free, rapid analysis possibilities for a wide range of biological materials. A disadvantage of NIR spectroscopy is its reliance on reference methods and model development using chemometrics. NIR measurements and predictions are, however, considered more reproducible than the usually more accurate and precise reference methods. The advantages of NIR spectroscopy contribute to it now often being favoured over other spectroscopic (colourimetry and MIR) and analytical methods, using chemicals and producing chemical waste, such as gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This tutorial review intends to provide a brief overview of the basic theoretical principles and most investigated applications of NIR spectroscopy. In addition, it considers the recent development, principles and applications of NIR hyperspectral imaging. NIR hyperspectral imaging provides NIR spectral data as a set of images, each representing a narrow wavelength range or spectral band. The advantage compared to NIR spectroscopy is that, due to the additional spatial dimension provided by this technology, the images can be analysed and visualised as

  9. Effect of repeated contact on adhesion measurements involving polydimethylsiloxane structural material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, E.; Maboudian, R.; Arzt, E.

    2009-09-01

    During the last few years several research groups have focused on the fabrication of artificial gecko inspired adhesives. For mimicking these structures, different polymers are used as structure material, such as polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS), polyurethanes (PU), and polypropylene (PP). While these polymers can be structured easily and used for artificial adhesion systems, the effects of repeated adhesion testing have never been investigated closely. In this paper we report on the effect of repeated adhesion measurements on the commercially available poly(dimethylsiloxane) polymer kit Sylgard 184 (Dow Corning). We show that the adhesion force decreases as a function of contact cycles. The rate of change and the final value of adhesion are found to depend on the details of the PDMS synthesis and structuring.

  10. Aseismic fracturing and cataclasis involving reaction softening within core material from the Cajon Pass drill hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, Tom G.; Sibson, Richard H.

    1992-04-01

    Core material from the Cajon Pass drill hole in southern California was examined for brittle structures and microstructures to address the questions of whether the observed structures and microstructures are related to the current phase of the San Andreas strike-slip activity and, if so, whether the deformation features bear any relation to the cyclic accumulation and release of shear stress accompanying major earthquakes on the San Andreas fault. Textures of extension fracture fillings, synchroneity of alteration and deformation, and particle size distributions in areas of distributed dilatancy, extension, and shear fractures all suggest that the deformation was slow. This agrees with the inference that most of the deformation features formed in an area of distributed crustal deformation, rather than within a major fault zone. The effective least principle stress was close to zero after initial fracture, and pore fluid pressures did not change abruptly. Temperatures of deformation are estimated to be in the range 90-250 C.

  11. Utilization of liquid human wastes and introduction into the material cycling in biological life-support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, N. P.>; Ushakova, S. A.; Gribovskaya, I. V.; Kudenko, U. A.

    The possibilities of step-by-step utilization of liquid human wastes in biological life-support systems on long-functioning space stations have been considered in this work. Utilization involves "wet" urine incineration with hydrogen peroxide at normal pressure and 90 - 95°C temperature, urease-enzymic decomposition of urine and biological desalination in the higher plant link. The soybean flour was used as a source of urease. Growing soya plants as a component of the higher plant link would give a steady source of urease to the system. To decompose urea (9-15g) contained in 1l of incinerated urine we used 0.5 - 1 g of soy flour. The duration of hydrolysis of daily urea excreted by a human is 70 - 95 hours. It is supposed that ammonia excreted in the reaction of urea decomposition will be processed by nitrifying bacteria. The concentration of total nitrogen in urine after urea hydrolysis and removal of ammonia formed during the reaction constituted 0.6 - 1.2 g/l. Further biological desalination was carried out in the higher plant link, for that the edible salt-accumulating halophytes Salicornia europaea were used. To grow this plant under the aqueous culture conditions, the urine was additionally mineralized at 180 °C after incineration and decomposition of urea. The process of additional mineralization was related to the necessity of removal of organic materials and nitrogen residues, which higher concentration under the aqueous culture conditions has negative effect on plants. The volume of the nutrient solution for growing 6 plants of Salicornia europaea was 1.5 l (daily norm of urine excreted by human), the planting area was 0.032 m2. By the end of vegetation the productivity and mineral composition of Salicornia europaea plants were analyzed. The productivity of plants grown on liquid human wastes (the experiment) practically was not different from the productivity of plants grown on the mineral solution with sodium chloride (checkout). In experimental

  12. Structural biology of disease-associated repetitive DNA sequences and protein-DNA complexes involved in DNA damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Santhana Mariappan, S.V.; Chen, X.; Catasti, P.; Silks, L.A. III; Moyzis, R.K.; Bradbury, E.M.; Garcia, A.E.

    1997-07-01

    This project is aimed at formulating the sequence-structure-function correlations of various microsatellites in the human (and other eukaryotic) genomes. Here the authors have been able to develop and apply structure biology tools to understand the following: the molecular mechanism of length polymorphism microsatellites; the molecular mechanism by which the microsatellites in the noncoding regions alter the regulation of the associated gene; and finally, the molecular mechanism by which the expansion of these microsatellites impairs gene expression and causes the disease. Their multidisciplinary structural biology approach is quantitative and can be applied to all coding and noncoding DNA sequences associated with any gene. Both NIH and DOE are interested in developing quantitative tools for understanding the function of various human genes for prevention against diseases caused by genetic and environmental effects.

  13. The Elemental Analysis of Biological and Environmental Materials Using a 2MEV Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshed, Waheed

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A programme has been developed to simulate the proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) spectra and its uses have been described. The PIXE technique has been applied to the analysis of new biological reference materials which consist of IAEA human diet samples and NIST leaf samples. Homogeneity of these and two existing reference materials, IAEA soil -7 and Bowen's kale, has also been determined at the mug scale. A subsample representative of a material is ascertained by determination of sampling factors for the elements detected in the material. Proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) analysis in conjunction with PIXE has been employed to investigate F and other elemental concentrations found in human teeth samples. The mean F concentration in enamel and dentine parts of teeth followed an age dependent model. Concentrations of Ca and P were found to be higher in the enamel than in the dentine. Analysis of blood and its components in the study of elemental models in sickle cell disease in Nigerians has been carried out. Comparisons revealed that Cl, Ca and Cu were at higher levels whereas K, Fe, Zn and Rb were at lower levels in the whole blood of the sicklers compared to controls. Similar results were obtained for the erythrocytes except that Br was found at higher concentration in erythrocytes of the sicklers. Higher concentrations of Cl, K, Fe and Cu were also observed in plasma of the sicklers compared to controls. PIXE and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used in the characterization of the Harmattan dust particulates collected at Kano and Ife. Most of the elements were found to be at higher concentrations as compared to those found in Recife (Brazil) and Toronto (Canada). The value of total suspended particulate was above the relevant national air quality standards. PIXE in conjunction with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis was employed in the

  14. Biological inspiration in optics and photonics: harnessing nature's light manipulation strategies for multifunctional optical materials (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolle, Mathias; Sandt, Joseph D.; Nagelberg, Sara N.; Zarzar, Lauren D.; Kreysing, Moritz; Vukusic, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The precise control of light-matter interactions is crucial for the majority of known biological organisms in their struggle to survive. Many species have evolved unique methods to manipulate light in their environment using a variety of physical effects including pigment-induced, spectrally selective absorption or light interference in photonic structures that consist of micro- and nano-periodic material morphologies. In their optical performance, many of the known biological photonic systems are subject to selection criteria not unlike the requirements faced in the development of novel optical technology. For this reason, biological light manipulation strategies provide inspiration for the creation of tunable, stimuli-responsive, adaptive material platforms that will contribute to the development of multifunctional surfaces and innovative optical technology. Biomimetic and bio-inspired approaches for the manufacture of photonic systems rely on self-assembly and bottom-up growth techniques often combined with conventional top-down manufacturing. In this regard, we can benefit in several ways from highly sophisticated material solutions that have convergently evolved in various organisms. We explore design concepts found in biological photonic architectures, seek to understand the mechanisms underlying morphogenesis of bio-optical systems, aim to devise viable manufacturing strategies that can benefit from insight in biological formation processes and the use of established synthetic routines alike, and ultimately strive to realize new photonic materials with tailor-made optical properties. This talk is focused on the identification of biological role model photonic architectures, a brief discussion of recently developed bio-inspired photonic structures, including mechano-sensitive color-tunable photonic fibers and reconfigurable fluid micro-lenses. Potentially, early-stage results in studying and harnessing the structure-forming capabilities of living cells that

  15. Teleost fish scales: a unique biological model for the fabrication of materials for corneal stroma regeneration.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yasuaki; Ura, Kazuhiro

    2007-03-01

    The corneal stroma is composed of multiple lamellae, each containing closely packed collagen fibrils. The orientation of fibrils in a lamella is parallel, but those in different lamellae are orthogonal. As a result, the corneal stroma has a characteristic orthogonal plywood-like structure. Such a highly-regulated three-dimensional arrangement of collagen fibrils gives strength and transparency to the corneal stroma, but it also presents a challenge in the fabrication of materials to replace it. A bioinspired technology is required to process such materials, but the regulatory mechanism of collagen-fibril orientation is still unknown. The low regenerating activity of the corneal stroma seems to be a major factor preventing progress in this field of research. A similarly highly-ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils can be seen in the basal plates of teleost fish scales. Moreover, the scales have high regenerating ability. When a scale is mechanically lost, a new scale is rapidly regenerated. The cells that produce the basal plates are extremely activated; thus, production of the highly-ordered collagen fibrils is very rapid. Therefore, the regenerating scales should be a uniquely helpful biological model for studying the regulatory mechanism of collagen-fibril orientation. Fish-scale collagen has another advantage for use as a biomaterial: the low probability of zoonotic infection. Therefore, scale collagen is a most promising biomaterial for fabricating three-dimensionally arranged collagen fibers to substitute for the corneal stroma. Three tasks that must be clarified for the bioinspired production of a corneal substitute from fish scale collagen are proposed. PMID:17450830

  16. Solid phase immobilization of optically responsive liposomes insol-gel materials for chemical and biological sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Stacey A.; Charych, Deborah H.; Loy, Douglas A.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.

    1997-04-01

    Liposomes enhanced with surface recognition groups have previously been found to have high affinity for heavy metal ions and virus particles with unique fluorescent and colorimetric responses, respectively. These lipid aggregate systems have now been successfully immobilized in a silica matrix via the sol-gel method, affording sensor materials that are robust, are easily handled, and offer optical clarity. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of preformed liposomes without modification of the aggregate structure. Lipid extraction studies of immobilized nonpolymerized liposomes showed no lipid leakage in aqueous solution over a period of 3 months. Heavy metal fluorescent sensor materials prepared with 5 percent N-[8-[1-octadecyl-2-(9-(1-pyrenyl)nonyl)-rac-glyceroyl]-3,6-dioxaoctyl]imino acid/distearylphosphatidylcholineliposomes exhibited a 4-50-fold enhancement in sensitivity to various metal ions compared to that of the liposomes in free solution. Through ionic attraction the anionic silicate surface, at the experimental pH of 7.4, may act as a preconcentrator of divalent metal ions, boosting the gel's internal metal concentration. Entrapped sialic acid-coated polydiacetylene liposomes responded with colorimetric signaling to influenza virus X31, although slower than the free liposomes in solution. The successful transport of the virus (50-100 nm diameter) reveals a large pore diameter of the gel connecting the liposome to the bulk solution. The porous and durable silica matrix additionally provides a protective barrier to biological attack (bacterial, fungal) and allows facile recycling of the liposome heavy metal sensor.

  17. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, David Barry; Oehrlein, Gottlieb

    2014-09-01

    atmospheric pressure using several types of low temperature plasma sources, for which radical induced interactions generally dominate due to short mean free paths of ions and VUV photons. For these conditions we demonstrated the importance of environmental interactions when atmospheric pressure plasma sources are used to modify biomolecules. This is evident from both gas phase characterization data and in-situ surface characterization of treated biomolecules. Environmental interactions can produce unexpected outcomes due to the complexity of reactions of reactive species with the atmosphere which determines the composition of reactive fluxes and atomistic changes of biomolecules. Overall, this work clarified a richer spectrum of scientific opportunities and challenges for the field of low temperature plasma-biomolecule surface interactions than initially anticipated, in particular for plasma sources operating at atmospheric pressure. The insights produced in this work, e.g. demonstration of the importance of environmental interactions, are generally important for applications of APP to materials modifications. Thus one major contributions of this research has been the establishment of methodologies to more systematically study the interaction of plasma with bio-molecules. In particular, our studies of atmospheric pressure plasma sources using very well-defined experimental conditions enabled to combine atomistic surface modifications of biomolecules with changes in their biological function. The clarification of the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in deactivation of biomolecules during low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasma-biomolecule interaction has broad implications, e.g. for the emerging field of plasma medicine. The development of methods to detect the effects of plasma treatment on immune-active biomolecules will be helpful in many future studies.

  18. Thresholding for biological material detection in real-time multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung Chul; Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Windham, William R.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, hyperspectral image analysis has proved successful for a target detection problem encountered in remote sensing as well as near sensing utilizing in situ instrumentation. The conventional global bi-level thresholding for target detection, such as the clustering-based Otsu's method, has been inadequate for the detection of biologically harmful material on foods that has a large degree of variability in size, location, color, shape, texture, and occurrence time. This paper presents multistep-like thresholding based on kernel density estimation for the real-time detection of harmful contaminants on a food product presented in multispectral images. We are particularly concerned with the detection of fecal contaminants on poultry carcasses in real-time. In the past, we identified 2 optimal wavelength bands and developed a real-time multispectral imaging system using a common aperture camera and a globally optimized thresholding method from a ratio of the optimal bands. This work extends our previous study by introducing a new decision rule to detect fecal contaminants on a single bird level. The underlying idea is to search for statistical separability along the two directions defined by the global optimal threshold vector and its orthogonal vector. Experimental results with real birds and fecal samples in different amounts are provided.

  19. Technique for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the kubelka-munk function

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Yang, Yuanlong

    2003-09-02

    Method and apparatus for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the Kubelka-Munk function. In one aspect, the method is used to determine whether a tissue sample is cancerous or not and comprises the steps of (a) measuring the diffuse reflectance from the tissue sample at a first wavelength and at a second wavelength, wherein the first wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 255-265 nm and wherein the second wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 275-285 nm; (b) using the Kubelka-Munk function to transform the diffuse reflectance measurement obtained at the first and second wavelengths; and (c) comparing a ratio or a difference of the transformed Kubelka-Munk measurements at the first and second wavelengths to appropriate standards determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous. One can use the spectral profile of KMF between 250 nm to 300 nm to determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous or precancerous. According to the value at the first and second wavelengths determine whether or not the malignant tissue is invasive or mixed invasive and in situ or carcinoma in situ.

  20. The biological impacts of ingested radioactive materials on the pale grass blue butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Nohara, Chiyo; Hiyama, Atsuki; Taira, Wataru; Tanahara, Akira; Otaki, Joji M.

    2014-01-01

    A massive amount of radioactive materials has been released into the environment by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, but its biological impacts have rarely been examined. Here, we have quantitatively evaluated the relationship between the dose of ingested radioactive cesium and mortality and abnormality rates using the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha. When larvae from Okinawa, which is likely the least polluted locality in Japan, were fed leaves collected from polluted localities, mortality and abnormality rates increased sharply at low doses in response to the ingested cesium dose. This dose-response relationship was best fitted by power function models, which indicated that the half lethal and abnormal doses were 1.9 and 0.76 Bq per larva, corresponding to 54,000 and 22,000 Bq per kilogram body weight, respectively. Both the retention of radioactive cesium in a pupa relative to the ingested dose throughout the larval stage and the accumulation of radioactive cesium in a pupa relative to the activity concentration in a diet were highest at the lowest level of cesium ingested. We conclude that the risk of ingesting a polluted diet is realistic, at least for this butterfly, and likely for certain other organisms living in the polluted area. PMID:24844938

  1. Neutron activation analysis for the determination of trace elements in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Versieck, J

    1994-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis, in both its radiochemical and instrumental forms, is a precious technique for the determination of trace elements in biological materials. Probably its most important advantage is its relative freedom from errors resulting from contamination of the samples. Invaluable characteristics are also its excellent sensitivity, outstanding selectivity, and remarkable multielement capability. It is, however, necessary to warn against uncritical expectations. This is best illustrated by the seriously inconsistent results obtained in several laboratories. Because of the necessity to have access to a nuclear research reactor, the stringent safety rules to be observed, the rather high costs of the analyses, the relatively low sample throughput, and the sometimes long delay between the taking of a sample and the obtaining the final result, the use of neutron activation analysis remained restricted to a few--essentially research--laboratories. It found its main application in solving arduous problems and in paving the way for other analytical techniques better suited to routine applications. PMID:7710855

  2. 3-d Brownian dynamics simulations of the smallest units of an active biological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta; Paudyal, Nabina; Adeli Koudehi, Maral

    Motor proteins generate stress in a cytoskeletal network by walking on one strand of the network while being attached to another one. A protein walker in contact with two elements of the network may be considered the smallest unit of an active biological material. In vitro experiments, mathematical modeling and computer simulations have provided important insights into active matter on large and on very small length and time scales. However, it is still difficult to model the effects of local environment and interactions at intermediate scales. Recently, we developed a coarse-grained, three-dimensional model for a motor protein transporting cargo by walking on a substrate. In this work, we simulate a tethered motor protein pulling a substrate with elastic response. As the walker progresses, the retarding force due to the substrate tension increases until contact fails. We present simulation results for the effect of motor-protein activity on the tension in the substrate and the effect of the retarding force on the processivity of the molecular motor.

  3. MyLabStocks: a web-application to manage molecular biology materials.

    PubMed

    Chuffart, Florent; Yvert, Gaël

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory stocks are the hardware of research. They must be stored and managed with mimimum loss of material and information. Plasmids, oligonucleotides and strains are regularly exchanged between collaborators within and between laboratories. Managing and sharing information about every item is crucial for retrieval of reagents, for planning experiments and for reproducing past experimental results. We have developed a web-based application to manage stocks commonly used in a molecular biology laboratory. Its functionalities include user-defined privileges, visualization of plasmid maps directly from their sequence and the capacity to search items from fields of annotation or directly from a query sequence using BLAST. It is designed to handle records of plasmids, oligonucleotides, yeast strains, antibodies, pipettes and notebooks. Based on PHP/MySQL, it can easily be extended to handle other types of stocks and it can be installed on any server architecture. MyLabStocks is freely available from: https://forge.cbp.ens-lyon.fr/redmine/projects/mylabstocks under an open source licence. PMID:24643870

  4. The biological impacts of ingested radioactive materials on the pale grass blue butterfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohara, Chiyo; Hiyama, Atsuki; Taira, Wataru; Tanahara, Akira; Otaki, Joji M.

    2014-05-01

    A massive amount of radioactive materials has been released into the environment by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, but its biological impacts have rarely been examined. Here, we have quantitatively evaluated the relationship between the dose of ingested radioactive cesium and mortality and abnormality rates using the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha. When larvae from Okinawa, which is likely the least polluted locality in Japan, were fed leaves collected from polluted localities, mortality and abnormality rates increased sharply at low doses in response to the ingested cesium dose. This dose-response relationship was best fitted by power function models, which indicated that the half lethal and abnormal doses were 1.9 and 0.76 Bq per larva, corresponding to 54,000 and 22,000 Bq per kilogram body weight, respectively. Both the retention of radioactive cesium in a pupa relative to the ingested dose throughout the larval stage and the accumulation of radioactive cesium in a pupa relative to the activity concentration in a diet were highest at the lowest level of cesium ingested. We conclude that the risk of ingesting a polluted diet is realistic, at least for this butterfly, and likely for certain other organisms living in the polluted area.

  5. The development of peptide-based interfacial biomaterials for generating biological functionality on the surface of bioinert materials

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Steven R.; Khoo, Xiaojuan; Huang, Xin; Walsh, Elisabeth B.; Grinstaff, Mark W.; Kenan, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials used in implants have traditionally been selected based on their mechanical properties, chemical stability, and biocompatibility. However, the durability and clinical efficacy of implantable biomedical devices remains limited in part due to the absence of appropriate biological interactions at the implant interface and the lack of integration into adjacent tissues. Herein, we describe a robust peptide-based coating technology capable of modifying the surface of existing biomaterials and medical devices through the non-covalent binding of modular biofunctional peptides. These peptides contain at least one material binding sequence and at least one biologically active sequence and thus are termed, “Interfacial Biomaterials” (IFBMs). IFBMs can simultaneously bind the biomaterial surface while endowing it with desired biological functionalities at the interface between the material and biological realms. We demonstrate the capabilities of model IFBMs to convert native polystyrene, a bioinert surface, into a bioactive surface that can support a range of cell activities. We further distinguish between simple cell attachment with insufficient integrin interactions, which in some cases can adversely impact downstream biology, versus biologically appropriate adhesion, cell spreading, and cell survival mediated by IFBMs. Moreover, we show that we can use the coating technology to create spatially resolved patterns of fluorophores and cells on substrates and that these patterns retain their borders in culture. PMID:18929406

  6. Efficiency of biological activator formulated material (BAFM) for volatile organic compounds removal--preliminary batch culture tests with activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Corre, Charline; Couriol, Catherine; Amrane, Abdeltif; Dumont, Eric; Andrès, Yves; Le Cloirec, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    During biological degradation, such as biofiltration of air loaded with volatile organic compounds, the pollutant is passed through a bed packed with a solid medium acting as a biofilm support. To improve microorganism nutritional equilibrium and hence to enhance the purification capacities, a Biological Activator Formulated Material (BAFM) was developed, which is a mixture of solid nutrients dissolving slowly in a liquid phase. This solid was previously validated on mineral pollutants: ammonia and hydrogen sulphide. To evaluate the efficiency of such a material for biodegradation of some organic compounds, a simple experiment using an activated sludge batch reactor was carried out. The pollutants (sodium benzoate, phenol, p-nitrophenol and 2-4-dichlorophenol) were in the concentration range 100 to 1200 mg L(-1). The positive impact of the formulated material was shown. The improvement of the degradation rates was in the range 10-30%. This was the consequence of the low dissolution of the nutrients incorporated during material formulation, followed by their consumption by the biomass, as shown for urea used as a nitrogen source. Owing to its twofold interest (mechanical resistance and nutritional supplementation), the Biological Activator Formulated Material seems to be a promising material. Its addition to organic or inorganic supports should be investigated to confirm its relevance for implementation in biofilters. PMID:22988627

  7. Micro-processing of polymers and biological materials using high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li

    has been observed in or around the laser-induced refractive index modification regions. These results support the notion that femtosecond laser micro-processing method may be an excellent means of altering the refraction or higher order aberration content of corneal tissue without cell death and short-term tissue damage, and has been named as Intra-tissue Refractive Index Shaping (IRIS). The femtosecond laser micro-processing workstation has also been employed for laser transfection of single defined cells. Some preliminary results suggest that this method can be used to trace individual cells and record their biological and morphological evolution, which is quite promising in many biomedical applications especially in immunology science. In conclusion, high repetition rate femtosecond laser micro-processing has been employed to fabricate microstructures in ophthalmological hydrogels and ocular tissues. Its unique three-dimensional capability over transparent materials and biological media makes it a powerful tool and will greatly impact the future of laser material-processing.

  8. Development and effectiveness of an educational card game as supplementary material in understanding selected topics in biology.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Arnel F

    2014-01-01

    The complex concepts and vocabulary of biology classes discourage many students. In this study, a pretest-posttest model was used to test the effectiveness of an educational card game in reinforcing biological concepts in comparison with traditional teaching methods. The subjects of this study were two biology classes at Bulacan State University-Sarmiento Campus. Both classes received conventional instruction; however, the experimental group's instruction was supplemented with the card game, while the control group's instruction was reinforced with traditional exercises and assignments. The score increases from pretest to posttest showed that both methods effectively reinforced biological concepts, but a t test showed that the card game is more effective than traditional teaching methods. Additionally, students from the experimental group evaluated the card game using five criteria: goals, design, organization, playability, and usefulness. The students rated the material very satisfactory. PMID:24591506

  9. Development and Effectiveness of an Educational Card Game as Supplementary Material in Understanding Selected Topics in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Arnel F.

    2014-01-01

    The complex concepts and vocabulary of biology classes discourage many students. In this study, a pretest–posttest model was used to test the effectiveness of an educational card game in reinforcing biological concepts in comparison with traditional teaching methods. The subjects of this study were two biology classes at Bulacan State University–Sarmiento Campus. Both classes received conventional instruction; however, the experimental group's instruction was supplemented with the card game, while the control group's instruction was reinforced with traditional exercises and assignments. The score increases from pretest to posttest showed that both methods effectively reinforced biological concepts, but a t test showed that the card game is more effective than traditional teaching methods. Additionally, students from the experimental group evaluated the card game using five criteria: goals, design, organization, playability, and usefulness. The students rated the material very satisfactory. PMID:24591506

  10. THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ann B. Beauchesne

    1998-09-30

    Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: (1) Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; (2) Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; (3) Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; (4) Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis; (5) Interstate waste and materials shipments; and (6) Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from June 1, 1998 through September 30, 1998, under the NGA grant. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: (1) maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; (2) maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, external regulation of DOE; and EM Integration activities; and (3

  11. THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ann M. Beauchesne

    1999-07-30

    Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis; Interstate waste and materials shipments; and Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from May 1, 1999, through July 30, 1999, under the NGA grant. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, external regulation of DOE; and continued to facilitate interactions between the states and DOE to develop a

  12. THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials. Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities. Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex. Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in DOE's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure strategy and contractor integration analysis. Interstate waste and materials shipments. Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from December 31, 1997 through April 30, 1998 under the NGA project. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; and provided ongoing support to state-DOE interactions in preparation for the March 30-31, 1998 NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force Meeting with DOE. maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low

  13. THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ann M. Beauchesne

    2000-01-01

    Through the National Governors Association (NGA) project ``Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis; Interstate waste and materials shipments; and Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the period from October 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000, under the NGA grant. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past three months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; convened and facilitated the October 6--8 NGA FFCA Task Force Meeting in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, external

  14. THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials. Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities. Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex. Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in DOE's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure strategy and contractor integration analysis. Interstate waste and materials shipments. Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from April 30, 1998 through June 30, 1998 under the NGA project. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; and provided ongoing support to state-DOE interactions. maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, DOE's Environmental Management Budget, and DOE's proposed

  15. THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ann M. Beauchesne

    1999-04-30

    Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis; Interstate waste and materials shipments; and Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from February 1, 1999, through April 30, 1999, under the NGA grant. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, external regulation of DOE; and EM Integration activities; and continued to serve as a liaison between

  16. THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials. Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities. Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex. Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the EM 2006 cleanup plans and contractor integration analysis. Interstate waste and materials shipments. Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from October 1, 1997 through December 31, 1997, under the NGA project. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; and maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, DOE activities in the area of the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule, and DOE's proposed National Dialogue.

  17. THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ann M. Beauchesne

    1999-01-31

    Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: (1) Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; (2) Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; (3) Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; (4) Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis; (5) Interstate waste and materials shipments; and (6) Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from October 1, 1998 through January 31, 1999, under the NGA grant. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: (1) maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; (2) maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, external regulation of DOE; and EM Integration activities; and (3

  18. Combustion method for assay of biological materials labeled with carbon-14 or tritium, or double-labeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, L. G.; Kisieleski, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    Dry catalytic combustion at high temperatures is used for assaying biological materials labeled carbon-14 and tritium, or double-labeled. A modified oxygen-flask technique is combined with standard vacuum-line techniques and includes convenience of direct in-vial collection of final combustion products, giving quantitative recovery of tritium and carbon-14.

  19. Apollo-Soyuz pamphlet no. 9: General science. [experimental design in Astronomy, Biology, Geophysics, Aeronomy and Materials science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, L. W.; From, T. P.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives and planning activities for the Apollo-Soyuz mission are summarized. Aspects of the space flight considered include the docking module and launch configurations, spacecraft orbits, and weightlessness. The 28 NASA experiments conducted onboard the spacecraft are summarized. The contributions of the mission to the fields of astronomy, geoscience, biology, and materials sciences resulting from the experiments are explored.

  20. Applied Biology and Chemistry. Course Materials: Chemistry 111, 112, 113, 114. Seattle Tech Prep Applied Academics Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    This publication contains materials for four courses in Applied Biology/Chemistry in the Applied Academics program at South Seattle Community College. It begins with the article, "Community College Applied Academics: The State of the Art?" (George B. Neff), which describes the characteristics, model, courses, and coordination activity that make up…

  1. Optimization of the Hyperspectral Imaging-based Spatially-resolved System for Measuring the Optical Properties of Biological Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports on the optimization and assessment of a hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved system for determination of the optical properties of biological materials over the wavelengths of 500-1,000 nm. Twelve model samples covering a wide range of absorption and reduced scattering c...

  2. Indium arsenide as a material for biological applications: Assessment of surface modifications, toxicity, and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Scott A.

    III-V semiconductors such as InAs have recently been employed in a variety of applications where the electronic and optical characteristics of traditional, silicon-based materials are inadequate. InAs has a narrow band gap and very high electron mobility in the near-surface region, which makes it very attractive for high performance transistors, optical applications, and chemical sensing. However, InAs forms an unstable surface oxide layer in ambient conditions, which can corrode over time and leach toxic indium and arsenic components. Current research has gone into making InAs more attractive for biological applications through passivation of the surface by adlayer adsorption. In particular, wet-chemical methods are current routes of exploration due to their simplicity, low cost, and flexibility in the type of passivating molecule. This dissertation focuses on surface modifications of InAs using wet-chemical methods in order to further its use in biological applications. First, the adsorption of collagen binding peptides and mixed peptide/thiol adlayers onto InAs was assessed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) along with atomic force microscopy (AFM) data suggested that the peptides successfully adsorbed onto InAs, but were only able to block oxide regrowth to a relatively low extent. This low passivation ability is due to the lack of covalent bonds of the peptide to InAs, which are necessary to effectively block oxide regrowth. The addition of a thiol, in the form of mixed peptide/thiol adlayers greatly enhanced passivation of InAs while maintaining peptide presence on the surface. Thiols form tight, covalent bonds with InAs, which prevents oxide regrowth. The presence of the collagen-binding peptide on the surface opens the door to subsequent modification with collagen or polyelectrolyte-based adlayers. Next, the stability and toxicity of modified InAs substrates were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and zebrafish

  3. Enhancement in biological response of Ag-nano composite polymer membranes using plasma treatment for fabrication of efficient bio materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Narendra Kumar; Sharma, Tamanna Kumari; Chauhan, Manish; Agarwal, Ravi; Vijay, Y. K.; Swami, K. C.

    2016-05-01

    Biomaterials are nonviable material used in medical devices, intended to interact with biological systems, which are becoming necessary for the development of artificial material for biological systems such as artificial skin diaphragm, valves for heart and kidney, lenses for eye etc. Polymers having novel properties like antibacterial, antimicrobial, high adhesion, blood compatibility and wettability are most suitable for synthesis of biomaterial, but all of these properties does not exist in any natural or artificial polymeric material. Nano particles and plasma treatment can offer these properties to the polymers. Hence a new nano-biomaterial has been developed by modifying the surface and chemical properties of Ag nanocomposite polymer membranes (NCPM) by Argon ion plasma treatment. These membranes were characterized using different techniques for surface and chemical modifications occurred. Bacterial adhesion and wettability were also tested for these membranes, to show direct use of this new class of nano-biomaterial for biomedical applications.

  4. Updated Lagrangian finite element formulations of various biological soft tissue non-linear material models: a comprehensive procedure and review.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Molly T; Sarigul-Klijn, Nesrin

    2016-01-01

    Simplified material models are commonly used in computational simulation of biological soft tissue as an approximation of the complicated material response and to minimize computational resources. However, the simulation of complex loadings, such as long-duration tissue swelling, necessitates complex models that are not easy to formulate. This paper strives to offer the updated Lagrangian formulation comprehensive procedure of various non-linear material models for the application of finite element analysis of biological soft tissues including a definition of the Cauchy stress and the spatial tangential stiffness. The relationships between water content, osmotic pressure, ionic concentration and the pore pressure stress of the tissue are discussed with the merits of these models and their applications. PMID:26611112

  5. The use of a single multielement standard for trace analysis in biological materials by external beam PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S. K.; Khaliquzzaman, M.; Islam, M. M.; Khan, A. H.

    1984-04-01

    The validity of the use of a single multielement standard for mass calibration in thick-target external beam PIXE analysis of biological materials has been investigated. In this study, the NBS orchard leaf, SRM 1571, was used as the basic standard for trace element analysis in other biological materials. Using the present procedure, the concentrations of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb and Sr were determined in several NBS reference materials such as bovine liver, spinach, rice flour, etc., generally in 20 μC irradiations with 2.0 MeV protons. The analytical results are compared with certified values of the NBS as well as with other measurements and the sources of errors are discussed.

  6. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research

  7. Chemically-functionalized microcantilevers for detection of chemical, biological and explosive material

    DOEpatents

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Gilbert M [Knoxville, TN; Hawk, John Eric [Olive Branch, MS; Boiadjiev, Vassil I [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    A chemically functionalized cantilever system has a cantilever coated on one side thereof with a reagent or biological species which binds to an analyte. The system is of particular value when the analyte is a toxic chemical biological warfare agent or an explosive.

  8. Sequential metal vapor elution analysis for the determination of Cu and Mn in biological materials and waters.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K; Uegomori, H; Kaneco, S; Mizuno, T

    1999-04-01

    The determination of copper and manganese in biological materials and river waters by sequential metal vapor elution analysis (SMVEA) using an atomic absorption detector (AA) is reported. An improved molybdenum column (open column, i.d. 1.22 mm) with three ring supporters was developed for SMVEA. An optimum flow rate of carrier gas (pure argon) for separation of metal vapors was 4.0 ml min(-1). Copper and manganese peaks separated from Al, Ca, Cd, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Pb, and Zn peaks at a vaporization temperature of 1950 degrees C and a column temperature of 1900 degrees C. The appearing order of these metals was Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu, Na and Mn. It was understood by considering the boiling points of these metals or chlorides. The delay of appearing time is due to an interaction between the metal vapors and inside surface of the column. Under the experimental conditions, the number of theoretical plates was 11.3 for Cd, 89.6 for Cu, 160 for Na, and 258 for Mn in the improved column. Under the optimal experimental conditions, NIST biological standards and river waters were analyzed for copper and manganese. The analytical results agreed well with the certified values and the recoveries were in the range of 94 to 109%. By SMVEA, it was found that copper and manganese in biological materials and waters were determined without interference of matrix elements, after only acid digestion for biological materials and no chemical treatment for river water samples. PMID:18967537

  9. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal; McNeill, Fiona E.; Prestwich, William V.; Byun, Soo Hyun; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel E.

    2014-01-01

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some "bystander effects" that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 1010 protons mm-2 s-1. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  10. Biological function of a DUF95 superfamily protein involved in the biosynthesis of a circular bacteriocin, leucocyclicin Q.

    PubMed

    Mu, Fuqin; Masuda, Yoshimitsu; Zendo, Takeshi; Ono, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Ito, Haruo; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Biological functions of a DUF95 superfamily protein in the biosynthesis gene cluster of a novel circular bacteriocin, leucocyclicin Q (LcyQ), were characterized in this paper. Sequence analysis and database search of the regions flanking the LcyQ structural gene lcyQ revealed four open reading frames (lcyR, lcyB, lcyC, and lcyD) related to bacteriocin biosynthesis. LcyD shares some similarity to the DUF95 superfamily proteins, often found in the biosynthetic gene clusters of circular bacteriocins. Mass spectrometry analysis showed accumulation of active mature LcyQ inside lcyD knockout cells. Heterologous expression of lcyD demonstrated that it confers robust immunity against LcyQ. Peptide release/binding assay revealed that the immunity could be attributed to the secretion of LcyQ to the cell exterior. Thus, the DUF95 superfamily protein has a dual function in the biosynthesis of LcyQ, as an immunity-associated transporter and as a secretion-aiding agent. Accumulation of mature LcyQ inside the cell in lcyD knockout strains, further implied that cyclization occurs within the cell. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on LcyQ cyclization inside the cell and the dual role of a DUF95 superfamily protein in circular bacteriocin biosynthesis. PMID:23906710

  11. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology at the interface of cell biology, materials science and medicine Nanotechnology at the interface of cell biology, materials science and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Andreas; Miles, Mervyn

    2008-09-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) and related scanning probe microscopes have become resourceful tools to study cells, supramolecular assemblies and single biomolecules, because they allow investigations of such structures in native environments. Quantitative information has been gathered about the surface structure of membrane proteins to lateral and vertical resolutions of 0.5 nm and 0.1 nm, respectively, about the forces that keep protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid assemblies together as well as single proteins in their native conformation, and about the nanomechanical properties of cells in health and disease. Such progress has been achieved mainly because of constant development of AFM instrumentation and sample preparation methods. This special issue of Nanotechnology presents papers from leading laboratories in the field of nanobiology, covering a wide range of topics in the form of original and novel scientific contributions. It addresses achievements in instrumentation, sample preparation, automation and in biological applications. These papers document the creativity and persistence of researchers pursuing the goal to unravel the structure and dynamics of cells, supramolecuar structures and single biomolecules at work. Improved cantilever sensors, novel optical probes, and quantitative data on supports for electrochemical experiments open new avenues for characterizing biological nanomachines down to the single molecule. Comparative measurements of healthy and metastatic cells promise new methods for early detection of tumors, and possible assessments of drug efficacy. High-speed AFMs document possibilities to monitor crystal growth and to observe large structures at video rate. A wealth of information on amyloid-type fibers as well as on membrane proteins has been gathered by single molecule force spectroscopy—a technology now being automated for large-scale data collection. With the progress of basic research and a strong industry supporting

  12. DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Marsha Keister

    2001-02-01

    DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials Implementing adequate institutional programs and validating preparedness for emergency response to radiological transportation incidents along or near U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shipping corridors poses unique challenges to transportation operations management. Delayed or insufficient attention to State and Tribal preparedness needs may significantly impact the transportation operations schedule and budget. The DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) has successfully used a cooperative planning process to develop strong partnerships with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs to support responder preparedness across the United States. DOE TEPP has found that building solid partnerships with key emergency response agencies ensures responders have access to the planning, training, technical expertise and assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to a radiological transportation accident. Through the efforts of TEPP over the past fifteen years, partnerships have resulted in States and Tribal Nations either using significant portions of the TEPP planning resources in their programs and/or adopting the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program into their hazardous material training curriculums to prepare their fire departments, law enforcement, hazardous materials response teams, emergency management officials, public information officers and emergency medical technicians for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. In addition, through strong partnerships with Federal Agencies and other national programs TEPP provided technical expertise to support a variety of radiological response initiatives and assisted several programs with integration of the nationally recognized MERRTT program

  13. Enhanced surface functionality via plasma modification and plasma deposition techniques to create more biologically relevant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Jeffrey C.

    Functionalizing nanoparticles and other unusually shaped substrates to create more biologically relevant materials has become central to a wide range of research programs. One of the primary challenges in this field is creating highly functionalized surfaces without modifying the underlying bulk material. Traditional wet chemistry techniques utilize thin film depositions to functionalize nanomaterials with oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups, such as --OH and --NHx. These functional groups can serve to create surfaces that are amenable to cell adhesion or can act as reactive groups for further attachment of larger structures, such as macromolecules or antiviral agents. Additional layers, such as SiO2, are often added between the nanomaterial and the functionalized coating to act as a barrier films, adhesion layers, and to increase overall hydrophilicity. However, some wet chemistry techniques can damage the bulk material during processing. This dissertation examines the use of plasma processing as an alternative method for producing these highly functionalized surfaces on nanoparticles and polymeric scaffolds through the use of plasma modification and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Specifically, this dissertation will focus on (1) plasma deposition of SiO2 barrier films on nanoparticle substrates; (2) surface functionalization of amine and alcohol groups through (a) plasma co-polymerization and (b) plasma modification; and (3) the design and construction of plasma hardware to facilitate plasma processing of nanoparticles and polymeric scaffolds. The body of work presented herein first examines the fabrication of composite nanoparticles by plasma processing. SiOxC y and hexylamine films were coated onto TiO2 nanoparticles to demonstrate enhanced water dispersion properties. Continuous wave and pulsed allyl alcohol plasmas were used to produce highly functionalized Fe2 O3 supported nanoparticles. Specifically, film composition was

  14. The protein and peptide mediated syntheses of non-biologically-produced oxide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Matthew B.

    Numerous examples exist in nature of organisms which have evolved the ability to produce sophisticated structures composed of inorganic minerals. Studies of such biomineralizing organisms have suggested that specialized biomolecules are, in part, responsible for the controlled formation of these structures. The research detailed in this dissertation is focused on the use of biomolecules (i.e., peptides and proteins) to form non-biologically produced materials under mild reaction conditions (i.e., neutral pH, aqueous solutions, and room temperature). The peptides utilized in the studies detailed in this dissertation were identified through the screening of single crystal rutile TiO2 substrates or Ge powder with a phagedisplayed peptide library. Twenty-one peptides were identified which possessed an affinity for Ge. Three of these twenty one peptides were tested for germania precipitation activity. Those peptides possessing a basic isoelectric point as well as hydroxyl- and imidazole-containing amino acid residues were found to be the most effective in precipitating amorphous germania from an alkoxide precursor. The phage-displayed peptide library screening of TiO2 substrates yielded twenty peptides. Four of these peptides, which were heavily enriched in histidine and/or basic amino acid residues, were found to possess signficant titania precipitation activity. The activity of these peptides was found to correlate with the number of positive charges they carried. The sequence of the most active of the library-identified peptides was modified to yield two additional peptides. The titania precipitation activity of these designed peptides was higher than the parent peptide, with reduced pH dependence. The titania materials generated by the library-identified and designed peptides were found to be composed of amorphous titania as well as <10 nm anatase and/or monoclinic TiO2 crystallites. The production of titania and zirconia resulting from the interaction of the

  15. STAT3 signaling pathway is involved in decitabine induced biological phenotype regulation of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhichao; Lu, Xuzhang; Jiang, Lijia; Sun, Xiao; Zhou, Haijun; Jia, Zhuxia; Zhang, Xiuwen; Ma, Lingdi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the role of signal transduction and transcriptional activator STAT3 and relevant signaling pathway in the DAC regulated biological phenotype of AML cells. Methods: The effect of DAC at different concentrations on the proliferation of HL-60 cells was determined. After DAC treatment for 48 h, the killing capability of NK cells against HL-60 cells and the protein expressions of STAT3, JAK1, JAK2, SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 were evaluated. Results: DAC markedly inhibited the proliferation of HL-60 cells. After the treatment of 48 hr with 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 mol/L DAC, the HL-60 viability was reduced by 25±13%, 39±8% and 50±7% (P<0.01), respectively, and the early apoptosis rate was increased to 24.77±7.5%, 27.1±4.48% and 30.53±3.93%, respectively (control: 3.11±0.12%, P<0.01). DAC up-regulated the expression of MICA/B, ULBP-1 and ULBP-3 in HL-60 cells, and increased the killing activity of NK cells to HL-60 cells. DAC significantly induced the apoptosis of HL-60 cells and up-regulated the expression of NKG2D ligands in a dose dependent manner. Western blot assay showed the protein expression of STAT3, JAK, JAK2, phosphorylated STAT3, phosphorylated JAK1 and phosphorylated JAK2 decreased, while that of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 increased in HL-60 cells after DAC treatment. Conclusion: In HL-60 cells, DAC can markedly inhibit their proliferation and up-regulate the expression of NKG2D ligands, and DAC also increase the cytotoxicity of NK cells to HL-60 cells, which may be related to the STAT3 related signaling pathway. PMID:26692933

  16. Restoration of sodic soils involving chemical and biological amendments and phytoremediation by Eucalyptus camaldulensis in a semiarid region.

    PubMed

    Seenivasan, R; Prasath, V; Mohanraj, R

    2015-06-01

    Salt-affected soils in semiarid regions impede the agricultural productivity and degrade the ecosystem health. In South India, several hectares of land are salt-affected, where the evapotranspiration exceeds the annual precipitation. This study is an attempt to ameliorate sodic soils, by an experiment involving chemical treatment (addition of gypsum), organic amendments (decomposed bagasse pith and green manuring with Sesbania rostrata) and phytoremediation by plantation of Eucalyptus camaldulensis. The prime focus is to minimize the use of gypsum and improve the soil health in terms of nutrients, microbial population and enzyme activity in addition to sodicity reclamation. At the end of the third year, a reduction of 10 % in soil pH, 33 % in electrical conductivity and 20 % in exchangeable sodium percentage was achieved compared to the initial values. Three- to fourfold increases in organic carbon content were observed. Significant improvement in the available major and micronutrients of soil, microbial growth and enzyme activity was observed, suggesting phytoremediation by E. camaldulensis as a sustainable option for restoration of similar kind of degraded lands. PMID:25547478

  17. Protective Behaviour of Citizens to Transport Accidents Involving Hazardous Materials: A Discrete Choice Experiment Applied to Populated Areas nearby Waterways

    PubMed Central

    de Bekker-Grob, Esther W.; Bergstra, Arnold D.; Bliemer, Michiel C. J.; Trijssenaar-Buhre, Inge J. M.; Burdorf, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Background To improve the information for and preparation of citizens at risk to hazardous material transport accidents, a first important step is to determine how different characteristics of hazardous material transport accidents will influence citizens’ protective behaviour. However, quantitative studies investigating citizens’ protective behaviour in case of hazardous material transport accidents are scarce. Methods A discrete choice experiment was conducted among subjects (19–64 years) living in the direct vicinity of a large waterway. Scenarios were described by three transport accident characteristics: odour perception, smoke/vapour perception, and the proportion of people in the environment that were leaving at their own discretion. Subjects were asked to consider each scenario as realistic and to choose the alternative that was most appealing to them: staying, seeking shelter, or escaping. A panel error component model was used to quantify how different transport accident characteristics influenced subjects’ protective behaviour. Results The response was 44% (881/1,994). The predicted probability that a subject would stay ranged from 1% in case of a severe looking accident till 62% in case of a mild looking accident. All three transport accident characteristics proved to influence protective behaviour. Particularly a perception of strong ammonia or mercaptan odours and visible smoke/vapour close to citizens had the strongest positive influence on escaping. In general, ‘escaping’ was more preferred than ‘seeking shelter’, although stated preference heterogeneity among subjects for these protective behaviour options was substantial. Males were less willing to seek shelter than females, whereas elderly people were more willing to escape than younger people. Conclusion Various characteristics of transport accident involving hazardous materials influence subjects’ protective behaviour. The preference heterogeneity shows that information needs

  18. The Review of Nuclear Microscopy Techniques: An Approach for Nondestructive Trace Elemental Analysis and Mapping of Biological Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    2015-01-01

    The properties of many biological materials often depend on the spatial distribution and concentration of the trace elements present in a matrix. Scientists have over the years tried various techniques including classical physical and chemical analyzing techniques each with relative level of accuracy. However, with the development of spatially sensitive submicron beams, the nuclear microprobe techniques using focused proton beams for the elemental analysis of biological materials have yielded significant success. In this paper, the basic principles of the commonly used microprobe techniques of STIM, RBS, and PIXE for trace elemental analysis are discussed. The details for sample preparation, the detection, and data collection and analysis are discussed. Finally, an application of the techniques to analysis of corn roots for elemental distribution and concentration is presented. PMID:26664356

  19. The Review of Nuclear Microscopy Techniques: An Approach for Nondestructive Trace Elemental Analysis and Mapping of Biological Materials.

    PubMed

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    2015-01-01

    The properties of many biological materials often depend on the spatial distribution and concentration of the trace elements present in a matrix. Scientists have over the years tried various techniques including classical physical and chemical analyzing techniques each with relative level of accuracy. However, with the development of spatially sensitive submicron beams, the nuclear microprobe techniques using focused proton beams for the elemental analysis of biological materials have yielded significant success. In this paper, the basic principles of the commonly used microprobe techniques of STIM, RBS, and PIXE for trace elemental analysis are discussed. The details for sample preparation, the detection, and data collection and analysis are discussed. Finally, an application of the techniques to analysis of corn roots for elemental distribution and concentration is presented. PMID:26664356

  20. Development of the technology of designing of nanocomposite materials based on fluorocontaining synthetic latex and biologically active polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, G. A.; Selezneva, I. I.; Knot'ko, A. V.; Savintseva, I. V.; Montrel, M. M.; Gavrilyuk, B. K.

    2008-03-01

    A conceptually novel approach to the formation of composite biosynthetic materials is proposed, which is based on the phenomenon of self-organization of ensembles of nanoparticles of synthetic latex and biologically active polysaccharides into three-dimensional structures. It is shown that, by varying the polysaccharide/latex ratio, the nature of polysaccharide, and the temperature of drying of colloidal suspension, it is possible to control the architecture of ensembles of nanoparticles and the physicochemical characteristics of biosynthetic materials formed on their basis.

  1. The use of an ion-beam source to alter the surface morphology of biological implant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    An electron bombardment, ion thruster was used as a neutralized-ion beam sputtering source to texture the surfaces of biological implant materials. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface morphology changes of all materials after ion-texturing. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to determine the effects of ion texturing on the surface chemical composition of some polymers. Liquid contact angle data were obtained for ion textured and untextured polymer samples. Results of tensile and fatigue tests of ion-textured metal alloys are presented. Preliminary data of tissue response to ion textured surfaces of some metals, polytetrafluoroethylene, alumina, and segmented polyurethane were obtained.

  2. Investigation of biological activity of fine fraction of lunar surface material returned to earth by the Luna 16 automatic station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kustov, V. V.; Ostapenko, O. F.; Petrukhin, V. G.

    1974-01-01

    The biological action of a sample of lunar surface material returned to earth by the Luna 16 automatic station from a new region of the mare surface on male white mice was studied. The condition and behavior of the animals were observed; the intensity of their oxygen consumption was recorded, and motor activity of the muscles, leucocyte and erythrocytes counts in the peripheral blood, and the activity of whole blood chloinesterase were determined. Experimental results showed that the tested doses of the fine fraction of the lunar surface material from the Sea of Fertility were virtually innocuous for white mice.

  3. Protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture cooperatively enable the fastest stress wave decay in load-bearing biological materials.

    PubMed

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2016-07-01

    One of the key functions of load-bearing biological materials, such as bone, dentin and sea shell, is to protect their inside fragile organs by effectively damping dynamic impact. How those materials achieve this remarkable function remains largely unknown. Using systematic finite element analyses, we study the stress wave propagation and attenuation in cortical bone at the nanoscale as a model material to examine the effects of protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture on the elastic wave decay. It is found that the staggered arrangement, protein viscosity and mineral fraction work cooperatively to effectively attenuate the stress wave. For a typical mineral volume fraction and protein viscosity, an optimal staggered nanostructure with specific feature sizes and layouts is able to give rise to the fastest stress wave decay, and the optimal aspect ratio and thickness of mineral platelets are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In contrary, as the mineral volume fraction or the protein viscosity goes much higher, the structural arrangement is seen having trivial effect on the stress wave decay, suggesting that the damping properties of the composites go into the structure-insensitive regime from the structure-sensitive regime. These findings not only significantly add to our understanding of the structure-function relationship of load-bearing biological materials, and but also provide useful guidelines for the design of bio-inspired materials with superior resistance to impact loading. PMID:26925698

  4. Oxygen isotope systematics of the Banda Arc: low δ 18O despite involvement of subducted continental material in magma genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vroon, P. Z.; Lowry, D.; van Bergen, M. J.; Boyce, A. J.; Mattey, D. P.

    2001-02-01

    This study reports new laser fluorination oxygen isotope data for 60 volcanic rocks and 15 sediments distributed over the whole length of the Banda Arc, eastern Indonesia. The melt oxygen isotope values (δ 18O melt) were calculated from phenocryst δ 18O data using theoretical and empirical mineral-melt fractionation factors. The δ 18O melt of individual volcanic centers within the arc varies between 5.57 and 6.54‰, except for Serua (δ 18O melt = 6.13-7.48‰) and Ambon (δ 18O melt = 8.12-8.38‰). These δ 18O melt values are up to 2‰ lower than new and previously published oxygen isotope data obtained on whole-rock powders by conventional methods. We attribute this discrepancy to post-emplacement low-temperature alteration and/or to a systematic deviation of the bulk analysis. Sediment δ 18O wr (calculated from the δ 18O carbonate and silica fractions, both measured conventionally) range between 12.9 and 24.2‰. The low δ 18O melt values (excluding Serua and Ambon) overlap with the mantle range, and are in agreement with simple two-component source-mixing models that predict 1-5% addition of subducted continental material to a depleted MORB-type source in the sub-arc mantle. This percentage is consistent with previous models based on Sr-Nd-Pb-Th-He-Hf isotope data. However, correlations between incompatible trace-element ratios and oxygen isotope systematics requires involvement of partial melts derived from subducted continental material as the major slab component rather than bulk addition. The contribution of hydrous fluids, from both subducted altered oceanic crust and continental material is probably of minor importance. Magma-mantle wedge interaction models could account for the observed low δ 18O signatures, but predicted effects are difficult to distinguish from models without mantle-wedge interaction. Assimilation of arc-crust material is thought to be important for the high δ 18O melt values of Serua and Ambon. AFC modelling suggests up to

  5. Digital Learning Material for Student-Directed Model Building in Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Coppens, Marjolijn; Janssen, Fred; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton

    2005-01-01

    The building of models to explain data and make predictions constitutes an important goal in molecular biology research. To give students the opportunity to practice such model building, two digital cases had previously been developed in which students are guided to build a model step by step. In this article, the development and initial…

  6. Development and applications of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The purpose was to develop and improve appropriate experimental techniques to the point where they could be applied to specific classes of biological problems. Progress is reported in the following areas: (1) area detectors; (2) x-ray diffraction studies of membranes; (3) electron transfer in loosely coupled systems; (4) bioluminescence and fluorescence; and (5) sonoluminescence. (ACR)

  7. INPPO2014, First INPPO World Congress on "Plant Proteomics: Methodology to Biology"-A global platform for involving, gathering and disseminating knowledge.

    PubMed

    Lüthje, Sabine; Renaut, Jenny; Job, Dominique; Hajduch, Martin; Carpentier, Sébastien; Sarkar, Abhijit; Agrawal, Raj; Dunn, Michael J; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The International Plant Proteomics Organization (INPPO) is a global platform of the plant proteomics community or, more generally, the scientific community that uses proteomics to address plant biology. Organizing an international conference is one of its initiatives to promote plant proteomics by involving and gathering scientists/researchers/students and by disseminating the acquired knowledge. In this fourth INPPO Highlights, the first INPPO World Congress 2014 (INPPO2014) is described and discussed. The INPPO2014 was held at the University of Hamburg (Germany) with the title "Plant Proteomics: Methodology to Biology" under the leadership of Sabine Lüthje (Germany). Participants (around 150) from 38 nations attended this congress covering all continents. The four-day scientific program comprised 52 lectures and 61 poster presentations in a highly professional and friendly atmosphere on mass spectrometry and gel-based proteomics. Two round-table open discussions deliberated on plant proteomics, its associated international organizations/initiatives and future INPPO perspectives. The Second INPPO World Congress 2016 (INPPO2016) "The Quest for Tolerant Varieties-Phenotyping at Plant and Cellular Level" is planned to be organized in Bratislava (Slovakia) under the leadership of Martin Hajduch (Slovak Republic) and Sébastien Carpentier (Belgium) and cosponsored by the COST action FA1306. PMID:25865070

  8. Characterization of genes involved in biosynthesis of a novel antibiotic from Burkholderia cepacia BC11 and their role in biological control of Rhizoctonia solani

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.; Carlson, R.; Tharpe, W.; Schell, M.A.

    1998-10-01

    Genetic manipulation of fluorescent pseudomonads has provided major insight into their production of antifungal molecules and their role in biological control of plant disease. Burkholderia cepacia also produces antifungal activities, but its biological control activity is much less well characterized, in part due to difficulties in applying genetic tools. Here the authors report genetic and biochemical characterization of a soil isolate of B. cepacia relating to its production of an unusual antibiotic that is very active against a variety of soil fungi. Purification and preliminary structural analyses suggest that this antibiotic (called AFC-BC11) is a novel lipopeptide associated largely with the cell membrane. Analysis of conditions for optimal production of AFC-BC11 indicated stringent environmental regulation of its synthesis. Furthermore, the authors show that production of AFC-BC11 is largely responsible for the ability of B. cepacia BC11 to effectively control the damping-Off of cotton caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani in a gnotobiotic system. Using Tn5 mutagenesis, they identified, cloned, and characterized a region of the genome of strain BC11 that is required for production of this antifungal metabolite. DNA sequence analysis suggested that this region encodes proteins directly involved in the production of a nonribosomally synthesized lipopeptide.

  9. The use of an ion-beam source to alter the surface morphology of biological implant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    An electron-bombardment ion-thruster was used as a neutralized-ion-beam sputtering source to texture the surfaces of biological implant materials. The materials investigated included 316 stainless steel; titanium-6% aluminum, 4% vanadium; cobalt-20% chromium, 15% tungsten; cobalt-35% nickel, 20% chromium, 10% molybdenum; polytetrafluoroethylene; polyoxymethylene; silicone and polyurethane copolymer; 32%-carbon-impregnated polyolefin; segmented polyurethane; silicone rubber; and alumina. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface morphology changes of all materials after ion-texturing. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to determine the effects of ion-texturing on the surface chemical composition of some polymers. Liquid contact angle data were obtained for ion-textured and untextured polymer samples. Results of tensile and fatigue tests of ion-textured metal alloys are presented. Preliminary data of tissue response to ion-textured surfaces of some metals, polytetrafluoroethylene, alumina, and segmented polyurethane have been obtained.

  10. Portable magnetic tweezers device enables visualization of the three-dimensional microscale deformation of soft biological materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yali; Lin, Jun; Meschewski, Ryan; Watson, Erin; Valentine, Megan T

    2011-07-01

    We have designed and built a magnetic tweezers device that enables the application of calibrated stresses to soft materials while simultaneously measuring their microscale deformation using confocal microscopy. Unlike previous magnetic tweezers designs, our device is entirely portable, allowing easy use on microscopes in core imaging facilities or in collaborators' laboratories. The imaging capabilities of the microscope are unimpaired, enabling the 3-D structures of fluorescently labeled materials to be precisely determined under applied load. With this device, we can apply a large range of forces (~1-1200 pN) over micron-scale contact areas to beads that are either embedded within 3-D matrices or attached to the surface of thin slab gels. To demonstrate the usefulness of this instrument, we have studied two important and biologically relevant materials: polyacrylamide-based hydrogel films typical of those used in cell traction force microscopy, and reconstituted networks of microtubules, essential cytoskeletal filaments. PMID:21781050

  11. Development of a candidate reference material for adventitious virus detection in vaccine and biologicals manufacturing by deep sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Edward T.; Preston, Mark D.; Minor, Philip D.; Schepelmann, Silke; Huang, Xuening; Nguyen, Jenny; Wall, David; Hargrove, Stacey; Fu, Thomas; Xu, George; Li, Li; Cote, Colette; Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin; Hewlett, Indira; Simonyan, Vahan; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Alin, Voskanian-Kordi; Mermod, Nicolas; Hill, Christiane; Ottenwälder, Birgit; Richter, Daniel C.; Tehrani, Arman; Jacqueline, Weber-Lehmann; Cassart, Jean-Pol; Letellier, Carine; Vandeputte, Olivier; Ruelle, Jean-Louis; Deyati, Avisek; La Neve, Fabio; Modena, Chiara; Mee, Edward; Schepelmann, Silke; Preston, Mark; Minor, Philip; Eloit, Marc; Muth, Erika; Lamamy, Arnaud; Jagorel, Florence; Cheval, Justine; Anscombe, Catherine; Misra, Raju; Wooldridge, David; Gharbia, Saheer; Rose, Graham; Ng, Siemon H.S.; Charlebois, Robert L.; Gisonni-Lex, Lucy; Mallet, Laurent; Dorange, Fabien; Chiu, Charles; Naccache, Samia; Kellam, Paul; van der Hoek, Lia; Cotten, Matt; Mitchell, Christine; Baier, Brian S.; Sun, Wenping; Malicki, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unbiased deep sequencing offers the potential for improved adventitious virus screening in vaccines and biotherapeutics. Successful implementation of such assays will require appropriate control materials to confirm assay performance and sensitivity. Methods A common reference material containing 25 target viruses was produced and 16 laboratories were invited to process it using their preferred adventitious virus detection assay. Results Fifteen laboratories returned results, obtained using a wide range of wet-lab and informatics methods. Six of 25 target viruses were detected by all laboratories, with the remaining viruses detected by 4–14 laboratories. Six non-target viruses were detected by three or more laboratories. Conclusion The study demonstrated that a wide range of methods are currently used for adventitious virus detection screening in biological products by deep sequencing and that they can yield significantly different results. This underscores the need for common reference materials to ensure satisfactory assay performance and enable comparisons between laboratories. PMID:26709640

  12. Determination of Perfluorinated Alkyl Acid Concentrations in Biological Standard Reference Materials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard reference materials (SRMs) are homogeneous, well-characterized materials used to validate measurements and improve the quality of analytical data. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has a wide range of SRMs that have mass fraction values assigned ...

  13. Biological effects of soft denture reline materials on L929 cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Carolina AL; Vergani, Carlos E; Thomas, Dominique; Young, Anne; Costa, Carlos AS; Machado, Ana L

    2014-01-01

    Soft denture reline materials have been developed to help patients when their oral mucosa is damaged or affected due to ill-fitting dentures or post-implant surgery. Although reports have indicated that these materials leach monomers and other components that do affect their biocompatibility, there is little information on what cell molecules may be implicated in these material/tissue interactions. The biocompatibility of six soft liners (Ufi Gel P, Sofreliner S, Durabase Soft, Trusoft, Softone and Coe Comfort) was evaluated using a mouse fibroblast cell line, L929. Within 2 h of material disc preparation, each of the materials was exposed by direct contact to L929 cells for periods of 24 and 48 h. The effect of this interaction was assessed by alamarBlue assay (for cell survival). The expression of integrin α5β1 and transforming growth factor β1 was also assessed using plate assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Trusoft, Softone and Coe Comfort showed significantly reduced cell survival compared with the other soft lining materials at each incubation period. Furthermore, there were significant differences with these same materials in the expression of both integrin α5β1 and transforming growth factor β1. Soft liner materials may affect cell viability and cellular proteins that have important roles in wound healing and the preservation of cell viability and function in the presence of environmental challenges and stresses. PMID:25383166

  14. UV LEDs for fluorescence detection of biological particles: from materials to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherasimova, M.; Han, J.; Song, Y.-K.; Nurmikko, A. V.; Pan, Y.-L.; Chang, R. K.

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate a compact system, incorporating a 32-element linear array of ultraviolet (290 nm and 340 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a multi-anode photomultiplier tube, to the in-flight fluorescence detection of aerosolized particles, here containing the biological molecules tryptophan and NADH. This system illustrates substantial advances in the growth and fabrication of new semiconductor UV light emitting devices and an evolution in packaging details for LEDs tailored to the bio-aerosol warning problem.

  15. Microcantilever technology for law enforcement and anti-terrorism applications: chemical, biological, and explosive material detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. D.; Rogers, B.; Whitten, R.

    2005-05-01

    The remarkable sensitivity, compactness, low cost, low power-consumption, scalability, and versatility of microcantilever sensors make this technology among the most promising solutions for detection of chemical and biological agents, as well as explosives. The University of Nevada, Reno, and Nevada Nanotech Systems, Inc (NNTS) are currently developing a microcantilever-based detection system that will measure trace concentrations of explosives, toxic chemicals, and biological agents in air. A baseline sensor unit design that includes the sensor array, electronics, power supply and air handling has been created and preliminary demonstrations of the microcantilever platform have been conducted. The envisioned device would measure about two cubic inches, run on a small watch battery and cost a few hundred dollars. The device could be operated by untrained law enforcement personnel. Microcantilever-based devices could be used to "sniff out" illegal and/or hazardous chemical and biological agents in high traffic public areas, or be packaged as a compact, low-power system used to monitor cargo in shipping containers. Among the best detectors for such applications at present is the dog, an animal which is expensive, requires significant training and can only be made to work for limited time periods. The public is already accustomed to explosives and metal detection systems in airports and other public venues, making the integration of the proposed device into such security protocols straightforward.

  16. Ethical and legal considerations regarding the ownership and commercial use of human biological materials and their derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    This article considers some of the ethical and legal issues relating to the ownership and use – including for commercial purposes – of biological material and products derived from humans. The discussion is divided into three parts: after first examining the general notion of ownership, it moves to the particular case of possible commercial use, and finally reflects on the case in point in the light of the preceding considerations. Units of cord blood donated altruistically for transplantation and which are found unsuitable for storage and transplantation, or which become unsuitable while stored in biobanks, are taken as an example. These cord-blood units can be discarded together with other biological waste, or they can be used for research or the development of blood-derived products such as platelet gel. Several ethical questions (eg, informed consent, property, distribution of profits, and others) arise from these circumstances. In this regard, some criteria and limits to use are proposed. PMID:22977316

  17. Hierarchical fiber bundle model to investigate the complex architectures of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola M; Bosia, Federico; Abdalrahman, Tamer

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of fiber bundles has been widely studied in the literature, and fiber bundle models in particular have provided a wealth of useful analytical and numerical results for modeling ordinary materials. These models, however, are inadequate to treat bioinspired nanostructured materials, where hierarchy, multiscale, and complex properties play a decisive role in determining the overall mechanical characteristics. Here, we develop an ad hoc hierarchical theory designed to tackle these complex architectures, thus allowing the determination of the strength of macroscopic hierarchical materials from the properties of their constituents at the nanoscale. The roles of finite size, twisting angle, and friction are also included. Size effects on the statistical distribution of fiber strengths naturally emerge without invoking best-fit or unknown parameters. A comparison between the developed theory and various experimental results on synthetic and natural materials yields considerable agreement. PMID:22400587

  18. Fracture analysis for biological materials with an expanded cohesive zone model.

    PubMed

    An, Bingbing; Zhao, Xinluo; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-07-18

    In this study, a theoretical framework for simulation of fracture of bone and bone-like materials is provided. An expanded cohesive zone model with thermodynamically consistent framework has been proposed and used to investigate the crack growth resistance of bone and bone-like materials. The reversible elastic deformation, irreversible plastic deformation caused by large deformation of soft protein matrix, and damage evidenced by the material separation and crack nucleation in the cohesive zone, were all taken into account in the model. Furthermore, the key mechanisms in deformation of biocomposites consisting of mineral platelets and protein interfacial layers were incorporated in the fracture process zone in this model, thereby overcoming the limitations of previous cohesive zone modeling of bone fracture. Finally, applications to fracture of cortical bone and human dentin were presented, which showed good agreement between numerical simulation and reported experiments and substantiated the effectiveness of the model in investigating the fracture behavior of bone-like materials. PMID:24877880

  19. A New Approach to Studying Biological and Soft Materials Using Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB SEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, D. J.; Morrissey, F.; Lich, B. H.

    2006-02-01

    Over the last decade techniques such as confocal light microscopy, in combination with fluorescent labelling, have helped biologists and life scientists to study biological architectures at tissue and cell level in great detail. Meanwhile, obtaining information at very small length scales is possible with the combination of sample preparation techniques and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is well known for the determination of surface characteristics and morphology. However, the desire to understand the three dimensional relationships of meso-scale hierarchies has led to the development of advanced microscopy techniques, to give a further complementary approach. A focused ion beam (FIB) can be used as a nano-scalpel and hence allows us to reveal internal microstructure in a site-specific manner. Whilst FIB instruments have been used to study and verify the three-dimensional architecture of man made materials, SEM and FIB technologies have now been brought together in a single instrument representing a powerful combination for the study of biological specimens and soft materials. We demonstrate the use of FIB SEM to study three-dimensional relationships for a range of length scales and materials, from small-scale cellular structures to the larger scale interactions between biomedical materials and tissues. FIB cutting of heterogeneous mixtures of hard and soft materials, resulting in a uniform cross-section, has proved to be of particular value since classical preparation methods tend to introduce artefacts. Furthermore, by appropriate selection, we can sequentially cross-section to create a series of 'slices' at specific intervals. 3D reconstruction software can then be used to volume-render information from the 2D slices, enabling us to immediately see the spatial relationships between microstructural components.

  20. Contextualizing the Genes Altered in Bladder Neoplasms in Pediatric andTeen Patients Allows Identifying Two Main Classes of Biological ProcessesInvolved and New Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Porrello, A.; Piergentili, R. b

    2016-01-01

    Research on bladder neoplasms in pediatric and teen patients (BNPTP) has described 21 genes, which are variously involved in this disease and are mostly responsible for deregulated cell proliferation. However, due to the limited number of publications on this subject, it is still unclear what type of relationships there are among these genes and which are the chances that, while having different molecular functions, they i) act as downstream effector genes of well-known pro- or anti- proliferative stimuli and/or interplay with biochemical pathways having oncological relevance or ii) are specific and, possibly, early biomarkers of these pathologies. A Gene Ontology (GO)-based analysis showed that these 21 genes are involved in biological processes, which can be split into two main classes: cell regulation-based and differentiation/development-based. In order to understand the involvement/overlapping with main cancer-related pathways, we performed a meta-analysis dependent on the 189 oncogenic signatures of the Molecular Signatures Database (OSMSD) curated by the Broad Institute. We generated a binary matrix with 53 gene signatures having at least one hit; this analysis i) suggests that some genes of the original list show inconsistencies and might need to be experimentally re- assessed or evaluated as biomarkers (in particular, ACTA2) and ii) allows hypothesizing that important (proto)oncogenes (E2F3, ERBB2/HER2, CCND1, WNT1, and YAP1) and (putative) tumor suppressors (BRCA1, RBBP8/CTIP, and RB1-RBL2/p130) may participate in the onset of this disease or worsen the observed phenotype, thus expanding the list of possible molecular targets for the treatment of BNPTP. PMID:27013923

  1. The use of Compton suppression spectrometers for trace element studies in biological materials.

    PubMed

    Rossbach, M; Zeisler, R; Woittiez, J R

    1990-01-01

    A straightforward method for demonstrating the powerful background reduction of Compton suppression spectrometers for neutron activation purposes is presented. The shorter acquisition time needed in Anti-Compton mode (A/C on) for peaks of appropriate counting statistics, compared to normal gamma counting (A/C off), allows a much higher sample throughput, thus compensating for the higher cost of the instrument. Two examples of artificial mixtures of radionuclides demonstrate the drastic time saving for measurement of monoenergetic decaying isotopes. The comparison of results from three different instruments proves the general usefulness of Compton suppression spectrometers for Neutron Activation Analysis of biological samples. PMID:1704771

  2. 2012 best practices for repositories collection, storage, retrieval, and distribution of biological materials for research international society for biological and environmental repositories.

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Third Edition [Formula: see text] [Box: see text] Printed with permission from the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER) © 2011 ISBER All Rights Reserved Editor-in-Chief Lori D. Campbell, PhD Associate Editors Fay Betsou, PhD Debra Leiolani Garcia, MPA Judith G. Giri, PhD Karen E. Pitt, PhD Rebecca S. Pugh, MS Katherine C. Sexton, MBA Amy P.N. Skubitz, PhD Stella B. Somiari, PhD Individual Contributors to the Third Edition Jonas Astrin, Susan Baker, Thomas J. Barr, Erica Benson, Mark Cada, Lori Campbell, Antonio Hugo Jose Froes Marques Campos, David Carpentieri, Omoshile Clement, Domenico Coppola, Yvonne De Souza, Paul Fearn, Kelly Feil, Debra Garcia, Judith Giri, William E. Grizzle, Kathleen Groover, Keith Harding, Edward Kaercher, Joseph Kessler, Sarah Loud, Hannah Maynor, Kevin McCluskey, Kevin Meagher, Cheryl Michels, Lisa Miranda, Judy Muller-Cohn, Rolf Muller, James O'Sullivan, Karen Pitt, Rebecca Pugh, Rivka Ravid, Katherine Sexton, Ricardo Luis A. Silva, Frank Simione, Amy Skubitz, Stella Somiari, Frans van der Horst, Gavin Welch, Andy Zaayenga 2012 Best Practices for Repositories: Collection, Storage, Retrieval and Distribution of Biological Materials for Research INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL REPOSITORIES (ISBER) INTRODUCTION T he availability of high quality biological and environmental specimens for research purposes requires the development of standardized methods for collection, long-term storage, retrieval and distribution of specimens that will enable their future use. Sharing successful strategies for accomplishing this goal is one of the driving forces for the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER). For more information about ISBER see www.isber.org . ISBER's Best Practices for Repositories (Best Practices) reflect the collective experience of its members and has received broad input from other repository professionals. Throughout this document

  3. Fluorescent and Magnetic Mesoporous Hybrid Material: A Chemical and Biological Nanosensor for Hg2+ Ions

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Moorthy; Anand, Chokkalingam; Frith, Jessica E.; Dhawale, Dattatray S.; Subramaniam, Vishnu P.; Strounina, Ekaterina; Sathish, Clastinrusselraj I.; Yamaura, Kazunari; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Vinu, Ajayan

    2016-01-01

    We introduce “sense, track and separate” approach for the removal of Hg2+ ion from aqueous media using highly ordered and magnetic mesoporous ferrosilicate nanocages functionalised with rhodamine fluorophore derivative. These functionalised materials offer both fluorescent and magnetic properties in a single system which help not only to selectively sense the Hg2+ ions with a high precision but also adsorb and separate a significant amount of Hg2+ ion in aqueous media. We demonstrate that the magnetic affinity of these materials, generated from the ultrafine γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles present inside the nanochannels of the support, can efficiently be used as a fluorescent tag to sense the Hg2+ ions present in NIH3T3 fibroblasts live cells and to track the movement of the cells by external magnetic field monitored using confocal fluorescence microscopy. This simple approach of introducing multiple functions in the magnetic mesoporous materials raise the prospect of creating new advanced functional materials by fusing organic, inorganic and biomolecules to create advanced hybrid nanoporous materials which have a potential use not only for sensing and the separation of toxic metal ions but also for cell tracking in bio-separation and the drug delivery. PMID:26911660

  4. Fluorescent and Magnetic Mesoporous Hybrid Material: A Chemical and Biological Nanosensor for Hg2+ Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Moorthy; Anand, Chokkalingam; Frith, Jessica E.; Dhawale, Dattatray S.; Subramaniam, Vishnu P.; Strounina, Ekaterina; Sathish, Clastinrusselraj I.; Yamaura, Kazunari; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Vinu, Ajayan

    2016-02-01

    We introduce “sense, track and separate” approach for the removal of Hg2+ ion from aqueous media using highly ordered and magnetic mesoporous ferrosilicate nanocages functionalised with rhodamine fluorophore derivative. These functionalised materials offer both fluorescent and magnetic properties in a single system which help not only to selectively sense the Hg2+ ions with a high precision but also adsorb and separate a significant amount of Hg2+ ion in aqueous media. We demonstrate that the magnetic affinity of these materials, generated from the ultrafine γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles present inside the nanochannels of the support, can efficiently be used as a fluorescent tag to sense the Hg2+ ions present in NIH3T3 fibroblasts live cells and to track the movement of the cells by external magnetic field monitored using confocal fluorescence microscopy. This simple approach of introducing multiple functions in the magnetic mesoporous materials raise the prospect of creating new advanced functional materials by fusing organic, inorganic and biomolecules to create advanced hybrid nanoporous materials which have a potential use not only for sensing and the separation of toxic metal ions but also for cell tracking in bio-separation and the drug delivery.

  5. Graphene-Based Materials as Solid Phase Extraction Sorbent for Trace Metal Ions, Organic Compounds, and Biological Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Nodeh, Hamid Rashidi; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2016-07-01

    Graphene is a new carbon-based material that is of interest in separation science. Graphene has extraordinary properties including nano size, high surface area, thermal and chemical stability, and excellent adsorption affinity to pollutants. Its adsorption mechanisms are through non-covalent interactions (π-π stacking, electrostatic interactions, and H-bonding) for organic compounds and covalent interactions for metal ions. These properties have led to graphene-based material becoming a desirable adsorbent in a popular sample preparation technique known as solid phase extraction (SPE). Numerous studies have been published on graphene applications in recent years, but few review papers have focused on its applications in analytical chemistry. This article focuses on recent preconcentration of trace elements, organic compounds, and biological species using SPE-based graphene, graphene oxide, and their modified forms. Solid phase microextraction and micro SPE (µSPE) methods based on graphene are discussed. PMID:26186420

  6. Determination of organomercury in biological reference materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchemin, D.; Siu, K.W.; Berman, S.S.

    1988-12-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used for the determination of organomercury in two marine biological standard reference materials for trace metals (dogfish muscle tissue DORM-1 and lobster hepatopancreas TORT-1). In most parts of this study, the organomercury was extracted as the chloride from the material with toluene and back extracted into an aqueous medium of cysteine acetate. Since the final extracts contained more than 4% sodium, isotope dilution and flow injection analysis were used to respectively counter the effect of concomitant elements and avoid clogging the interface. Comparison of results with gas chromatography shows that the only significant organomercury is methyl-mercury. At least 93% of mercury in DORM-1 and 39% of mercury in TORT-1 exist as methylmercury.

  7. MATERIALS USED IN TEACHING AND EVALUATING THE CONCEPTS RELATED TO THE BIOLOGICAL CELL IN GRADES 2-6, PRACTICAL PAPER NO. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STAUSS, NYLES G.

    INCLUDED ARE MATERIALS FOR USE IN TEACHING AND EVALUATING 11 SELECTED CONCEPTS RELATED TO THE BIOLOGICAL CELL IN GRADES 2 TO 6. THE CONCEPTS WERE SELECTED AND THEIR ORDER DETERMINED THROUGH AN ANALYSIS OF ELEMENTARY TEXTBOOK SERIES, HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE BIOLOGY TEXTS, CYTOLOGY TEXTS, AND INFORMATION GATHERED THROUGH A PILOT STUDY. THE MATERIALS…

  8. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sangwon

    2008-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

  9. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING SYSTEMS FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES (PRODUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF ANALYTICAL REFERENCE MATERIALS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA programs in pesticides, toxics, and hazardous waste require analytical reference materials. This project emphasized the collection of and analysis of urine, fat, and blood for ultimate use as reference samples. Another objective of the project concerned the practicality of us...

  10. Biological testing and chemical analysis of process materials from an integrated two stage coal liquefaction: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Buhl, P.; Moroni, E.C.

    1983-07-01

    Samples for chemical characterization and biological testing were obtained from ITSL runs 3LCF7, 3LCF8 and 3LCF9. Chemical analysis of these materials showed that SCT products were composed of fewer compounds than analogous materials from Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) processes. Major components in the SCT materials were three-, four-, five- and six-ring neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Methyl(C/sub 1/) and C/sub 2/ homologs of these compounds were present in relatively low concentrations, compared to their non-alkylated homologs. Organic nitrogen was primarily in the form of tertiary polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles and carbazoles. Little or no amino PAH (APAH) or cyano PAH were detected in samples taken during normal PDU operations, however, mutagenic APAH were produced during off-normal operation. Microbial mutagenicity appeared to be due mainly to the presence of APAH which were probably formed in the LC finer due to failure of the catalyst to promote deamination following carbon-nitrogen bond scission of nitrogen-containing hydroaromatics. This failure was observed for the off-normal runs where it was likely that the catalyst had been deactivated. Carcinogenic activity of ITSL materials as assessed by (tumors per animal) in the initiation/promotion mouse skin painting assay was slightly reduced for materials produced with good catalyst under normal operation compared to those collected during recycle of the LC Finer feed. Initiation activity of the latter samples did not appear to be significantly different from that of other coal derived materials with comparable boiling ranges. The observed initiation activity was not unexpected, considering analytical data which showed the presence of four-, five- and six-ring PAH in ITSL materials.

  11. Transition from Bioinert to Bioactive Material by Tailoring the Biological Cell Response to Carboxylated Nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kai; Rocha, Igor; Zhang, Peng; Gustafsson, Simon; Ning, Yi; Strømme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert; Ferraz, Natalia

    2016-03-14

    This work presents an insight into the relationship between cell response and physicochemical properties of Cladophora cellulose (CC) by investigating the effect of CC functional group density on the response of model cell lines. CC was carboxylated by electrochemical TEMPO-mediated oxidation. By varying the amount of charge passed through the electrolysis setup, CC materials with different degrees of oxidation were obtained. The effect of carboxyl group density on the material's physicochemical properties was investigated together with the response of human dermal fibroblasts (hDF) and human osteoblastic cells (Saos-2) to the carboxylated CC films. The introduction of carboxyl groups resulted in CC films with decreased specific surface area and smaller total pore volume compared with the unmodified CC (u-CC). While u-CC films presented a porous network of randomly oriented fibers, a compact and aligned fiber pattern was depicted for the carboxylated-CC films. The decrease in surface area and total pore volume, and the orientation and aggregation of the fibers tended to augment parallel to the increase in the carboxyl group density. hDF and Saos-2 cells presented poor cell adhesion and spreading on u-CC, which gradually increased for the carboxylated CC as the degree of oxidation increased. It was found that a threshold value in carboxyl group density needs be reached to obtain a carboxylated-CC film with cytocompatibility comparable to commercial tissue culture material. Hence, this study demonstrates that a normally bioinert nanomaterial can be rendered bioactive by carefully tuning the density of charged groups on the material surface, a finding that not only may contribute to the fundamental understanding of biointerface phenomena, but also to the development of bioinert/bioactive materials. PMID:26886265

  12. The application of semiconductor based UV sources for the detection and classification of biological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliszewski, Miron; Włodarski, Maksymilian; Bombalska, Aneta; Kwaśny, Mirosław; Mularczyk-Oliwa, Monika; Młyńczak, Jarosław; Kopczyński, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence analysis of dry samples of biological origin like pollens, fungi, flours and proteins was presented. In the laboratory study presentenced here two fluorescence methods using semiconductor light sources were applied. Firstly, laser induced fluorescence emission (LIF) spectra of the samples were recorded under 266 and 375 nm excitation. The second technique covered fluorescence decay (FD) at 280 and 340 nm excitation. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) of acquired spectra and decays was performed. Both LIF and FD showed that single wavelength excitation 266 and 280 nm, respectively allow distinguishing of pollens from other samples. Combining data of both excitation wavelengths, for LIF and FD, respectively, resulted in substantial improvement of data classification for groups according to the samples origin.

  13. Material balance and diets in biological life support systems: a relationship with a coefficient of closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukovsky, N. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Somova, L. A.

    Biological life support systems (BLSS) of various coefficients of closure were considered The basic coefficient of closure was accepted equal to 66%. With increase in coefficient of closure food requirements for the greater degree should be satisfied due to the manufacture of food inside the BLSS. In this connection food values were estimated both in the basic variant, and in those with increased coefficients of closure. Metabolic massflow rates were estimated at the input and output of the BLSS as well as inside it. Human massflow rates were submitted on the basis of characteristics of the 'reference man'. Stoichiometric synthesis - degradation equations of organic substances in the BLSS were obtained. A problem of nitrogen imbalance was shown to occur under an incomplete BLSS closure. To compensate losses of nitrogen with urine and feces, food and nitrogen-containing additives should be introduced into the BLSS.

  14. [Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of etofenamate/ Determination, method and use in biological material (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dell, H D; Fiedler, J; Jacobi, H; Kolle, J

    1981-01-01

    Etofenamate in biological specimen can be determined by gas-liquid chromatography with etofenamate benzyl ether as internal standard. Determination in urine is done directly after extraction and concentration, whereas plasma and homogenates from organs have to be prepurified by thin-layer chromatography. Unchanged etofenamate is found in small amounts in human urine (0--4, 6--6, 6--8 h p. appl.). Inflamed rat paws after local application contain up to 75 microgram etofenamate/g in comparison to only 2 microgram flufenamic acid/g tissue. Both compounds are also found in non-inflamed paws, contents being only 3--4% as compared to the inflamed tissue. Elimination of etofenamate from the inflamed area occurs with a half-life of approx. 8.5 h. These results from gas-liquid chromatography correspond to results from t.l.c./fluorescence measurements. PMID:6971109

  15. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Wittig, Andrea; Michel, Jean; Moss, Raymond L; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bendel, Peter; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Hilger, Ralf; Salvadori, Piero A; Menichetti, Luca; Zamenhof, Robert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang A G

    2008-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy. BNCT strongly depends on the selective uptake of 10B in tumor cells and on its distribution inside the cells. The chemical properties of boron and the need to discriminate different isotopes make the investigation of the concentration and distribution of 10B a challenging task. The most advanced techniques to measure and image boron are described, both invasive and non-invasive. The most promising approach for further investigation will be the complementary use of the different techniques to obtain the information that is mandatory for the future of this innovative treatment modality. PMID:18439836

  16. Determination of traces of zinc in biological materials, wine, and alloys by fluorometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pavon, J.M.C.; Pozo, M.E.U.; de Torres, A.G.

    1986-06-01

    A simple, rapid, and selective method for the fluorometric determination of zinc has been developed based upon the formation of the salicylaldehyde thiocarbohydrazone (SATCH-Zn(II)) complex. The reaction is carried out at pH 4.6-4.9 in an aqueous-ethanol medium (52% v/v ethanol). The detection limit is 10 ng/mL and the relative standard deviations are +/-1.65% (15-100 ppb zinc), +/-1.70% (100-500 ppb zinc), and +/-2.22% (500-1000 ppb zinc). The effect of interferences was studied. The method has been applied to the determination of zinc in biological samples (prior to destruction of the organic matter by using a HNO/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ mixture), wine, and alloys.

  17. Parastomal Hernia Repair and Reinforcement: The Role of Biologic and Synthetic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gillern, Suzanne; Bleier, Joshua I. S.

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is a prevalent problem and treatment can pose difficulties due to significant rates of recurrence and morbidities of the repair. The current standard of care is to perform parastomal hernia repair with mesh whenever possible. There exist multiple options for mesh reinforcement (biologic and synthetic) as well as surgical techniques, to include type of repair (keyhole and Sugarbaker) and position of mesh placement (onlay, sublay, or intraperitoneal). The sublay and intraperitoneal positions have been shown to be superior with a lower incidence of recurrence. This procedure may be performed open or laparoscopically, both having similar recurrence and morbidity results. Prophylactic mesh placement at the time of stoma formation has been shown to significantly decrease the rates of parastomal hernia formation. PMID:25435825

  18. Social justice and research using human biological material: A response to Mahomed, Nöthling-Slabbert and Pepper.

    PubMed

    Jordaan, Donrich W

    2016-07-01

    Social justice in the context of research using human biological material is an important contemporary legal-ethical issue. A question at the heart of this issue is the following: Is it fair to expect a research participant (a person who participates in such research by, among others, making available biological material from his or her body) to participate on an altruistic basis, while the researchers and the investors in the research can gain commercially from the research? In a recent article, Mahomed, Nöthling-Slabbert and Pepper proposed that research participants should be entitled to share in the profits emanating from such research via a proposed new statutory right to the intellectual property emanating from such research. In order to stimulate debate on this important issue of social justice, this article responds to the position of Mahomed et al. by focusing on two main points: Firstly, I contend that Mahomed et al. fail to make a convincing argument in favour of shifting away from altruism; secondly, I caution against framing the debate in terms of the binary poles of altruism v. profitsharing, and suggest that should healthcare public policy ever move away from altruism, various non-monetary forms of benefit-sharing by research participants should be considered. PMID:27384358

  19. Large-scale photonic neural networks with biology-like processing elements: the role of electron-trapping materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Nabil H.; Wen, Zhimin

    1995-08-01

    Neural networks employing pulsating biology-oriented integrate-and-fire (IF) model neurons, that can exhibit synchronicity (phase-locking), bifurcation, and chaos, have features that make them potentially useful for learning and recognition of spatio-temporal patterns, generation of complex motor control, emulating higher-level cortical functions like feature binding, separation of object from background, cognition and other higher-level functions; all of which are beyond the ready reach of nonpulsating sigmoidal neuron networks. The spiking nature of biology-oriented neural networks makes their study in digital hardware impractical. Prange and Klar convincingly argued that the best way of realizing such networks is through analog CMOS technology rather than digital hardware. They showed, however, that the number of neurons one can accommodate on a VLSI chip limited to a hundred or so, even when submicron CMOS technology is used, because of the relatively large size of the neuron/dendrite cell. One way of reducing the size of neuron/dendrite cell is to reduce the structural complexity of the cell by realizing some of the processes needed in the cell's operation externally to the chip and by coupling these processes to the cell optically. Two such processes are the relaxation mechanism of the IF neuron and dendritic-tree processing. We have shown, by examining the blue light impulse response of electron trapping materials (ETMs) used under simultaneous infrared and blue light bias, that these materials offer features that can be used in realizing both the optical relaxation and synapto-dendritic response mechanisms. Experimental results demonstrating the potential of this approach in realizing dense arrays of biology-oriented neuron/dendrite cells will be presented, focusing on the concept and design of ETM-based image intensifier as new enabling technology.

  20. Synthesis of hybrid sol-gel materials and their biological evaluation with human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Escolano, M; Juan-Díaz, M J; Martínez-Ibáñez, M; Suay, J; Goñi, I; Gurruchaga, M

    2013-06-01

    Surface engineering of biomaterials could promote the osseointegration of implants. In this work, two types of hybrid sol-gel materials were developed to stimulate cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation of osteogenic cells. One type was synthesised from vinyl triethoxysilane (VTES) and tetraethyl-orthosilicate (TEOS) at different molar ratios, while the other from VTES and hydroxyapatite particles (HAp). Hybrid materials were systematically investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and contact angle metrology. The biocompatibility and osseoinduction of the coatings were evaluated by measuring mesenchymal stem cell proliferation using MTT assays and analysing the mineralised extracellular matrix production by quantifying calcium-rich deposits. The results highlighted the versatility of these coatings in obtaining different properties by changing the molar ratio of the VTES:TEOS precursors. Thus, mineralisation was stimulated by increasing TEOS content, while the addition of HAp improved cell proliferation but worsened mineralisation. PMID:23475116

  1. The legal status of human biological materials and the consequences in biobanking.

    PubMed

    Macilotti, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the legal status of human tissue when detached from the body. Scientific advances compel a change in legal perspective from the traditional 'material' view to recognise the 'informational' capacity of tissue. The aim of this article is to critically review this legal shift and its consequences for human research biobanking, and to propose a new theory on the legal nature of human tissue. PMID:22977958

  2. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel: Phase 3 -- biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, N.P.; Karle, L.M.; Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; White, P.J.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.

    1993-10-01

    The John F. Baldwin Ship Channel is a 28-mile-long portion of the San Francisco Bay to Stockton Ship Channel, the primary shipping lane through San Francisco Bay and Delta. The San Francisco District of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for construction of the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel, which is authorized to be deepened to a project depth of {minus}45 ft relative to mean lower low water (MLLW). Approximately 8.5 million cubic yards (mcy) of sediment will be removed from the channel to reach this project depth. The USACE requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to conduct testing for ocean disposal under the guidelines in Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal-Testing Manual (EPA/USACE 1991). This testing manual contains a tiered evaluation approach developed specifically for ocean disposal of dredged material at a selected site. In this study, John F. Baldwin Ship Channel sediments were evaluated under the Tier III (biological) testing guidance, which is considered to be highly stringent and protective of the environment. The Tier III guidance for ocean disposal testing requires tests of water column effects, (following dredged material disposal), deposited sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants from deposited sediment (dredged material).

  3. Lorentz contact resonance spectroscopy for nanoscale characterisation of structural and mechanical properties of biological, dental and pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Dipesh; Dillon, Eoghan; Hau, Herman; Fu, Dong; Ramzan, Iqbal; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been widely used to obtain topographical information and to quantify nanostructural properties of different materials. Qualitative and quantitative imaging is of particular interest to study material-material interactions and map surface properties on a nanoscale (i.e. stiffness and viscoelastic properties). These data are essential for the development of new biomedical materials. Currently, there are limited options to map viscoelastic properties of materials at nanoscale and at high resolutions. Lorentz contact resonance (LCR) is an emerging technique, which allows mapping viscoelasticity of samples with stiffness ranging from a few hundred Pa up to several GPa. Here we demonstrate the applicability of LCR to probe and map the viscoelasticity and stiffness of 'soft' (biological sample: cell treated with nanodiamond), 'medium hard' (pharmaceutical sample: pMDI canister) and 'hard' (human teeth enamel) specimens. The results allowed the identification of nanodiamond on the cells and the qualitative assessment of its distribution based on its nanomechanical properties. It also enabled mapping of the mechanical properties of the cell to demonstrate variability of these characteristics in a single cell. Qualitative imaging of an enamel sample demonstrated variations of stiffness across the specimen and precise identification of enamel prisms (higher stiffness) and enamel interrods (lower stiffness). Similarly, mapping of the pMDI canister wall showed that drug particles were adsorbed to the wall. These particles showed differences in stiffness at nanoscale, which suggested variations in surface composition-multiphasic material. LCR technique emerges as a valuable tool for probing viscoelasticity of samples of varying stiffness's. PMID:26518012

  4. Remote Raman Spectroscopic Detection of Inorganic, Organic and Biological Materials to 100 m and More

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.

    2008-11-01

    We have designed and tested a portable gated-Raman system that is capable of detecting organic and inorganic bulk chemicals over stand-off distances of 100 m and more during day and night time. Utilizing a 532 nm laser pulse (~35 mJ/pulse), Raman spectra of several organic and inorganic compounds have been measured with the portable Raman instrument over a distance of 100 m. Remote Raman spectra, obtained with a very short gate (2 micro second), from a variety of inorganic minerals such as calcite (CaCO3), α-quartz (α-SiO2), barite (BaSO4), and FeSO4.7H2O, and organic compounds such as acetone, methanol, 2-propanol and naphthalene showed all major bands required for unambiguous chemical identification. We also measured the Raman and fluorescence spectra of plant leaves, tomato, and chicken eggshell excited with a 532 nm, 20 Hz pulsed laser and accumulated over 200 laser shots (10-s integration time) at 110 m with good signal-to-noise ratio. The results of these investigations show that remote Raman spectroscopy over a distance of 100 m can be used to identify Raman fingerprints of both inorganic, organic, and some biological compounds on planetary surfaces and could be useful for environmental monitoring.

  5. Integration of X-ray microanalysis and morphometry of biological material

    SciTech Connect

    de Bruijn, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    The authors investigated how to extract both morphometrical and X-ray elemental information from scanning electron microscopical (SEM) or scanning transmission electron microscopical (STEM)-images and how to integrate these two information streams either on line or off-line after storage. Cytochemical reaction products in cell organelles in ultrathin sections are the biological structures of interest. A new program has been proposed and described, which permits determination of both the area and the mean net-intensity value of chemical elements, inhomogeneously distributed over heteromorph organelles. The value of this integration method is demonstrated by three examples of increasing complexity, starting with two elements which are more or less homogeneously distributed over one lysosome, the establishing of a platinum discontinuity in an acidophilic granule and finally the localization of two chemical elements inhomogeneously distributed over a rather heteromorph phagolysosome. In two examples Chelex ion exchange beads, maximally loaded with the element also present in the structure of interest, are co-embedded with the tissue as internal standards. In such cases the absolute elemental concentration in the structures analysed can be established.

  6. Studies on aqueous two phase polymer systems useful for partitioning of biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. E.; Bamberger, S.

    1982-01-01

    The two phase systems that result when aqueous solutions of dextran and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are mixed above a critical concentration of a few percent provide a useful medium for the separation of biological cell subpopulations via partition between the top, PEG-rich phase and the liquid-liquid phase boundary. Interfacial tensions of such systems have been measured by the rotating drop technique and found to range between 0.1-100 micro-N/m. The tension was found to depend on the length of the tie line describing the system on a phase diagram, via a power law relationship which differed depending on the concentration of Na phosphate buffer present. The electrokinetic properties of drops of one phase suspended in the other were studied for a variety of systems. It was found that the droplet electrophoretic mobility increased monotonically with phosphate concentration and drop diameter but exhibited the opposite sign from that anticipated from phosphate partition measurements. It was possible to take advantage of these electrokinetic properties and dramatically enhance the speed of phase separation through application of relatively small electric fields.

  7. Influence of Pichia pastoris cellular material on polymerase chain reaction performance as a synthetic biology standard for genome monitoring.

    PubMed

    Templar, Alexander; Woodhouse, Stefan; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-08-01

    Advances in synthetic genomics are now well underway in yeasts due to the low cost of synthetic DNA. These new capabilities also bring greater need for quantitating the presence, loss and rearrangement of loci within synthetic yeast genomes. Methods for achieving this will ideally; i) be robust to industrial settings, ii) adhere to a global standard and iii) be sufficiently rapid to enable at-line monitoring during cell growth. The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) is increasingly used for industrial production of biotherapeutic proteins so we sought to answer the following questions for this particular yeast species. Is time-consuming DNA purification necessary to obtain accurate end-point polymerase chain reaction (e-pPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) data? Can the novel linear regression of efficiency qPCR method (LRE qPCR), which has properties desirable in a synthetic biology standard, match the accuracy of conventional qPCR? Does cell cultivation scale influence PCR performance? To answer these questions we performed e-pPCR and qPCR in the presence and absence of cellular material disrupted by a mild 30s sonication procedure. The e-pPCR limit of detection (LOD) for a genomic target locus was 50pg (4.91×10(3) copies) of purified genomic DNA (gDNA) but the presence of cellular material reduced this sensitivity sixfold to 300pg gDNA (2.95×10(4) copies). LRE qPCR matched the accuracy of a conventional standard curve qPCR method. The presence of material from bioreactor cultivation of up to OD600=80 did not significantly compromise the accuracy of LRE qPCR. We conclude that a simple and rapid cell disruption step is sufficient to render P. pastoris samples of up to OD600=80 amenable to analysis using LRE qPCR which we propose as a synthetic biology standard. PMID:27211507

  8. Comparison of three different DNA extraction methods from a highly degraded biological material.

    PubMed

    Kuś, M; Ossowski, A; Zielińska, G

    2016-05-01

    The identification of unknown victims is one of the most challenging tasks faced by forensic medicine. This is due to the rapid decomposition of tissues, beginning at the moment of death and caused by released enzymes and microbial activity. Decay is directly associated with the decomposition of soft tissues and also the degradation of genetic material inside cells. Decomposition rates vary depending on a number of environmental factors, including temperature, humidity, season, and soil properties. Decomposition also differs between bodies left in the open air or buried. To date, forensic medicine has identified mainly people who were the victims of various types of criminal offences. However, with advances in identification methods, increasingly frequent attempts are made to identify the victims of armed conflicts, crimes of totalitarian regimes, or genocide. The aim of the study was to compare three different methods for the extraction of nuclear DNA from material considered in forensic medicine as difficult to handle, i.e. fragments of bones and teeth, and to determine the performance of these methods and their suitability for identification procedures. PMID:27016882

  9. Berstein's anti-reductionistic materialism: On the road towards a biology of activity (1965).

    PubMed

    Bongaardt, R; Pickenhain, L; Meijer, O G

    2000-10-01

    Bernstein's paper, "On the Road Towards a Biology of Activity," appeared the year before his death.2 With this paper, Bernstein closed several lines of argument that he had been developing from the onset of his career in the early 1920s. The paper converges on the notion of activity. In accordance with his own shifting focus heuristic (cf. Bongaardt, 1996), Bernstein challenged future researchers of movement to integrate models of the movement functions that constitute activity. He suggested that these functions are: the coordination of movement, the planning of movement, and the exploration of better, optimal ways to move. In the 1920s, Bernstein had collaborated with his friend and colleague L.S. Vygotsky at the Moscow Institute of Experimental Psychology. Vygotsky (cf. 1926/1994) was the first to place activity at the core of Soviet psychology. According to Vygotsky, reflexology and behaviorism, then dominant approaches in psychology, were fundamentally wrong; they focus on building-blocks of behavior without addressing phenomena that stand out as typically human, most importantly, consciousness. Rather than starting with building blocks, psychology should start with the daily activity of human beings in their environment and show how this activity relates to consciousness. Forty years later, in his 1965 paper, Bernstein stressed a point that mirrors Vygotsky's: Reflexes are not building blocks of movement. The general characteristics of any movement precede the specificity of such units, whether reflexes or synergies, and this primacy pertains to the actual organization of movements as well as to the study of movement. The development and relevance of the activity concept in Bernstein's work in the period from 1925 to 1965 deserves a study of its own; here, a brief historical sketch of Bernstein's activity concept is offered, along with a few theoretical considerations concerning activity's constituent functions. PMID:11020671

  10. Fractional derivatives in the transport of drugs across biological materials and human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Michele; Cametti, Cesare

    2016-11-01

    The diffusion of drugs across a composite structure such as a biological membrane is a rather complex phenomenon, because of its inhomogeneous nature, yielding a diffusion rate and a drug solubility strongly dependent on the local position across the membrane itself. These problems are particularly strengthened in composite structures of a considerable thickness like, for example, the human skin, where the high heterogeneity provokes the transport through different simultaneous pathways. In this note, we propose a generalization of the diffusion model based on Fick's 2nd equation by substituting a diffusion constant by means of the memory formalism approach (diffusion with memory). In particular, we employ two different definitions of the fractional derivative, i.e., the usual Caputo fractional derivative and a new definition recently proposed by Caputo and Fabrizio. The model predictions have been compared to experimental results concerning the permeation of two different compounds through human skin in vivo, such as piroxicam, an anti-inflammatory drug, and 4-cyanophenol, a test chemical model compound. Moreover, we have also considered water penetration across human stratum corneum and the diffusion of an antiviral agent employed as model drugs across the skin of male hairless rats. In all cases, a satisfactory good agreement based on the diffusion with memory has been found. However, the model based on the new definition of fractional derivative gives a better description of the experimental data, on the basis of the residuals analysis. The use of the new definition widens the applicability of the fractional derivative to diffusion processes in highly heterogeneous systems.

  11. Development of a Neutron Spectrometer to Assess Biological Radiation Damage Behind Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Roth, D. R.; Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Zeitlin, C.; Singleterry, R.

    2001-01-01

    Astronauts who spend months and years traveling long distances in spacecraft and working on other planets will be subjected to high energy radiation of galactic and solar origin without the protection of the Earth's thick (one writer has called it buff) atmosphere and magnetic field. The lack of natural protection will allow high energy cosmic ray particles and solar protons to crash directly into relatively thin spacecraft walls and planetary atmospheres producing energetic secondary particles in these collisions. A substantial fraction of these secondaries will be neutrons that carry no electric charge and, consequently, are difficult to detect. At sea level on Earth the remaining neutrons are the result of many generations (approximately 10) of collisions, have very low energies (scientists call them thermal neutrons), and do not penetrate deeply into the human body. They do contribute to the natural background radiation seen by humans on Earth, but much of the dose is only at the surface or skin of the body. In the International Space Station or on the surface of Mars, the secondary neutrons will be the result of only one or two generations of interaction due to the thinner (about a factor of 20 compared to the Earth's atmosphere) walls or atmosphere, have considerably more energy and penetrate deeply into the human body. In addition, neutrons are substantially moderated by hydrogenous material such as water. A significant fraction of the water exists in the astronaut's body. Therefore, the neutron can not only penetrate more deeply into the body, but also be stopped there and deposit all or most of its radiation dose in organs such as the liver, spleen, kidney, etc. We hypothesize that the risk of serious cancers will be increased for the exposed humans. The portable, real time neutron spectrometer being developed by our team will monitor the environment inside spacecraft structures and on planetary surfaces. Activities supported by this grant will evaluate

  12. Mineral trioxide aggregate: a review of the constituents and biological properties of the material.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, J; Pitt Ford, T R

    2006-10-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the constituents and biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). A Medline search was conducted. The first publication on the material was in November 1993. The Medline search identified 206 papers published from November 1993 to August 2005. Specific searches on constituents and biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate, however, yielded few publications. Initially all abstracts were read to identify which fitted one of the two categories required for this review, constituents or biocompatibility. Based on this assessment and a review of the papers, 13 were included in the constituent category and 53 in the biocompatibility category. Relatively few articles addressed the constituents of MTA, whilst cytological evaluation was the most widely used biocompatibility test. PMID:16948659

  13. Biologically-Induced Micropitting of Alloy 22, a Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Material

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S; Carrillo, C; Horn, J

    2003-11-03

    The effects of potential microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) on candidate packaging materials for nuclear waste containment are being assessed. Coupons of Alloy 22, the outer barrier candidate for waste packaging, were exposed to a simulated, saturated repository environment (or microcosm) consisting of crushed rock (tuff) from the Yucca Mountain repository site and a continual flow of simulated groundwater for periods up to five years at room temperature and 30 C. Coupons were incubated with YM tuff under both sterile and non-sterile conditions. Surfacial analysis by scanning electron microscopy of the biotically-incubated coupons show development of both submicron-sized pinholes and pores; these features were not present on either sterile or untreated control coupons. Room temperature, biotically-incubated coupons show a wide distribution of pores covering the coupon surface, while coupons incubated at 30 C show the pores restricted to polishing ridges.

  14. A projection method to extract biological membrane models from 3D material models.

    PubMed

    Roohbakhshan, Farshad; Duong, Thang X; Sauer, Roger A

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a projection method for deriving membrane models from the corresponding three-dimensional material models. As a particular example the anisotropic Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden model is considered. The projection procedure is based on the kinematical and constitutive assumptions of a general membrane theory, considering the membrane to be a general two-dimensional manifold. By assuming zero transverse stress, the Lagrange multiplier associated with the incompressibility constraint can be eliminated from the formulation. The resulting nonlinear model is discretized and linearized within the finite element method. Several numerical examples are shown, considering quadratic Lagrange and NURBS finite elements. These show that the proposed model is in very good agreement with analytical solutions and with full 3D finite element computations. PMID:26455810

  15. Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository: an open shared public resource of structural genomics plasmids for the biological community

    PubMed Central

    Cormier, Catherine Y.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Zuo, Dongmei; Hu, Yanhui; Rolfs, Andreas; Kramer, Jason; Taycher, Elena; Kelley, Fontina; Fiacco, Michael; Turnbull, Greggory; LaBaer, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    The Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository (PSI-MR; http://psimr.asu.edu) provides centralized storage and distribution for the protein expression plasmids created by PSI researchers. These plasmids are a resource that allows the research community to dissect the biological function of proteins whose structures have been identified by the PSI. The plasmid annotation, which includes the full length sequence, vector information and associated publications, is stored in a freely available, searchable database called DNASU (http://dnasu.asu.edu). Each PSI plasmid is also linked to a variety of additional resources, which facilitates cross-referencing of a particular plasmid to protein annotations and experimental data. Plasmid samples can be requested directly through the website. We have also developed a novel strategy to avoid the most common concern encountered when distributing plasmids namely, the complexity of material transfer agreement (MTA) processing and the resulting delays this causes. The Expedited Process MTA, in which we created a network of institutions that agree to the terms of transfer in advance of a material request, eliminates these delays. Our hope is that by creating a repository of expression-ready plasmids and expediting the process for receiving these plasmids, we will help accelerate the accessibility and pace of scientific discovery. PMID:19906724

  16. The use of two or more microorganisms versus one microorganism in the carrier materials for biological indicators.

    PubMed

    Shintani, H

    1997-01-01

    Specification for the preparation of a biological indicator (BI) using two or more microorganisms in the carrier material were deleted from the current ISO 11138 series and Working Draft 14161 because it was assumed that the resistances of the individual microorganisms would be affected by interference from the other microorganisms. This assumption is speculative only, and has not been supported by experimental evidence. To test its validity, the author carried out an experiment to determine the resistances of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus when used alone and together in BI carrier material. In total concentrations of 10(6) cfu/0.1 mL, the organisms were applied alone and together to filter paper and dried. After incorporation into the BI, the three preparations (B. subtilis alone, B. stearothermophilus alone, and both together) were subjected to ethylene oxide sterilization or to moist-heat sterilization using the procedures described in ISO 11138-2 or ISO 11138-3, respectively. Resistances were measured in terms of decimal reduction times (D values). The D values of the preparations were determined using the survival-curve method and the limited Spearman-Karber method in conjunction with a BI evaluator resistometer. The D values of the preparations did not differ significantly with either sterilization method, providing experimental evidence that, at least under these conditions, the presence of a second microorganism in the carrier material did not interfere with the resistance of the original microorganism. PMID:9262838

  17. An Analysis of Teaching Competence in Science Teachers Involved in the Design of Context-Based Curriculum Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Putter-Smits, Lesley G. A.; Taconis, Ruurd; Jochems, Wim; Van Driel, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The committees for the current Dutch context-based innovation in secondary science education employed teachers to design context-based curriculum materials. A study on the learning of science teachers in design teams for context-based curriculum materials is presented in this paper. In a correlation study, teachers with (n = 5 and 840 students)…

  18. Developing Materials for Biology Teaching. Asian Programme of Educational Innovation for Development (APEID) Report of a Sub-Regional Workshop (Bangkok, Thailand, August 3-12, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    The major purposes of this workshop were to develop teaching and learning materials on certain selected key biology concepts relevant to environmental, genetic, and agricultural aspects, and to develop exemplary training materials on certain teacher competencies relating to laboratory and field techniques. Chapter One reports on the status and…

  19. Ethical issues in DNA identification of human biological material from mass disasters.

    PubMed

    Caenazzo, Luciana; Tozzo, Pamela; Rodriguez, Daniele

    2013-08-01

    Each mass disaster has its own characteristics and will involve a different approach, so the safeguarding and collection of forensic evidence have to be considered as part of the field response procedure. DNA typing has played a more prominent role in the identification of human remains, and particularly so for highly decomposed and fragmented remains. Although the ultimate goal is to obtain the identification, the specific context of each application of human identity testing has its specific problems, ranging from technical approach, through statistical interpretation, to ethical issues. The preparedness plan of the forensic genetics laboratory needs to include policies for family notification, long-term sample storage, and data archiving. For this reason, DNA sample collection and a strategy for DNA-based victim identification needs to be part of the preparedness plan. In this paper, the authors seek to define three of these ethical aspects: (1) the humanitarian importance of identification; (2) resource allocation in the victims' DNA identification; and (3) the secondary use for research of the samples initially collected for identification purposes. DNA analysis for the purpose of identifying victims of mass disasters has complex implications that demand much more rigorous examination than they have received until now. PMID:23594584

  20. A non-resonant mass sensor to eliminate the "missing mass" effect during mass measurement of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrikanth, V.; Bobji, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    Resonant sensors and crystal oscillators for mass detection need to be excited at very high natural frequencies (MHz). Use of such systems to measure mass of biological materials affects the accuracy of mass measurement due to their viscous and/or viscoelastic properties. The measurement limitation of such sensor system is the difficulty in accounting for the "missing mass" of the biological specimen in question. A sensor system has been developed in this work, to be operated in the stiffness controlled region at very low frequencies as compared to its fundamental natural frequency. The resulting reduction in the sensitivity due to non-resonant mode of operation of this sensor is compensated by the high resolution of the sensor. The mass of different aged drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is measured. The difference in its mass measurement during resonant mode of operation is also presented. That, viscosity effects do not affect the working of this non-resonant mass sensor is clearly established by direct comparison.

  1. Application of biological traits to further our understanding of the impacts of dredged material disposal on benthic assemblages.

    PubMed

    Bolam, S G; McIlwaine, P S O; Garcia, C

    2016-04-15

    While the effects of coastal disposal of dredged material on benthic assemblage structure have been well studied, our understanding of the mechanism of such responses, and their potential ecological implications, remain relatively unknown. Data from a licenced disposal site off the northeast coast of England are analysed to address this and improve our ability to make informed licencing decisions for this activity. Assemblages within the disposal site displayed reduced number of species and total invertebrate density, an altered assemblage taxonomic structure, and a shift towards a greater numerical dominance of less-productive individuals. Following separate analyses of biological response and effect traits, a novel approach for marine benthic trait analysis, we identify the traits responsible (i.e. response traits) for the observed structural alterations. Furthermore, analysis of the effect traits revealed that the assemblages characterising the disposal site possess a greater bioturbative capability compared to those not directly impacted by disposal. PMID:26899157

  2. [On the methodology of the determination of alkylating activities of nitrogen mustards with nitrobenzylpyridine (NBP) in biological material (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hesse, G; Schulze, W; Wachtel, E

    1981-09-01

    It is dealt with modifications to the spectrophotometric determination of the alkylating behaviour of bifunctional nitrogen mustards with 4-(4'-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP). The authors succeeded in characterizing spectrophotometrically, by means of a one-phase procedure, not only soluble, but also difficultly soluble, therapeutically known and newly synthetized mustards in regard to their alkylating behaviour. In the framework of in vitro studies, the authors report of experimental details of the proper preparation of biological material for the determination of residual activities, the analytical approach being always depending on the structure of the respective mustard. The differences in the time courses of the acylating attacks in serum, blood and suspensions of leukaemic cells are demonstrated by the example of some selected nitrogen mustards. PMID:7301901

  3. Biological regeneration of ferric (Fe3+) solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams: effect of nutrients and support material.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the biological regeneration of ferric Fe3+ solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is absorbed into aqueous ferric sulphate solution and oxidised to elemental sulphur, while ferric ions Fe3+ are reduced to ferrous ions Fe2+. During the industrial regeneration of Fe3+, nutrients and trace minerals usually provided in a laboratory setup are not present and this depletion of nutrients may have a negative impact on the bacteria responsible for ferrous iron oxidation and may probably affect the oxidation rate. In this study, the effect of nutrients and trace minerals on ferrous iron oxidation have been investigated and the results showed that the presence of nutrients and trace minerals affects the efficiency of bacterial Fe2+oxidation. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the geotextile support material was also conducted and the results showed that the iron precipitate deposits appear to play a direct role on the bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26038932

  4. Organomercury determination in biological reference materials: Application to a study on mercury speciation in marine mammals off the Faroee Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Schintu, M.; Jean-Caurant, F.; Amiard, J.C. )

    1992-08-01

    The potential use of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) for the organic mercury determination in marine biological tissues was evaluated. Following its isolation by acid extraction in toluene, organic mercury was recovered in aqueous thiosulfate and measured by GF-AAS. The detection limit was 0.01 microgram Hg/g (as methyl mercury). Analyses were conducted on three reference standard materials certified for their methyl mercury content, DOLT-1, DORM-1, and TORT-1, provided by the National Research Council of Canada. The method resulted in very good recovery and reproducibility, indicating that GF-AAS can provide results comparable to those obtained by using more expensive and time consuming analytical techniques. The method was applied to the analysis of liver tissues of pilot whale specimens (Globicephala melas) from the drive fishery of the Faroee Islands (northeast Atlantic). The results provided useful information on the proportion of different mercury forms in the liver of these marine mammals.

  5. Quercetin conjugated silica particles as novel biofunctional hybrid materials for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Castañeda, Hayde; Hernandez-Martinez, Angel R; Estevez, Miriam; Mendoza, Sandra; Luna-Barcenas, Gabriel; Pool, Héctor

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this work is to formulate biofunctional hybrid materials (HMs) with quercetin (QC) and silica particles (SiPs) by simple methods such as sol-gel and QC conjugation. Physicochemical characterization included particle size, zeta potential (ζ), FTIR and SEM imaging. Spherical particles with ca. 115 nm in diameter were produced, ζ and FTIR demonstrated that QC conjugation was successfully achieved. Electrochemical analyses performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) suggested that potential binding sites between QC and SiPs may be at functional groups from A ring or C ring, affecting the transfer electron of resorcinol moiety. Iron chelating activity and lipid peroxidation assays showed that after conjugation to SiPs, QC decreased its metal chelating activity, but anti-radical properties is maintained. Our results demonstrated that our proposed method is simple and effective to obtain bio-functional HMs. Our findings prove to be useful in the design of protective approaches against lipid oxidation in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetics fields. PMID:26704475

  6. A combined remote Raman and fluorescence spectrometer system for detecting inorganic and biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Lucey, Paul G.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a combined remote telescopic Raman and laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) spectrograph with 532 nm pulsed laser excitation and a gated CCD detector. With this system, we have measured time-resolved Raman and LINF spectral measurements at 9 m with 10-ns time resolution. A comparison of Raman spectra of calcite crystal and that of chicken eggshell show that the CaCO 3 in the chicken eggshell is arranged in a calcite structure. The strong LINF band in the spectrum of the calcite crystal has lifetime longer than 1 μs, whereas the lifetime of LINF bands of the eggshell are in 10's of nano-sec (ns). The time-resolved Raman spectra of tomato and poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrimum) green leaves show resonance Raman features of carotenes. The time-resolved remote LINF spectrum of ruby crystals, and LINF spectra of tomato and poinsettia green leaves yield information that the LINF lifetime of ruby lines is much longer (in milliseconds (ms)) as compared with the fluorescence lifetime of the tomato and the poinsettia leaves (in 10s of ns). These results show that it will be possible to discriminate between inorganic and biogenic materials on the basis of LINF lifetimes even with 8 nano-sec laser pulses and gated detection.

  7. A novel three-dimensional scaffold for regenerative endodontics: materials and biological characterizations.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Marco C; Yassen, Ghaeth H; Platt, Jeffrey A; Labban, Nawaf; Windsor, L Jack; Spolnik, Kenneth J; Bressiani, Ana H A

    2015-11-01

    An electrospun nanocomposite fibrous material holds promise as a scaffold, as well as a drug-delivery device to aid in root maturogenesis and the regeneration of the pulp-dentine complex. A novel three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite scaffold composed of polydioxanone (PDS II®) and halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) was designed and fabricated by electrospinning. Morphology, structure, mechanical properties and cell compatibility studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of HNTs incorporation (0.5-10 wt% relative to PDS w/w). Overall, a 3D porous network was seen in the different fabricated electrospun scaffolds, regardless of the HNT content. The incorporation of HNTs at 10 wt% led to a significant (p < 0.0001) fibre diameter increase and a reduction in scaffold strength. Moreover, PDS-HNTs scaffolds supported the attachment and proliferation of human-derived pulp fibroblast cells. Quantitative proliferation assay performed with human dental pulp-derived cells as a function of nanotubes concentration indicated that the HNTs exhibit a high level of biocompatibility, rendering them good candidates for the potential encapsulation of distinct bioactive molecules. Collectively, the reported data support the conclusion that PDS-HNTs nanocomposite fibrous structures hold potential in the development of a bioactive scaffold for regenerative endodontics. PMID:23475586

  8. From cells to embryos: the application of femtosecond laser pulses for altering cellular material in complex biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, V.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2008-02-01

    We report the application of high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses as a novel tool for manipulating biological specimens. When femtosecond laser pulses were focused to a near diffraction-limited focal spot, cellular material within the laser focal volume was surgically ablated. Several dissection cuts were made in the membrane of live mammalian cells, and membrane surgery was accomplished without inducing cell collapse or disassociation. By altering how the laser pulses were applied, focal adhesions joining live epithelial cells were surgically removed, resulting in single cell isolation. To further examine the versatility of this reported tool, cells were transiently permeabilized for introducing foreign material into the cytoplasm of live mammalian cells. Localizing focused femtosecond laser pulses on the biological membrane resulted in the formation of transient pores, which were harnessed as a pathway for the delivery of exogenous material. Individual mammalian cells were permeabilized in the presence of a hyperosmotic cryoprotective disaccharide. Material delivery was confirmed by measuring the volumetric response of cells permeabilized in 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 M cryoprotective sugar. The survival of permeabilized cells in increasing osmolarity of sugar was assessed using a membrane integrity assay. Further demonstrating the novelty of this reported tool, laser surgery of an aquatic embryo, the zebrafish (Danio rerio), was also performed. Utilizing the transient pores that were formed in the embryonic cells of the zebrafish embryo, an exogenous fluorescent probe FITC, Streptavidin-conjugated quantum dots or plasmid DNA (sCMV) encoding EGFP was introduced into the developing embryonic cells. To determine if the laser induced any short- or long-term effects on development, laser-manipulated embryos were reared to 2 and 7 days post-fertilization and compared to control embryos at the same developmental stages. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  9. Macrophage Phenotype as a Predictor of Constructive Remodeling following the Implantation of Biologically Derived Surgical Mesh Materials

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bryan N.; Londono, Ricardo; Tottey, Stephen; Zhang, Li; Kukla, Kathryn A.; Wolf, Matthew T.; Daly, Kerry A.; Reing, Janet E.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages have been classified as having plastic phenotypes which exist within a spectrum between M1 (classically activated; pro-inflammatory) and M2 (alternatively activated; regulatory, homeostatic). To date, the effects of polarization towards a predominantly M1 or M2 phenotype have been studied largely in the context of response to pathogen or cancer. Recently, M1 and M2 macrophages have been shown to play distinct roles in tissue remodeling following injury. In the present study, the M1/M2 paradigm was utilized to examine the role of macrophages in the remodeling process following implantation of 14 biologically derived surgical mesh materials in the rat abdominal wall. In situ polarization of macrophages responding to the materials was examined and correlated to a quantitative measure of the observed tissue remodeling response to determine whether macrophage polarization is an accurate predictor of the ability of a biologic scaffold to promote constructive tissue remodeling. Additionally the ability of M1 and M2 macrophages to differentially recruit progenitor-like cells in vitro, which are commonly observed to participate in the remodeling of those ECM scaffolds which have a positive clinical outcome, was examined as a possible mechanism underlying the differences in the observed remodeling responses. The results of the present study show that there is a strong correlation between the early macrophage response to implanted materials and the outcome of tissue remodeling. Increased numbers of M2 macrophages and higher ratios of M2:M1 macrophages within the site of remodeling at 14 days were associated with more positive remodeling outcomes (r2=0.525–0.686, p<0.05). Further, the results of the present study suggest that the constructive remodeling outcome may be due to the recruitment and survival of different cell populations to the sites of remodeling associated with materials that elicit an M1 versus M2 response. Both M2 and M0 macrophage conditioned

  10. Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, Ed

    The paper discusses the rationale and guidelines for parent involvement in HCEEP (Handicapped Children's Early Education Program) projects. Ways of assessing parents' needs are reviewed, as are four types of services to meet the identified needs: parent education, direct participation, parent counseling, and parent provided programs. Materials and…

  11. New materials for old problems: What can nanomaterials do for biology and neuroscience?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivatsan, Malathi; Badanavalu, Mahadevappa P.; Yancey, Justin; Xie, Jining; Chen, Linfeng; Hankins, Philip T.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2009-03-01

    The emerging field of nanotechnology offers the development of new materials and methods for crucial neuroscience applications namely (a) promoting survival and growth of the neurons, and (b) monitoring physiological signals generated in the nervous system such as excitation, synaptic transmission, release of neurotransmitter molecules and cell-to-cell communication. Such bio-devices will have several novel applications in basic science, laboratory analysis and therapeutic treatments. Our goals in this field of research include (a) development of new biocompatible substrates to guide and promote neuronal growth along specific pathways; (b) designing a neuron-friendly, bio-molecule delivery system for neuroprotection; (c) monitoring of electrical activity from neuron and also from neuronal networks; (d) determining the diffusion and intracellular localization of nanomaterial interacting with neurons at high resolution; and (e) detection of release of neurotransmitter molecules by means of newly designed nanosensors. Here we describe the fabrication and use of magnetic nanotubes and nanowire electrode arrays in studies using a cell culture model of neuronally differentiating rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells. The magnetic nanotubes were fabricated by a template method yielding hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanotubes. These nanotubes were coupled with nerve growth factor (NGF). Vertically aligned nanowires were fabricated on glass substrates using the lithography-assisted template bonding (LATB) method. Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells were cultured on these nanotubes and polylysine coated nanowire electrodes. Our results showed that magnetic nanotube bound NGF was available to PC12 cells as they showed significant differentiation into neurons. PC12 cells growing on nanowires in the presence of NGF differentiated into neurons capable of synthesis and release of dopamine upon stimulation. The neurons grew healthy neurites appearing to form synapses with other neurons in the

  12. To do, to have, or to share? Valuing experiences over material possessions depends on the involvement of others.

    PubMed

    Caprariello, Peter A; Reis, Harry T

    2013-02-01

    Recent evidence indicates that spending discretionary money with the intention of acquiring life experiences-events that one lives through-makes people happier than spending money with the intention of acquiring material possessions-tangible objects that one obtains and possesses. We propose and show that experiences are more likely to be shared with others, whereas material possessions are more prone to solitary use and that this distinction may account for their differential effects on happiness. In 4 studies, we present evidence demonstrating that the inclusion of others is a key dimension of how people derive happiness from discretionary spending. These studies showed that when the social-solitary and experiential-material dimensions were considered simultaneously, social discretionary spending was favored over solitary discretionary spending, whereas experiences showed no happiness-producing advantage relative to possessions. Furthermore, whereas spending money on socially shared experiences was valued more than spending money on either experiences enacted alone or material possessions, solitary experiences were no more valued than material possessions. Together, these results extend and clarify the basic findings of prior research and add to growing evidence that the social context of experiences is critical for their effects on happiness. PMID:23276272

  13. New Methods of Simulation of Mn(II) EPR Spectra: Single Crystals, Polycrystalline and Amorphous (Biological) Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sushil K.

    Biological systems exhibit properties of amorphous materials. The Mn(II) ion in amorphous materials is characterized by distributions of spin-Hamiltonian parameters around mean values. It has a certain advantage over other ions, being one of the most abundant elements on the earth. The extent to which living organisms utilize manganese varies from one organism to the other. There is a fairly high concentration of the Mn(II) ion in green plants, which use it in the O2 evolution reaction of photosynthesis (Sauer, 1980). Structure-reactivity relationships in Mn(II)-O2 complexes are given in a review article by Coleman and Taylor (1980). Manganese is a trace requirement in animal nutrition; highly elevated levels of manganese in the diet can be toxic, probably because of an interference with iron homeostasis (Underwood, 1971). On the other hand, animals raised with a dietary deficiency of manganese exhibit severe abnormalities in connective tissue; these problems have been attributed to the obligatory role of Mn(II) in mucopolysaccharide metabolism (Leach, 1971). Mn(II) has been detected unequivocally in living organisms.

  14. Effects of oyster shell on soil chemical and biological properties and cabbage productivity as a liming materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Lee, Do Kyoung; Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Kim, Pil Joo

    2008-12-01

    Oyster shell, a byproduct of shellfish-farming in Korea and containing a high amount of CaCO(3), has a high potential to be used as a liming material in agriculture. However, the agricultural utilization of oyster shell is limited due to its high concentration NaCl. The oyster-shell meal collected had a low concentration of water soluble NaCl (mean 2.7 g kg(-1)), which might be a result of stacking the material for 6 months in the open field. It has a very similar liming potential with calcium carbonate, with 3.4 and 3.8 Mg ha(-1) for silt loam (SiL, pH 6.2) and sandy loam (SL, pH 5.8) to bring the soil pH to 6.5, respectively. To determine the effect of crushed oyster-shell meal on improving soil chemical and biological properties and crop plant productivity, oyster-shell meal was applied at rates of 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 Mg ha(-1) before transplanting Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L.) in the two soils mentioned above. Soil pH was significantly increased to 6.9 and 7.4 by 16 Mg ha(-1) shell meal application (4 times higher level than the recommendation) in SiL and SL, respectively, at harvesting stage. The effect of liming was found higher in SL compared to SiL soil, probably due to the different buffering capacity of the two soils. The concentration of NaCl and EC value of soils were found slightly increased with shell meal applications, but no salt damage was observed. Oyster-shell meal application increased soil organic matter, available P, and exchangeable cations concentrations. The improved soil pH and nutrient status significantly increased the microbial biomass C and N concentrations and stimulated soil enzyme activities. With the exception of acid phosphomonoesterase (PMEase) activity, which decreased with increasing soil pH in SL but slightly increased in SiL, the activities of urease and alkali PMEase increased markedly with increasing soil pH by shell meal application. The improved soil chemical and biological properties resulted in increased crop

  15. Kinetic study of atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: evidence for resistance to biologic effects of the hormone even in patients with mild myocardial involvement.

    PubMed

    Iervasi, G; Clerico, A; Pilo, A; Berti, S; Vitek, F; Biagini, A; Bianchi, R; Donato, L

    1994-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) kinetics was studied in 12 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy at different sodium excretion (30-175 mmol/day) and variable degrees of hemodynamic dysfunction [New York Heart Association (NYHA) class range I-III] to investigate whether differences in renewal and distribution of this hormone (as compared with those of a control group) play a role in pathogenesis and evolution of heart failure. [125I]Labeled ANP was injected as a bolus, and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure was used to purify the labeled hormone in venous plasma samples collected for < or = 50 min after injection; the main ANP kinetic parameters were then derived from the disappearance curve of the labeled hormone. As in controls, a positive linear regression between ANP metabolic clearance rate (MCR, ml/min/m2) values and daily urinary excretion of sodium (NaUE, mmol/day) was noted in patients. The different linear regression coefficients between normal subjects (MCR = 365 +/- 8.08 NaUE, r = 0.986, p < 0.0001) and patients (MCR = 497 + 18.5 NaUE, r = 0.867, p = 0.001) indicate that in patients a higher peptide clearance rate is needed to obtain the same biologic effect (sodium excretion) and suggest that resistance to biologic effects of the hormone exists in patients at an early stage of disease (NYHA class I). When the efficiency of the ANP system in excreting sodium was expressed as the ratio of NaUE to ANP production rate (PR = MCR x ANP plasma concentration, microgram/day/m2) patients showed significantly lower values (p = 0.0126) than normal volunteers, thus confirming resistance to the hormone effects. Significantly lower values for ANP total distribution volume (16.5 +/- 8.4 L/m2), mean residence time in the sampling space (4.04 +/- 1.14 min), mean residence time in the body (7.25 +/- 2.13 min), and fewer recycles through the initial (sampling) space (0.27 +/- 0.16) were noted in patients, indicating an altered mechanism

  16. Fractionally distilled SRC-I, SRC-II, EDS, H-Coal and ITSL direct coal liquefaction process materials: a comparative summary of chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.; Dauble, D.D.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-07-01

    This document reports and compares the results compiled from chemical analyses and biological testing of coal liquefaction process materials which were fractionally distilled, after production, into various comparable boiling-point range cuts. Comparative analyses were performed on solvent refined coal (SRC)-I, SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS an integrated two-stage liquefaction (ITSL) distillate materials. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative, chemical and biological assessments. Where possible, results obtained from the distillate cuts are compared to those from coal liquefaction materials with limited boiling ranges. Work reported here was conducted by investigators in the Biology and Chemistry Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, WA. 38 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  17. Structure-Function Analyses of Cytochrome P450revI Involved in Reveromycin A Biosynthesis and Evaluation of the Biological Activity of Its Substrate, Reveromycin T*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Shunji; Nagano, Shingo; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Kanoh, Naoki; Uramoto, Masakazu; Kawatani, Makoto; Shimizu, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Takeshi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cytochrome P450s are involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. The biosynthetic gene cluster for reveromycin A (RM-A), which is a promising lead compound with anti-osteoclastic activity, also includes a P450 gene, revI. To understand the roles of P450revI, we comprehensively characterized the enzyme by genetic, kinetic, and structural studies. The revI gene disruptants (ΔrevI) resulted in accumulation of reveromycin T (RM-T), and revI gene complementation restored RM-A production, indicating that the physiological substrate of P450revI is RM-T. Indeed, the purified P450revI catalyzed the C18-hydroxylation of RM-T more efficiently than the other RM derivatives tested. Moreover, the 1.4 Å resolution co-crystal structure of P450revI with RM-T revealed that the substrate binds the enzyme with a folded compact conformation for C18-hydroxylation. To address the structure-enzyme activity relationship, site-directed mutagenesis was performed in P450revI. R190A and R81A mutations, which abolished salt bridge formation with C1 and C24 carboxyl groups of RM-T, respectively, resulted in significant loss of enzyme activity. The interaction between Arg190 and the C1 carboxyl group of RM-T elucidated why P450revI was unable to catalyze both RM-T 1-methyl ester and RM-T 1-ethyl ester. Moreover, the accumulation of RM-T in ΔrevI mutants enabled us to characterize its biological activity. Our results show that RM-T had stronger anticancer activity and isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase inhibition than RM-A. However, RM-T showed much less anti-osteoclastic activity than RM-A, indicating that hemisuccinate moiety is important for the activity. Structure-based P450revI engineering for novel hydroxylation and subsequent hemisuccinylation will help facilitate the development of RM derivatives with anti-osteoclast activity. PMID:25258320

  18. Carbon Stable Isotope Analysis of Methylmercury Toxin in Biological Materials by Gas Chromatography Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masbou, Jeremy; Point, David; Guillou, Gaël; Sonke, Jeroen E; Lebreton, Benoit; Richard, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    A critical component of the biogeochemical cycle of mercury (Hg) is the transformation of inorganic Hg to neurotoxic monomethylmercury (CH3Hg). Humans are exposed to CH3Hg by consuming marine fish, yet the origin of CH3Hg in fish is a topic of debate. The carbon stable isotopic composition (δ(13)C) embedded in the methyl group of CH3Hg remains unexplored. This new isotopic information at the molecular level is thought to represent a new proxy to trace the carbon source at the origin of CH3Hg. Here, we present a compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) technique for the determination of the δ(13)C value of CH3Hg in biological samples by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry analysis (GC-C-IRMS). The method consists first of calibrating a CH3Hg standard solution for δ(13)C CSIA. This was achieved by comparing three independent approaches consisting of the derivatization and halogenation of the CH3Hg standard solution. The determination of δ(13)C(CH3Hg) values on natural biological samples was performed by combining a CH3Hg selective extraction, purification, and halogenation followed by GC-C-IRMS analysis. Reference δ(13)C values were established for a tuna fish certified material (ERM-CE464) originating from the Adriatic Sea (δ(13)C(CH3Hg) = -22.1 ± 1.5‰, ± 2 SD). This value is similar to the δ(13)C value of marine algal-derived particulate organic carbon (δ(13)CPOC = -21‰). PMID:26511394

  19. Radioactive characterization of the main materials involved in the titanium dioxide production process and their environmental radiological impact.

    PubMed

    Mantero, J; Gazquez, M J; Bolivar, J P; Garcia-Tenorio, R; Vaca, F

    2013-06-01

    A study about the distribution of several radionuclides from the uranium and the thorium series radionuclides along the production process of a typical NORM industry devoted to the production of titanium dioxide has been performed. With this end the activity concentrations in raw materials, final product, co-products, and wastes of the production process have been determined by both gamma-ray and alpha-particle spectrometry. The main raw material used in the studied process (ilmenite) presents activity concentrations of around 300 Bq kg(-1) for Th-series radionuclides and 100 Bq kg(-1) for the U-series ones. These radionuclides in the industrial process are distributed in the different steps of the production process according mostly to the chemical behaviour of each radioelement, following different routes. As an example, most of the radium remains associated with the un-dissolved material waste, with activity concentrations around 3 kBq kg(-1) of (228)Ra and around 1 kBq kg(-1) of (226)Ra, while the final commercial products (TiO2 pigments and co-products) contain negligible amounts of radioactivity. The obtained results have allowed assessing the possible public radiological impact associated with the use of the products and co-products obtained in this type of industry, as well as the environmental radiological impact associated with the solid residues and liquid generated discharges. PMID:23416226

  20. Ni-Al Nanoscale Energetic Materials: Phenomena Involved During the Manufacturing of Bulk Samples by Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciochini, A.; Bourdon-Lafleur, S.; Poupart, C.; Radulescu, M.; Jodoin, B.

    2014-10-01

    It has been shown that the cold-gas dynamic spraying process, or simply cold spray, is a suitable technique to manufacture nanoscale energetic materials with high reactivity and low porosity. The current study focuses on the Ni-Al system, for which the reactivity has been increased by an initial mechanical activation achieved by the ball-milling technique, leading to lamellar nanostructured composite particles. The consolidation of this nanoscale energetic material using the cold-gas dynamic spray technique permits to retain the feedstock powder nanoscale structure in the coatings, which in turn retain the high reactivity features of the powder. However, it has been noticed that the stagnation temperature during the spray can lead to partial reaction of the highly reactive feedstock powder, which directly influences the reactivity of the coatings. In this study, different stages of the spray process were investigated: (i) the in-flight behavior of the nanoscale energetic material (powder) at different stagnation temperatures (from 300 to 800 °C); (ii) the substrate-temperature evolution as the function of gas temperature; and (iii) the impact of the powder on the substrate, related to particle's velocity and its influence on the nanostructure of the particles.

  1. Development and Effectiveness of an Educational Card Game as Supplementary Material in Understanding Selected Topics in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Arnel F.

    2014-01-01

    The complex concepts and vocabulary of biology classes discourage many students. In this study, a pretest-posttest model was used to test the effectiveness of an educational card game in reinforcing biological concepts in comparison with traditional teaching methods. The subjects of this study were two biology classes at Bulacan State…

  2. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including chi-square tests on a microcomputer, an integrated biology game, microscope slides of leaf stomata, culturing soil nematodes, technique for watering locust egg-laying tubes, hazards of biological chemicals (such as benzene, benzidene, calchicine,…

  3. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including use of dwarf cichlids (fishes) in secondary school biology, teaching edge effects on stomatal diffusion, computer program on effects of selection on gene frequencies, biological oxidation/reduction reactions, short cuts with Drosophila, computer program…

  4. Modeling the collagen fibril network of biological tissues as a nonlinearly elastic material using a continuous volume fraction distribution function

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Reza; Vena, Pasquale; Sah, Robert L.; Klisch, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite distinct mechanical functions, biological soft tissues have a common microstructure in which a ground matrix is reinforced by a collagen fibril network. The microstructural properties of the collagen network contribute to continuum mechanical tissue properties that are strongly anisotropic with tensile-compressive asymmetry. In this study, a novel approach based on a continuous distribution of collagen fibril volume fractions is developed to model fibril reinforced soft tissues as a nonlinearly elastic and anisotropic material. Compared with other approaches that use a normalized number of fibrils for the definition of the distribution function, this representation is based on a distribution parameter (i.e. volume fraction) that is commonly measured experimentally while also incorporating pre-stress of the collagen fibril network in a tissue natural configuration. After motivating the form of the collagen strain energy function, examples are provided for two volume fraction distribution functions. Consequently, collagen second-Piola Kirchhoff stress and elasticity tensors are derived, first in general form and then specifically for a model that may be used for immature bovine articular cartilage. It is shown that the proposed strain energy is a convex function of the deformation gradient tensor and, thus, is suitable for the formation of a polyconvex tissue strain energy function. PMID:23390357

  5. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring: enabling real-time characterization of biological materials and their interactions.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Matthew C

    2008-07-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid growth in the number of scientific reports in which the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique has played a key role in elucidating various aspects of biological materials and their interactions. This article illustrates some key advances in the development of a special variation of this technique called quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The main feature and advantage of QCM-D, compared with the conventional QCM, is that it in addition to measuring changes in resonant frequency (Deltaf), a simultaneous parameter related to the energy loss or dissipation (DeltaD) of the system is also measured. Deltaf essentially measures changes in the mass attached to the sensor surface, while DeltaD measures properties related to the viscoelastic properties of the adlayer. Thus, QCM-D measures two totally independent properties of the adlayer. The focus of this review is an overview of the QCM-D technology and highlights of recent applications. Specifically, recent applications dealing with DNA, proteins, lipids, and cells will be detailed. This is not intended as a comprehensive review of all possible applications of the QCM-D technology, but rather a glimpse into a few highlighted application areas in the biomolecular field that were published in 2007. PMID:19137101

  6. Relative biological effectiveness enhancement of a 125I brachytherapy seed with characteristic x rays from its constitutive materials.

    PubMed

    Taschereau, Richard; Roy, René; Pouliot, Jean

    2002-07-01

    The isotopes used for permanent prostate implants, 125I and 103Pd, provide about equivalent tumor control. The purpose of this study is to investigate how characteristic x rays may be used to raise the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of an iodine seed at short distances to increase the differential effect between tumor and healthy tissue. Within the theoretical framework of microdosimetry, the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit has been used to calculate the RBE of experimental seed designs in which shell and core dimensions and composition were varied independently. A new seed model was also simulated based on the best results obtained. The RBE could be enhanced by increasing the shell thickness and for the range considered, optimum results were obtained by using gradually lower atomic number elements. For a practical 50-60 microm shell, molybdenum is the material of choice. The core diameter has little influence on RBE, but maximum effectiveness is obtained with yttrium or zirconium. These results were put together to design a Mo-shell and Y-core seed for which the RBE enhancement was at least 5-7% (close to the source), which is higher than palladium. This enhanced RBE combined with the longer half-life of iodine could mean comparable tumor control and better protection to organs at risk than with current seeds. The RBE dependence on distance is an interesting feature that could benefit other applications such as ocular melanoma or coronary brachytherapy where a highly localized dose distribution is desired. PMID:12148718

  7. Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring: Enabling Real-Time Characterization of Biological Materials and Their Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Matthew C.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid growth in the number of scientific reports in which the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique has played a key role in elucidating various aspects of biological materials and their interactions. This article illustrates some key advances in the development of a special variation of this technique called quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The main feature and advantage of QCM-D, compared with the conventional QCM, is that it in addition to measuring changes in resonant frequency (Δf), a simultaneous parameter related to the energy loss or dissipation (ΔD) of the system is also measured. Δf essentially measures changes in the mass attached to the sensor surface, while ΔD measures properties related to the viscoelastic properties of the adlayer. Thus, QCM-D measures two totally independent properties of the adlayer. The focus of this review is an overview of the QCM-D technology and highlights of recent applications. Specifically, recent applications dealing with DNA, proteins, lipids, and cells will be detailed. This is not intended as a comprehensive review of all possible applications of the QCM-D technology, but rather a glimpse into a few highlighted application areas in the biomolecular field that were published in 2007. PMID:19137101

  8. Two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville Facility operated in the nonintegrated and integrated modes: chemical analyses and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    This document reports the results from chemical analyses and biological testing of process materials sampled during operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, Alabama) in both the noncoupled or nonintegrated (NTSL Run 241) and coupled or integrated (ITSL Run 242) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative chemical and biological assessments of several NTSL and ITSL process materials. In general, the NTSL process materials were biologically more active and chemically more refractory than analogous ITSL process materials. To provide perspective, the NTSL and ITSL results are compared with those from similar testing and analyses of other direct coal liquefaction materials from the solvent refined coal (SRC) I, SRC II and EDS processes. Comparisons are also made between two-stage coal liquefaction materials from the Wilsonville pilot plant and the C.E. Lummus PDU-ITSL Facility in an effort to assess scale-up effects in these two similar processes. 36 references, 26 figures, 37 tables.

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; preparation procedure for aquatic biological material determined for trace metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the chemical preparation of tissue samples that are subsequently analyzed for 22 trace metals is described. The tissue-preparation procedure was tested with three National Institute of Standards and Technology biological standard reference materials and two National Water Quality Laboratory homogenized biological materials. A low-temperature (85 degrees Celsius) nitric acid digestion followed by the careful addition of hydrogen peroxide (30-percent solution) is used to decompose the biological material. The solutions are evaporated to incipient dryness, reconstituted with 5 percent nitric acid, and filtered. After filtration the solutions were diluted to a known volume and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrophotometry (CV-AAS). Many of the metals were determined by both ICP-MS and ICP-AES. This report does not provide a detailed description of the instrumental procedures and conditions used with the three types of instrumentation for the quantitation of trace metals determined in this study. Statistical data regarding recovery, accuracy, and precision for individual trace metals determined in the biological material tested are summarized.

  10. Physicochemical properties of aerosol released in the case of a fire involving materials used in the nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Ouf, F-X; Mocho, V-M; Pontreau, S; Wang, Z; Ferry, D; Yon, J

    2015-01-01

    For industrial concerns, and more especially for nuclear applications, the characterization of soot is essential for predicting the behaviour of containment barriers in fire conditions. This study deals with the characterization (emission factor, composition, size, morphology, microstructure) of particles produced during thermal degradation of materials found in nuclear facilities (electrical cables, polymers, oil and solvents). Small-scale experiments have been conducted for oxygen concentrations [O2] ranging from 15% to 21% in order to imitate the oxygen depletion encountered during a confined fire. Particles denote distinct shapes, from aggregates composed of monomers with diameters ranging from 31.2 nm to 52.8 nm, to compact nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 15 nm to 400 nm, and their composition strongly depends on fuel type. Despite the organic to total carbon ratio (OC/TC), their properties are poorly influenced by the decrease in [O2]. Finally, two empirical correlations are proposed for predicting the OC/TC ratio and the monomer diameter, respectively, as a function of the fuel's carbon to hydrogen ratio and the emission factor. PMID:25306534

  11. An analysis of the consequences of accidents involving shipments of multiple Type A radioactive material (RAM) packages

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, N.C.; McClure, J.D.; Reardon, P.C.; Wangler, M.

    1989-01-01

    Comparing the results of the RADTRANIII calculations with a normalized set of results, both for incident-free transport and vehicular accident cases, the calculated consequences in the current analysis are lower. Even for the High-Activity Shipment, the total expected population dose from either incident-free transport or vehicular accidents is small, and smaller than that estimated in USNRC 1977. The results of the simulation in which parameters were varied randomly and independently indicate that, regardless of the input values assumed, the maximum total population dose from the High-Activity Shipment and the simultaneous occurrence of the least conservative value for each input parameter might be as high as 300 person-rem for a single shipment. The values for either of the other shipments (DOT Exemption or Common Carrier) would be significantly lower. The potential average individual radiation doses from accidents involving multiple Type A package shipments are comparable to the increase in the normal background radiation dose of 0.09 rem/person/year (90 mrem) that an individual would receive by moving from sea level to 5000 ft elevation. The maximum dose to an individual (one very near the accident scene) for the High Activity Shipment would be approximately 0.3 rem (300 mrem) in a maximum severity accident. This is within the individual dose guidelines outlined by NCRP (0.5 rem). Even at the high levels postulated for multiple package shipments under DOT controlled exemptions, the potential risks to the public in terms of expected population dose in the current analysis are below those already found to be acceptable. 4 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Biological conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.

    A system for bioconversion of organic material comprises a primary bioreactor column wherein a biological active agent (zymomonas mobilis) converts the organic material (sugar) to a product (alcohol), a rejuvenator column wherein the biological activity of said biological active agent is enhanced, and means for circulating said biological active agent between said primary bioreactor column and said rejuvenator column.

  13. The prevalence of new psychoactive substances in biological material - a three-year review of casework in Poland.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Piotr; Gieroń, Joanna; Gil, Dominika; Lechowicz, Wojciech; Skulska, Agnieszka; Tokarczyk, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    New psychoactive substances (NPS) pose a challenge for forensic and clinical toxicologists, as well as for legislators. We present our findings from cases where NPS have been detected in biological material. During the three-year period 2012-2014 we found NPS in 112 cases (out of 1058 analyzed), with 75 cases in 2014 alone. The prevalence of all NPS (15.1-17.6%) was similar to amphetamine alone that was detected in 15.1-16.5% of cases. The new drugs found belonged to the following classes: cathinones (88%), synthetic cannabinoids (5%), phenethylamines (3%), piperazines and piperidines (3%), arylalkylamines (1%) and other (1%). The drugs detected were (in the order of decreased frequency): 3-MMC (50), α-pyrrolidinopentiophenone (α-PVP) (23), pentedrone (16), 3',4'-methylenedioxy-α-pyrrolidinobutyrophenone (MDPBP) (12), synthetic cannabinoid UR-144 (7), ethcathinone (5), mephedrone (5), methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) (4), 4-methylethcathinone (4-MEC) (3), buphedrone (3), desoxypipradrol (2-DPMP) (3), methylone (2) and 2C-B (2). In single cases, 2-methylmethcathinone (2-MMC), 2C-P, eutylone, 25I-NBOMe, meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP), ephedrone, methiopropamine (MPA), and 5-(2-aminopropyl)benzofuran (5-APB) were found. One NPS was the sole agent in 35% of all cases, and two or more NPS were present in 19% of cases. NPS (one or more) with other conventional drugs (like amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, and benzodiazepines) were detected in most (65%) of the cases. NPS were very often detected in the blood of drivers which was a challenge for toxicologists due to a lack of data on their influence on psychomotor performance. A review of concentrations showed a wide range of values in different types of cases, especially driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) and intoxication. PMID:26666629

  14. Restricted access magnetic materials prepared by dual surface modification for selective extraction of therapeutic drugs from biological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yuxia; Chen, Lei; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic porous particles with dual functionality have been prepared by a two-step procedure and evaluated as novel restricted access materials for extraction of therapeutic agents from biological fluids. The magnetic silica particles served as scaffolds were first modified with diol groups, which were then converted to octadecyl esters through reaction with stearoyl chloride. In the second step, the octadecyl esters on the exterior surface were hydrolyzed by the action of lipase to yield magnetic particles with hydrophobic reversed-phase ligands on the inner surface and biocompatible diol groups on the outer surface. The restricted access behavior of the resulting materials was confirmed by differential binding of small molecules such as methotrexate (MTX), leucovorin (LV) and folic acid (FA) relative to bovine serum albumin. While MTX, LV and FA were all bound to the magnetic particles with high affinity, the adsorption of the protein was markedly reduced due to size exclusion effect. The utility of the magnetic particles for sample preparation was tested in solid-phase extraction of MTX, LV and FA from spiked human serum and the effects of the SPE conditions on the recovery of the analytes were systematically studied. Moreover, the magnetic particle-based sample preparation procedure coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis was validated in terms of specificity, linearity and reproducibility. The method was shown to be free from interference of endogenous compounds and linear over the concentration range of 0.5-10 μg/mL for the three drugs studied. The limits of detection for the three drugs in serum were in the range of 0.160-0.302 μg/mL. Reproducibility expressed as the RSD of the recovery for ten replicated extractions at three different concentrations was found to be less than 8.93%. With a unique combination of surface functionality with magnetic cores, the restricted access magnetic particles may be adapted in automated and high

  15. The NGA-DOE grant to examine critical issues related to radioactive waste and materials disposition involving DOE facilities. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchesne, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    Topics explored through this project include: decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the EM 2006 cleanup plans and contractor integration analysis; interstate waste and materials shipments; and reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; and maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, DOE activities in the area of the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule, and DOE`s proposed National Dialogue.

  16. Simulation of sharp interface multi-material flows involving an arbitrary number of components through an extended five-equation model

    SciTech Connect

    Billaud Friess, Marie; Kokh, Samuel

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we present an anti-diffusive method dedicated to the simulation of interface flows on Cartesian grids involving an arbitrary number m of compressible components. Our work is two-fold: first, we introduce a m-component flow model that generalizes a classic two material five-equation model. In that way, interfaces are localized using color function discontinuities and a pressure equilibrium closure law is used to complete this new model. The resulting model is demonstrated to be hyperbolic under simple assumptions and consistent. Second, we present a discretization strategy for this model relying on a Lagrange–Remap scheme. Here, the projection step involves an anti-dissipative mechanism allowing to prevent numerical diffusion of the material interfaces. The proposed solver is built ensuring consistency and stability properties but also that the sum of the color functions remains equal to one. The resulting scheme is first order accurate and conservative for the mass, momentum, energy and partial masses. Furthermore, the obtained discretization preserves Riemann invariants like pressure and velocity at the interfaces. Finally, validation computations of this numerical method are performed on several tests in one and two dimensions. The accuracy of the method is also compared to results obtained with the upwind Lagrange–Remap scheme.

  17. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Facility at BATAN for Nanostructure Studies in Materials Science and Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, E. Giri Rachman

    2010-01-01

    structure of n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-DMS) core-shell micelle has been revealed by applying a contrast variation, H2O/D2O mixture. Preliminary investigation of globular protein on folding-unfolding, protein denaturation and protein self-assembly studies is being performed. It can be concluded that SMARTer, a 36 m SANS BATAN spectrometer becomes a major tool for structural investigations in the effective length scale of 1-100 nm in materials science and biology.

  18. Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H S.

    2006-06-01

    The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most biologists because it took us into increasingly familiar territory. It took mysterious processes, such as the replication of genetic material and assigned them parts that could be readily understood by the human mind. When we think of ''molecular machines'' as being the underlying basis of life, we are using a paradigm derived from everyday experience. However, the price that we paid was a relentless drive towards reductionism and the attendant balkanization of biology. Now along comes ''systems biology'' that promises us a solution to the problem of ''knowing more and more about less and less''. Unlike molecular biology, systems biology appears to be taking us into unfamiliar intellectual territory, such as statistics, mathematics and computer modeling. Not surprisingly, systems biology has met with widespread skepticism and resistance. Why do we need systems biology anyway and how does this new area of research promise to change the face of biology in the next couple of decades?

  19. Analysis of the complete sequences of two biologically distinct Zucchini yellow mosaic virus isolates further evidences the involvement of a single amino acid in the virus pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Nováková, S; Svoboda, J; Glasa, M

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of two Slovak Zucchini yellow mosaic virus isolates (ZYMV-H and ZYMV-SE04T) were determined. These isolates differ significantly in their pathogenicity, producing either severe or very mild symptoms on susceptible cucurbit hosts. The viral genome of both isolates consisted of 9593 nucleotides in size, and contained an open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein of 3080 amino acids. Despite their different biological properties, an extremely high nucleotide identity could be noted (99.8%), resulting in differences of only 5 aa, located in the HC-Pro, P3, and NIb, respectively. In silico analysis including 5 additional fully-sequenced and phylogenetically closely-related isolates known to induce different symptoms in cucurbits was performed. This suggested that the key single mutation responsible for virus pathogenicity is likely located in the N-terminal part of P3, adjacent to the PIPO. PMID:25518719

  20. Development of a high-throughput screening for nerve agent detoxifying materials using a fully-automated robot-assisted biological assay.

    PubMed

    Wille, T; Thiermann, H; Worek, F

    2010-04-01

    Developing improved medical countermeasures against chemical warfare agents (nerve agents) is urgently needed but time-consuming and costly. Here we introduce a robot-assisted liquid handling system with warming, cooling and incubating facilities to screen the detoxifying properties of biological and chemical materials against nerve agents. Two biological tests were established and plasma from various species, DFPase and three cyclodextrins were used as test materials. In test 1, plasma was mixed with sarin or VX and the inhibitory potency of the incubate was determined with human acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at 0, 30 and 60 min. In test 2, test materials and nerve agents were mixed and incubated. Between 0 and 40 min samples were taken and incubated for 3 min with AChE and the residual AChE inhibition was determined to enable the semi-quantitative evaluation of the detoxification kinetics. The automated assays proved to be highly reproducible. It was possible to pre-select detoxifying reagents with test 1 and to determine more detailed detoxifying kinetics with test 2. In conclusion, the automated assay may be considered as a versatile tool for the high-throughput screening of potential detoxifying materials against different nerve agents. With this two-step assay it is possible to screen effectively for detoxifying materials in a high-throughput system. PMID:19961920

  1. The involvement of TRP channels in sensory irritation: a mechanistic approach toward a better understanding of the biological effects of local irritants.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Ramona; Schöbel, Nicole; Hatt, Hanns; van Thriel, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves innervating the mucosae of the nose, mouth, and throat protect the organism against chemical hazards. Upon their stimulation, characteristic perceptions (e.g., stinging and burning) and various reflexes are triggered (e.g., sneezing and cough). The potency of a chemical to cause sensory irritation can be estimated by a mouse bioassay assessing the concentration-dependent decrease in the respiratory rate (50 % decrease: RD50). The involvement of the N. trigeminus and its sensory neurons in the irritant-induced decrease in respiratory rates are not well understood to date. In calcium imaging experiments, we tested which of eight different irritants (RD50 5-730 ppm) could induce responses in primary mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons. The tested irritants acetophenone, 2-ethylhexanol, hexyl isocyanate, isophorone, and trimethylcyclohexanol stimulated responses in trigeminal neurons. Most of these responses depended on functional TRPA1 or TRPV1 channels. For crotyl alcohol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and sodium metabisulfite, no activation could be observed. 2-ethylhexanol can activate both TRPA1 and TRPV1, and at low contractions (100 µM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) seem to be involved. GPCRs might also be involved in the mediation of the responses to trimethylcyclohexanol. By using neurobiological tools, we showed that sensory irritation in vivo could be based on the direct activation of TRP channels but also on yet unknown interactions with GPCRs present in trigeminal neurons. Our results showed that the potency suggested by the RD50 values was not reflected by direct nerve-compound interaction. PMID:27037703

  2. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26301463

  3. Comparative analysis of the biaxial mechanical behavior of carotid wall tissue and biological and synthetic materials used for carotid patch angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Kamenskiy, Alexey V; Pipinos, Iraklis I; MacTaggart, Jason N; Kazmi, Syed A Jaffar; Dzenis, Yuris A

    2011-11-01

    Patch angioplasty is the most common technique used for the performance of carotid endarterectomy. A large number of patching materials are available for use while new materials are being continuously developed. Surprisingly little is known about the mechanical properties of these materials and how these properties compare with those of the carotid artery wall. Mismatch of the mechanical properties can produce mechanical and hemodynamic effects that may compromise the long-term patency of the endarterectomized arterial segment. The aim of this paper was to systematically evaluate and compare the biaxial mechanical behavior of the most commonly used patching materials. We compared PTFE (n  =  1), Dacron (n  =  2), bovine pericardium (n  =  10), autogenous greater saphenous vein (n  =  10), and autogenous external jugular vein (n  =  9) with the wall of the common carotid artery (n  =  18). All patching materials were found to be significantly stiffer than the carotid wall in both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. Synthetic patches demonstrated the most mismatch in stiffness values and vein patches the least mismatch in stiffness values compared to those of the native carotid artery. All biological materials, including the carotid artery, demonstrated substantial nonlinearity, anisotropy, and variability; however, the behavior of biological and biologically-derived patches was both qualitatively and quantitatively different from the behavior of the carotid wall. The majority of carotid arteries tested were stiffer in the circumferential direction, while the opposite anisotropy was observed for all types of vein patches and bovine pericardium. The rates of increase in the nonlinear stiffness over the physiological stress range were also different for the carotid and patching materials. Several carotid wall samples exhibited reverse anisotropy compared to the average behavior of the carotid tissue. A similar characteristic was

  4. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling involved in the biological activities of a lignan E2S isolated from Carya cathayensis fruits.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xichun; Bi, Xiuli; Wu, Wei; Mou, Yanhua; Hou, Yue; Zhang, Kaiqing; Zhao, Yuqing

    2013-11-01

    Carya cathayensis is a fruit-bearing plant that belongs to the Juglandaceae family and is widely distributed throughout the world. It possesses various important biological activities. We have previously isolated an antitumor compound from the shell of C. cathayensis fruits and named it E2S ((E)-3-[(2S,3R)-2,3-dihydro-2-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxymethyl-7-methoxy-1-benzo[b]furan-5-yl]-2-propenal). In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of E2S against various human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT116, HT29, SW480, LoVo). The results showed that E2S could significantly inhibit the growth of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner, as well as disrupt the progression of the cell cycle. Mechanistic study revealed that E2S could decrease the protein levels of β-catenin and its downstream targets (such as c-myc, a key transcriptional target of β-catenin) in the cells. In addition, it also significantly suppressed β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity. Taken together, the results suggested that E2S might partially exert an antiproliferative effect on human colorectal cancer cells by targeting β-catenin signaling, a finding that might potentially translate into a chemotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. It might also have implications for cancer prevention strategies. PMID:24218372

  5. Cloning of Genes Involved in the Synthesis of Pyrrolnitrin from Pseudomonas fluorescens and Role of Pyrrolnitrin Synthesis in Biological Control of Plant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D. S.; Stein, J. I.; Torkewitz, N. R.; Morse, A. M.; Howell, C. R.; Pachlatko, J. P.; Becker, J. O.; Ligon, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    A soil isolate of Pseudomonas fluorescens (BL915) was shown to be an effective antagonist of Rhizoctonia solani-induced damping-off of cotton. Investigation of the biological basis of this antagonism revealed that the strain produces pyrrolnitrin, a secondary metabolite known to inhibit R. solani and other fungi. Mutants of strain BL915 that did not produce pyrrolnitrin and did not suppress damping-off of cotton by R. solani were generated by exposure to N-methyl-N′ -nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. A gene region that was capable of restoring pyrrolnitrin production to the non-pyrrolnitrin-producing mutants and of conferring this ability upon two other P. fluorescens strains not otherwise known to produce this compound or to be capable of suppressing damping-off caused by R. solani was isolated from strain BL915. The non-pyrrolnitrin-producing strains (mutants of BL915 and the other two P. fluorescens strains) which synthesized pyrrolnitrin after the introduction of the gene region from strain BL915 were also shown to be equal to strain BL915 in their ability to suppress R. solani-induced damping-off of cotton. These results indicate that we have isolated from P. fluorescens BL915 a gene(s) that has a role in the synthesis of pyrrolnitrin and that the production of this compound has a role in the ability of this strain to control damping-off of cotton by R. solani. PMID:16349167

  6. Chiral front propagation in liquid-crystalline materials: Formation of the planar monodomain twisted plywood architecture of biological fibrous composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luca, Gino; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2004-01-01

    Biological fibrous composites commonly exhibit an architecture known as twisted plywood, which is similar to that of the cholesteric liquid-crystalline mesophases. The explanation for the structural similarity is that biological fibrous composites adopt a lyotropic cholesteric liquid-crystalline phase during their formation process. In this work, a mathematical model based on the Landau de Gennes theory of liquid crystals has been developed to reproduce the process by which long chiral fibrous molecules form the twisted plywood structures observed in biological composites. The dynamics of the process was then further investigated by analytically solving a simplified version of the governing equations. Results obtained from the model are in good qualitative agreement with the theory of Neville [Biology of Fibrous Composites (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, 1993)] who hypothesized the necessity of a constraining layer to lock the direction of the helical axis of the plywood in order to create a monodomain structure. Computational results indicate that the plywood architecture is obtained by a chiral front propagation process with a fully relaxed wake. The effects of chirality and concentration on the formation process kinetics are characterized.

  7. Interplay of carbon-silica sources on the formation of hierarchical porous composite materials for biological applications such as lipase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Higuita, Mario; Bernal, Claudia; Mesa, Monica

    2014-10-01

    The porous inorganic materials, with hierarchical structures, find application in many processes where the chemical stability and pore connectivity are key points, such as separation, adsorption and catalysis. Here, we synthesized carbon-silica composite materials, which combine hydrolytic stability of the carbon with the surface chemical reactivity of silica in aqueous media. The polycondensation of carbonaceous and siliceous species from sucrose, Triton X-100 surfactant and tetraethylortosilicate during the hydrothermal synthesis led to the formation of hydrochar composite materials. The subsequent carbonization process of these composite hydrochars gave carbon-silica hierarchical porous materials. The study of the micellar reaction system and the characterization of the derivate materials (carbon-silica composite, carbon and silica) were carried out. The results indicate that synthesis conditions allowed the formation of a silica network interpenetrated with a carbon one, which is produced from the incorporated organic matter. The control of the acidity of the reaction medium and hydrothermal conditions modulated the reaction yield and porous characteristics of the materials. The composite nature in conjunction with the hierarchical porosity increases the interest of these materials for future biological applications, such as lipase immobilization. PMID:25175205

  8. Low Budget Biology 3: A Collection of Low Cost Labs and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartski, Bert; Wartski, Lynn Marie

    This document contains biology labs, demonstrations, and activities that use low budget materials. The goal is to get students involved in the learning process by experiencing biology. Each lab has a teacher preparation section which outlines the purpose of the lab, some basic information, a list of materials , and how to prepare the different…

  9. Hawaiian double volcanic chain triggered by an episodic involvement of recycled material: Constraints from temporal Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic trend of the Loa-type volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ryoji; Makishima, Akio; Nakamura, Eizo

    2008-01-01

    The two parallel loci of recent Hawaiian volcanoes, Kea and Loa, have been regarded as the best targets to interpret the chemical structure of an upwelling mantle plume derived from the lower mantle. Here we show that the Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic data of the shield-building lavas along the Loa locus form a systematic trend from the main shield stage of Koolau (> 2.9 Ma) to the active Loihi volcanoes. During the growth of the Koolau volcano, the dominant material in the melting region successively changed from the proposed KEA, DMK (depleted Makapuu), to EMK (enriched Makapuu) components. The proportion of EMK, dominated by a recycled mafic component, is typified by some Koolau Makapuu-stage and some Lanai lavas. Subsequently, the EMK component decreased and LOIHI component increased toward the Loihi lavas. The temporal coincidence between the episodically elevated magma production rate and the abrupt appearance of the typical Loa-type lavas that is restricted to the last 3 Myr should be linked to magma genesis. We suggest that the abrupt appearance of Loa-type magmatism should be attributed to the transient incorporation of the relatively dense recycled material and surrounding less degassed lower mantle material that accumulated near the core-mantle boundary into the upwelling plume. This episodic involvement could have been trigged by episodic thermal pulses and buoyancy increases in the plume. The continuous appearance of Kea-type lavas during the long history of Hawaiian-chain magmatism and the larger magma volume of Kea-type lavas relative to that of the Loa-type lavas in the last 3 Myr indicate that the Kea locus is closer to the thermal centre of the Hawaiian plume relative to that of the Loa locus.

  10. Br-rich tips of calcified crab claws are less hard but more fracture resistant: a comparison of mineralized and heavy-element biological materials.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Robert M S; Niedbala, Jack C; Nesson, Michael H; Tao, Ye; Shokes, Jacob E; Scott, Robert A; Latimer, Matthew J

    2009-06-01

    We find that the spoon-like tips of the chelipeds (large claws) of the crab Pachygrapsus crassipes differ from the rest of the claw in that they are not calcified, but instead contain about 1% bromine--thus they represent a new example of a class of structural biological materials that contain heavy elements such as Zn, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Br bound in an organic matrix. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data suggest that the bromine is bound to phenyl rings, possibly in tyrosine. We measure a broad array of mechanical properties of a heavy-element biological material for the first time (abrasion resistance, coefficient of kinetic friction, energy of fracture, hardness, modulus of elasticity and dynamic mechanical properties), and we make a direct comparison with a mineralized tissue. Our results suggest that the greatest advantage of bromine-rich cuticle over calcified cuticle is resistance to fracture (the energy of fracture is about an order of magnitude greater than for calcified cuticle). The greatest advantage relative to unenriched cuticle, represented by ant mandible cuticle, is a factor of about 1.5 greater hardness and modulus of elasticity.The spoon-like tips gain additional fracture resistance from the orientation of the constituent laminae and from the viscoelasticity of the material. We suggest that fracture resistance is of greater importance in smaller organisms, and we speculate that one function of heavy elements in structural biological materials is to reduce molecular resonant frequencies and thereby increase absorption of energy from impacts. PMID:19422071

  11. Investigating Teacher Learning Supports in High School Biology Curricular Programs to Inform the Design of Educative Curriculum Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Carrie J.; Delgado, Cesar; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Krajcik, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Reform efforts have emphasized the need to support teachers' learning about reform-oriented practices. Educative curriculum materials are one potential vehicle for promoting teacher learning about these practices. Educative curriculum materials include supports that are intended to promote both student "and" teacher learning. However, little is…

  12. Biological microtribology: anisotropy in frictional forces of orthopteran attachment pads reflects the ultrastructure of a highly deformable material.

    PubMed Central

    Gorb, S; Scherge, M

    2000-01-01

    Evolutionarily optimized frictional devices of insects are usually adapted to attach to a variety of natural surfaces. Orthopteran attachment pads are composed of hexagonal outgrowths with smooth flexible surfaces. The pads are designed to balance the weight of the insect in different positions and on different materials. In a scanning electron microscopy study followed by freezing-substitution experiments, the ultrastructural architecture of the pad material was visualized. In friction experiments, the interaction was measured between the attachment pad and a polished silicon surface. The inner structure of this material contains distally directed rods, branching close to the surface, and spaces filled with fluid. The specific design of the pad material provides a higher frictional force in the distal direction. Frictional anisotropy is more enhanced at higher normal forces and lower sliding velocities. It is concluded that optimal mechanical functionality of biosystems is the result of a combination of surface structuring and material design. PMID:10902690

  13. A rapid and sensitive nonradioactive method applicable for genome-wide analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in small RNA biology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingyan; Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Hopper, Anita K.

    2013-01-01

    The conventional small RNA isolation and detection methods for yeast cells have been designed for a small number of samples. In order to conduct a genome-wide assessment of how each gene product impacts upon small non-coding RNAs, we developed a rapid method for analyzing small RNAs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and mutants cells in the deletion and temperature-sensitive (ts) collections. Our method implements three optimized techniques: a procedure for growing small yeast cultures in 96-deepwell plates, a fast procedure for small RNA isolation from the plates, and a sensitive nonradioactive Northern method for RNA detection. The RNA isolation procedure is highly reproducible and requires only 4 hours for processing 96 samples, and yields RNA of good quality and quantity. The nonradioactive Northern method employs digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled DNA probes and chemiluminescence. It detects femtomole-level small RNAs within 1-minute exposure time. We minimized the processing time for large-scale analysis and optimized the stripping and re-probing procedures for analysis of multiple RNAs from a single membrane. The method described is rapid, sensitive, safe, and cost-effective for genome-wide screens of novel genes involved in the biogenesis, subcellular trafficking, and stability of small RNAs. Moreover, it will be useful to educational laboratory class venues and to research institutions with limited access to radioisotopes or robots. PMID:23417998

  14. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  15. Marine Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  16. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, techniques, and materials including construction of a survey frame for field biology, a simple tidal system, isolation and applications of plant protoplasts, tropisms, teaching lung structure, and a key to statistical methods for biologists. (DS)

  17. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including water relation exercise on auxin-treated artichoke tuber tissue; aerobic respiration in yeast; an improved potometer; use of mobiles in biological classification, and experiments on powdery mildews and banana polyphenol oxidase. Includes reading lists…

  18. A planar transmission-line sensor for measuring the microwave permittivity of liquid and semisolid biological materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A planar transmission-line configuration for rapid, nondestructive, wideband permittivity measurements of liquid and semisolid materials at microwave frequencies is described. The transmission-line propagation constant of the proposed configuration is determined with the multiline technique from sca...

  19. Determination of clozapine in hair and nail: the role of keratinous biological materials in the identification of a bloated cadaver case.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hang; Xiang, Ping; Shen, Min

    2014-02-01

    Keratinous biological materials, such as hair and nails, offer a substantially longer retrospective window of detection compared to other body fluids. Little research on drug analysis in nails is currently being conducted. In this study, the hair and nails from a bloated cadaver was analyzed. The study showed that the forensic toxicology results of keratinous biological materials could provide valuable clues for solving cases. In this study, a method was developed for the extraction and analysis of clozapine from hair and nails. The keratinous bio-samples were washed and then pulverized using a freeze mill. After ultrasonic bath extraction, the supernatants were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometer (UPLC-MS/MS). The method presented in this study proved to be reliable, specific, selective and sensitive with high precision and accuracy. Clozapine was found in both hair and nails from a long term user's remains, even after serious decomposition. The mean concentration of clozapine in the hair was 322.9 pg/mg and 138.3 pg/mg in the nails. Toxicological results helped police narrow the scope of the investigation and improved the efficiency of the breaking of the case. The findings of the present study demonstrated that the method can be used in forensic investigation. Toxicological results increased the efficiency of cadaver identification and the solving of the case. The study demonstrated that hair and nail analysis could provide vital clues for solving cases and showed the value of keratinous biological materials in the forensics field. PMID:24485424

  20. Heavy ion induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L. D.; Apavatjrut, P.; Phanchaisri, B.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Brown, I. G.

    2004-10-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment of biological materials for genetic modification purposes has experienced rapid growth in the last decade, particularly for the direct DNA transfer into living organisms including both plants and bacteria. Attempts have been made to understand the mechanisms involved in ion-bombardment-induced direct gene transfer into biological cells. Here we summarize the present status of the application of low-energy ions for genetic modification of living sample materials.

  1. Development and application of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials. Third year progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, S.M.; Reynolds, G.T.

    1992-05-15

    This report describes progress as of the third year of a 3-year DoE grant for 1/1/92 to 12/31/92. Because this is the last year of a 3- year grant cycle, this report will summarize progress over the entire 3-year period. The overall goals of the grant are to develop novel instrumentation and techniques for the performance of biological and materials research, and especially for the development of x-ray detectors suitable for use at storage ring sources. Research progress has been excellent and the overall goals, as well as most of the specific goals have been successfully met.

  2. Preliminary chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. [Aliphatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Coal-derived materials from experimental runs of Hydrocarbon Research Incorporated's (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. This process differs from two-stage coal liquefaction processes in that catalyst is used in both stages. Samples from both the first and second stages were class-fractionated by alumina adsorption chromatography. The fractions were analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography; gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; direct probe, low voltage mass spectrometry; and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Mutagenicity assays were performed with the crude and class fractions in Salmonella typhimurium, TA98. Preliminary results of chemical analyses indicate that >80% CTSL materials from both process stages were aliphatic hydrocarbon and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Furthermore, the gross and specific chemical composition of process materials from the first stage were very similar to those of the second stage. In general, the unfractionated materials were only slightly active in the TA98 mutagenicity assay. Like other coal liquefaction materials investigated in this laboratory, the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) class fractions were responsible for the bulk of the mutagenic activity of the crudes. Finally, it was shown that this activity correlated with the presence of amino-PAH. 20 figures, 9 tables.

  3. Poly(L-lactide) and poly(butylene succinate) immiscible blends: from electrospinning to biologically active materials.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, Nikoleta; Paneva, Dilyana; Mincheva, Rosica; Toncheva, Antoniya; Manolova, Nevena; Dubois, Philippe; Rashkov, Iliya

    2014-08-01

    For the first time the preparation of defect-free fibers from immiscible blends of high molar mass poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) in the whole range of the polyester weight ratios is shown. Electrospinning using the solvent-nonsolvent approach proved most appropriate. Moreover, electrospinning revealed crucial for the obtaining of PLA/PBS materials maintaining integrity. DSC and XRD analyses attested for a plasticizing effect and for increased PLA crystallinity at PBS addition to PLA. The mechanical properties of the PLA/PBS mats were controlled by the alignment of the fibers and changed from plastic to brittle materials upon increasing the PBS content. Drug loading and tests against pathogenic microorganisms suggested that the obtained mats can find application as antibacterial fibrous materials. PMID:24907744

  4. Derivation of risk indices and analysis of variablility for the management of incidents involving the transport of nuclear materials in the Northern Seas.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Hosseini, A; Karcher, M; Kauker, F; Dowdall, M; Schnur, R; Strand, P

    2016-04-15

    The transport of nuclear or radioactive materials and the presence of nuclear powered vessels pose risks to the Northern Seas in terms of potential impacts to man and environment as well socio-economic impacts. Management of incidents involving actual or potential releases to the marine environment are potentially difficult due to the complexity of the environment into which the release may occur and difficulties in quantifying risk to both man and environment. In order to address this, a state of the art oceanographic model was used to characterize the underlying variability for a specific radionuclide release scenario. The resultant probabilistic data were used as inputs to transfer and dose models providing an indication of potential impacts for man and environment This characterization was then employed to facilitate a rapid means of quantifying risk to man and the environment that included and addressed this variability. The radionuclide specific risk indices derived can be applied by simply multiplying the reported values by the magnitude of the source term and thereafter summing over all radionuclides to provide an indication of total risk. PMID:26895720

  5. Industrial systems biology.

    PubMed

    Otero, José Manuel; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-02-15

    The chemical industry is currently undergoing a dramatic change driven by demand for developing more sustainable processes for the production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. In biotechnological processes different microorganisms can be exploited, and the large diversity of metabolic reactions represents a rich repository for the design of chemical conversion processes that lead to efficient production of desirable products. However, often microorganisms that produce a desirable product, either naturally or because they have been engineered through insertion of heterologous pathways, have low yields and productivities, and in order to establish an economically viable process it is necessary to improve the performance of the microorganism. Here metabolic engineering is the enabling technology. Through metabolic engineering the metabolic landscape of the microorganism is engineered such that there is an efficient conversion of the raw material, typically glucose, to the product of interest. This process may involve both insertion of new enzymes activities, deletion of existing enzyme activities, but often also deregulation of existing regulatory structures operating in the cell. In order to rapidly identify the optimal metabolic engineering strategy the industry is to an increasing extent looking into the use of tools from systems biology. This involves both x-ome technologies such as transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome analysis, and advanced mathematical modeling tools such as genome-scale metabolic modeling. Here we look into the history of these different techniques and review how they find application in industrial biotechnology, which will lead to what we here define as industrial systems biology. PMID:19891008

  6. Dense Plasma Focus: physics and applications (radiation material science, single-shot disclosure of hidden illegal objects, radiation biology and medicine, etc.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Chernyshova, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Pimenov, V. N.; Demina, E. V.; Niemela, J.; Crespo, M.-L.; Cicuttin, A.; Tomaszewski, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Pytel, K.; Zawadka, A.; Giannini, G.; Longo, F.; Talab, A.; Ul'yanenko, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents some outcomes obtained during the year of 2013 of the activity in the frame of the International Atomic Energy Agency Co-ordinated research project "Investigations of Materials under High Repetition and Intense Fusion-Relevant Pulses". The main results are related to the effects created at the interaction of powerful pulses of different types of radiation (soft and hard X-rays, hot plasma and fast ion streams, neutrons, etc. generated in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) facilities) with various materials including those that are counted as perspective ones for their use in future thermonuclear reactors. Besides we discuss phenomena observed at the irradiation of biological test objects. We examine possible applications of nanosecond powerful pulses of neutrons to the aims of nuclear medicine and for disclosure of hidden illegal objects. Special attention is devoted to discussions of a possibility to create extremely large and enormously diminutive DPF devices and probabilities of their use in energetics, medicine and modern electronics.

  7. Picosecond-pulse-induced two-photon fluorescence enhancement in biological material by application of grating waveguide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selle, André; Kappel, Christoph; Bader, Mark Andreas; Marowsky, Gerd; Winkler, Kathrin; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2005-07-01

    We report enhancement of two-photon fluorescence (TPF) excitation in fluorescent dyes and fluorescently labeled biomolecules by exploiting the optical properties of double grating waveguide structures (DGWSs). Picosecond laser pulses generate a large evanescent field based on the guided mode phenomenon in the resonant DGWSs, which induces strong TPF signals from fluorescent dyes at the waveguide surface. By recording enhanced TPF signals of Rhodamine B and Lucifer Yellow under resonance conditions, a detection sensitivity of concentrations of approximately one dye molecule per 0.1 μm2 was achieved. For the first time to our knowledge, enhanced TPF signals of a Lucifer Yellow-labeled biomolecule (human self-peptide) in an aqueous environment are demonstrated. These results strongly encourage the use of DGWSs as enhancement platforms in modern biophysics and biotechnology for investigations of biological membranes and cells.

  8. Application of direct solid sample analysis for the determination of chlorine in biological materials using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gois, Jefferson Santos; Pereira, Éderson R.; Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Daniel L. G.

    2015-03-01

    This work describes a methodology developed to carry out Cl determination in biological materials using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis. The solid samples were directly weighed into graphite 'cups' and inserted into the graphite furnace. The RF power and the carrier gas flow rate were optimized at 1300 W and 0.7 L min- 1, respectively. Calibration could be carried out using aqueous standard solutions with pre-dried modifiers (Pd + Nd or Pd + Ca) or using solid certified reference materials with the same pre-dried modifiers or without the use of modifiers. The limit of quantification was determined as 5 μg g- 1 under optimized conditions and the Cl concentration was determined in five certified reference materials with certified concentrations for Cl, in addition to three certified reference materials, for which certified values for Cl were unavailable; in the latter case, the results were compared with those obtained using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry. Good agreement at a 95% statistical confidence level was achieved between determined and certified or reference values.

  9. Biological preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  10. Alternative biological-treatment processes for remediation of creosote- and PCP-contaminated materials: Bench-scale treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.G.; Lantz, S.E.; Blattman, B.O.; Middaugh, D.P.; Chapman, P.J.

    1991-03-01

    Bench-scale biotreatability studies were performed to determine the most effective of two bioremediation application strategies to ameliorate creosote- and pentachlorophenol (PCP)-contaminated soils present at the American Creosote Works Superfund site, Pensacola, Florida: solid-phase bioremediation or slurry-phase bioremediation. When indigenous microorganisms were employed as biocatalysts, solid-phase bioremediation was slow and ineffective (8-12 weeks required to biodegrade >50% of resident organics). Biodegradation was limited to lower-molecular-weight constituents rather than the more hazardous, higher-molecular-weight (HMW) compounds; PCP and HMW polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing 4 or more fused rings resisted biological attach. Moreover, supplementation with aqueous solution of inorganic nutrients had little effect on the overall effectiveness of the treatment strategy. Alternatively, slurry-phase bioremediation was much more effective: >50% of targeted organics were biodegraded in 14 days. Again, however, more persistent contaminants, such as PCP and HMW PAHs, were not extensively degraded when subjected to the action of indigenous microorganisms.

  11. Photoabsorption study of Bacillus megaterium, DNA and Related Biological Materials in the Phosphorus K-edge Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigo, Sean P.; McNulty,Ian; Richmond, Robert C.; Ehret, Charles F.

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the x-ray transmission spectra of several biologically related samples in the phosphorus K-edge absorption region. These include red phosphorus, hydrated sodium phosphate (Na3PO4 12 H2O), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), adenosinetriphosphate (ATP), diolylphosphatidyl choline (DOPC), and Bacillus megaterium spores. Red phosphorus essentially displays an edge-jump. All other spectra are similar in form and energy position, where each is dominated by a narrower, more intense first peak and a broader but less intense second peak. The corresponding K-edge absorption thresholds are shifted towards higher energy relative to that for red phosphorus, as expected for increasing degrees of phosphorus oxidation. The B.meguterium spectrum has aspects common to both the phosphate and DNA spectra and is therefore interpreted as a composite of spectra arising from DNA/RNA and phosphates within the spore. The B. megaterium spore spectrum provides needed information for resonant radiation damage studies in the phosphorus K-edge absorption region by identifying candidate photoexcitations. In addition, the absorption spectra will be useful in macromolecular crystallography studies employing anomalous dispersion effects at the phosphorus K-edge.

  12. Photoabsorption Study of Bacillus megaterium, DNA and Related Biological Materials in the Phosphorus K-edge Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigo, Sean P.; McNulty, Ian; Richmond, Robert C.; Ehret, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the x-ray transmission spectra of several biologically related samples in the phosphorus K-edge absorption region. These include elemental red phosphorus, hydrated sodium phosphate (Na3PO4.12H2O), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), adenosinetriphosphate (ATP), diolylphosphatidyl choline (DOPC), and Bacillus megaterium spores. Elemental red phosphorus essentially displays an edge-jump. All other spectra are similar in form and energy position. Each spectrum for these substances is dominated by a narrower, more intense first peak and a broader but less intense second peak. The corresponding K-edge absorption thresholds are shifted towards higher energy relative to that for elemental red phosphorus, as expected for increasing degrees of phosphorus oxidation. The B. megaterium spectrum has aspects common to both the phosphate and DNA spectra and is therefore interpreted as a composite of spectra arising from DNA/RNA and phosphates within the spore. The B. megaterium spore spectrum provides needed information for resonant radiation damage studies in the phosphorus K-edge absorption region by identifying candidate photoexcitations. In addition,the absorption spectra will be useful in macromolecular crystallography studies employing anomalous dispersion effects at the phosphorus K-edge.

  13. Mechanisms underlying protective effects of trimetazidine on endothelial progenitor cells biological functions against H2O2-induced injury: involvement of antioxidation and Akt/eNOS signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinqin; Qi, Benling; Liu, Yun; Cheng, Bei; Liu, Lihua; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qian

    2013-05-01

    Trimetazidine (TMZ) is a widely used drug exerting cardioprotective effects against ischemic heart disease through a number of mechanisms in conditions of oxidative stress. However, there are few data regarding the effects of TMZ on endothelial lineage, especially endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Thus, we sought to investigate whether TMZ could protect EPCs against oxidative stress injury induced by H2O2 (100 µM) and the preliminary mechanisms involved in vitro. The results showed that pretreatment of EPCs with TMZ (10 µM) protected the proliferation, adhesion, migration, and apoptosis of EPCs against H2O2, accompanied by an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, a decrease in malonaldehyde (MDA) content, and increases in eNOS, Akt phosphorylation, and NO production. These TMZ-mediated beneficial effects on EPCs could be attenuated by pre-incubation with the Akt inhibitor triciribine. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that TMZ ameliorated H2O2-induced impairment of biological functions in EPCs with the involvement of antioxidation and Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. These findings suggest that TMZ mediating preservation of EPCs may contribute to its cardioprotective effects on ischemic heart disease. PMID:23528356

  14. FOB-SH: Fragment orbital-based surface hopping for charge carrier transport in organic and biological molecules and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J.; Gajdos, F.; Blumberger, J.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a fragment orbital-based fewest switches surface hopping method, FOB-SH, designed to efficiently simulate charge carrier transport in strongly fluctuating condensed phase systems such as organic semiconductors and biomolecules. The charge carrier wavefunction is expanded and the electronic Hamiltonian constructed in a set of singly occupied molecular orbitals of the molecular sites that mediate the charge transfer. Diagonal elements of the electronic Hamiltonian (site energies) are obtained from a force field, whereas the off-diagonal or electronic coupling matrix elements are obtained using our recently developed analytic overlap method. We derive a general expression for the exact forces on the adiabatic ground and excited electronic state surfaces from the nuclear gradients of the charge localized electronic states. Applications to electron hole transfer in a model ethylene dimer and through a chain of ten model ethylenes validate our implementation and demonstrate its computational efficiency. On the larger system, we calculate the qualitative behaviour of charge mobility with change in temperature T for different regimes of the intermolecular electronic coupling. For small couplings, FOB-SH predicts a crossover from a thermally activated regime at low temperatures to a band-like transport regime at higher temperatures. For higher electronic couplings, the thermally activated regime disappears and the mobility decreases according to a power law. This is interpreted by a gradual loss in probability for resonance between the sites as the temperature increases. The polaron hopping model solved for the same system gives a qualitatively different result and underestimates the mobility decay at higher temperatures. Taken together, the FOB-SH methodology introduced here shows promise for a realistic investigation of charge carrier transport in complex organic, aqueous, and biological systems.

  15. An Investigation into the Effects of Interface Stress and Interfacial Arrangement on Temperature Dependent Thermal Properties of a Biological and a Biomimetic Material

    SciTech Connect

    Tomar, Vikas

    2015-01-13

    A significant effort in the biomimetic materials research is on developing materials that can mimic and function in the same way as biological tissues, on bio-inspired electronic circuits, on bio-inspired flight structures, on bio-mimetic materials processing, and on structural biomimetic materials, etc. Most structural biological and biomimetic material properties are affected by two primary factors: (1) interfacial interactions between an organic and an inorganic phase usually in the form of interactions between an inorganic mineral phase and organic protein network; and (2) structural arrangement of the constituents. Examples are exoskeleton structures such as spicule, nacre, and crustacean exoskeletons. A significant effort is being directed towards making synthetic biomimetic materials based on a manipulation of the above two primary factors. The proposed research is based on a hypothesis that in synthetic materials with biomimetic morphology thermal conductivity, k, (how fast heat is carried away) and thermal diffusivity, D, (how fast a material’s temperature rises: proportional to the ratio of k and heat capacity) can be engineered to be either significantly low or significantly high based on a combination of chosen interface orientation and interfacial arrangement in comparison to conventional material microstructures with the same phases and phase volume fractions. METHOD DEVELOPMENT 1. We have established a combined Raman spectroscopy and nanomechanical loading based experimental framework to perform environment (liquid vs. air vs. vacuum) dependent and temperature dependent (~1000 degree-C) in-situ thermal diffusivity measurements in biomaterials at nanoscale to micron scale along with the corresponding analytical theoretic calculations. (Zhang and Tomar, 2013) 2. We have also established a new classical molecular simulation based framework to measure thermal diffusivity in biomolecular interfaces. We are writing a publication currently (Qu and Tomar

  16. Systems Biology of Industrial Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Marta; Salazar, Margarita; Nielsen, Jens

    The field of industrial biotechnology is expanding rapidly as the chemical industry is looking towards more sustainable production of chemicals that can be used as fuels or building blocks for production of solvents and materials. In connection with the development of sustainable bioprocesses, it is a major challenge to design and develop efficient cell factories that can ensure cost efficient conversion of the raw material into the chemical of interest. This is achieved through metabolic engineering, where the metabolism of the cell factory is engineered such that there is an efficient conversion of sugars, the typical raw materials in the fermentation industry, into the desired product. However, engineering of cellular metabolism is often challenging due to the complex regulation that has evolved in connection with adaptation of the different microorganisms to their ecological niches. In order to map these regulatory structures and further de-regulate them, as well as identify ingenious metabolic engineering strategies that full-fill mass balance constraints, tools from systems biology can be applied. This involves both high-throughput analysis tools like transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis, as well as the use of mathematical modeling to simulate the phenotypes resulting from the different metabolic engineering strategies. It is in fact expected that systems biology may substantially improve the process of cell factory development, and we therefore propose the term Industrial Systems Biology for how systems biology will enhance the development of industrial biotechnology for sustainable chemical production.

  17. Biologically engineered protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels: A cell-adhesive and plasmin-degradable biosynthetic material for tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstenberg, Sven

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the research presented in this dissertation was to create a biomimetic artificial material that exhibits functions of extracellular matrix relevant for improved nerve regeneration. Neural adhesion peptides were photoimmobilized on highly crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-based substrates that were otherwise non-adhesive. Neurons adhered in two-dimensional patterns for eleven hours, but no neurites extended. To enable neurite extension and nerve regeneration in three dimensions, and to address the need for specifically cell adhesive and cell degradable materials for clinical applications in tissue repair in general, an artificial protein was recombinantly expressed and purified that consisted of a repeating amino acid sequence based on fibrinogen and anti-thrombin III. The recombinant protein contained integrin-binding RGD sites, plasmin degradation sites, heparin binding sites, and six thiol-containing cysteine residues as grafting sites for poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate via Michael-type conjugate addition. The resulting protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol)acrylates were crosslinked by photopolymerization to form hydrogels. Although three-dimensional, RGD mediated and serine protease-dependent ingrowth of human fibroblasts into protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels occurred, only surface neurite outgrowth was observed from chick dorsal root ganglia. Axonal outgrowth depended on the concentration of matrix-bound heparin, suggesting that improved mechanical strength of the hydrogels and possible immobilization of neuroactive factors due to the presence of heparin promoted neurite outgrowth. Together, the above results show that specific biological functions can be harnessed by protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels to serve as matrices for tissue repair and regeneration. In particular, the two design objectives, specific cell adhesion and degradability by cell-associated proteases, were fulfilled by the material. In the future, this and

  18. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  19. Biological materials: Part A. tuning LCST of raft copolymers and gold/copolymer hybrid nanoparticles and Part B. Biobased nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ning

    material) was copolymerized with poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate), a common polyhydroxyalkanoate produced by bacteria with the objective of determining if a useful material could be obtained with a less rigorous work-up on harvesting polyhydroxyalkanoates. The copolyesteramide product having 25 wt.% peptidoglycan from a highly purified peptidoglycan increased thermal stability by 100-200 °C compared to the poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) control, while a less pure peptidoglycan, harvested from B. megaterium (ATCC 11561), gave a 25-50 °C increase in thermal stability. Both copolymers absorbed more moisture than pure poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate). The results suggest that a less rigorously harvested and purified polyhydroxyalkanoate might be useful for some applications.

  20. The on-line detection of biological particle emissions from selected agricultural materials using the WIBS-4 (Waveband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, David J.; Healy, David A.; Sodeau, John R.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural activities have, for some time, been linked to adverse health effects such as Farmers' lung, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, aspergillosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) This connection is known to be, at least in part, due to the numerous microbiological organisms that live and grow on materials found in occupational settings such as barns, animal shelters, stables and composting sites. Traditional techniques for determining biological release of fungal spores and bacteria require intensive, experienced human resources and considerable time to determine ambient concentrations. However more recently the fluorescence and light scattering signals obtained from primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) have been utilised for their near real-time counting and characterisation abilities. In the current study, data collected for the bioaerosol types released from hay and silage were counted and identified using a combination of the WIBS-4 bioaerosol sensor approach and impaction/optical microscopy. Particle emissions were characterised according to particle numbers, their size distributions, particle asymmetry values and fluorescence characteristics. The variables obtained were shown to provide potential “fingerprint” signatures for PBAP emissions emanating from two important compost components, namely, silage and hay. Comparisons between the data acquired by the WIBS-4 bioaerosol sensor, optical microscopy findings and also previous literature suggest that the likely identification of Aspergillus/Penicillium type spores and bacterial species released from hay and silage was achieved on a relatively rapid time-scale.

  1. Biological potential of extraterrestrial materials. 2. Microbial and plant responses to nutrients in the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mautner, M. N.; Conner, A. J.; Killham, K.; Deamer, D. W.

    1997-01-01

    Meteoritic materials are investigated as potential early planetary nutrients. Aqueous extracts of the Murchison C2 carbonaceous meteorite are utilized as a sole carbon source by microorganisms, as demonstrated by the genetically modified Pseudomonas fluorescence equipped with the lux gene. Nutrient effects are observed also with the soil microorganisms Nocardia asteroides and Arthrobacter pascens that reach populations up to 5 x 10(7) CFU/ml in meteorite extracts, similar to populations in terrestrial soil extracts. Plant tissue cultures of Asparagus officinalis and Solanum tuberosum (potato) exhibit enhanced pigmentation and some enhanced growth when meteorite extracts are added to partial nutrient media, but inhibited growth when added to full nutrient solution. The meteorite extracts lead to large increases in S, Ca, Mg, and Fe plant tissue contents as shown by X-ray fluorescence, while P, K, and Cl contents show mixed effects. In both microbiological and plant tissue experiments, the nutrient and inhibitory effects appear to be best balanced for growth at about 1:20 (extracted solid : H2O) ratios. The results suggest that solutions in cavities in meteorites can provide efficient concentrated biogenic and early nutrient environments, including high phosphate levels, which may be the limiting nutrient. The results also suggest that carbonaceous asteroid resources can sustain soil microbial activity and provide essential macronutrients for future space-based ecosystems.

  2. Verification of biological activity of irradiated Sopoongsan, an oriental medicinal prescription, for industrial application of functional cosmetic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Young; Park, Tae-Soon; Ho Son, Jun; Jo, Cheorun; Woo Byun, Myung; Jeun An, Bong

    2007-11-01

    Sopoongsan is an oriental medicinal prescription including 12 medicinal herbs. Sopoongsan is known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-allergic, and anti-cancer effects on human skin. To use Sopoongsan extract for functional cosmetic composition, its dark color should be brighter for seeking consumer demand, clear products, without any adverse change in its function. Irradiation with doses 0, 5, 10, and 20 kGy was applied to improve color of ethanol- or water-extracted Sopoongsan and also superoxide dismutase (SOD), xanthine oxidase (XO), melanoma cell growth inhibition, and anti-microbial activity was investigated. Generally, ethanol extract was better than water extract in function and irradiation up to 20 kGy did not change any functional effect. Especially, the inhibition of melanin deposition on skin measured by inhibition of B16F10 (melanoma) cell growth was as high as arbutin, commercially available product, when the ethanol-extracted Sopoongsan was irradiated for 20 kGy. Results showed that when irradiation technology is used, the limitation of addition amount of natural materials for food or cosmetic composition caused by color problem can be decreased significantly with time saving and cost benefit compared to conventional color removal process. Therefore, irradiation would be one of the good methods to pose an additional value for related industry.

  3. A comparative ESR study of some paramagnetic materials as probes for the noninvasive measurement of dissolved oxygen in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Utsumi, H; Kirino, Y

    1994-11-01

    The ESR properties of three types of paramagnetic material, active charcoal, fusinite and a stable nitroxide radical 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPONE), were examined in order to evaluate their suitability as probes to measure dissolved intra- and extra-cellular oxygen. Although, with changes in oxygen concentration, a greater change in the linewidth of ESR signals was observed with fusinite or active charcoal, it took a long time (15 min for active charcoal and more than 6 h for fusinite) for equilibrium to be achieved. On the other hand, equilibrium was reached very rapidly in the case of the TEMPONE spectra although the sensitivity to changes in oxygen concentration was only moderate. Furthermore, since lipid bilayers are permeable to TEMPONE, this compound can be used to measure intracellular oxygen concentration when employed in combination with membrane-impermeable spin-broadening reagents which act on ESR signals arising from extracellular probes. A perdeuterated derivative of TEMPONE is useful in that it gives a greater signal-to-noise ratio and greater sensitivity to changes in oxygen concentration. In conclusion, active charcoal is suitable as a probe for extracellular oxygen in a system where changes are slow, while nitroxide is a versatile probe for measuring rapidly changing intra- and extra-cellular oxygen concentrations. PMID:7859334

  4. Development and application of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials. Progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, S.M.; Reynolds, G.T.

    1993-09-14

    This progress report summarizes results, as of August, 1993, for DOE grant DE-FG-02-76ER60522 during the fiscal period 1/1/93 to 12/31/93, which is the first year of a 3-year grant cycle. The overall goals of the grant are to develop advanced x-ray detector technologies, especially as applicable for biological and materials research at the national laboratories, and to train graduate and post-doctoral students on the use of these technologies via the performance of original biological and materials research. As summarized below, there has been good progress toward achieving the research goals of the original 3-year proposal; in consequence, the research plan and the total budget for the rest of 1993 and beyond is still well described by the original proposal. Accomplishments since the last progress report include: (A) A 1k x 1k fiber optically coupled CCD detector was assembled, tested at CHESS and is slated for extended user trials this Fall. A 2k x 2k CCD detector is being assembled for permanent installation at CHESS. (B) X-ray detector phosphors, calibration techniques, and system software have been developed. (C) The design of a Pixel Array Detector, a collaborative project with the Advanced Photon Source, has been initiated. (D) The properties of biomembrane lipids under extremes of pressure have been investigated. High pressure instrumentation and techniques have been developed. (E) The physics of mesophase formation in biomembrane lipid, surfactant, and polymeric systems have been studied. This includes study of the interaction of membrane proteins with elastically strained lipid bilayers. (G) Work has been initiated on the use of thermal diffuse scatter from proteins as a probe of protein dynamics. (H) Studies on luminescent phenomena have been reported. Since the last progress report (dated 15 May 1992), this work has resulted in 10 published papers, 7 abstracts, 1 Ph.D. thesis and 1 technical report.

  5. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  6. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  7. A biologically active delivery material with dried-rehydrated vesicles containing the anti-inflammatory diclofenac for potential wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Helena; Silva, Raquel; Matamá, Teresa; Silva, Carla; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wounds usually remain in the inflammatory phase of the healing process during several months or even years. Hence, a continuous research has been resulting in the development of wound dressings with improved performance. Herein, we report a delivery system for cutaneous wound healing, consisting of a textile material (non-woven gauzes) covered with lipidic vesicles containing diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). This study also aims to compare the entrapment efficiency data with previous works and confirm that this parameter and drug amount are not directly correlated. A method of dehydration-rehydration of the liposomes presenting different sizes and lamellarities was used to assess the best conditions to attain the highest drug entrapment efficiency. Optimum conditions for the NSAID release were achieved with high phospholipid concentrations and dried-rehydrated vesicles (DRVs) prepared from multilamellar liposomes (MLVs). A chemical activation of the gauzes was performed to enhance the vesicles attachment, also contributing to a higher drug amount in the surrounding media. In spite of the entrapment efficiency being lower comparatively with other values presented by us previously, the diclofenac concentration was considerably higher in this formulation. Entrapment efficiency is, therefore, not sufficient per se to define the real amount of drug contained in the formulation. The cytocompatibility assessment in human skin fibroblasts showed that DRVs from MLVs and DRVs from large unilamellar liposomes (LUVs) with less than 750 μM of egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine (EPC), containing diclofenac, were not cytotoxic after 72 h of contact, greatly implying potential for their application in the chronic wounds healing. PMID:26634871

  8. A new canine model to evaluate the biological response of intramedullary bone to implant materials and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Spivak, J M; Ricci, J L; Blumenthal, N C; Alexander, H

    1990-09-01

    A new canine model utilizing an implantable chamber with multiple bone ingrowth channels has been used to study the response of intramedullary bone to various implant materials and surfaces. The first group of dogs received implants containing channels lined by smooth-surfaced coupons of titanium, titanium alloy, sputter-hydroxyapatite-coated (HA-coated) titanium alloy, and polyethylene. A pattern of early initial bone ingrowth by 2 weeks, becoming maximal at 6 to 12 weeks with remodeling to a more mature lamellar bone, and later resorption by 24 weeks was seen for all test groups, with fibrous tissue interfaces covering the smooth test coupons at all time points. Significantly increased bone ingrowth in the sputter-HA coated group was found only at 6 weeks. The second group of dogs received implants with channels lined by surface-roughened coupons of either titanium or plasma-HA-coated titanium, half of which were also packed with a crystalline-HA grouting at the time of surgery. At both 6 and 12 weeks, bone ingrowth was greatly enhanced by the presence of the plasma-HA coating or the crystalline-HA grouting as compared to the uncoated titanium channels. Histologically, bone was seen to bond directly to the plasma-HA coating and the crystalline-HA grouting. A thin fibrous tissue layer was noted between bone and the titanium in most areas, but evidence of direct bone contact to the metal surface was seen. Mechanical testing in tension of intact coupon-bone-coupon units revealed significant strength of the bone-plasma-HA bond, with failure initiating at the metal-HA interface with forces of 15.3 N at 6 weeks, increasing to 44.8 N at 12 weeks. Plasma-HA-lined channels with crystalline-HA packing required similar forces for failure. No significant adhesion strength was noted for the titanium channels at 6 weeks, and only the crystalline-HA-filled channels displayed measurable strength of the bone-titanium interface at 12 weeks, with a force of 9 N needed for failure

  9. Structure and reaction studies of biological organic and inorganic composite materials: Abalone shells, diatoms, and a unique birch bark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaremba, Charlotte Marie

    Biopolymer/calcium carbonate composites grown on inorganic abiotic substrates implanted between the shell and the shell-secreting epithelium of live red abalones (Haliotis rufescens) results in an unusual highly (104)-oriented aggregate of microcrystalline calcite that precedes nacre deposition. Calcite of this orientation has never before been observed in nature. Also with this method, nacre deposition is found to correct for calcite surface roughness and chemically anomalous surfaces. Pole figure X-ray diffraction studies of these "flat pearls" provide comparisons of preferred orientation of the various mineral components of the abalone shell. Complete conversion of the aragonite in abalone nacre to hydroxyapatite in hydrothermal phosphate solution results in an oriented polycrystalline aggregate with ultrastructure preservation and an unexpected preferred orientation different from that of other biominerals and abiogenic CaCO3 samples subjected to this reaction. The new orientation, which increases with reaction time, may result from the organization of the organic matrix in the nacre, which directs the hydrothermal solution through the material. This orientation suggests strongly that the conversion proceeds via a dissolution-recrystallization mechanism, rather than by topotaxy, which was previously proposed. In addition to cellulose I, a highly oriented cellulose-II-like polymer was found in the bark of Prunus serrula, an exceptionally strong, tough, and extensible composite film. The cellulose II polymorph, which has not previously been found in nature, may be accordion-folded in the plane of the bark thickness and contribute to the strength and unusual behavior with plasticization of this natural film. The silica frustule of the diatom Skeletonema costatum has a surface area of 135 mm2/g and contains 1.5--2 wt % occluded organic. This organic includes a water-insoluble scaffolding. When treated with organic oxidizers, the chitin secreted by the diatom

  10. Involvement of the Artemis Protein in the Relative Biological Efficiency Observed With the 76-MeV Proton Beam Used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay

    SciTech Connect

    Calugaru, Valentin; Nauraye, Catherine; Cordelières, Fabrice P.; Biard, Denis; De Marzi, Ludovic; Hall, Janet; Favaudon, Vincent; Mégnin-Chanet, Frédérique

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Previously we showed that the relative biological efficiency for induced cell killing by the 76-MeV beam used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay increased with depth throughout the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). To investigate the repair pathways underlying this increase, we used an isogenic human cell model in which individual DNA repair proteins have been depleted, and techniques dedicated to precise measurements of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: The 3-Gy surviving fractions of HeLa cells individually depleted of Ogg1, XRCC1, and PARP1 (the base excision repair/SSB repair pathway) or of ATM, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, and Artemis (nonhomologous end-joining pathway) were determined at the 3 positions previously defined in the SOBP. Quantification of incident SSBs and DSBs by the alkaline elution technique and 3-dimensional (3D) immunofluorescence of γ-H2AX foci, respectively, was performed in SQ20 B cells. Results: We showed that the amount of SSBs and DSBs depends directly on the particle fluence and that the increase in relative biological efficiency observed in the distal part of the SOBP is due to a subset of lesions generated under these conditions, leading to cell death via a pathway in which the Artemis protein plays a central role. Conclusions: Because therapies like proton or carbon beams are now being used to treat cancer, it is even more important to dissect the mechanisms implicated in the repair of the lesions generated by these particles. Additionally, alteration of the expression or activity of the Artemis protein could be a novel therapeutic tool before high linear energy transfer irradiation treatment.

  11. Genetic investigation of biological materials from patients after stem cell transplantation based on autosomal as well as Y-chromosomal markers.

    PubMed

    Jacewicz, Renata; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Rupa-Matysek, Joanna; Jedrzejczyk, Maciej; Komarnicki, Mieczysław; Berent, Jarosław

    2013-03-01

    The authors presented the results of DNA polymorphism investigation of blood, buccal swabs and hair follicles originating from patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The real-time and multiplex assays based on polymerase chain reaction within the range of autosomal as well as Y-chromosomal markers were applied to assess the possible dangers arising from investigation of these materials in forensic genetics. The results revealed that not only post-transplant blood and buccal swab, but also recipient hair, up to now regarded as devoid of any donor's cells, do not constitute entirely safe material for forensic purposes. Their analysis can lead to the false identification of gender or male haplotype. The investigation of sex-determining region Y and Y-chromosome short tandem repeats performed in female recipients with male donors resulted in the designation of donor's DNA in hair cells as well as in blood and buccal swabs. Therefore, biological stains gathered from crime scenes should not be analysed exclusively based on the investigation of male-specific markers. PMID:23052441

  12. On-line solid phase extraction with polyurethane foam: trace level spectrophotometric determination of iron in natural waters and biological materials.

    PubMed

    Cassella, Ricardo J

    2002-08-01

    This paper reports the development of a simple and accurate on-line procedure for preconcentration and determination of dissolved iron in waters and biological materials using unloaded polyether-type polyurethane foam as solid extractor. In the developed flow injection system, the analyte was preconcentrated from acidic aqueous medium as iron-thiocyanate complex with post-elution with ascorbic acid solution and spectrophotometric measurement with 1,10-phenanthroline as colorimetric reagent. In order to improve the performance of the system several chemical and flow variables were investigated as well as the effect caused by the presence of possible interferents. The method was validated by the analysis of two certified reference materials. Application of the methodology was carried out by the determination of dissolved iron content in eight natural water samples with different characteristics. The results were compared with those obtained by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and no statistical difference was observed. The detection limit was 0.75 microgram l-1 and the RSD was 1.2% for 2 min preconcentration time. At this condition, a productivity of 20 samples h-1 was achieved. Increasing the preconcentration time up to 3 min, a detection limit of 0.45 microgram l-1, an RSD of 1.5% and an analytical throughput of 15 h-1 were verified. PMID:12195994

  13. Three-year summary report of biological monitoring at the Southwest Ocean dredged-material disposal site and additional locations off Grays Harbor, Washington, 1990--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Antrim, L.D.; Shreffler, D.K.; Pearson, W.H.; Cullinan, V.I. )

    1992-12-01

    The Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project was initiated to improve navigation by widening and deepening the federal channel at Grays Harbor. Dredged-material disposal sites were selected after an extensive review process that included inter-agency agreements, biological surveys, other laboratory and field studies, and preparation of environmental impact statements The Southwest Site, was designated to receive materials dredged during annual maintenance dredging as well as the initial construction phase of the project. The Southwest Site was located, and the disposal operations designed, primarily to avoid impacts to Dungeness crab. The Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplement for the project incorporated a Site Monitoring Plan in which a tiered approach to disposal site monitoring was recommended. Under Tier I of the Site Monitoring Plan, Dungeness crab densities are monitored to confirm that large aggregations of newly settled Dungeness crab have not moved onto the Southwest Site. Tier 2 entails an increased sampling effort to determine whether a change in disposal operations is needed. Four epibenthic surveys using beam trawls were conducted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 at the Southwest Site and North Reference area, where high crab concentrations were found in the spring of 1985. Survey results during these three years prompted no Tier 2 activities. Epibenthic surveys were also conducted at two nearshore sites where construction of sediment berms has been proposed. This work is summarized in an appendix to this report.

  14. H. R. 3124: A bill to require the Secretary of Transportation to take actions to protect against railroad accidents involving hazardous materials, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on July 31, 1991 to require the Secretary of Transportation to take actions to protect against railroad accidents involving hazardous materials. One of the main aspects of this legislation is to identify railroad routes which present the greatest danger of accidents and to find alternative routes.

  15. Dangers resulting from DNA profiling of biological materials derived from patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) with regard to forensic genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jacewicz, R; Lewandowski, K; Rupa-Matysek, J; Jędrzejczyk, M; Berent, J

    2015-01-01

    The study documents the risk that comes with DNA analysis of materials derived from patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in forensic genetics. DNA chimerism was studied in 30 patients after allo-HSCT, based on techniques applied in contemporary forensic genetics, i.e. real-time PCR and multiplex PCR-STR with the use of autosomal DNA as well as Y-DNA markers. The results revealed that the DNA profile of the recipient's blood was identical with the donor's in the majority of cases. Therefore, blood analysis can lead to false conclusions in personal identification as well as kinship analysis. An investigation of buccal swabs revealed a mixture of DNA in the majority of recipients. Consequently, personal identification on the basis of stain analysis of the same origin may be impossible. The safest (but not ideal) material turned out to be the hair root. Its analysis based on autosomal DNA revealed 100% of the recipient's profile. However, an analysis based on Y-chromosome markers performed in female allo-HSCT recipients with male donors demonstrated the presence of donor DNA in hair cells - similarly to the blood and buccal swabs. In the light of potential risks arising from DNA profiling of biological materials derived from persons after allotransplantation in judicial aspects, certain procedures were proposed to eliminate such dangers. The basic procedures include abandoning the approach based exclusively on blood collection, both for kinship analysis and personal identification; asking persons who are to be tested about their history of allo-HSCT before sample collection and profile entry in the DNA database, and verification of DNA profiling based on hair follicles in uncertain cases. PMID:27543957

  16. Ethical Issues in Clinical Trials Involving Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.; Tinkle, Sally S.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomedicine shows tremendous promise for improving medical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, but it also raises a variety of ethical concerns. Because of the paucity of data on the physicochemical properties of nanoscale materials in biological systems, clinical trials of nanomedicine products present some unique challenges related to risk minimization, management and communication involving human subjects. Although these clinical trials do not raise any truly novel ethical issues, the rapid development of nanotechnology and its potentially profound social and environmental impacts, add a sense of urgency to the problems that arise. PMID:17166777

  17. Final Report of “Collaborative research: Fundamental science of low temperature plasma-biological material interactions” (Award# DE-SC0005105)

    SciTech Connect

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Seog, Joonil; Graves, David; Chu, J. -W.

    2014-09-24

    temperature plasma sources with modified geometry where radical induced interactions generally dominate due to short mean free paths of ions and VUV photons. In these conditions we demonstrated the importance of environmental interactions of plasma species when APP sources are used to modify biomolecules. This is evident from both gas phase characterization data and in-situ surface characterization of treated biomolecules. Environmental interactions can produce unexpected outcomes due to the complex reactions of reactive species with the atmosphere which determine the composition of reactive fluxes and atomistic changes in biomolecules. Overall, this work elucidated a richer spectrum of scientific opportunities and challenges for the field of low temperature plasma-biomolecule surface interactions than initially anticipated, in particular, for plasma sources operating at atmospheric pressure. The insights produced in this work, e.g. demonstration of the importance of environmental interactions, are generally important for applications of APP to materials modifications. Thus one major contributions of this research has been the establishment of methodologies to study the interaction of plasma with bio-molecules in a systemic and rigorous manner. In particular, our studies of atmospheric pressure plasma sources using very well-defined experimental conditions enabled us to correlate atomistic surface modifications of biomolecules with changes in their biological function. The clarification of the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in deactivation of biomolecules during low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasma-biomolecule interaction has broad implications, e.g. for the emerging field of plasma medicine. The development of methods to detect the effects of plasma treatment on immune-active biomolecules will lay a fundamental foundation to enhance our understanding of the effect of plasma on biological systems. be helpful in many future studies.

  18. Reconstructing the infected aortic root with antibiotic impregnated biological glue.

    PubMed

    McGiffin, David C; Davies, James E; Kirklin, James K

    2014-05-01

    Prosthetic valve dehiscence and persistent infection are two complications following reconstruction of the aortic root in destructive endocarditis. A technique is described involving the principles of aggressive debridement, closure of large abscess cavities with biological material incorporating a slurry of antibiotic-impregnated biological sealant, and replacement of the aortic valve with an aortic allograft valve. This strategy appears to have been successful in preventing persistent endocarditis and valve dehiscence in a limited number of patients. PMID:24433228

  19. Biological Threats

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thunderstorms & Lightning Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may ...

  20. Biological applications of nanoscale materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chi-Hui

    2007-12-01

    The objective of my research work is to synthesize, characterize, design, and apply nanocrystals for biomedical use. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized in the presence of chitosan via reduction of HAuCl4 with sodium borohydride. The average particle size of gold nanoparticles was significantly affected with the concentration of chitosan added and was ranged between 5 and 30 nm. The gold-chitosan nanocomposites were formed by adsorbing chitosan molecules on the gold nanoparticles. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were prepared by a solution phase synthetic method. A new route for the phase transfer of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots from non-polar solvents into aqueous solution was developed using hydrophobically modified polysaccharides, both chitosan and alginate. In addition, it was shown that CdSe/ZnS based polysaccharide nanoparticles effectively inhibited the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3 in vitro. The findings suggest that CdSe/ZnS quantum dot based polysaccharide nanoparticles not only act as a long-term biomarker but also have potential value in cancer therapy. A novel method for extracting magnetite nanoparticles from magnetotactic bacteria was developed by using co-surfactant. The problem of mass cultivation was solved by growing AMB-1 in Ca2+-alginate microbeads. To apply magnetotactic bacterial in biomedical applications, uptake of chitosan-capped CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on magnetotactic bacteria and introducing fluorescent magnetotactic bacteria into mouse macrophage cells was achieved. A general strategy is described which allows for constructing multifunctional magnetic nanocomposites based on bacterial magnetite nanoparticles. Specifically, core-shell structures of bacterial magnetite-CdSe ZnS and bacterial magnetite-gold nanocomplexes have been built in this way. Furthermore, design and synthesis multimodal contrast agents which are ultrasound and photoacoustic active are achieved by utilizing biocompatible gold nanorods self assembling on liquid perfluorocarbon particles. The probe is likely to provide richer information for a better understanding of the target and subsequent diagnosis. In summary, nanocrystals including gold, CdSe ZnS quantum dots, and bacterial magnetite and nanocomplexes including bacterial magnetite-quantum dots, bacterial magnetite-gold, gold-perfluorocarbon, quantum dots-chitosan, and quantum dots-alginate were successful synthesized. Some potential applications of these nanoparticles and nanocomplexes in biomedical engineering are explored.

  1. An Evaluative Study of Some Supplementary Free and Inexpensive Materials Available for Use By Middle-Grade Classrooms Involved in Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielke, Sandra Lee

    In an effort to determine the "how, what, when, and intent" of outdoor education, this brief report is based upon a survey of available free and inexpensive instructional materials relative to middle-grade outdoor education. A review of pertinent literature is presented and some analyzation is provided relative to the factors and rationale…

  2. The use of personal data from medical records and biological materials: ethical perspectives and the basis for legal restrictions in health research.

    PubMed

    Regidor, Enrique

    2004-11-01

    This paper discusses the moral justification for using personal data without informed consent, from both medical records and biological materials, in research where subjects are not physically present in the study and will never have any contact with the study investigators. Although the idea of waiving the requirement for informed consent in certain investigations has been mentioned in several ethical guidelines formulated by epidemiologists and physicians since the late 1980s, these guidelines are now of limited use due to legal restrictions on the use of personal data in most western countries. Several misconceptions that form the basis for legal restriction of health research are discussed: lack of knowledge of the need to link personal information from health services with personal information produced outside the health system in many biomedical investigations; the assumption of a deterministic model of disease causation in which the prediction of disease occurrence is based on a genetic association despite the fact that most genotypes for common diseases are incompletely penetrant; the lack of a logical rationale for the recommendation in the Declaration of Helsinki that only research that offers some benefit to study subjects is justified; the great lack of knowledge about research methodology revealed in some alternatives proposed to avoid using personal data; and the lack of a debate about the ethical double standard of institutions and investigators in countries that prohibit the use of personal data but finance and carry out studies in other countries where it is permitted. PMID:15312931

  3. Simultaneous determination of macro and trace elements in biological reference materials by microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry with slurry sample introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Golik, Bartosz

    2004-05-01

    A slurry sampling technique (SST) has been utilized for simultaneous multi-element analysis by microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES). Slurry samples from a spray chamber are fed directly into the microwave cavity-torch assembly (power 300 W) with no desolvation apparatus. The performance of SST-MIP-OES was demonstrated by the determination of macro (Na, K, Ca, Mg, P) and trace (Cd, Cu, Mn, Sr, Zn) elements in three biological certified reference materials using a V-groove, clog-free Babington-type nebulizer. Slurry concentrations up to 1% m/v (particles <20 μm), prepared in 10% HNO 3 (pH 1.2) containing 0.01% of Triton X-100, were used with calibration by the standard additions method. The method offers relatively good precision (R.S.D. ranged from 7 to 11%) with measured concentrations being in satisfactory agreement with certified values for NRCC TORT-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas), NRCC LUTS-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas) and IAEA-153 (Milk powder). The concentrations of Na, K, Ca, Mg, P and Cd, Cu, Mn, Sr, Zn were determined in the range 90-22 000 μg/g and 1-420 μg/g, respectively. The method could be useful as a routine procedure.

  4. The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR): a model organism database providing a centralized, curated gateway to Arabidopsis biology, research materials and community.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Seung Yon; Beavis, William; Berardini, Tanya Z; Chen, Guanghong; Dixon, David; Doyle, Aisling; Garcia-Hernandez, Margarita; Huala, Eva; Lander, Gabriel; Montoya, Mary; Miller, Neil; Mueller, Lukas A; Mundodi, Suparna; Reiser, Leonore; Tacklind, Julie; Weems, Dan C; Wu, Yihe; Xu, Iris; Yoo, Daniel; Yoon, Jungwon; Zhang, Peifen

    2003-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely-studied plant today. The concerted efforts of over 11 000 researchers and 4000 organizations around the world are generating a rich diversity and quantity of information and materials. This information is made available through a comprehensive on-line resource called the Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) (http://arabidopsis.org), which is accessible via commonly used web browsers and can be searched and downloaded in a number of ways. In the last two years, efforts have been focused on increasing data content and diversity, functionally annotating genes and gene products with controlled vocabularies, and improving data retrieval, analysis and visualization tools. New information include sequence polymorphisms including alleles, germplasms and phenotypes, Gene Ontology annotations, gene families, protein information, metabolic pathways, gene expression data from microarray experiments and seed and DNA stocks. New data visualization and analysis tools include SeqViewer, which interactively displays the genome from the whole chromosome down to 10 kb of nucleotide sequence and AraCyc, a metabolic pathway database and map tool that allows overlaying expression data onto the pathway diagrams. Finally, we have recently incorporated seed and DNA stock information from the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC) and implemented a shopping-cart style on-line ordering system. PMID:12519987

  5. Emergency physicians and biological terrorism.

    PubMed

    Richards, C F; Burstein, J L; Waeckerle, J F; Hutson, H R

    1999-08-01

    Recent developments, such as the bombings of the World Trade Center in 1993 and the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in 1995, the sarin attacks in Tokyo and Matsumoto, Japan, and US Embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998, have heightened fears of terrorist attacks. Future terrorist activities will continue to involve bombs and firearms, but may also include weapons of mass destruction, including biological agents. Recent US government initiatives have recognized the threats to our country from these weapons and have funded planning and response programs. These preparedness programs are being built on existing infrastructure of EMS and fire services' plans for hazardous materials response. Appropriate emergency department and hospital response, guided by public health principles, could significantly limit the morbidity and mortality of biological warfare agents. Inappropriate response by the medical community may worsen a chaotic and potentially devastating situation. This article discusses planning and response issues central to a potential bioterrorism event. PMID:10424920

  6. Optical recognition of biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Chris W.; Linder, Kim Dalton; Trujillo, Josh J.

    2008-04-01

    Differentiation between particulate biological agents and non-biological agents is typically performed via a time-consuming "wet chemistry" process or through the use of fluorescent and spectroscopic analysis. However, while these methods can provide definitive recognition of biological agents, many of them have to be performed in a laboratory environment, or are difficult to implement in the field. Optical recognition techniques offer an additional recognition approach that can provide rapid analysis of a material in-situ to identify those materials that may be biological in nature. One possible application is to use these techniques to "screen" suspicious materials and to identify those that are potentially biological in nature. Suspicious materials identified by this screening process can then be analyzed in greater detail using the other, more definitive (but time consuming) analysis techniques. This presentation will describe the results of a feasibility study to determine whether optical pattern recognition techniques can be used to differentiate biological related materials from non-biological materials. As part of this study, feature extraction algorithms were developed utilizing multiple contrast and texture based features to characterize the macroscopic properties of different materials. In addition, several pattern recognition approaches using these features were tested including cluster analysis and neural networks. Test materials included biological agent simulants, biological agent related materials, and non-biological materials (suspicious white powders). Results of a series of feasibility tests will be presented along with a discussion of the potential field applications for these techniques.

  7. Combinational pixel-by-pixel and object-level classifying, segmenting, and agglomerating in performing quantitative image analysis that distinguishes between healthy non-cancerous and cancerous cell nuclei and delineates nuclear, cytoplasm, and stromal material objects from stained biological tissue materials

    DOEpatents

    Boucheron, Laura E

    2013-07-16

    Quantitative object and spatial arrangement-level analysis of tissue are detailed using expert (pathologist) input to guide the classification process. A two-step method is disclosed for imaging tissue, by classifying one or more biological materials, e.g. nuclei, cytoplasm, and stroma, in the tissue into one or more identified classes on a pixel-by-pixel basis, and segmenting the identified classes to agglomerate one or more sets of identified pixels into segmented regions. Typically, the one or more biological materials comprises nuclear material, cytoplasm material, and stromal material. The method further allows a user to markup the image subsequent to the classification to re-classify said materials. The markup is performed via a graphic user interface to edit designated regions in the image.

  8. The application of SRF vs. RDF classification and specifications to the material flows of two mechanical-biological treatment plants of Rome: Comparison and implications.

    PubMed

    Di Lonardo, Maria Chiara; Franzese, Maurizio; Costa, Giulia; Gavasci, Renato; Lombardi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This work assessed the quality in terms of solid recovered fuel (SRF) definitions of the dry light flow (until now indicated as refuse derived fuel, RDF), heavy rejects and stabilisation rejects, produced by two mechanical biological treatment plants of Rome (Italy). SRF classification and specifications were evaluated first on the basis of RDF historical characterisation methods and data and then applying the sampling and analytical methods laid down by the recently issued SRF standards. The results showed that the dry light flow presented a worst SRF class in terms of net calorific value applying the new methods compared to that obtained from RDF historical data (4 instead of 3). This lead to incompliance with end of waste criteria established by Italian legislation for SRF use as co-fuel in cement kilns and power plants. Furthermore, the metal contents of the dry light flow obtained applying SRF current methods proved to be considerably higher (although still meeting SRF specifications) compared to those resulting from historical data retrieved with RDF standard methods. These differences were not related to a decrease in the quality of the dry light flow produced in the mechanical-biological treatment plants but rather to the different sampling procedures set by the former RDF and current SRF standards. In particular, the shredding of the sample before quartering established by the latter methods ensures that also the finest waste fractions, characterised by higher moisture and metal contents, are included in the sample to be analysed, therefore affecting the composition and net calorific value of the waste. As for the reject flows, on the basis of their SRF classification and specification parameters, it was found that combined with the dry light flow they may present similar if not the same class codes as the latter alone, thus indicating that these material flows could be also treated in combustion plants instead of landfilled. In conclusion, the

  9. Development of Research Infrastructure in Nevada for the Exploitation of Hyperspectral Image Data to Address Proliferation and Detection of Chemical and Biological Materials.

    SciTech Connect

    James V. Taranik

    2007-12-31

    This research was to exploit hyperspectral reflectance imaging technology for the detection and mapping variability (clutter) of the natural background against which gases in the atmosphere are imaged. The natural background consists of landscape surface cover composed of consolidated rocks, unconsolidated rock weathering products, soils, coatings on rock materials, vegetation, water, materials constructed by humans, and mixtures of the above. Human made gases in the atmosphere may indicate industrial processes important to detecting non-nuclear chemical and biological proliferation. Our research was to exploit the Visible and Near-Infrared (NIR) and the Short-wave Infrared (SWIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum to determine the properties of solid materials on the earth’s surface that could influence the detection of gases in the Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR). We used some new experimental hyperspectral imaging technologies to collect data over the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Center (NPTEC) located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The SpecTIR HyperSpecTIR (HST) and Specim Dual hyperspectral sensors were used to understand the variability in the imaged background (clutter), that detected, measured, identified and mapped with operational commercial hyperspectral techniques. The HST sensors were determined to be more experimental than operational because of problems with radiometric and atmospheric data correction. However the SpecTIR Dual system, developed by Specim in Finland, eventually was found to provide cost-effective hyperspectral image data collection and it was possible to correct the Dual system’s data for specific areas. Batch processing of long flightlines was still complex, and if comparison to laboratory spectra was desired, the Dual system data still had to be processed using the empirical line method. This research determined that 5-meter spatial resolution was adequate for mapping natural background variations. Furthermore, this

  10. Mother Involvement as an Influence on Father Involvement with Early Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pleck, Joseph H.; Hofferth, Sandra L.

    2009-01-01

    This study hypothesized that father involvement is influenced by mothers' level of involvement as well as by marital conflict, mothers' work hours, and fathers' status as biological or step father. The analysis also tested hypotheses about mother involvement as a potential mediator of the effects of marital conflict and maternal work hours on father involvement, and hypotheses about factors influencing mother involvement. Children aged 10-14 from the NLSY79 who resided with their biological or step father and with their mother reported on each parent's involvement with them. As hypothesized, father involvement was predicted by mother involvement, and the reciprocal influence was not significant. Father involvement was associated with low marital conflict and being a biological father. Mothers' involvement partially mediated the effects of marital conflict on father involvement. If the mediating role of maternal involvement is not taken into account, the effect of marital conflict on father involvement is overestimated. PMID:21776195

  11. Biology 100-A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pensacola Junior Coll., FL.

    This publication is the course guide book for a one-semester, non-laboratory junior college course in biology. Included for each topic are lesson objectives, learning materials, and discussion ideas for seminar groups. Topics include the organization of life, heredity, reproduction, the meaning of biology to modern man, and homeostasis and…

  12. Designing synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2014-03-21

    Synthetic biology is frequently defined as the application of engineering design principles to biology. Such principles are intended to streamline the practice of biological engineering, to shorten the time required to design, build, and test synthetic gene networks. This streamlining of iterative design cycles can facilitate the future construction of biological systems for a range of applications in the production of fuels, foods, materials, and medicines. The promise of these potential applications as well as the emphasis on design has prompted critical reflection on synthetic biology from design theorists and practicing designers from many fields, who can bring valuable perspectives to the discipline. While interdisciplinary connections between biologists and engineers have built synthetic biology via the science and the technology of biology, interdisciplinary collaboration with artists, designers, and social theorists can provide insight on the connections between technology and society. Such collaborations can open up new avenues and new principles for research and design, as well as shed new light on the challenging context-dependence-both biological and social-that face living technologies at many scales. This review is inspired by the session titled "Design and Synthetic Biology: Connecting People and Technology" at Synthetic Biology 6.0 and covers a range of literature on design practice in synthetic biology and beyond. Critical engagement with how design is used to shape the discipline opens up new possibilities for how we might design the future of synthetic biology. PMID:24156739

  13. Issues involved in a Martian sample return: Integrity preservation and the Curation and Analysis Planning Team for Extraterrestrial Materials (CAPTEM) position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Clive R.

    2000-09-01

    Returning geological samples from Mars is the next logical step as part of an integrated exploration program and is the critical subsequent stage in the search for evidence of life on the red planet. Analysis of such samples on Earth will generally produce data of superior accuracy and precision than can be accomplished in situ on the Martian surface, and such data will be invaluable in providing ground truth for remotely sensed observations. However, obtaining meaningful data requires that the samples returned to Earth suffer little (or preferably no) compositional or morphological changes during collection on Mars, transit to Earth, entry into Earth's atmosphere, impact on the surface, and long-term curation. This paper presents recommendations from NASA's committee for Curation and Analysis Planning Team for Extraterrestrial Materials (CAPTEM) for preserving the integrity of Martian samples during a return mission. Potential contaminants include dead bacteria on the outbound spacecraft and materials that come into contact with the samples during collection and storage. Therefore it is recommended that the spacecraft be sterilized and cleaned at least to Pathfinder standards, with the components that interact with the samples having a higher degree of cleanliness. Furthermore, it is recommended that only pure, homogeneous materials should be used for components that come into contact with the samples. The adverse effects of temperature on the samples are explored, and it is demonstrated that heat sterilization or undue temperature increases in transit or reentry have the potential to destroy important mineralogical and geochemical information. Concomitant with this will be degassing of the samples and stable isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is recommended that samples be kept at 240 K or below during transit, reentry, and curation. It is further recommended that heat sterilization not be used, except in extreme circumstances, and other sterilization

  14. Biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes allow life as we know it to exist. They form cells and enable separation between the inside and outside of an organism, controlling by means of their selective permeability which substances enter and leave. By allowing gradients of ions to be created across them, membranes also enable living organisms to generate energy. In addition, they control the flow of messages between cells by sending, receiving and processing information in the form of chemical and electrical signals. This essay summarizes the structure and function of membranes and the proteins within them, and describes their role in trafficking and transport, and their involvement in health and disease. Techniques for studying membranes are also discussed. PMID:26504250

  15. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. PMID:23790592

  16. Possible involvement of the A/sup 20/-A/sup 21/ peptide bond in the expression of the biological activity of insulin. 2. (21-Asparagine diethylamide-A)insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.C.; Burke, G.T.; Chanley, J.D.; Katsoyannis, P.G.

    1987-11-03

    The authors have synthesized (21-asparagine diethylamide-A)insulin, which differs from the parent molecule in that the free carboxyl group of the C-terminal amino acid residue, asparagine, of the A chain moiety has been converted to a diethylamide group. The analogue displays equivalent potency in receptor binding and biological activity, 48% and 56%, respectively, relative to bovine insulin. In contrast, they have reported previously that (21-asparaginamide-A)insulin exhibits a divergence in these properties, ca. 60% in receptor binding and ca. 13% in biological activity. The disparity in the biological behavior of these analogues is discussed, and we ascribe the modulation of biological activity independent of receptor binding activity observed between these analogues to the difference in the negativity of the carbonyl oxygen of the A chain moiety C-terminal amino acid residue.

  17. Toward the complete utilization of rice straw: Methane fermentation and lignin recovery by a combinational process involving mechanical milling, supporting material and nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kengo; Okamoto, Mami; Shirai, Tomokazu; Tsuge, Yota; Fujino, Ayami; Sasaki, Daisuke; Morita, Masahiko; Matsuda, Fumio; Kikuchi, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Rice straw was mechanically milled using a process consuming 1.9MJ/kg-biomass, and 10g/L of unmilled or milled rice straw was used as the carbon source for methane fermentation in a digester containing carbon fiber textile as the supporting material. Milling increased methane production from 226 to 419mL/L/day at an organic loading rate of 2180mg-dichromate chemical oxygen demand/L/day, corresponding to 260mLCH4/gVS. Storage of the fermentation effluent at room temperature decreased the weight of the milled rice straw residue from 3.81 to 1.00g/L. The supernatant of the effluent was subjected to nanofiltration. The black concentrates deposited on the nanofiltration membranes contained 53.0-57.9% lignin. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance showed that lignin aromatic components such as p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) were retained primarily, and major lignin interunit structures such as the β-O-4-H/G unit were absent. This combinational process will aid the complete utilization of rice straw. PMID:27318161

  18. Understanding Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Almost everything people have ever done has involved materials. Historical evidence indicates that "engineered materials" have been available and utilized for the benefit of humankind since the Neolithic period, beginning about 10,000 BC. Some of these materials have been in existence for thousands of years. At first, materials consisted of wood,…

  19. Biological Technicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important ... Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important ...

  20. Biologically Inspired Purification and Dispersion of SWCNTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S.; Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    A biologically inspired method has been developed for (1) separating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from other materials (principally, amorphous carbon and metal catalysts) in raw production batches and (2) dispersing the SWCNTs as individual particles (in contradistinction to ropes and bundles) in suspension, as required for a number of applications. Prior methods of purification and dispersal of SWCNTs involve, variously, harsh physical processes (e.g., sonication) or harsh chemical processes (e.g., acid reflux). These processes do not completely remove the undesired materials and do not disperse bundles and ropes into individual suspended SWCNTs. Moreover, these processes cut long SWCNTs into shorter pieces, yielding typical nanotube lengths between 150 and 250 nm. In contrast, the present method does not involve harsh physical or chemical processes. The method involves the use of biologically derived dispersal agents (BDDAs) in an aqueous solution that is mechanically homogenized (but not sonicated) and centrifuged. The dense solid material remaining after centrifugation is resuspended by vortexing in distilled water, yielding an aqueous suspension of individual, separated SWCNTs having lengths from about 10 to about 15 microns.