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Sample records for biological nutrient removal

  1. Biological nutrient removal from dairy wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Danalewich, J.R.; Papagiannis, T.G.; Gerards, R.; Vriens, L.; Belyea, R.; Tumbleson, M.E.; Raskin, L.

    1998-07-01

    The authors developed a synthetic wastewater which closely represents actual milk processing wastewater. The design of this synthetic wastewater was facilitated by the collection of composite wastewater samples from 15 milk processing plants in the Upper Midwest. These samples, milk, and milk products were analyzed for various chemical parameters. Based on these results, they diluted evaporated milk and cottage cheese, as well as a number of dry chemicals to create a synthetic wastewater. The concentrations in the resulting synthetic wastewater matched average concentrations of 15 composite wastewater samples. Four continuous-flow activated sludge treatment systems are currently being operated to evaluate biological nutrient removal using this synthetic wastewater as an influent.

  2. Nutrient release, recovery and removal from waste sludge of a biological nutrient removal system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Pei, Li-Ying; Ke, Li; Peng, Dang-Cong; Xia, Si-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of nutrients from waste sludge results in nitrogen and phosphorus overloading in wastewater treatment plants when supernatant is returned to the inlet. A controlled release, recovery and removal of nutrient from the waste sludge of a Biological Nutrient Removal system (BNR) are investigated. Results showed that the supernatant was of high mineral salt, high electrical conductivity and poor biodegradability, in addition to high nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations after the waste sludge was hydrolysed through sodium dodecyl sulphate addition. Subsequently, over 91.8% of phosphorus and 10.5% of nitrogen in the supernatants were extracted by the crystallization method under the conditions of 9.5 pH and 400 rpm. The precipitate was mainly struvite according to X-ray diffraction and morphological examination. A multistage anoxic-oxic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) was then adopted to remove the residual carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in the supernatant. The MBBR exhibited good performance in simultaneously removing carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus under a short aeration time, which accounted for 31.25% of a cycle. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that nitrifiers presented mainly in floc, although higher extracellular polymeric substance content, especially DNA, appeared in the biofilm. Thus, a combination of hydrolysis and precipitation, followed by the MBBR, can complete the nutrient release from the waste sludge of a BNR system, recovers nutrients from the hydrolysed liquor and removes nutrients from leftovers effectively. PMID:25176308

  3. Biological nutrient removal from municipal and industrial wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Udomsinrot, K.

    1985-01-01

    Biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal has received considerable interest in recent years. Basic benefits reported for biological nutrients removal include monetary savings through reduced aeration capacity, and the obviated expense for chemical treatment. A suspended growth biological treatment process was designed and operated to achieve high removals of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus from municipal and industrial wastewaters without the addition of chemicals; and to develop the biological kinetic coefficients of nutrient removal. The process utilized anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic reactor sequence with sludge return. The influent and return sludge were mixed into the first reactor. In this reactor and anoxic condition was maintained due to high nitrate and DO in the returned sludge. Sixty to eighty percent total nitrogen removal was achieved in this reactor. The contents were continuously discharged into the second reactor that maintained anerobic conditions. Under constant mixing and anaerobic environment complete release of phosphorus occurred as orthophosphate. The flow from the anaerobic reactor was continuously released into the third reactor that maintained aerobic condition. In the third reactor, high removal of carbonaceous material, high-rate biological nitrification, and high soluble phosphate removal occurred.

  4. Enhancing aerobic granulation for biological nutrient removal from domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Coma, M; Verawaty, M; Pijuan, M; Yuan, Z; Bond, P L

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the enhancement of aerobic granulation and biological nutrient removal maintenance treating domestic wastewater. Two sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were inoculated with either only floccular sludge (100%-floc SBR) or supplemented with 10% crushed granules (90%-floc SBR). Granules developed in both reactors. The 100%-floc SBR achieved 75% of nitrogen and 93% of phosphorus removal at the end of the performance, but some floccular sludge remained in the system. The 90%-floc SBR became fully granulated and finished with 84% and 99% of nitrogen and phosphorus removal, respectively. Regarding biological phosphorus removal, nitrite was identified as an inhibitor of the process. Nitrite levels lower than 5 mg N-NO2-L(-1) were used for anoxic phosphate uptake while higher concentrations inhibited the process. PMID:22050837

  5. Characteristics of Biological Nitrogen Removal in a Multiple Anoxic and Aerobic Biological Nutrient Removal Process

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huoqing; Guan, Yuntao; Li, Li; Wu, Guangxue

    2015-01-01

    Two sequencing batch reactors, one with the conventional anoxic and aerobic (AO) process and the other with the multiple AO process, were operated to examine characteristics of biological nitrogen removal, especially of the multiple AO process. The long-term operation showed that the total nitrogen removal percentage of the multiple AO reactor was 38.7% higher than that of the AO reactor. In the multiple AO reactor, at the initial SBR cycle stage, due to the occurrence of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, no nitrite and/or nitrate were accumulated. In the multiple AO reactor, activities of nitrite oxidizing bacteria were inhibited due to the multiple AO operating mode applied, resulting in the partial nitrification. Denitrifiers in the multiple AO reactor mainly utilized internal organic carbon for denitrification, and their activities were lower than those of denitrifiers in the AO reactor utilizing external organic carbon. PMID:26491676

  6. Effects of Sludge Retention Times on Nutrient Removal and Nitrous Oxide Emission in Biological Nutrient Removal Processes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Wu, Guangxue

    2014-01-01

    Sludge retention time (SRT) is an important factor affecting not only the performance of the nutrient removal and sludge characteristics, but also the production of secondary pollutants such as nitrous oxide (N2O) in biological nutrient removal (BNR) processes. Four laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), namely, SBR5, SBR10, SBR20 and SBR40 with the SRT of 5 d, 10 d, 20 d and 40 d, respectively, were operated to examine effects of SRT on nutrient removal, activated sludge characteristics and N2O emissions. The removal of chemical oxygen demand or total phosphorus was similar under SRTs of 5–40 d, SRT mainly affected the nitrogen removal and the optimal SRT for BNR was 20 d. The molecular weight distribution of the effluent organic matters was in the range of 500–3,000 Da under SRTs of 5–40 d. The lowest concentration of the effluent soluble microbial products concentration was obtained at the SRT of 5 d. Nitrifier growth was limited at a short SRT and nitrite existed in the effluent of SBR5. With increasing SRTs, mixed liquor suspended solids concentration increased while the excess sludge production was reduced due to the high endogenous decay rate at high SRTs. Endogenous decay coefficients were 0.020 d−1, 0.036 d−1, 0.037 d−1 and 0.039 d−1 under SRTs of 5–40 d, respectively. In BNR, the N2O emission occurred mainly during the aerobic phase and its emission ratio decreased with increasing SRTs. The ratio between the N2O-N emission and the removed ammonium nitrogen in the aerobic phase was 5%, 3%, 1.8% and 0.8% at the SRT of 5 d, 10 d, 20 d and 40 d, respectively. With low concentrations of dissolved oxygen and high concentrations of oxidized nitrogen, the N2O emission was significantly accelerated due to heterotrophic denitrification activities. PMID:24681555

  7. Biological nutrient removal in a sequencing batch reactor operated as oxic/anoxic/extended-idle regime.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-ming; Chen, Hong-bo; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dong-bo; Luo, Kun; Zeng, Guang-ming

    2014-06-01

    Previous researches have demonstrated that biological phosphorus removal from wastewater could be induced by oxic/extended-idle (O/EI) regime. In this study, an anoxic period was introduced after the aeration to realize biological nutrient removal. High nitrite accumulation ratio and polyhydroxyalkanoates biosynthesis were obtained in the aeration and biological nutrient removal could be well achieved in oxic/anoxic/extended-idle (O/A/EI) regime for the wastewater used. In addition, nitrogen and phosphorus removal performance in O/A/EI regime was compared with that in conventional anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic (A(2)/O) and O/EI processes. The results showed that O/A/EI regime exhibited higher nitrogen and phosphorus removal than A(2)/O and O/EI processes. More ammonium oxidizing bacteria and polyphosphate accumulating organisms and less glycogen accumulating organisms containing in the biomass might be the principal reason for the better nitrogen and phosphorus removal in O/A/EI regime. Furthermore, biological nutrient removal with O/A/EI regime was demonstrated with municipal wastewater. The average TN, SOP and COD removal efficiencies were 93%, 95% and 87%, respectively. PMID:24393562

  8. Recent advances in nutrient removal and recovery in biological and bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Nancharaiah, Y V; Venkata Mohan, S; Lens, P N L

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorous are key pollutants in wastewater to be removed and recovered for sustainable development. Traditionally, nitrogen removal is practiced through energy intensive biological nitrification and denitrification entailing a major cost in wastewater treatment. Recent innovations in nitrogen removal aim at reducing energy requirements and recovering ammonium nitrogen. Bioelectrochemical systems (BES) are promising for recovering ammonium nitrogen from nitrogen rich waste streams (urine, digester liquor, swine liquor, and landfill leachate) profitably. Phosphorus is removed from the wastewater in the form of polyphosphate granules by polyphosphate accumulating organisms. Alternatively, phosphorous is removed/recovered as Fe-P or struvite through chemical precipitation (iron or magnesium dosing). In this article, recent advances in nutrients removal from wastewater coupled to recovery are presented by applying a waste biorefinery concept. Potential capabilities of BES in recovering nitrogen and phosphorous are reviewed to spur future investigations towards development of nutrient recovery biotechnologies. PMID:27053446

  9. Enhancement of post-anoxic denitrification for biological nutrient removal: effect of different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-bo; Wang, Dong-bo; Li, Xiao-ming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guang-ming

    2015-04-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that post-anoxic denitrification and biological nutrient removal could be achieved in the oxic/anoxic/extended-idle wastewater treatment regime. This study further investigated the effect of different carbon sources on post-anoxic denitrification and biological nutrient removal. Acetate, propionate (volatile fatty acids (VFAs)), glucose (carbohydrate), methanol, and ethanol (alcohol) were used as the sole carbon source, respectively. The experimental results showed that VFA substrates led to an improvement in nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The total nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency values driven by acetate achieved 93 and 99%, respectively. In contrast, glucose present in mixed liquor deteriorated total nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency values to 72 and 54%. In the reactors cultured with methanol and ethanol, 66 and 63% of the total nitrogen were removed, and phosphorus removal efficiency values were 78 and 71%, respectively. The mechanism studies revealed that different carbon sources affected the transformations of intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and glycogen. PHAs are the dominant storages for microorganisms cultured with VFA substrates. Though glycogen is not the favorable energy and carbon source for polyphosphate-accumulating organisms, it can be consumed by microorganisms related to biological nitrogen removal and is able to serve as the electron donor for post-anoxic denitrification. PMID:25354439

  10. Effect of cycle changes on simultaneous biological nutrient removal in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Coma, M; Puig, S; Monclús, H; Balaguer, M D; Colprim, J

    2010-03-01

    The destabilization of a microbial population is sometimes hard to solve when different biological reactions are coupled in the same reactor as in sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). This paper will try to guide through practical experiences the recovery of simultaneous nitrogen and phosphorus removal in an SBR after increasing the demand of wastewater treatment by taking advantage of its flexibility. The results demonstrate that the length of phases and the optimization of influent distribution are key factors in stabilizing the system for long-term periods with high nutrient removal (88%, 93% and 99% of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively). In order to recover a biological nutrient removal (BNR) system, different interactions such as simultaneous nitrification and denitrification and also phosphorus removal must be taken into account. As a general conclusion, it can be stated there is no such thing as a perfect SBR operation, and that much will depend on the state of the BNR system. Hence, the SBR operating strategy must be based on a dynamic cycle definition in line with process efficiency. PMID:20426270

  11. Biological nutrient removal by internal circulation upflow sludge blanket reactor after landfill leachate pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Abood, Alkhafaji R; Bao, Jianguo; Abudi, Zaidun N

    2013-10-01

    The removal of biological nutrient from mature landfill leachate with a high nitrogen load by an internal circulation upflow sludge blanket (ICUSB) reactor was studied. The reactor is a set of anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic (A2/O) bioreactors, developed on the basis of an expended granular sludge blanket (EGSB), granular sequencing batch reactor (GSBR) and intermittent cycle extended aeration system (ICEAS). Leachate was subjected to stripping by agitation process and poly ferric sulfate coagulation as a pretreatment process, in order to reduce both ammonia toxicity to microorganisms and the organic contents. The reactor was operated under three different operating systems, consisting of recycling sludge with air (A2/O), recycling sludge without air (low oxygen) and a combination of both (A2/O and low oxygen). The lowest effluent nutrient levels were realised by the combined system of A2/O and low oxygen, which resulted in effluent of chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH3-N and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) concentrations of 98.20, 13.50 and 22.50 mg/L. The optimal operating conditions for the efficient removal of biological nutrient using the ICUSB reactor were examined to evaluate the influence of the parameters on its performance. The results showed that average removal efficiencies of COD and NH3-N of 96.49% and 99.39%, respectively were achieved under the condition of a hydraulic retention time of 12 hr, including 4 hr of pumping air into the reactor, with dissolved oxygen at an rate of 4 mg/L and an upflow velocity 2 m/hr. These combined processes were successfully employed and effectively decreased pollutant loading. PMID:24494501

  12. Source Separation of Urine as an Alternative Solution to Nutrient Management in Biological Nutrient Removal Treatment Plants.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Jose; Bott, Charles; Love, Nancy; Bratby, John

    2015-12-01

    Municipal wastewater contains a mixture of brown (feces and toilet paper), yellow (urine), and gray (kitchen, bathroom and wash) waters. Urine contributes approximately 70-80% of the nitrogen (N), 50-70% of the phosphorus (P) load and 60-70% of the pharmaceutical residues in normal domestic sewage. This study evaluated the impact of different levels of source separation of urine on an existing biological nutrient removal (BNR) process. A process model of an existing biological nutrient removal (BNR) plant was used. Increasing the amount of urine diverted from the water reclamation facilities, has little impact on effluent ammonia (NH₃-N) concentration, but effluent nitrate (NO₃-N) concentration decreases. If nitrification is necessary then no reduction in the sludge age can be realized. However, a point is reached where the remaining influent nitrogen load matches the nitrogen requirements for biomass growth, and no residual nitrogen needs to be nitrified. That allows a significant reduction in sludge age, implying reduced process volume requirements. In situations where nitrification is required, lower effluent nitrate (NO₃-N) concentrations were realized due to both the lower influent nitrogen content in the wastewater and a more favorable nitrogen-to-carbon ratio for denitrification. The external carbon requirement for denitrification decreases as the urine separation efficiency increases due to the lower influent nitrogen content in the wastewater and a more favorable nitrogen-to-carbon ratio for denitrification. The effluent phosphorus concentration decreases when the amount of urine sent to water reclamation facilities is decreased due to lower influent phosphorus concentrations. In the case of chemical phosphate removal, urine separation reduces the amount of chemicals required. PMID:26652123

  13. Assessing biological and chemical signatures related to nutrient removal by floating islands in stormwater mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Islam, Kamrul; Marimon, Zachary; Wanielista, Martin P

    2012-07-01

    Aquatic floating plants on BioHaven mats were tested for their potential use as a Best Management Practice to be incorporated within existing stormwater detention ponds. Plants were analyzed for their capability to remove nutrient-pollution in parallel with the study of ecological dynamics. Experiments were carried out in cylindrical mesocosms of 5 m diameter and 1.2 m height, above-ground pools with a water volume of 14 m(3). The design parameters tested were for 5% and 10% vegetated floating island coverage of the mesocosm, both with and without shoreline plants called littoral zone. This littoral shelf was 0.5 m thick, graded at a downward slope of 1:5 toward the center using loamy soil with low organic matter content, excavated from below turf grass. Endemic plant species were chosen for the experimental location in central Florida based on a wetland identification manual by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to ensure the study was not compromised by unique climate requirements of the plants. Nutrient and aquatic chemical conditions such as pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, turbidity, and chlorophyll a were monitored to understand their relationships to the general wetland ecosystem. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis identified the microbial activity near the rhizospheric zone. Logistical placement considerations were made using spatial sampling across the horizontal plane of the mesocosms, beneath and around the root zone, to determine if nutrients tend to aggregate around the floating island. This study concluded that the application of floating islands as a stormwater technology can remove nutrients through plant uptake and biological activity. The most cost-effective size in the outdoor mesocosms was 5% surface area coverage of the mat. PMID:22587952

  14. Biological nutrient removal from leachate using a pilot liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (LSCFB).

    PubMed

    Eldyasti, Ahmed; Chowdhury, Nabin; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse

    2010-09-15

    Biological treatment of landfill leachate is a concern due to toxicity, high ammonia, low biodegradable organic matter concentrations, and low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. To study the reliability and commercial viability of leachate treatment using an integrated liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (LSCFB), a pilot-scale LSCFB was established at the Adelaide Pollution Control Plant, London, Ontario, Canada. Anoxic and aerobic columns were used to optimize carbon and nutrient removal capability from leachate using 600 microm lava rock with a total porosity of 61%, at empty bed contact times (EBCTs) of 0.55, 0.49, and 0.41 d. The LSCFB achieved COD, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal efficiencies of 85%, 80%, and 70%, respectively at a low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of 3:1 and nutrients loading rates of 2.15 kg COD/(m(3) d), 0.70 kg N/(m(3) d), and 0.014 kg P/(m(3) d), as compared with 60-77% COD and 70-79% nitrogen removal efficiencies achieved by upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and moving bed bioreactor (MBBR), respectively. The LSCFB effluent characterized by biological solids retention times (SRTs) of 31, 38 and 44 d. PMID:20510504

  15. Biological Nutrient Removal Model No. 2 (BNRM2): a general model for wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Barat, R; Serralta, J; Ruano, M V; Jiménez, E; Ribes, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the plant-wide model Biological Nutrient Removal Model No. 2 (BNRM2). Since nitrite was not considered in the BNRM1, and this previous model also failed to accurately simulate the anaerobic digestion because precipitation processes were not considered, an extension of BNRM1 has been developed. This extension comprises all the components and processes required to simulate nitrogen removal via nitrite and the formation of the solids most likely to precipitate in anaerobic digesters. The solids considered in BNRM2 are: struvite, amorphous calcium phosphate, hidroxyapatite, newberite, vivianite, strengite, variscite, and calcium carbonate. With regard to nitrogen removal via nitrite, apart from nitrite oxidizing bacteria two groups of ammonium oxidizing organisms (AOO) have been considered since different sets of kinetic parameters have been reported for the AOO present in activated sludge systems and SHARON (Single reactor system for High activity Ammonium Removal Over Nitrite) reactors. Due to the new processes considered, BNRM2 allows an accurate prediction of wastewater treatment plant performance in wider environmental and operating conditions. PMID:23552235

  16. Integrated side-stream reactor for biological nutrient removal and minimization of sludge production.

    PubMed

    Coma, M; Rovira, S; Canals, J; Colprim, J

    2015-01-01

    Integrated processes to reduce in situ the sludge production in wastewater treatment plants are gaining attention in order to facilitate excess sludge management. In contrast to post-treatments, such as anaerobic digestion which is placed between the activated sludge system and dewatering processes, integrated technologies are placed in the sludge return line. This study evaluates the application of an anoxic side-stream reactor (SSR) which creates a physiological shock and uncouples the biomass metabolism and diverts the activity from assimilation for biosynthesis to non-growth activities. The effect of this system in biological nutrient removal for both nitrogen and phosphorus was evaluated for the anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic reactors. The RedOx potential within the SSR was maintained at -150 mV while the sludge loading rate was modified by increasing the percentage of recycled activated sludge feed to the SSR (0 and 40% at laboratory scale and 0, 10, 50 and 100% at pilot scale). The use of the SSR presented a slight reduction of phosphorus removal but maintained the effluent quality to the required discharge values. Nitrogen removal efficiency increased from 75 to 86% while reducing the sludge production rate by 18.3%. PMID:25860709

  17. Benchmarking biological nutrient removal in wastewater treatment plants: influence of mathematical model assumptions.

    PubMed

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Gernaey, Krist V; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of different model assumptions when describing biological nutrient removal (BNR) by the activated sludge models (ASM) 1, 2d & 3. The performance of a nitrogen removal (WWTP1) and a combined nitrogen and phosphorus removal (WWTP2) benchmark wastewater treatment plant was compared for a series of model assumptions. Three different model approaches describing BNR are considered. In the reference case, the original model implementations are used to simulate WWTP1 (ASM1 & 3) and WWTP2 (ASM2d). The second set of models includes a reactive settler, which extends the description of the non-reactive TSS sedimentation and transport in the reference case with the full set of ASM processes. Finally, the third set of models is based on including electron acceptor dependency of biomass decay rates for ASM1 (WWTP1) and ASM2d (WWTP2). The results show that incorporation of a reactive settler: (1) increases the hydrolysis of particulates; (2) increases the overall plant's denitrification efficiency by reducing the S(NOx) concentration at the bottom of the clarifier; (3) increases the oxidation of COD compounds; (4) increases X(OHO) and X(ANO) decay; and, finally, (5) increases the growth of X(PAO) and formation of X(PHA,Stor) for ASM2d, which has a major impact on the whole P removal system. Introduction of electron acceptor dependent decay leads to a substantial increase of the concentration of X(ANO), X(OHO) and X(PAO) in the bottom of the clarifier. The paper ends with a critical discussion of the influence of the different model assumptions, and emphasizes the need for a model user to understand the significant differences in simulation results that are obtained when applying different combinations of 'standard' models. PMID:22466599

  18. Biotransformation of trace organic compounds by activated sludge from a biological nutrient removal treatment system.

    PubMed

    Inyang, Mandu; Flowers, Riley; McAvoy, Drew; Dickenson, Eric

    2016-09-01

    The removal of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) and their biotransformation rates, kb (LgSS(-)(1)h(-)(1)) was investigated across different redox zones in a biological nutrient removal (BNR) system using an OECD batch test. Biodegradation kinetics of fourteen TOrCs with initial concentration of 1-36μgL(-)(1) in activated sludge were monitored over the course of 24h. Degradation kinetic behavior for the TOrCs fell into four groupings: Group 1 (atenolol) was biotransformed (0.018-0.22LgSS(-)(1)h(-)(1)) under anaerobic, anoxic, and aerobic conditions. Group 2 (meprobamate and trimethoprim) biotransformed (0.01-0.21LgSS(-)(1)h(-)(1)) under anoxic and aerobic conditions, Group 3 (DEET, gemfibrozil and triclosan) only biotransformed (0.034-0.26LgSS(-)(1)h(-)(1)) under aerobic conditions, and Group 4 (carbamazepine, primidone, sucralose and TCEP) exhibited little to no biotransformation (<0.001LgSS(-)(1)h(-)(1)) under any redox conditions. BNR treatment did not provide a barrier against Group 4 compounds. PMID:27309772

  19. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-products not only affected the transformation of nitrogen, phosphorus, poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), and glycogen in the BNR process, but also resulted in higher removal efficiencies for phosphorus and nitrogen compared with sodium acetate. Furthermore, assays for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (DPAOs) demonstrated that the proportion of DPAOs to PAOs reached 62.6% (Day 86) and 61.8% (Day 65) when using cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, respectively, as the external carbon source. In addition, the nitrate utilization rates (NURs) of the cassava by-products were in the range of 5.49-5.99 g N/(kg MLVSS⋅h) (MLVSS is mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) and 6.63-6.81 g N/(kg MLVSS⋅h), respectively. The improvement in BNR performance and the reduction in the amount of cassava stillage to be treated in-situ make cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid attractive alternatives to sodium acetate as external carbon sources for BNR processes. PMID:25845364

  20. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal*

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-products not only affected the transformation of nitrogen, phosphorus, poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), and glycogen in the BNR process, but also resulted in higher removal efficiencies for phosphorus and nitrogen compared with sodium acetate. Furthermore, assays for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (DPAOs) demonstrated that the proportion of DPAOs to PAOs reached 62.6% (Day 86) and 61.8% (Day 65) when using cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, respectively, as the external carbon source. In addition, the nitrate utilization rates (NURs) of the cassava by-products were in the range of 5.49–5.99 g N/(kg MLVSS∙h) (MLVSS is mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) and 6.63–6.81 g N/(kg MLVSS∙h), respectively. The improvement in BNR performance and the reduction in the amount of cassava stillage to be treated in-situ make cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid attractive alternatives to sodium acetate as external carbon sources for BNR processes. PMID:25845364

  1. Effect of free nitrous acid as inhibitors on nitrate reduction by a biological nutrient removal sludge.

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan; Yang, Qing; Wang, Shuying; Wang, Li; Takigawa, Akio; Peng, Yongzhen

    2010-03-15

    Nitrite has been commonly thought to have a broad inhibitory effect on bacterial metabolism. Little is known about the impact of nitrite on nitrate reduction with pH considered as an important factor. This study investigates the nitrite inhibition on nitrate reduction during denitrification under various pH conditions by using a biological nutrient removal (BNR) sludge. The results showed that nitrate reduction performance had a much stronger relationship with the free nitrous acid (FNA) than that of nitrite concentration, implying that FNA, rather than nitrite, is likely the real inhibitor on nitrate reduction. The nitrate reduction activity of the biomass was observed to be inhibited about 60% in the range of 0.01-0.025 mg HNO(2)-N/L and was totally inhibited when FNA level was greater than the threshold concentration (0.2mg HNO(2)-N/L). Moreover, the recovery rate from inhibitory effect was found to be dependent much more strongly on the concentration of FNA, of which the biomass was exposed to during the inhibition period, than on the duration of the inhibition and the feeding mode of inhibitor. It was also found that nitrite reduction was significantly inhibited by FNA and the nitrite reduction rate was linear to nitrate reduction rate due to the inhibitory mechanism under which FNA may react with the enzymes involved in the denitrification process. PMID:19910113

  2. Performance evaluation of a novel anaerobic-anoxic sludge blanket reactor for biological nutrient removal treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Díez-Montero, Rubén; De Florio, Loredana; González-Viar, Marta; Herrero, María; Tejero, Iñaki

    2016-06-01

    A novel anaerobic-anoxic sludge blanket reactor, AnoxAn, unifies the non-aerated zones of the biological nutrient removal treatment train in a single upflow reactor, aimed at achieving high compactness and efficiency. The environmental conditions are vertically divided up inside the reactor with the anaerobic zone at the bottom and the anoxic zone above. This contribution presents the performance evaluation of the novel reactor in the removal of organic matter and nutrients from municipal wastewater, coupled with an aerobic hybrid MBR. The overall system achieved total nitrogen and phosphorus removal with average efficiencies of 75% and 89%, respectively. Separate anoxic and anaerobic conditions were maintained in AnoxAn, allowing anaerobic phosphate release and nearly complete anoxic denitrification in the single reactor operating with an HRT of 4.2h. Biomass was retained in the reactor achieving TSS concentration up to 10gL(-1) and partial hydrolysis of influent particulate organic matter. PMID:26970922

  3. Impact of solids residence time on biological nutrient removal performance of membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ersu, Cagatayhan Bekir; Ong, Say Kee; Arslankaya, Ertan; Lee, Yong-Woo

    2010-05-01

    Impact of long solids residence times (SRTs) on nutrient removal was investigated using a submerged plate-frame membrane bioreactor with anaerobic and anoxic tanks. The system was operated at 10, 25, 50 and 75 days SRTs with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 2 h each for the anaerobic and anoxic tanks and 8 h for the oxic tank. Recirculation of oxic tank mixed liquor into the anaerobic tank and permeate into the anoxic tank were fixed at 100% each of the influent flow. For all SRTs, percent removals of soluble chemical oxygen demand were more than 93% and nitrification was more than 98.5% but total nitrogen percent removal seemed to peak at 81% at 50 days SRT while total phosphorus (TP) percent removal showed a deterioration from approximately 80% at 50 days SRT to 60% at 75 days SRT. Before calibrating the Biowin((R)) model to the experimental data, a sensitivity analysis of the model was conducted which indicated that heterotrophic anoxic yield, anaerobic hydrolysis factors of heterotrophs, heterotrophic hydrolysis, oxic endogenous decay rate for heterotrophs and oxic endogenous decay rate of PAOs had the most impact on predicted effluent TP concentration. The final values of kinetic parameters obtained in the calibration seemed to imply that nitrogen and phosphorus removal increased with SRT due to an increase in anoxic and anaerobic hydrolysis factors up to 50 days SRT but beyond that removal of phosphorus deteriorated due to high oxic endogenous decay rates. This indirectly imply that the decrease in phosphorus removal at 75 days SRT may be due to an increase in lysis of microbial cells at high SRTs along with the low food/microorganisms ratio as a result of high suspended solids in the oxic tank. Several polynomial correlations relating the various calibrated kinetic parameters with SRTs were derived. The Biowin((R)) model and the kinetic parameters predicted by the polynomial correlations were verified and found to predict well the effluent water quality

  4. Removal of organics and nutrients from food wastewater using combined thermophilic two-phase anaerobic digestion and shortcut biological nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fenghao; Lee, Seungho; Kim, Moonil

    2011-10-15

    A process combining pilot-scale two-phase anaerobic digestion and shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR) was developed to treat organics and nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from food wastewater. The thermophilic two-phase anaerobic digestion process was investigated without adjusting the pH of the wastewater for the pre-acidification process. The digested food wastewater was treated using the SBNR process without supplemental carbon sources or alkalinity. Under these circumstances, the combined system was able to remove about 99% of COD, 88% of TN, and 97% of TP. However, considerable amounts of nutrients were removed due to chemical precipitation processes between the anaerobic digestion and SBNR. The average TN removal efficiency of the SBNR process was about 74% at very low C/N (TCOD/TN) ratio of 2. The SBNR process removed about 39% of TP from the digested food wastewater. Conclusively, application of the combined system improved organic removal efficiency while producing valuable energy (biogas), removed nitrogen at a low C/N ratio, and conserved additional resources (carbon and alkalinity). PMID:21849203

  5. A novel approach to enhance biological nutrient removal using a culture supernatant from Micrococcus luteus containing resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) in SBR process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yindong; Su, Xiaomei; Lu, Lian; Ding, Linxian; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-03-01

    A culture supernatant from Micrococcus luteus containing resuscitation-promoting factor (SRpf) was used to enhance the biological nutrient removal of potentially functional bacteria. The obtained results suggest that SRpf accelerated the start-up process and significantly enhanced the biological nutrient removal in sequencing batch reactor (SBR). PO4 (3-)-P removal efficiency increased by over 12 % and total nitrogen removal efficiency increased by over 8 % in treatment reactor acclimated by SRpf compared with those without SRpf addition. The Illumina high-throughput sequencing analysis showed that SRpf played an essential role in shifts in the composition and diversity of bacterial community. The phyla of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, which were closely related to biological nutrient removal, were greatly abundant after SRpf addition. This study demonstrates that SRpf acclimation or addition might hold great potential as an efficient and cost-effective alternative for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to meet more stringent operation conditions and legislations. PMID:26514565

  6. Comparative modeling of biological nutrient removal from landfill leachate using a circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (CFBBR).

    PubMed

    Eldyasti, Ahmed; Andalib, Mehran; Hafez, Hisham; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse

    2011-03-15

    Steady state operational data from a pilot scale circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (CFBBR) during biological treatment of landfill leachate, at empty bed contact times (EBCTs) of 0.49, and 0.41 d and volumetric nutrients loading rates of 2.2-2.6 kg COD/(m(3)d), 0.7-0.8 kg N/(m(3)d), and 0.014-0.016 kg P/(m(3)d), was used to calibrate and compare developed process models in BioWin(®) and AQUIFAS(®). BioWin(®) and AQUIFAS(®) were both capable of predicting most of the performance parameters such as effluent TKN, NH(4)-N, NO(3)-N, TP, PO(4)-P, TSS, and VSS with an average percentage error (APE) of 0-20%. BioWin(®) underpredicted the effluent BOD and SBOD values for various runs by 80% while AQUIFAS(®) predicted effluent BOD and SBOD with an APE of 50%. Although both calibrated models, confirmed the advantages of the CFBBR technology in treating the leachate of high volumetric loading and low biomass yields due to the long solid retention time (SRT), both BioWin(®) and AQUIFAS(®) predicted the total biomass and SRT of CFBBR based on active biomass only, whereas in the CFBBR runs both active as well as inactive biomass accumulated. PMID:21255923

  7. Using sludge fermentation liquid to reduce the inhibitory effect of copper oxide nanoparticles on municipal wastewater biological nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Zheng, Xiong; Wan, Rui; Huang, Haining; Li, Mu; Wu, Lijuan

    2016-08-01

    The deterioration of biological nutrient removal (BNR) can occur with the release of engineering nanomaterials into wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Also, large amounts of waste sludge are generated in WWTPs, which can be reutilized as a useful resource. In this study, the use of sludge fermentation liquid to reduce CuO nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity to municipal wastewater BNR was reported. In the BNR system supplemented with sodium acetate, which was widely used as additional carbon source of municipal wastewater in literatures, the appearance of 2.5 mg/L CuO NPs for 5.5 h decreased the total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency from 81.4% to 59.0%, but the TN removal was recovered to 78.7% after sodium acetate was replaced by sludge fermentation liquid. It was found that CuO NPs induced excessive generation of reactive nitrogen species (RNS), which led to the disorder of redox status, low levels of energy and reduction equivalents generations, and deterioration of denitrification. Further investigation revealed that cysteine in fermentation liquid played a vital biological role in reducing nanotoxicity by facilitating the synthesis of glutathione, which reduced excessive RNS generation, increased key proteins expression, guaranteed the metabolisms of intracellular energy and substrate smoothly, and finally recovered the BNR performance. PMID:27161888

  8. Biological nutrients removal from the supernatant originating from the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Malamis, S; Katsou, E; Di Fabio, S; Bolzonella, D; Fatone, F

    2014-09-01

    This study critically evaluates the biological processes and techniques applied to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from the anaerobic supernatant produced from the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and from its co-digestion with other biodegradable organic waste (BOW) streams. The wide application of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of several organic waste streams results in the production of high quantities of anaerobic effluents. Such effluents are characterized by high nutrient content, because organic and particulate nitrogen and phosphorus are hydrolyzed in the anaerobic digestion process. Consequently, adequate post-treatment is required in order to comply with the existing land application and discharge legislation in the European Union countries. This may include physicochemical and biological processes, with the latter being more advantageous due to their lower cost. Nitrogen removal is accomplished through the conventional nitrification/denitrification, nitritation/denitritation and the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal process; the latter is accomplished by nitritation coupled with the anoxic ammonium oxidation process. As anaerobic digestion effluents are characterized by low COD/TKN ratio, conventional denitrification/nitrification is not an attractive option; short-cut nitrogen removal processes are more promising. Both suspended and attached growth processes have been employed to treat the anaerobic supernatant. Specifically, the sequencing batch reactor, the membrane bioreactor, the conventional activated sludge and the moving bed biofilm reactor processes have been investigated. Physicochemical phosphorus removal via struvite precipitation has been extensively examined. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal from the anaerobic supernatant can take place through the sequencing anaerobic/aerobic process. More recently, denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite or nitrate has been explored. The removal of

  9. Assessing the effects of silver nanoparticles on biological nutrient removal in bench-scale activated sludge sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Alito, Christina L; Gunsch, Claudia K

    2014-01-21

    Consumer products such as clothing and medical products are increasingly integrating silver and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) into base materials to serve as an antimicrobial agent. Thus, it is critical to assess the effects of AgNPs on wastewater microorganisms essential to biological nutrient removal. In the present study, pulse and continuous additions of 0.2 and 2 ppm gum arabic and citrate coated AgNPs as well as Ag as AgNO3 were fed into sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) inoculated with nitrifying sludge. Treatment efficiency (chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia removal), Ag dissolution measurements, and 16S rRNA bacterial community analyses (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, T-RFLP) were performed to evaluate the response of the SBRs to Ag addition. Results suggest that the AgNPs may have been precipitating in the SBRs. While COD and ammonia removal decreased by as much as 30% or greater directly after spikes, SBRs were able to recover within 24 h (3 hydraulic retention times (HRTs)) and resume removal near 95%. T-RFLP results indicate Ag spiked SBRs were similar in a 16s rRNA bacterial community. The results shown in this study indicate that wastewater treatment could be impacted by Ag and AgNPs in the short term but the amount of treatment disruption will depend on the magnitude of influent Ag. PMID:24364625

  10. Nutrient Removal in Wastewater Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Kanti L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the sources and effects of nutrients in wastewater, and the methods of their removal in wastewater treatment. In order to conserve water resources and eliminate the cost of nutrient removal, treated effluent should be used wherever possible for irrigation, since it contains all the ingredients for proper plant growth. (JR)

  11. Two-stage thermophilic-mesophilic anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge from a biological nutrient removal plant.

    PubMed

    Watts, S; Hamilton, G; Keller, J

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage thermophilic-mesophilic anaerobic digestion pilot-plant was operated solely on waste activated sludge (WAS) from a biological nutrient removal (BNR) plant. The first-stage thermophilic reactor (HRT 2 days) was operated at 47, 54 and 60 degrees C. The second-stage mesophilic digester (HRT 15 days) was held at a constant temperature of 36-37 degrees C. For comparison with a single-stage mesophilic process, the mesophilic digester was also operated separately with an HRT of 17 days and temperature of 36-37 degrees C. The results showed a truly thermophilic stage (60 degrees C) was essential to achieve good WAS degradation. The lower thermophilic temperatures examined did not offer advantages over single-stage mesophilic treatment in terms of COD and VS removal. At a thermophilic temperature of 60 degrees C, the plant achieved 35% VS reduction, representing a 46% increase compared to the single-stage mesophilic digester. This is a significant level of degradation which could make such a process viable in situations where there is no primary sludge generated. The fate of the biologically stored phosphorus in this BNR sludge was also investigated. Over 80% of the incoming phosphorus remained bound up with the solids and was not released into solution during the WAS digestion. Therefore only a small fraction of phosphorus would be recycled to the main treatment plant with the dewatering stream. PMID:16784199

  12. High rate biological nutrient removal from high strength wastewater using anaerobic-circulating fluidized bed bioreactor (A-CFBBR).

    PubMed

    Andalib, Mehran; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse

    2012-08-01

    Biological nutrient removal (BNR) from high strength wastewater was investigated using a newly developed integrated anaerobic fluidized bed (AF) with circulating fluidized bed bioreactor henceforth called A-CFBBR. The A-CFBBR showed 99.7%COD removal, 84% nitrogen removal, with a very low sludge yield of 0.017 g VSS/g COD while treating a synthetic wastewater containing 10,700 mg COD/L and 250 mg NH(3)-N/L over a period of 6 months. The system was operated at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 35 kg COD/m(3)(AF) d and nitrogen loading rate (NLR) of 1.1 kg N/m(3)(CFBBR) d at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of less than 12 h in the A-CFBBR. Microbial communities analysis using DGGE confirmed the presence of both AOBs and NOBs in the riser and downer. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescence were the dominant denitrifiers present in the downer. Methanogenic activity was accomplished by a microbial mixture of archaea and bacteria in the anaerobic column. PMID:22717573

  13. Assessment of full-scale biological nutrient removal systems upgraded with physico-chemical processes for the removal of emerging pollutants present in wastewaters from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Arriaga, Edson Baltazar; Cortés-Muñoz, Juana Enriqueta; González-Herrera, Arturo; Calderón-Mólgora, César Guillermo; de Lourdes Rivera-Huerta, Ma; Ramírez-Camperos, Esperanza; Montellano-Palacios, Leticia; Gelover-Santiago, Silvia Lucila; Pérez-Castrejón, Sara; Cardoso-Vigueros, Lina; Martín-Domínguez, Alejandra; García-Sánchez, Liliana

    2016-11-15

    Two full-scale biological nutrient removal systems upgraded with three physico-chemical processes (coagulation, chemical precipitation, and neutral Fenton) were evaluated in order to determine the removal of emerging pollutants (EPs) present in municipal wastewater from Mexico. Between 41 and 55 EPs were detected in the influents of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), including personal care products (PPCPs), antibiotics, analgesics, antiepileptics, antilipidemics, antihypertensives, antiseptics, stimulants, and hormones. Emerging pollutants were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.69ng/L to 94,600ng/L. High concentrations of emerging pollutants were found during dry season. WWTP 1, integrated by oxidation ditches and UV light lamps, showed removal efficiencies of EPs between 20% and 22%. On the other hand, WWTP 2 consisted of anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic tanks coupled with two disinfection processes; chlorine dioxide and UV light lamps, for which the removal of EPs was significant (up to 80%). The concentrations of emerging pollutants in WWTP 1 effluent was found within a rangeremovals, compared to those of WWTP 1, due to a greater activity of the simultaneous nitrification-denitrification processes, hydraulic retention time, and solids retention time. The compounds that were more persistent with removals below 50% in both effluents were: carbamazepine, dehydronifedipine, meprobamate, sertraline, propranolol, propoxyphene, norverapamil, diazepam, alprazolam, sulfamethoxazole, metoprolol, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, fluoxetine, erythromycin-H2O, diphenhydramine, dehydronifedipine, clarithromycin, hydrochlorothiazide, and albuterol. The application of neutral Fenton reaction as post-treatment for the two effluents from the WWTPs is promising for the removal of emerging pollutants (up to 100

  14. Fate of dissolved organic nitrogen during biological nutrient removal wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Lin, Huirong; Yu, Guozhong; Zhang, Shenghua; Zhao, Chengmei

    2013-04-01

    Due to its potential to form toxic nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is considered as one of the most important parameters in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). This study describes a comprehensive investigation of variations in DON levels in orbal oxidation ditches. The results showed that DON increased gradually from 0.71 to 1.14 mg I(-1) along anaerobic zone, anoxic zone, aerobic zone 1 and aerobic 2. Molecular weight fractionation of DON in one anaerobic zone and one aerobic zone (aerobic zone 2) was performed. We found that the proportion of small molecular weight (<6 kDa) decreased and large molecular weight (> 20 kDa) showed opposite trend. This variation may have been caused due to the release of different types of soluble microbial products (SMPs) during biological processes. These SMPs contained both tryptophan protein-like and aromatic protein-like substances, which were confirmed by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) analysis. PMID:24620601

  15. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source. PMID:26783836

  16. Evaluation of biological nutrient removal from wastewater by Twin Circulating Fluidized Bed Bioreactor (TCFBBR) using a predictive fluidization model and AQUIFAS APP.

    PubMed

    Andalib, Mehran; Nakhla, George; Sen, Dipankar; Zhu, Jesse

    2011-02-01

    A two-phase and three-phase predictive fluidization model based on the characteristics of a system such as media type and size, flow rates, and reactor cross sectional area was proposed to calculate bed expansion, solid, liquid and gas hold up and specific surface area (SSA) of the biofilm particles. The model was subsequently linked to 1d AQUIFAS APP software (Aquaregen) to model biological nutrient removal in two phase (anoxic) and three phase (aerobic) fluidized bed bioreactors. The credibility of the proposed model for biological nutrient removal was investigated using the experimental data from a Twin Circulating Fluidized Bed Bioreactors (TCFBBR) treating synthetic and municipal wastewater. The SSA of bio-particles and volume of the expanded bed were simulated as a function of operational parameters. Two-sided t-tests demonstrated that simulated SCOD, NH(4)-N, NO(3)-N, TN, VSS and biomass yields agreed with the experimental values at the 95% confidence level. PMID:21075620

  17. Removal of nutrients in denitrification system using coconut coir fibre for the biological treatment of aquaculture wastewater.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Valsa Remony; Vasudevan, Namasivayam

    2012-03-01

    Ideal bacterial support medium for fixed film denitrification processes/bioreactors must be inexpensive, durable and possess large surface area with sufficient porosity. The present study has been focussed on removing nitrate nitrogen at two different nitrate nitrogen loading rates (60 (NLR I) and 120 (NLR II) mg l(-1)) from simulated aquaculture wastewater. Coconut coir fibre and a commercially available synthetic reticulated plastic media (Fujino Spirals) were used as packing medium in two independent upflow anaerobic packed bed column reactors. Removal of nitrate nitrogen was studied in correlation with other nutrients (COD, TKN, dissolved orthophosphate). Maximum removal of 97% at NLR-I and 99% at NLR - II of nitrate nitrogen was observed in with either media. Greater consistency in the case of COD removal of upto 81% was observed at NLR II where coconut coir was used as support medium compared to 72% COD removal by Fujino Spirals. The results observed indicate that the organic support medium is just as efficient in nitrate nitrogen removal as conventionally used synthetic support medium. The study is important as it specifically focuses on denitrification of aquaculture wastewater using cheaper organic support medium in anoxic bioreactors for the removal of nitrate nitrogen; which is seldom addressed as a significant problem. PMID:23033693

  18. Pilot-scale experience with biological nutrient removal and biomass yield reduction in a liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nabin; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse; Islam, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    A pilot-scale liquid-solid circulating fluidized bed (LSCFB) bioreactor was developed at the Adelaide Pollution Control Plant, London, Ontario, Canada, to study its commercial viability for biological nutrient removal. Lava rock particles of 600 microm were used as a biomass carrier media. The LSCFB removed approximately 90% organic, 80% nitrogen, and 70% phosphorus at loading rates of 4.12 kg COD/m3 x d, 0.26 kg N/m3 x d, and 0.052 kg P/m3 x d, and an empty bed contact time of 1.5 hours. Effluent characterized by < 1.0 mg NH4-N/L, < 5.0 mg NO3-N/ L, < 1.0 mg PO4-P/L, < 10 mg TN/L, < 10 mg SBOD/L, and 10 to 15 mg volatile suspended solids (VSS)/L can easily meet the criteria for nonpotable reuse of treated wastewater. The system removed nutrients without using any chemicals, and the secondary clarifier removed suspended solids removal without chemicals. A significant reduction (approximately 75%) in biomass yield to 0.12 to 0.16 g VSS/g chemical oxygen demand (COD) was observed, primarily because of long biological solids retention time (SRT) of 20 to 39 days and a combination of anoxic and aerobic COD consumption. PMID:20942332

  19. Biological nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) removal from municipal wastewater using different variations of the activated sludge process

    SciTech Connect

    Munirathinam, K.

    1986-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to obtain operation and design information necessary for the successful functioning of municipal wastewater treatment plants to accomplish carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal. Investigations were carried out on continuous flow bench-scale pilot systems using municipal wastewater. The continuous flow studies involved a one-stage nitrifying system, a three-stage nitrifying-denitrifying system, and a combined biological nitrogen-phosphorus removal system. The first two systems were operated simultaneously. These systems were operated under different sludge retention times and food-to-microorganism ratios. The hydraulic flow rates were carefully controlled throughout all experiments. These data were then used to evaluate the systems for organics, nitrogen, and phosphorus removal.

  20. Design of nutrient removal activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Ferrer, J; Seco, A; Garcia-Usach, F

    2003-01-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for nutrient and organic matter removal was used to describe the behavior of a nitrification denitrification enhanced biological phosphorus removal (NDEBPR) system. This model was implemented in a user-friendly software DESASS (design and simulation of activated sludge systems). A 484-L pilot plant was operated to verify the model results. The pilot plant was operated for three years over three different sludge ages. The validity of the model was confirmed with data from the pilot plant. Also, the utility of DESASS as a valuable tool for designing NDEBPR systems was confirmed. PMID:12906279

  1. Biological nutrient removal with low nitrous oxide generation by cancelling the anaerobic phase and extending the idle phase in a sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinguang; Wang, Dongbo; Zheng, Xiong; Li, Xiang; Feng, Leiyu; Chen, Hong

    2014-08-01

    Although wastewater biological nutrient removal can be achieved by alternating the anaerobic-oxic-anoxic phases, significant amount of nitrous oxide (N2O) is generated in oxic phases, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) rather than heterotrophic denitrifiers are the main contributors. Here a new efficient strategy to remarkably reduce N2O generation was reported. It was found that by cancelling the anaerobic phase and extending the idle phase the N2O generation was reduced by 42% using synthetic wastewater, whereas the total nitrogen and phosphorus removals were unaffected. The mechanistic investigations revealed that the cancelling of anaerobic phase benefited heterotrophic denitrifiers instead of AOB to be responsible for nitrogen removal in the oxic phases, increased the ratio of total nitrogen removal driven by external carbon source, and decreased nitrite accumulation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses further showed that the new strategy increased the number of N2O reducing bacteria but decreased the abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms, with N2O as their primary denitrification product. It was also determined that the ratio of nitric oxide reductase activity to N2O reductase activity was significantly decreased after anaerobic phase was cancelled. All these observations were in accord with the reduction of N2O production. The feasibility of this strategy to minimize the generation of N2O was finally confirmed for a real municipal wastewater. The results reported in this paper provide a new viewpoint to reduce N2O generation from wastewater biological nutrient removal. PMID:24873707

  2. Long-term effects of copper nanoparticles on wastewater biological nutrient removal and N2O generation in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinguang; Wang, Dongbo; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Xiong; Feng, Leiyu

    2012-11-20

    The increasing use of copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) raises concerns about their potential toxic effects on the environment. However, their influences on wastewater biological nutrient removal (BNR) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) generation in the activated sludge process have never been documented. In this study the long-term effects of Cu NPs (0.1-10 mg/L) on BNR and N(2)O generation were investigated. The total nitrogen (TN) removal was enhanced and N(2)O generation was reduced at any Cu NPs levels investigated, but both ammonia and phosphorus removals were not affected. The mechanism studies showed although most of the Cu NPs were absorbed to activated sludge, the activated sludge surface was not damaged, and the released copper ion from Cu NPs dissolution was the main reason for TN removal improvement and N(2)O reduction. It was also found that the transformation of polyhydroxyalkanoates and the activities of ammonia monooxygenase, nitrite oxidoreductase, exopolyphosphatase, and polyphosphate kinase were not affected by Cu NPs, whereas the decreased metabolism of glycogen and the increased activities of denitrification enzymes were observed. Further investigation revealed that Cu NPs increased the number of denitrifiers (especially N(2)O reducing denitrifiers) but decreased nitrite accumulation. All these observations were in correspondence with the enhancement of TN removal and reduction of N(2)O generation. PMID:23110389

  3. BIOLOGICAL PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three proprietary biological phosphorus removal processes are reviewed. The paper presents the description and development status of these technologies. The paper is a summary of the emerging technology assessment report published by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1984. ...

  4. Plant Leachate Nutrient Recovery with Biological, Thermal, and Photocatalytic Pretreatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Les

    2015-01-01

    Plants are ideal for long term space travel: provide essential resources - oxygen, water, food; Water-soaked plants expel soluble nutrients in a leachate solution - toxins and wastes are also expelled and inhibit growth; biological, thermal, photocatalytic coupled with an acid digestion treatment will hopefully maximize recovery and remove wastes

  5. Optimizing Nutrient Uptake in Biological Transport Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Katifori, Eleni

    2013-03-01

    Many biological systems employ complex networks of vascular tubes to facilitate transport of solute nutrients, examples include the vascular system of plants (phloem), some fungi, and the slime-mold Physarum. It is believed that such networks are optimized through evolution for carrying out their designated task. We propose a set of hydrodynamic governing equations for solute transport in a complex network, and obtain the optimal network architecture for various classes of optimizing functionals. We finally discuss the topological properties and statistical mechanics of the resulting complex networks, and examine correspondence of the obtained networks to those found in actual biological systems.

  6. Effect of COD/TP ratio on biological nutrient removal in A²O and SBR processes coupled with microfiltration and effluent reuse potential.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qihong; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Shim, Hojae

    2016-01-01

    Two bench-scale hybrid processes, anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A(2)O) reactor and sequencing batch reactor (SBR), each followed by the microfiltration (MF) system, were simultaneously operated to compare their performances on the removal of organics and phosphorus from both synthetic and real wastewater to further explore the potential for effluent reuse. The effects of different influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total phosphorus (TP) ratios (27, 50, 80, and 200) were investigated. For both processes, when the influent COD/TP ratio was 200, the effluent quality was satisfactory for some reuse potential. The MF membrane system showed an evident further removal of COD (20-89%) and color (18-60%), especially the removal of suspended solids (SS) and turbidity with the final effluent SS <1 mg/L and turbidity <0.1 NTU. When real wastewater was tested, the effluent quality was adequate and met the standard goals for regional reuse purposes. PMID:26581582

  7. Full-scale assessment of the nutrient removal capabilities of membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Daigger, Glen T; Crawford, George V; Johnson, Bruce R

    2010-01-01

    Operating results from two full-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) practicing biological and chemical phosphorus and biological nitrogen removal to meet stringent effluent nutrient limits are analyzed. Full-scale results and special studies conducted at these facilities resulted in the development of guidelines for the design of MBRs to achieve stringent effluent nutrient concentrations--as low as 0.05 mg/L total phosphorus and 3 mg/L total nitrogen. These guidelines include the following: (1) direct the membrane recirculation flow to the aerobic zone, (2) provide intense mixing at the inlets of the anaerobic and anoxic zones, (3) maintain internal recirculation flowrates to maintain the desired mixed liquor suspended solids distribution, and (4) carefully control supplemental metal salt addition in proportion to the phosphorus remaining after biological removal is complete. Staging the various process zones and providing effective dissolved oxygen control also enhances nutrient removal performance. The results demonstrated that process performance can be characterized by the International Water Association (London, United Kingdom) (IWA) activated sludge model number 2d (ASM2d) and the Water Environment Federation (Alexandria, Virginia) chemical phosphorus removal model. These models subsequently were used to develop unique process configurations that are currently under design and/or construction for several full-scale nutrient removal MBRs. PMID:20942336

  8. Phycoremediation: key issues for cost-effective nutrient removal processes.

    PubMed

    Olguín, Eugenia J

    2003-12-01

    Phycoremediation applied to the removal of nutrients from animal wastewater and other high organic content wastewater is a field with a great potential and demand considering that surface and underground water bodies in several regions of the world are suffering of eutrophication. However, the development of more efficient nutrient removal algal systems requires further research in key areas. Algae growth rate controls directly and indirectly the nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency. Thus, maximum algae productivity is required for effective nutrient removal and must be considered as a key area of research. Likewise, low harvesting costs are also required for a cost-effective nutrient removal system. The use of filamentous microalgae with a high autoflocculation capacity and the use of immobilized cells have been investigated in this respect. Another key area of research is the use of algae strains with special attributes such as tolerance to extreme temperature, chemical composition with predominance of high added value products, a quick sedimentation behavior, or a capacity for growing mixotrophically. Finally, to combine most of the achievements from key areas and to design integrated recycling systems (IRS) should be an ultimate and rewarding goal. PMID:14623045

  9. Striking the balance between nutrient removal, greenhouse gas emissions, receiving water quality, and costs.

    PubMed

    Falk, Michael W; Reardon, David J; Neethling, J B; Clark, David L; Pramanik, Amit

    2013-12-01

    This Water Environment Research Foundation study considered the relationship between varying nutrient-removal levels at wastewater treatment plants, greenhouse gas emissions, receiving water quality (measured by potential algal production), and costs. The effluent nutrient concentrations required by some U.S. permits are very low, approaching the technology-best-achievable performance. This study evaluated five different treatment levels at a nominal 40 ML/d (10 mgd) flow. Greenhouse gas emissions and costs increase gradually up to the technologies' best-achievable performance, after which they increase exponentially. The gradual increase is attributed to additional biological treatment facilities, increased energy and chemical use, and additional tertiary nitrogen and phosphorus removal processes. Within the limited focus of this study, the evaluation shows that a point of diminishing return is reached as nutrient-removal objectives approach the technology-best-achievable performance, where greenhouse gas emissions and cost of treatment increases rapidly while the potential for algal growth reduce marginally. PMID:24597046

  10. Nutrient removal from swine lagoon effluent by duckweed

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, B.A.; Cheng, J.; Classen, J.; Stomp, A.M.

    2000-04-01

    Three duckweed geographic isolates were grown on varying concentrations of swine lagoon effluent in a greenhouse to determine their ability to remove nutrients from the effluent. Duckweed biomass was harvested every other day over a 12-day period. Duckweed biomass production, nutrient loss from the swine lagoon effluent, and nutrient content of duckweed biomass were used to identify effluent concentrations/geographic isolate combinations that are effective in terms of nutrient utilization from swine lagoon effluent and production of healthy duckweed biomass. When Lemna minor geographic isolate 8627 was grown on 50% swine lagoon effluent, respective losses of TKN, NH{sub 3}-N, TP, OPO{sub 4}-P, TOC, K, Cu, and Zn were 83, 100, 49, 31, 68, 21, 28 and 67%.

  11. SOUTHEASTERN PLAINS IN-STREAM NUTRIENT AND BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE (SPINBR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    States and EPA lack a tool to characterize and measure biological response to nutrients in flowing waters. This study is designed to describe, examine and characterize the relationship between biological response and aquatic nutrients as a potential causal variable along a gradi...

  12. Nutrient removal by root zone treatment systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Sonavane, P G; Munavalli, G R; Ranade, S V

    2008-07-01

    The Root Zone Treatment System (RZTS) has been used widely for nutrient removal in European countries. In spite of having its more adaptability in tropical region like India its use to address nutrient induced issues in the country is very less. The lack of widely accepted data, non consensus of scientists over nutrient removal mechanism and inability to apply performance standards observed in other countries directly might have hampered the acceptance of this technology in India. A few technology assessment programs are being conducted in collaboration with other countries to engineer this technology but nutrient removal aspects are not essentially focused. In this context, there is need to direct lab scale research to identify potential wetland plants, bed media and comparative study of their combination specific performance under similar conditions. The field application of the data will help to understand variability in performance and disparities in the mechanism. The systems would be amended based on these studies to establish combination specific performance standards for typical Indian conditions. Maintenance strategy and optimization of design will help to foster the technology. The development strategy should give due consideration to the contributions of other countries so as to avoid repetition of work which will save time, money and efforts, and help for the real acceptance of RZTS in Indian conditions. PMID:19552081

  13. Interacting Physical and Biological Processes Affecting Nutrient Transport Through Human Dominated Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities increasingly dominate biogeochemical cycles of limiting nutrients on Earth. Urban and agricultural landscapes represent the largest sources of excess nutrients that drive water quality degradation. The physical structure of both urban and agricultural watersheds has been extensively modified, and these changes have large impacts on water and nutrient transport. Despite strong physical controls over nutrient transport in human dominated landscapes, biological processes play important roles in determining the fates of both nitrogen and phosphorus. This talk uses examples from research in urban and agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern USA to illustrate interactions of physical and biological controls over nutrient cycles that have shifted nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) sources and cycling in unexpected ways in response to management changes. In urban watersheds, efforts to improve water quality have been hindered by legacy sources of phosphorus added to storm water through transport to drainage systems by vegetation. Similarly, reductions in field erosion in agricultural watersheds have not led to major reductions in phosphorus transport, because of continued release of biological sources of P. Where management of phosphorus has been most effective in reducing eutrophication of lakes, decreases in N removal processes have led to long term increases in N concentration and transport. Together, these examples show important roles for biological processes affecting nutrient movement in highly modified landscapes. Consideration of the downstream physical and biological responses of management changes are thus critical toward identification of actions that will most effectively reduce excess nutrients watersheds and coastal zones.

  14. Solids and nutrient removal from flushed swine manure using polyacrylamides

    SciTech Connect

    Vanotti, M.B.; Hunt, P.G.

    1999-12-01

    Most of the organic nutrients and reduced carbon (C) materials in liquid swine manure are contained in fine suspended particles that are not separated by available mechanical separators. Treatment with polyacrylamide (PAM) polymers prior to mechanical removal or gravity settling has the potential for enhancing solids-liquid separation, thus concentrating nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and organic C. In this work, the authors determined PAM charge and density characteristics most desirable for swine wastewater applications and established the optimum chemical requirement. Treatments were applied to flushed manure from two swine operations in North Carolina. Cationic PAMs significantly increased solids separation while performance of neutral and anionic types was not different from a control. Cationic PAMs with moderate-charge density (20%) were more effective than polymers with higher charge density. Flocs were large and effectively retained with a 1-mm screen. Optimum PAM rate varied with the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in the liquid manure; 26 and 79 mg PAM/L for samples containing 1.5 and 4.1 g TSS/L, respectively. Corresponding TSS removal efficiencies were 90 to 94%. In contrast, screening without PAM treatment captured only 5 to 14% of the suspended solids. Polymer usage rate was consistent and averaged 2.0{degree} based on weight of dry solids produced. Volatile suspended solids (VSS) were highly correlated with TSS and comprised 79.5% of TSS. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and organic nutrient concentrations in the effluent were also significantly decreased by PAM treatment. The decrease of COD concentration, an important consideration for odor control, was linearly related with removal of suspended solids, at a rate of 2.0 g COD/g TSS and 2.6 g COD/g VSS. Removal efficiency of organic N and P followed approximately a 1:1 relationship with removal efficiency of TSS. Chemical cost to capture 90% of the suspended solids was estimated to be $0.026 per

  15. Nutrient removal and greenhouse gas emissions in duckweed treatment ponds.

    PubMed

    Sims, Atreyee; Gajaraj, Shashikanth; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-03-01

    Stormwater treatment ponds provide a variety of functions including sediment retention, organic and nutrient removal, and habitat restoration. The treatment ponds are, however, also a source of greenhouse gases. The objectives of this study were to assess greenhouse gas (CH(4), CO(2) and N(2)O) emissions in duckweed treatment ponds (DWPs) treating simulated stormwater and to determine the role of ammonia-oxidizing organisms in nutrient removal and methanogens in greenhouse gas emissions. Two replicated DWPs operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days were able to remove 84% (± 4% [standard deviation]) chemical oxygen demand (COD), 79% (± 3%) NH(4)(+)-N, 86% (± 2%) NO(3)(-)-N and 56% (± 7%) orthophosphate. CH(4) emission rates in the DWPs ranged from 502 to 1900 mg CH(4) m(-2) d(-1) while those of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) ranged from 0.63 to 4 mg N(2)O m(-2) d(-1). The CO(2) emission rates ranged from 1700 to 3300 mg CO(2) m(-2) day(-1). Duckweed coverage on water surface along with the continued deposit of duckweed debris in the DWPs and low-nutrient influent water created a low dissolved oxygen environment for the growth of unique ammonia-oxidizing organisms and methanogens. Archaeal and bacterial amoA abundance in the DWPs ranged from (1.5 ± 0.2) × 10(7) to (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10(8) copies/g dry soil and from (1.0 ± 0.3) × 10(3) to (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10(6) copies/g dry soil, respectively. The 16S rRNA acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens ranged from (5.2 ± 0.2) × 10(5) to (9.0 ± 0.3) × 10(6) copies/g dry soil and from (1.0 ± 0.1) × 10(2) to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10(3) copies/g dry soil, respectively. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) appeared to be the dominant nitrifiers and acetoclastic Methanosaeta was the major methanogenic genus. The results suggest that methane is the predominant (>90%) greenhouse gas in the DWPs, where the relatively low stormwater nutrient inputs facilitate the growth of K-strategists such as AOA and Methanosaeta that may

  16. Retrofitting SBR systems to nutrient removal in sensitive tourist areas.

    PubMed

    Tasli, R; Artan, N; Orhon, D

    2001-01-01

    Retrofitting of existing SBR systems for nutrient removal is evaluated and defined for small communities in sensitive coastal areas, with seasonal fluctuations in wastewater quantity and quality. The proposed approach is developed by means of basic process stoichiometry and verified using ASM2d. The efficiency of retrofitting is found to rely on the delicate balance between the overall sludge age, the initial settled sludge volume in the reactor, and the ratio of the initial volume to the feed volume in each cycle, a parameter corresponding to the recycle ratio in continuous systems. PMID:11496662

  17. Limited filamentous bulking in order to enhance integrated nutrient removal and effluent quality.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wen-De; Li, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Hui; Kang, Xiao-Rong; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-10-15

    Limited filamentous bulking has been proposed as a means to enhance floc size and make conditions more favorable for simultaneous nitrification/Denitrification (SND). Moreover a slightly heightened SVI is supposed to increase the removal of small particulates in the clarifier. Integrated nitrogen, phosphorus and COD removal performance under limited filamentous bulking was investigated using a bench-scale plug-flow enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) reactor fed with raw domestic wastewater. Limited filamentous bulking in this study was mainly induced by low DO levels, while other influencing factors associated with filamentous bulking (F/M, nutrients, and wastewater characteristics) were not selective for filamentous bacteria. The optimum scenario for integrated nitrogen, phosphorus and COD removal was achieved under limited filamentous bulking with an SVI level of 170-200 (associated with a DO of 1.0-1.5 mg/L). The removal efficiencies of COD, TP and NH4+-N were 90%, 97% and 92%, respectively. Under these conditions, the solid-liquid separation was practically not affected and sludge loss was never observed. A well-clarified effluent with marginal suspended solids was obtained. The results of this study indicated the feasibility of limited filamentous bulking under low DO as a stimulation of simultaneous nitrification/denitrification for enhancing nutrient removal and effluent quality in an EBPR process. PMID:21802110

  18. Habitat-specific nutrient removal and release in Oregon salt marshes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  19. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1999-07-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for microorganisms in the sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  20. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1997-11-11

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  1. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Geesey, Gill G.; Gillis, Richard J.; Lehman, R. Michael

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

  2. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Geesey, Gill G.; Gillis, Richard J.; Lehman, R. Michael

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

  3. Study on the effect of landfill leachate on nutrient removal from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiuyan; Jia, Huijun; Poveda, Mario

    2016-05-01

    In this study, landfill leachate with and without pre-treatment was co-treated with municipal wastewater at different mixing ratios. The leachate pre-treatment was achieved by air stripping to removal ammonia. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of landfill leachate on nutrient removal of the wastewater treatment process. It was demonstrated that when landfill leachate was co-treated with municipal wastewater, the high ammonia concentration in the leachate did not have a negative impact on the nitrification. The system was able to adapt to the environment and was able to improve nitrification capacity. The readily biodegradable portion of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the leachate was utilized by the system to improve phosphorus and nitrate removal. However, this portion was small and majority of the COD ended up in the effluent thereby decreased the quality of the effluent. The study showed that the 2.5% mixing ratio of leachate with wastewater improved the overall biological nutrient removal process of the system without compromising the COD removal efficiency. PMID:27155420

  4. Nutrient removal and phosphorus recovery performances of a novel anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying/induced crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Lu, Xiwu; Yu, Ran; Zhu, Wentao

    2012-10-01

    An anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying (A(2)N) two sludge process coupled with induced crystallization (IC) called A(2)N-IC process was developed for wastewater nutrient removal and phosphorus recovery. The performances of A(2)N-IC process in comparison with A(2)N process at different COD to phosphorus (COD/P) feeding ratios were investigated. The results indicated that A(2)N-IC achieved not only high and stable nutrient removal but also phosphorus recovery. Calcium phosphorus crystals were formed in the crystallization reactor in A(2)N-IC. Moreover, the incorporation of chemical induced crystallization improved biological phosphorus removal. In A(2)N-IC process, phosphorus removal efficiency was consistently maintained at 99.2%, whereas in A(2)N it decreased from 93.0% to 65.7% with the decrease of feeding COD/P ratio. The COD and ammonia removal efficiencies were regardless of feeding COD/P ratio in the two processes. PMID:22858484

  5. BIOLOGICAL PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL: A TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of alternative biological phosphorus (bio-P) removal processes was undertaken to evaluate their effectiveness and reliability. Thirty such facilities were identified in the United States and Canada. Four plants were selected for detailed study. The PhoStrip process is use...

  6. Radiological/biological/aerosol removal system

    DOEpatents

    Haslam, Jeffery J

    2015-03-17

    An air filter replacement system for existing buildings, vehicles, arenas, and other enclosed airspaces includes a replacement air filter for replacing a standard air filter. The replacement air filter has dimensions and air flow specifications that allow it to replace the standard air filter. The replacement air filter includes a filter material that removes radiological or biological or aerosol particles.

  7. Effect of nickel on nutrient removal by selected indigenous protozoan species in wastewater systems.

    PubMed

    Kamika, Ilunga; Momba, Maggy N B

    2015-03-01

    Nutrient and heavy metal pollutions are major concern worldwide. This study aimed at comparing the effect of Ni(2+) on nutrient removal efficiency of four indigenous wastewater protozoan species (Aspidisca sp., Paramecium sp., Peranema sp., Trachelophyllum sp.). Specific physicochemical parameters and microbial growth/die-off were measured using standard methods. The results revealed that protozoan species were able to simultaneously remove phosphate, nitrate and Ni(2+) at concentrations ranging between 66.4-99.36%, 56.19-99.88% and 45.98-85.69%, respectively. Peranema sp. appeared to be the isolates with the highest removal of nutrients (Phosphate-99.36% and Nitrate-99.88%) while Paramecium sp. showed higher removal of Ni(2+) at 85.69% and low removal of nutrients. Aspidisca sp. was the most sensitive isolate to Ni(2+) but with significant nutrient removal (Phosphate-66.4% and Nitrate-56.19%) at 10 mg-N(2+)/L followed by an inhibition of nutrient removal at Ni(2+) concentration greater than 10 mg/L. Significant correlation between the growth rate and nutrient removal (r = 0.806/0.799, p < 0.05 for phosphate and nitrate, respectively) was noted. Except for Peranema sp. which revealed better nutrient removal ability at 10 mg-Ni(2+)/L, an increase in Ni(2+) concentration had a significant effect on nutrient removal efficiency of these indigenous protozoan species. This study suggests that although Ni(2+) appeared to be toxic to microbial isolates, its effect at a low concentration (10 mg-Ni(2+)/L) towards these isolates can be used to enhance the wastewater treatment process for the removal of nutrients. Peranema sp., which was able to remove both Ni(2+) and nutrients from wastewater mixed-liquor, can also be used for bioremediation of wastewater systems. PMID:25737645

  8. Effect of nickel on nutrient removal by selected indigenous protozoan species in wastewater systems

    PubMed Central

    Kamika, Ilunga; Momba, Maggy N.B.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient and heavy metal pollutions are major concern worldwide. This study aimed at comparing the effect of Ni2+ on nutrient removal efficiency of four indigenous wastewater protozoan species (Aspidisca sp., Paramecium sp., Peranema sp., Trachelophyllum sp.). Specific physicochemical parameters and microbial growth/die-off were measured using standard methods. The results revealed that protozoan species were able to simultaneously remove phosphate, nitrate and Ni2+ at concentrations ranging between 66.4–99.36%, 56.19–99.88% and 45.98–85.69%, respectively. Peranema sp. appeared to be the isolates with the highest removal of nutrients (Phosphate-99.36% and Nitrate-99.88%) while Paramecium sp. showed higher removal of Ni2+ at 85.69% and low removal of nutrients. Aspidisca sp. was the most sensitive isolate to Ni2+ but with significant nutrient removal (Phosphate-66.4% and Nitrate-56.19%) at 10 mg-N2+/L followed by an inhibition of nutrient removal at Ni2+ concentration greater than 10 mg/L. Significant correlation between the growth rate and nutrient removal (r = 0.806/0.799, p < 0.05 for phosphate and nitrate, respectively) was noted. Except for Peranema sp. which revealed better nutrient removal ability at 10 mg-Ni2+/L, an increase in Ni2+ concentration had a significant effect on nutrient removal efficiency of these indigenous protozoan species. This study suggests that although Ni2+ appeared to be toxic to microbial isolates, its effect at a low concentration (10 mg-Ni2+/L) towards these isolates can be used to enhance the wastewater treatment process for the removal of nutrients. Peranema sp., which was able to remove both Ni2+ and nutrients from wastewater mixed-liquor, can also be used for bioremediation of wastewater systems. PMID:25737645

  9. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal employing EDTA disodium

    SciTech Connect

    Bojinova, D.; Velkova, R.

    1996-12-31

    The biological phosphorus removal is a promising alternative to the conventional chemical technologies for processing of phosphate raw materials. The object of this study was the effect of EDTA disodium on the biotreatment of tunisian phosphorite with the strain of Aspergillus niger. The incubation was carried out in two nutritive mediums, with different phosphate content. The experimental results showed that the additives of EDTA disodium in the nutritive medium increased the rate of extraction of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and shortened significantly the time for biological leaching. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. ENHANCED NUTRIENT REMOVAL FROM ON-SITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) runoffs impact streams and ecosystems. Furthermore, on-site wastewater treatment systems are important sources of nutrient discharges because effluents from septic tanks typically contain high concentrations of organic matter, nitrogen and ph...

  11. Enhancement of nutrient removal from swine wastewater digestate coupled to biogas purification by microalgae Scenedesmus spp.

    PubMed

    Prandini, Jean Michel; da Silva, Márcio Luís Busi; Mezzari, Melissa Paola; Pirolli, Mateus; Michelon, William; Soares, Hugo Moreira

    2016-02-01

    This work investigated the effects of swine wastewater-derived biogas on microalgae biomass production and nutrient removal rates from piggery wastewater concomitantly with biogas filtration. Photobioreactors with dominant Scenedesmus spp. were prepared using non-sterile digestate and exposed to different photoperiods. In the presence of biogas and autotrophic conditions microalgae yield of 1.1±0.2 g L(-1) (growth rate of 141.8±3.5 mg L(-1) d(-1)) was obtained leading to faster N-NH3 and P-PO4(3-) assimilation rate of 21.2±1.2 and 3.5±2.5 mg L(-1) d(-1), respectively. H2S up to 3000 ppmv was not inhibitory and completely removed. Maximum CO2 assimilation of 219±4.8 mg L(-1) d(-1) was achieved. Biological consumption of CH4 up to 18% v/v was verified. O2 up to 22% v/v was controlled by adding acetate to exacerbate oxygen demand by microorganisms. Microalgae-based wastewater treatment coupled to biogas purification accelerates nutrient removal concomitantly producing valuable biomass and biomethane. PMID:26700760

  12. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, John; McGlynn, Brian; Covino, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater ‑ surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role

  13. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, J. M.; McGlynn, B. L.; Covino, T. P.; Bergstrom, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater - surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with a distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role

  14. Nutrient Recovery of Plant Leachates Under Thermal, Biological, and Photocatalytic Pretreatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Les

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient recovery has always been a problem for long distance and long-term space missions. To allow humans to man these missions, a steady source of oxygen, water, and food are necessary for survival beyond Earth's atmosphere. Plants are currently an area of interest since they are capable of providing all three resources for life sustainability. We are currently interested in nutrient recovery for future plant growth and simple aqueous leachate extractions can recover some of the nutrients. However, leaching plants also removes water-soluble organic plant wastes, which inhibits plant growth if not separated properly. To combat the issues with waste and maximize nutrient recovery, we are attempting to pre-treat the plant matter using biological, thermal, and photocatalytic methods before subjecting the solution with variable-strength acid digestion. For the biological method, the inoculums: mixed heterotrophic/nitrifying bioreactor effluent and Trichoderma vessei are used in an attempt to liberate more nutrients from the plant matter. For the thermal method, plants are subjected to varying temperatures at different retention times to determine nutrient recovery. Lastly, the photocatalytic method utilizes TiO (sub 2)'s oxidizing abilities under specific pHs and retention times to reduce organic wastes and improve nutrient gains. A final acid digestion serves to liberate nutrients even further in order to maximize recovery. So far, we have tested ideal acid digestion variables for practicality and performance in our experiments. We found that a low retention time of 10 minutes and a high acid concentration of 0.1 and 1 mole HCl were the most effective at nutrient recovery. For space travel purposes, 0.1 mole currently looks like a viable acid digestion to use since it is relatively effective and sustainable from a mass and energy balance if acid recovery can be performed on waste brines. Biological pretreatments do not look to be too effective and the thermal and

  15. Biomass production and nutrient removal by switchgrass under irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass has been identified to supply a major portion of U.S. energy needs when used as a fuel. Assessments of the export of essential plant nutrients are needed to determine impacts on soil fertility that will influence fertilizer recommendations since the nutrients contained in the above groun...

  16. Nutrient and Pesticide Removal From Laboratory Simulated Tile Drainage Discharge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excess nutrient and pesticide transport through subsurface tile drainage is well documented. One approach receiving consideration for reducing the amount of nutrients and pesticides in subsurface drainage waters is end-of-tile filters. The filters are often comprised of industrial wastes or by-produ...

  17. Using wastewater and high-rate algal ponds for nutrient removal and the production of bioenergy and biofuels.

    PubMed

    Batten, David; Beer, Tom; Freischmidt, George; Grant, Tim; Liffman, Kurt; Paterson, David; Priestley, Tony; Rye, Lucas; Threlfall, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This paper projects a positive outcome for large-scale algal biofuel and energy production when wastewater treatment is the primary goal. Such a view arises partly from a recent change in emphasis in wastewater treatment technology, from simply oxidising the organic matter in the waste (i.e. removing the biological oxygen demand) to removing the nutrients - specifically nitrogen and phosphorus - which are the root cause of eutrophication of inland waterways and coastal zones. A growing need for nutrient removal greatly improves the prospects for using new algal ponds in wastewater treatment, since microalgae are particularly efficient in capturing and removing such nutrients. Using a spreadsheet model, four scenarios combining algae biomass production with the making of biodiesel, biogas and other products were assessed for two of Australia's largest wastewater treatment plants. The results showed that super critical water reactors and anaerobic digesters could be attractive pathway options, the latter providing significant savings in greenhouse gas emissions. Combining anaerobic digestion with oil extraction and the internal economies derived from cheap land and recycling of water and nutrients on-site could allow algal oil to be produced for less than US$1 per litre. PMID:23306273

  18. Phosphorus removal and recovery from domestic wastewater in a novel process of enhanced biological phosphorus removal coupled with crystallization.

    PubMed

    Zou, Haiming; Wang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    A new process of enhanced biological phosphorus removal coupled with crystallization recovery of phosphorus was developed here, where the feasibility of nutrients removal and potential for phosphorus recovery from domestic wastewater was further assessed. Results showed that an excellent nutrients removal and phosphorus recovery performance was achieved, in which the averaged COD, PO4(3-)-P and NO3(-)-N removal efficiencies were 82.6%, 87.5% and 91.6%, respectively and a total of 59.3% of phosphorus was recovered as hydroxyapatite. What's more, crystallization recovery of phosphorus greatly enhanced the biological phosphorus removal efficiency. After the incorporation of the phosphorus recovery column via side-stream, the phosphorus concentration of effluent was significantly decreased ranging from 1.24mg/L to 0.85mg/L, 0.52mg/L and 0.41mg/L at the lateral flow ratios of 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, respectively. The results obtained here would be beneficial to provide a prospective alternative for phosphorus removal and recovery from wastewater. PMID:27003794

  19. Biological removal of NOx from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, R; Muyzer, G; Kuenen, J G; Loosdrecht, M C M

    2004-01-01

    BioDeNOx is a novel integrated physico-chemical and biological process for the removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas. Due to the high temperature of flue gas the process is performed at a temperature between 50-55 degrees C. Flue gas containing CO2, O2, SO2 and NOx, is purged through Fe(II)EDTA2- containing liquid. The Fe(II)EDTA2- complex effectively binds the NOx; the bound NOx is converted into N2 in a complex reaction sequence. In this paper an overview of the potential microbial reactions in the BioDeNOx process is discussed. It is evident that though the process looks simple, due to the large number of parallel potential reactions and serial microbial conversions, it is much more complex. There is a need for a detailed investigation in order to properly understand and optimise the process. PMID:15536984

  20. A comparison between the theory and reality of full-scale step-feed nutrient removal systems.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B R; Goodwin, S; Daigger, G T; Crawford, G V

    2005-01-01

    Capacity enhancement and volume reduction benefits of step-feeding fully aerobic bioreactors has been well documented. Application of step-feed technology to biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems, particularly those removing nitrogen alone or both nitrogen and phosphorus, is relatively new to the industry. In recent years, a number of full-scale step-feed facilities have been brought into service. This paper reviews nine full-scale step-feed biological nutrient removal systems--both nitrogen removal alone, and nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The objective is to compare the theoretical benefits of such systems with their actual operation. The predicted benefits of reduced bioreactor volume or increased process capacity, reduced energy usage, more robust nitrification performance, and the flexibility to tune (or de-tune) nitrification efficiency were verified in full-scale systems. Equations are also presented that may be used in the prediction of step-feed benefits. There are two primary drivers for considering a step-feed biological reactor system: 1. Reduced bioreactor volume for a defined capacity or performance or increased process capacity given a fixed bioreactor volume. 2. More robust nitrification performance. Full-scale operation of these step-feed nutrient removal systems provides a real world basis for the claimed benefits of step-feed operation. These systems have uniformly shown additional capacity. A number of them have also exhibited more robust performance, especially during storms. Where possible, side-by-side comparisons of full-scale step-feed systems with non-step-feed systems have exhibited greater process reliability and flexibility. PMID:16459837

  1. Nutrients, Recycling, and Biological Populations in Upwelling Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Whitledge, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Nutrient recycling has been studied in the upwelling areas of Baja California, Northwest Africa, and Peru. Regeneration by biological populations in these areas contributes significant quantities of recycled nitrogen which is utilized in productivity processes. Each area has a different combination of organisms which leads to differences in the relative contributions of zooplankton, nekton, or benthos to the nutrient cycles. Comparisons of ammonium regeneration rates of zooplankton and nekton-micronekton populations in the three upwelling areas show that zooplankton recycle relatively less nitrogen in the Baja California and Peru systems than nekton. In the Northwest Africa upwelling region, however, zooplankton, fish, and benthic inputs are all substantial. In recent years the Peruvian upwelling system has been altered with the decline of the anchoveta population and an increase in the importance of zooplankton in nutrient recycling. The distribution of recycled nitrogen (ammonium and urea) in transects across the shelf at 10°S and 15°S indicates that regeneration is relatively more important at 10°S in the region of the wide shelf. In both areas the distribution of ammonium and urea are not entirely coincident thereby indicating differences in their production and/or utilization.

  2. Retrofitting conventional primary clarifiers to activated primary clarifiers to enhance nutrient removal and energy conservation in WWTPs in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-wei; Zhang, Tian-zhu; Chen, Ji-ning; Hu, Zhi-rong

    2011-01-01

    Biological nutrient removal requires sufficient carbon source. Meanwhile, the removal of organic matter in wastewater requires energy consumption in the aeration tank. Carbon source for nutrient removal in most wastewater treatment plants with conventional primary clarifier (CPC) is generally insufficient in China. In order to increase carbon source and to save energy, a part of the CPC may be retrofitted as an activated primary clarifier (APC). In this paper, a pilot scale experiment was conducted to examine the performance of primary sludge fermentation and its effect on nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Results show that the primary sludge fermentation in APC has produced a similar VFA/TP ratio but a higher BOD5/TN ratio compared with those in the CPC effluent, and the TN concentrations in the secondary effluent are at 8.0, 10.8, and 17.4 mg/L, while TP is at 0.45, 1.10, and 2.28 mg/L when the pilot test system was fed with (1) the APC effluent, (2) 50% from the APC effluent and 50% from the CPC effluent, and (3) the CPC effluent, respectively. Results also indicate that the BOD5/TN ratio is a more sensitive factor than the VFA/TP ratio for nutrient removal and energy conservation for the APC fermentation. PMID:21508549

  3. EVALUATION OF FILTER FEEDING FISHES FOR REMOVING EXCESSIVE NUTRIENTS AND ALGAE FROM WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of utilizing finfish for the removal and recycling of excessive nutrients and algae from wastewater was investigated. The silver carp (Hypopthalmichthyes molitrix) and the bighead carp (Aristichthyes nobilis) were chosen due to their specifically adapted filter fe...

  4. Using floating vegetation to remove nutrients from an anaerobic swine wastewater lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods are needed for utilizing nutrients contained within animal wastewater lagoons. One potential method for removing nutrients is to have vegetation growing in the lagoon. A study was conducted from 2005-2007 to determine the feasibility of growing vegetation on floating platforms on a single ...

  5. Waste rock revegetation: Evaluation of nutrient and biological amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Meikle, T.W.; Lu, S.; Barta, J.P.

    1999-07-01

    Lack of salvaged topsoil for the reclamation of historical waste rock piles is a common problem in the arid Great Basin region. Utilization of amended waste rock as a growth media could reduce further disturbance resulting from topsoil harvest, minimize hauling costs, and potentially allow for the use of a higher quality material for plant growth. Getchell Gold Corporation initiated a study in 1995 to determine the suitability of waste rock substrates to support plant growth following application of nutrient and biological amendments. Three nutrient amendments and a biological seed treatment were evaluation for use in establishing vegetative cover on three distinct waste rock substrates. Completely randomized blocks were placed on the three substrates. Treatments included organic fertilizers (Biosol and Gro-Power), a mineral fertilizer (16-20-0), and Azospirillum bacterial inoculant, plus controls. The seed mix consisted of Agropyron riparium, Agropyron spicatum, Elymus cinereus, Poa secunda, and Sitanion hystrix. Canopy and ground cover were monitored for three growing seasons. Conclusions from the study are: (1) two of the three substrates supported plant growth following amendment with organic fertilizers; (2) organic fertilizers increased cover substantially over the mineral fertilizer; and (3) Azospirillum had no effect on canopy cover.

  6. Removal of nutrients in various types of constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Vymazal, Jan

    2007-07-15

    The processes that affect removal and retention of nitrogen during wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands (CWs) are manifold and include NH(3) volatilization, nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, plant and microbial uptake, mineralization (ammonification), nitrate reduction to ammonium (nitrate-ammonification), anaerobic ammonia oxidation (ANAMMOX), fragmentation, sorption, desorption, burial, and leaching. However, only few processes ultimately remove total nitrogen from the wastewater while most processes just convert nitrogen to its various forms. Removal of total nitrogen in studied types of constructed wetlands varied between 40 and 55% with removed load ranging between 250 and 630 g N m(-2) yr(-1) depending on CWs type and inflow loading. However, the processes responsible for the removal differ in magnitude among systems. Single-stage constructed wetlands cannot achieve high removal of total nitrogen due to their inability to provide both aerobic and anaerobic conditions at the same time. Vertical flow constructed wetlands remove successfully ammonia-N but very limited denitrification takes place in these systems. On the other hand, horizontal-flow constructed wetlands provide good conditions for denitrification but the ability of these system to nitrify ammonia is very limited. Therefore, various types of constructed wetlands may be combined with each other in order to exploit the specific advantages of the individual systems. The soil phosphorus cycle is fundamentally different from the N cycle. There are no valency changes during biotic assimilation of inorganic P or during decomposition of organic P by microorganisms. Phosphorus transformations during wastewater treatment in CWs include adsorption, desorption, precipitation, dissolution, plant and microbial uptake, fragmentation, leaching, mineralization, sedimentation (peat accretion) and burial. The major phosphorus removal processes are sorption, precipitation, plant uptake (with

  7. Expert systems guide biological phosphorus removal

    SciTech Connect

    Krichten, D.J.; Wilson, K.D.; Tracy, K.D. )

    1991-10-01

    There is a large body of knowledge regarding optimum control strategies for new secondary wastewater treatment technology using an anaerobic selector to provide biological phosphorus removal. However, because the selector technology is new and the concepts differ somewhat from those used in conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment, a method of communicating this knowledge to plant operators is needed. Traditional methods such as classroom training and operating manuals are of limited effectiveness. The commonplace availability and low cost of the personal computer (PC) makes it practical to use a computer program to communicate the type of information required to control a wastewater treatment plant. Knowledge-based systems technology, commonly referred to as expert systems (ES) technology, is easy to use, provides useful information regarding a consistent control strategy, relieves the anxiety associated with learning a new process,' and provides instruction for inexperienced personnel. ES technology does not require special formatted input and is therefore easily accessible. All information required by the program is readily available through routine laboratory analysis, common plant instrumentation, or direct user observation. The program was designed for all levels of computer users and will run on all IBM-compatible or Apple MacIntosh systems.

  8. A new method for nutrients removal and recovery from wastewater using a bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Li, Jian; He, Zhen

    2014-08-01

    Nutrients management is a key task of wastewater treatment and removal of nutrients is usually associated with significant energy/economic cost. A new bioelectrochemical system, named "R(2)-BES", was developed for removing and possibly recovering nutrients from wastewater. This R(2)-BES takes advantage of bioelectricity generation from oxidation of organic compounds to drive ammonium migration out of wastewater, and uses hydroxide ions produced from the cathode reaction as a medium to exchange phosphate ions from wastewater at the same time. Under an applied voltage of 0.8 V, the R(2)-BES removed 83.4 ± 1.3% of ammonium nitrogen and 52.4 ± 9.8% of phosphate, significantly higher than those (3.6 ± 3.7% and 21.1 ± 2.6%) under an open circuit condition. Applying an external voltage can increase current generation, COD removal, and nutrient removal. Those results demonstrate a proof of concept that the R(2)-BES may be potentially applied to remove and recover nutrients through appropriate integration into the existing treatment facilities. PMID:24948532

  9. Comparison of Habitat-Specific Nutrient Removal and Release in Pacific NW Salt Marshes at Multiple Spatial Scales - CERF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  10. Comparison of Habitat-Specific Nutrient Removal and Release in Pacific NW Salt Marshes at Multiple Spatial Scales

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  11. Reliability analysis of nutrient removal from stormwater runoff with green sorption media under varying influent conditions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jamie; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P

    2015-01-01

    To support nutrient removal, various stormwater treatment technologies have been developed via the use of green materials, such as sawdust, tire crumbs, sand, clay, sulfur, and limestone, as typical constituents of filter media mixes. These materials aid in the physiochemical sorption and precipitation of orthophosphates as well as in the biological transformation of ammonia, nitrates and nitrites. However, these processes are dependent upon influent conditions such as hydraulic residence time, influent orthophosphate concentrations, and other chemical species present in the inflow. This study aims to compare the physiochemical removal of orthophosphate by isotherm and column tests under differing influent conditions to realize the reliability of orthophosphate removal process with the aid of green sorption media. The green sorption media of interest in this study is composed of a 5:2:2:1 (by volume) mixture of cement sand, tire crumb, fine expanded clay, and limestone. Scenarios of manipulating the hydraulic residence time of the water from 18 min and 60 min, the influent dissolved phosphorus concentrations of 1.0 mg·L(-1) and 0.5 mg·L(-1), and influent water types of distilled and pond water, were all investigated in the column tests. Experimental data were compared with the outputs from the Thomas Model based on orthophosphate removal to shed light on the equilibrium condition versus kinetic situation. With ANOVA tests, significant differences were confirmed between the experimental data sets of the breakthrough curves in the column tests. SEM imaging analysis helps to deepen the understanding of pore structures and pore networks of meta-materials being used in the green sorption media. Life expectancy curves derived from the output of Thomas Model may be applicable for future system design of engineering processes. PMID:25278294

  12. Coupling the treatment of low strength anaerobic effluent with fermented biowaste for nutrient removal via nitrite.

    PubMed

    Katsou, E; Malamis, S; Frison, N; Fatone, F

    2015-02-01

    Nutrient removal via nitrite was investigated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treating low strength effluent produced from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Domestic organic waste (DOW) and vegetable and fruit waste (VFW) were fermented and applied as external carbon source to the SBR. Nutrient removal via nitrite was much higher when DOW fermentation liquid (FL) was applied rather than VFW FL and acetic acid. The DOW FL contained propionic acid and butyric acid in significant proportions, favouring the nutrient removal via nitrite, while the VFW FL contained mainly acetic acid, which was associated with lower nutrient via nitrite activity. The application of high volumetric nitrogen loading rate (vNLR = 0.19-0.21 kgN m(-3) d(-1)) in combination with low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration during the aerobic phase, resulted in high and stable nitrite accumulation (NO2-N/NOx-N >97%). These conditions favoured the phosphorus uptake via nitrite, which reached high rates (5.95 ± 2.21 mgP (gVSS h)(-1)), while the aerobic phosphorus removal was much lower. Through mass balances, it was demonstrated that the application of the UASB-SBR process with nutrient removal via nitrite at a decentralized level is a sustainable solution for effective co-treatment of domestic sewage and biowaste. PMID:25463576

  13. Nutrient removal in a closed silvofishery system using three mangrove species (Avicennia germinans, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle).

    PubMed

    De-León-Herrera, R; Flores-Verdugo, F; Flores-de-Santiago, F; González-Farías, F

    2015-02-15

    The removal of ammonium (NH4(+)), nitrite (NO2(-)), nitrate (NO3(-)), and phosphate (PO4(-3)) in a closed silvofishery system was examined using three mangrove species (i.e., Avicennia germinans, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle). Specifically, six closed tanks were installed for this experiment with a population of 60 Dormitator latifrons fishes per tank. We planted 40 seedlings in each of three experimental tanks separated by species, while the remaining tanks were used as control. During 15 weeks, nutrient concentrations among the three mangrove systems presented no significant differences (P>0.05). However, nutrient removal variability was minimum during the last 2-5 weeks. Mangroves presented an average efficiency of 63% for the removal of NH4(+) and NO2(-). Contrary, the average removal potential of NO3(-) and PO4(-3) was 50%. Results from this study suggest that the three mangrove species could be used in a closed silvofishery systems for the biological removal of NH4(+), NO2(-), NO3(-), and PO4(-3). PMID:25499182

  14. Biological potential of extraterrestrial materials - 1. Nutrients in carbonaceous meteorites, and effects on biological growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    1997-06-01

    Soil nutrient analysis of the Murchison C2 carbonaceous chondrite shows biologically available S, P, Ca, Mg, Na, K and Fe and cation exchange capacity (CEC) at levels comparable with terrestrial agricultural soils. Weathering, and aqueous, hydrothermal (121°C, 15 min) and high-temperature (550°C, 3 h) processing increase the extractable nutrients. Extractable phosphorus (by 0.3 M NH 4F + 0.1 M HCl) content, which may be growth-limiting, is 6.3 μg g -1 in the unprocessed meteorite, but increases to 81 μg g -1 by hydrothermal processing and weathering, and to 130 μg g -1 by high temperature processing. The cation exchange capacity (CEC), attributed mainly to the organic fraction, corresponds responds to 345 meq per 100 g of the polymer, suggesting one ionizable COOH or OH group per 3-4 aromatic rings. The Allende C3(V) meteorite has low extractable Ca, Mg and K, in parallel to its low organic content and CEC, but high extractable P levels (160 μg g -1). Biological effects are observed on growth of the soil microorganisms Flavobacterium oryzihabitans and Nocardia asteroides in meteorite extracts, and the population levels suggest that P is the limiting nutrient. Effects on plant growth are examined on Solanum tuberosum (potato), where extracts of the Murchison meteorite lead to enhanced growth and pigmentation. The biologically available organic and inorganic nutrients in carbonaceous chondrites can provide concentrated solutions for prebiotic and early life processes, and serve as soils and fertilizers for future space-based biological expansion.

  15. ENGINEERING DESIGN CONFIGURATIONS FOR BIOLOGICAL AMMONIA REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many regions in the United States have excessive levels of nutrients including ammonia in their source waters. For example, farming and agricultural sources of ammonia in the Midwest contribute to relatively high levels of ammonia in many ground waters. Although ammonia in water ...

  16. Evaluation of a thermo-tolerant acidophilic alga, Galdieria sulphuraria, for nutrient removal from urban wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Selvaratnam, T; Pegallapati, A K; Montelya, F; Rodriguez, G; Nirmalakhandan, N; Van Voorhies, W; Lammers, P J

    2014-03-01

    Nutrient removal from primary wastewater effluent was tested using Galdieria sulphuraria, an acidophilic and moderately thermophilic alga. Biomass yield recorded in this study (27.42g biomass per g nitrogen removed) is higher than the average reported in the literature (25.75g g(-1)) while, the theoretical yield estimated from the empirical molecular formula of algal biomass is 15.8g g(-1). Seven-day removal efficiencies were 88.3% for ammoniacal-nitrogen and 95.5% for phosphates; corresponding removal rates were 4.85 and 1.21mg L(-1)d(-1). Although these rates are lower than the average literature values for other strains (6.36 and 1.34mg L(-1)d(-1), respectively), potential advantages of G. sulphuraria for accomplishing energy-positive nutrient removal are highlighted. Feasibility of growing G. sulphuraria outdoors at densities higher than in high-rate oxidation ponds is also demonstrated. PMID:24582952

  17. Scenedesmus quadricauda for Nutrient Removal and Lipid Production in Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y K; Yung, K K L; Tsang, Y F; Xia, Y; Wang, L; Ho, K C

    2015-12-01

    Scenedesmus quadricauda, a local freshwater microalga, was used to treat primary settled and filtrate wastewater and to produce algal lipid. For the primary settled wastewater, the maximum biomass concentrations of acclimated and unacclimated microalgae were 0.995 g/L and 0.940 g/L, respectively. Over 90% orthophosphate and 95% ammonia nitrogen in the acclimated and unacclimated cultures, respectively, were removed after five days. The lipid contents of the microalgae were higher than 13% in all cultures. The highest growth rate occurred in the 25% filtrate culture. Over 80% phosphate was removed under the 25% and 50% filtrate cultures within six days, while over 90% ammonia nitrogen was removed within five days under both conditions. The lipid content was the highest (18.1%) under the 50% filtrate condition. C16:0, C18:2n6, and C18:3n3 were dominant fatty acids. In conclusion, S. quadricauda is a viable candidate for wastewater treatment and lipid production. PMID:26652116

  18. Nutrient removal using algal-bacterial mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Vaishali; Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Bose, Purnendu

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous nitrate (N), phosphate (P), and COD removal was investigated in photobioreactors containing both algae and bacteria. The reactors were operated in the semi-batch mode with a hydraulic retention time of 2 days. Reactors were operated in two phases, (1) with 33 % biomass recycle and (2) with no biomass recycle. In both phases, more than 90 % of N and P and 80 % of COD present in synthetic wastewaters with initial N and P concentrations of up to 110 and 25 mg/L, respectively, and initial COD of 45 mg/L could be removed. Biomass growth in reactors did not increase with the increase in initial N and P concentration in either phase. However, biomass growth was slightly more in reactors operated with no biomass recycle. In both phases, N and P uptake was greater in reactors with greater initial N and P concentrations. Also in all cases, N and P uptake in the reactors was far in excess of the stoichiometric requirements for the observed biomass growth. This "luxury uptake" of nitrogen and phosphorus by biomass was responsible for excellent nitrogen and phosphorus removal as observed. However, based on the results of this study, no advantage of biomass recycling could be demonstrated. PMID:25293638

  19. Large-scale constructed wetlands for nutrient removal from stormwater runoff: An everglades restoration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardo, Mariano; Fink, Larry; Fontaine, Thomas D.; Newman, Susan; Chimney, Michael; Bearzotti, Ronald; Goforth, Gary

    1995-11-01

    The South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) constructed a wetland south of Lake Okeechobee to begin the process of removing nutrients (especially phosphorus) from agricultural stormwater runoff entering the Everglades. The project, called the Everglades Nutrient Removal (ENR) project, is a prototype for larger, similarly constructed wetlands that the SFWMD will build as part of the Everglades restoration program. This innovative project is believed to be one of the largest agricultural stormwater cleanup projects in the United States, if not in the world. This publication describes the ENR project's design, construction, and proposed operation, as well as the proposed research program to be implemented over the next few years.

  20. Evaluation of leaf removal as a means to reduce nutrient concentrations and loads in urban stormwater.

    PubMed

    Selbig, William R

    2016-11-15

    While the sources of nutrients to urban stormwater are many, the primary contributor is often organic detritus, especially in areas with dense overhead tree canopy. One way to remove organic detritus before it becomes entrained in runoff is to implement a city-wide leaf collection and street cleaning program. Improving our knowledge of the potential reduction of nutrients to stormwater through removal of leaves and other organic detritus on streets could help tailor more targeted municipal leaf collection programs. This study characterized an upper ideal limit in reductions of total and dissolved forms of phosphorus and nitrogen in stormwater through implementation of a municipal leaf collection and street cleaning program in Madison, WI, USA. Additional measures were taken to remove leaf litter from street surfaces prior to precipitation events. Loads of total and dissolved phosphorus were reduced by 84 and 83% (p<0.05), and total and dissolved nitrogen by 74 and 71% (p<0.05) with an active leaf removal program. Without leaf removal, 56% of the annual total phosphorus yield (winter excluded) was due to leaf litter in the fall compared to 16% with leaf removal. Despite significant reductions in load, total nitrogen showed only minor changes in fall yields without and with leaf removal at 19 and 16%, respectively. The majority of nutrient concentrations were in the dissolved fraction making source control through leaf removal one of the few treatment options available to environmental managers when reducing the amount of dissolved nutrients in stormwater runoff. Subsequently, the efficiency, frequency, and timing of leaf removal and street cleaning are the primary factors to consider when developing a leaf management program. PMID:27470671

  1. Fluidized-bed biological nitrogen removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hosaka, Yukihisa; Minami, Takeshi; Nasuno, Sai )

    1991-08-01

    This article describes a compact process for nitrogen removal developed in Japan. It does not require the large amounts of land of current denitrification processes. The process uses a three-phase fluidized bed of granular anthracite to which the nitrifying bacteria adhere and are fluidized by the activated sludge in the reactor. The process was developed in response to the need for nitrogen and phosphorus removal from waste water to prevent the eutrophication of Tokyo Bay, Japan.

  2. Nutrient removal performance and microbial characteristics of a full-scale IFAS-EBPR process treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the nutrient removal performance and microbial characteristics of a full-scale integrated fixed-film activated sludge-enhanced biological phosphorus removal (IFAS-EBPR) process for municipal wastewater treatment. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis results showed that the presence of bacteria in this process, including Nitrosomonas sp., Nitrospira sp., Nitrobacter sp., Pseudomonas sp. and Acinetobacter sp., clusters. The fluorescence in situ hybridization results implied that there were more nitrifiers and denitrifiers on the biofilm carriers than in the suspended sludge, whereas more phosphorus-accumulating organisms (PAOs) resided in the suspended sludge. With the cooperation of these functional microbial populations both on the biofilm carriers and in the suspended sludge, the chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH4(+)-N, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiencies were maintained at 84, 97, 70 and 81%, and the effluent concentrations of them averaged 30, 1.0, 11.5 and 0.6 mg/L, which all satisfy the Chinese discharge standard (COD <50 mg/L, NH4(+)-N <5 mg/L, TN <15 mg/L and TP <1 mg/L), respectively. Therefore, the IFAS-EBPR process is a reliable and effective process for nutrient removal. PMID:27003065

  3. Vegetation effects on floating treatment wetland nutrient removal and harvesting strategies in urban stormwater ponds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Yu; Sample, David J; Bell, Cameron

    2014-11-15

    Floating treatment wetlands (FTWs) consist of emergent macrophytes that are placed on a floating mat in a pond for water treatment and aesthetic purposes. FTWs may have unique advantages with respect to treating urban runoff within existing retention ponds for excess nutrients. However, research is lacking in providing guidance on performance of specific species for treating urban runoff, and on timing of harvest. Harvesting is needed to remove nutrients permanently from the retention pond. We investigated vegetation effects on FTWs on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) removal performance and storage in above-ground FTW macrophyte tissues. The study evaluated pickerelweed (PW, Pontederia cordata L.) and softstem bulrush (SB, Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani) over time in microcosms flushed with water obtained from a nearby urban retention pond in northern Virginia near Washington, DC. While the literature exhibits a wide range of experimental sizes, using the term mesocosm, we have chosen the term microcosm to reflect the small size of our vessel; and do not include effects of sediment. The experiment demonstrated PW outperformed SB for P and N removal. Based upon analysis of the accumulated nutrient removal over time, a harvest of the whole PW and SB plants in September or October is recommended. However, when harvesting only the aerial parts, we recommend harvesting above-ground PW tissues in July or August to maximize nutrient removal. This is because PW translocates most of its nutrients to below-ground storage organs in the fall, resulting in less nutrient mass in the above-ground tissue compared to the case in the summer (vegetative stage). Further research is suggested to investigate whether vegetation can be overly damaged from multiple harvests on an annual basis in temperate regions. PMID:25214393

  4. Nutrient removal and biogas upgrading by integrating freshwater algae cultivation with piggery anaerobic digestate liquid treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Zhao, Yongjun; Zhao, Guohua; Zhang, Hui

    2015-08-01

    An integrated approach that combined freshwater microalgae Scenedesmus obliquus (FACHB-31) cultivation with piggery anaerobic digestate liquid treatment was investigated in this study. The characteristics of algal growth, biogas production, and nutrient removal were examined using photobioreactor bags (PBRbs) to cultivate S. obliquus (FACHB-31) in digestate with various digestate dilutions (the concentration levels of 3200, 2200, 1600, 1200, 800, and 400 mg L(-1) chemical oxygen demand (COD)) during 7-day period. The effects of the level of pollutants on nutrient removal efficiency and CO2 removal process were investigated to select the optimum system for effectively upgrade biogas and simultaneously reduce the nutrient content in digestate. The treatment performance displayed that average removal rates of COD, total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorous (TP), and CO2 were 61.58-75.29, 58.39-74.63, 70.09-88.79, and 54.26-73.81 %, respectively. All the strains grew well under any the dilution treatments. With increased initial nutrient concentration to a certain range, the CO4 content (v/v) of raw biogas increased. Differences in the biogas enrichment of S. obliquus (FACHB-31) in all treatments mainly resulted from variations in biomass productivity and CO2 uptake. Notably, the diluted digestate sample of 1600 mg L(-1) COD provided an optimal nutrient concentration for S. obliquus (FACHB-31) cultivation, where the advantageous nutrient and CO2 removals, as well as the highest productivities of biomass and biogas upgrading, were revealed. Results showed that microalgal biomass production offered real opportunities to address issues such as CO2 sequestration, wastewater treatment, and biogas production. PMID:25808519

  5. The rapid return of marine-derived nutrients to a freshwater food web following dam removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tonra, Christopher M; Sager-Fradkin, Kimberly A.; Morley, Sarah A; Duda, Jeff; Marra, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Dam removal is increasingly being recognized as a viable river restoration action. Although the main beneficiaries of restored connectivity are often migratory fish populations, little is known regarding recovery of other parts of the freshwater food web, particularly terrestrial components. We measured stable isotopes in key components to the freshwater food web: salmon, freshwater macroinvertebrates and a river specialist bird, American dipper (Cinclus mexicanus), before and after removal of the Elwha Dam, WA, USA. Less than a year after dam removal, salmon returned to the system and released marine-derived nutrients (MDN). In that same year we documented an increase in stable-nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios in American dippers. These results indicate that MDN from anadromous fish, an important nutrient subsidy that crosses the aquatic–terrestrial boundary, can return rapidly to food webs after dams are removed which is an important component of ecosystem recovery.

  6. Nutrient removal and lipid accumulation properties of newly isolated microalgal strains.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Han, Fei; Song, Mingming; Zhang, Shuo

    2014-08-01

    In this work, four microalgae including Chlorella sp. SDEC-10, Chlorella ellipsoidea SDEC-11, Scenedesmus bijuga SDEC-12 and Scenedesmus quadricauda SEDC-13 isolated from a local lake have been investigated for the properties of growth, nutrient removal and lipid accumulation in synthetic sewage. Their biomass ranged between 0.4 and 0.5g/L. The total phosphorus removal efficiency of four strains was nearly 100%, but in the case of total nitrogen and ammonium the removal efficiency was relatively low. Their lipid content, ranging from 25.92% to 27.76% and corresponding to the lipid productivity 7.88-18.08mg/L/d, was higher than that obtained in BG-11. Palmitic acid and oleic acid were the predominant compositions found through fatty acids analysis. S. quadricauda SDEC-13 performed best both in nutrient removal and in lipid production among the four strains. PMID:24731916

  7. Hydraulic retention time effects on wastewater nutrient removal and bioproduct production via rotating algal biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Iman Shayan, Sahand; Agblevor, Foster A; Bertin, Lorenzo; Sims, Ronald C

    2016-07-01

    Rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) technology was successfully employed in an effective strategy to couple the removal of wastewater nutrients with accumulation of valuable bioproducts by grown algae. A secondary stage municipal wastewater was fed to the developed system and the effects of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) parameter on both nutrient removal and bioproduct production were evaluated under fed-batch operation mode. Two sets of bench scale RABRs were designed and operated with HRTs of 2 and 6days in order to provide competitive environment for algal growth. The HRT significantly affected nitrogen and phosphorus uptakes along with lipid and starch accumulations by microalgae in harvested biofilms. Domination of nitrogen removal in 2-day HRT with higher lipid accumulation (20% on dried weight basis) and phosphorus removal in 6-day HRT with higher starch production (27% on dried weight basis) was observed by comparing the performances of the RABRs in duplicate runs. PMID:27038261

  8. Impacts of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on Nutrient Removal from Wastewater and Bacterial Community Structure in Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Reti; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Xiaohui; Du, Zhize; Li, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) will inevitably lead to the exposure of wastewater treatment facilities. However, knowledge of the impacts of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal and bacterial community structure in the activated sludge process is sparse. Aims To investigate the effects of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal, and bacterial community structure in activated sludge. Methods Three triplicate sequencing batch reactors (SBR) were exposed to wastewater which contained 0, 1, and 20 mg/L MWCNTs. MiSeq sequencing was used to investigate the bacterial community structures in activated sludge samples which were exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs. Results Exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs had no acute (1 day) impact on nutrient removal from wastewater. After long-term (180 days) exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs, the average total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency was not significantly affected. TN removal efficiency decreased from 84.0% to 71.9% after long-term effects of 20 mg/L MWCNTs. After long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs, the total phosphorus removal efficiencies decreased from 96.8% to 52.3% and from 98.2% to 34.0% respectively. Further study revealed that long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs inhibited activities of ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs both inhibited activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase. MiSeq sequencing data indicated that 20 mg/L MWCNTs significantly decreased the diversity of bacterial community in activated sludge. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs differentially decreased the abundance of nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The abundance of PAOs was decreased after long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs. The abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) was increased after long-term exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs. Conclusion MWCNTs have adverse effects on biological

  9. The influence of duckweed species diversity on biomass productivity and nutrient removal efficiency in swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhao; Shi, Huijuan; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Hai; Su, Haifeng; Wang, Maolin; Zhao, Yun

    2014-09-01

    The effect of temperature, light intensity, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations on the biomass and starch content of duckweed (Landoltia punctata OT, Lemna minor OT) in monoculture and mixture were assessed. Low light intensity promoted more starch accumulation in mixture than in monoculture. The duckweed in mixture had higher biomass and nutrient removal efficiency than those in monoculture in swine wastewater. Moreover, the ability of L. punctata C3, L. minor C2, Spirodela polyrhiza C1 and their mixtures to recovery nutrients and their biomass were analyzed. Results showed that L. minor C2 had the highest N and P content, while L. punctata C3 had the highest starch content, and the mixture of L. punctata C3 and L. minor C2 had the greatest nutrient removal rate and the highest biomass. Compared with L. punctata C3 and L. minor C2 in monoculture, their biomass in mixture increased by 17.0% and 39.8%, respectively. PMID:24998479

  10. Comparison of four aquatic plant treatment systems for nutrient removal from eutrophied water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihua; Yang, Xiaoying; Wang, Zhengfang; Shan, Ying; Zheng, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Nutrient removal behaviors of four aquatic plant treatment systems (Oenanthe javanica, Iris pseudacorus L., Canna lily, and Potamogeton crispus) were systematically examined and compared. The kinetics of nutrient uptake were conducted with the standard depletion method. All four aquatic species exhibited a strong preference of ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) over nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) and nitrite nitrogen (NO2(-)-N). Main pathways of nutrient removal in the aquatic plant treatment system were examined in details. It was estimated that direct assimilation by plants accounted for 28.2-34.5% of N reduction and 25.2-33.4% of P reduction while substrate absorption accounted for 7.2-25.5% of N reduction and 7.3-25.0% of P reduction. The activity of urease and phosphatase in the substrates could indicate the aquatic plant treatment system's capability for reducing TN and soluble P load. PMID:25514395

  11. PRODUCTION AND NUTRIENT REMOVAL BY PERIPHYTON GROWN UNDER DIFFERENT LOADING RATES OF ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED DAIRY MANURE.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growing algae to scrub nutrients from manure presents an alternative to the current practice of land application and provides utilizable algal biomass as an end product. Previous studies in our laboratory on manure from two different dairy farms showed that removal by periphyton grown on ATS (algal...

  12. Corn stover nutrient removal estimates for Central Iowa, U.S.A.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most frequently asked questions to those striving to secure sustainable corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock supplies for Iowa’s new bioenergy conversion facilities is “what quantity of nutrients will be removed if I harvest my stover?”. Our objective is to summarize six years of field res...

  13. Simultaneous nutrient removal and lipid production from pretreated piggery wastewater by Chlorella vulgaris YSW-04.

    PubMed

    Ji, Min-Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Sapireddy, Veer Raghavulu; Yun, Hyun-Shik; Abou-Shanab, Reda A I; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Wontae; Timmes, Thomas C; Inamuddin; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2013-03-01

    The feasibility of using a microalga Chlorella vulgaris YSW-04 was investigated for removal of nutrients from piggery wastewater effluent. The consequent lipid production by the microalga was also identified and quantitatively determined. The wastewater effluent was diluted to different concentrations ranging from 20 to 80 % of the original using either synthetic media or distilled water. The dilution effect on both lipid production and nutrient removal was evaluated, and growth rate of C. vulgaris was also monitored. Dilution of the wastewater effluent improved microalgal growth, lipid productivity, and nutrient removal. The growth rate of C. vulgaris was increased with decreased concentration of piggery wastewater in the culture media regardless of the diluent type. Lipid production was relatively higher when using synthetic media than using distilled water for dilution of wastewater. The composition of fatty acids accumulated in microalgal biomass was dependent upon both dilution ratio and diluent type. The microalga grown on a 20 % concentration of wastewater effluent diluted with distilled water was more promising for generating high-efficient biodiesel compared to the other culture conditions. The highest removal of inorganic nutrients was also achieved at the same dilution condition. Our results revealed the optimal pretreatment condition for the biodegradation of piggery wastewater with microalgae for subsequent production of high-efficient biodiesel. PMID:22569638

  14. Nutrient removal as a function of corn stover cutting height and cob harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One-pass harvest equipment has been developed to collect corn (Zea mays L.) grain, stover, and cobs: three plant components that can be used as bioenergy feedstock. Nutrients removed in these feedstocks have soil fertility implications and affect feedstock quality. The study objectives were to quant...

  15. Treatment of high ethanol concentration wastewater by biological sand filters: enhanced COD removal and bacterial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Caballero, A; Ramond, J-B; Welz, P J; Cowan, D A; Odlare, M; Burton, S G

    2012-10-30

    Winery wastewater is characterized by its high chemical oxygen demand (COD), seasonal occurrence and variable composition, including periodic high ethanol concentrations. In addition, winery wastewater may contain insufficient inorganic nutrients for optimal biodegradation of organic constituents. Two pilot-scale biological sand filters (BSFs) were used to treat artificial wastewater: the first was amended with ethanol and the second with ethanol, inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). A number of biochemical parameters involved in the removal of pollutants through BSF systems were monitored, including effluent chemistry and bacterial community structures. The nutrient supplemented BSF showed efficient COD, N and P removal. Comparison of the COD removal efficiencies of the two BSFs showed that N and P addition enhanced COD removal efficiency by up to 16%. Molecular fingerprinting of BSF sediment samples using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that amendment with high concentrations of ethanol destabilized the microbial community structure, but that nutrient supplementation countered this effect. PMID:22683841

  16. POST BIOLOGICAL SOLIDS CHARACTERIZATION AND REMOVAL FROM PULP MILL EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study characterized the post biological solids in pulp and paper mill secondary effluent and evaluated various suspended solids removal techniques. Characterization was performed on samples from 9 mills, representing various locations, pulping processes and treatment system t...

  17. Carbon and nutrient removal from centrates and domestic wastewater using algal-bacterial biofilm bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Posadas, Esther; García-Encina, Pedro-Antonio; Soltau, Anna; Domínguez, Antonio; Díaz, Ignacio; Muñoz, Raúl

    2013-07-01

    The mechanisms of carbon and nutrient removal in an open algal-bacterial biofilm reactor and an open bacterial biofilm reactor were comparatively evaluated during the treatment of centrates and domestic wastewater. Comparable carbon removals (>80%) were recorded in both bioreactors, despite the algal-bacterial biofilm supported twice higher nutrient removals than the bacterial biofilm. The main carbon and nitrogen removal mechanisms in the algal-bacterial photobioreactor were assimilation into algal biomass and stripping, while stripping accounted for most carbon and nitrogen removal in the bacterial biofilm. Phosphorus was removed by assimilation into algal-bacterial biomass while no effective phosphorous removal was observed in the bacterial biofilm. Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removals of 91 ± 3%, 70 ± 8% and 85 ± 9%, respectively, were recorded in the algal-bacterial bioreactor at 10d of hydraulic retention time when treating domestic wastewater. However, the high water footprint recorded (0.5-6.7 Lm(-2)d(-1)) could eventually compromise the environmental sustainability of this microalgae-based technology. PMID:23644070

  18. Suitability of macrophytes for nutrient removal from surface flow constructed wetlands receiving secondary treated sewage effluent in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Greenway, M

    2003-01-01

    From a botanical perspective the major difference between waste stabilisation ponds and wetlands is the dominance of algae or floating plants in the former and emergent plants in the latter. Algae, floating and submerged plants remove nutrients directly from the water column whereas emergent species remove nutrients from the sediment. Water depth is a crucial factor in determining which plant types will become established. Surface flow constructed wetlands offer the greatest potential to grow a wide variety of different types of macrophytes. In assessing the suitability of plant species for nutrient removal, consideration must be given not only to nutrient uptake for growth but also storage of nutrients as plant biomass. A survey of macrophytes in 15 surface flow constructed wetlands treating secondary effluent was conducted in Queensland; 63 native species and 14 introduced species were found. Emergent species have been able to tolerate deeper water than in their natural environment and permanent waterlogging. All species grew well in the higher nutrient enriched wastewater. Submerged, floating leaved-attached and free floating species had the highest tissue nutrient content, followed by aquatic creepers. All these species remove nutrients from the water column. Emergent species had lower nutrient content but a greater biomass and were therefore able to store more nutrients per unit area of wetland. In order to maximise the efficiency of constructed wetlands for nutrient removal, a range of species should be used. Native species should be selected in preference to introduced/exotic species. PMID:14510202

  19. Characterization of the dissolved phosphorus uptake kinetics for the effluents from advanced nutrient removal processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Brett, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Given the importance of the watershed protection plans, direct determination of phosphorus (P) mineralization rates in advanced wastewater treatment facility effluents is crucial for developing the most protective strategies minimiz eutrophication in receiving surface waters. In this study, algal bioassays were used to determine the uptake rate of dissolved P in effluents from a broad range of advanced nutrient removal technologies (e.g., membrane biological reactor, traditional biological, tertiary membrane, Blue PRO™, etc.). Dissolved P uptake kinetics were fit to a gamma model and three first-order decay models. A traditional one-pool model correlated poorly with the experimental data (i.e., r(2) = 0.73 ± 0.09), whereas two-pool model and three-pool models performed much better (i.e., r(2) > 0.9). These models also provided strong evidence for the existence of recalcitrant P in the effluents from these tertiary facilities. The Gamma model showed the mineralization of organic P followed a reactive continuum and further suggested the partitioning of P loads with different bioavailability levels should be accounted for the future modeling practices. From a modeling perspective, the Gamma model should be considered to be the theoretically best model as it gave the most parsimonious fit to the data using the fewest terms. Our study suggested that the current Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) model could be easily modified with the updated mineralization kinetics, which should lead to both ecological and economic benefits. PMID:26233657

  20. Effect of Nutrient/Carbon Supplements on Biological Phosphate and Nitrate Uptake by Protozoan Isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpor, O. B.; Momba, M. N. B.; Okonkwo, J.

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of nine different nutrient/carbon supplements in mixed liquor on nutrient uptake ability of three wastewater protozoan isolates, which have previously been screened for phosphate and nitrate uptake efficiency. The results revealed that over 50% of phosphate was removed in the presence of sodium acetate, glucose or sucrose. Similarly, nitrate uptake of over 60% was observed in the presence of sodium acetate, sodium succinate, glucose or sucrose. These trends were common in all the isolates. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal in the mixed liquor was only found to be significantly removed in mixed liquors that were supplemented with glucose, sucrose or sodium succinate. In the presence of sodium acetate, COD was observed to increase. The findings of this investigation have revealed that nutrient uptake and COD removal by the test protozoan isolates may be dependent primarily on the initial nutrient supplement in mixed liquor.

  1. Nutrients and pharmaceuticals removal from wastewater by culture and harvesting of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Escapa, C; Coimbra, R N; Paniagua, S; García, A I; Otero, M

    2015-06-01

    This work aimed to study both the removal of nutrients and pharmaceuticals, namely salicylic acid or paracetamol, from water by the culture of Chlorella sorokiniana. The removal of nutrients was nearly complete at the end of the batch culture; above 70% for nitrates and 89% for phosphates in the semicontinuous culture. The pharmaceuticals removal kinetics were 2.3 times greater for the salicylic acid than paracetamol, reaching volumetric efficiencies above 93% for salicylic acid in the semicontinuous culture. Finally, to separate the microalgae biomass from treated water, metal salts, synthetic polyelectrolytes and a biopolymer were tested as coagulants-flocculants. The best flocculation results were achieved with AlCl3 (95.23% with 200mgg(-1), 1min incubation time). However, given that resulting flocs had different characteristics, flocculants must be chosen on the basis of the subsequent use of the biomass. PMID:25780903

  2. Streamlined ammonia removal from wastewater using biological deammonification process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work we evaluated biological deammonification process to more economically remove ammonia from livestock wastewater. The process combines partial nitritation (PN) and anammox. The anammox is a biologically mediated reaction that oxidizes ammonia (NH4+) and releases di-nitrogen gas (N2) unde...

  3. Innovative Biological Water Treatment for the Removal of Elevated Ammonia

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the effectiveness of an innovative and simple biological water treatment approach for removing 3.3 mg N/L ammonia and iron from water using a pilot study conducted at a utility in Iowa. Biological water treatment can be an effective a...

  4. Cultivation of Chlorella protothecoides with urban wastewater in continuous photobioreactor: biomass productivity and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Ramos Tercero, E A; Sforza, E; Morandini, M; Bertucco, A

    2014-02-01

    The capability to grow microalgae in nonsterilized wastewater is essential for an application of this technology in an actual industrial process. Batch experiments were carried out with the species in nonsterilized urban wastewater from local treatment plants to measure both the algal growth and the nutrient consumption. Chlorella protothecoides showed a high specific growth rate (about 1 day(-1)), and no effects of bacterial contamination were observed. Then, this microalgae was grown in a continuous photobioreactor with CO₂-air aeration in order to verify the feasibility of an integrated process of the removal of nutrient from real wastewaters. Different residence times were tested, and biomass productivity and nutrients removal were measured. A maximum of microalgae productivity was found at around 0.8 day of residence time in agreement with theoretical expectation in the case of light-limited cultures. In addition, N-NH₄ and P-PO₄ removal rates were determined in order to model the kinetic of nutrients uptake. Results from batch and continuous experiments were used to propose an integrated process scheme of wastewater treatment at industrial scale including a section with C. protothecoides. PMID:24222500

  5. Growth and efficiency of nutrient removal by Salix jiangsuensis J172 for phytoremediation of urban wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang; Sun, Haijing; Pan, Hongwei; Chen, Yitai; Jiang, Zeping; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Shufeng

    2016-02-01

    Willows are a group of versatile tree species that may have multiple environmental applications. In the present study, Salix jiangsuensis J172 plants were grown in the fixed mats as an economic plant-based treatment system to evaluate its potential for removing nutrients in wastewater. Plants grew normally in wastewater compared with those in Hoagland solution. However, wastewater containing a high concentration of chlorine ions was toxic to S. jiangsuensis J172 plants. The plants accumulated large amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus in aboveground tissues under conditions of abundant supply. The removal efficiency for raw wastewater was 82.18-87.78 % for nitrogen, 57.35-65.58 % for phosphorus, and 58.24-59.90 % for chemical oxygen demand. Nutrient removal efficiency was positively correlated with the initial nutrient supply. The results show that S. jiangsuensis J172 grown in the fixed mat economic plant-based treatment system with nutrient-rich, eutrophic water may be an effective, low-cost phytoremediation technology to treat water containing undesirable levels of wastewater. PMID:26438370

  6. In situ nutrient removal from aquaculture wastewater by aquatic vegetable Ipomoea aquatica on floating beds.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenxiang; Li, Zhongjie

    2009-01-01

    Nutrient-rich effluents caused rising concern due to eutrophication of aquatic environment by utilization of a large amount of formula feed. Nutrient removal and water quality were investigated by planting aquatic vegetable on artificial beds in 36-m(2) concrete fishponds. After treatment of 120 days, 30.6% of total nitrogen (TN) and 18.2% of total phosphorus (TP) were removed from the total input nutrients by 6-m(2) aquatic vegetable Ipomoea aquatica. The concentrations of TN, TP, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and chlorophyll a in planted ponds were significantly lower than those in non-planted ponds (P<0.05). Transparency of water in planted ponds was much higher than that of control ponds. No significant differences in the concentration of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN), nitrate nitrogen (NO(3) (-)-N) and nitrite nitrogen (NO(2) (-)-N) were found between planted and non-planted ponds. These results suggested that planting aquatic vegetable with one-sixth covered area of the fishponds could efficiently remove nutrient and improve water quality. PMID:19474487

  7. Seed removal by scatter-hoarding rodents: the effects of tannin and nutrient concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaolan

    2015-04-01

    The mutualistic interaction between scatter-hoarding rodents and seed plants have a long co-evolutionary history. Plants are believed to have evolved traits that influence the foraging behavior of rodents, thus increasing the probability of seed removal and caching, which benefits the establishment of seedlings. Tannin and nutrient content in seeds are considered among the most essential factors in this plant-animal interaction. However, most previous studies used different species of plant seeds, rendering it difficult to tease apart the relative effect of each single nutrient on rodent foraging behavior due to confounding combinations of nutrient contents across seed species. Hence, to further explore how tannin and different nutritional traits of seed affect scatter-hoarding rodent foraging preferences, we manipulated tannin, fat, protein and starch content levels, and also seed size levels by using an artificial seed system. Our results showed that both tannin and various nutrients significantly affected rodent foraging preferences, but were also strongly affected by seed size. In general, rodents preferred to remove seeds with less tannin. Fat addition could counteract the negative effect of tannin on seed removal by rodents, while the effect of protein addition was weaker. Starch by itself had no effect, but it interacted with tannin in a complex way. Our findings shed light on the effects of tannin and nutrient content on seed removal by scatter-hoarding rodents. We therefore, believe that these and perhaps other seed traits should interactively influence this important plant-rodent interaction. However, how selection operates on seed traits to counterbalance these competing interests/factors merits further study. PMID:25625425

  8. Impacts of sewage effluent on tree survival, water quality and nutrient removal in coastal plain swamps

    SciTech Connect

    Kuenzler, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    An investigation was conducted of the impacts of sprayed municipal sewage on swamp tree survival and the effects of the swamp system on nutrient concentrations below the outfalls on two streams on the coastal plain of North Carolina. Effluent was discharged to one swamp stream by aerial spraying and to the other stream by way of a small ditch. Ninety-eight percent of the trees struck directly by the spray were dead within 18 months of the date spraying began. Both swamp systems removed sufficient quantities of nitrogen and phosphorus within a few kilometers to account for virtually all of the sewage nutrient load to the swamps.

  9. Optimization of hard clams, polychaetes, physical disturbance and denitrifying bacteria of removing nutrients in marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Thrush, Simon F; Wan, Xihe; Li, Hui; Qiao, Yi; Jiang, Ge; Sun, Ruijian; Wang, LiBao; He, Peimin

    2016-09-15

    Marine organisms are known to play important roles in transforming nutrients in sediments, however, guidelines to optimize sediment restoration are not available. We conducted a laboratory mesocosm experiment to investigate the role of hard clams, polychaetes, the degree of physical disturbance and denitrifying bacterial concentrations in removing total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and total organic carbon (TOC) in marine sediments. Response surface methodology was employed to analyze the results of initial experiments and in a subsequent experiment identified optimal combinations of parameters. Balancing the TN, TP, TOC removal efficiency, our model predicted 39% TN removal, 33% TP removal, and 42% TOC removal for a 14-day laboratory bioremediation trial using hard clams biomass of 1.2kgm(-2), physical disturbance depth of 16.4cm, bacterial density of 0.18Lm(-2), and polychaetes biomass of 0.16kgm(-2), respectively. These results emphasize the value of combining different species in field-based bioremediation. PMID:27371956

  10. Nutrients removal and nitrous oxide emission during simultaneous nitrification, denitrification, and phosphorus removal process: effect of iron.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wenlin; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Weihua; Zhou, Xiaowei

    2016-08-01

    The short- and long-term influences of ferric iron (Fe(III)) on nutrients removal and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during SNDPR process were evaluated. According to the continuous cycle experiments, it was concluded that the addition of Fe(III) could lower the nitrogen removal of the following cycle during SNDPR process, which was mainly induced by the chemical removal of phosphorus. However, the impacts were transitory, and simultaneous nitrogen and phosphorus removal would recover from the inhibition of Fe(III) after running certain cycles. Moreover, the addition of Fe(III) could stimulate N2O emission transitorily during SNDPR process. However, if Fe(III) was added into reactor continuously, the nitrogen removal would be improved, especially at low Fe load condition. It was because that the activity of NO reductase was enhanced by the addition of Fe. However, the low Fe load in reactor would induce more N2O emission. When Fe(III) load was 40 mg/L in the reactor, the N2O yield was 10 % higher than control. The TN removal was weakened when Fe(III) load reached to 60 mg/L, and the N2O yield was lower than control, due to the inhibition of the high Fe load on denitrification enzymes. PMID:27137189

  11. Optimization of simultaneous biomass production and nutrient removal by mixotrophic Chlorella sp. using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Ru; Chen, Jen-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    The bioprospecting of potentially mixotrophic microalgae in a constructed wetland was conducted. A locally isolated microalga, Chlorella sp., was grown to determine the effect of temperature, aeration rate, and cultivation time on simultaneous biomass production and nutrient removal from piggery wastewater using central composite design (CCD). The most important variable for the biomass productivity of Chlorella sp. was aeration rate, while that for lipid content and nutrient removal efficiency was cultivation time. Total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiencies were higher than that of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from piggery wastewater. The CCD results indicate that the highest biomass productivity (79.2 mg L(-1) d(-1)) and simultaneous nutrient removal efficiency (TN 80.9%, TP 99.2%, COD 74.5%) were obtained with a cultivation temperature of 25 °C, a cultivation time of 5 days, and an air aeration rate of 1.6 L L(-1) min(-1). Palmitic acid (C16:0) and linoleic acid (C18:2) were both abundant in Chlorella sp. cells under mixotrophic cultivation with piggery wastewater. PMID:27054723

  12. Influence of carbon source on nutrient removal performance and physical-chemical characteristics of aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Lashkarizadeh, Monireh; Yuan, Qiuyan; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2015-01-01

    The impact of carbon source variation on the physical and chemical characteristics of aerobic granular sludge and its biological nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) removal performance was investigated. Two identical sequencing batch reactors, R1 and R2, were set up. Granular biomass was cultivated to maturity using acetate-based synthetic wastewater. After mature granules in both reactors with simultaneous chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonium and phosphorus removal capability were achieved, the feed of R2 was changed to municipal wastewater and R1 was continued on synthetic feed as control. Biological phosphorus removal was completely inhibited in R2 due to lack of readily biodegradable COD; however, the biomass maintained high ammonium and COD removal efficiencies. The disintegration of the granules in R2 occurred during the first two weeks after the change of feed, but it did not have significant impacts on settling properties of the sludge. Re-granulation of the biomass in R2 was then observed within 30 d after granules' disintegration when the biomass acclimated to the new substrate. The granular biomass in R1 and R2 maintained a Sludge Volume Index close to 60 and 47 mL g(-1), respectively, during the experimental period. It was concluded that changing the carbon source from readily biodegradable acetate to the more complex ones present in municipal wastewater did not have significant impacts on aerobic granular sludge characteristics; it particularly did not affect its settling properties. However, sufficient readily biodegradable carbon would have to be provided to maintain simultaneous biological nitrate and phosphorus removal. PMID:25719420

  13. Nutrient removal by grasses irrigated with wastewater and nitrogen balance for reed canarygrass

    SciTech Connect

    Geber, U.

    2000-04-01

    To develop complementary wastewater treatment systems that increase nutrient reduction and recycling, an experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of three grass species as catch crops for N, P, and K at Aurahammar wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in the southern part of Sweden. Another objective was also to assess soil accumulation of N, P, and K and the risk of N leaching by drainage. Three grasses--reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.), meadow foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis L.), and smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss.)--were irrigated with a mixture of treated effluent and supernatant at two levels of intensity [optimum level (equal to evapotranspiration) and over-optimal level] and at two nutrient levels, approximately 150 and 300 kg N ha{sup {minus}1}. There were small differences in dry matter (DM) yield between grass species and no difference in N removal among species. The amount of N removed in harvested biomass to N applied was 0.58 in 1995 and 0.63 in 1996. The amount of N removed increased with increased nutrient load. Applied amounts of P were the same as P in harvested biomass. All species removed K amounts several times greater than applied amounts. Increased nutrient load increased overall K removal. The low amount of mineral N and especially NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N in the soil profile in autumn samplings indicate the risk for leaching is small. Soil water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} contents were also low, <2.5 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N L{sup {minus}1} during the growing season, with a mean value of <1 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N L{sup {minus}1}.

  14. Enhanced nutrient removal from municipal wastewater assisted by mixotrophic microalgal cultivation using glycerol.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prabuddha L; Choi, Hee Jeong; Lee, Seung-Mok

    2016-05-01

    In a present study, nutrient removal from municipal wastewater by Chlorella vulgaris and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated by using mixotrophic cultivation with glycerol (0 to 5 g/L). Performance parameters were assessed by estimating the removal of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand (COD), biomass growth, chlorophyll content, lipid yield, and fatty acids. With the addition of 2 g/L glycerol, a maximum biomass productivity of 56 mg/L/day was achieved in the mixotrophic culture of C. vulgaris within 12 days. The mixotrophic culture showed a 30-fold increase in biomass productivity compared to the wastewater without any glycerol. However, the highest total nitrogen removal (80.62 %), total phosphate removal (60.72 %), and COD removal (96.3 %) was observed in the N. oculata culture supplemented with 3, 5, and 1 g/L glycerol, respectively. These results suggest that mixotrophic cultivation using glycerol offers great potential in the production of renewable biomass, waste water treatment, and consequent production of high-value microalgal oil. Graphical Abstract Simultaneous biomass production and nutrient removal using microalgae cultivated in wastewater supplemented with glycerol. PMID:26867689

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF NUTRIENT EXPOSURE AND BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE INDICATORS FOR LAKE MICHIGAN COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines how landscape-scale gradient affect sedimentation rates, nutrient exposure, and biological responses in Lake Michigan coastal wetlands, and assess indicators for these trends. Twenty riverine coastal wetlands in Lake Michigan (Herdendorf 1981) were selected t...

  16. Removal of arsenic and iron removal from drinking water using coagulation and biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Pramanik, Sagor Kumar; Suja, Fatihah

    2016-02-01

    Effects of biological activated carbon (BAC), biological aerated filter (BAF), alum coagulation and Moringa oleifera coagulation were investigated to remove iron and arsenic contaminants from drinking water. At an initial dose of 5 mg/L, the removal efficiency for arsenic and iron was 63% and 58% respectively using alum, and 47% and 41% respectively using Moringa oleifera. The removal of both contaminants increased with the increase in coagulant dose and decrease in pH. Biological processes were more effective in removing these contaminants than coagulation. Compared to BAF, BAC gave greater removal of both arsenic and iron, removing 85% and 74%, respectively. Longer contact time for both processes could reduce the greater concentration of arsenic and iron contaminants. The addition of coagulation (at 5 mg/L dosage) and a biological process (with 15 or 60 min contact time) could significantly increase removal efficiency, and the maximum removal was observed for the combination of alum and BAC treatment (60 min contact time), with 100% and 98.56% for arsenic and iron respectively. The reduction efficiency of arsenic and iron reduced with the increase in the concentration of dissolved organics in the feedwater due to the adsorption competition between organic molecules and heavy metals. PMID:26837833

  17. Removal of trace organic micropollutants by drinking water biological filters.

    PubMed

    Zearley, Thomas L; Summers, R Scott

    2012-09-01

    The long-term removal of 34 trace organic micropollutants (<1 μg L(-1)) was evaluated and modeled in drinking water biological filters with sand media from a full-scale plant. The micropollutants included pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products, some of which are endocrine disrupting chemicals, and represent a wide range of uses, chemical structures, adsorbabilities, and biodegradabilities. Micropollutant removal ranged from no measurable removal (<15%) for 13 compounds to removal below the detection limit and followed one of four trends over the one year study period: steady state removal throughout, increasing removal to steady state (acclimation), decreasing removal, or no removal (recalcitrant). Removals for all 19 nonrecalcitrant compounds followed first-order kinetics when at steady state with increased removal at longer empty bed contact times (EBCT). Rate constants were calculated, 0.02-0.37 min(-1), and used in a pseudo-first-order rate model with the EBCT to predict removals in laboratory biofilters at a different EBCT and influent conditions. Drinking water biofiltration has the potential to be an effective process for the control of many trace organic contaminants and a pseudo-first-order model can serve as an appropriate method for approximating performance. PMID:22881485

  18. A Potential Waste to be Selected as Media for Metal and Nutrient Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayadi, N.; Othman, N.; Hamdan, R.

    2016-07-01

    This study describes the potential of application of cassava peel, banana peel, coconut shell, and coconut coir to be selected as metal removal while limestone and steel slag for nutrient removal. The media were characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-Ray (FESEM-EDX), and X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD). The results of XRF analysis medias show the present of calcium oxide, CaO which confirm the high efficiency in adsorbing metal ions and nutrient which is in agreement with the result of XRD. The characteristics of medias by FTIR analysis also confirmed the involvement of alcohol, carboxylic, alkanes, amines and ethers which play important role to reduce ions while FESEM-EDX indicates the porous structures of study medias. The characterization analysis highlight that cassava peel and steel slag were selected as a potential media in this study.

  19. Influence of light presence and biomass concentration on nutrient kinetic removal from urban wastewater by Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J; Arbib, Z; Alvarez-Díaz, P D; Garrido-Pérez, C; Barragán, J; Perales, J A

    2014-05-20

    This work was aimed at studying the effect of light-darkness and high-low biomass concentrations in the feasibility of removing nitrogen and phosphorus from urban treated wastewater by the microalga Scenedesmus obliquus. Laboratory experiments were conducted in batch, where microalgae were cultured under different initial biomass concentrations (150 and 1500mgSSl(-1)) and light conditions (dark or illuminated). Nutrient uptake was more dependent on internal nutrient content of the biomass than on light presence or biomass concentration. When a maximum nitrogen or phosphorus content in the biomass was reached (around 8% and 2%, respectively), the removal of that nutrient was almost stopped. Biomass concentration affected more than light presence on the nutrient removal rate, increasing significantly with its increase. Light was only required to remove nutrients when the maximum nutrient storage capacity of the cells was reached and further growth was therefore needed. Residence times to maintain a stable biomass concentration, avoiding the washout of the reactor, were much higher than those needed to remove the nutrients from the wastewater. This ability to remove nutrients in the absence of light could lead to new configurations of reactors aimed to wastewater treatment. PMID:24631723

  20. The removal of nutrients from non-point source wastewater by a hybrid bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghong; Hu, Zhengyi; Yang, Linzhang; Graham, Bruce; Kerr, Philip G

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this project was to establish an economical and environmentally benign biotechnology for removing nutrients from non-point source wastewater. The proposal involves a hybrid bioreactor comprised of sequential anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic (A(2)/O) processes and an eco-ditch being constructed and applied in a suburban area, Kunming, south-western China, where wastewater was discharged from an industrial park and suburban communities. The results show that the hybrid bioreactor fosters heterotrophic and autotrophic microorganisms. When the hydraulic load is 200 m(3) per day with the running mode in 12h cycles, the removal efficiencies of the nutrients were 81% for TP, 74% for TDP, 82% for TN, 79% for NO(3)-N and 86% for NH(4)-N. The improved bacterial community structure and bacterial habitats further implied enhanced water quality and indicates that the easily-deployed, affordable and environmentally-friendly hybrid bioreactor is a promising bio-measure for removing high loadings of nutrients from non-point source wastewater. PMID:21093255

  1. Life-Cycle Assessment of Advanced Nutrient Removal Technologies for Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Sheikh M; Eckelman, Matthew J; Onnis-Hayden, Annalisa; Gu, April Z

    2016-03-15

    Advanced nutrient removal processes, while improving the water quality of the receiving water body, can also produce indirect environmental and health impacts associated with increases in usage of energy, chemicals, and other material resources. The present study evaluated three levels of treatment for nutrient removal (N and P) using 27 representative treatment process configurations. Impacts were assessed across multiple environmental and health impacts using life-cycle assessment (LCA) following the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and Other Environmental Impacts (TRACI) impact-assessment method. Results show that advanced technologies that achieve high-level nutrient removal significantly decreased local eutrophication potential, while chemicals and electricity use for these advanced treatments, particularly multistage enhanced tertiary processes and reverse osmosis, simultaneously increased eutrophication indirectly and contributed to other potential environmental and health impacts including human and ecotoxicity, global warming potential, ozone depletion, and acidification. Average eutrophication potential can be reduced by about 70% when Level 2 (TN = 3 mg/L; TP = 0.1 mg/L) treatments are employed instead of Level 1 (TN = 8 mg/L; TP = 1 mg/L), but the implementation of more advanced tertiary processes for Level 3 (TN = 1 mg/L; TP = 0.01 mg/L) treatment may only lead to an additional 15% net reduction in life-cycle eutrophication potential. PMID:26871301

  2. Nutrient removal and lipid production by Coelastrella sp. in anaerobically and aerobically treated swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Luo, Le; He, Huijun; Yang, Chunping; Wen, Shan; Zeng, Guangming; Wu, Mengjie; Zhou, Zili; Lou, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Coelastrella sp. QY01, a microalgae species isolated from a local pond, was identified and used for the treatment of anaerobically and aerobically treated swine wastewater (AnATSW). Microalgal growth characteristics, nutrient removal and lipid accumulation of QY01 cultivated in the initial concentration of AnATSW ranged from 63 to 319mg NH3-N/L were examined. The specific growth rate of QY01 cultivated in cultures ranged from 0.269 to 0.325day(-1) with a biomass productivity from 42.77 to 57.46mgL(-1)day(-1). Removal rates for NH3-N, TP and inorganic carbon in AnATSW at the various nutrient concentrations ranged from 90% to 100%, from 90% to 100% and from 74% to 78%, respectively. The lipid content of QY01 ranged from 22.4% to 24.8%. The lipid productivity was positive correlation with the biomass productivity. 40% AnATSW was optimal for QY01 cultivation, in which nutrient removal and productivity of biomass and lipid were maximized. PMID:27236400

  3. Influence of wastewater composition on nutrient removal behaviors in the new anaerobic–anoxic/nitrifying/induced crystallization process

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Lu, Xiwu; Yu, Ran; Gu, Qian; Zhou, Yi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the new anaerobic–anoxic/nitrifying/induced crystallization (A2N–IC) system was compared with anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying (A2N) process to investigate nutrient removal performance under different influent COD and ammonia concentrations. Ammonia and COD removal rates were very stable in both processes, which were maintained at 84.9% and 86.6% when the influent ammonia varied from 30 mg L−1 to 45 mg L−1 and COD ranged from 250 mg L−1 to 300 mg L−1. The effluent phosphorus always maintained below 0.2 mg L−1 in A2N–IC, whereas in A2N the effluent phosphorus concentration was 0.4–1.7 mg L−1, demonstrating that A2N–IC is suitable to apply in a broader influent COD and ammonia concentration range. Under higher influent COD (300 mg L−1) or lower ammonia conditions (30 mg L−1), the main function of chemical induced crystallization was to coordinate better nutrient ratio for anoxic phosphorus uptake, whereas under high phosphorus concentration, it was to reduce phosphorus loading for biological system. Under the similar influent wastewater compositions, phosphorus release amounts were always lower in A2N–IC. To clarify the decrease procedure of phosphorus release in the A2N–IC, the equilibrium between chemical phosphorus removal and biological phosphorus removal in A2N–IC was analyzed by mass balance equations. During the long-term experiment, some undesirable phenomena were observed: the declining nitrification in post-aerobic tank and calcium phosphorus precipitation in the anaerobic tank. The reasons were analyzed; furthermore, the corresponding improvements were proposed. Nitrification effect could be enhanced in the post-aerobic tank, therefore ammonia removal rate could be increased; and biologically induced phosphorus precipitation could be inhibited by controlling pH at the anaerobic stage, so the phosphorus release and recovery could be improved. PMID:24596502

  4. Influence of wastewater composition on nutrient removal behaviors in the new anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying/induced crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Lu, Xiwu; Yu, Ran; Gu, Qian; Zhou, Yi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the new anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying/induced crystallization (A2N-IC) system was compared with anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying (A2N) process to investigate nutrient removal performance under different influent COD and ammonia concentrations. Ammonia and COD removal rates were very stable in both processes, which were maintained at 84.9% and 86.6% when the influent ammonia varied from 30 mg L(-1) to 45 mg L(-1) and COD ranged from 250 mg L(-1) to 300 mg L(-1). The effluent phosphorus always maintained below 0.2 mg L(-1) in A2N-IC, whereas in A2N the effluent phosphorus concentration was 0.4-1.7 mg L(-1), demonstrating that A2N-IC is suitable to apply in a broader influent COD and ammonia concentration range. Under higher influent COD (300 mg L(-1)) or lower ammonia conditions (30 mg L(-1)), the main function of chemical induced crystallization was to coordinate better nutrient ratio for anoxic phosphorus uptake, whereas under high phosphorus concentration, it was to reduce phosphorus loading for biological system. Under the similar influent wastewater compositions, phosphorus release amounts were always lower in A2N-IC. To clarify the decrease procedure of phosphorus release in the A2N-IC, the equilibrium between chemical phosphorus removal and biological phosphorus removal in A2N-IC was analyzed by mass balance equations. During the long-term experiment, some undesirable phenomena were observed: the declining nitrification in post-aerobic tank and calcium phosphorus precipitation in the anaerobic tank. The reasons were analyzed; furthermore, the corresponding improvements were proposed. Nitrification effect could be enhanced in the post-aerobic tank, therefore ammonia removal rate could be increased; and biologically induced phosphorus precipitation could be inhibited by controlling pH at the anaerobic stage, so the phosphorus release and recovery could be improved. PMID:24596502

  5. Sludge Retention Time as a Suitable Operational Parameter to Remove Both Estrogen and Nutrients in an Anaerobic–Anoxic–Aerobic Activated Sludge System

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qingling; Li, Yongmei; Yang, Shijia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Estrogen in wastewater are responsible for a significant part of the endocrine-disrupting effects observed in the aquatic environment. The effect of sludge retention time (SRT) on the removal and fate of 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in an anaerobic–anoxic–oxic activated sludge system designed for nutrient removal was investigated by laboratory-scale experiments using synthetic wastewater. With a hydraulic retention time of 8 h, when SRT ranged 10–25 days, E2 was almost completely removed from water, and EE2 removal efficiency was 65%–81%. Both estrogens were easily sorbed onto activated sludge. Distribution coefficients (Kd) of estrogens on anaerobic sludge were greater than those on anoxic and aerobic sludges. Mass balance calculation indicated that 99% of influent E2 was degraded by the activated sludge process, and 1% remained in excess sludge; of influent EE2, 62.0%–80.1% was biodegraded; 18.9%–34.7% was released in effluent; and 0.88%–3.31% remained in excess sludge. Optimal SRT was 20 days for both estrogen and nutrient removal. E2 was almost completely degraded, and EE2 was only partly degraded in the activated sludge process. Residual estrogen on excess sludge must be considered in the sludge treatment and disposal processes. The originality of the work is that removal of nutrients and estrogens were linked, and optimal SRT for both estrogen and nutrient removal in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal system was determined. This has an important implication for the design and operation of full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:23633892

  6. Sludge Retention Time as a Suitable Operational Parameter to Remove Both Estrogen and Nutrients in an Anaerobic-Anoxic-Aerobic Activated Sludge System.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qingling; Li, Yongmei; Yang, Shijia

    2013-04-01

    Estrogen in wastewater are responsible for a significant part of the endocrine-disrupting effects observed in the aquatic environment. The effect of sludge retention time (SRT) on the removal and fate of 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in an anaerobic-anoxic-oxic activated sludge system designed for nutrient removal was investigated by laboratory-scale experiments using synthetic wastewater. With a hydraulic retention time of 8 h, when SRT ranged 10-25 days, E2 was almost completely removed from water, and EE2 removal efficiency was 65%-81%. Both estrogens were easily sorbed onto activated sludge. Distribution coefficients (K d) of estrogens on anaerobic sludge were greater than those on anoxic and aerobic sludges. Mass balance calculation indicated that 99% of influent E2 was degraded by the activated sludge process, and 1% remained in excess sludge; of influent EE2, 62.0%-80.1% was biodegraded; 18.9%-34.7% was released in effluent; and 0.88%-3.31% remained in excess sludge. Optimal SRT was 20 days for both estrogen and nutrient removal. E2 was almost completely degraded, and EE2 was only partly degraded in the activated sludge process. Residual estrogen on excess sludge must be considered in the sludge treatment and disposal processes. The originality of the work is that removal of nutrients and estrogens were linked, and optimal SRT for both estrogen and nutrient removal in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal system was determined. This has an important implication for the design and operation of full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:23633892

  7. Nutrient removal and microalgal biomass production on urine in a short light-path photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tuantet, Kanjana; Temmink, Hardy; Zeeman, Grietje; Janssen, Marcel; Wijffels, René H; Buisman, Cees J N

    2014-05-15

    Due to the high nitrogen and phosphorus content, source-separated urine can serve as a major nutrient source for microalgae production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutrient removal rate and the biomass production rate of Chlorella sorokiniana being grown continuously in urine employing a short light-path photobioreactor. The results demonstrated, for the first time, the possibility of continuous microalgae cultivation in human urine. The lowest dilution factor successfully employed was a factor of 2 (50% v/v urine). Microalgae dominated a smaller bacterial population and were responsible for more than 90% of total nitrogen and phosphorus removal. With a light-path of 10 mm, a maximum volumetric biomass productivity as high as 9.3 g L(-1) d(-1) was achieved. The co-existing bacterial population removed up to 70% of organic pollutants from the urine at a rate of 1300 mg COD L(-1) d(-1). Enriching the urine with magnesium, adjusting the N:P molar ratio, and shortening the reactor light-path further increased the volumetric biomass productivity to 14.8 g L(-1) d(-1). The corresponding nitrogen and phosphorus removal rates were 1300 and 150 mg L(-1) d(-1), respectively. The subsequently produced biomass contained 43-53% w/w proteins and 16-25% w/w total fatty acids. PMID:24607312

  8. Physical and biological controls on reach to catchment scale nutrient retention and streamwater composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, T. P.; McGlynn, B. L.; Wohl, E.

    2014-12-01

    Physical and biological processes occurring within fluvial networks can have strong influence on catchment scale retention of water and nutrients. Quantifying the physical (i.e., hydrologic exchange) and biological (i.e., nutrient uptake) contributions to total retention and deciphering how they relate to catchment morphology remains a central challenge in the hydrologic and biogeo-sciences. Here we present examples from our research that highlight the interactions between biology, physical hydrology, and geomorphology and how they combine to influence nutrient retention and streamwater compositions. Biological nutrient uptake in streams can have substantial influence on downstream fluxes and induce nutrient transformation along stream networks. Additionally, hydrologic loss of water and associated nutrients from streams to surrounding groundwater systems can greatly elongate water and nutrient retention times. While in-stream nutrient uptake is often associated with hyporheic exchanges that occur at sub-meter scales, these are nested within a larger framework of fluvial exchanges (100s - 1000s of meters). Larger scale exchanges can lead to strong shifts in streamwater composition over relatively short spatial scales (~1km) and are often very pronounced along geomorphic transitions (e.g., mountain to valley) and/or catchment retention zones (e.g., alluvial aquifers, wetlands, lakes). In fact, 50 - 80% of the water in the channel can be exchanged and replaced by different water (i.e., groundwater) along geomorphic transitions/catchment retention zones that are ~1 km in scale. These features can enhance geochemical processing through extended interactions between water, sediment, and nutrients. Accordingly, we suggest that although catchment retention features may be limited in spatial extent (~1km) and frequency they have the capacity to play a disproportionately large role in controlling catchment retention dynamics and setting fluvial network streamwater

  9. A novel control strategy for efficient biological phosphorus removal with carbon-limited wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Javier; Guisasola, Albert; Baeza, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    This work shows the development and the in silico evaluation of a novel control strategy aiming at successful biological phosphorus removal in a wastewater treatment plant operating in an A(2)/O configuration with carbon-limited influent. The principle of this novel approach is that the phosphorus in the effluent can be controlled with the nitrate setpoint in the anoxic reactor as manipulated variable. The theoretical background behind this control strategy is that reducing nitrate entrance to the anoxic reactor would result in more organic matter available for biological phosphorus removal. Thus, phosphorus removal would be enhanced at the expense of increasing nitrate in the effluent (but always below legal limits). The work shows the control development, tuning and performance in comparison to open-loop conditions and to two other conventional control strategies for phosphorus removal based on organic matter and metal addition. It is shown that the novel proposed strategy achieves positive nutrient removal results with similar operational costs to the other control strategies and open-loop operation. PMID:25116500

  10. Characterization of the In Situ Ecophysiology of Novel Phylotypes in Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Awata, Takanori; Nierychlo, Marta; Albertsen, Mads; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-01-01

    An in depth understanding of the ecology of activated sludge nutrient removal wastewater treatment systems requires detailed knowledge of the community composition and metabolic activities of individual members. Recent 16S rRNA gene amplicon surveys of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal indicate the presence of a core set of bacterial genera. These organisms are likely responsible for the bulk of nutrient transformations underpinning the functions of these plants. While the basic activities of some of these genera in situ are known, there is little to no information for the majority. This study applied microautoradiography coupled with fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-FISH) for the in situ characterization of selected genus-level-phylotypes for which limited physiological information is available. These included Sulfuritalea and A21b, both within the class Betaproteobacteria, as well as Kaga01, within sub-group 10 of the phylum Acidobacteria. While the Sulfuritalea spp. were observed to be metabolically versatile, the A21b and Kaga01 phylotypes appeared to be highly specialized. PMID:26340564

  11. Optimization and performance evaluation for nutrient removal from palm oil mill effluent wastewater using microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Raheek I.; Wong, Z. H.; Mohammad, A. W.

    2015-04-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) wastewater was produced in huge amounts in Malaysia, and if it discharged into the environment, it causes a serious problem regarding its high content of nutrients. This study was devoted to POME wastewater treatment with microalgae. The main objective was to find the optimum conditions (retention time, and pH) in the microalgae treatment of POME wastewater considering retention time as a most important parameter in algae treatment, since after the optimum conditions there is a diverse effect of time and pH and so, the process becomes costly. According to our knowledge, there is no existing study optimized the retention time and pH with % removal of nutrients (ammonia nitrogen NH3-N, and orthophosphorous PO43-) for microalgae treatment of POME wastewater. In order to achieve with optimization, a central composite rotatable design with a second order polynomial model was used, regression coefficients and goodness of fit results in removal percentages of nutrients (NH3-N, and PO43-) were estimated.WinQSB technique was used to optimize the surface response objective functionfor the developed model. Also experiments were done to validate the model results.The optimum conditions were found to be 18 day retention time for ammonia nitrogen, and pH of 9.22, while for orthophosphorous, 15 days were indicated as the optimum retention time with a pH value of 9.2.

  12. Biological removal of phenol from wastewaters: a mini review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, N. V.; Anupama, S.; Navya, K.; Shalini, H. N.; Idris, M.; Hampannavar, U. S.

    2014-03-01

    Phenol and its derivatives are common water pollutants and include wide variety of organic chemicals. Phenol poisoning can occur by skin absorption, inhalation, ingestion and various other methods which can result in health effects. High exposures to phenol may be fatal to human beings. Accumulation of phenol creates toxicity both for flora and fauna. Therefore, removal of phenol is crucial to perpetuate the environment and individual. Among various treatment methods available for removal of phenols, biodegradation is environmental friendly. Biological methods are gaining importance as they convert the wastes into harmless end products. The present work focuses on assessment of biological removal (biodegradation) of phenol. Various factors influence the efficiency of biodegradation of phenol such as ability of the microorganism, enzymes involved, the mechanism of degradation and influencing factors. This study describes about the sources of phenol, adverse effects on the environment, microorganisms involved in the biodegradation (aerobic and anaerobic) and enzymes that polymerize phenol.

  13. Biological removal of phenol from wastewaters: a mini review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, N. V.; Anupama, S.; Navya, K.; Shalini, H. N.; Idris, M.; Hampannavar, U. S.

    2015-06-01

    Phenol and its derivatives are common water pollutants and include wide variety of organic chemicals. Phenol poisoning can occur by skin absorption, inhalation, ingestion and various other methods which can result in health effects. High exposures to phenol may be fatal to human beings. Accumulation of phenol creates toxicity both for flora and fauna. Therefore, removal of phenol is crucial to perpetuate the environment and individual. Among various treatment methods available for removal of phenols, biodegradation is environmental friendly. Biological methods are gaining importance as they convert the wastes into harmless end products. The present work focuses on assessment of biological removal (biodegradation) of phenol. Various factors influence the efficiency of biodegradation of phenol such as ability of the microorganism, enzymes involved, the mechanism of degradation and influencing factors. This study describes about the sources of phenol, adverse effects on the environment, microorganisms involved in the biodegradation (aerobic and anaerobic) and enzymes that polymerize phenol.

  14. Mixed Wastewater Coupled with CO2 for Microalgae Culturing and Nutrient Removal

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lili; Shi, Jianye; Miao, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Biomass, nutrient removal capacity, lipid productivity and morphological changes of Chlorella sorokiniana and Desmodesmus communis were investigated in mixed wastewaters with different CO2 concentrations. Under optimal condition, which was 1:3 ratio of swine wastewater to second treated municipal wastewater with 5% CO2, the maximum biomass concentrations were 1.22 g L-1 and 0.84 g L-1 for C. sorokiniana and D. communis, respectively. Almost all of the ammonia and phosphorus were removed, the removal rates of total nitrogen were 88.05% for C. sorokiniana and 83.18% for D. communis. Lipid content reached 17.04% for C. sorokiniana and 20.37% for D. communis after 10 days culture. CO2 aeration increased intracellular particle numbers of both microalgae and made D. communis tend to be solitary. The research suggested the aeration of CO2 improve the tolerance of microalgae to high concentration of NH4-N, and nutrient excess stress could induce lipid accumulation of microalgae. PMID:26418261

  15. Feasibility of using brewery wastewater for biodiesel production and nutrient removal by Scenedesmus dimorphus.

    PubMed

    Lutzu, Giovanni Antonio; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the potential use of a brewery wastewater as a medium for the cultivation of the oleaginous species Scenedesmus dimorphus with the double aim of removing nutrients and to produce biomass as feedstock for biodiesel. For this purpose, effects of nitrogen (61.8-247 mg L(-1)), phosphorous (1.4-5.5 mg L(-1)), and iron (1.5-6 mg L(-1)) concentrations on growth, nutrients uptake, lipid accumulation, and fatty acids profile of this microalga were investigated. Results showed that brewery wastewater can be used as a culture medium even if nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations should have been modified to improve both biomass (6.82 g L(-1)) and lipid accumulation (44.26%). The analysis revealed a C16-C18 composition of 93.47% fatty acids methyl esters with a relative high portion of unsaturated ones (67.24%). High removal efficiency (>99%) for total nitrogen and total phosphorous and a reduction of up to 65% in chemical oxygen demand were achieved, respectively. The final microalgae biomass, considering its high lipid content as well as its compliance with the standards for the quality of biodiesel, and considering also the high removal efficiencies obtained for macronutrients and organic carbon, makes the brewery wastewater a viable option as a priceless medium for the cultivation of microalgae. PMID:26714635

  16. Mixed Wastewater Coupled with CO2 for Microalgae Culturing and Nutrient Removal.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lili; Shi, Jianye; Miao, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Biomass, nutrient removal capacity, lipid productivity and morphological changes of Chlorella sorokiniana and Desmodesmus communis were investigated in mixed wastewaters with different CO2 concentrations. Under optimal condition, which was 1:3 ratio of swine wastewater to second treated municipal wastewater with 5% CO2, the maximum biomass concentrations were 1.22 g L-1 and 0.84 g L-1 for C. sorokiniana and D. communis, respectively. Almost all of the ammonia and phosphorus were removed, the removal rates of total nitrogen were 88.05% for C. sorokiniana and 83.18% for D. communis. Lipid content reached 17.04% for C. sorokiniana and 20.37% for D. communis after 10 days culture. CO2 aeration increased intracellular particle numbers of both microalgae and made D. communis tend to be solitary. The research suggested the aeration of CO2 improve the tolerance of microalgae to high concentration of NH4-N, and nutrient excess stress could induce lipid accumulation of microalgae. PMID:26418261

  17. Growing Chlorella sp. on meat processing wastewater for nutrient removal and biomass production.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Ma, Xiaochen; Chandra, Ceria; Doan, Yen T T; Ma, Yiwei; Zheng, Hongli; Cheng, Sibo; Griffith, Richard; Chen, Paul; Chen, Chi; Urriola, Pedro E; Shurson, Gerald C; Gislerød, Hans R; Ruan, Roger

    2015-12-01

    In this work, Chlorella sp. (UM6151) was selected to treat meat processing wastewater for nutrient removal and biomass production. To balance the nutrient profile and improve biomass yield at low cost, an innovative algae cultivation model based on wastewater mixing was developed. The result showed that biomass yield (0.675-1.538 g/L) of algae grown on mixed wastewater was much higher than that on individual wastewater and artificial medium. Wastewater mixing eased the bottleneck for algae growth and contributed to the improved biomass yield. Furthermore, in mixed wastewater with sufficient nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies (68.75-90.38%) and total nitrogen removal efficiencies (30.06-50.94%) were improved. Wastewater mixing also promoted the synthesis of protein in algal cells. Protein content of algae growing on mixed wastewater reached 60.87-68.65%, which is much higher than that of traditional protein source. Algae cultivation model based on wastewater mixing is an efficient and economical way to improve biomass yield. PMID:26386422

  18. A high loading overland flow system: Impacts on soil characteristics, grass constituents, yields and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Wen, C G; Chen, T H; Hsu, F H; Lu, C H; Lin, J B; Chang, C H; Chang, S P; Lee, C S

    2007-04-01

    The objectives of this paper are to determine effects of different grass species and their harvests on pollutant removal, elucidate impacts on soil characteristics and grass constituents, observe grass yield and quantify nutrient uptake by vegetation in an overland flow system (OLFS). Polluted creek water was applied to eight channels in the OLFS, which were planted with Paragrass, Nilegrass, Cattail, and Vetiver, with each two channels being randomly planted with a given grass species. The grass in one channel was harvested while that in the other channel was not. At a high rate of 27.8 m d(-1) hydraulic loading, the removal efficiencies of conventional pollutants such as BOD, COD, suspended solids (SS), and total coliforms in wastewater are not affected by the type of the grasses species, but those of nitrogen and phosphorus are affected by different species. Overall average removal efficiencies of BOD, COD, SS, ammonia, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and total coliforms through the OLFS are 42%, 48%, 78%, 47%, 40%, 33% and 89%, respectively. The concentration of nitrate, however, increases due to nitrification. Soil characteristics in OLFS have been changed significantly; specific conductivity, organic matter, exchangeable magnesium, extractable copper and zinc in soils all increase with time while pHs decrease. During the winter season, there is a significant accumulation of nitrate in grass with the subsequent reduction during the active growing season (Spring). The contents of nitrate and phosphorus in grass tissue are higher than those of grass in general pastureland, probably due to nutrient luxury uptake by grass. The overall grass yield, growth rate and nutrient uptake are quantified and implication of such high rate OLFS discussed. PMID:17234253

  19. Effects of two different nutrient loads on microalgal production, nutrient removal and photosynthetic efficiency in pilot-scale wastewater high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2014-12-01

    When wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds (HRAP) are coupled with resource recovery processes, such as biofuel production, short hydraulic retention times (HRTs) are often favoured to increase the microalgal biomass productivity. However, short HRT can result in increased nutrient load to the HRAP which may negatively impact on the performance of the microalgae. This paper investigate the effects of high (NH4-N mean concentration 39.7 ± 17.9 g m(-3)) and moderate ((NH4-N mean concentration 19.9 ± 8.9 g m(-3)) nutrient loads and short HRT on the performance of microalgae with respect to light absorption, photosynthesis, biomass production and nutrient removal in pilot-scale (total volume 8 m(3)) wastewater treatment HRAPs. Microalgal biomass productivity was significantly higher under high nutrient loads, with a 133% and 126% increase in the chlorophyll-a and VSS areal productivities, respectively. Microalgae were more efficient at assimilating NH4-N from the wastewater under higher nutrient loads compared to moderate loads. Higher microalgal biomass with increased nutrient load resulted in increased light attenuation in the HRAP and lower light absorption efficiency by the microalgae. High nutrient loads also resulted in improved photosynthetic performance with significantly higher maximum rates of electron transport, oxygen production and quantum yield. This experiment demonstrated that microalgal productivity and nutrient removal efficiency were not inhibited by high nutrient loads, however, higher loads resulted in lower water quality in effluent discharge. PMID:25189477

  20. Leaching techniques to remove metals and potentially hazardous nutrients from trout farm sludge.

    PubMed

    Jung, I S; Lovitt, R W

    2011-11-15

    A fish farm sludge high in P (2-6% w/w as dry matter), Fe (5-7%), C (40-50%) and N (0.8-4%) was subjected to a series of acid leaching treatments using HCl, organic acids, and biologically mediated acid production. Additions of biodegradable organic acid solubilized heavy metals better than HCl, while additions of 1.5% w/v glucose followed by 7 day incubation stabilized the sludge releasing 92% P, 100% Fe. The use of homo-lactic Lactobacillus plantarum starter cultures were more effective than hetero-lactic Lactobacillus buchneri, solubilizing 81.9% P, 92.2% Fe, 93.0% Zn and 96.4% Ca in the sludge. The anaerobic sludge-glucose fermentation using L. plantarum produced a leached sludge that has low heavy metal and nutrient content while affording the recovery of nutrients. The potential of these methods for practical application are briefly discussed. PMID:21940031

  1. Enhanced nutrient removal in three types of step feeding process from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yongzhen; Ge, Shijian

    2011-06-01

    An anoxic/oxic step feeding process was improved to enhance nutrient removal by reconfiguring the process into (1) anaerobic/anoxic/oxic step feeding process or (2) modified University of Capetown (UCT) step feeding process. Enhanced nitrogen and phosphorus removal and optimized organics utilization were obtained simultaneously in the modified UCT type with both internal and sludge recycle ratios of 75% as well as anaerobic/anoxic/oxic volume ratio of 1:3:6. Specifically, the UCT configuration and optimized operational conditions lead to the enrichment of denitrifying phosphorus removal microorganisms and achieved improved anaerobic P-release and anoxic P-uptake activities, which were beneficial to the denitrifying phosphorus removal activities and removal efficiencies. Due to high mixed liquor suspended solid and uneven distributed dissolved oxygen, 35% of total nitrogen was eliminated through simultaneous nitrification and denitrification process in aerobic zones. Moreover, 62 ± 6% of influent chemical oxygen demands was involved in the denitrification or phosphorus release processes. PMID:21474307

  2. Southern Ocean nutrient trapping and the efficiency of the biological pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, FrançOis W.; Holzer, Mark; Devries, Timothy

    2013-05-01

    We present a data-assimilated model of the ocean's phosphorus cycle that is constrained by climatological phosphate, temperature, salinity, sea-surface height, surface heat and freshwater fluxes, as well as chlorofluorocarbon-11(CFC-11) and natural Δ14C. Export production is estimated to be 5.8±2.0×1012 mol P/yr of which (26±6)% originates in the Southern Ocean (SO) south of 40°S. The biological pump efficiency, defined as the proportion of the ocean's phosphate inventory that is regenerated, is (39±7)%. Dividing the SO south of 40°S into a sub-Antarctic zone (SANTZ) and an Antarctic zone (ANTZ) separated by the latitude of maximum Ekman divergence, we estimate that the SANTZ and ANTZ account, respectively, for (23±5)% and (3±1)% of global export production, (17±4)% and (3±1)% of the regenerated nutrient inventory, and (31±1)% and (43±5)% of the preformed nutrient inventory. Idealized SO nutrient depletion experiments reveal a large-scale transfer of nutrients into circumpolar and deep waters and from the preformed to the regenerated pool. In accord with the concept of the biogeochemical divide, we find that nutrient drawdown in the ANTZ is more effective than in the SANTZ for increasing the efficiency of the biological pump, while having a smaller impact on production in regions north of 40°S. Complete SO nutrient drawdown would allow the biological pump to operate at 94% efficiency by short circuiting the transport of nutrients in northward Ekman currents, leading to a trapping of nutrients in circumpolar and deep waters that would decrease production outside the SO by approximately 44% while increasing it in the SO by more than 725%.

  3. Simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal in anoxic-aerobic circulating fluidized bed biological reactor (CFBBR).

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Nakhla, G; Zhu, J; Patel, A

    2004-06-01

    Biological nutrient removal (BNR) in municipal wastewater treatment to remove carbonaceous substrates and nutrients, has recently become increasingly popular worldwide due to increasingly stringent regulations. Biological fluidized bed (BFB) technology, which could be potentially used for BNR, can provide some advantages such as high efficiency and a compact structure. This work shows the results of simultaneous elimination of organic carbon and nitrogen using a circulating fluidized bed biological reactor (CFBBR, which has been developed recently for chemical engineering processes. The CFBBR has two fluidized beds, running as anoxic and aerobic processes to accomplish simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, with continuous liquid recirculation through the anoxic bed and the aerobic bed. Soluble COD concentrations in the effluent ranging from 4 to 20 mg l(-1) were obtained at varying COD loading rates; ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies averaged in excess of 99% at a minimum total hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2.0 hours over a temperature range of 25 degrees C to 28 degrees C. Effluent nitrate nitrogen concentration of less than 5 mg l(-1) was achieved by increasing effluent recycle rate. No nitrite accumulation was observed either in the anoxic bed or in the aerobic bed. The system was able to treat grit chamber effluent wastewater at a HRT of 2.0 hours while achieving average effluent BOD, COD, NH3-N, TKN, nitrates, total phosphate, TSS and VSS concentrations of 10 mg l(-1), 18 mg l(-1), 1.3 mg l(-1), 1.5 mg l(-1), 7 mg l(-1), 2.0 mg l(-1), 10 mg l(-1) and 8 mg l(-1) respectively. The CFBBR appears to be not only an excellent alternative for conventional activated sludge type BNR technologies but also capable of processing much higher loadings that are suitable for industrial applications. PMID:15369290

  4. Nutrient removal using biosorption activated media: preliminary biogeochemical assessment of an innovative stormwater infiltration basin.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Andrew M; Wanielista, Martin P; Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Harris, Willie G

    2012-08-15

    Soil beneath a stormwater infiltration basin receiving runoff from a 23 ha predominantly residential watershed in north-central Florida, USA, was amended using biosorption activated media (BAM) to study the effectiveness of this technology in reducing inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus to groundwater. The functionalized soil amendment BAM consists of a 1.0:1.9:4.1 mixture (by volume) of tire crumb (to increase sorption capacity), silt and clay (to increase soil moisture retention), and sand (to promote sufficient infiltration), which was applied to develop an innovative stormwater infiltration basin utilizing nutrient reduction and flood control sub-basins. Comparison of nitrate/chloride (NO(3)(-)/Cl(-)) ratios for the shallow groundwater indicates that prior to using BAM, NO(3)(-) concentrations were substantially influenced by nitrification or variations in NO(3)(-) input. In contrast, for the new basin utilizing BAM, NO(3)(-)/Cl(-) ratios indicate minor nitrification and NO(3)(-) losses with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 45% loss. Biogeochemical indicators (denitrifier activity derived from real-time polymerase chain reaction and variations in major ions, nutrients, dissolved and soil gases, and stable isotopes) suggest that NO(3)(-) losses are primarily attributable to denitrification, whereas dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium is a minor process. Denitrification was likely occurring intermittently in anoxic microsites in the unsaturated zone, which was enhanced by the increased soil moisture within the BAM layer and resultant reductions in surface/subsurface oxygen exchange that produced conditions conducive to increased denitrifier activity. Concentrations of total dissolved phosphorus and orthophosphate (PO(4)(3-)) were reduced by more than 70% in unsaturated zone soil water, with the largest decreases in the BAM layer where sorption was the most likely mechanism for removal. Post-BAM PO(4)(3-)/Cl(-) ratios for shallow

  5. Nutrient removal using biosorption activated media: preliminary biogeochemical assessment of an innovative stormwater infiltration basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Wanielista, Martin P.; Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Harris, Willie G.

    2012-01-01

    Soil beneath a stormwater infiltration basin receiving runoff from a 22.7 ha predominantly residential watershed in central Florida, USA, was amended using biosorption activated media (BAM) to study the effectiveness of this technology in reducing inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus to groundwater. The functionalized soil amendment BAM consists of a 1.0:1.9:4.1 mixture (by volume) of tire crumb (to increase sorption capacity), silt and clay (to increase soil moisture retention), and sand (to promote sufficient infiltration), which was applied to develop a prototype stormwater infiltration basin utilizing nutrient reduction and flood control sub-basins. Comparison of nitrate/chloride (NO3-/Cl-) ratios for the shallow groundwater indicate that prior to using BAM, NO3- concentrations were substantially influenced by nitrification or variations in NO3- input. In contrast, for the prototype basin utilizing BAM, NO3-/Cl- ratios indicate minor nitrification and NO3- losses with the exception of one summer sample that indicated a 45% loss. Biogeochemical indicators (denitrifier activity derived from real-time polymerase chain reaction and variations in major ions, nutrients, dissolved and soil gases, and stable isotopes) suggest NO3- losses are primarily attributable to denitrification, whereas dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium is a minor process. Denitrification was likely occurring intermittently in anoxic microsites in the unsaturated zone, which was enhanced by increased soil moisture within the BAM layer and resultant reductions in surface/subsurface oxygen exchange that produced conditions conducive to increased denitrifier activity. Concentrations of total dissolved phosphorus and orthophosphate (PO43-) were reduced by more than 70% in unsaturated zone soil water, with the largest decreases in the BAM layer where sorption was the most likely mechanism for removal. Post-BAM PO43-/Cl- ratios for shallow groundwater indicate predominantly minor increases and

  6. Assessment of the nutrient removal effectiveness of floating treatment wetlands applied to urban retention ponds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Yu; Sample, David J

    2014-05-01

    The application of floating treatment wetlands (FTWs) in point and non-point source pollution control has received much attention recently. Although the potential of this emerging technology is supported by various studies, quantifying FTW performance in urban retention ponds remains elusive due to significant research gaps. Actual urban retention pond water was utilized in this mesocosm study to evaluate phosphorus and nitrogen removal efficiency of FTWs. Multiple treatments were used to investigate the contribution of each component in the FTW system with a seven-day retention time. The four treatments included a control, floating mat, pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata L.), and softstem bulrush (Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani). The water samples collected on Day 0 (initial) and 7 were analyzed for total phosphorus (TP), total particulate phosphorus, orthophosphate, total nitrogen (TN), organic nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, nitrate-nitrite nitrogen, and chlorophyll-a. Statistical tests were used to evaluate the differences between the four treatments. The effects of temperature on TP and TN removal rates of the FTWs were described by the modified Arrhenius equation. Our results indicated that all three FTW designs, planted and unplanted floating mats, could significantly improve phosphorus and nitrogen removal efficiency (%, E-TP and E-TN) compared to the control treatment during the growing season, i.e., May through August. The E-TP and E-TN was enhanced by 8.2% and 18.2% in the FTW treatments planted with the pickerelweed and softstem bulrush, respectively. Organic matter decomposition was likely to be the primary contributor of nutrient removal by FTWs in urban retention ponds. Such a mechanism is fostered by microbes within the attached biofilms on the floating mats and plant root surfaces. Among the results of the four treatments, the FTWs planted with pickerelweed had the highest E-TP, and behaved similarly with the other two FTW treatments for nitrogen removal

  7. Including Life Cycle Assessment for decision-making in controlling wastewater nutrient removal systems.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Lluís; Larsen, Henrik F; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2013-10-15

    This paper focuses on the use of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to evaluate the performance of seventeen control strategies in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). It tackles the importance of using site-specific factors for nutrient enrichment when decision-makers have to select best operating strategies. Therefore, the LCA evaluation is repeated for three different scenarios depending on the limitation of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or both, when evaluating the nutrient enrichment impact in water bodies. The LCA results indicate that for treated effluent discharged into N-deficient aquatic systems (e.g. open coastal areas) the most eco-friendly strategies differ from the ones dealing with discharging into P-deficient (e.g. lakes and rivers) and N&P-deficient systems (e.g. coastal zones). More particularly, the results suggest that strategies that promote increased nutrient removal and/or energy savings present an environmental benefit for N&P and P-deficient systems. This is not the case when addressing N-deficient systems for which the use of chemicals (even for improving N removal efficiencies) is not always beneficial for the environment. A sensitivity analysis on using weighting of the impact categories is conducted to assess how value choices (policy decisions) may affect the management of WWTPs. For the scenarios with only N-limitation, the LCA-based ranking of the control strategies is sensitive to the choice of weighting factors, whereas this is not the case for N&P or P-deficient aquatic systems. PMID:23856224

  8. Precooking processing of bamboo shoots for removal of anti-nutrients.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Ojha, Vijayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo shoots being low in fat, high in dietary fiber and rich in mineral content, like an ideal vegetable have been used traditionally. Besides nutrients, bamboo shoots also contain lethal concentration of the anti-nutrient (cyanogen) that need to be removed before human consumption. Therefore an attempt has been made to find out the best processing method for confiscation of cyanogens. B. bambos, B. tulda, D. strictus and D.asper were selected for the study. Fresh and processed bamboo shoots were analyzed for their various nutritional and anti-nutritional contents. Carbohydrate content in fresh shoots of studied species ranged from 2.39%-3.6%, proteins from 1.65%-2.08%, phenols from 0.36%-0.63%, cyanogens from 0.011%-0.018%, minerals did not vary significantly among the species except potassium which ranged from 0.32%-0.52%. The shoots were processed by boiling in water and different concentrations of NaCl (1%, 5% and 10%) for different intervals (10, 15, 20 and 25 min) to achieve maximum removal of cyanogens with minimum loss of nutrients. Boiling shoots in 5% NaCl for 15 min was found to be the best method for B. bamboos, 10 min boiling in 1% NaCl for B. tulda, 15 min boiling in 1% NaCl for D. strictus and 10 min boiling in 5% NaCl for D. asper. These processing methods will be very useful in utilization of bamboo shoots as these are very simple and can be used by the local inhabitants and shoot processing industries. PMID:24426046

  9. Nutrient removal by NF and RO membranes in a decentralized sanitation system.

    PubMed

    van Voorthuizen, Ellen M; Zwijnenburg, Arie; Wessling, Matthias

    2005-09-01

    Decentralized treatment of domestic wastewater offers the possibility of water and nutrient reuse. In a decentralized sanitation system the household wastewater streams are separated in a large diluted stream (gray water) and a small and concentrated stream (black water) containing important nutrients like ammonium and phosphate. Nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes might be used to recover the nutrients from anaerobically treated black water. The permeate might be used in a water reuse scheme. In case of water reuse the produced permeate should meet guidelines for potable water or meet new guidelines which might be applied in the future for intermediate quality of water, for example toilet flushwater; when this is not possible the permeate should meet guidelines for discharge. The most stringent guidelines apply for ammonium and phosphate. The focus of this paper is to test commercially available NF and RO membranes to remove nutrients from anaerobically treated black water in order to meet the Dutch guidelines. A large number of commercial tubular, capillary and flat sheet NF and RO membranes was tested on laboratory scale on their performance to meet the Dutch guidelines for ammonium and phosphate. The ammonium and phosphate concentrations used were based on the effluent composition of anaerobically treated black water. Ammonium and phosphate rejection were both measured in synthetic single salt and multi-ion mixtures and in anaerobic effluent. The rejection for ammonium (30-95%) is neither sufficient for discharge nor potable water use. The rejection of phosphate (74-99%) is in most cases almost sufficient to meet the standards for potable water. PMID:16054670

  10. Effects of physical and morphometric factors on nutrient removal properties in agricultural ponds.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Onodera, S; Okubo, K; Takagi, S; Maruyama, Y; Jin, G; Shimizu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Effects of physical and morphometric factors on nutrient removal properties were studied in small agricultural ponds with different depths, volumes, and residence times in western Japan. Average residence time was estimated to be >15 days, and it tended to decrease from summer to winter because of the increase in water withdrawal for agricultural activity. Water temperature was clearly different between the surface and bottom layers; this indicates that thermal stratification occurred in summer. Chlorophyll-a was significantly high (>20 μg/L) in the surface layer (<0.5 m) and influenced by the thermal stratification. Removal ratios of dissolved total nitrogen (DTN) and dissolved total phosphorus in the ponds were estimated to be 53-98% and 39-98% in August and 10-92% and 36-57% in December, respectively. Residence time of the ponds was longer in August than in December, and DTN removal, in particular, was more significant in ponds with longer residence time. Our results suggest residence time is an important factor for nitrogen removal in small agricultural ponds as well as large lakes. PMID:26676006

  11. Nutrient removal from membrane bioreactor permeate using microalgae and in a microalgae membrane photoreactor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurdev; Thomas, Pamela Baldwin

    2012-08-01

    This paper explores the use of a novel microalgae membrane photoreactor (mMR) to polish the effluent from an aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) fed with domestic wastewater. Four microalgae species Chlorella (Chlorella sp.), Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris), Scenedesmus quadricauda (S. quadricauda) and Scenedesmus dimorphus (S. dimorphus) were isolated from the environment and tested in batch reactors fed with permeate from the aerobic MBR to evaluate the nutrient removal rates for each species. All four microalgae species were able to completely remove NH4 in the reactor within 3 days. The removal rates of NO3, NO2 and PO4 were between 43-54%, 83-95% and 70-92%, respectively after 3 days in the batch reactor. Subsequently, an MBR-mMR system was operated for 23 days. The mMR was able to remove on average 50% of NH4, 75% of NO2, 35% of NO3 and 60% of PO4 consistently from the MBR effluent under the conditions tested. PMID:22609717

  12. Impacts of variable pH on stability and nutrient removal efficiency of aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Lashkarizadeh, Monireh; Munz, Giulio; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    The impact of pH variation on aerobic granular sludge stability and performance was investigated. A 9-day alkaline (pH=9) and acidic (pH=6) pH shocks were imposed on mature granules with simultaneous chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The imposed alkaline pH shock (pH 9) reduced nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency from 88% and 98% to 66% and 50%, respectively, with no further recovery. However, acidic pH shock (pH 6) did not have a major impact on nutrient removal and the removal efficiencies recovered to their initial values after 3 days of operation under the new pH condition. Operating the reactors under alkaline pH induced granules breakage and resulted in an increased solids concentration in the effluent and a significant decrease in the size of the bio-particles, while acidic pH did not have significant impacts on granules stability. Changes in chemical structure and composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix were suggested as the main factors inducing granules instability under high pH. PMID:26744935

  13. Kinetics of Nutrient Removal by Nano Zero-Valent Iron under Different Biochemical Environments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengnan; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of nano zero-valent iron (NZVI; an average size of 55 nm at a concentration of 200 mg Fe/L) in nutrient removal was determined under anaerobic, anoxic, and aerobic conditions. Compared to the rate of reduction of nitrate nitrogen (NO3--N) to ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4+-N) by NZVI alone, the presence of activated sludge increased the rate of complete reduction by 300%. About 31% of NO3--N was converted to NH4+-N through NZVI-facilitated dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, while 56% of NO3--N was removed by heterotrophic denitrification. The presence of sludge reduced the rates of phosphorus removal by NZVI, with the first-order reaction rate constants of 0.06/hour, 0.42/hour, and 0.18/hour under anaerobic, anoxic, and aerobic conditions, respectively. The highest phosphorus removal efficiency (95%) by NZVI was observed under anoxic abiotic conditions, whereas the efficiency dropped to 31% under anaerobic biotic conditions, which was attributed to significant sludge-facilitated NZVI agglomeration. PMID:26459816

  14. Cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris in wastewater with waste glycerol: Strategies for improving nutrients removal and enhancing lipid production.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaochen; Zheng, Hongli; Addy, Min; Anderson, Erik; Liu, Yuhuan; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2016-05-01

    To improve nutrients removal from wastewater and enhance lipid production, cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris in wastewater with waste glycerol generated from biodiesel production using scum derived oil as feedstock was studied. The results showed that nutrients removal was improved and lipid production of C. vulgaris was enhanced with the addition of waste glycerol into wastewater to balance its C/N ratio. The optimal concentration of the pretreated glycerol for C. vulgaris was 10gL(-1) with biomass concentration of 2.92gL(-1), lipid productivity of 163mgL(-1)d(-1), and the removal of 100% ammonia and 95% of total nitrogen. Alkaline conditions prompted cell growth and lipid accumulation of C. vulgaris while stimulating nutrients removal. The application of the integration process can lower both wastewater treatment and biofuel feedstock costs. PMID:26894565

  15. Biological removal of phyto-sterols in pulp mill effluents.

    PubMed

    Mahmood-Khan, Zahid; Hall, Eric R

    2013-12-15

    Phyto-sterols and extractives found in pulp mill effluents are suspected to cause endocrine abnormalities in receiving water fish. The control of sterols in pulp mill effluents through biological secondary wastewater treatment was studied using two lab-scale bioreactor systems. After achieving a stable performance, both bioreactor systems successfully removed (>90%) sterols and the estimated biodegradation was up to 80%. Reactor 1 system operating at 6.7 ± 0.2 pH effectively treated pulp mill effluent sterols spiked up to 4500 μg/L in 11 h HRT and 11 day SRT. However, Reactor 2 system operating at 7.6 ± 0.2 pH performed relatively poorly. Retention time reductions beyond critical values deteriorated the performance of treatment systems and quickly reduced the sterols biodegradation. The biodegradation loss was indicated by mixed liquor sterols content that started increasing. This biodegradation loss was compensated by the increased role of bio-adsorption and the overall sterols removal remained relatively high. Hence, a relatively small (20-30%) loss in the overall sterols removal efficiency did not fully reflect the associated major (60-70%) loss in the sterols biodegradation because the amount of sterols accumulated in the sludge due to adsorption increased so the estimate of sterols removal through adsorption increased from 30-40% to 70-80% keeping the overall sterols removal still high. PMID:24211569

  16. Simultaneous removal of nutrients from milking parlor wastewater using an AO2 sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using a lab-scale, anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor ((AO)2 SBR) to simultaneously remove biological organics, nitrogen and phosphorus from dairy milking parlor wastewater was investigated in this study. Three hydraulic retention times (HRT = 2.1, 2.7, and 3.5 days) and three mixing-to-process time ratios (TM/TP = 0.43, 0.57, and 0.68) were evaluated as two controlling factors using a 3 × 3 experimental design to determine the optimal combination. Results showed that the HRT of 2.7 days with TM/TP = 0.57 was the best to achieve simultaneous nutrients removal for the influent with initial soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of about 2000 mg L(-1) (only 0.55 mg L(-1) NH4-N, < 0.1 mg L(-1) nitrate, and 0.14 mg L(-1) soluble phosphorus in the effluent). Good correlations between pH and ORP, and ORP and DO, were also obtained with correlation coefficients all higher than or equal to 0.975. These relationships could be used to develop real-time control strategies to optimize the duration of each operating phase in the (AO)2 SBR system to save energy and enhance treatment efficiency. PMID:25723066

  17. Simultaneous carbon and nutrient removal in an airlift loop reactor under a limited filamentous bulking state.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming; Zhang, Yalei; Zhou, Xuefei; Su, Yimin; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Ke

    2013-02-01

    Airlift loop reactors (ALRs) are important bioreactors for wastewater treatment. However, few studies have investigated the application of an ALR for simultaneous carbon and nutrient removal, especially for activated sludge systems. This study evaluated the performance of integrated nitrogen, phosphorus and COD removal in an ALR with a low height-to-diameter ratio in a limited filamentous bulking (LFB) state (SVI of 180-220mL/g). The average removal efficiencies for COD, NH(4)(+)-N, TN and TP were 91%, 92%, 86% and 94%, respectively. Additional research showed that only under the LFB state, the appropriate distribution of dissolved oxygen inside the ALR was established to promote a well-balanced aerobic and anoxic/anaerobic state. In addition, the macro-gradient of the substrate concentration at the inlet and the heavier bio-P sludge density compensated for the proliferation of filaments. Hence, the stable LFB state was achieved by balancing the floc-forming bacteria and the filamentous bacteria in the ALR. PMID:23313686

  18. Chlorella stigmatophora for urban wastewater nutrient removal and CO2 abatement.

    PubMed

    Arbib, Zouhayr; Ruiz, Jesus; Alvarez, Pablo; Garrido, Carmen; Barragan, Jesus; Perales, Jose Antonio

    2012-08-01

    Batch experiments were performed to study biomass growth rate, nutrient removal and carbon dioxide bio-fixation of the marine microalgae Chlorella stigmatophora. Four different cultures at different salinities were tested: wastewater (WW), synthetic wastewater (SWW), seawater (SW) and diluted seawater (DSW). Experimental results showed that Chlorella stigmatophora grew satisfactorily in all culture media, except in SWW where inhibition occurred. In all cases, biomass experimental data were fitted to the Verlhust Logistic model (R2 > 0.982, p < or = 0.05). Maximum biomass productivity (P(bmax)) and CO2 biofixation (P(vCO2)) were reached in the WW medium, 1.146g SSL(-1)day(-1) and 2.324g CO2L(-1)day(-1) respectively. The order of maximum specific growth rates (micro max) was WW >DSW>SW. In order to compare nitrogen and phosphorous removal kinetics, an estimation of the time required to reach the most restrictive concentration of total N and P in effluents as defined in the Directive 98/1565/CE (10 mg sigmaNL(-1) (T10(N)) and 1 mg sigmaPL(-1) (T1(p)) was performed. In the WW test T10(N) and T1(p) needed were of 45.15 and 32.27 hours respectively and at the end of the experimental the removal was in both 100%. PMID:22908639

  19. Biological removal of dimethyl sulphide from sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiene, Ronald P.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1990-06-01

    DIMETHYL sulphide (DMS) is an important sulphur-containing trace gas in the atmosphere. It is present in oceanic surface waters at concentrations sufficient to sustain a considerable net flux of DMS from the oceans to the atmosphere, estimated to comprise nearly half of the global biogenic input of sulphur to the atmosphere1. DMS emitted from the oceans may be a precursor of tropospheric aerosols and of cloud condensation nuclei in the remote marine atmosphere, thereby affecting the Earth's radiative balance and thus its climate2-4. Relatively little is known, however, about the biogeochemical and physical processes that control the concentration of DMS in sea water. Here we present data from incubation experiments, carried out at sea, which show that DMS is removed by microbial activity. In the eastern, tropical Pacific Ocean, DMS turnover is dominated by biological processes, with turnover times for biological DMS removal generally more than ten (3-430) times faster than turnover by ventilation to the atmosphere. Thus biological consumption of DMS seems to be a more important factor than atmospheric exchange in controlling DMS concentrations in the ocean, and hence its flux to the atmosphere. These results have significant implications for climate feedback models involving DMS emissions3, and highlight the importance of the microbial food web in oceanic DMS cycling.

  20. Removal design report for the 108-F Biological Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Most of the 100-F facilities were deactivated with the reactor and have since been demolished. Of the dozen or so reactor-related structures, only the 105-F Reactor Building and the 108-F Biology Laboratory remain standing today. The 108-F Biology Laboratory was intended to be used as a facility for the mixing and addition of chemicals used in the treatment of the reactor cooling water. Shortly after F Reactor began operation, it was determined that the facility was not needed for this purpose. In 1949, the building was converted for use as a biological laboratory. In 1962, the lab was expanded by adding a three-story annex to the original four-story structure. The resulting lab had a floor area of approximately 2,883 m{sup 2} (main building and annex) that operated until 1973. The building contained 47 laboratories, a number of small offices, a conference room, administrative section, lunch and locker rooms, and a heavily shielded, high-energy exposure cell. The purpose of this removal design report is to establish the methods of decontamination and decommissioning and the supporting functions associated with facility removal and disposal.

  1. Enhanced nitrogen and phosphorus removal by an advanced simultaneous sludge reduction, inorganic solids separation, phosphorus recovery, and enhanced nutrient removal wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Yan, Peng; Guo, Jin-Song; Wang, Jing; Chen, You-Peng; Ji, Fang-Ying; Dong, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Wen-juan

    2015-05-01

    An advanced wastewater treatment process (SIPER) was developed to simultaneously decrease sludge production, prevent the accumulation of inorganic solids, recover phosphorus, and enhance nutrient removal. The feasibility of simultaneous enhanced nutrient removal along with sludge reduction as well as the potential for enhanced nutrient removal via this process were further evaluated. The results showed that the denitrification potential of the supernatant of alkaline-treated sludge was higher than that of the influent. The system COD and VFA were increased by 23.0% and 68.2%, respectively, after the return of alkaline-treated sludge as an internal C-source, and the internal C-source contributed 24.1% of the total C-source. A total of 74.5% of phosphorus from wastewater was recovered as a usable chemical crystalline product. The nitrogen and phosphorus removal were improved by 19.6% and 23.6%, respectively, after incorporation of the side-stream system. Sludge minimization and excellent nutrient removal were successfully coupled in the SIPER process. PMID:25735007

  2. Atrazine removal from aqueous solutions using submerged biological aerated filter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atrazine is widely used in the agriculture as an herbicide. Due to its high mobility, Atrazine leaks into the groundwaters, surface waters, and drinking water wells. Many physical and chemical methods have been suggested for removing Atrazine from aquatic environments. However, these methods are very costly, have many performance problems, produce a lot of toxic intermediates which are very harmful and dangerous, and cannot completely mineralize Atrazine. In this study, biodegradation of Atrazine by microbial consortium was evaluated in the aquatic environment. In order to assess the Atrazine removal from the aquatic environment, submerged biological aerated filter (SBAF) was fed with synthetic wastewater based on sucrose and Atrazine at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The maximum efficiencies for Atrazine and Soluble Chemical Oxygen Demand (SCOD) removal were 97.9% and 98.9%, respectively. The study findings showed that Stover-Kincannon model had very good fitness (R2 > 99%) in loading Atrazine in the biofilter and by increasing the initial concentration of Atrazine, the removal efficiency increased. Aerobic mixed biofilm culture was observed to be suitable for the treatment of Atrazine from aquatic environment. There was no significant inhibition effect on mixed aerobic microbial consortia. Atrazine degradation depended on the strength of wastewater and the amount of Atrazine in the influent. PMID:24499572

  3. Atrazine removal from aqueous solutions using submerged biological aerated filter.

    PubMed

    Baghapour, Mohammad Ali; Nasseri, Simin; Derakhshan, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Atrazine is widely used in the agriculture as an herbicide. Due to its high mobility, Atrazine leaks into the groundwaters, surface waters, and drinking water wells. Many physical and chemical methods have been suggested for removing Atrazine from aquatic environments. However, these methods are very costly, have many performance problems, produce a lot of toxic intermediates which are very harmful and dangerous, and cannot completely mineralize Atrazine. In this study, biodegradation of Atrazine by microbial consortium was evaluated in the aquatic environment. In order to assess the Atrazine removal from the aquatic environment, submerged biological aerated filter (SBAF) was fed with synthetic wastewater based on sucrose and Atrazine at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The maximum efficiencies for Atrazine and Soluble Chemical Oxygen Demand (SCOD) removal were 97.9% and 98.9%, respectively. The study findings showed that Stover-Kincannon model had very good fitness (R2 > 99%) in loading Atrazine in the biofilter and by increasing the initial concentration of Atrazine, the removal efficiency increased. Aerobic mixed biofilm culture was observed to be suitable for the treatment of Atrazine from aquatic environment. There was no significant inhibition effect on mixed aerobic microbial consortia. Atrazine degradation depended on the strength of wastewater and the amount of Atrazine in the influent. PMID:24499572

  4. Upgrading of wastewater treatment plants for nutrient removal under optimal use of existing structures.

    PubMed

    Winkler, S; Gasser, M; Schättle, W; Kremmel, D; Kletzmayr, P; Matsché, N

    2008-01-01

    Upgrading of wastewater treatment plants under maximum use of existing structures is often an important requirement, but also useful due to a number of aspects. Because of a change in legal effluent requirements, a number of plants in Austria, typically aged 20+ years, were required to be extended. The two stage activated sludge HYBRID-process often provides an interesting design alternative for such plant upgrades, especially in case an anaerobic sludge treatment stage already exists. It provides high nutrient removal capacity at low area demand. The latter is especially important in cases where no or very limited extension area is available making it the key factor to preserve a site for future use. Based on two full stage case studies the adaptation of the plant layout, first operation results and a synthetic cost comparison to a conventional (single stage) plant extension are given. PMID:18496010

  5. Human liberation: removing biological and psychological barriers to freedom.

    PubMed

    Savulescu, Julian

    2010-03-01

    In this article, the author argues that there are psychological and biological constraints on our moral behaviour, rational decision-making and capacities to love. For example, low oxytocin levels can constrain our willingness to cooperate with others, and our capacity to maintain long-term loving relationships. There is also evidence that increasing iodine intake can improve a person's general intelligence, while drugs such as Modafinil can enhance cognitive performance. Savulescu argues that we have a moral obligation to remove those constraints, and that we ought to accept these methods of improving our moral behaviour, decision-making, and cognitive functioning. PMID:22031983

  6. Removal of Biologically Active Organic Contaminants using Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Banks, Michael A. (Inventor); Banks, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical devices that are to come into contact with living tissue, such as prosthetic and other implants for the human body and the containers used to store and transport them, are together cleaned of non-living, but biologically active organic materials, including endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides, and assembled into a hermetically sealed package without recontamination. This is achieved by cleaning both the device and package components together in an apparatus, which includes a hermetically sealed chamber, in which they are contacted with atomic oxygen which biocleans them, by oxidizing the biologically active organic materials. The apparatus also includes means for manipulating the device and container and hermetically sealing the cleaned device into the cleaned container to form the package. A calibrated witness coupon visually indicates whether or not the device and container have received enough exposure to the atomic oxygen to have removed the organic materials from their surfaces. Gamma radiation is then used to sterilize the device in the sealed container.

  7. Intense nutrient removal in the remote area off larsen ice shelf (Weddell Sea)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppema, M.; Goeyens, L.; Fahrbach, E.

    2000-07-01

    Although carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a minor component of the atmosphere, the issue of its steadily rising atmospheric concentration has stimulated much interest, because this may lead to an enhanced greenhouse effect with accompanying adverse environmental and economical effects. CO{sub 2} is a natural and essential component of the atmosphere, which plays a pivotal role in the heat budget of the earth surface. Using Weddell Sea data collected during a cruise with FS Polarstern in austral summer 1992/1993, depletions of nutrients and TCO{sub 2} in the summer surface layer were calculated. The analogous depletion-like properties for temperature (Heat Storage) and salinity were also computed. The latter properties are useful to describe the physical conditions over the time period pertinent to the depletions. For different areas a strong correlation exists of Heat Storage and nutrient/TCO{sub 2} depletions, which is caused by a common factor--the period of light availability. Offshore of the Larsen shelf, an area usually inaccessible due to perennial ice cover, high nutrients/TCO{sub 2} depletions are achieved over a short period of time, pointing to a rapidly producing biological system. Primary productivity, calculated from the TCO{sub 2} depletion, amounts to about 100 mg C m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1} for the central Weddell Sea, but 570--1,140 mg C m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1} for the offshore Larsen region. These values agree fairly well with the open-ocean Antarctic and other coastal areas, respectively.

  8. Biological nitrate removal using a food waste-derived carbon source in synthetic wastewater and real sewage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haowei; Jiang, Jianguo; Li, Menglu; Yan, Feng; Gong, Changxiu; Wang, Quan

    2016-01-15

    The production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from food waste to improve biological nutrient removal has drawn much attention. In this study, acidogenic liquid from food waste was used as an alternative carbon source for synthetic wastewater treatment. C/N ratios of 5 and 6 were suitable for denitrification, and the change in acidogenic liquid composition had no negative effect on denitrification. The denitrification rates using optimal carbon-to-nitrate ratios of acidogenic liquid were more than 25 mg NO3-N/(gVSS·h). At the same time, acidogenic liquid was used to improve nutrient removal from summer and winter sewage. C/N ratios of 5 and 6 were acceptable for summer sewage treatment. Total nitrogen in the final effluent was less than 7 mg/L. Two additional hours were required for winter sewage treatment, and the C/N ratio had to be >6. PMID:26547269

  9. Changes in plant biomass and nutrient removal over 3 years in a constructed wetland in Cairns, Australia.

    PubMed

    Greenway, M; Woolley, A

    2001-01-01

    The surface flow wetland in Cairns, Australia consists of 3 linear channels each 65 m long. Channels 1 and 2 are 5 m wide and Channel 3 is 15 m wide. The wetland was constructed in 1994 and band planted with emergent macrophyte species and alternating open water sections. The wetland was monitored for plant growth and nutrient removal until 1997. During that period HRT was 16 days in Channel 1 and 10 days in Channels 2 and 3; mass loading rates were 2.4 kg Total N and 2.0 kg Total P ha(-1) d(-1) in Channel 1 and 3.7 kg TN and 3.3 kg TP ha(-1) d(-1) in Channels 2 and 3. The aim of this work was to determine the proportion of nutrient removal that could be attributed to direct uptake by macrophytes and incorporated into plant biomass. Over the 3 year monitoring period reduction in total mass of nutrients was: Channel 1: 26% P, 85% N; Channel 2: 28% P, 87% N; Channel 3: 21% P, 81% N. Percentage reduction of FRP (Filterable Reactive Phosphorus) was similar to TP; NOx removal was 97-98%. Mass removal rates for TN and TP were higher in Channels 2 and 3 despite greater nutrient loading rates and shorter detention times. Total FRP removal was 23 kg P in Channel 1, 33 kg P in Channel 2 and 70 kg P in Channel 3 of which plant biomass accounted for 65%, 44% and 47% respectively. Total nitrogen removal was 92 kg in Channel 1,154 kg in Channel 2 and 386 kg in Channel 3 of which plant biomass accounted for 47%, 27% and 27% respectively. Thus, in this tropical surface flow wetland supporting a mixture of emergent macrophytes and floating duckweed, vegetation is an important mechanism for direct nutrient removal. PMID:11804111

  10. Treating Urban Wastewater: Nutrient Removal by Using Immobilized Green Algae in Batch Cultures.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Saeedeh; Nemati, Atefeh; Montazeri-Najafabady, Nima; Mobasher, Mohammad Ali; Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Ghasemi, Younes

    2015-01-01

    Essential roles of microalgae during the tertiary treatment of municipal wastewater have been proven. In order to avoid wash out of the biomass and also modify the quality of the treated wastewater; some techniques such as cell immobilization have been developed. To do so, in this study four samples from two species of microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas sp.) were determined and confirmed by taxonomic identification. The samples were immobilized in calcium alginate beads. Within 10 days the amounts of nitrate (No3(-)-N) and orthophosphate (Po4(3-)-P) were measured to calculate the removal efficacy for each individual sample. Based on the standard methods, the amount of nitrate and orthophosphate were determined every 3 days within 10 days. The results indicate that immobilized microalgae are able to remove the nutrients and reduce the amount of nitrate and orthophosphate, significantly. Furthermore, the C. vulgaris (YG02) was the best species in this experience with 72% and 99% of reduction in the amount of nitrate and orthophosphate, respectively. PMID:26023845

  11. Identification and characterization of a freshwater microalga Scenedesmus SDEC-8 for nutrient removal and biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingming; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Zhang, Shuo; Ma, Guixia; Han, Lin; Ji, Yan

    2014-06-01

    The selection of the right strains is of fundamental important to the success of the algae-based oil industry. From the six newly isolated microalgae strains tested for growth, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles and biodiesel properties, Scenedesmus SDEC-8, with favorable C16:0 fatty acids (73.43%), showed the best combined results. Then, morphological and molecular identification were examined. From the three wastewaters samples, Scenedesmus SDEC-8 showed good ability to yield oil and remove nutrients, which were comparable with other reports. In b artificial wastewater (TN 40 mg L(-1), TP 8 mg L(-1)), Scenedesmus SDEC-8 achieved the highest value of lipid productivity (53.84 mg L(-1) d(-1)), MUFA content (35.35%) and total FAME content (59.57±0.02 mg g(-1) DW), besides higher removal efficiencies of TN (99.18%) and TP (98.86%) helped effluent directly discharge and smaller dilution factor of N, P (3.3 and 9) which was good for lessening water utilization. PMID:24747391

  12. Microalgae cultivation in wastewater: nutrient removal from anaerobic membrane bioreactor effluent.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Martinez, A; Martin Garcia, N; Romero, I; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from the effluent of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) by means of a lab-scale photobioreactor in which algae biomass was cultured in a semi-continuous mode for a period of 42 days. Solids retention time was 2 days and a stable pH value in the system was maintained by adding CO(2). Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the SAnMBR effluent fluctuated according to the operating performance of the bioreactor and the properties of its actual wastewater load. Despite these variations, the anaerobic effluent proved to be a suitable growth medium for microalgae (mean biomass productivity was 234 mg l(-1)d(-1)), achieving a nutrient removal efficiency of 67.2% for ammonium (NH(4)(+)-N) and 97.8% for phosphate (PO(4)(-3)-P). When conditions were optimum, excellent water quality with very low ammonium and phosphate concentrations was obtained. PMID:23073115

  13. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal with different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Shen, Nan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is one of the most economical and sustainable methods for phosphorus removal from wastewater. However, the performance of EBPR can be affected by available carbon sources types in the wastewater that may induce different functional microbial communities in the process. Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are commonly found by coexisting in the EBPR process. Predominance of GAO population may lead to EBPR failure due to the competition on carbon source with PAO without contributing phosphorus removal. Carbon sources indeed play an important role in alteration of PAOs and GAOs in EBPR processes. Various types of carbon sources have been investigated for EBPR performance. Certain carbon sources tend to enrich specific groups of GAOs and/or PAOs. This review summarizes the types of carbon sources applied in EBPR systems and highlights the roles of these carbon sources in PAO and GAO competition. Both single (e.g., acetate, propionate, glucose, ethanol, and amino acid) and complex carbon sources (e.g., yeast extract, peptone, and mixed carbon sources) are discussed in this review. Meanwhile, the environmental friendly and economical carbon sources that are derived from waste materials, such as crude glycerol and wasted sludge, are also discussed and compared. PMID:27087523

  14. Fed-batch cultivation of Arthrospira and Chlorella in ammonia-rich wastewater: Optimization of nutrient removal and biomass production.

    PubMed

    Markou, Giorgos

    2015-10-01

    In the present work the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis and the microalga Chlorella vulgaris were fed-batch cultivated in ammonia-rich wastewater derived from the anaerobic digestion of poultry litter. Aim of the study was to maximize the biomass production along with the nutrient removal aiming to wastewater treatment. Ammonia and phosphorus removals were very high (>95%) for all cultures investigated. Both microorganisms were able to remove volatile fatty acids to an extent of >90%, indicating that they were capable of mixotrophic growth. Chemical oxygen demand and proteins were also removed in various degrees. In contrast, in all cultures carbohydrate concentration was increased. The biochemical composition of the microorganisms varied greatly and was influenced by the indicate that the nutrient availability. A. platensis accumulated carbohydrates (≈ 40%), while C. vulgaris accumulated lipids (≈ 50%), rendering them interesting for biofuel production. PMID:26117233

  15. Nitrification and microalgae cultivation for two-stage biological nutrient valorization from source separated urine.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Joeri; Lindeboom, Ralph; Muys, Maarten; Coessens, Wout; Alloul, Abbas; Meerbergen, Ken; Lievens, Bart; Clauwaert, Peter; Boon, Nico; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E

    2016-07-01

    Urine contains the majority of nutrients in urban wastewaters and is an ideal nutrient recovery target. In this study, stabilization of real undiluted urine through nitrification and subsequent microalgae cultivation were explored as strategy for biological nutrient recovery. A nitrifying inoculum screening revealed a commercial aquaculture inoculum to have the highest halotolerance. This inoculum was compared with municipal activated sludge for the start-up of two nitrification membrane bioreactors. Complete nitrification of undiluted urine was achieved in both systems at a conductivity of 75mScm(-1) and loading rate above 450mgNL(-1)d(-1). The halotolerant inoculum shortened the start-up time with 54%. Nitrite oxidizers showed faster salt adaptation and Nitrobacter spp. became the dominant nitrite oxidizers. Nitrified urine as growth medium for Arthrospira platensis demonstrated superior growth compared to untreated urine and resulted in a high protein content of 62%. This two-stage strategy is therefore a promising approach for biological nutrient recovery. PMID:26998796

  16. Biomass production and nutrient removal by Chlorella sp. as affected by sludge liquor concentration.

    PubMed

    Åkerström, Anette M; Mortensen, Leiv M; Rusten, Bjørn; Gislerød, Hans Ragnar

    2014-11-01

    The use of microalgae for biomass production and nutrient removal from the reject water produced in the dewatering process of anaerobically digested sludge, sludge liquor, was investigated. The sludge liquor was characterized by a high content of total suspended solids (1590 mg L(-1)), a high nitrogen concentration (1210 mg L(-1)), and a low phosphorus concentration (28 mg L(-1)). Chlorella sp. was grown in sludge liquor diluted with wastewater treatment plant effluent water to different concentrations (12, 25, 40, 50, 70, and 100%) using batch mode. The environmental conditions were 25 °C, a continuous lightning of 115 μmol m(-2) s(-1), and a CO2 concentration of 3.0%. The highest biomass production (0.42-0.45 g dry weight L(-1) Day(-1)) was achieved at 40-50% sludge liquor, which was comparable to the production of the control culture grown with an artificial fertilizer. The biomass production was 0.12 and 0.26 g dry weight L(-1) Day(-1) at 12% and 100% sludge liquor, respectively. The percentage of nitrogen in the algal biomass increased from 3.6% in 12% sludge liquor and reached a saturation of ∼10% in concentrations with 50% sludge liquor and higher. The phosphorus content in the biomass increased linearly from 0.2 to 1.5% with increasing sludge liquor concentrations. The highest nitrogen removal rates by algal biosynthesis were 33.6-42.6 mg TN L(-1) Day(-1) at 40-70% sludge liquor, while the highest phosphorus removal rates were 3.1-4.1 mg TP L(-1) Day(-1) at 50-100% sludge liquor. PMID:24935023

  17. Electrically enhanced MBR system for total nutrient removal in remote northern applications.

    PubMed

    Wei, V; Elektorowicz, M; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of sparsely populated communities scatter in the remote areas of northern Canada. It is economically preferable to adopt the decentralized systems to treat the domestic wastewater because of the vast human inhabitant distribution and cold climatic conditions. Electro-technologies such as electrofiltration, elctrofloatation, electrocoagulation and electrokinetic separation have been applied in water and conventional wastewater treatment for decades due to the minimum requirements of chemicals as well as ease of operation. The membrane bioreactor (MBR) is gaining popularity in recent years as an alternative water/wastewater treatment technology. However, few studies have been conducted to hyphenate these two technologies. The purpose of this work is to design a novel electrically enhanced membrane bioreactor (EMBR) as an alternative decentralized wastewater treatment system with improved nutrient removal and reduced membrane fouling. Two identical submerged membranes (GE ZW-1 hollow fiber module) were used for the experiment, with one as a control. The EMBR and control MBR were operated for 4 months at room temperature (20 ± 2 °C) with synthetic feed and 2 months at 10 °C with real sewage. The following results were observed: (1) the transmembrane pressure (TMP) increased significantly more slowly in the EMBR and the interval between the cleaning cycles of the EMBR increased at least twice; (2) the dissolved chemical oxygen demand (COD) or total organic carbon (TOC) in the EMBR biomass was reduced from 30 to 51%, correspondingly, concentrations of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), the major suspicious membrane foulants, decreased by 26-46% in the EMBR; (3) both control and EMBR removed >99% of ammonium-N and >95% of dissolved COD, in addition, ortho-P removal in the EMBR was >90%, compared with 47-61% of ortho-P removal in the MBR; and (4) the advantage of the EMBR over the conventional MBR in terms of membrane fouling retardation and

  18. Population dynamics of bacteria involved in enhanced biological phosphorus removal in Danish wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Mielczarek, Artur Tomasz; Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2013-03-15

    The enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is increasingly popular as a sustainable method for removal of phosphorus (P) from wastewater. This study consisted of a comprehensive three-year investigation of the identity and population dynamics of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) in 28 Danish municipal wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to quantify ten probe-defined populations of PAO and GAO that in total constituted a large fraction (30% on average) of the entire microbial community targeted by the EUBmix probes. Two PAO genera, Accumulibacter and Tetrasphaera, were very abundant in all EBPR plants (average of 3.7% and 27% of all bacteria, respectively), and their abundance was relatively stable in the Danish full-scale plants without clear temporal variations. GAOs were occasionally present in some plants (Competibacter in 11 plants, Defluviicoccus in 6 plants) and were consistent in only a few plants. This shows that these were not core species in the EBPR communities. The total GAO abundance was always lower than that of Accumulibacter. In plants without EBPR design, the abundance of PAO and GAO was significantly lower. Competibacter correlated in general with high fraction of industrial wastewater. In specific plants Accumulibacter correlated with high C/P ratio of the wastewater and Tetrasphaera with high organic loading. Interestingly, the relative microbial composition of the PAO/GAO species was unique to each plant over time, which gives a characteristic plant-specific "fingerprint". PMID:23317522

  19. Evaluation of cyanobacteria: Spirulina maxima for growth, nutrient removal, and quality on waste-effluent media in batch cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Tadros, M.G.; Phillips, J. )

    1992-01-01

    Spirulina maxima, a semi-microscopic filamentous blue-green alga, was inoculated in synthetic and waste media of different sources. The alga was evaluated for growth yield, uptake of nutrients and chemical composition. The removal rate of N and P was rapid during the first week of growth. At the end of the second week, more than 90% of the total -P and -N was removed. The mass of alga was high. The quality of the alga obtained in different media did not show much variations, except when the medium was limited in nutrients. Results indicated that Spirulina may be integrated into the effluent treatment system. Recycling waste materials not only minimizes the problem of water pollution but also revitalizes the inherently rich nutrients of waste. The biomass obtained from cultivation of Spirulina in these wastewater media may be used as a pigment-protein supplement in animal feed and as raw material for certain chemicals.

  20. Optimization of operation conditions for the startup of aerobic granular sludge reactors biologically removing carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous.

    PubMed

    Lochmatter, Samuel; Holliger, Christof

    2014-08-01

    The transformation of conventional flocculent sludge to aerobic granular sludge (AGS) biologically removing carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (COD, N, P) is still a main challenge in startup of AGS sequencing batch reactors (AGS-SBRs). On the one hand a rapid granulation is desired, on the other hand good biological nutrient removal capacities have to be maintained. So far, several operation parameters have been studied separately, which makes it difficult to compare their impacts. We investigated seven operation parameters in parallel by applying a Plackett-Burman experimental design approach with the aim to propose an optimized startup strategy. Five out of the seven tested parameters had a significant impact on the startup duration. The conditions identified to allow a rapid startup of AGS-SBRs with good nutrient removal performances were (i) alternation of high and low dissolved oxygen phases during aeration, (ii) a settling strategy avoiding too high biomass washout during the first weeks of reactor operation, (iii) adaptation of the contaminant load in the early stage of the startup in order to ensure that all soluble COD was consumed before the beginning of the aeration phase, (iv) a temperature of 20 °C, and (v) a neutral pH. Under such conditions, it took less than 30 days to produce granular sludge with high removal performances for COD, N, and P. A control run using this optimized startup strategy produced again AGS with good nutrient removal performances within four weeks and the system was stable during the additional operation period of more than 50 days. PMID:24784454

  1. [Biological evaluation of means for chemomechanical removal of carious dentine].

    PubMed

    Chechina, G N; Vinnichenko, Iu A; Rudenko, O E

    2007-01-01

    Biological evaluation of the 1st domestically developed and produced preparation for chemomechanical removal of carious dentine Caricleans (firm "VladMiVa", Belgorod) was performed in the CRIS with the use of express techniques of the hemolytic activity (HA) and cytotoxic effect (CTE). It was established that according to HA data both gels of the Caricleans preparation were nontoxic. CTE of 2 gels was also determined on 2 cells lines - LECH (lung embryon cell human) and HeLa; higher sensitivity was received on HeLa cells, the toxic effect of gel #2 of the Caricleans preparation was higher. The received results allowed the authors come to the conclusion that taking into account high sensitivity, high specificity and high cost of the CTE-test not to recommend its use for evaluation of the preparations for short-term action in stomatology. PMID:17690636

  2. High nutrient pulses, tidal mixing and biological response in a small California estuary: Variability in nutrient concentrations from decadal to hourly time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caffrey, J.M.; Chapin, T.P.; Jannasch, H.W.; Haskins, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Elkhorn Slough is a small estuary in Central California, where nutrient inputs are dominated by runoff from agricultural row crops, a golf course, and residential development. We examined the variability in nutrient concentrations from decadal to hourly time scales in Elkhorn Slough to compare forcing by physical and biological factors. Hourly data were collected using in situ nitrate analyzers and water quality data sondes, and two decades of monthly monitoring data were analyzed. Nutrient concentrations increased from the mid 1970s to 1990s as pastures and woodlands were converted to row crops and population increased in the watershed. Climatic variability was also a significant factor controlling interannual nutrient variability, with higher nutrient concentrations during wet than drought years. Elkhorn Slough has a Mediterranean climate with dry and rainy seasons. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations were relatively low (10-70 ??mol L-1) during the dry season and high (20-160 ??mol L-1) during the rainy season. Dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations showed the inverse pattern, with higher concentrations during the dry season. Pulsed runoff events were a consistent feature controlling nitrate concentrations during the rainy season. Peak nitrate concentrations lagged runoff events by 1 to 6 days. Tidal exchange with Monterey Bay was also an important process controlling nutrient concentrations, particularly near the mouth of the Slough. Biological processes had the greatest effect on nitrate concentrations during the dry season and were less important during the rainy season. While primary production was enhanced by nutrient pulses, chlorophyll a concentrations were not. We believe that the generally weak biological response compared to the strong physical forcing in Elkhorn Slough occurred because the short residence time and tidal mixing rapidly diluted nutrient pulses. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biological removal of carbon disulfide from waste air streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hugler, W.; Acosta, C.; Revah, S.

    1999-09-30

    A pilot-scale biological control system for the treatment of 3,400 m{sup 3} h{sup {minus}1} of a gaseous stream containing up to 7.8 g CS{sub 2} m{sup {minus}3} and trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) was installed in a cellulose sponge manufacturing facility. The objective was to demonstrate the capability of the process to attain sustained removal efficiencies of 90% for CS{sub 2} and 99% for H{sub 2}S. The system consisted of two sequential biotrickling reactors, which had been previously inoculated with an adapted microbial consortium. During the pilot test, stable removal efficiency and elimination capacity of +90% and 220g CS{sub 2} m{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1}, respectively, were attained with an empty bed residence time (EBTR) of 33 seconds for a period of several weeks. Efficiencies greater than 99% were always obtained for H{sub 2}S. Based on the results, the system was determined to be an effective process to remediate waste air streams containing reduced sulfur compounds generated at cellulose sponge facilities.

  4. Seasonal variation in the occurrence and removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in different biological wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Sui, Qian; Huang, Jun; Deng, Shubo; Chen, Weiwei; Yu, Gang

    2011-04-15

    The occurrence of 12 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in two wastewater treatment plants in Beijing was studied monthly over the course of one year. The removal of PPCPs by three biological treatment processes including conventional activated sludge (CAS), biological nutrient removal (BNR), and membrane bioreactor (MBR) was compared during different seasons. Seasonal variations of PPCPs in the wastewater influent were discrepant, while in the wastewater effluent, most PPCPs had lower concentrations in the summer than in the winter. For the easily biodegradable PPCPs, the performance of MBR was demonstrated to be more stable than CAS or BNR especially during winter months. Diclofenac, trimethoprim, metoprolol, and gemfibrozil could be moderately removed by MBR, while their removal by CAS and BNR was much lower or even negligible. Nevertheless, no removal was achieved regardless of the season or the treatment processes for the recalcitrant PPCPs. Studies on the contribution of each tank of the MBR process to the total removal of four biodegradable PPCPs indicated the oxic tank was the most important unit, whereas membrane filtration made a negligible contribution to their elimination. PMID:21428396

  5. Grazer removal and nutrient enrichment as recovery enhancers for overexploited rocky subtidal habitats.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Stanislao; Vignes, Fabio; Fraschetti, Simonetta

    2014-07-01

    Increasing anthropogenic pressures are causing long-lasting regime shifts from high-diversity ecosystems to low-diversity degraded ones. Understanding the effects of multiple threats on ecosystems, and identifying processes allowing for the recovery of biodiversity, are the current major challenges in ecology. In several temperate marine areas, large parts of rocky subtidal habitats characterised by high diversity have been completely degraded to barren grounds by overfishing, including illegal date mussel fishing. Bare areas are characterized by the dominance of sea urchins whose grazing perpetuates the impact of overfishing. We investigated experimentally the separate and combined effects of nutrient enrichment and sea urchin exclusion on the recovery of barren grounds. Our results indicate that the two factors have a synergistic effect leading to the re-establishment of erect macroalgal canopies, enhancing the structural complexity of subtidal assemblages. In particular, in the overfished system considered here, the recovery of disturbed assemblages could occur only if sea urchins are removed. However, the recolonization of barren grounds by erect macroalgae is further enhanced under enriched conditions. This study demonstrates that the recovery of dramatically depleted marine habitats is possible, and provides useful indications for specific management actions, which at present are totally lacking, to achieve the restoration of barren grounds caused by human activity. PMID:24748204

  6. Microalgae treatment removes nutrients and reduces ecotoxicity of diluted piggery digestate.

    PubMed

    Franchino, Marta; Tigini, Valeria; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Mussat Sartor, Rocco; Bona, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    Liquid digestate is considered as an important by-product of anaerobic digestion of agriculture wastes. Currently, it is very often directly spread on local agricultural land. Yet recently concerns on its environmental risk of this processing has begun to rise. On the other hand, investigations on the effectiveness of microalgae for wastewater treatment have started to consider also this complex matrix. In this study, we cultured the green alga Chlorella vulgaris in diluted digestate coming from the anaerobic digestion of pig slurry and corn, with the aim to significantly reduce its toxicity and its very high nutrient concentration. For this purpose, a battery of toxicity tests composed of four acute and two chronic bioassays was applied after the alga cultivation. Results were compared with those obtained in the initial characterization of the digestate. Results show that highly diluted piggery digestate can be a suitable medium for culturing microalgae, as we obtained a high removal efficiency (>90%) for ammonia, total nitrogen and phosphate, though after a few days phosphorus limitation occurred. Toxicity was significantly reduced for all the organisms tested. Possible solutions for optimizing this approach avoiding high dilution rates are discussed. PMID:27328398

  7. Effect of wastewater-borne bacteria on algal growth and nutrients removal in wastewater-based algae cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaochen; Zhou, Wenguang; Fu, Zongqiang; Cheng, Yanling; Min, Min; Liu, Yuhuan; Zhang, Yunkai; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2014-09-01

    Centrate, a type of nutrient-rich municipal wastewater was used to determine the effect of wastewater-borne bacteria on algal growth and nutrients removal efficiency in this study. The characteristics of algal and bacterial growth profiles, wastewater nutrient removal and effect of initial algal inoculums were systematically examined. The results showed that initial algal concentration had apparent effect on bacterial growth, and the presence of bacteria had a significant influence on algal growth pattern, suggesting symbiotic relationship between algae and bacteria at the initial stage of algae cultivation. The maximum algal biomass of 2.01 g/L with 0.1g/L initial algal inoculums concentration can be obtained during algae cultivation in raw centrate medium. The synergistic effect of centrate-borne bacteria and microalgae on algae growth and nutrient removal performance at initial fast growth stage has great potential to be applied to pilot-scale wastewater-based algae wastewater system cultivated in continuous or semi-continuous mode. PMID:24968106

  8. Factors affecting population of filamentous bacteria in wastewater treatment plants with nutrients removal.

    PubMed

    Miłobędzka, Aleksandra; Witeska, Anna; Muszyński, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous population in activated sludge and key operational parameters of full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with bulking problems representative for Poland were investigated with quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization. Statistical analyses revealed few relationships between operational parameters and biovolume of filamentous bacteria. Sludge age was not only positively correlated with abundance of Chloroflexi (parametric correlation and principal component analysis (PCA)), but also differentiated Microthrix population (analysis of variance (ANOVA)). Phylum Chloroflexi and pH presented a negative relation during the study (PCA). ANOVA showed that pH of influent and sludge volume index (SVI) differentiated abundance of types 0803 and 1851 of Chloroflexi and candidate division TM7. SVI increased along with higher abundance of Microthrix (positive parametric and non-parametric correlations and positive relation in PCA). Biovolumes of morphotypes 0803 and 1851 of Chloroflexi were differentiated by organic matter in influent, also by nutrients in the case of Chloroflexi type 1851. Chemical and biological oxygen demands (COD and BOD5, respectively) were negatively correlated with Microthrix. COD also differentiated the abundance of Haliscomenobacter hydrossis. Results of the study can be used to prevent WWTPs from excessive proliferation of filamentous bacteria and operational problems caused by them--bulking and foaming of activated sludge. PMID:26901721

  9. Using Stable Isotopes to Link Nutrient Sources in the Everglades and Biological Sinks in Florida Bay: A Biogeochemical Approach to Evaluate Ecosystem Response to Changing Nutrient Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoare, A. M.; Hollander, D. J.; Heil, C.; Glibert, P.; Murasko, S.; Revilla, M.; Alexander, J.

    2005-05-01

    Anthropogenic influences in South Florida have led to deterioration of its two major ecosystems, the Everglades wetlands and the Florida Bay estuary. Consequently, the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan has been proposed to restore the Everglades ecosystem; however, restoration efforts will likely exert new ecological changes in the Everglades and ultimately Florida Bay. The success of the Florida Everglades restoration depends on our understanding and ability to predict how regional changes in the distribution and composition of dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients will direct the downstream biogeochemical dynamics of Florida Bay. While the transport of freshwater and nutrients to Florida Bay have been studied, much work remains to directly link nutrient dynamics in Florida Bay to nutrient sources in the Everglades. Our study uses stable C and N isotopic measurements of chemical and biological materials from the Everglades and Florida Bay as part of a multi-proxy approach to link nutrient sources in the Everglades to biological sinks in Florida Bay. Isotopic analyses of dissolved and particulate species of water, aquatic vegetation and sedimentary organic matter show that the watersheds within the Everglades are chemically distinct and that these signatures are also reflected in the bay. A large east-west gradient in both carbon and nitrogen (as much as 10‰ for δ15N POM) reflect differing nutrient sources for each region of Florida Bay and is strongly correlated with upstream sources in the Everglades. Isotopic signatures also reflect seasonal relationships associated with wet and dry periods. High C and N measurements of DOM and POM measurements suggest significant influence from waste water in Canal C-111 in eastern Florida Bay, particularly during the dry season. These observations show that nutrients from the Everglades watersheds enter Florida Bay and are important in controlling biogeochemical processes in the bay. This study proves that

  10. Identification of active denitrifiers in full-scale nutrient removal wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Starnawska, Anna; Starnawski, Piotr; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Nierychlo, Marta; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is essential to the removal of nitrogen from wastewater during treatment, yet an understanding of the diversity of the active denitrifying bacteria responsible in full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is lacking. In this study, stable-isotope probing (SIP) was applied in combination with microautoradiography (MAR)-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to identify previously unrecognized active denitrifying phylotypes in a full-scale WWTP with biological N and P removal. Acknowledging that different denitrifiers will have specific carbon source preferences, a fully (13)C-labelled complex substrate was used for SIP incubations, under nitrite-reducing conditions, in order to maximize the capture of the potentially metabolically diverse denitrifiers likely present. Members of the Rhodoferax, Dechloromonas, Sulfuritalea, Haliangium and Thermomonas were represented in the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from DNA enriched in (13)C, with FISH probes optimized here for their in situ characterization. FISH and MAR confirmed that they were all active denitrifiers in the community. The combined approach of SIP and MAR-FISH represents an excellent approach for identifying and characterizing an un-described diversity of active denitrifiers in full-scale systems. PMID:25181571

  11. From Earth to Space: Application of Biological Treatment for the Removal of Ammonia from Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Amlan; Seidel, Chad; Adam, Niklas; Pickering, Karen; White, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Managing ammonia is often a challenge in both drinking water and wastewater treatment facilities. Ammonia is unregulated in drinking water, but its presence may result in numerous water quality issues in the distribution system such as loss of residual disinfectant, nitrification, and corrosion. Ammonia concentrations need to be managed in wastewater effluent to sustain the health of receiving water bodies. Biological treatment involves the microbiological oxidation of ammonia to nitrate through a two-step process. While nitrification is common in the environment, and nitrifying bacteria can grow rapidly on filtration media, appropriate conditions, such as the presence of dissolved oxygen and required nutrients, need to be established. This presentation will highlight results from two ongoing research programs - one at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and the other at a drinking water facility in California. Both programs are designed to demonstrate nitrification through biological treatment. The objective of NASA's research is to be able to recycle wastewater to potable water for spaceflight mission. To this end, a biological water processor (BWP) has been integrated with a forward osmosis secondary treatment system (FOST). Bacteria mineralize organic carbon to carbon dioxide as well as ammonia-nitrogen present in the wastewater to nitrogen gas, through a combination of nitrification and denitrification. The effluent from the BWP system is low in organic contaminants, but high in total dissolved solids. The FOST system, integrated downstream of the BWP, removes dissolved solids through a combination of concentration-driven forward osmosis and pressure driven reverse osmosis. The integrated system testing planned for this year is expected to produce water that requires only a polishing step to meet potable water requirements for spaceflight. The pilot study in California is being conducted on Golden State Water Company's Yukon wellsthat have hydrogen sulfide odor

  12. From Earth to Space: Application of Biological Treatment for the Removal of Ammonia from Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Karen; Adam, Niklas; White, Dawn; Ghosh, Amlan; Seidel, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Managing ammonia is often a challenge in both drinking water and wastewater treatment facilities. Ammonia is unregulated in drinking water, but its presence may result in numerous water quality issues in the distribution system such as loss of residual disinfectant, nitrification, and corrosion. Ammonia concentrations need to be managed in wastewater effluent to sustain the health of receiving water bodies. Biological treatment involves the microbiological oxidation of ammonia to nitrate through a two-step process. While nitrification is common in the environment, and nitrifying bacteria can grow rapidly on filtration media, appropriate conditions, such as the presence of dissolved oxygen and required nutrients, need to be established. This presentation will highlight results from two ongoing research programs - one at NASA's Johnson Space Center, and the other at a drinking water facility in California. Both programs are designed to demonstrate nitrification through biological treatment. The objective of NASA's research is to be able to recycle wastewater to potable water for spaceflight missions. To this end, a biological water processor (BWP) has been integrated with a forward osmosis secondary treatment system (FOST). Bacteria mineralize organic carbon to carbon dioxide as well as ammonia-nitrogen present in the wastewater to nitrogen gas, through a combination of nitrification and denitrification. The effluent from the BWP system is low in organic contaminants, but high in total dissolved solids. The FOST system, integrated downstream of the BWP, removes dissolved solids through a combination of concentration-driven forward osmosis and pressure driven reverse osmosis. The integrated system testing planned for this year is expected to produce water that requires only a polishing step to meet potable water requirements for spaceflight. The pilot study in California is being conducted on Golden State Water Company's Yukon wells that have hydrogen sulfide odor

  13. TRIENNIAL LACTATION SYMPOSIUM: Systems biology of regulatory mechanisms of nutrient metabolism in lactation.

    PubMed

    McNamara, J P

    2015-12-01

    A major role of the dairy cow is to convert low-quality plant materials into high-quality protein and other nutrients for humans. We must select and manage cows with the goal of having animals of the greatest efficiency matched to their environment. We have increased efficiency tremendously over the years, yet the variation in productive and reproductive efficiency among animals is still large. In part, this is because of a lack of full integration of genetic, nutritional, and reproductive biology into management decisions. However, integration across these disciplines is increasing as the biological research findings show specific control points at which genetics, nutrition, and reproduction interact. An ordered systems biology approach that focuses on why and how cells regulate energy and N use and on how and why organs interact through endocrine and neurocrine mechanisms will speed improvements in efficiency. More sophisticated dairy managers will demand better information to improve the efficiency of their animals. Using genetic improvement and animal management to improve milk productive and reproductive efficiency requires a deeper understanding of metabolic processes throughout the life cycle. Using existing metabolic models, we can design experiments specifically to integrate data from global transcriptional profiling into models that describe nutrient use in farm animals. A systems modeling approach can help focus our research to make faster and larger advances in efficiency and determine how this knowledge can be applied on the farms. PMID:26641166

  14. Prevention of clogging in a biological trickle-bed reactor removing toluene from contaminated air

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.J.; Hartmans, S.

    1996-04-05

    Removal of organic compounds like toluene from waste gases with a trickle-bed reactor can result in clogging of the reactor due to the formation of an excessive amount of biomass. The authors therefore limited the amount of nutrients available for growth, to prevent clogging of the reactor. As a consequence of this nutrient limitations a lower removal rate was observed. However, when a fungal culture was used to inoculate the reactor, the toluene removal rate under nutrient limiting conditions was higher. Over a period of 375 days, an average removal rate of 27 g C/(m{sup 3} h) was obtained with the reactor inoculated with the fungal culture. From the carbon balance over the reactor and the nitrogen availability it was concluded that, under these nutrient-limited conditions, large amounts of carbohydrates are probably formed. The authors also studied the application of a NaOH wash to remove excess biomass, as a method to prevent clogging. Under these conditions an average toluene removal rate of 35 g C/(m{sup 3} h) was obtained. After about 50 days there was no net increase in the biomass content of the reactor. The amount of biomass which was formed in the reactor equaled the amount removed by the NaOH wash.

  15. Removal of Pesticides and Inorganic Contaminants in Anaerobic and Aerobic Biological Contactors

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation contains data on the removal of pesticides (acetochlor, clethodim, dicrotophos), ammonia, nitrate, bromate and perchlorate through aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment processes.

  16. Wastewater microalgal production, nutrient removal and physiological adaptation in response to changes in mixing frequency.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2014-09-15

    Laminar flows are a common problem in high rate algal ponds (HRAP) due to their long channels and gentle mixing by a single paddlewheel. Sustained laminar flows may modify the amount of light microalgal cells are exposed to, increase the boundary layer between the cell and the environment and increase settling out of cells onto the pond bottom. To date, there has been little focus on the effects of the time between mixing events (frequency of mixing) on the performance of microalgae in wastewater treatment HRAPs. This paper investigates the performance of three morphologically distinct microalgae in wastewater treatment high rate algal mesocosms operated at four different mixing frequencies (continuous, mixed every 45 min, mixed every 90 min and no mixing). Microalgal performance was measured in terms of biomass concentration, nutrient removal efficiency, light utilisation and photosynthetic performance. Microalgal biomass increased significantly with increasing mixing frequency for the two colonial species but did not differ for the single celled species. All three species were more efficient at NH4-N uptake as the frequency of mixing increased. Increased frequency of mixing supported larger colonies with improved harvest-ability by gravity but at the expense of efficient light absorption and maximum rate of photosynthesis. However, maximum quantum yield was highest in the continuously mixed cultures due to higher efficiency of photosynthesis under light limited conditions. Based on these results, higher microalgal productivity, improved wastewater treatment and better gravity based harvest-ability can be achieved with the inclusion of more mixing points and reduced laminar flows in full-scale HRAP. PMID:24911561

  17. Heterogeneity of intracellular polymer storage states in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR)--observation and modeling.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Vanni; Majed, Nehreen; Hellweger, Ferdi L; Gu, April Z

    2012-03-20

    A number of agent-based models (ABMs) for biological wastewater treatment processes have been developed, but their skill in predicting heterogeneity of intracellular storage states has not been tested against observations due to the lack of analytical methods for measuring single-cell intracellular properties. Further, several mechanisms can produce and maintain heterogeneity (e.g., different histories, uneven division) and their relative importance has not been explored. This article presents an ABM for the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) treatment process that resolves heterogeneity in three intracellular polymer storage compounds (i.e., polyphosphate, polyhydroxybutyrate, and glycogen) in three functional microbial populations (i.e., polyphosphate-accumulating, glycogen-accumulating, and ordinary heterotrophic organisms). Model predicted distributions were compared to those based on single-cell estimates obtained using a Raman microscopy method for a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system. The model can reproduce many features of the observed heterogeneity. Two methods for introducing heterogeneity were evaluated. First, biological variability in individual cell behavior was simulated by randomizing model parameters (e.g., maximum acetate uptake rate) at division. This method produced the best fit to the data. An optimization algorithm was used to determine the best variability (i.e., coefficient of variance) for each parameter, which suggests large variability in acetate uptake. Second, biological variability in individual cell states was simulated by randomizing state variables (e.g., internal nutrient) at division, which was not able to maintain heterogeneity because the memory in the internal states is too short. These results demonstrate the ability of ABM to predict heterogeneity and provide insights into the factors that contribute to it. Comparison of the ABM with an equivalent population-level model illustrates the effect

  18. Biomass Production and Nutrient Removal by Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) under Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial herbaceous bioenergy crops have the potential to improve soil quality, sequester soil C, enhance nutrient cycling improve wildlife habitat, and supply a portion of U.S. energy needs when used as a fuel. Assessments of the export of essential plant nutrients are needed to determine impacts ...

  19. Implications of nutrient removal and biomass production by native and augmented algal populations at a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Ivy L C; Bekaan, Sascha; Eskandari, Yasmin; Yeh, Daniel H

    2014-01-01

    Algal monocultures (Chlorella sorokiniana and Botryococcus braunii) and algal communities native to clarifiers of a wastewater treatment plant were batch cultivated in (1) clarified effluent following a biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) removal reactor post-BOD removal clarified effluent (PBCE), (2) clarified effluent following a nitrification reactor post-nitrification clarified effluent (PNCE), and (3) a reference media (RM). After 12 days, all algal species achieved nitrogen removal between 68 and 82% in PBCE and 37 and 99% in PNCE, and phosphorus removal between 91 and 100% in PBCE and 60 and 100% in PNCE. The pH of the wastewater samples increased above 9.8 after cultivation of each species, which likely aided ammonia volatilization and phosphorus adsorption. Both monocultures grew readily with wastewater as a feedstock, but B. braunii experienced significant crowding from endemic fauna. In most cases, native algal species' nutrient removal efficiency was competitive with augmented algal monocultures, and in some cases achieved a higher biomass yield, demonstrating the potential to utilize native species for nutrient polishing and algal biomass production. PMID:25325538

  20. Biologically-based signal processing system applied to noise removal for signal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    2004-07-13

    The method and system described herein use a biologically-based signal processing system for noise removal for signal extraction. A wavelet transform may be used in conjunction with a neural network to imitate a biological system. The neural network may be trained using ideal data derived from physical principles or noiseless signals to determine to remove noise from the signal.

  1. Scrubbing the Bay: Nutrient Removal Using Small Algal Turf Scrubbers on Chesapeake Bay Tributaries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restoration of the Chesapeake Bay poses significant challenges because of increasing population pressure, conversion of farmland to urban/suburban development, and the expense of infrastructure needed to achieve significant and sustained nutrient reductions from agricultural and urban sources. One ...

  2. Nutrient removal of agricultural drainage water using algal turf scrubbers and solar power

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restoration of the Chesapeake Bay poses significant challenges because of increasing population pressure, conversion of farmland to urban/suburban development, and the expense of infrastructure needed to achieve significant and sustained nutrient reductions from agricultural and urban sources. One ...

  3. Cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris JSC-6 with swine wastewater for simultaneous nutrient/COD removal and carbohydrate production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Guo, Wanqian; Yen, Hong-Wei; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Lo, Yung-Chung; Cheng, Chieh-Lun; Ren, Nanqi; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-12-01

    Swine wastewater, containing a high concentration of COD and ammonia nitrogen, is suitable for the growth of microalgae, leading to simultaneous COD/nutrients removal from the wastewater. In this study, an isolated carbohydrate-rich microalga Chlorella vulgaris JSC-6 was adopted to perform swine wastewater treatment. Nearly 60-70% COD removal and 40-90% NH3-N removal was achieved in the mixotrophic and heterotrophic culture, depending on the dilution ratio of the wastewater, while the highest removal percentage was obtained with 20-fold diluted wastewater. Mixotrophic cultivation by using fivefold diluted wastewater resulted in the highest biomass concentration of 3.96 g/L. The carbohydrate content of the microalga grown on the wastewater can reach up to 58% (per dry weight). The results indicated that the microalgae-based wastewater treatment can efficiently reduce the nutrients and COD level, and the resulting microalgal biomass had high carbohydrate content, thereby having potential applications for the fermentative production of biofuels or chemicals. PMID:26433786

  4. How the novel integration of electrolysis in tidal flow constructed wetlands intensifies nutrient removal and odor control.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xinxin; Wu, Shubiao; Huang, Xu; Zhang, Yansheng; Dong, Renjie

    2014-10-01

    Intensified nutrient removal and odor control in a novel electrolysis-integrated tidal flow constructed wetland were evaluated. The average removal efficiencies of COD and NH4(+)-N were above 85% and 80% in the two experimental wetlands at influent COD concentration of 300 mg/L and ammonium nitrogen concentration of 60 mg/L regardless of electrolysis integration. Effluent nitrate concentration decreased from 2.5mg/L to 0.5mg/L with the reduction in current intensity from 1.5 mA/cm(2) to 0.57 mA/cm(2). This result reveals the important role of current intensity in nitrogen transformation. Owing to the ferrous and ferric iron coagulant formed through the electro-dissolution of the iron anode, electrolysis integration not only exerted a positive effect on phosphorus removal but also effectively inhibited sulfide accumulation for odor control. Although electrolysis operation enhanced nutrient removal and promoted the emission of CH4, no significant difference was observed in the microbial communities and abundance of the two experimental wetlands. PMID:25103037

  5. Potential societal and economic impacts of wastewater nutrient removal and recycling.

    PubMed

    Randall, C W

    2003-01-01

    Because adequate nutrient controls were not established when there were past opportunities to do so, nutrient pollution of estuaries and coastal waters has resulted in the impairment of ecosystems and major reductions or collapse of fisheries at numerous sites around the world, resulting in major economical and societal impacts. The root of the problem is that the political policies and processes have permitted municipalities, developers, industries and farmers to expand and operate without paying the full cost of their activities, and this has been done at the expense of those who rely on the productivity and recreational value of our estuarine and coastal waters. Some governments have developed remedial nutrient control programs, but most of them have been under funded and inadequately enforced, resulting in small increments of progress that tend to be lost because of inadequate land use and immigration controls. It is believed that nutrient recovery and controlled reuse can provide a major tool for the control of nutrient pollution and should be widely implemented. Plans are currently being developed to promote widespread use of nutrient recovery and reuse in the Chesapeake Bay region of the USA. An example of phosphorus reuse is presented. PMID:12926616

  6. Microbiological study of bacteriophage induction in the presence of chemical stress factors in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR).

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Bhattacharjee, Ananda S; Goel, Ramesh

    2015-09-15

    Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are responsible for carrying the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). Although the EBPR process is well studied, the failure of EBPR performance at both laboratory and full-scale plants has revealed a lack of knowledge about the ecological and microbiological aspects of EBPR processes. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria as their sole host. Bacteriophage infection of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) has not been considered as a main contributor to biological phosphorus removal upsets. This study examined the effects of different stress factors on the dynamics of bacteriophages and the corresponding effects on the phosphorus removal performance in a lab-scale EBPR system. The results showed that copper (heavy metal), cyanide (toxic chemical), and ciprofloxacin (antibiotic), as three different anthropogenic stress factors, can induce phages integrated onto bacterial genomes (i.e. prophages) in an enriched EBPR sequencing batch reactor, resulting in a decrease in the polyphosphate kinase gene ppk1 clades copy number, phosphorus accumulation capacity, and phosphorus removal performance. This study opens opportunities for further research on the effects of bacteriophages in nutrient cycles both in controlled systems such as wastewater treatment plants and natural ecosystems. PMID:26024959

  7. An efficient process for wastewater treatment to mitigate free nitrous acid generation and its inhibition on biological phosphorus removal

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianwei; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Chen, Hongbo; Zhong, Yu; An, Hongxue; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA), which is the protonated form of nitrite and inevitably produced during biological nitrogen removal, has been demonstrated to strongly inhibit the activity of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Herein we reported an efficient process for wastewater treatment, i.e., the oxic/anoxic/oxic/extended-idle process to mitigate the generation of FNA and its inhibition on PAOs. The results showed that this new process enriched more PAOs which thereby achieved higher phosphorus removal efficiency than the conventional four-step (i.e., anaerobic/oxic/anoxic/oxic) biological nutrient removal process (41 ± 7% versus 30 ± 5% in abundance of PAOs and 97 ± 0.73% versus 82 ± 1.2% in efficiency of phosphorus removal). It was found that this new process increased pH value but decreased nitrite accumulation, resulting in the decreased FNA generation. Further experiments showed that the new process could alleviate the inhibition of FNA on the metabolisms of PAOs even under the same FNA concentration. PMID:25721019

  8. An efficient process for wastewater treatment to mitigate free nitrous acid generation and its inhibition on biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianwei; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Chen, Hongbo; Zhong, Yu; An, Hongxue; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA), which is the protonated form of nitrite and inevitably produced during biological nitrogen removal, has been demonstrated to strongly inhibit the activity of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Herein we reported an efficient process for wastewater treatment, i.e., the oxic/anoxic/oxic/extended-idle process to mitigate the generation of FNA and its inhibition on PAOs. The results showed that this new process enriched more PAOs which thereby achieved higher phosphorus removal efficiency than the conventional four-step (i.e., anaerobic/oxic/anoxic/oxic) biological nutrient removal process (41 ± 7% versus 30 ± 5% in abundance of PAOs and 97 ± 0.73% versus 82 ± 1.2% in efficiency of phosphorus removal). It was found that this new process increased pH value but decreased nitrite accumulation, resulting in the decreased FNA generation. Further experiments showed that the new process could alleviate the inhibition of FNA on the metabolisms of PAOs even under the same FNA concentration. PMID:25721019

  9. An efficient process for wastewater treatment to mitigate free nitrous acid generation and its inhibition on biological phosphorus removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianwei; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Chen, Hongbo; Zhong, Yu; An, Hongxue; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-02-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA), which is the protonated form of nitrite and inevitably produced during biological nitrogen removal, has been demonstrated to strongly inhibit the activity of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Herein we reported an efficient process for wastewater treatment, i.e., the oxic/anoxic/oxic/extended-idle process to mitigate the generation of FNA and its inhibition on PAOs. The results showed that this new process enriched more PAOs which thereby achieved higher phosphorus removal efficiency than the conventional four-step (i.e., anaerobic/oxic/anoxic/oxic) biological nutrient removal process (41 +/- 7% versus 30 +/- 5% in abundance of PAOs and 97 +/- 0.73% versus 82 +/- 1.2% in efficiency of phosphorus removal). It was found that this new process increased pH value but decreased nitrite accumulation, resulting in the decreased FNA generation. Further experiments showed that the new process could alleviate the inhibition of FNA on the metabolisms of PAOs even under the same FNA concentration.

  10. Sensitivity of the rate of nutrient uptake by chemotactic bacteria to physical and biological parameters in a turbulent environment.

    PubMed

    Watteaux, Romain; Stocker, Roman; Taylor, John R

    2015-12-21

    In this study, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) to investigate the response of chemotactic bacteria to an isolated patch of chemoattractant in a turbulent environment. Previous work has shown that by stirring nutrients that are chemoattractants into a network of thin, elongated filaments, turbulence directly influences the rate at which chemotactic bacteria consume nutrients. However, the quantitative outcome of this process is influenced by a host of physical and biological factors, and many of these remain unexplored. Here, we analyse the sensitivity of nutrient uptake by chemotactic bacteria on a wide range of physical and biological parameters using a series of controlled DNS. Starting with uniformly distributed populations of motile and non-motile bacteria in a fully developed homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flow, we inject a patch of dissolved nutrients. We then assess the chemotactic advantage, defined as the difference between the nutrients consumed by motile and non-motile bacteria over the lifetime of the patch. We find that the chemotaxis can enhance the total uptake rate by a factor of 1.6 and allows the population of chemotactic bacteria to absorb nutrients 2.2 times faster than non-motile bacteria Results show that chemotactic bacteria are subject to a trade-off between swimming to leave regions devoid of nutrients and, once a nutrient gradient is detected, staying in regions of large nutrient concentration. These findings could help explain how the physical characteristics of turbulent marine ecosystems influence the optimal biological traits of bacteria through the competition for limited resources. PMID:26392215

  11. Effect of subalpine canopy removal on snowpack, soil solution, and nutrient export, Fraser Experimental Forest, CO

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stottlemyer, R.; Troendle, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    proportionally greater than water flux. Increased subsurface flow accounted for most of the increase in non-limiting nutrient loss. For limiting nutrients, loss of plant uptake and increased shallow subsurface flow accounted for the greater loss. Seasonal ion concentration patterns in streamwater and subsurface flow were similar.Research on the effects of vegetation manipulation on snowpack, soil water, and streamwater chemistry and flux has been underway at the Fraser Experimental Forest (FEF), CO, since 1982. Greater than 95% of FEF snowmelt passes through watersheds as subsurface flow where soil processes significantly alter meltwater chemistry. To better understand the mechanisms accounting for annual variation in watershed streamwater ion concentration and flux with snowmelt, we studied subsurface water flow, its ion concentration, and flux in conterminous forested and clear cut plots. Repetitive patterns in subsurface flow and chemistry were apparent. Control plot subsurface flow chemistry had the highest ion concentrations in late winter and fall. When shallow subsurface flow occurred, its Ca2+, SO42-, and HCO3- concentrations were lower and K+ higher than deep flow. The percentage of Ca2+, NO3-, SO42-, and HCO3- flux in shallow depths was less and K+ slightly greater than the percentage of total flow. Canopy removal increased precipitation reaching the forest floor by about 40%, increased peak snowpack water equivalent (SWE) > 35%, increased the average snowpack Ca2+, NO3-, and NH4+ content, reduced the snowpack K+ content, and increased the runoff four-fold. Clear cutting doubled the percentage of subsurface flow at shallow depths, and increased K+ concentration in shallow subsurface flow and NO3- concentrations in both shallow and deep flow. The percentage change in total Ca2+, SO42-, and HCO3- flux in shallow depths was less than the change in water flux, while that of K+ and NO3- flux was greater. Relative to the control, in the clear cut the percentage of total Ca

  12. Removal of nutrients and organic pollution load from pulp and paper mill effluent by microalgae in outdoor open pond.

    PubMed

    Usha, M T; Sarat Chandra, T; Sarada, R; Chauhan, V S

    2016-08-01

    A mixed culture of microalgae, containing two Scenedesmus species, was analysed to determine its potential in coupling of pulp and paper mill effluent treatment and microalgal cultivation. Laboratory studies suggested that 60% concentration of wastewater was optimum for microalgal cultivation. A maximum of 82% and 75% removal of BOD and COD respectively was achieved with microalgal cultivation in outdoor open pond. By the end of the cultivation period, 65% removal of NO3-N and 71.29% removal of PO4-P was observed. The fatty acid composition of mixed microalgal culture cultivated with effluent showed the palmitic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid as major fatty acids. The results obtained suggest that pulp and paper mill effluent could be used effectively for cultivation of microalgae to minimise the freshwater and nutrient requirements. PMID:27161156

  13. Effect of tetracycline on the growth and nutrient removal capacity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in simulated effluent from wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Zheng, Xiaoqian; Liu, Kaichuan; Sun, Shujuan; Li, Xiaochen

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of tetracycline, which is on the growth, physiological characteristics, and contaminants removal by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results showed that the biomass and photosynthetic pigment concentration of C. reinhardtii exposed to tetracycline were lower than those of the control, while the superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities, and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, were higher than those of the control. Additionally, when the tetracycline concentration reached 0.25mg/L, the removal of total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased from 80.8 to 55.0%, 100 to 92.5%, and 36.5 to 11.5%, respectively. Thus, tetracycline concentrations of 0-0.25mg/L are expected to have a significant effect on the growth and nutrient removal of C. reinhardtii in recycled water from wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27472492

  14. EBP2R - an innovative enhanced biological nutrient recovery activated sludge system to produce growth medium for green microalgae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Pérez, Borja; Ramin, Elham; Smets, Barth F; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-01-01

    Current research considers wastewater as a source of energy, nutrients and water and not just a source of pollution. So far, mainly energy intensive physical and chemical unit processes have been developed to recover some of these resources, and less energy and resource demanding alternatives are needed. Here, we present a modified enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery system (referred to as EBP2R) that can produce optimal culture media for downstream micro-algal growth in terms of N and P content. Phosphorus is recovered as a P-stream by diversion of some of the effluent from the upstream anaerobic reactor. By operating the process at comparably low solids retention times (SRT), the nitrogen content of wastewater is retained as free and saline ammonia, the preferred form of nitrogen for most micro-algae. Scenario simulations were carried out to assess the capacity of the EBP2R system to produce nutrient rich organic-carbon depleted algal cultivation media of target composition. Via SRT control, the quality of the constructed cultivation media can be optimized to support a wide range of green micro-algal growth requirements. Up to 75% of the influent phosphorus can be recovered, by diverting 30% of the influent flow as a P-stream at an SRT of 5 days. Through global sensitivity analysis we find that the effluent N-to-P ratio and the P recovered are mainly dependent on the influent quality rather than on biokinetics or stoichiometry. Further research is needed to demonstrate that the system performance predicted through the model-based design can be achieved in reality. PMID:25480432

  15. Yield, nutrient removal, and quality of sorghum grain and biomass as influenced by nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Moresco, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted during 1983 and 1984 at two locations using one conventional (ATx399xRTx430) and two high energy sorghum hybrids (Sorghum bicolor L., Moench) to evaluate the effects of N and P applications on grain, biomass, and fermentable carbohydrate production. Genotype and N most influenced grain and biomass yields at both locations. Cultivars ATx399xRTx430 and ATx623xRTx430 produced more grain, but less biomass than ATx623xRio. Applied N increased grain yields at College Station more in 1984 than in 1983, indicating a decrease in soil N after one year of total dry matter removal. Less yield response to N was observed at Weslaco. Applied P had little effect on grain or biomass production at either location. Applied N increased grain and biomass concentrations and uptake of most nutrients. Increased nutrient removals generally resulted more from increases in dry matter production than from changes in nutrient concentrations. Apparent N uptake efficiency was higher at College Station (41 to 53%) than at Weslaco (24 to 37%). Complete aboveground dry matter removal of high energy sorghums resulted in an additional removal of 100 to 180 kg K and 40 to 50 kg N/ha when compared with conventional sorghum produced for grain only. Genotype influenced stalk fermentable carbohydrate yields, with ATx623xRio producing substantially greater amounts than the other hybrids. Applied N decreased structural carbohydrates, while nonstructural carbohydrates remained unchanged. Stalk fermentable carbohydrate fuels, however, increased linearly with N application because of higher biomass yields with applied N.

  16. Effect of mine wastewater on nutrient removal and lipid production by a green microalga Micratinium reisseri from concentrated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ji, Min-Kyu; Kabra, Akhil N; Salama, El-Sayed; Roh, Hyun-Seog; Kim, Jung Rae; Lee, Dae Sung; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2014-04-01

    Effect of mine wastewater on the nutrient removal efficiency of a green microalga Micratinium reisseri from concentrated municipal wastewater (CMW) with simultaneous lipid production was investigated. Different dilution ratios (1-10%) of CMW either with mine wastewater (MWF) or mine wastewater without Fe (MWOF) were used. M. reisseri showed the highest growth (0.8gL(-1)) and nutrient uptake (35.9mgTNL(-1) and 5.4mgTPL(-1)) at 3% MWF ([Fe]tot=6.7mgL(-1)), and the highest lipid productivity (10.4mgL(-1)day(-1)) at 5% MWF ([Fe]tot=11.2mgL(-1)) after 15days. CMW supported the algal autoflocculation due to formation of phosphate, calcium and magnesium precipitates at a high suspension pH. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis revealed that the microalgal lipids possessed 79-82% of C16/C18 fatty acids. Application of mine wastewater improved the nutrient removal efficiency, growth and lipid productivity of M. reisseri cultivated in CMW. PMID:24534788

  17. Use of external carbon sources derived from biowaste for short-cut nutrient removal from anaerobic effluents.

    PubMed

    Katsou, Evina; Frison, Nicola; Malamis, Simos; Fatone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the use of different external carbon sources to promote the via-nitrite nutrient removal from anaerobic effluents. The carbon sources consisted of fermentation liquid produced from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW FL), drainage liquid produced from OFMSW, fermentation liquid produced from vegetable and fruit waste (VFW FL) and acetic acid. Denitritation and phosphorus uptake via nitrite were evaluated in two sequencing batch reactors, one treating the anaerobic supernatant produced from the co-digestion of OFMSW and activated sludge (highly nitrogenous anaerobic effluent - HNAE), and the other one treating the weakly nitrogenous anaerobic effluent (WNAE) from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. The use of OFMSW FL to treat HNAE resulted in high nitrite (27 mgN/(gVSS·h) (VSS - volatile suspended solids) and phosphate uptake (15 mgP/gVSS·h). In the WNAE, nutrient kinetics were much slower. The use of acetic acid and VFW FL performed poorly, while the use of OFMSW FL, which was rich in butyric acid and propionic acid, resulted in significant nutrient removal (7 mgN/gVSS·h and 6 mgP/gVSS·h). The economic evaluation showed that the use of OFMSW FL is a less expensive option than the acetic acid use. PMID:24804659

  18. Cultivating Chlorella sp. in a pilot-scale photobioreactor using centrate wastewater for microalgae biomass production and wastewater nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Min, Min; Wang, Liang; Li, Yecong; Mohr, Michael J; Hu, Bing; Zhou, Wenguang; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2011-09-01

    This study is concerned with a novel mass microalgae production system which, for the first time, uses "centrate", a concentrated wastewater stream, to produce microalgal biomass for energy production. Centrate contains a high level of nutrients that support algal growth. The objective of this study was to investigate the growth characteristics of a locally isolated microalgae strain Chlorella sp. in centrate and its ability to remove nutrients from centrate. A pilot-scale photobioreactor (PBR) was constructed at a local wastewater treatment plant. The system was tested under different harvesting rates and exogenous CO(2) levels with the local strain of Chlorella sp. Under low light conditions (25 μmol·m(-2)s(-1)) the system can produce 34.6 and 17.7 g·m(-2)day(-1) biomass in terms of total suspended solids and volatile suspended solids, respectively. At a one fourth harvesting rate, reduction of chemical oxygen demand, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, and soluble total phosphorus were 70%, 61%, and 61%, respectively. The addition of CO(2) to the system did not exhibit a positive effect on biomass productivity or nutrient removal in centrate which is an organic carbon rich medium. The unique PBR system is highly scalable and provides a great opportunity for biomass production coupled with wastewater treatment. PMID:21494756

  19. Enhanced mixotrophic growth of microalga Chlorella sp. on pretreated swine manure for simultaneous biofuel feedstock production and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Min, Min; Zhou, Wenguang; Du, Zhenyi; Mohr, Michael; Chen, Paul; Zhu, Jun; Cheng, Yanling; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger

    2012-12-01

    The objectives were to assess the feasibility of using fermented liquid swine manure (LSM) as nutrient supplement for cultivation of Chlorella sp. UMN271, a locally isolated facultative heterotrophic strain, and to evaluate the nutrient removal efficiencies by alga compared with those from the conventionally decomposed LSM-algae system. The results showed that addition of 0.1% (v/v) acetic, propionic and butyric acids, respectively, could promote algal growth, enhance nutrient removal efficiencies and improve total lipids productivities during a 7-day batch cultivation. Similar results were observed when the acidogenic fermentation was applied to the sterilized and raw digested LSM rich in volatile fatty acids (VFAs). High algal growth rate (0.90 d(-1)) and fatty acid content (10.93% of the dry weight) were observed for the raw VFA-enriched manure sample. Finally, the fatty acid profile analyses showed that Chlorella sp. grown on acidogenically digested manure could be used as a feedstock for high-quality biodiesel production. PMID:23073091

  20. Long-term study on the impact of temperature on enhanced biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sayi-Ucar, N; Sarioglu, M; Insel, G; Cokgor, E U; Orhon, D; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-11-01

    The study involved experimental observation and performance evaluation of a membrane bioreactor system treating municipal wastewater for nutrient removal for a period 500 days, emphasizing the impact of high temperature on enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). The MBR system was operated at relatively high temperatures (24-41 °C). During the operational period, the total phosphorus (TP) removal gradually increased from 50% up to 95% while the temperature descended from 41 to 24 °C. At high temperatures, anaerobic volatile fatty acid (VFA) uptake occurred with low phosphorus release implying the competition of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) with polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Low dissolved oxygen conditions associated with high wastewater temperatures did not appreciable affected nitrification but enhanced nitrogen removal. Dissolved oxygen levels around 1.0 mgO2/L in membrane tank provided additional denitrification capacity of 6-7 mgN/L by activating simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. As a result, nearly complete removal of nitrogen could be achieved in the MBR system, generating a permeate with no appreciable nitrogen content. The gross membrane flux was 43 LMH corresponding to the specific permeability (K) of 413 LMH/bar at 39 °C in the MBR tank. The specific permeability increased by the factor of 43% at 39 °C compared to that of 25 °C during long-term operation. PMID:26204227

  1. Separating physical and biological nutrient retention and quantifying uptake kinetics from ambient to saturation in successive mountain stream reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, Timothy; McGlynn, Brian; Baker, Michelle

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological and biogeochemical processes in stream reaches impact the downstream transport of nutrients. The output from one stream reach becomes the input for the next, leading to serial processing along stream networks. The shape of the uptake-concentration curve for each reach indicates in-stream biological uptake of nutrient. Combined with physical retention due to hydrologic turnover, both biological and physical retention will control nutrient export downstream. We performed an instantaneous addition of conservative (chloride, Cl) and nonconservative nutrient (nitrate-nitrogen, NO3-N) tracers to ascertain the relative roles of physical and biological retention across four adjacent reaches along a 3744 m stream network in the Sawtooth Mountains, ID. Physical retention dominated total retention ranging from 15% to 58% across individual reaches and totaling 81% across the entire stream length. Within each reach, biological uptake was strongly controlled by nutrient concentration. We quantified continuous Michaelis-Menten (M-M) kinetic curves for each reach and determined that ambient uptake (Uamb) ranged from 19 to 58 μg m-2 min-1, maximum uptake (Umax) from 65 to 240 μg m-2 min-1, and half-saturation constants (Km) from 4.2 to 14.4 μg l-1 NO3-N. Biological retention capacity indicated by Umax decreased in a downstream direction. Although biological retention capacity decreased moving downstream, it did not decrease as much as physical retention, which led to biological retention comprising a larger portion of total retention at downstream reaches. We suggest that accurate assessment of total retention across stream reaches and stream networks requires quantification of physical retention and the concentration-dependent nature of biological uptake.

  2. Endotoxin removal and prevention for pre-clinical biologics production.

    PubMed

    Serdakowski London, Anne; Kerins, Brendan; Tschantz, William R; Eisfeld, Jochen; Mackay, Kasey

    2012-12-01

    The removal of endotoxin from protein solutions and its prevention are key to the success of recombinant protein production due to the possible pyogenic response in mammals caused by contaminated samples. In the pre-clinical situation, protein production is often carried out in a non-good manufacturing practice (GMP) setting, utilizing bacterial DNA for transient transfection and non-validated cleaning techniques. Here, we present our findings evaluating various options for endotoxin removal, and propose strategies for endotoxin prevention with emphasis on chromatographic separations, endotoxin-removing membranes and on-column wash strategies. PMID:23081824

  3. Unraveling characteristics of nutrient removal and microbial community in a novel aerated landscape - Activated sludge ecological system.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jun-Ming; Hu, Miao-Miao; Sun, Rong; Chen, Bor-Yann

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a novel landscape-activated sludge ecological system (LASeM) was constructed with the advantages of promising treatment, less land need and significant landscape services. Compared to literature, this study provided promising integrated wastewater treatment and landscape for wastewater treatment. This first-attempt study clearly deciphered interactive effect of aeration rate (AR) on nutrient removal and microbial community structure in LASeM. When AR was 0.016m(3)h(-1), the most appropriate removal of COD, NH4(+)-N and TP were 96%, 97% and 74% with the effluent of 14.3, 1.7 and 0.7mgL(-1), respectively, which showed satisfactory capabilities for rural domestic wastewater treatment. According to clone library analysis, Proteobacteria (71%), Bacteroidetes (17%) were found to be the dominant bacterial phylums present in LASeM for biodegradation. In particular, the incorporation of plants altered the microbial community and strengthened capability for the nutrients removal likely due to synergistic interactions among species in the ecosystem. PMID:27111873

  4. Evaluation of biological removal efficiency in a UCT process treating municipal wastewater during start-up stage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Liu, Bo; Liu, Yong-De; Wan, Fujun

    2013-04-01

    This study reports the performance of University of Cape Town (UCT) municipal wastewater treatment plant, during the startup stage with the focus on the relationship between hydraulic retention time (HRT) and biological nutrient removal (BNR) efficiency. The entire experimental period was 144 days, divided into four periods. Results showed that the removal efficiency of TN, NH4+-N, and Kjeldahl nitrogen (KN) was closely related to the HRT. Furthermore, the biodegradation kinetics analysis was used to calculate the specific degradation rates of pollutants. The GPS-X modeling was also used to examine the effect of the UCT pilot plant on BNR. The UCT pilot plant used in this study achieved high BNR efficiency even during the startup stage. With HRT of 24 hr (Period 1, day 1-40, data set 1-10), the highest levels of TN, NH(4+)-N and KN removal efficiency were approximately 72, 76 and 78%, respectively. The COD showed consistent high removal efficiency, with the highest level of approximately 96% at HRT of 15 hr (Period 3, day 81-120, data set 21-30). The TP removal efficiency rose at first and subsequently decreased abruptly. The maximum removal efficiency was 85% with HRT of 19 hr (Period 2, day 41-80, data set 11-20). With the optimal HRT 19 hr, the average removal efficiency values of COD, TP, TN, NH(4+)-N and KN were 89, 80, 65, 67 and 68%, respectively. The GPS-X modeling results indicated that the UCT process was effective in COD, TP and TN removal. PMID:24620618

  5. Performance of subsurface flow constructed wetland mesocosms in enhancing nutrient removal from municipal wastewater in warm tropical environments.

    PubMed

    Bateganya, Najib Lukooya; Kazibwe, Alex; Langergraber, Guenter; Okot-Okumu, James; Hein, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient-rich effluents from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have significantly contributed to eutrophication of surface waters in East Africa. We used vertical (VF, 0.2 m(2)) and horizontal (HF, 0.45 m(2)) subsurface flow (SSF) constructed wetland (CW) configurations to design single-stage mesocosms planted with Cyperus papyrus, and operating under batch hydraulic loading regime (at a mean organic loading rate of 20 g COD m(-2) d(-1) for HF and 77 g COD m(-2) d(-1) for VF beds). The aim of the investigation was to assess the performance of SSF CWs as hotspots of nutrient transformation and removal processes between the WWTP and the receiving natural urban wetland environment in Kampala, Uganda. C. papyrus coupled with batch loading enhanced aerobic conditions and high efficiency regarding the elimination of suspended solids, organic matter, and nutrients with significant performance (P < .05) in VF mesocosms. The mean N and P elimination rates (g m(-2) d(-1)) were 9.16 N and 5.41 P in planted VF, and 1.97 N and 1.02 P in planted HF mesocosms, respectively. The lowest mean nutrient elimination rate (g m(-2) d(-1)) was 1.10 N and 0.62 P found in unplanted HF controls. Nutrient accumulation in plants and sediment retention were found to be essential processes. It can be concluded that whereas the SSF CWs may not function as independent treatment systems, they could be easily adopted as flexible and technologically less intensive options at a local scale, to increase the resilience of receiving environments by buffering peak loads from WWTPs. PMID:26387557

  6. Macrophytes may not contribute significantly to removal of nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotic resistance in model surface constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Pascal; Anderson, Julie C; Carlson, Jules C; Low, Jennifer E; Challis, Jonathan K; Beattie, Sarah A; Bartel, Caitlin N; Elliott, Ashley D; Montero, Oscar F; Lokesh, Sheetal; Favreau, Alex; Kozlova, Tatiana A; Knapp, Charles W; Hanson, Mark L; Wong, Charles S

    2014-06-01

    Outdoor shallow wetland mesocosms, designed to simulate surface constructed wetlands to improve lagoon wastewater treatment, were used to assess the role of macrophytes in the dissipation of wastewater nutrients, selected pharmaceuticals, and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Specifically, mesocosms were established with or without populations of Typha spp. (cattails), Myriophyllum sibiricum (northern water milfoil), and Utricularia vulgaris (bladderwort). Following macrophyte establishment, mesocosms were seeded with ARG-bearing organisms from a local wastewater lagoon, and treated with a single pulse of artificial municipal wastewater with or without carbamazepine, clofibric acid, fluoxetine, and naproxen (each at 7.6μg/L), as well as sulfamethoxazole and sulfapyridine (each at 150μg/L). Rates of pharmaceutical dissipation over 28d ranged from 0.073 to 3.0d(-1), corresponding to half-lives of 0.23 to 9.4d. Based on calculated rate constants, observed dissipation rates were consistent with photodegradation driving clofibric acid, naproxen, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfapyridine removal, and with sorption also contributing to carbamazepine and fluoxetine loss. Of the seven gene determinants assayed, only two genes for both beta-lactam resistance (blaCTX and blaTEM) and sulfonamide resistance (sulI and sulII) were found in sufficient quantity for monitoring. Genes disappeared relatively rapidly from the water column, with half-lives ranging from 2.1 to 99d. In contrast, detected gene levels did not change in the sediment, with the exception of sulI, which increased after 28d in pharmaceutical-treated systems. These shallow wetland mesocosms were able to dissipate wastewater contaminants rapidly. However, no significant enhancement in removal of nutrients or pharmaceuticals was observed in mesocosms with extensive aquatic plant communities. This was likely due to three factors: first, use of naïve systems with an unchallenged capacity for nutrient assimilation and

  7. Dynamic control of nutrient-removal from industrial wastewater in a sequencing batch reactor, using common and low-cost online sensors.

    PubMed

    Dries, Jan

    2016-01-01

    On-line control of the biological treatment process is an innovative tool to cope with variable concentrations of chemical oxygen demand and nutrients in industrial wastewater. In the present study we implemented a simple dynamic control strategy for nutrient-removal in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treating variable tank truck cleaning wastewater. The control system was based on derived signals from two low-cost and robust sensors that are very common in activated sludge plants, i.e. oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and dissolved oxygen. The amount of wastewater fed during anoxic filling phases, and the number of filling phases in the SBR cycle, were determined by the appearance of the 'nitrate knee' in the profile of the ORP. The phase length of the subsequent aerobic phases was controlled by the oxygen uptake rate measured online in the reactor. As a result, the sludge loading rate (F/M ratio), the volume exchange rate and the SBR cycle length adapted dynamically to the activity of the activated sludge and the actual characteristics of the wastewater, without affecting the final effluent quality. PMID:26901715

  8. Impact of biological filtrations for organic micropollutants and polyfluoroalkyl substances removal from secondary effluent.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Pramanik, Sagor Kumar; Suja, Fatihah

    2016-08-01

    The impact of biological activated carbon (BAC), sand filtration (SF) and biological aerated filter (BAF) for removal of the selected organic micropollutants and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) from secondary effluent was studied. BAC led to greater removal of dissolved organic carbon (43%) than BAF (30%) which in turn was greater than SF (24%). All biological filtration systems could effectively remove most of the selected organic micropollutants, and there was a greater removal of these micropollutants by BAC (76-98%) than BAF (70-92%) or SF (68-90%). It was found that all treatment was effective for removal of the hydrophobic (log D > 3.2) and readily biodegradable organic micropollutants. The major mechanism for the removal of these molecules was biodegradation by the micro-organism and sorption by the biofilm. Compared to organic micropollutants removal, there was a lower removal of PFASs by all treatments, and BAF and SF had a considerably lower removal than BAC treatment. The better removal for all molecule types by BAC was due to additional adsorption capacity by the activated carbon. This study demonstrated that the BAC process was most effective in removing organic micropollutants present in the secondary effluent. PMID:26695189

  9. PARTICLE REMOVAL AND HEAD LOSS DEVELOPMENT IN BIOLOGICAL FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical performance of granular media filters was studied under pre-chlorinated, backwash-chlorinated, and nonchlorinated conditions. Overall, biological filteration produced a high-quality water. Although effluent turbidities showed littleer difference between the perform...

  10. Biological regeneration of ferric (Fe3+) solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams: effect of nutrients and support material.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the biological regeneration of ferric Fe3+ solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is absorbed into aqueous ferric sulphate solution and oxidised to elemental sulphur, while ferric ions Fe3+ are reduced to ferrous ions Fe2+. During the industrial regeneration of Fe3+, nutrients and trace minerals usually provided in a laboratory setup are not present and this depletion of nutrients may have a negative impact on the bacteria responsible for ferrous iron oxidation and may probably affect the oxidation rate. In this study, the effect of nutrients and trace minerals on ferrous iron oxidation have been investigated and the results showed that the presence of nutrients and trace minerals affects the efficiency of bacterial Fe2+oxidation. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the geotextile support material was also conducted and the results showed that the iron precipitate deposits appear to play a direct role on the bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26038932

  11. Digestate color and light intensity affect nutrient removal and competition phenomena in a microalgal-bacterial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Marcilhac, Cyril; Sialve, Bruno; Pourcher, Anne-Marie; Ziebal, Christine; Bernet, Nicolas; Béline, Fabrice

    2014-11-01

    During anaerobic digestion, nutrients are mineralized and may require post-treatment for optimum valorization. The cultivation of autotrophic microalgae using the digestate supernatant is a promising solution; however the dark color of the influent poses a serious problem. First, the color of the digestates was studied and the results obtained using three different digestates demonstrated a strong heterogeneity although their color remained rather constant over time. The digestates absorbed light over the whole visible spectrum and remained colored even after a ten-fold dilution. Secondly, the impact of light and of substrate color on the growth of Scenedesmus sp. and on nitrogen removal were assessed. These experiments led to the construction of a model for predicting the impact of influent color and light intensity on N removal. Maximum N removal (8.5 mgN- [Formula: see text]  L(-1) d(-1)) was observed with an initial optical density of 0.221 and 244 μmolE m(-)² s(-1) light and the model allows to determine N removal between 15.9 and 22.7 mgN- [Formula: see text]  L(-1) d(-1) in real conditions according to the dilution level of the influent and related color. Changes in the microalgae community were monitored and revealed the advantage of Chlorella over Scenedesmus under light-limitation. Additionally microalgae outcompeted nitrifying bacteria and experiments showed how microalgae become better competitors for nutrients when phosphorus is limiting. Furthermore, nitrification was limited by microalgae growth, even when P was not limiting. PMID:25078443

  12. Electricity generation and nutrients removal from high-strength liquid manure by air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hongjian; Wu, Xiao; Nelson, Chad; Miller, Curtis; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are widely tested to recover electrical energy from waste streams containing organic matter. When high-strength wastewater, such as liquid animal manure, is used as a medium, inhibition on anode and cathode catalysts potentially impairs the effectiveness of MFC performance in power generation and pollutant removal. This study evaluated possible inhibitive effects of liquid swine manure components on MFC power generation, improved liquid manure-fed MFCs performance by pretreatment (dilution and selective adsorption), and modeled the kinetics of organic matter and nutrients removal kinetics. Parameters monitored included pH, conductivity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN), nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate concentrations. The removals of VFA and TAN were efficient, indicated by the short half-life times of 4.99 and 7.84 d, respectively. The mechanism for phosphate decrease was principally the salt precipitation on cathode, but the removal was incomplete after 42-d operation. MFC with an external resistor of 2.2 kΩ and fed with swine wastewater generated relatively small power (28.2 μW), energy efficiency (0.37%) and Coulombic efficiency (1.5%). Dilution of swine wastewater dramatically improved the power generation as the inhibitory effect was decreased. Zeolite and granular activated carbon were effective in the selective adsorption of ammonia or organic matter in swine wastewater, and so substantially improved the power generation, energy efficiency, and Coulombic efficiency. A smaller external resistor in the circuit was also observed to promote the organic matter degradation and thus to shorten the treatment time. Overall, air-cathode MFCs are promising for generating electrical power from livestock wastewater and meanwhile reducing the level of organic matter and nutrients. PMID:26654000

  13. Modelling of micropollutant removal in biological wastewater treatments: a review.

    PubMed

    Pomiès, M; Choubert, J-M; Wisniewski, C; Coquery, M

    2013-01-15

    Modelling the fate of micropollutants through wastewater treatment plants is of present concern. Indeed, such a tool is useful to increase the removal of micropollutants and reduce their release to the environment. In this paper, 18 literature models describing micropollutant removal in activated sludge processes were reviewed. Investigated micropollutants were mainly volatile organic compounds, metals, surfactants, pesticides and pharmaceutical compounds. This work provides a detailed insight about the main mechanisms leading to the micropollutant removal (volatilisation, sorption, biodegradation, cometabolism), the associated mathematical equations and the parameter values found in the literature. A critical analysis was carried out to evaluate the conditions and the domain of validity for which each model was set-up. We also propose (i) an inventory of the experimental methodologies applied to determine the values of model parameters, (ii) a critical study of the main differences between models and (iii) suggestions for a standardisation of calibration methodologies. Finally, this review highlights the lack of explanation concerning the domain of validity of the models and proposes future developments to improve modelling of micropollutant removal in wastewater treatment plants. PMID:23228719

  14. Impact of nitrite on aerobic phosphorus uptake by poly-phosphate accumulating organisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal sludges.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Boxiao; Yang, Yingying; Wang, Xiangdong; Li, Lei; Peng, Yongzhen

    2014-02-01

    Impact of nitrite on aerobic phosphorus (P) uptake of poly-phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in three different enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems was investigated, i.e., the enriched PAOs culture fed with synthetic wastewater, the two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) treating domestic wastewater for nutrient removal through nitrite-pathway nitritation and nitrate-pathway nitrification, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization results showed that PAOs in the three sludges accounted for 72, 7.6 and 6.5% of bacteria, respectively. In the enriched PAOs culture, at free nitrous acid (FNA) concentration of 0.47 × 10(-3) mg HNO₂-N/L, aerobic P-uptake and oxidation of intercellular poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates were both inhibited. Denitrifying phosphorus removal under the aerobic conditions was observed, indicating the existence of PAOs using nitrite as electron acceptor in this culture. When the FNA concentration reached 2.25 × 10(-3) mg HNO2-N/L, denitrifying phosphorus removal was also inhibited. And the inhibition ceased once nitrite was exhausted. Corresponding to both SBRs treating domestic wastewater with nitritation and nitrification pathway, nitrite inhibition on aerobic P-uptake by PAOs did not occur even though FNA concentration reached 3 × 10(-3) and 2.13 × 10(-3) mg HNO₂-N/L, respectively. Therefore, PAOs taken from different EBPR activated sludges had different tolerance to nitrite. PMID:23771179

  15. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF PHOSTRIP, A/O, AND BARDENPHO PROCESSES FOR BIOLOGICAL PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An engineering evaluation of three proprietary processes for biological removal of phosphorus from municipal wastewater was conducted. The report presents for each process: Technology description; Technology evaluation; Development status; Equivalent technologies comparison; Asse...

  16. Environmental distribution and population biology of Candidatus Accumulibacter, a primary agent of biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S Brook; Warnecke, Falk; Madejska, Julita; McMahon, Katherine D; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-10-01

    Members of the uncultured bacterial genus Candidatus Accumulibacter are capable of intracellular accumulation of inorganic phosphate in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal, but were also recently shown to inhabit freshwater and estuarine sediments. Additionally, metagenomic sequencing of two bioreactor cultures enriched in Candidatus Accumulibacter, but housed on separate continents, revealed the potential for global dispersal of particular Candidatus Accumulibacter strains, which we hypothesize is facilitated by the ability of Candidatus Accumulibacter to persist in environmental habitats. In the current study, we used sequencing of a phylogenetic marker, the ppk1 gene, to characterize Candidatus Accumulibacter populations in diverse environments, at varying distances from WWTPs. We discovered several new lineages of Candidatus Accumulibacter which had not previously been detected in WWTPs, and also uncovered new diversity and structure within previously detected lineages. Habitat characteristics were found to be a key determinant of Candidatus Accumulibacter lineage distribution while, as predicted, geographic distance played little role in limiting dispersal on a regional scale. However, on a local scale, enrichment of particular Candidatus Accumulibacter lineages in WWTP appeared to impact local environmental populations. These results provide evidence of ecological differences among Candidatus Accumulibacter lineages. PMID:18643843

  17. Nutrient availability affects pigment production but not growth in lichens of biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Koch, G.W.; Belnap, J.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research suggests that micronutrients such as Mn may limit growth of slow-growing biological soil crusts (BSCs) in some of the drylands of the world. These soil surface communities contribute strongly to arid ecosystem function and are easily degraded, creating a need for new restoration tools. The possibility that Mn fertilization could be used as a restoration tool for BSCs has not been tested previously. We used microcosms in a controlled greenhouse setting to investigate the hypothesis that Mn may limit photosynthesis and consequently growth in Collema tenax, a dominant N-fixing lichen found in BSCs worldwide. We found no evidence to support our hypothesis; furthermore, addition of other nutrients (primarily P, K, and Zn) had a suppressive effect on gross photosynthesis (P = 0.05). We also monitored the growth and physiological status of our microcosms and found that other nutrients increased the production of scytonemin, an important sunscreen pigment, but only when not added with Mn (P = 0.01). A structural equation model indicated that this effect was independent of any photosynthesis-related variable. We propose two alternative hypotheses to account for this pattern: (1) Mn suppresses processes needed to produce scytonemin; and (2) Mn is required to suppress scytonemin production at low light, when it is an unnecessary photosynthate sink. Although Mn fertilization does not appear likely to increase photosynthesis or growth of Collema, it could have a role in survivorship during environmentally stressful periods due to modification of scytonemin production. Thus, Mn enrichment should be studied further for its potential to facilitate BSC rehabilitation. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Microalgal-biotechnology as a platform for an integral biogas upgrading and nutrient removal from anaerobic effluents.

    PubMed

    Bahr, Melanie; Díaz, Ignacio; Dominguez, Antonio; González Sánchez, Armando; Muñoz, Raul

    2014-01-01

    The potential of a pilot high rate algal pond (HRAP) interconnected via liquid recirculation with an external absorption column for the simultaneous removal of H2S and CO2 from biogas using an alkaliphilic microalgal-bacterial consortium was evaluated. A bubble column was preferred as external absorption unit to a packed bed column based on its ease of operation, despite showing a comparable CO2 mass transfer capacity. When the combined HRAP-bubble column system was operated under continuous mode with mineral salt medium at a biogas residence time of 30 min in the absorption column, the system removed 100% of the H2S (up to 5000 ppmv) and 90% of the CO2 supplied, with O2 concentrations in the upgraded biogas below 0.2%. The use of diluted centrates as a free nutrient source resulted in a gradual decrease in CO2 removal to steady values of 40%, while H2S removal remained at 100%. The anaerobic digestion of the algal-bacterial biomass produced during biogas upgrading resulted in a CH4 yield of 0.21-0.27 L/gVS, which could satisfy up to 60% of the overall energy demand for biogas upgrading. This proof of concept study confirmed that algal-bacterial photobioreactors can support an integral upgrading without biogas contamination, with a net negative CO2 footprint, energy production, and a reduction of the eutrophication potential of the residual anaerobic effluents. PMID:24298934

  19. Growth rate, organic carbon and nutrient removal rates of Chlorella sorokiniana in autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunjin; Park, Jeong-eun; Cho, Yong-Beom; Hwang, Sun-Jin

    2013-09-01

    This study sought to investigate the growth rate and organic carbon and nutrient removal efficiency of Chlorella sorokiniana under autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. Growth rates of the microalgae were 0.24 d(-1), 0.53 d(-1) and 0.44 d(-1) in autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions, respectively. The growth rate of C. sorokiniana was significantly higher for that grown under heterotrophic conditions. The nitrogen removal rates were 13.1 mg-N/L/day, 23.9 mg-N/L/day and 19.4 mg-N/L/day, respectively. The phosphorus removal rates reached to 3.4 mg-P/L/day, 5.6 mg-P/L/day and 5.1 mg-P/L/day, respectively. Heterotrophic conditions were superior in terms of the microalgae growth and removal of nitrogen and phosphorus compared to autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions, suggesting that microalgae cultured under this condition would be most useful for application in wastewater treatment systems. PMID:23850820

  20. In situ biological resources: Soluble nutrients and electrolytes in carbonaceous asteroids/meteorites. Implications for astroecology and human space populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    2014-12-01

    Ecosystems in space will need in-situ bioavailable nutrients. The measured nutrients in meteorites allow experiment-based estimates of nutrients in asteroids, and of the biomass and populations that can be derived from these in situ bioresources. In this respect, we found that carbonaceous chondrite meteorites can support microorganisms and plant cultures, suggesting that similar asteroid materials are also biologically fertile. The sustainable biomass and populations are determined by the available resource materials, their yields of nutrients and biomass, the biomass needed to support human populations, the duration of the ecosystem, and wastage. The bioavailable C, N, and electrolytes in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites vary as CM2>CR2>CV3>CO3>CK4>CK5 in correlation with petrologic type, including aqueous alteration. Their average bioavailable C, N, K and P can yield 2.4, 3.5, 2.5, and 0.08 g biomass/kg resource material, respectively, showing phosphorus as the limiting nutrient. On this basis, soluble nutrients in a 100 km radius, 1019 kg resource asteroid can sustain an ecosystem of 108 kg biomass and a human population of 10,000 for >109 years, and its total nutrient contents can sustain a population of one million, by replacing a wastage of 1% of the biomass per year. Overall, the total nutrient contents of the 1022 kg carbonaceous asteroids can yield a biomass of 1020 kg that supports a steady-state human population of one billion during the habitable future of the Solar System, contributing a time-integrated biomass of 1022 kg-years. These astroecology estimates use experimental data on nutrients in asteroids/meteorites to quantify the sustainable biomass and human populations in this and similar solar systems.

  1. Effect of Cu(II) shock loads on shortcut biological nitrogen removal in a hybrid biofilm nitrogen removal reactor.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Xu, Hengjuan; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Kun; Lin, Ying

    2015-06-01

    The effect of Cu(II) shock loads on shortcut biological nitrogen removal during a continuous-flow anoxic/aerobic process was investigated using a hybrid biofilm nitrogen removal reactor. The results demonstrated that [Formula: see text]-N removal was not affected by any Cu(II) shock loads, but TN removal was inhibited by Cu(II) of shock loads of 2 and 5 mg/L, and the performance could not be recovered at 5 mg/L. Furthermore, the TN removal pathway also changed in response to Cu(II) concentrations of 2 and 5 mg/L. Denitrification is more sensitive to Cu(II) shock in SBNR processes. Examination of amoA communities using quantitative PCR showed that the abundance of AOB in the aerobic tank decreased after Cu(II) shock with 5 mg/L, which supported the observed changes in [Formula: see text]-N removal efficiency. The abundance of denitrification genes declined obviously at Cu(II) concentrations of 2 and 5 mg/L, which explained the decreased TN removal efficiency at those concentrations. PMID:25833010

  2. Biomass production and nutrient removal potential of water hyacinth cultured in sewage effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.R.; Hueston, F.M.; McKinn, T.

    1985-05-01

    Growth and nutrient uptake of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart Solms)) cultured in sewage effluent were measured over a period of one year in a prototype wastewater treatment system which has been in operation at Walt Disney World near Orlando, Florida. Annual productivity of water hyacinth cultured in primary sewage effluent (Channel II) was found to be in the range of 5 to 27 g dry wt/m/sup 2/ day (23.6 dry tons/acre yr). Average growth rate during the months of May through October 1982 for hyacinth cultured in Channel II (primary sewage effluent) and Channel I (treated primary sewage effluent leaving Channel II) was about 16 g dry wt/m/sup 2/ (27 dry tons/acre yr), compared to the growth rate of 13 g dry wt/m/sup 2/ (22 dry tons/acre yr) for hyacinths cultured in secondary sewage effluent. Plants cultured in secondary sewage effluent generally had longer roots than the plants cultured in primary sewage effluent. A significant relationship was observed between the growth rate of hyacinth and the solar radiation. N and P concentration of the plant tissue were higher in the hyacinths cultured during winter months compared to the plants grown in summer months. Average N and P concentration of the plants cultured im primary sewage effluent were found to be 3.7% N and 0.94% P, respectively, while the plants cultured in secondary sewage effluent had a total N and P content of 2.8% N and 0.79% P. Nutrient ratios of the major plant nurtrients were found to be approximately the same as the nutrient ratios in the sewage effluent. Annual N and P uptake rates of hyacinth cultured in sewage effluent were found to be in the range of 1176 to 1193 kg N/ha yr and 321 to 387 kg P/ha yr, respectively.

  3. Biomass production and nutrient removal potential of water hyacinth cultured in sewage effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.R.; Hueston, F.M.; McKim, T.

    1985-05-01

    Growth and nutrient uptake of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solms) cultured in sewage effluent were measured over a period of 1 year in a prototype wastewater treatment system which has been in operation at Walt Disney World near Orlando, Florida. Annual productivity of water hyacinth cultured in primary sewage effluent (Channel II) was found to be in the range of 5 to 27 g dry wt m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/ (23.6 dry tons acre/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/). Average growth rate during the months of May through October 1982 for hyacinth cultured in Channel II (primary sewage effluent) and Channel I (treated primary sewage effluent leaving Channel II) was about 16 g dry wt m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/ (27 dry tons acre/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/), compared to the growth rate of 13 g dry wt m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/ (22 dry tons acre/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/) for hyacinths cultured in secondary sewage effluent. Plants cultured in secondary sewage effluent generally had longer roots than the plants cultured in primary sewage effluent. A significant relationship was observed between the growth rate of hyacinth and the solar radiation. Nitrogen and P concentration of the plant tissue were higher in the hyacinths cultured during winter months compared to the plants grown in summer months. Average N and P concentration of the plants cultured in primary sewage effluent were found to be 3.7 percent N and 0.94 percent P, respectively, while the plants cultured in secondary sewage effluent had a total N and P content of 2.8 percent N and 0.79 percent P. Nutrient ratios of the major plant nutrients were found to be approximately the same as the nutrient ratios in the sewage effluent. Annual N and P uptake rates of hyacinth cultured in sewage effluent were found to be in the range of 1176 to 1193 kg N ha/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/ and 321 to 387 kg P ha/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/, respectively.

  4. Removal of Plant Nutrients by Means of Aerobic Stabilization of Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Irgens, Roar L.; Halvorson, H. Orin

    1965-01-01

    In the conventional treatment of sewage, the solids are normally disposed of by anaerobic digestion. This leaves a considerable amount of plant nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphate, as soluble compounds which will eventually find their way into the plant's final effluent, since the supernatant fluid from the digesters is normally returned to the raw sewage. In a recent investigation, we found that, if the sludges were treated by an aerobic process, a significant portion of the carbonaceous matter was oxidized to carbon dioxide and water, and the rest was assimilated into microbial protoplasm. This process tied up the available nitrogen and phosphorus so that practically none remained dissolved in the suspending liquid. The accumulated solids, consisting mostly of microbial cells, were separated very easily from the liquid, leaving a slightly colored supernatant fluid that was water-clear, free from plant nutrients, and very low in BOD and COD. The overall process was accomplished in a detention time not exceeding 20 days, in contrast to anaerobic digestion which requires from 50 to 70 days. PMID:14325277

  5. The Impact of Temperature on Anaerobic Biological Perchlorate Removal and Aerobic Polishing of the Effluent - paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a pilot-scale evaluation of anaerobic biological perchlorate (C1O4) removal followed by aerobic effluent polishing. The anaerobic biological contactor operated for 3.5 years. During that period, two effluent polishing evaluations, lasting 311 an...

  6. NITRIFICATION AND ARSENIC REMOVAL IN BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE FILTERS: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia in source waters can cause water treatment and distribution system problems, many of which are associated with biological nitrification. Therefore, in some cases, the removal of ammonia from water is desirable. Biological oxidation of ammonia to nitrate and nitrate (nitr...

  7. The Impact of Temperature on Anaerobic Biological Perchlorate Removal and Aerobic Polishing of the Effluent

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a pilot-scale evaluation of anaerobic biological perchlorate (C1O4) removal followed by aerobic effluent polishing. The anaerobic biological contactor operated for 3.5 years. During that period, two effluent polishing evaluations, lasting 311 an...

  8. NITRIFICATION AND IRON AND ARSENIC REMOVAL IN BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE FILTERS: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia in source waters can cause water treatment and distribution system problems, many of which are associated with biological nitrification. Therefore, in some cases, the removal of ammonia from water is desirable. Biological oxidation of ammonia to nitrate and nitrate (nitr...

  9. A diatom-based biological condition gradient (BCG) approach for assessing impairment and developing nutrient criteria for streams.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Sonja; Charles, Donald F; Gerritsen, Jeroen; Belton, Thomas J

    2016-08-15

    Over-enrichment leading to excess algal growth is a major problem in rivers and streams. Regulations to protect streams typically incorporate nutrient criteria, concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen that should not be exceeded in order to protect biological communities. A major challenge has been to develop an approach for both categorizing streams based on their biological conditions and determining scientifically defensible nutrient criteria to protect the biotic integrity of streams in those categories. To address this challenge, we applied the Biological Condition Gradient (BCG) approach to stream diatom assemblages to develop a system for categorizing sites by level of impairment, and then examined the related nutrient concentrations to identify potential nutrient criteria. The six levels of the BCG represent a range of ecological conditions from natural (1) to highly disturbed (6). A group of diatom experts developed a set of rules and a model to assign sites to these levels based on their diatom assemblages. To identify potential numeric nutrient criteria, we explored the relation of assigned BCG levels to nutrient concentrations, other anthropogenic stressors, and possible confounding variables using data for stream sites in New Jersey (n=42) and in surrounding Mid-Atlantic states, USA (n=1443). In both data sets, BCG levels correlated most strongly with total phosphorus and the percentage of forest in the watershed, but were independent of pH. We applied Threshold Indicator Taxa Analysis (TITAN) to determine change-points in the diatom assemblages along the BCG gradient. In both data sets, statistically significant diatom changes occurred between BCG levels 3 and 4. Sites with BCG levels 1 to 3 were dominated by species that grow attached to surfaces, while sites with BCG scores of 4 and above were characterized by motile diatoms. The diatom change-point corresponded with a total phosphorus concentration of about 50μg/L. PMID:27128024

  10. Ecological Limits to Terrestrial Biological Carbon Dioxide Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torn, M. S.; Smith, L. J.; Mishra, U.; Sanchez, D.; Williams, J.

    2014-12-01

    Many climate change mitigation scenarios include terrestrial atmospheric carbon dioxide removal (BCDR) or carbon neutral bioenergy production through bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECS) or afforestation/reforestation. Very high sequestration potentials for these strategies have been reported, and we evaluate the potential ecological limits (e.g., land and resource requirements) to implementation at the 1 Pg C y-1 scale relevant to climate change mitigation for U.S. and global scenarios. We estimate that removing 1 Pg C y-1 via tropical afforestation would require at least 7×106 ha y-1 of land, 0.09 Tg y-1 of nitrogen, and 0.2 Tg y-1 of phosphorous, and would increase evapotranspiration from those lands by almost 50%. Because of improved carbon capture technologies, we are updating (and reducing) our previous estimates for switchgrass BECS (previous estimate was 2×108 ha land and 20 Tg y-1 of nitrogen (20 % of global fertilizer nitrogen production)). Miscanthus could meet the same biomass production with much lower N demand. Moreover, transitioning the U.S land currently under corn- ethanol production to no-till perennial grasses for bioenergy would meet U.S. needs and have additional environmental benefits (such as improved wildlife habitat and soil restoration). Thus, there are both signficant ecological limits to BCDR as well as potential ecological benefits, depending on implementation.

  11. Patterns in nutrient concentrations and biological quality indices across the upper Thames river basin, UK.

    PubMed

    Jarvi, Helen P; Lycett, Esther; Neal, Colin; Love, Alison

    2002-01-23

    This paper examines the nutrient chemistry and biological quality indices [Mean Trophic Rank (MTR) and Trophic Diatom Index (TDI)] for rivers within the upper Thames basin. The predominant sources of nitrogen within the rivers monitored were diffuse and agricultural in nature. However, phosphorus showed both diffuse and point source signals. MTR surveys undertaken both upstream and downstream of major STWs indicate that these rivers are 'at risk' of eutrophication or 'badly damaged'. MTR surveys also indicate increased trophic status downstream of STWs, whereas TDI does not indicate such a consistent pattern. Phosphorus treatment at selected major sewage treatment works in the upper Thames basin resulted in significant reductions in in-stream P concentrations and reductions in fluxes by a half to two thirds. However, the effects of P-reduction on in-stream ecology (measured as MTR and TDI) were more difficult to ascribe, owing to: (1) the high variability in river flow rates experienced since P-reduction was introduced; (2) lag effects related to P stores in river bed sediments; and (3) diffuse and smaller point source inputs upstream. The results of this study indicate that control of upstream sources of phosphorus may prove critical in improving the biological quality status of UK lowland rivers, including ecological responses to P-source controls on the major sewage treatment works downstream. Upstream sources include both diffuse (agricultural) sources and small point source inputs which, at present, are not classified as 'qualifying discharges' under the Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive (UWWTD) and are thus not subject to phosphorus control measures. These results are of relevance for integrated, sustainable management and protection of European freshwater resources, particularly in terms of new ecological targets for water quality management under the new Water Framework Directive. PMID:11846074

  12. Green-cane harvest of sugarcane effects on biomass and energy yields and nutrient removal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane yields in Louisiana can approach 40 dry Mg ha-1, making sugarcane an attractive biofuel feedstock as well as a profitable sugar crop. Existing technology used in green-cane harvesting can be used to allow chopper harvester extractor fans to remove variable amounts of extraneous leaf materi...

  13. HARVESTING ANNUAL RYEGRASS TO REMOVE EXCESS SOIL NUTRIENTS IN A BERMUDAGRASS PASTURE FERTILIZED WITH BROILER LITTER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage producers in the southeast USA often overseed bermudagrass with annual ryegrass in order to enhance annual dry matter (DM) production. As a result, this practice has potential to increase the removal rate of excess phosphorus (P) from manure-impacted soils. This research compared the fate of ...

  14. HIGH RATE NUTRIENT REMOVAL FOR COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS. BENCH SCALE AND DEMONSTRATION SCALE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high rate physical/chemical treatment system has been evaluated for the removal of suspended solids and the macronutrients, phosphorus and nitrogen, from combined sewer overflow. The system utilized a single unit process concept consisting of in-line chemical addition, coagulat...

  15. Corn grain, stover yield and nutrient removal validations at regional partnership sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn (Zea mays, L.) stover has been identified as a major feedstock for cellulosic bioenergy. This report summarizes grain and stover yield as well as N, P, and K removal at several Sun Grant Regional Partnership (SGRP) sites. National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) grain yields were used t...

  16. A novel membrane distillation-thermophilic bioreactor system: biological stability and trace organic compound removal.

    PubMed

    Wijekoon, Kaushalya C; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Cath, Tzahi Y; Nghiem, Long D

    2014-05-01

    The removal of trace organic compounds (TrOCs) by a novel membrane distillation-thermophilic bioreactor (MDBR) system was examined. Salinity build-up and the thermophilic conditions to some extent adversely impacted the performance of the bioreactor, particularly the removal of total nitrogen and recalcitrant TrOCs. While most TrOCs were well removed by the thermophilic bioreactor, compounds containing electron withdrawing functional groups in their molecular structure were recalcitrant to biological treatment and their removal efficiency by the thermophilic bioreactor was low (0-53%). However, the overall performance of the novel MDBR system with respect to the removal of total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and TrOCs was high and was not significantly affected by the conditions of the bioreactor. All TrOCs investigated here were highly removed (>95%) by the MDBR system. Biodegradation, sludge adsorption, and rejection by MD contribute to the removal of TrOCs by MDBR treatment. PMID:24658107

  17. Comparison of biological and chemical phosphorus removals in continuous and sequencing batch reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, L.H.; Irvine, R.L. Jr.; Breyfogle, R.E.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A full-scale study of phosphorus removal has been conducted at Culver using continuous-flow operation, SBR operation, and several different chemical treatment schemes. A full-scale demonstration of SBR biological phosphorus removal also has been shown to be effective. Four contributing groups of organisms and their roles in biological SBR phosphorus removal have been described: denitrifying organisms, fermentation product-manufacturing organisms, phosphorus- accumulating organisms, and aerobic autotrophs and heterotrophs. The SBR can provide the proper balance of anoxic, anaerobic, and aerobic conditions to allow these group of organisms to successfully remove phosphorus biologically, without chemical addition. Treatment results using various chemicals for phosphorus removal, both during conventional, continuous-flow operation and after the plant was converted for SBR operation, have also been provided for comparison. Effluent phosphorus concentrations were almost identical for each period, except for the period when phosphorus was removed biologically and without any chemical addition when effluent phosphorus concentrations were the lowest. These removals were made as a result of settling alone; no tertiary rapid stand filter was used or required.

  18. Effect of carbon source on biomass growth and nutrients removal of Scenedesmus obliquus for wastewater advanced treatment and lipid production.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiao-Hui; Jiang, Jia-Wei; Chen, Li-Ping; Cheng, Li-Hua; Xu, Xin-Hua; Chen, Huan-Lin

    2015-08-01

    The combination of tertiary wastewater treatment and microalgal lipid production is considered to be a promising approach to water eutrophication as well as energy crisis. To intensify wastewater treatment and microalgal biofuel production, the effect of organic and inorganic carbon on algal growth and nutrient removal of Scenedesmus obliquus were examined by varying TOC (total organic carbon) concentrations of 20-120mgL(-1) in wastewater and feeding CO2 concentrations in the range of 0.03-15%, respectively. The results showed that the maximal biomass and average lipid productivity were 577.6 and 16.7mgL(-1)d(-1) with 5% CO2 aeration. The total nitrogen, total phosphorus and TOC removal efficiencies were 97.8%, 95.6% and 59.1% respectively within 6days when cultured with real secondary municipal wastewater. This work further showed that S. obliquus could be utilized for simultaneous organic pollutants reduction, N, P removal and lipid accumulation. PMID:25958150

  19. Microalgae consortia cultivation in dairy wastewater to improve the potential of nutrient removal and biodiesel feedstock production.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Wang, Zhongming; Sun, Yongming; Shu, Qing; Feng, Pingzhong; Zhu, Liandong; Xu, Jin; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2016-05-01

    The potential of microalgae consortia used in dairy wastewater treatment combined with microalgae biodiesel feedstock production was evaluated by comparing the nutrient removal of dairy wastewater, the growth of cells, and the lipid content and composition of biomass between monoalgae and microalgae consortia cultivation system. Our results showed that higher chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (maximum, 57.01-62.86 %) and total phosphorus (TP) removal (maximum, 91.16-95.96 %) were achieved in almost microalgae consortia cultivation system than those in Chlorella sp. monoalgae cultivation system (maximum, 44.76 and 86.74 %, respectively). In addition, microalgae consortia cultivation except the mixture of Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus spp. reached higher biomass concentration (5.11-5.41 g L(-1)), biomass productivity (730.4-773.2 mg L(-1) day(-1)), and lipid productivity (143.7-150.6 mg L(-1) day(-1)) than those of monoalgae cultivation (4.72 g L(-1), 674.3, and 142.2 mg L(-1) day(-1), respectively) on the seventh day. Furthermore, the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles indicated the lipids produced from microalgae consortia cultivation system were more suitable for biodiesel production. The microalgae consortia display superiority in dairy wastewater treatment and the getting feedstock for biodiesel production. PMID:26780059

  20. Simultaneous nitrogen and phosphorus removal in the sulfur cycle-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) process.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Ekama, George A; Wang, Hai-Guang; Wei, Li; Lu, Hui; Chui, Ho-Kwong; Liu, Wen-Tso; Brdjanovic, Damir; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2014-02-01

    Hong Kong has practiced seawater toilet flushing since 1958, saving 750,000 m(3) of freshwater every day. A high sulfate-to-COD ratio (>1.25 mg SO4(2-)/mg COD) in the saline sewage resulting from this practice has enabled us to develop the Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification and Nitrification Integrated (SANI(®)) process with minimal sludge production and oxygen demand. Recently, the SANI(®) process has been expanded to include Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) in an alternating anaerobic/limited-oxygen (LOS-EBPR) aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR). This paper presents further development - an anaerobic/anoxic denitrifying sulfur cycle-associated EBPR, named as DS-EBPR, bioprocess in an alternating anaerobic/anoxic SBR for simultaneous removal of organics, nitrogen and phosphorus. The 211 day SBR operation confirmed the sulfur cycle-associated biological phosphorus uptake utilizing nitrate as electron acceptor. This new bioprocess cannot only reduce operation time but also enhance volumetric loading of SBR compared with the LOS-EBPR. The DS-EBPR process performed well at high temperatures of 30 °C and a high salinity of 20% seawater. A synergistic relationship may exist between sulfur cycle and biological phosphorus removal as the optimal ratio of P-release to SO4(2-)-reduction is close to 1.0 mg P/mg S. There were no conventional PAOs in the sludge. PMID:24342048

  1. Optimizing cultivation strategies for robust algal growth and consequent removal of inorganic nutrients in pretreated livestock effluent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Choi, Wook Jin; Ryu, Jun Hee; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Kim, Han Soo; Lee, Byung-Chan; Song, Kyung Guen

    2014-10-01

    Dilution was employed as a pretreatment strategy to increase light transmittance and decrease ammonia toxicity in piggery effluent prior to the cultivation of microalgae. The dilution effect was quantitatively determined based on both the maximum specific nutrient consumption rate and the maximum growth coefficient to minimize the usage of diluent. The biomass productivity of microalgae was also evaluated to select the best species among the five different candidates examined. A 20-fold dilution of piggery wastewater resulted in decreased chromaticity (584 mg Pt-Co L(-1)) and total nitrogen (76 mg L(-1)), on which the microalgae cultivation was more effective for an algal growth compared to the other dilution factors. If the initial cell concentration of Scenedesmus quadricauda increased, the production of biomass tended to improve. Robust growth and harvesting of S. quadricauda were achieved, and the associated consistent removal of inorganic nutrients was accomplished during the semi-continuous cultivation of the best species. PMID:25138601

  2. Carbon mass balance and microbial ecology in a laboratory scale reactor achieving simultaneous sludge reduction and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pei; Li, Liang; Kotay, Shireen Meher; Goel, Ramesh

    2014-04-15

    Solids reduction in activated sludge processes (ASP) at source using process manipulation has been researched widely over the last two-decades. However, the absence of nutrient removal component, lack of understanding on the organic carbon, and limited information on key microbial community in solids minimizing ASP preclude the widespread acceptance of sludge minimizing processes. In this manuscript, we report simultaneous solids reduction through anaerobiosis along with nitrogen and phosphorus removals. The manuscript also reports carbon mass balance using stable isotope of carbon, microbial ecology of nitrifiers and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Two laboratory scale reactors were operated in anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic (A(2)O) mode. One reactor was run in the standard mode (hereafter called the control-SBR) simulating conventional A(2)O type of activated sludge process and the second reactor was run in the sludge minimizing mode (called the modified-SBR). Unlike other research efforts where the sludge minimizing reactor was maintained at nearly infinite solids retention time (SRT). To sustain the efficient nutrient removal, the modified-SBR in this research was operated at a very small solids yield rather than at infinite SRT. Both reactors showed consistent NH3-N, phosphorus and COD removals over a period of 263 days. Both reactors also showed active denitrification during the anoxic phase even if there was no organic carbon source available during this phase, suggesting the presence of denitrifying PAOs (DNPAOs). The observed solids yield in the modified-SBR was 60% less than the observed solids yield in the control-SBR. Specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) for the modified-SBR was almost 44% more than the control-SBR under identical feeding conditions, but was nearly the same for both reactors under fasting conditions. The modified-SBR showed greater diversity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and PAOs compared to the control-SBR. The diversity of PAOs

  3. Influence of Silver nanoparticles on nutrient removal and microbial communities in SBR process after long-term exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaohan; Gao, Peng; Li, Moqing; Cheng, Jiaqi; Liu, Wei; Feng, Yujie

    2016-11-01

    The widespread utilization of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in industrial and commercial products inevitably raises the release into wastewater that might cause potential negative impacts on sewage treatment system. In this paper, long-term exposure experiments at four levels were conducted to determine whether AgNPs caused adverse impacts on nutrient removals in sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) and changes of microbial community structure. Compared with the control reactor (without AgNPs), carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removal in presence of 0.1mg/L AgNPs was no difference. However, presence of 1.0 and 10mg/L AgNPs decreased the average removal efficiencies of COD from 95.4% to 85.2% and 68.3%, ammonia nitrogen from 98.8% to 71.2% and 49%, SOP from 97.6% to 75.5% and 54.1%, respectively. It was found that AgNPs could accumulate in sludge with the distribution coefficients of 39.2-114L/g, inhibit the protein and polysaccharide production in EPS, reduce the SOUR of sludge, and greatly increase LDH release from microbial cells. The illumina high-throughput sequencing results indicated that AgNPs concentration changed the structures of bacterial communities, associating with the effects of AgNPs on reactor performance. Sequence analyses showed that Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria were the dominant phyla. It was notable that AgNPs addition reduced the contents of several nitrifying bacteria at genera level in sludge, leading to the lower removal of nitrogen. PMID:27343942

  4. Nutrient removal and microbial granulation in an anaerobic process treating inorganic and organic nitrogenous wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Y H; Kim, H C

    2004-01-01

    The sustainable anaerobic nitrogen removal and microbial granulation were investigated by using a laboratory anaerobic granular sludge bed reactor, treating synthetic (inorganic and organic) wastewater and piggery waste. From inorganic synthetic wastewater, lithoautotrophic ammonium oxidation to nitrite/nitrate was observed by an addition of hydroxylamine. Also, the results revealed that the Anammox intermediates (particularly, hydrazine) contents in the substrate would be one of the important parameters for success of the anaerobic nitrogen removal process. The results from organic synthetic wastewater show that if the Anammox organism were not great enough in the startup of the process, denitritation and anaerobic ammonification would be a process prior to the Anammox reaction. The anaerobic ammonium removal from the piggery waste was performed successfully, probably due to the Anammox intermediates contained in the substrate. This reactor shows a complex performance including the Anammox reaction and HAP crystallization, as well as having partial denitritation occurring simultaneously. From the activity test, the maximum specific N conversion rate was 0.1 g NH4-N/g VSS/day (0.77 g T-N/g VSS/day), indicating that potential denitritation is quite high. The NO2-N/NH4-N ratio to Anammox is 1.17. The colour of the biomass treating the piggery waste changed from black to dark red. It was also observed that the red-colored granular sludge had a diameter of 1-2 mm. The settleability assessment of the granular sludge revealed that the granular sludge had a good settleability even though it was worse than that of seed granular sludge. PMID:15537009

  5. Bacterial composition and nutrient removal with a novel PIA-A(2)/O sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Li; Yahong, Luo; Yanan, Cai; Huiping, Zeng; Jie, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    A novel post intermittent aeration anaerobic-anoxic-oxic (PIA-A(2)/O) process was developed to integrate shortcut nitrification-denitrification with denitrifying phosphorus (P) removal for domestic sewage treatment. With the transformation in configuration and phased start-up strategy, the nitritation rate and the ratio of denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms to phosphorus accumulating organisms (DPAO/PAO) were enhanced greatly to 88.2% and 83.9-91.7% in the PIA-A(2)/O process, respectively. Improved total nitrogen and phosphorus removal were achieved at long sludge retention time and low aeration. High sludge activity was maintained through the periodic selection of the additional intermittent aeration zone. High-throughput sequencing revealed that Bacteroidetes (38.96%), Proteobacteria (33.59%), TM7 (4.53%), Chloroflexi (3.09%), and Firmicutes (2.49%) were the dominant phyla in the resultant bacterial community. Abundant anaerobic and facultative bacteria conducive to excess sludge reduction were generated by this process. Potential DPAOs involve the genera of Brevundimonas, Brachymonas, Steroidobacter, Haliscomenobacter, and Rhodocyclus. PMID:27232409

  6. Comparison of the biological NH3 removal characteristics among four inorganic packing materials.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Kamamoto, M; Yani, M; Shoda, M

    2001-01-01

    Four inorganic packing materials were evaluated in terms of their availability as a packing material of a packed tower deodorization apparatus (biofilter) from the viewpoints of biological NH3 removal characteristics and some physical properties. Porous ceramics (A), calcinated cristobalite (B), calcinated and formed obsidian (C), granulated and calculated soil (D) were used. The superiority of these packing materials determined based on the values of non-biological removal per unit weight or unit volume of packing material, complete removal capacity of NH3 per unit weight of packing material per day or unit volume of packing material per day and pressure drop of the packed bed was in the order of A approximately = C > B > or = D. Packing materials A and C with high porosity, maximum water content, and suitable mean pore diameter showed excellent removal capacity. PMID:16233018

  7. Fouling of enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactors by humic-like substances.

    PubMed

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; König, Katja; Fojan, Peter; Keiding, Kristian; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2014-12-01

    Fouling by free extracellular polymeric substances was studied in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor. It was demonstrated that the free extracellular polymeric substances, primarily consisting of humic-like substances, were adsorbed to the membrane used in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor plant. Infrared analyses indicated the presence of the humic-like substances on the membrane's active surface after filtration of the free extracellular polymeric substances suspension. Scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of a gel layer on the membrane surface after filtration of the free extracellular polymeric substances suspension. The gel layer caused a significant decline in water flux. This layer was not entirely removed by a backwashing, and the membrane's water flux could not be re-established. The membrane used in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor plant showed infrared spectra similar to that fouled by the free extracellular polymeric substances suspension in the laboratory. Thus, the results of this study show the importance of humic-like substances in irreversible fouling of enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor systems. PMID:25014564

  8. [Review on the main microorganisms and their metabolic mechanisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue; Zhu, Wei-Jing; Wang, Liang; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is applied widely for removing phosphorus from wastewater. Studies on functional microorganisms and their metabolic mechanisms are fundamental to effective regulation for stable operation and performance improvement of EBPR process. Two main types of microorganisms in EBPR systems, polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) were selected to summarize their metabolic mechanisms such as substrate uptake mechanisms, glycogen degradation pathways, extent of TCA cycle involvement and metabolic similarity between PAOs and GAOs. Application of molecular biology techniques in microbiology and metabolic mechanisms involved in the EBPR system was evaluated. Potential future research areas for the EBPR system and process optimization were also proposed. PMID:24984512

  9. Nutrient removal in an A2O-MBR reactor with sludge reduction.

    PubMed

    Rajesh Banu, J; Uan, Do Khac; Yeom, Ick-Tae

    2009-08-01

    In the present study, an advanced sewage treatment process has been developed by incorporating excess sludge reduction and phosphorous recovery in an A2O-MBR process. The A2O-MBR reactor was operated at a flux of 17 LMH over a period of 210 days. The designed flux was increased stepwise over a period of two weeks. The reactor was operated at two different MLSS range. Thermo chemical digestion of sludge was carried out at a fixed pH (11) and temperature (75 degrees C) for 25% COD solubilisation. The released phosphorous was recovered by precipitation process and the organics was sent back to anoxic tank. The sludge digestion did not have any impact on COD and TP removal efficiency of the reactor. During the 210 days of reactor operation, the MBR maintained relatively constant transmembrane pressure. The results based on the study indicated that the proposed process configuration has potential to reduce the excess sludge production as well as it didn't detoriated the treated water quality. PMID:19246191

  10. [Determination of the biological activity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on a dry nutrient medium of Soviet manufacture].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, V M; Andreeva, Z M; Astanina, L N; Shiriaeva, V L; Gridneva, N I

    1981-06-01

    Possible use of the dry nutrient medium manufactured in the USSR for the assay of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity with the agar diffusion method was studied. The optimal conditions for the antibiotic activity assay on this medium were developed. The dry nutrient medium may be used for the activity assay of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, i. e. streptomycin sulfate, dihydrostreptomycin sulfate, neomycin sulfate, monomycin and gentamicin sulfate. PMID:7271256

  11. Treatment of sludge containing nitro-aromatic compounds in reed-bed mesocosms - Water, BOD, carbon and nutrient removal

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsson, L.; Engwall, M.

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is necessary to improve existing and develop new sludge management techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One method is dewatering and biodegradation of compounds in constructed wetlands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result showed high reduction of all tested parameters after treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plants improve degradation and Phragmites australis is tolerant to xenobiotics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of sludge could be reduced by 50-70%. - Abstract: Since the mid-1970s, Sweden has been depositing 1 million ton d.w sludge/year, produced at waste water treatment plants. Due to recent legislation this practice is no longer a viable method of waste management. It is necessary to improve existing and develop new sludge management techniques and one promising alternative is the dewatering and treatment of sludge in constructed wetlands. The aim of this study was to follow reduction of organic carbon, BOD and nutrients in an industrial sludge containing nitro-aromatic compounds passing through constructed small-scale wetlands, and to investigate any toxic effect such as growth inhibition of the common reed Phragmites australis. The result showed high reduction of all tested parameters in all the outgoing water samples, which shows that constructed wetlands are suitable for carbon and nutrient removal. The results also showed that P. australis is tolerant to xenobiotics and did not appear to be affected by the toxic compounds in the sludge. The sludge residual on the top of the beds contained low levels of organic carbon and is considered non-organic and could therefore be landfilled. Using this type of secondary treatment method, the amount of sludge could be reduced by 50-70%, mainly by dewatering and biodegradation of organic compounds.

  12. Tracing the limits of organic micropollutant removal in biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Falås, Per; Wick, Arne; Castronovo, Sandro; Habermacher, Jonathan; Ternes, Thomas A; Joss, Adriano

    2016-05-15

    Removal of organic micropollutants was investigated in 15 diverse biological reactors through short and long-term experiments. Short-term batch experiments were performed with activated sludge from three parallel sequencing batch reactors (25, 40, and 80 d solid retention time, SRT) fed with synthetic wastewater without micropollutants for one year. Despite the minimal micropollutant exposure, the synthetic wastewater sludges were able to degrade several micropollutants present in municipal wastewater. The degradation occurred immediately after spiking (1-5 μg/L), showed no strong or systematic correlation to the sludge age, and proceeded at rates comparable to those of municipal wastewater sludges. Thus, the results from the batch experiments indicate that degradation of organic micropollutants in biological wastewater treatment is quite insensitive to SRT increases from 25 to 80 days, and not necessarily induced by exposure to micropollutants. Long-term experiments with municipal wastewater were performed to assess the potential for extended biological micropollutant removal under different redox conditions and substrate concentrations (carbon and nitrogen). A total of 31 organic micropollutants were monitored through influent-effluent sampling of twelve municipal wastewater reactors. In accordance with the results from the sludges grown on synthetic wastewater, several compounds such as bezafibrate, atenolol and acyclovir were significantly removed in the activated sludge processes fed with municipal wastewater. Complementary removal of two compounds, diuron and diclofenac, was achieved in an oxic biofilm treatment. A few aerobically persistent micropollutants such as venlafaxine, diatrizoate and tramadol were removed under anaerobic conditions, but a large number of micropollutants persisted in all biological treatments. Collectively, these results indicate that certain improvements in biological micropollutant removal can be achieved by combining different

  13. Simultaneous removal of nanosilver and fullerene in sequencing batch reactors for biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Wang, Yifei; Hristovski, Kiril; Westerhoff, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Increasing use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) inevitably leads to their potential release to the sewer system. The co-removal of nano fullerenes (nC60) and nanosilver as well as their impact on COD removal were studied in biological sequencing batch reactors (SBR) for a year. When dosing nC60 at 0.07-2mgL(-1), the SBR removed greater than 95% of nC60 except for short-term interruptions occurred (i.e., dysfunction of bioreactor by nanosilver addition) when nC60 and nanosilver were dosed simultaneously. During repeated 30-d periods of adding both 2 mg L(-1) nC60 and 2 mg L(-1) nanosilver, short-term interruption of SBRs for 4d was observed and accompanied by (1) reduced total suspended solids in the reactor, (2) poor COD removal rate as low as 22%, and (3) decreased nC60 removal to 0%. After the short-term interruption, COD removal gradually returned to normal within one solids retention time. Except for during these "short-term interruptions", the silver removal rate was above 90%. A series of bottle-point batch experiments was conducted to determine the distribution coefficients of nC60 between liquid and biomass phases. A linear distribution model on nC60 combined with a mass balance equation simulated well its removal rate at a range of 0.07-0.76 mg L(-1) in SBRs. This paper illustrates the effect of "pulse" inputs (i.e., addition for a short period of time) of ENMs into biological reactors, demonstrates long-term capability of SBRs to remove ENMs and COD, and provides an example to predict the removal of ENMs in SBRs upon batch experiments. PMID:25532763

  14. Biological-Community Composition in Small Streams and its Relations to Habitat, Nutrients, and Land Use in Agriculturally Dominated Landscapes in Indiana and Ohio, 2004, and Implications for Assessing Nutrient Conditions in Midwest Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caskey, Brian J.; Frey, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to relate algal-, invertebrate-, and fish-community composition to habitat, nutrients, and land-use variables in small streams in agriculturally dominated landscapes of the Midwest in Indiana and Ohio. Thirty sample locations were selected from a single ecoregion; all were small wadable streams within agriculturally dominated landscapes with similar substrate and canopy. Biological and nutrient samples were collected during stable flow conditions in August 2004. Canonical correspondence analysis was used to determine which variables most influenced each community. Total phosphorus concentrations significantly influenced the depositional-targeted habitat algal-diatom community and the richest-targeted habitat invertebrate community. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that habitat variables were more influential to the richest-targeted habitat algal-diatom and fish communities than nutrient concentrations. Although the nutrient concentrations measured during this study indicate that most streams were not eutrophic, the biological communities were dominated by eutrophic species, suggesting streams sampled were eutrophic. Consequently, it was concluded that biological relations to nutrients in agriculturally dominated landscapes are complex and habitat variables should be included in biological assessments of nutrient conditions in agriculturally dominated landscapes.

  15. Comparison of Three Bed Packings for the Biological Removal of Nitric Oxide from Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady Douglas; Flanagan, W. P.; Barnes, Charles Marshall; Barrett, Karen B.; Zaccardi, Larry Bryan; Apel, William Arnold

    2000-10-01

    Environmental and health issues coupled with increasingly stringent nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission standards indicates a need for the development of alternative low-cost technologies for the removal of NOx from gas streams. Biological NOx conversion offers promise as a novel treatment method. Thermophilic denitrifying bacteria indigenous to composts and soils are capable of converting NOx to environmentally benign nitrogen via a dissimilatory reductive pathway. The present study compares the performance of three bioreactor packing materials (compost, perlite, and biofoam) for the removal of nitric oxide (NO) from a simulated wet-scrubbed combustion gas. Although all three materials performed well (>85% NO removal) at residence times of 70-80 seconds, the compost performed better than the other materials at shorter residence times (13-44 seconds). The perlite and biofoam materials, however, both offer long-term thermal stability and lower pressure drop compared with compost. The feasibility of biological NOx conversion processes will depend on the combined factors of NOx removal ability and pressure drop. The results presented here suggest that the compost, perlite and biofoam systems, subject to further optimization, offer potential for the biological removal of NOx from gas streams.

  16. Insect biological control accelerates leaf litter decomposition and alters short-term nutrient dynamics in a Tamarix-invaded riparian ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect herbivory can strongly influence ecosystem nutrient dynamics, yet the indirect effects of herbivore-altered litter quality on subsequent decomposition remain poorly understood. The northern tamarisk beetle, Diorhabda carinulata, was released across several western states as a biological contr...

  17. Biological Ammonia Removal: From Theory to Case Studies in 20 Minutes

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation documents the results of two pilot-scale treatment studies, in Ohio and Iowa, that investigated the biological removal of ammonia from ground water. Influent ammonia concentrations in the Ohio and Iowa studies averaged 1.3 and 3.3 mg/L - N, respectively. Both ...

  18. Biological and physico-chemical formation of Birnessite during the ripening of manganese removal filters.

    PubMed

    Bruins, Jantinus H; Petrusevski, Branislav; Slokar, Yness M; Huysman, Koen; Joris, Koen; Kruithof, Joop C; Kennedy, Maria D

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of manganese removal in conventional groundwater treatment consisting of aeration followed by rapid sand filtration, strongly depends on the ability of filter media to promote auto-catalytic adsorption of dissolved manganese and its subsequent oxidation. Earlier studies have shown that the compound responsible for the auto-catalytic activity in ripened filters is a manganese oxide called Birnessite. The aim of this study was to determine if the ripening of manganese removal filters and the formation of Birnessite on virgin sand is initiated biologically or physico-chemically. The ripening of virgin filter media in a pilot filter column fed by pre-treated manganese containing groundwater was studied for approximately 600 days. Samples of filter media were taken at regular time intervals, and the manganese oxides formed in the coating were analysed by Raman spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the EPR analyses, it was established that the formation of Birnessite was most likely initiated via biological activity. With the progress of filter ripening and development of the coating, Birnessite formation became predominantly physico-chemical, although biological manganese oxidation continued to contribute to the overall manganese removal. The knowledge that manganese removal in conventional groundwater treatment is initiated biologically could be of help in reducing typically long ripening times by creating conditions that are favourable for the growth of manganese oxidizing bacteria. PMID:25463936

  19. Fermentation of Bioenergy Crops Into Ethanol Using Biological Abatement for Removal of Inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of biomass to fuels or chemicals is hampered by the presence of inhibitory compounds contained in sugar streams derived from lignocellulosic biomass. Biological abatement is a promising method for removing these inhibitors because it neither consumes chemicals nor generates wastes. In t...

  20. Comparison of the biological H2S removal characteristics among four inorganic packing materials.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Kamamoto, M; Yani, M; Shoda, M

    2001-01-01

    Four inorganic packing materials were evaluated in terms of their availability as packing materials of a packed tower deodorization apparatus (biofilter) from the viewpoints of biological H2S removal characteristics and some physical properties. Among porous ceramics (A), calcinated cristobalite (B), calcinated and formed obsidian (C), granulated and calcinated soil (D), the superiority of these packing materials determined based on the values of non-biological removal per unit weight or unit volume of packing material, complete removal capacity of H2S per unit weight of packing material per day or unit volume of packing material per day and pressure drop of the packed bed was in the order of A approximately equal to C > D approximately equal to B, which is correlated with the maximum water content, porosity, and mean pore diameter. PMID:16233011

  1. Effects of idle time on biological phosphorus removal by sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dawen; Yin, Hang; Liu, Lin; Li, Xing; Liang, Hong

    2013-12-01

    Three identical sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated to investigate the effects of various idle times on the biological phosphorus (P) removal. The idle times were set to 3 hr (R1), 10 hr (R2) and 17 hr (R3). The results showed that the idle time of a SBR had potential impact on biological phosphorus removal, especially when the influent phosphorus concentration increased. The phosphorus removal efficiencies of the R2 and R3 systems declined dramatically compared with the stable R1 system, and the P-release and P-uptake rates of the R3 system in particular decreased dramatically. The PCR-DGGE analysis showed that uncultured Pseudomonas sp. (GQ183242.1) and beta-Proteobacteria (AY823971) were the dominant phosphorus removal bacteria for the R1 and R2 systems, while uncultured gamma-Proteobacteria were the dominant phosphorus removal bacteria for the R3 system. Glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs), such as uncultured Sphingomonas sp. (AM889077), were found in the R2 and R3 systems. Overall, the R1 system was the most stable and exhibited the best phosphorus removal efficiency. It was found that although the idle time can be prolonged to allow the formation of intracellular polymers when the phosphorus concentration of the influent is low, systems with a long idle time can become unstable when the influent phosphorus concentration is increased. PMID:24649669

  2. Removal of pharmaceuticals from wastewater by biological processes, hydrodynamic cavitation and UV treatment.

    PubMed

    Zupanc, Mojca; Kosjek, Tina; Petkovšek, Martin; Dular, Matevž; Kompare, Boris; Širok, Brane; Blažeka, Željko; Heath, Ester

    2013-07-01

    To augment the removal of pharmaceuticals different conventional and alternative wastewater treatment processes and their combinations were investigated. We tested the efficiency of (1) two distinct laboratory scale biological processes: suspended activated sludge and attached-growth biomass, (2) a combined hydrodynamic cavitation-hydrogen peroxide process and (3) UV treatment. Five pharmaceuticals were chosen including ibuprofen, naproxen, ketoprofen, carbamazepine and diclofenac, and an active metabolite of the lipid regulating agent clofibric acid. Biological treatment efficiency was evaluated using lab-scale suspended activated sludge and moving bed biofilm flow-through reactors, which were operated under identical conditions in respect to hydraulic retention time, working volume, concentration of added pharmaceuticals and synthetic wastewater composition. The suspended activated sludge process showed poor and inconsistent removal of clofibric acid, carbamazepine and diclofenac, while ibuprofen, naproxen and ketoprofen yielded over 74% removal. Moving bed biofilm reactors were filled with two different types of carriers i.e. Kaldnes K1 and Mutag BioChip™ and resulted in higher removal efficiencies for ibuprofen and diclofenac. Augmentation and consistency in the removal of diclofenac were observed in reactors using Mutag BioChip™ carriers (85%±10%) compared to reactors using Kaldnes carriers and suspended activated sludge (74%±22% and 48%±19%, respectively). To enhance the removal of pharmaceuticals hydrodynamic cavitation with hydrogen peroxide process was evaluated and optimal conditions for removal were established regarding the duration of cavitation, amount of added hydrogen peroxide and initial pressure, all of which influence the efficiency of the process. Optimal parameters resulted in removal efficiencies between 3-70%. Coupling the attached-growth biomass biological treatment, hydrodynamic cavitation/hydrogen peroxide process and UV treatment

  3. Kinetics of nutrient removal and expression of extracellular polymeric substances of the microalgae, Chlorella sp. and Micractinium sp., in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Kuo-Dahab, Wenye Camilla; Dolan, Sona; Park, Chul

    2014-02-01

    Two species of green algae, Chlorella sp. and Micractinium sp., were cultivated in primary effluent wastewater and high-strength wastewater (a mixture of anaerobic digestion centrate and primary effluent) to study nutrient removal and EPS (extracellular polymeric substances) expression during their growth. The high N concentration and P-limited condition in the mixed wastewater (total N=197 mg/L; N/P mass ratio=56) led to about 3 times greater specific N removal rate than the primary effluent set, indicating that algal cells growing in N-rich wastewater had N over-uptake. Both Chlorella and Micractinium grown in the high-strength wastewater also produced larger amounts of protein EPS, possibly accounting for higher N uptake in those cultivation sets. These results suggest that different types of wastewater could cause different nutrient removal kinetics and EPS expression by algae, which may subsequently influence harvesting and anaerobic digestion of their biomass. PMID:24384320

  4. A hetero-photoautotrophic two-stage cultivation process to improve wastewater nutrient removal and enhance algal lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Li, Yecong; Hu, Bing; Ma, Xiaochen; Cheng, Yanling; Liu, Yuhuan; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2012-04-01

    A hetero-photoautotrophic algal growth model was studied for improved wastewater treatment and low cost algal biofuel feedstock production. The microalga, Auxenochlorella protothecoides UMN280, was grown heterotrophically on concentrated municipal wastewater and then autotrophically with CO(2) supplementation (air, 1% and 5%, respectively). Strain UMN280 was harvested by self-sedimentation after the heterotrophic stage and the supernatant was aerated with different levels of CO(2) to facilitate autotrophic growth in the second stage. The maximal biomass concentration and lipid content at the first and second stages reached 1.12g/L and 28.90%, and 1.16g/L and 33.22%, respectively. The nutrient removal efficiencies for total phosphorus, ammonia, nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand at the end of the two-stage cultivation were 98.48%, 100%, 90.60% and 79.10%, respectively. The above process can be used to treat organic-rich wastewaters (e.g. industrial and animal manure wastewaters) to achieve the dual purpose of low-cost wastewater treatment and biofuel feedstock production. PMID:22326332

  5. Characteristics and transformations of dissolved organic nitrogen in municipal biological nitrogen removal wastewater treatment plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Shouliang; Xi, Beidou; Yu, Honglei; Qin, Yanwen; Zan, Fengyu; Zhang, Jingtian

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) represents most of the dissolved nitrogen in the effluent of biological nitrogen removal (BNR) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The characteristics of wastewater-derived DON in two different WWTPs were investigated by several different methods. The major removals of DON and biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen (BDON) along the treatment train were observed in the anaerobic process. Dissolved combined amino acids (DCAA) and dissolved free amino acids (DFAA) in the effluent accounted approximately for less than 4% and 1% of the effluent DON, respectively. Approximately half of wastewater-derived DON was capable of passing through a 1 kDa ultrafilter, and low MW DON cannot effectively be removed by BNR processes. More than 80% of effluent DON was composed of hydrophilic compounds, which stimulate algal growth. The study provided important information for future upgrading of WWTPs or the selection of DON removal systems to meet more demanding nitrogen discharge limits.

  6. Nutrient removal by up-scaling a hybrid floating treatment bed (HFTB) using plant and periphyton: From laboratory tank to polluted river.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzhuo; Wang, Fengwu; Liu, Wei; Tang, Cilai; Wu, Chenxi; Wu, Yonghong

    2016-05-01

    Planted floating treatment bed (FTB) is an innovative technique of removing nutrients from polluted water but limited in deep water and cold seasons. Periphyton was integrated into FTB for a hybrid floating treatment bed (HFTB) to improve its nutrient removal capacity. To assess its potential for treating nutrient-polluted rivers, HFTB was up-scaled from 5L laboratory tanks to 350L outdoor tanks and then to a commercial-scale 900m section of polluted river. Plants and periphyton interacted in HFTB with periphyton limiting plant root growth and plants having shading effects on periphyton. Non-overlapping distribution of plants and periphyton can minimize the negative interactions in HFTB. HFTB successfully kept TN and TP of the river at less than 2.0 and 0.02mgL(-1), respectively. This study indicates that HFTB can be easily up-scaled for nutrients removal from polluted rivers in different seasons providing a long-term, environmentally-friendly method to remediate polluted ecosystems. PMID:26878359

  7. Ocean nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Hurd, Catriona L.

    Nutrients provide the chemical life-support system for phytoplankton in the ocean. Together with the carbon fixed during photosynthesis, nutrients provide the other elements, such as N and P, needed to synthesize macromolecules to build cellular constituents such as ribosomes. The makeup of these various biochemicals, such as proteins, pigments, and nucleic acids, together determine the elemental stoichiometry of an individual phytoplankton cell. The stoichiometry of different phytoplankton species or groups will vary depending on the proportions of distinct cellular machinery, such as for growth or resource acquisition, they require for their life strategies. The uptake of nutrients by phytoplankton helps to set the primary productivity, and drives the biological pump, of the global ocean. In the case of nitrogen, the supply of nutrients is categorized as either new or regenerated. The supply of new nitrogen, such as nitrate upwelled from the ocean' interior or biological nitrogen fixation, is equal to the vertical export of particular organic matter from the upper ocean on a timescale of years. Nutrients such as silica can also play a structural role in some phytoplankton groups, such as diatoms, where they are used to synthesize a siliceous frustule that offers some mechanical protection from grazers. In this chapter, we also explore nutrient uptake kinetics, patterns in nutrient distributions in space and time, the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, the atmospheric supply of nutrients, departures from the Redfield ratio, and whether nutrient distributions and cycling will be altered in the future

  8. The role of plant uptake on the removal of organic matter and nutrients in subsurface flow constructed wetlands: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Langergraber, G

    2005-01-01

    Plants in constructed wetlands have several functions related to the treatment processes. It is generally agreed that nutrient uptake is a minor factor in constructed wetlands treating wastewater compared to the loadings applied. For low loaded systems plant uptake can contribute a significant amount to nutrient removal. The contribution of plant uptake is simulated for different qualities of water to be treated using the multi-component reactive transport module CW2D. CW2D is able to describe the biochemical elimination and transformation processes for organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus in subsurface flow constructed wetlands. The model for plant uptake implemented describes nutrient uptake coupled to water uptake. Literature values are used to calculate potential water and nutrient uptake rates. For a constructed wetland treating municipal wastewater a potential nutrient uptake of about 1.9% of the influent nitrogen and phosphorus load can be expected. For lower loaded systems the potential uptake is significantly higher, e.g. 46% of the nitrogen load for treatment of greywater. The potential uptake rates could only be simulated for high loaded systems i.e. constructed wetlands treating wastewater. For low loaded systems the nutrient concentrations in the liquid phase were too low to simulate the potential uptake rates using the implemented model for plant uptake. PMID:16042261

  9. LANDSCAPE INDICATORS FOR PESTICIDES, NUTRIENTS, EMERGING CONTAMINANTS, AND AQUATIC BIOLOGY IN MIDWESTERN CORN BELT STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is part of a long-term cooperative national research project among the US EPA and the USGS to collect comparable water-quality data from small streams and to develop regional predicitive models that use landscape characteristics to estimate pesticide and nutrient conce...

  10. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  11. Removal of anaerobic soluble microbial products in a biological activated carbon reactor.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaojing; Zhou, Weili; He, Shengbing

    2013-09-01

    The soluble microbial products (SMP) in the biological treatment effluent are generally of great amount and are poorly biodegradable. Focusing on the biodegradation of anaerobic SMP, the biological activated carbon (BAC) was introduced into the anaerobic system. The experiments were conducted in two identical lab-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. The high strength organics were degraded in the first UASB reactor (UASB1) and the second UASB (UASB2, i.e., BAC) functioned as a polishing step to remove SMP produced in UASB1. The results showed that 90% of the SMP could be removed before granular activated carbon was saturated. After the saturation, the SMP removal decreased to 60% on the average. Analysis of granular activated carbon adsorption revealed that the main role of SMP removal in BAC reactor was biodegradation. A strain of SMP-degrading bacteria, which was found highly similar to Klebsiella sp., was isolated, enriched and inoculated back to the BAC reactor. When the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 10,000 mg/L and the organic loading rate achieved 10 kg COD/(m3 x day), the effluent from the BAC reactor could meet the discharge standard without further treatment. Anaerobic BAC reactor inoculated with the isolated Klebsiella was proved to be an effective, cheap and easy technical treatment approach for the removal of SMP in the treatment of easily-degradable wastewater with COD lower than 10,000 mg/L. PMID:24520716

  12. Effect of side-stream phosphorus recovery on biological phosphorus removal performance investigated by chemical and microbial analyses in a novel BNR-IC process.

    PubMed

    Zou, H M; Lu, X W; Li, T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of side-stream ratio (SSR) on performance of phosphorus (P) removal and recovery in a novel process linking biological nutrients removal (BNR) and induced crystallization (IC). Results showed that P removal efficiency was significantly enhanced when given an appropriate SSR, resulting in effluent P concentrations decreasing from 0.75 to 0.39 mg/L with an increase of SSR from 0 to 35%, where a maximum of 7.19 mg/L P recovery amount was obtained at 35% of SSR. Increasing the SSR can favor the P recovery, while an excessively high SSR (more than 35%) would have a negative effect on the subsequent biological P removal in the BNR-IC system. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis showed that in total, 11 DGGE bands of highest species richness were visually detected and significant changes in microbial community structure were found, with SSR variations ranging from 0 to 55%. Moreover, an increase in SSR can cause an increase in microbial community biodiversity; where microbial populations correspond to the 11 bands, they were generally classified into five different phyla or classes (Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, as well as Clostridia and Flavobacteria) based on the evolutionary tree analysis. PMID:25401306

  13. Effects of Litter Removal and Addition on the Nutrient Mineralization Dynamics in Hyperseasonal Tropical Savannas of the Brazilian Pantanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentz, C. S.; Pinto-Jr, O. B.; Vourlitis, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    The tropical savanna of Brazil (cerrado) is extremely species diverse and it encompasses many different physiognomic features, which are influenced by rainfall, fire, and soil nutrient availability. Plant litter decomposition recycles nutrients to the soil, and in turn, assists plant growth. However the rate at which these nutrients become available to the soil is poorly understood. Thus, a six month field experiment that encompassed the wet and dry seasons was conducted to assess how different quantities of litter inputs affect nutrient (P, N, C, K, Ca, and Mg) availability. It was hypothesized that nutrient mineralization would be significantly influenced by manipulation of the surface litter and that there would be a positive correlation between soil moisture and nutrient mineralization. Initial results indicate that there were significant differences in mineralization over time for all nutrients, except P, supporting our hypothesis of changes in mineralization with soil moisture. However, there were no significant differences between litter treatments and net mineralization rates for all the nutrients tested. Our results indicate that litterpool size has little effect on short-term nutrient mineralization dynamics.

  14. Temperature influence on biological phosphorus removal induced by aerobic/extended-idle regime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bo; Wang, Dong-Bo; Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Qi; Luo, Kun; Zeng, Guang-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Previous researches have demonstrated that biological phosphorus removal (BPR) from wastewater could be driven by the aerobic/extended-idle (A/EI) regime. This study further investigated temperature effects on phosphorus removal performance in six A/EI sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) operated at temperatures ranging from 5 to 30 °C. The results showed that phosphorus removal efficiency increased with temperature increasing from 5 to 20 °C but slightly decreased when temperature continually increased to 30 °C. The highest phosphorus removal rate of 97.1 % was obtained at 20 °C. The biomass cultured at 20 °C contained more polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAO) and less glycogen accumulating organisms (GAO) than that cultured at any other temperatures investigated. The mechanism studies revealed that temperature affected the transformations of glycogen and polyhydroxyalkanoates, and the activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase activities. In addition, phosphorus removal performances of the A/EI and traditional anaerobic/oxic (A/O) SBRs were compared at 5 and 20 °C, respectively. The results showed the A/EI regime drove better phosphorus removal than the A/O regime at both 5 and 20 °C, and more PAO and less GAO abundances in the biomass might be the principal reason for the higher BPR in the A/EI SBRs as compared with the A/O SBRs. PMID:24464081

  15. Population dynamics of filamentous bacteria identified in Polish full-scale wastewater treatment plants with nutrients removal.

    PubMed

    Miłobędzka, A; Muszyński, A

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the identity and population dynamics of filamentous bacteria in five Polish full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with nutrients removal had been carried out for 2 years. A quantitative culture-independent, molecular method - fluorescence in situ hybridization - was applied to evaluate the structure of different filamentous bacteria populations and their temporal variations. Activated sludge was examined for the abundance of 11 groups of filamentous bacteria. On average, filaments constituted 28% of all bacteria. All samples presented a low diversity of probe-defined filamentous bacteria, usually with significant domination of Chloroflexi (with distinction to types 1851, 0803 and others) and/or Microthrix (14% and 7% of EUBmix, respectively). Haliscomenobacter hydrossis, Mycolata, Skermania piniformis and TM7 were less abundant, whereas Curvibacter, Thiothrix/021N and family Gordonia have not been detected in any of the samples. The tested WWTPs showed similarity among species found and differences in their abundance. The composition of filamentous populations was rather stable in each plant and similar to those found in other European countries. Little differences between plants were shown by multivariate analysis of variance in terms of Chloroflexi and Microthrix. No significant general correlations have been found with Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Medium correlation strength between the presence of different filaments was recorded only for Microthrix and Skermania piniformis. Deleterious effect on settling properties of sludge (measured as sludge volume index) was found only for abundance of Microthrix; a strong linear correlation was recorded between them. However, no other correlations with wastewater and operational data were revealed. PMID:25768213

  16. Preparation of ferric-activated sludge-based adsorbent from biological sludge for tetracycline removal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Xu, Guoren; Yu, Huarong; Zhang, Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Ferric activation was novelly used to produce sludge-based adsorbent (SBA) from biological sludge through pyrolysis, and the adsorbents were applied to remove tetracycline from aqueous solution. The pyrolysis temperature and mass ratio (activator/dried sludge) greatly influenced the surface area and pore characteristics of SBA. Ferric activation could promote the porous structure development of adsorbents, and the optimum preparation conditions were pyrolysis temperature 750°C and mass ratio (activator/dried sludge) 0.5. In batch experiments, ferric-activated SBA showed a higher adsorption capacity for tetracycline than non-activated SBA, because the enhanced mesoporous structure favored the diffusion of tetracycline into the pores, the iron oxides and oxygen-containing functional groups in the adsorbents captured tetracycline by surface complexation. The results indicate that ferric activation is an effective approach for preparing adsorbents from biological sludge to remove tetracycline, providing a potential option for waste resource recovery. PMID:27038265

  17. NOx removal from flue gas by an integrated physicochemical absorption and biological denitrification process.

    PubMed

    van der Maas, Peter; van den Bosch, Pim; Klapwijk, Bram; Lens, Piet

    2005-05-20

    An integrated physicochemical and biological technique for NO(x) removal from flue gas, the so-called BioDeNO(x) process, combines the principles of wet absorption of NO in an aqueous Fe(II)EDTA(2-) solution with biological reduction of the sorbed NO in a bioreactor. The biological reduction of NO to di-nitrogen gas (N(2)) takes place under thermophilic conditions (55 degrees C). This study demonstrates the technical feasibility of this BioDeNO(x) concept in a bench-scale installation with a continuous flue gas flow of 650 l.h(-1) (70-500 ppm NO; 0.8-3.3% O(2)). Stable NO removal with an efficiency of at least 70% was obtained in case the artificial flue gas contained 300 ppm NO and 1% O(2) when the bioreactor was inoculated with a denitrifying sludge. An increase of the O(2) concentration of only 0.3% resulted in a rapid elevation of the redox potential (ORP) in the bioreactor, accompanied by a drastic decline of the NO removal efficiency. This was not due to a limitation or inhibition of the NO reduction, but to a limited biological iron reduction capacity. The latter leads to a depletion of the NO absorption capacity of the scrubber liquor, and thus to a poor NO removal efficiency. Bio-augmentation of the reactor mixed liquor with an anaerobic granular sludge with a high Fe(III) reduction capacity successfully improved the bioreactor efficiency and enabled to treat a flue gas containing at least 3.3% O(2) and 500 ppm NO with an NO removal efficiency of over 80%. The ORP in the bioreactor was found to be a proper parameter for the control of the ethanol supply, needed as electron donor for the biological regeneration process. The NO removal efficiency as well as the Fe(III)EDTA(-) reduction rate were found to decline at ORP values higher than -140 mV (pH 7.0). For stable BioDeNO(x) operation, the supply of electron donor (ethanol) can be used to control the ORP below that critical value. PMID:15812803

  18. Modelling and control strategy testing of biological and chemical phosphorus removal at Avedøre WWTP.

    PubMed

    Ingildsen, P; Rosen, C; Gernaey, K V; Nielsen, M K; Guildal, T; Jacobsen, B N

    2006-01-01

    The biological phosphorus removal process is often implemented at plants by the construction of an anaerobic bio-p tank in front of the traditional N removing plant configuration. However, biological phosphorus removal is also observed in plant configurations constructed only for nitrogen removal and simultaneous or post-precipitation. The operational experience with this "accidental" biological phosphorus removal is often mixed with quite a lot of frustration, as the process seems to come and go and hence behaves quite uncontrollably. The aim of this work is to develop ways of intentionally exploiting the biological phosphorus process by the use of instrumentation, control and automation to reduce the consumption of precipitants. Means to this end are first to calibrate a modified ASM2d model to a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), including both biological and chemical phosphorus removal and a model of the sedimentation process. Second, based on the calibrated model a benchmark model is developed and various control strategies for biological phosphorus removal are tested. Experiences and knowledge gained from the strategies presented and discussed in this paper are vital inputs for the full-scale implementation of a control strategy for biological phosphorus removal at Avedøre WWTP, which is described in another paper. The two papers hence show a way to bridge the gap from model to full implementation. PMID:16722060

  19. Removal of nutrient and pesticides from tile drainage discharge using an end-of-tile cartridge approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient transport from subsurface tile drainage is pretty well documented. One approach receiving consideration for reducing the amount of nutrients and pesticides in subsurface drainage waters is end-of-tile filters. The filters are often comprised of industrial wastes or by-products that have a s...

  20. An experimental study for biological nitrogen removal and control strategies in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Venegas, C; Palma-Acosta, M J; Abad, D

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present an overview about an experimental study for biological nitrogen removal implemented in a pilot-scale plant, located in the Universidad Del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia. This plant was studied in two different periods. The first period, which was carried out in 90 days, was dedicated to study the influence of the daily variations on the influent and effluent wastewater, and prove some control routines for nitrogen removal. In the second period, which was carried out in 120 days, the removal process was optimized with the addition of acetic acid as an external carbon source, and the implementation of the final control strategy was performed based on the results of the previous period. PMID:17674653

  1. Enhancing combined biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal from wastewater by applying mechanically disintegrated excess sludge.

    PubMed

    Zubrowska-Sudol, Monika; Walczak, Justyna

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the possibility of applying disintegrated excess sludge as a source of organic carbon to enhance biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The experiment, performed in a sequencing batch reactor, consisted of two two-month series, without and with applying mechanically disintegrated excess sludge, respectively. The effects on carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removal were observed. It was shown that the method allows enhancement of combined nitrogen and phosphorus removal. After using disintegrated sludge, denitrification effectiveness increased from 49.2 ± 6.8% to 76.2 ± 2.3%, which resulted in a decline in the NOx-N concentration in the effluent from the SBR by an average of 21.4 mg NOx-N/L. Effectiveness of biological phosphorus removal increased from 28.1 ± 11.3% to 96.2 ± 2.5%, thus resulting in a drop in the [Formula: see text] concentration in the effluent by, on average, 6.05 mg PO4(3-)-P/L. The application of disintegrated sludge did not deteriorate effluent quality in terms of COD and NH4(+)-N. The concentration of NH4(+)-N in both series averaged 0.16 ± 0.11 mg NH4(+)-N/L, and the concentration of COD was 15.36 ± 3.54 mg O2/L. PMID:25776916

  2. [Denitrifying phosphate uptake of biological phosphorous removal granular sludge in SBR].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-ying; Zhao, Hong-mei; Peng, Dang-cong; Sui, Xian-jie

    2008-08-01

    The denitrification and excessive P removal can be realized by denitrifying phosphate-accumulating organisms (DNPAOs) under low carbon condition. DNPAOs use poly-3-hydroxy- butyrate (PHB) as electron donor, and use nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor during the denitrifying phosphate uptake. In this study the biological phosphorus removal granular sludge was induced into the denitrifying and phosphate uptake granular sludge under an anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic alternating operation (referred to as an A/A/O) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). When the system is stable, the P and N removal ratio is over 90% and 93% respectively; the release phosphorus is 25-33 mg/L at anaerobic stage; 1g NOx-N approximately takes up P 1.3 g at anoxic stage. In the typical cycle the anaerobic maximum specific release phosphorus rate (max. SRPR) is 18.39 mg/(g x h); the anoxic max. specific uptake phosphorus rate (SUPR) and the max. specific denitrification rate (SDNR) is 23.72 mg/(g x h) and 18.19 mg/(g x h) respectively; the aerobic max. SUPR is 17.15 mg/(g x h). The fraction of DNPAOs rises from 14.9% to 80.7%. Compared with the physical-chemical property of the biological phosphorus removal granular sludge, the settling velocity and the specific gravity of the denitrifying phosphate uptake granular sludge is elevated 0.16-0.7 times and 0.0031 respectively. PMID:18839581

  3. Nitrogen removal in maturation waste stabilisation ponds via biological uptake and sedimentation of dead biomass.

    PubMed

    Camargo Valero, M A; Mara, D D; Newton, R J

    2010-01-01

    In this work a set of experiments was undertaken in a pilot-scale WSP system to determine the importance of organic nitrogen sedimentation on ammonium and total nitrogen removals in maturation ponds and its seasonal variation under British weather conditions, from September 2004 to May 2007. The nitrogen content in collected sediment samples varied from 4.17% to 6.78% (dry weight) and calculated nitrogen sedimentation rates ranged from 273 to 2868 g N/ha d. High ammonium removals were observed together with high concentrations of chlorophyll-a in the pond effluent. Moreover, chlorophyll-a had a very good correlation with the corresponding increment of VSS (algal biomass) and suspended organic nitrogen (biological nitrogen uptake) in the maturation pond effluents. Therefore, when ammonium removal reached its maximum, total nitrogen removal was very poor as most of the ammonia taken up by algae was washed out in the pond effluent in the form of suspended solids. After sedimentation of the dead algal biomass, it was clear that algal-cell nitrogen was recycled from the sludge layer into the pond water column. Recycled nitrogen can either be taken up by algae or washed out in the pond effluent. Biological (mainly algal) uptake of inorganic nitrogen species and further sedimentation of dead biomass (together with its subsequent mineralization) is one of the major mechanisms controlling in-pond nitrogen recycling in maturation WSP, particularly when environmental and operational conditions are favourable for algal growth. PMID:20182083

  4. Removal of micropollutants in WWTP effluent by biological assisted membrane carbon filtration (BioMAC).

    PubMed

    Weemaes, M; Fink, G; Lachmund, C; Magdeburg, A; Stalter, D; Thoeye, C; De Gueldre, G; Van De Steene, B

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of the European FP6 project Neptune, a combination of biological activated carbon with ultrafiltration (BioMAC) was investigated for micropollutant, pathogen and ecotoxicity removal. One pilot scale set-up and two lab-scale set-ups, of which in one set-up the granular activated carbon (GAC) was replaced by sand, were followed up during a period of 11 months. It was found that a combination of GAC and ultrafiltration led to an almost complete removal of antibiotics and a high removal (>80%) of most of the investigated acidic pharmaceuticals and iodinated contrast media. The duration of the tests did however not allow to conclude that the biological activation was able to extend the lifetime of the GAC. Furthermore, a significant decrease in estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity could be illustrated. The set-up in which GAC was replaced by sand showed a considerably lower removal efficiency for micropollutants, especially for antibiotics but no influence on steroid activity. PMID:21245556

  5. Investigation into cyclic utilization of carbon source in an advanced sludge reduction, inorganic solids separation, phosphorus recovery, and enhanced nutrient removal (SIPER) wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Yan, Peng; Ji, Fang-Ying; Wang, Jing; Chen, You-Peng; Shen, Yu; Fang, Fang; Guo, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    An advanced wastewater treatment process (SIPER) was developed to simultaneously reduce sludge production, prevent the accumulation of inorganic solids, recover phosphorus, and enhance nutrient removal. The ability to recover organic substance from excess sludge to enhance nutrient removal (especially nitrogen) and its performance as a C-source were evaluated in this study. The chemical oxygen demand/total nitrogen (COD/TN) and volatile fatty acids/total phosphorus (VFA/TP) ratios for the supernatant of the alkaline-treated sludge were 3.1 times and 2.7 times those of the influent, respectively. The biodegradability of the supernatant was much better than that of the influent. The system COD was increased by 91 mg/L, and nitrogen removal was improved by 19.6% (the removal rate for TN reached 80.4%) after the return of the alkaline-treated sludge as an internal C-source. The C-source recovered from the excess sludge was successfully used to enhance nitrogen removal. The internal C-source contributed 24.1% of the total C-source, and the cyclic utilization of the system C-source was achieved by recirculation of alkaline-treated sludge in the sludge reduction, inorganic solids separation, phosphorus recovery (SIPER) process. PMID:26524455

  6. Mechanisms of manganese removal from wastewaters in constructed wetlands comprising water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) grown under different nutrient conditions.

    PubMed

    Kularatne, Ranil K A; Kasturiarachchi, Jagath C; Manatunge, Jagath M A; Wijeyekoon, Suren L J

    2009-02-01

    This article discusses key mechanisms involved in removing 1 mg/L Mn from synthetic wastewaters in constructed wetlands comprising water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) grown under different nutrient levels of 1-fold (28 mg/L and 7.7 mg/L of total nitrogen and total phosphorus, respectively), 2-fold, 1/4-fold, and 1/8-fold. A mass balance was carried out to evaluate the key removal mechanisms. Phytoremediation mainly due to phytoextraction substantially contributed to manganese removal. However, chemical precipitation was absent, suggesting that manganese has a higher solubility in the given average pH (6.2 to 7.1) conditions in constructed wetlands. Bacterial mediated immobilization mechanisms also did not contribute to manganese removal. Sediments constituted a minor sink to manganese, implying that manganese has a poor adsorption potential. Constructed wetlands comprising water hyacinth are effective at removing manganese from wastewaters despite the fact that the plants are grown under higher or lower nutrient conditions. PMID:19323287

  7. Dry Matter Production, Nutrient Cycled and Removed, and Soil Fertility Changes in Yam-Based Cropping Systems with Herbaceous Legumes in the Guinea-Sudan Zone of Benin.

    PubMed

    Maliki, Raphiou; Sinsin, Brice; Floquet, Anne; Cornet, Denis; Malezieux, Eric; Vernier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Traditional yam-based cropping systems (shifting cultivation, slash-and-burn, and short fallow) often result in deforestation and soil nutrient depletion. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of yam-based systems with herbaceous legumes on dry matter (DM) production (tubers, shoots), nutrients removed and recycled, and the soil fertility changes. We compared smallholders' traditional systems (1-year fallow of Andropogon gayanus-yam rotation, maize-yam rotation) with yam-based systems integrated herbaceous legumes (Aeschynomene histrix/maize intercropping-yam rotation, Mucuna pruriens/maize intercropping-yam rotation). The experiment was conducted during the 2002 and 2004 cropping seasons with 32 farmers, eight in each site. For each of them, a randomized complete block design with four treatments and four replicates was carried out using a partial nested model with five factors: Year, Replicate, Farmer, Site, and Treatment. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) using the general linear model (GLM) procedure was applied to the dry matter (DM) production (tubers, shoots), nutrient contribution to the systems, and soil properties at depths 0-10 and 10-20 cm. DM removed and recycled, total N, P, and K recycled or removed, and soil chemical properties (SOM, N, P, K, and pH water) were significantly improved on yam-based systems with legumes in comparison with traditional systems. PMID:27446635

  8. Dry Matter Production, Nutrient Cycled and Removed, and Soil Fertility Changes in Yam-Based Cropping Systems with Herbaceous Legumes in the Guinea-Sudan Zone of Benin

    PubMed Central

    Sinsin, Brice; Floquet, Anne; Cornet, Denis; Malezieux, Eric; Vernier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Traditional yam-based cropping systems (shifting cultivation, slash-and-burn, and short fallow) often result in deforestation and soil nutrient depletion. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of yam-based systems with herbaceous legumes on dry matter (DM) production (tubers, shoots), nutrients removed and recycled, and the soil fertility changes. We compared smallholders' traditional systems (1-year fallow of Andropogon gayanus-yam rotation, maize-yam rotation) with yam-based systems integrated herbaceous legumes (Aeschynomene histrix/maize intercropping-yam rotation, Mucuna pruriens/maize intercropping-yam rotation). The experiment was conducted during the 2002 and 2004 cropping seasons with 32 farmers, eight in each site. For each of them, a randomized complete block design with four treatments and four replicates was carried out using a partial nested model with five factors: Year, Replicate, Farmer, Site, and Treatment. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) using the general linear model (GLM) procedure was applied to the dry matter (DM) production (tubers, shoots), nutrient contribution to the systems, and soil properties at depths 0–10 and 10–20 cm. DM removed and recycled, total N, P, and K recycled or removed, and soil chemical properties (SOM, N, P, K, and pH water) were significantly improved on yam-based systems with legumes in comparison with traditional systems. PMID:27446635

  9. Oxygen and carbon requirements for biological nitrogen removal processes accomplishing nitrification, nitritation, and anammox.

    PubMed

    Daigger, Glen T

    2014-03-01

    The oxygen and carbon savings associated with novel nitrogen removal processes for the treatment of high ammonia, low biodegradable organic matter waste streams such as the recycle streams from the dewatering of anaerobically digested sludges are well documented.This understanding may lead some to think that similar oxygen savings are possible if novel processes such as nitritation/ denitritation and partial nitritation-deammonification are incorporated into main liquid stream processes where influent biodegradable organic matter is used to denitrify residual oxidized nitrogen (nitrite and nitrate). It is demonstrated that the net oxygen required for nitrogen removal is 1.71 mg O2/mg ammonia-nitrogen converted to nitrogen gas as long as influent biodegradable organic matter is used to denitrify residual oxidized nitrogen. Less oxygen is required to produce oxidized nitrogen with these novel processes, but less biodegradable organic matter is also required for oxidized nitrogen reduction to nitrogen gas, resulting in reduced oxygen savings for the oxidation of biodegradable organic matter. The net oxygen requirement is the same since the net electron transfer for the conversion of ammonia-nitrogen to nitrogen gas is the same. The biodegradable organic matter required to reduce the oxidized nitrogen to nitrogen gas is estimated for these processes based on standard biological process calculations. It is estimated to be in the range of 3.5 to 4.0 mg biodegradable COD/mg ammonia-nitrogen reduced to nitrogen gas for nitrification-denitrification, 2.0 to 2.5 for nitritation-denitritation, and 0.5 for partial nitritation-deammonification. The resulting limiting influent wastewater carbon-to-nitrogen ratios are estimated and can be used to guide the appropriate selection of biological nitrogen removal process given knowledge of the biological process influent wastewater carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Energy savings possible for mainstream processes incorporating these novel

  10. Integrated physicochemical and biological treatment process for fluoride and phosphorus removal from fertilizer plant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gouider, Mbarka; Mlaik, Najwa; Feki, Mongi; Sayadi, Sami

    2011-08-01

    The phosphate fertilizer industry produces highly hazardous and acidic wastewaters. This study was undertaken to develop an integrated approach for the treatment of wastewaters from the phosphate industry. Effluent samples were collected from a local phosphate fertilizer producer and were characterized by their high fluoride and phosphate content. First, the samples were pretreated by precipitation of phosphate and fluoride ions using hydrated lime. The resulting low- fluoride and phosphorus effluent was then treated with the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process to monitor the simultaneous removal of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus. Phosphorus removal included a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic system operating under continuous flow. Pretreated wastewater was added to the activated sludge and operated for 160 days in the reactor. The operating strategy included increasing the organic loading rate (OLR) from 0.3 to 1.2 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L.d. The stable and high removal rates of COD, NH4(+)-N, and PO4(3-)-P were then recorded. The mean concentrations of the influent were approximately 3600 mg COD/L, 60 mg N/L, and 14 mg P/L, which corresponded to removal efficiencies of approximately 98%, 86%, and 92%, respectively. PMID:21905410

  11. Nitrogen Eutrophication on the Colorado Plateau: Using Biological Indicators to Detect Nutrient Enrichment in the Grand Canyon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkel, J. A.; Johnson, N.; Hultine, K. R.; Sesnie, S.; Sisk, T.

    2012-12-01

    Human activities have more than doubled the availability of biologically reactive forms of nitrogen (N) since the industrial and agricultural revolutions. Though N is an important plant nutrient, increased deposition initiates a cascade of deleterious effects including ecosystem acidification, biodiversity loss, and increased smog and haze. Atmospheric pollution continues to threaten the air quality of the 16 Class 1 Wilderness areas on the Colorado Plateau, including Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP). However, the ecological impacts of N deposition in these historically N-limited, nutrient sensitive arid regions, are little- known. Here, we report baseline atmospheric and terrestrial responses to anthropogenic N deposition derived from vehicular exhaust in GCNP and long-range deposition from a local coal-fired power plant, the Navajo Generating Station (NGS). We used passive air samplers, natural abundance δ15N stable isotope analysis, and nutrient analysis to observe N patterns in air, soils, and pinyon pine (Pinus edulis) foliage. In GCNP, samples were collected from ten sites over an eight-month period in areas of projected low to high vehicular N deposition (i.e. distance from primary roadways). On the Paria Plateau, northeast of GCNP and in close proximity to the NGS, samples were collected along a distance gradient from the NGS, across the Plateau. In both study areas, atmospheric deposition, as well as soil and pine- needle nutrient concentrations show significant negative relationships with increased distance from N-source (p<0.05). In heavily trafficked sites of GCNP, atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NOx) were 65% lower at 30m compared to the roadside. Likewise, on the Paria, NOx were 54% lower at 50km compared to 25km from NGS (p<0.01; R2 =0.87, for GCNP and the Paria, respectively). In GCNP, soil δ15N, and pinyon needle δ15N decrease significantly 30m from the roadside (18%, F= 4.07, p<0.05; 40%, F=4.34, p<0.05). On the Paria Plateau, soil δ15N, C

  12. Evaluating our understanding of the biological carbon pump using the transport matrix method and global nutrient distributions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardello, Raffaele; Martin, Adrian; Khatiwala, Samar; Kriest, Iris; Henson, Stephanie; Dunne, John; Totterdell, Ian; Allen, Icarus; Yool, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Global net primary production by marine phytoplankton plays a key role in the Earth system, fuelling the marine ecosystem and supporting resources such as fisheries. A fraction of the resulting organic material sinks out of the euphotic zone as 'export production', sequestering large amounts of carbon at depth, away from the atmosphere. Model studies have demonstrated that atmospheric pCO2 concentrations can be very sensitive to small changes in the depth at which this organic material is remineralised into CO2 and nutrients. The accuracy of parameterisations for remineralisation has often been assessed by direct comparison of simulated and sparse observed fluxes of sinking material. The consequences of remineralisation, i.e. the global distribution of inorganic nutrients, provide a much stronger test of our knowledge concerning the impact of remineralisation on ocean nutrient cycles because they are much more densely sampled. In this study, we investigate how alternative paradigms for the Biological Carbon Pump (BCP) have distinctive signatures in the consequent global distribution of nutrients. We compare several combinations of parameterisations for export production and remineralisation within two different representations of ocean circulation using the Transport Matrix Method (Khatiwala, 2007). Export production is represented using an NPZD-DOP model (Kriest et al., 2010) and three remote sensing-derived estimates while remineralisation is represented by either constant or spatially variable values of the Martin's curve exponent (Martin et al., 1987). In order to evaluate the ability of each export-remineralisation combination to correctly represent the BCP, we introduce a set of diagnostics to allow the intercomparison between in-situ data and simulations. These diagnostics are based on both nutrient fields and water masses and are designed to minimize the influence of biases originating from the representation of ocean circulation on the model

  13. Performance of a constructed wetland in Grand Marais, Manitoba, Canada: Removal of nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotic resistance genes from municipal wastewater

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The discharge of complex mixtures of nutrients, organic micropollutants, and antibiotic resistance genes from treated municipal wastewater into freshwater systems are global concerns for human health and aquatic organisms. Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are genes that have the ability to impart resistance to antibiotics and reduce the efficacy of antibiotics in the systems in which they are found. In the rural community of Grand Marais, Manitoba, Canada, wastewater is treated passively in a sewage lagoon prior to passage through a treatment wetland and subsequent release into surface waters. Using this facility as a model system for the Canadian Prairies, the two aims of this study were to assess: (a) the presence of nutrients, micropollutants (i.e., pesticides, pharmaceuticals), and ARGs in lagoon outputs, and (b) their potential removal by the treatment wetland prior to release to surface waters in 2012. Results As expected, concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus species were greatest in the lagoon and declined with movement through the wetland treatment system. Pharmaceutical and agricultural chemicals were detected at concentrations in the ng/L range. Concentrations of these compounds spiked downstream of the lagoon following discharge and attenuation was observed as the effluent migrated through the wetland system. Hazard quotients calculated for micropollutants of interest indicated minimal toxicological risk to aquatic biota, and results suggest that the wetland attenuated atrazine and carbamazepine significantly. There was no significant targeted removal of ARGs in the wetland and our data suggest that the bacterial population in this system may have genes imparting antibiotic resistance. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that while the treatment wetland may effectively attenuate excess nutrients and remove some micropollutants and bacteria, it does not specifically target ARGs for removal. Additional studies would be

  14. Vascular plant removal effects on biological N fixation vary across a boreal forest island gradient.

    PubMed

    Gundale, Michael J; Wardle, David A; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte

    2010-06-01

    There is currently much interest in understanding how biodiversity loss affects the functioning of ecosystems, but few studies have evaluated how ecosystem processes change in response to one another following biodiversity loss. We focused on a well-described gradient of 30 forested lake islands in northern Sweden, where island size determines the occurrence of lightning-ignited wildfire, which in turn determines successional stage, plant species composition, and productivity. We investigated the effect of biodiversity loss on biological nitrogen fixation by feathermosses through an experiment consisting of factorial removals of three understory shrub species (Vaccinium myrtillis, Vaccinium vitis-idaea, and Empetrum hermaphroditum) and two plant functional groups (shrubs and tree roots). We tested the hypothesis that, following vascular plant species loss, N fixation rates would be impaired by changes in pools or processes that increase extractable soil N, because changes in the supply rate of N to feathermosses should influence their demand for newly fixed N. Further, we hypothesized that the effects of removals on N fixation would depend on environmental context (i.e., island size), because it has been previously demonstrated that the effect of vascular plant species removal on N recycling pools and processes was strongest on productive islands. The data demonstrated that removal of two shrub species (V. vitis-idaea and E. hermaphroditum) negatively aflected the N fixation of Hylocomium splendens, but positively affected Pleurozium schreberi, resulting in unchanged areal N fixation rates. In the functional removal experiment, tree root removal resulted in a significant negative effect on N fixation. The effects of shrub and root removals on N fixation occurred only on small islands and thus were context dependent. This pattern did not correspond to the effect of shrub and root removal treatments on N-recycling pools or processes, which only occurred in response

  15. Physical and Biological Responses to Dam Removal Sediment Release, Patapsco River, Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. J.; Andrews, M.; Banks, W.; Boardman, G.; Dillow, J. J.; Gellis, A.; Harbold, W.; Kilian, J.; Lowe, S.; McClain, S.; Miller, A. J.; Stranko, S.; Wilcock, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Simkins Dam on Maryland's Patapsco River was removed in the fall of 2010 to improve public safety and habitat for migratory fish. An estimated 60,000 m3 of sand and fine gravel were released to a downstream receiving reach that extends approximately 20 river km to Chesapeake Bay. The downstream reach is comprised of a variety of fluvial environments ranging from a comparatively steep, confined valley in lightly developed parkland in the Piedmont section to low gradient, meandering, and tidally-influenced alluvial bottoms bordered by urban development in the Coastal Plain. Less than a kilometer downstream of the Simkins dam removal site is another impoundment that was mostly filled with unconsolidated sediments before the Simkins dam was deconstructed. Bloede Dam is also being considered for removal and partial release of impounded sediment. We are evaluating the physical and biological responses of the lower Patapsco River to these two dam removals and sediment releases by comparing post-removal data with baseline data collected in 2009 and 2010. To investigate the magnitudes and rates of morphologic change in the former impoundments and the downstream receiving reach, we resurvey nearly 30 monumented cross-sections for topography, grain size distribution, and facies maps. We also resurvey detailed digital elevation models in the two impoundments and in three discrete areas of the downstream reach that cover about 2 river kilometers. Nearly 100 repeat photo stations provide qualitative morphologic information in river reaches where we are not collecting quantitative data or they otherwise supplement our physical data. The morphologic data are complemented by continuous suspended-sediment discharge and flow data at three sites: above the project reach, immediately below the Simkins dam removal site, and five kilometers downstream of Bloede Dam. To investigate biological responses to sediment release and increased aquatic connectivity, we are conducting repeat

  16. Effect of hydraulic retention time on inorganic nutrient recovery and biodegradable organics removal in a biofilm reactor treating plant biomass leachate.

    PubMed

    Krumins, Valdis; Hummerick, Mary; Levine, Lanfang; Strayer, Richard; Adams, Jennifer L; Bauer, Jan

    2002-12-01

    A fixed-film (biofilm) reactor was designed and its performance was determined at various retention times. The goal was to find the optimal retention time for recycling plant nutrients in an advanced life support system, to minimize the size, mass, and volume (hold-up) of a production model. The prototype reactor was tested with aqueous leachate from wheat crop residue at 24, 12, 6, and 3 h hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), nitrates and other plant nutrients, carbohydrates, total phenolics, and microbial counts were monitored to characterize reactor performance. BOD removal decreased significantly from 92% at the 24 h HRT to 73% at 3 h. Removal of phenolics was 62% at the 24 h retention time, but 37% at 3 h. Dissolved oxygen concentrations, nitric acid consumption, and calcium and magnesium removals were also affected by HRT. Carbohydrate removals, carbon dioxide (CO2) productions, denitrification, potassium concentrations, and microbial counts were not affected by different retention times. A 6 h HRT will be used in future studies to determine the suitability of the bioreactor effluent for hydroponic plant production. PMID:12365490

  17. Effect of intermittent aeration cycle on nutrient removal and microbial community in a fluidized bed reactor-membrane bioreactor combo system.

    PubMed

    Guadie, Awoke; Xia, Siqing; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zeleke, Jemaneh; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2014-03-01

    Effect of intermittent aeration cycle (IAC=15/45-60/60min) on nutrient removal and microbial community structure was investigated using a novel fluidized bed reactor-membrane bioreactor (FBR-MBR) combo system. FBR alone was found more efficient for removing PO4-P (>85%) than NH4-N (<40%) and chemical oxygen demand (COD<35%). However, in the combo system, COD and NH4-N removals were almost complete (>98%). Efficient nitrification, stable mixed liquor suspended solid and reduced transmembrane pressure was also achieved. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction results of total bacteria 16S rRNA gene copies per mL of mixed-liquor varied from (2.48±0.42)×10(9) initial to (2.74±0.10)×10(8), (6.27±0.16)×10(9) and (9.17±1.78)×10(9) for 15/45, 45/15 and 60/60min of IACs, respectively. The results of clone library analysis revealed that Proteobacteria (59%), Firmicutes (12%) and Bacteroidetes (11%) were the dominant bacterial group in all samples. Overall, the combo system performs optimum nutrient removal and host stable microbial communities at 45/15min of IAC. PMID:24508900

  18. Effect of hydraulic retention time on inorganic nutrient recovery and biodegradable organics removal in a biofilm reactor treating plant biomass leachate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krumins, Valdis; Hummerick, Mary; Levine, Lanfang; Strayer, Richard; Adams, Jennifer L.; Bauer, Jan

    2002-01-01

    A fixed-film (biofilm) reactor was designed and its performance was determined at various retention times. The goal was to find the optimal retention time for recycling plant nutrients in an advanced life support system, to minimize the size, mass, and volume (hold-up) of a production model. The prototype reactor was tested with aqueous leachate from wheat crop residue at 24, 12, 6, and 3 h hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), nitrates and other plant nutrients, carbohydrates, total phenolics, and microbial counts were monitored to characterize reactor performance. BOD removal decreased significantly from 92% at the 24 h HRT to 73% at 3 h. Removal of phenolics was 62% at the 24 h retention time, but 37% at 3 h. Dissolved oxygen concentrations, nitric acid consumption, and calcium and magnesium removals were also affected by HRT. Carbohydrate removals, carbon dioxide (CO2) productions, denitrification, potassium concentrations, and microbial counts were not affected by different retention times. A 6 h HRT will be used in future studies to determine the suitability of the bioreactor effluent for hydroponic plant production.

  19. Biological nitrogen removal from industrial wastewater discharged from metal recovery processes.

    PubMed

    Hirata, A; Nakamura, Y; Tsuneda, S

    2001-01-01

    The wastewater generated from the processes of recovering precious metals from industrial wastes contains high concentrations of acids and alkalis such as nitric acid and aqueous ammonia, and of salts such as sodium chloride and sodium sulfate. Biological nitrogen removal from this wastewater was attempted by using a circulating bioreactor system equipped with an anaerobic packed bed and an aerobic three-phase fluidized bed. As a result of acclimating microorganisms with change of the hydraulic residence time, this system effectively removed nitrogen from diluted wastewater (T-N: from 2,000 to 4,000 g/m3), such that the total nitrogen concentration in the effluent met the sewage discharge control criteria in Japan (240 g/m3). The removal ratio of total nitrogen was 90% to 98% and that of ammonia was 80% to 92%. In addition, the characteristic equations for biological treatment were applied to this system on the assumption that both reactions of denitrification in the anaerobic reactor and nitrification in the aerobic reactor can be approximated to a first-order reaction. This simplified approach successfully led to a new analytical method for simulating the optimum volume ratio of anaerobic reactor to aerobic reactor for minimizing the total hydraulic residence time. PMID:11547981

  20. Removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluent by aerobic biological treatment with steroidal metabolite detection.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Soledad; Vergara, Juan P; Jarpa, Mayra; Hernandez, Victor; Becerra, Jose; Vidal, Gladys

    2016-10-14

    Stigmasterol is a phytosterol contained in Kraft mill effluent that is able to increase over 100% after aerobic biological treatment. This compound can act as an endocrine disrupter as its structure is similar to that of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluents treated by a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with steroidal metabolite detection. The MBBR was operated for 145 days, with a hydraulic retention time of 2 days. Stigmasterol and steroidal metabolites were detected by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector during MBBR operation. The results show that the MBBR removed 87.4% of biological oxygen demand (BOD5), 61.5% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 24.5% of phenol and 31.5% of lignin, expressed in average values. The MBBR system successfully removed 100% of the stigmasterol contained in the influent (33 µg L(-1)) after 5 weeks of operation. In that case, the organic load rate was 0.343 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). Furthermore, different steroidal compounds (e.g., testosterone propionate, stigmast-4-en-3-one, 5α-pregnan-12-one-20α-hydroxy, 5α-pregnane-3,11,20-trione and 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstane-11,17-dione were detected in the Kraft mill effluent as potential products of phytosterol biotransformation. PMID:27399163

  1. A hybrid biological process of indoor air treatment for toluene removal.

    PubMed

    Hort, C; Platel, V; Sochard, S; Munoz, Luengas A T; Ondarts, M; Reguer, A; Barona, A; Elias, A

    2014-12-01

    Bioprocesses, such as biofiltration, are commonly used to treat industrial effluents containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at low concentrations. Nevertheless, the use of biofiltration for indoor air pollution (IAP) treatment requires adjustments depending on specific indoor environments. Therefore, this study focuses on the convenience of a hybrid biological process for IAP treatment. A biofiltration reactor using a green waste compost was combined with an adsorption column filled with activated carbon (AC). This system treated a toluene-micropolluted effluent (concentration between 17 and 52 μg/m3), exhibiting concentration peaks close to 733 μg/m3 for a few hours per day. High removal efficiency was obtained despite changes in toluene inlet load (from 4.2 x 10(-3) to 0.20 g/m3/hr), which proves the hybrid system's effectiveness. In fact, during unexpected concentration changes, the efficiency of the biofilter is greatly decreased, but the adsorption column maintains the high efficiency of the entire process (removal efficiency [RE] close to 100%). Moreover, the adsorption column after biofiltration is able to deal with the problem of the emission of particles and/or microorganisms from the biofilter. Implications: Indoor air pollution is nowadays recognized as major environmental and health issue. This original study investigates the performance of a hybrid biological process combining a biofilter and an adsorption column for removal of indoor VOCs, specifically toluene. PMID:25562936

  2. Biological flocculation of suspended particles in nutrient-rich aqueous ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Federico

    2009-09-01

    SummaryWe describe the development and testing of a mechanistic model (BFLOC) to predict the average size of sediment aggregates in nutrient-rich aqueous ecosystems. The original capability of BFLOC is to couple turbulence-induced flocculation of suspended minerals and micro-organisms with the nutrient-related dynamics of aggregate-attached micro-organisms. The model, calibrated and validated against the average floc size recorded at two stations in the Belgian North Sea [Fettweis, M., Francken, F., Pison V., Ven den Eynde, D., 2006. Suspended particulate matter dynamics and aggregate sizes in a high turbidity area. Marine Geology 235, 63-74], closely captured site conditions and significantly clarified interpretation of field measurements. Modeling results indicated that an accurate prediction of time-varying floc sizes was possible only by taking into account the organic fraction of the suspended particle matter and the micro-organism colonization of the floc micro-environment. BFLOC showed that the floc excess density strongly correlated with the floc biomass volume, while the settling velocity strongly correlated with the floc mineral volume. We noticed that the settling velocity was poorly correlated with the total floc volume (and floc size), suggesting a revision of current methods that assess suspended matter deposition uniquely on the basis of the floc size. Additionally, various hypotheses tested with BFLOC suggested that the effect of aggregate-attached biomass on aggregation and breakup rates was very small when it was accounted for with a first-order description. More generally, the sediment and biomass parameters found here were nearly site independent suggesting that the mechanistic approach of BFLOC was relatively robust.

  3. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for the Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems: Adsorption and Application

    PubMed Central

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, R. Shane

    2012-01-01

    Surface-functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS), has previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems, suggesting that they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials’ biocompatibility, and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e., blood, urine, etc.) Consequentially, thiol-functionalized SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material’s performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e., variable pH and ionic strength) to gauge any potentially negative effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or the removal of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus nontoxic. The results show that organic ligand functionalized nanoporous silica could be a valuable material for a range of detoxification therapies and potentially other biomedical applications. PMID:20939537

  4. Phosphorus availability and elevated CO2 affect biological nitrogen fixation and nutrient fluxes in a clover-dominated sward.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Everard J; McCaffery, Stephanie; Evans, John R

    2006-01-01

    The response of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) to elevated CO(2) was examined in white clover (Trifolium repens)-dominated swards under both high and low phosphorus availability. Mixed swards of clover and buffalo grass (Stenotaphrum secundatum) were grown for 15 months in 0.2 m2 sand-filled mesocosms under two CO2 treatments (ambient and twice ambient) and three nutrient treatments [no N, and either low or high P (5 or 134 kg P ha(-1)); the third nutrient treatment was supplied with high P and N (240 kg N ha(-1))]. Under ambient CO2, high P increased BNF from 410 to 900 kg ha(-1). Elevated CO2 further increased BNF to 1180 kg ha(-1) with high P, but there was no effect of CO2 on BNF with low P. Allocation of N belowground increased by approx. 50% under elevated CO2 irrespective of supplied P. The results suggest that where soil P availability is low, elevated CO2 will not increase BNF, and pasture quality could decrease because of a reduction in aboveground N. PMID:16390427

  5. A comparative study of the bacterial community in denitrifying and traditional enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiao-Mei; Shao, Ming-Fei; Li, Chao-Lin; Li, Ji; Gao, Xin-Lei; Sun, Fei-Yun

    2014-09-17

    Denitrifying phosphorus removal is an attractive wastewater treatment process due to its reduced carbon source demand and sludge minimization potential. Two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated in alternating anaerobic-anoxic (A-A) or anaerobic-oxic (A-O) conditions to achieve denitrifying enhanced biological phosphate removal (EBPR) and traditional EBPR. No significant differences were observed in phosphorus removal efficiencies between A-A SBR and A-O SBR, with phosphorus removal rates being 87.9% and 89.0% respectively. The community structures in denitrifying and traditional EBPR processes were evaluated by high-throughput sequencing of the PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes from each sludge. The results obtained showed that the bacterial community was more diverse in A-O sludge than in A-A sludge. Taxonomy and β-diversity analyses indicated that a significant shift occurred in the dominant microbial community in A-A sludge compared with the seed sludge during the whole acclimation phase, while a slight fluctuation was observed in the abundance of the major taxonomies in A-O sludge. One Dechloromonas-related OTU outside the 4 known Candidatus "Accumulibacter" clades was detected as the main OTU in A-A sludge at the stationary operation, while Candidatus "Accumulibacter" dominated in A-O sludge. PMID:24964811

  6. Impact of butyrate on microbial selection in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2014-01-01

    Microbial selection in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal system was investigated in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor fed exclusively with butyrate as a carbon source. As reported in the few previous studies, butyrate uptake was slow and phosphorus (P) release occurred during the entire anaerobic period. Polyphosphate-accumulating organism (PAO), i.e. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (named as Accumulibacter), glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs), i.e. Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis (named as Competibacter) and Defluviicoccus-related, tetrad-forming alphaproteobacteria (named as Defluviicoccus) were identified using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The results show that Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus were selected in the butyrate-fed reactor, whereas Competibacter was not selected. P removal was efficient at the beginning of the experiment with an increasing percentage relative abundance (% RA) of PAOs. The % RA of Accumulibacter and Defluviicoccus increased from 13% to 50% and 8% to 16%, respectively, and the % RA of Competibacter decreased from 8% to 2% during the experiment. After 6 weeks, P removal deteriorated with the poor correlation between the percentage of P removal and % RA of GAOs. PMID:25189844

  7. [Application of new biological nitrogen removal technologies in full-scale treatment of landfill leachate].

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei-Ying; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Juan; Liang, Yan-Zhen; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2007-03-01

    In order to improve the treatment efficiency of the high concentration of ammonium nitrogen in landfill leachate, anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) and hybrid biofilm reactor (HBR) were introduced to the full-scale treatment of Datianshang landfill leachate. The efficiencies of nitrogen removal and the status of microorganism of the two biological treatment processes were analyzed. To achieve ANAMMOX and partial nitritation process, the concentration of dissolved oxygen in HBR was controlled and the effluent of HBR was recycled to the inlet of the ABR in a large proportion. The full-scale operation results showed that when the concentration of influent ammonium nitrogen was at 336.24 - 685.09 mg/L, the anaerobic granule sludge and the ANAMMOX bacteria were observed and the average ammonium nitrogen removal rate reached 34.9% in ABR after the start-up period of 60 days. The population of ammonium oxidizing bacteria and the average ammonium nitrogen removal rate in HBR reached 6.4 x 10(7) cells/mL and 95.1%, respectively, after 30 days of ABR stable running process. The final effluent ammonium nitrogen concentration was under 25 mg/L and the removal rate of total nitrogen was above 80% after the ABR-HBR combined processes treatment. It was suggested that using of advance environmental biotechnology to improve the capacity of the conventional leachate treatment plant was advisable, especially for those low efficiency facilities working improperly. PMID:17633642

  8. Enrichment and immobilization of sulfide removal microbiota applied for environmental biological remediation of aquaculture area.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang-Guo; Zheng, Yu; Tian, Weijun; Bai, Jie; Feng, Gong; Guo, Liang; Gao, Mengchun

    2016-07-01

    To remove sulfide in the deteriorating aquaculture sediment and water, sulfide-oxidizing microbiota was enriched from Jiaozhou Bay, China, by using sulfide-rich medium. Composition and structure of microbial communities in the enrichments were investigated by 16S rDNA molecular biotechniques. Results showed that microbial community structure continuously shifted and the abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria, i.e., Desulfobacterium, Desulfococcus and Desulfobacca apparently declined. Several halophile genera, Vibrio, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, Prochlorococcus, Pediococcus and Thiobacillus predominated finally in the microbiota. The enriched microbiota was capable of removing a maximum of 1000 mg/L sulfide within 12 h with 10% inoculum at pH 7.0, 20-30 °C. After immobilized, the microbiota presented excellent resistance to impact and could completely remove 600 mg/L sulfide in 12 h. Moreover, the immobilized microbiota recovered well even recycled for five times. In conclusion, the immobilized sulfide-removing microbiota showed a quite promising application for biological restoring of sulfide-rich aquaculture environment. PMID:27105167

  9. [Perchlorate removal from underground water by anaerobic biological reduction with bark].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Fei; Chen, Nan; Chen, Hong-Han

    2013-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to check the feasibility of perchlorate removal from underground water with bark as a carbon source and reaction media, the effect of bark dosage, temperature and initial perchlorate concentrations on perchlorate reduction were also investigated. The results indicated that compared to corn cob, sweet potato and potato, bark in combination with perchlorate reducing microorganisms (PRMs) can efficiently achieve perchlorate removal from underground water, the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which was available to PRMs was the limiting factor that affected the perchlorate removal efficiency. Degradation of 10 mg perchlorate needed to consume 35-40 mg DOC when using bark as the solid carbon source. The removal rate of perchlorate was increased by about 3 fold when the bark dosage was increased from 1:500 to 3:500; however, further increase of solid-liquid ratio (over 5:500) provided no further benefit to the perchlorate reduction rate. The rate constant reached 1.365 mg x (L x d)(-1) at (38 +/- 1) degrees C which was the highest in the batch experiments. The activation energy was 31.08 kJ x mol(-1). Anaerobic biological reduction supported by bark had a good impact on the water quality; the high perchlorate concentration did not cause substrate inhibition. PMID:24028002

  10. Biologically active carbon filtration for haloacetic acid removal from swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao L; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2016-01-15

    A biologically activate carbon (BAC) filter was continuously operated on site for the treatment of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in an outdoor swimming pool at an average empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 5.8 min. Results showed that BAC filtration was a viable technology for direct removal of HAAs from the pool water with a nominal efficiency of 57.7% by the filter while the chlorine residuals were 1.71 ± 0.90 mg/L during the study. THMs and TOC were not removed and thus were not considered as indicators of the effectiveness of BAC filtration. Increased EBCT in the range of 4.5 and 6.4 min led to improved HAA removal performance, which could be best fit by a logarithmic regression model. BAC filtration also affected the HAA speciation by removing more dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) than trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), resulting in a lower ratio of DCAA/TCAA in the filtered effluent. However, the observation of an overall constant ratio could be attributable to a complex formation and degradation mechanism occurring in swimming pools. PMID:26398451

  11. A combined biological removal of Cd(2+) from aqueous solutions using Phanerochaete chrysosporium and rice straw.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meihua; Zhang, Chaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Cheng, Min; Liu, Yang

    2016-08-01

    The removal of Cd(2+) from aqueous solutions by agricultural residues rice straw combined with white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium) was investigated. The results showed that over 99% of the total Cd(2+) (initial concentration of 150mgL(-1)) was removed at the optimal operating conditions (pH 5.0 at 35°C). We also found that P. chrysosporium could survive under Cd(2+) stress even with an initial Cd(2+) concentration of 250mgL(-1). But when Cd(2+) concentration increased to 250mgL(-1), fungus growth and reproduction were remarkably restrained, and as a result, Cd(2+) removal dropped to 59.2%. It was observed that the fungus biomass and activities of ligninolytic enzymes decreased at some degree under high concentration of Cd(2+) (above 100mgL(-1)). Also, we found that a moderate Cd(2+) stress (below 150mgL(-1)) could stimulate P. chrysosporium's production of the heavy metals chelator - oxalate. This study will provide useful information for the application of biological removal of heavy metal irons from wastewater. PMID:27088621

  12. Contribution of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) grown under different nutrient conditions to Fe-removal mechanisms in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Jayaweera, Mahesh W; Kasturiarachchi, Jagath C; Kularatne, Ranil K A; Wijeyekoon, Suren L J

    2008-05-01

    Severe contamination of water resources including groundwater with iron (Fe) due to various anthropogenic activities has been a major environmental problem in industrial areas of Sri Lanka. Hence, the use of the obnoxious weed, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) in constructed wetlands (floating aquatic macrophyte-based plant treatment systems) to phytoremediate Fe-rich wastewaters seems to be an appealing option. Although several studies have documented that hyacinths are good metal-accumulating plants none of these studies have documented the ability of this plant grown under different nutrient conditions to remove heavy metals from wastewaters. This paper, therefore, reports the phytoremediation efficiencies of water hyacinth grown under different nutrient conditions for Fe-rich wastewaters in batch-type constructed wetlands. This study was conducted for 15 weeks after 1-week acclimatization by culturing young water hyacinth plants (average height of 20+/-2cm) in 590L capacity fiberglass tanks under different nutrient concentrations of 1-fold [28 and 7.7mg/L of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP), respectively], 2-fold, 1/2-fold, 1/4-fold and 1/8-fold with synthetic wastewaters containing 9.27Femg/L. Another set-up of hyacinths containing only Fe as a heavy metal but without any nutrients (i.e., 0-fold) was also studied. A mass balance was carried out to investigate the phytoremediation efficiencies and to determine the different mechanisms governing Fe removal from the wastewaters. Fe removal was largely due to phytoremediation mainly through the process of rhizofiltration and chemical precipitation of Fe2O3 and FeOH3 followed by flocculation and sedimentation. However, chemical precipitation was more significant especially during the first 3 weeks of the study. Plants grown in the 0-fold set-up showed the highest phytoremediation efficiency of 47% during optimum growth at the 6th week with a highest accumulation of 6707Femg/kg dry

  13. Decentralized two-stage sewage treatment by chemical-biological flocculation combined with microalgae biofilm for nutrient immobilization in a roof installed parallel plate reactor.

    PubMed

    Zamalloa, Carlos; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2013-02-01

    In this lab-scale study, domestic wastewater is subjected to a chemical biological adsorption (A-stage), followed by treatment in an innovative roof installed parallel plate microalgae biofilm reactor for nutrient immobilization (I-stage). The A-stage process was operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1h and a solid retention time of 1day (FeSO(4) as flocculant). The I-stage, which consequently received the effluent of the A-stage process, was operated at an HRT of 1day and exposed to natural light. The overall system removed on average 74% of the total chemical oxygen demand, 82% of the total suspended solids, 67% of the total nitrogen and 96% of the total phosphorous in the wastewater. The design involves a relatively low capital and operating cost which is in the order of 0.5€/m(3) wastewater treated. These aspects suggest that the A/I process can be used as a decentralized domestic wastewater treatment system. PMID:23306123

  14. Comparative study on nutrient removal of agricultural non-point source pollution for three filter media filling schemes in eco-soil reactors.

    PubMed

    Du, Fuyi; Xie, Qingjie; Fang, Longxiang; Su, Hang

    2016-08-01

    Nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution have been increasingly recognized as a major contributor to the deterioration of water quality in recent years. The purpose of this article is to investigate the discrepancies in interception of nutrients in agricultural NPS pollution for eco-soil reactors using different filling schemes. Parallel eco-soil reactors of laboratory scale were created and filled with filter media, such as grit, zeolite, limestone, and gravel. Three filling schemes were adopted: increasing-sized filling (I-filling), decreasing-sized filling (D-filling), and blend-sized filling (B-filling). The systems were intermittent operations via simulated rainstorm runoff. The nutrient removal efficiency, biomass accumulation and vertical dissolved oxygen (DO) distribution were defined to assess the performance of eco-soil. The results showed that B-filling reactor presented an ideal DO for partial nitrification-denitrification across the eco-soil, and B-filling was the most stable in the change of bio-film accumulation trends with depth in the three fillings. Simultaneous and highest removals of NH4(+)-N (57.74-70.52%), total nitrogen (43.69-54.50%), and total phosphorus (42.50-55.00%) were obtained in the B-filling, demonstrating the efficiency of the blend filling schemes of eco-soil for oxygen transfer and biomass accumulation to cope with agricultural NPS pollution. PMID:27441855

  15. Polyhydroxyalkanoates form potentially a key aspect of aerobic phosphorus uptake in enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Randall, Andrew Amis; Liu, Yan-Hua

    2002-08-01

    Eighteen anaerobic/aerobic batch experiments were conducted with a variety of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) population displaying enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). A statistically significant (P < 0.01 for all variables) correlation between aerobic phosphorus uptake and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) quantity and form was observed. The results suggest that poly-3-hydroxy-butyrate (3HB) results in significantly higher aerobic phosphorus (P) uptake per unit mmoles as carbon (mmoles-C) than poly-3-hydroxy-valerate (3HV). The results showed that acetic and isovaleric acids resulted in higher P removals (relative to propionic and valeric acids) during EBPR batch experiments not because of higher PHAs quantity, but largely because the predominant type was 3HB rather than 3HV. In contrast propionic and valeric acids resulted in 3HV, and showed much lower aerobic P uptake per unit PHAs. PMID:12230192

  16. Biological treatment process for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from oil field produced waters

    SciTech Connect

    Tellez, G.; Khandan, N.

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of removing petroleum hydrocarbons from oil fields produced waters using biological treatment was evaluated under laboratory and field conditions. Based on previous laboratory studies, a field-scale prototype system was designed and operated over a period of four months. Two different sources of produced waters were tested in this field study under various continuous flow rates ranging from 375 1/D to 1,800 1/D. One source of produced water was an open storage pit; the other, a closed storage tank. The TDS concentrations of these sources exceeded 50,000 mg/l; total n-alkanes exceeded 100 mg/l; total petroleum hydrocarbons exceeded 125 mg/l; and total BTEX exceeded 3 mg/l. Removals of total n-alkanes, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and BTEX remained consistently high over 99%. During these tests, the energy costs averaged $0.20/bbl at 12 bbl/D.

  17. Modelling biological phosphorus removal from a cheese factory effluent by an SBR.

    PubMed

    Ky, R C; Comeau, Y; Perrier, M; Takacs, I

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model, named A3DX, based on ASM3(A3) for C and N removal, on the bio-P metabolic model of the Technological University of Delft (D), and on extra processes (X) for chemical and biological phosphorus removal, was developed and used to simulate the treatment of a fermented cheese factory effluent by a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). Experimental data obtained from a pilot-scale SBR were used to calibrate the model. The model calibration was performed by changing a minimal number (four) of default values for parameters, and by introducing a Monod function to account for magnesium limitation. This study suggests that the value of stoichiometric and kinetic model parameters determined with municipal effluents or enriched bio-P cultures can be reasonably used with some agro-industrial effluents with minimal parameter adjustment for calibration. PMID:11381914

  18. Inter-ocean switching in tropical thermocline nutrient supply: another way to vary the efficiency of the marine biological pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubere, P.

    2008-12-01

    Variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide content have been associated with glacial-interglacial cycles, and could help drive them. The marine biological pump has been implicated as causing up to one half of the carbon dioxide variations observed. Different mechanisms have been proposed to account for a positive feedback link between marine biological production and climate change, mediated through regulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide content. The more recent generation of these mechanisms focuses on the efficiency of export to the deep ocean, and on the flux ratio. In modeling exercises, increasing efficiency and the ratio (organic carbon to carbonate) can account for glacial period draw-down of atmosphere CO2 concentrations. While much of the thinking on the biotic pump has been focused on the polar regions, modeling of export and the flux ratio show that variation in tropical production can be important to the draw- down process (e.g. silicate leakage hypothesis). We present a new mechanism which could influence overall oceanic export and flux ratio. Combining records of carbon isotopes from the tropical thermocline and deep ocean labile organic carbon flux, we show that over the glacial cycle the supply of nutrients to the tropical Atlantic and Pacific Oceans varied inversely, with increases/decreases to the Atlantic/Pacific during the colder periods and the reverse during warmings. This, combined with greater export efficiency in the Atlantic (as well as Ice Age increases in the flux ratio in both oceans), yielded greater CO2 drawdown during glacials than interglacials. The timing of thermocline shifts in nutrient content, and tropical productivity, matches with that required to account for observed changes in atmospheric CO2. It seems likely that combined changes in a number of productivity regulating factors during glacials created the positive feedback to climate provided by the biotic pump.

  19. Microbial communities involved in biological ammonium removal from coal combustion wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Fisher, L Suzanne; Brodie, Greg A; Phelps, Tommy J

    2013-07-01

    The efficiency of a novel integrated treatment system for biological removal of ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, and heavy metals from fossil power plant effluent was evaluated. Microbial communities were analyzed using bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (Sanger sequences) and 454 pyrosequencing technology. While seasonal changes in microbial community composition were observed, the significant (P = 0.001) changes in bacterial and archaeal communities were consistent with variations in ammonium concentration. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed an increase of potential ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), Nitrosomonas, Nitrosococcus, Planctomycetes, and OD1, in samples with elevated ammonium concentration. Other bacteria, such as Nitrospira, Nitrococcus, Nitrobacter, Thiobacillus, ε-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Acidobacteria, which play roles in nitrification and denitrification, were also detected. The AOB oxidized 56 % of the ammonium with the concomitant increase in nitrite and ultimately nitrate in the trickling filters at the beginning of the treatment system. Thermoprotei within the phylum Crenarchaeota thrived in the splitter box and especially in zero-valent iron extraction trenches, where an additional 25 % of the ammonium was removed. The potential ammonium-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) (Candidatus Nitrosocaldus) were detected towards the downstream end of the treatment system. The design of an integrated treatment system consisting of trickling filters, zero-valent iron reaction cells, settling pond, and anaerobic wetlands was efficient for the biological removal of ammonium and several other contaminants from wastewater generated at a coal burning power plant equipped with selective catalytic reducers for nitrogen oxide removal. PMID:23314095

  20. Application of vascular aquatic plants for pollution removal, energy and food production in a biological system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Barlow, R. M.; Mcdonald, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Vascular aquatic plants such as water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) (Mart.) Solms and alligator weeds (Alternanthera philoxeroides) (Mart.) Griesb., when utilized in a controlled biological system (including a regular program of harvesting to achieve maximum growth and pollution removal efficiency), may represent a remarkably efficient and inexpensive filtration and disposal system for toxic materials and sewage released into waters near urban and industrial areas. The harvested and processed plant materials are sources of energy, fertilizer, animal feed, and human food. Such a system has industrial, municipal, and agricultural applications.

  1. Removal of diclofenac from surface water by electron beam irradiation combined with a biological aerated filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shijun; Wang, Jianlong; Ye, Longfei; Zhang, Youxue; Yu, Jiang

    2014-12-01

    The degradation of DCF was investigated in aqueous solution by using electron beam (EB) technology. When the initial concentration was between 10 and 40 mg/L, almost 100% of the DCF was degraded at a dose of 0.5 kGy. However, only about 6.5% of DCF was mineralized even at 2 kGy according to total organic carbon (TOC) measurements. A combined process of EB and biological aerated filter (BAF) was therefore developed to enhance the treatment of DCF contaminated surface water. The effluent quality of combined process was substantially improved by EB pretreatment due to the degradation of DCF and related intermediates. Both irradiation and biological treatment reduced the toxicity of the treated water. The experimental results showed that EB is effective for removing DCF from artificial aqueous solution and real surface water.

  2. Intensification of ammonia removal from waste water in biologically active zeolitic ion exchange columns.

    PubMed

    Almutairi, Azel; Weatherley, Laurence R

    2015-09-01

    The use of nitrification filters for the removal of ammonium ion from waste-water is an established technology deployed extensively in municipal water treatment, in industrial water treatment and in applications such as fish farming. The process involves the development of immobilized bacterial films on a solid packing support, which is designed to provide a suitable host for the film, and allow supply of oxygen to promote aerobic action. Removal of ammonia and nitrite is increasingly necessary to meet drinking water and discharge standards being applied in the US, Europe and other places. Ion-exchange techniques are also effective for removal of ammonia (as the ammonium ion) from waste water and have the advantage of fast start-up times compared to biological filtration which in some cases may take several weeks to be fully operational. Here we explore the performance of ion exchange columns in which nitrifying bacteria are cultivated, with the goal of a "combined" process involving simultaneous ion-exchange and nitrification, intensified by in-situ aeration with a novel membrane module. There were three experimental goals. Firstly, ion exchange zeolites were characterized and prepared for comparative column breakthrough studies for ammonia removal. Secondly effective in-situ aeration for promotion of nitrifying bacterial growth was studied using a number of different membranes including polyethersulfone (PES), polypropylene (PP), nylon, and polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE). Thirdly the breakthrough performance of ion exchange columns filled with zeolite in the presence of aeration and in the presence of nitrifying bacteria was determined to establish the influence of biomass, and aeration upon breakthrough during ammonium ion uptake. The methodology adopted included screening of two types of the naturally occuring zeolite clinoptilolite for effective ammonia removal in continuous ion-exchange columns. Next, the performance of fixed beds of clinoptilolite in the

  3. Cultivation of Chlorella sp. using raw dairy wastewater for nutrient removal and biodiesel production: Characteristics comparison of indoor bench-scale and outdoor pilot-scale cultures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weidong; Wang, Zhongming; Wang, Xuewei; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2015-09-01

    The biomass productivity and nutrient removal capacity of simultaneous Chlorella sp. cultivation for biodiesel production and nutrient removal in raw dairy wastewater (RDW) in indoor bench-scale and outdoor pilot-scale photobioreactors were compared. Results from the current work show that maximum biomass productivity in indoor bench-scale cultures can reach 260 mg L(-1) day(-1), compared to that of 110 mg L(-1) day(-1) in outdoor pilot-scale cultures. Maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorous (TP) removal rate obtained in indoor conditions was 88.38, 38.34, and 2.03 mg L(-1) day(-1), respectively, this compared to 41.31, 6.58, and 2.74 mg L(-1) day(-1), respectively, for outdoor conditions. Finally, dominant fatty acids determined to be C16/C18 in outdoor pilot-scale cultures indicated great potential for scale up of Chlorella sp. cultivation in RDW for high quality biodiesel production coupling with RDW treatment. PMID:26056780

  4. Impact of hazardous events on the removal of nutrients and trace organic contaminants by an anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactor receiving real wastewater.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hop V; Hai, Faisal I; McDonald, James A; Khan, Stuart J; van de Merwe, Jason P; Leusch, Frederic D L; Zhang, Ren; Price, William E; Broeckmann, Andreas; Nghiem, Long D

    2015-09-01

    The impacts of four simulated hazardous events, namely, aeration failure, power loss, and chemical shocks (ammonia or bleach) on the performance of an anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) receiving real wastewater were investigated. Hazardous events could alter pH and/or oxidation reduction potential of the mixed liquor and inhibit biomass growth, thus affecting the removal of bulk organics, nutrients and trace organic contaminants (TrOC). Chemical shocks generally exerted greater impact on MBR performance than aeration/power failure events, with ammonia shock exerting the greatest impact. Compared to total organic carbon, nutrient removal was more severely affected. Removal of the hydrophilic TrOCs that are resistant and/or occur at high concentrations in wastewater was notably affected. The MBR effectively reduced estrogenicity and toxicity from wastewater, but chemical shocks could temporarily increase the endocrine activity of the effluent. Depending on the chemical shock-dose and the membrane flux, hazardous events can exacerbate membrane fouling. PMID:26038323

  5. Characterization of nutrient removal and microalgal biomass production on an industrial waste-stream by application of the deceleration-stat technique.

    PubMed

    Van Wagenen, Jon; Pape, Mathias Leon; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-05-15

    Industrial wastewaters can serve as a nutrient and water source for microalgal production. In this study the effluent of an internal circulation (IC) reactor anaerobically treating the wastes of a biotechnology production facility were chosen as the cultivation medium for Chlorella sorokiniana in batch and continuous cultures. The aim was to evaluate the rates of nutrient removal and biomass production possible at various dilution rates. The results demonstrate that the industrial wastewater served as a highly effective microalgae culture medium and that dilution rate strongly influenced algae productivity in a short light-path photobioreactor. Batch culture on undiluted wastewater showed biomass productivity of 1.33 g L(-1)day(-1), while removing over 99% of the ammonia and phosphate from the wastewater. Deceleration-stat (D-stat) experiments performed at high and low intensities of 2100 and 200 (μmol photon m(2)s(-1)) established the optimal dilution rates to reach volumetric productivity of 5.87 and 1.67 g L(-1)day(-1) respectively. The corresponding removal rates of nitrogen were 238 and 93 mg L(-1)day(-1) and 40 and 19 mg L(-1)day(-1) for phosphorous. The yield on photons at low light intensity was as high as had been observed in any previous report indicating that the waste stream allowed the algae to grow at its full potential. PMID:25792276

  6. Effects of a NBC (nuclear, biological, and chemical) nutrient solution on physiological and psychological status during sustained activity in the heat. Final report, February-March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, M.S.; Francesconi, R.P.; Levine, L.; Shukitt, B.; Munro, I.

    1987-07-17

    Soldiers involved in nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) warfare may be encapsulated in MOPP4 ensemble for up to 24 hours. In that configuration the soldier is in a fasting state unless he can move to a decontaminated area to eat. The purpose of this study was to determine if a nutrient solution containing 2.34% carbohydrate and 24.1 mEq sodium per liter (NBC nutrient solution) would be more effective than a control solution of colored and flavored water in maintaining the physiological and psychological status of a person under thermal conditions that simulate MOPP4 encapsulation. Fluid intake was encouraged and the subjects maintained hydration fairly well. The results of this study indicated that water and the NBC Nutrient solution were equally effective in maintaining hydration and physiological status under hot dry conditions. The NBC Nutrient solution was more palatable, lowered symptom intensity, and improves mood; cognitive performance was not improved.

  7. BIOLOGICALLY-MEDIATED REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF PLUTONIUM FROM CONTAMINATED SOIL

    SciTech Connect

    Jerger, Douglas E., Ph.D.,; Alperin, Edward S., QEP,; Holmes, Robert G., Ph.D.

    2003-02-27

    An innovative biological treatment technology successfully reduced plutonium concentration in soil from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by over 80%. The final volume of plutonium-contaminated material that required disposal was reduced by over 90%. These results, achieved by an independent testing laboratory, confirm the results reported previously using NTS soil. In the previous test a 2530-gram sample of soil (350 to 400 pCi/g Pu) resulted in production of 131 grams of sludge (6,320 pCi/ g Pu) and a treated soil containing 72 pCi/g of Pu. The technology is based on the biological acidification of the soil and subsequent removal of the plutonium and other dissolved metals by a low volume, low energy water leaching process. The leachate is treated in a sulfate-reducing bioreactor to precipitate the metals as metal sulfides. Water may be recycled as process water or disposed since the treatment process removes over 99% of the dissolved metals including plutonium from the water. The plutonium is contained as a stable sludge that can be containerized for final disposal. Full-scale process costs have been developed which employ widely used treatment technologies such as aerated soil piles (biopiles) and bioreactors. The process costs were less than $10 per cubic foot, which were 40 to 50% lower than the baseline costs for the treatment of the NTS soil. The equipment and materials for water and sludge treatment and soil handling are commercially available.

  8. Calcium effect on the metabolic pathway of phosphorus accumulating organisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ling; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Fang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Peng; Fang, Cai-Yun; Shao, Li-Min; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) have been found to act as glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) under certain conditions, thus, the deterioration in the performance of enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems is not always attributed to the proliferation of GAOs. In this work, the effects of calcium on the metabolic pathway of PAOs were explored. It was found that when the influent Ca(2+) concentration was elevated, the tendency and extent of extracellular calcium phosphate precipitation increased, and the intracellular inert Ca-bound polyphosphate was synthesized, while the microbial population remained almost unchanged. The changes in the ratios of phosphorus released/acetate uptaken, the glycogen degraded/acetate uptaken and the poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates synthesized/acetate uptaken during the anaerobic period confirm that, as the influent Ca(2+) concentration was increased, the polyphosphate-accumulating metabolism was partially shifted to the glycogen-accumulating metabolism. At an influent Ca(2+) around 50 mg/L, in addition to the extracellular calcium phosphate precipitation, the intracellular inert Ca-bound polyphosphate synthesis might also be involved in the metabolic change of PAOs. The results of the present work would be beneficial to better understand the biochemical metabolism of PAOs in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems. PMID:26233656

  9. Integration of photocatalysis and biological treatment for azo dye removal--application to AR183.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Derradji; Fourcade, Florence; Brosillon, Stephan; Nacef, Saci; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2011-04-01

    The feasibility of coupling photocatalysis with biological treatment to treat effluents containing azo dyes was examined in this work. With this aim, the degradation of Acid Red 183 was investigated. The very low biodegradability of AR183 was confirmed beforehand by measuring the biological oxygen demand (BOD5). Photocatalysis experiments were carried out in a closed-loop step photoreactor. The reactor walls were covered by TiO2 catalyst coated on non-woven paper, and the effluent flowed over the photocatalyst as a thin falling film. The removal of the dye was 82.7% after 4 h, and a quasi-complete decolorization (98.5%) was obtained for 10 h of irradiation (initial concentration 100 mg L(-1)). The decrease in concentration followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, with a constant k of 0.47 h(-1). Mineralization and oxidation yields were 80% and 75%, respectively, after 10 h of pretreatment. Therefore, even if target compound oxidation occurs (COD removal), indicating a modification to the chemical structure, the concomitant high mineralization was not in favour of subsequent microbial growth. The BOD5 measurement confirmed the non-biodegradability of the irradiated solution, which remained toxic since the EC50 decreased from 35 to 3 mg L(-1). The proposed integrated process appeared, therefore, to be not relevant for the treatment of AR183. However, this result should be confirmed for other azo dyes. PMID:21877531

  10. Biological sulphide removal from anaerobically treated domestic sewage: reactor performance and microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Graziella Patrício Pereira; Diniz, Renata Côrtes Oliveira; Bicalho, Sarah Kinaip; Franco, Vitor Araujo de Souza; Gontijo, Eider Max de Oliveira; Toscano, Rodrigo Argolo; Canhestro, Kenia Oliveira; Santos, Merly Rita Dos; Carmo, Ana Luiza Rodrigues Dias; Lobato, Livia Cristina S; Brandt, Emanuel Manfred F; Chernicharo, Carlos A L; Calabria de Araujo, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    We developed a biological sulphide oxidation system and evaluated two reactors (shaped similar to the settler compartment of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket [UASB] reactor) with different support materials for biomass retention: polypropylene rings and polyurethane foam. The start-up reaction was achieved using microorganisms naturally occurring on the open surface of UASB reactors treating domestic wastewater. Sulphide removal efficiencies of 65% and 90% were achieved with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 24 and 12 h, respectively, in both reactors. However, a higher amount of elemental sulphur was formed and accumulated in the biomass from reactor 1 (20 mg S(0) g(-1) VTS) than in that from reactor 2 (2.9 mg S(0) g(-1) VTS) with an HRT of 24 h. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) results revealed that the the pink and green biomass that developed in both reactors comprised a diverse bacterial community and had sequences related to phototrophic green and purple-sulphur bacteria such as Chlorobium sp., Chloronema giganteum, and Chromatiaceae. DGGE band patterns also demonstrated that bacterial community was dynamic over time within the same reactor and that different support materials selected for distinct bacterial communities. Taken together, these results indicated that sulphide concentrations of 1-6 mg L(-1) could be efficiently removed from the effluent of a pilot-scale UASB reactor in two sulphide biological oxidation reactors at HRTs of 12 and 24 h, showing the potential for sulphur recovery from anaerobically treated domestic wastewater. PMID:25737383

  11. Laboratory Batch Test Evaluation of Five Filter Materials for Removal of Nutrients and Pesticides From Drainage Waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fertilizer nutrients and pesticides applied on farm fields, especially in the Midwest U.S., are commonly intercepted by buried agricultural drainage pipes and then discharged into local streams and lakes, oftentimes producing adverse environmental impacts on these surface water bodies. Various filte...

  12. Impact of salinity on organic matter and nitrogen removal from a municipal wastewater RO concentrate using biologically activated carbon coupled with UV/H2O2.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Shovana; Fan, Linhua; Roddick, Felicity A; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Ball, Andrew S

    2016-05-01

    The concentrate streams generated from reverse osmosis (RO)-based municipal wastewater reclamation processes contain organic substances and nutrients at elevated concentrations, posing environmental and health risks on their disposal to confined receiving environments such as bays. The impact of salinity (TDS at 7, 10 and 16 g/L) of a RO concentrate (ROC) on the treatment efficiency of a biological activated carbon (BAC) system after pre-oxidation with UV/H2O2 was characterised in terms of removal of organic matter and nitrogen species, and the bacterial communities. Organic matter removal was comparable for the ROC over the tested salinity range, with 45-49% of DOC and 70-74% of UVA254 removed by the combined treatment. However, removal in total nitrogen (TN) was considerably higher for the ROC at the high salinity (TDS ∼ 16 mg/L) compared with the low (∼7 g/L) and medium salinity (∼10 g/L). Effective nitrification with high ammonium removal (>90%) was achieved at all salinity levels, whereas greater denitrification (39%) was obtained at high salinity than low (23%) and medium salinity (27%) which might suggest that the bacterial communities contributing to the greater denitrification were more halotolerant. Microbiological characterisation using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and culture based techniques showed that diversified bacterial communities were present in the BAC system as evident from different 16S rDNA. The major bacterial groups residing on the BAC media belonged to Bacillus (Firmicutes), Pseudomonas (γ-Proteobacteria), and Rhodococcus (Actinobacteria) for all salinity levels, confirming that these microbial communities could be responsible for carbon and nitrogen removal at the different salinity levels. This has implications in understanding the effectiveness and robustness of the BAC system over the salinity range of the ROC and so would be useful for optimising the treatment efficiency of

  13. BIOLOGICAL NITRIFICATION IN A FULL-SCALE AND PILOT-SCALE IRON REMOVAL DRINKING WATER TREATMENT PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia in source waters can cause water treatment and distribution system problems, many of which are associated with biological nitrification. Therefore, in some cases, the removal of ammonia from water is desirable. Biological oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate (nitr...

  14. Roles of extracellular polymeric substances in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is known to mainly rely on the ability of phosphorus-accumulating organisms to take up, transform and store excess amount of phosphorus (P) inside the cells. However, recent studies have revealed considerable accumulation of P also in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of sludge, implying a non-negligible role of EPS in P removal by EBPR sludge. However, the contribution of EPS to P uptake and the forms of accumulated extracellular P vary substantially in different studies, and the underlying mechanism of P transformation and transportation in EPS remains poorly understood. This review provides a new recognition into the P removal process in EBPR system by incorporating the role of EPS. It overviews on the characteristics of P accumulation in EPS, explores the mechanism of P transformation and transportation in EBPR sludge and EPS, summarizes the main influential factors for the P-accumulation properties of EPS, and discusses the remaining knowledge gaps and needed future efforts that may lead to better understanding and use of such an EPS role for maximizing P recovery from wastewater. PMID:26143588

  15. Biological Nitrogen Removal through Nitritation Coupled with Thiosulfate-Driven Denitritation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jin; Zhou, Junmei; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Rulong; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    A novel biological nitrogen removal system based on nitritation coupled with thiosulfate-driven denitritation (Nitritation-TDD) was developed to achieve a high nitrogen removal rate and low sludge production. A nitritation sequential batch reactor (nitritation SBR) and an anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) reactor were applied for effective nitritation and denitritation, respectively. Above 75% nitrite was accumulated in the nitritation SBR with an influent ammonia loading rate of 0.43 kg N/d/m(3). During Nitritation-TDD operation, particle sizes (d50) of the sludge decreased from 406 to 225 um in nitritation SBR and from 327-183 um in AnUSB reactor. Pyrosequencing tests revealed that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) population was stabilized at approximately 7.0% (calculated as population of AOB-related genus divided by the total microbial population) in the nitritation SBR. In contrast, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population decreased from 6.5-0.6% over the same time, indicating the effective nitrite accumulation in the nitritation SBR. Thiobacillus, accounting for 34.2% in the AnUSB reactor, was mainly responsible for nitrogen removal via autotrophic denitritation, using an external source of thiosulfate as electron donor. Also, it was found that free nitrous acid could directly affect the denitritation activity. PMID:27272192

  16. Biological Nitrogen Removal through Nitritation Coupled with Thiosulfate-Driven Denitritation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Zhou, Junmei; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Rulong; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    A novel biological nitrogen removal system based on nitritation coupled with thiosulfate-driven denitritation (Nitritation-TDD) was developed to achieve a high nitrogen removal rate and low sludge production. A nitritation sequential batch reactor (nitritation SBR) and an anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) reactor were applied for effective nitritation and denitritation, respectively. Above 75% nitrite was accumulated in the nitritation SBR with an influent ammonia loading rate of 0.43 kg N/d/m3. During Nitritation-TDD operation, particle sizes (d50) of the sludge decreased from 406 to 225 um in nitritation SBR and from 327–183 um in AnUSB reactor. Pyrosequencing tests revealed that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) population was stabilized at approximately 7.0% (calculated as population of AOB-related genus divided by the total microbial population) in the nitritation SBR. In contrast, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population decreased from 6.5–0.6% over the same time, indicating the effective nitrite accumulation in the nitritation SBR. Thiobacillus, accounting for 34.2% in the AnUSB reactor, was mainly responsible for nitrogen removal via autotrophic denitritation, using an external source of thiosulfate as electron donor. Also, it was found that free nitrous acid could directly affect the denitritation activity. PMID:27272192

  17. A Biophysicochemical Model for NO Removal by the Chemical Absorption-Biological Reduction Integrated Process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingkai; Xia, Yinfeng; Li, Meifang; Li, Sujing; Li, Wei; Zhang, Shihan

    2016-08-16

    The chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated process is regarded as a promising technology for NOx removal from flue gas. To advance the scale-up of the CABR process, a mathematic model based on mass transfer with reaction in the gas, liquid, and biofilm was developed to simulate and predict the NOx removal by the CABR system in a biotrickling filter. The developed model was validated by the experimental results and subsequently was used to predict the system performance under different operating conditions, such as NO and O2 concentration and gas and liquid flow rate. NO distribution in the gas phase along the biotrickling filter was also modeled and predicted. On the basis of the modeling results, the liquid flow rate and total iron concentration were optimized to achieve >90% NO removal efficiency. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis of the model revealed that the performance of the CABR process was controlled by the bioreduction activity of Fe(III)EDTA. This work will provide the guideline for the design and operation of the CABR process in the industrial application. PMID:27442232

  18. Biological sulfate removal from construction and demolition debris leachate: effect of bioreactor configuration.

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Do, Anh Tien; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Yeh, Daniel H; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-03-30

    Due to the contamination of construction and demolition debris (CDD) by gypsum drywall, especially, its sand fraction (CDD sand, CDDS), the sulfate content in CDDS exceeds the posed limit of the maximum amount of sulfate present in building sand (1.73 g sulfate per kg of sand for the Netherlands). Therefore, the CDDS cannot be reused for construction. The CDDS has to be washed in order to remove most of the impurities and to obtain the right sulfate content, thus generating a leachate, containing high sulfate and calcium concentrations. This study aimed at developing a biological sulfate reduction system for CDDS leachate treatment and compared three different reactor configurations for the sulfate reduction step: the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, inverse fluidized bed (IFB) reactor and gas lift anaerobic membrane bioreactor (GL-AnMBR). This investigation demonstrated that all three systems can be applied for the treatment of CDDS leachate. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 75-85% was achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15.5h. A high calcium concentration up to 1,000 mg L(-1) did not give any adverse effect on the sulfate removal efficiency of the IFB and GL-AnMBR systems. PMID:24211179

  19. Biological Phosphorus Removal During High-Rate, Low-Temperature, Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Ciara; Chin, Jason P.; Hughes, Dermot; Manesiotis, Panagiotis; Cysneiros, Denise; Mahony, Therese; Smith, Cindy J.; McGrath, John W.; O’Flaherty, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We report, for the first time, extensive biologically mediated phosphate removal from wastewater during high-rate anaerobic digestion (AD). A hybrid sludge bed/fixed-film (packed pumice stone) reactor was employed for low-temperature (12°C) anaerobic treatment of synthetic sewage wastewater. Successful phosphate removal from the wastewater (up to 78% of influent phosphate) was observed, mediated by biofilms in the reactor. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis revealed the accumulation of elemental phosphorus (∼2%) within the sludge bed and fixed-film biofilms. 4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining indicated phosphorus accumulation was biological in nature and mediated through the formation of intracellular inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) granules within these biofilms. DAPI staining further indicated that polyP accumulation was rarely associated with free cells. Efficient and consistent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was recorded, throughout the 732-day trial, at applied organic loading rates between 0.4 and 1.5 kg COD m-3 d-1 and hydraulic retention times of 8–24 h, while phosphate removal efficiency ranged from 28 to 78% on average per phase. Analysis of protein hydrolysis kinetics and the methanogenic activity profiles of the biomass revealed the development, at 12°C, of active hydrolytic and methanogenic populations. Temporal microbial changes were monitored using Illumina MiSeq analysis of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences. The dominant bacterial phyla present in the biomass at the conclusion of the trial were the Proteobacteria and Firmicutes and the dominant archaeal genus was Methanosaeta. Trichococcus and Flavobacterium populations, previously associated with low temperature protein degradation, developed in the reactor biomass. The presence of previously characterized polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) such as Rhodocyclus, Chromatiales, Actinobacter, and Acinetobacter was recorded

  20. Biological Phosphorus Removal During High-Rate, Low-Temperature, Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Keating, Ciara; Chin, Jason P; Hughes, Dermot; Manesiotis, Panagiotis; Cysneiros, Denise; Mahony, Therese; Smith, Cindy J; McGrath, John W; O'Flaherty, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We report, for the first time, extensive biologically mediated phosphate removal from wastewater during high-rate anaerobic digestion (AD). A hybrid sludge bed/fixed-film (packed pumice stone) reactor was employed for low-temperature (12°C) anaerobic treatment of synthetic sewage wastewater. Successful phosphate removal from the wastewater (up to 78% of influent phosphate) was observed, mediated by biofilms in the reactor. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis revealed the accumulation of elemental phosphorus (∼2%) within the sludge bed and fixed-film biofilms. 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining indicated phosphorus accumulation was biological in nature and mediated through the formation of intracellular inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) granules within these biofilms. DAPI staining further indicated that polyP accumulation was rarely associated with free cells. Efficient and consistent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was recorded, throughout the 732-day trial, at applied organic loading rates between 0.4 and 1.5 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) and hydraulic retention times of 8-24 h, while phosphate removal efficiency ranged from 28 to 78% on average per phase. Analysis of protein hydrolysis kinetics and the methanogenic activity profiles of the biomass revealed the development, at 12°C, of active hydrolytic and methanogenic populations. Temporal microbial changes were monitored using Illumina MiSeq analysis of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences. The dominant bacterial phyla present in the biomass at the conclusion of the trial were the Proteobacteria and Firmicutes and the dominant archaeal genus was Methanosaeta. Trichococcus and Flavobacterium populations, previously associated with low temperature protein degradation, developed in the reactor biomass. The presence of previously characterized polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) such as Rhodocyclus, Chromatiales, Actinobacter, and Acinetobacter was recorded

  1. Is biological treatment a viable alternative for micropollutant removal in drinking water treatment processes?

    PubMed

    Benner, Jessica; Helbling, Damian E; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Wittebol, Janneke; Kaiser, Elena; Prasse, Carsten; Ternes, Thomas A; Albers, Christian N; Aamand, Jens; Horemans, Benjamin; Springael, Dirk; Walravens, Eddy; Boon, Nico

    2013-10-15

    In western societies, clean and safe drinking water is often taken for granted, but there are threats to drinking water resources that should not be underestimated. Contamination of drinking water sources by anthropogenic chemicals is one threat that is particularly widespread in industrialized nations. Recently, a significant amount of attention has been given to the occurrence of micropollutants in the urban water cycle. Micropollutants are bioactive and/or persistent chemicals originating from diverse sources that are frequently detected in water resources in the pg/L to μg/L range. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the viability of biological treatment processes as a means to remove micropollutants from drinking water resources. We first place the micropollutant problem in context by providing a comprehensive summary of the reported occurrence of micropollutants in raw water used directly for drinking water production and in finished drinking water. We then present a critical discussion on conventional and advanced drinking water treatment processes and their contribution to micropollutant removal. Finally, we propose biological treatment and bioaugmentation as a potential targeted, cost-effective, and sustainable alternative to existing processes while critically examining the technical limitations and scientific challenges that need to be addressed prior to implementation. This review will serve as a valuable source of data and literature for water utilities, water researchers, policy makers, and environmental consultants. Meanwhile this review will open the door to meaningful discussion on the feasibility and application of biological treatment and bioaugmentation in drinking water treatment processes to protect the public from exposure to micropollutants. PMID:24053940

  2. Occurrence of cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in aqueous environment and their removal by biological and abiotic wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Česen, Marjeta; Kosjek, Tina; Laimou-Geraniou, Maria; Kompare, Boris; Širok, Brane; Lambropolou, Dimitra; Heath, Ester

    2015-09-15

    Cytostatic drug residues in the aqueous environment are of concern due to their possible adverse effects on non-target organisms. Here we report the occurrence and removal efficiency of cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) by biological and abiotic treatments including advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Cyclophosphamide was detected in hospital wastewaters (14-22,000 ng L(-1)), wastewater treatment plant influents (19-27 ng L(-1)) and effluent (17 ng L(-1)), whereas IF was detected only in hospital wastewaters (48-6800 ng L(-1)). The highest removal efficiency during biological treatment (attached growth biomass in a flow through bioreactor) was 59 ± 15% and 35 ± 9.3% for CP and IF, respectively. Also reported are the removal efficiencies of both compounds from wastewater using hydrodynamic cavitation (HC), ozonation (O3) and/or UV, either individually or in combination with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Hydrodynamic cavitation did not remove CP and IF to any significant degree. The highest removal efficiencies: 99 ± 0.71% for CP and 94 ± 2.4% for IF, were achieved using UV/O3/H2O2 at 5 g L(-1) for 120 min. When combined with biological treatment, removal efficiencies were >99% for both compounds. This is the first report of combined biological and AOP treatment of CP and IF from wastewater with a removal efficiency >99%. PMID:25981944

  3. Colour and organic removal of biologically treated coffee curing wastewater by electrochemical oxidation method.

    PubMed

    Bejankiwar, Rajesh S; Lokesh, K S; Gowda, T P Halappa

    2003-05-01

    The treatment of biologically treated wastewater of coffee-curing industry by the electrochemical oxidation using steel anode was investigated. Bench-scale experiments were conducted for activated sludge process on raw wastewater and the treated effluents were further treated by electrochemical oxidation method for its colour and organic content removal. The efficiency of the process was determined in terms of removal percentage of COD, BOD and colour during the course of reaction. Several operating parameters like time, pH and current density were examined to ascertain their effects on the treatment efficiency. Steel anode was found to be effective for the COD and colour removal with anode efficiency of 0.118 kgCOD x h(-1) x A(-1) x m(-2) and energy consumption 20.61 kWh x kg(-1) of COD at pH 9. The decrease in pH from 9 to 3 found to increase the anode efficiency from 0.118 kgCOD x h(-1) x A(-1) x m(-2) to 0.144 kWh x kg(-1) of COD while decrease the energy consumption from 20.61 kWh x kg(-1) of COD to 12.86 kWh x kg(-1) of COD. The pH of 5 was considered an ideal from the present treatment process as it avoids the addition of chemicals for neutralization of treated effluents and also economical with respect to energy consumption. An empirical relation developed for relationship between applied current density and COD removal efficiency showed strong predictive capability with coefficient of determination of 96.5%. PMID:12938980

  4. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems; Adsorption and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2010-10-01

    Functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS) have previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems suggesting they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials biocompatibility and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e. blood, urine, etc.) As a result, thiol SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material’s performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e. variable pH and ionic strength) as well to gauge any potentially negative cellular effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or possible chelation of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus non-toxic. As a result, it has been determined that organic ligand-functionalized nanoporous silica materials could be a valuable material for detoxification therapeutics and potentially other biomedical applications as needed.

  5. Enhanced Removal of Lead by Chemically and Biologically Treated Carbonaceous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E.; Osman, Maher M.; Ahmed, Somia B.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid sorbents and biosorbents were synthesized via chemical and biological treatment of active carbon by simple and direct redox reaction followed by surface loading of baker's yeast. Surface functionality and morphology of chemically and biologically modified sorbents and biosorbents were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared analysis and scanning electron microscope imaging. Hybrid carbonaceous sorbents and biosorbents were characterized by excellent efficiency and superiority toward lead(II) sorption compared to blank active carbon providing a maximum sorption capacity of lead(II) ion as 500 μmol g−1. Sorption processes of lead(II) by these hybrid materials were investigated under the influence of several controlling parameters such as pH, contact time, mass of sorbent and biosorbent, lead(II) concentration, and foreign ions. Lead(II) sorption mechanisms were found to obey the Langmuir and BET isotherm models. The potential applications of chemically and biologically modified-active carbonaceous materials for removal and extraction of lead from real water matrices were also studied via a double-stage microcolumn technique. The results of this study were found to denote to superior recovery values of lead (95.0–99.0 ± 3.0–5.0%) by various carbonaceous-modified-bakers yeast biosorbents. PMID:22629157

  6. Removal of COD and color from hydrolyzed textile azo dye by combined ozonation and biological treatment.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Selene Maria de Arruda Guelli Ulson; Bonilla, Karin Angela Santos; de Souza, Antônio Augusto Ulson

    2010-07-15

    The application of ozonation has been increasing in recent years, the main disadvantage of this type of treatment being related to the by-products, which can have toxic and carcinogenic properties, and therefore should be studied further. In this study, the combined treatment of ozonation and subsequent biological degradation with a biofilm, to reduce the color and chemical oxygen demand (COD), was investigated. The experimental part of the study consisted of two phases. The first phase was the ozonation process, the results obtained demonstrated that the ozonation of Remazol Black B dye at pH values of 3-11, was effective, partially oxidizing and completely decolorizing the effluent, even at relatively high concentrations of the dye (500 mg/L). Color removal efficiencies greater than 96% were obtained in all cases. The degradation kinetics of ozone is a pseudo-first-order reaction with respect to the dye concentration. It was possible to verify that the ozonation process as a pre-treatment increases the dye degradation efficiency. For the biological treatment, an increase in ozonization time increased the dye concentration reduction in hydrolyzed dye synthetic effluent. The toxicological results of the tests with Daphnia Magna showed that there is an increase in toxicity after ozonization and a decrease after submitting the ozonized synthetic wastewater to biological treatment with a biofilm. PMID:20227826

  7. Effects of interspecific competition on the growth of macrophytes and nutrient removal in constructed wetlands: A comparative assessment of free water surface and horizontal subsurface flow systems.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yucong; Wang, Xiaochang; Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Zhao, Yaqian; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Ge, Yuan; Xiong, Jiaqing

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of competition between adjoining interspecific colonies of Phragmites and Typha in two large field pilot-scale free water surface (FWS) and subsurface flow (SSF) CWs is evaluated. According to findings, the effect of interspecific competition was notable for Phragmites australis, whereby it showed the highest growth performance in both FWS and SSF wetland. In a mixed-culture, P. australis demonstrates superiority in terms of competitive interactions for space between plants. Furthermore, the interspecific competition among planted species seemed to cause different ecological responses of plant species in the two CWs. For example, while relatively high density and shoot height determined the high aboveground dry weight of P. australis in the FWS wetland, this association was not evident in the SSF. Additionally, while plants nutrients uptake accounts for a higher proportion of the nitrogen removal in FWS, that in the SSF accounts for a higher proportion of the phosphorous removal. PMID:26874442

  8. Removal of lipid soluble process chemicals from biological materials by extraction with naturally occurring oils or synthetic substitutes thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, K.R.; Orme, T.W.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a method of removing lipid soluble process chemicals from biological materials comprising blood plasma and fractions thereof containing the lipid soluble process chemicals. The lipid soluble process chemical is a virus attenuating solvent having a high flash point, a detergent, or a mixture thereof. It comprises bringing the biological materials containing the lipid soluble process chemicals into contact with an effective amount of a naturally occurring oil extracted from a plant or an animal or a synthetic compound of similar chemical structure. Also described is a method of removing lymphokine inducing phorbol esters from lympholkine-containing biological material. It comprises bringing the biological materials containing the phorbol esters into contact with an effective amount of a naturally occurring oil extracted from a plant or an animal or a synthetic compound of similar chemical structure so as to remove 80% or more of the phorbol esters.

  9. Nutrient effect on the biological leaching of a black-schist ore.

    PubMed

    Niemelä, S I; Riekkola-Vanhanen, M; Sivelä, C; Viguera, F; Tuovinen, O H

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the influence of inorganic N (NH(4), NO(3)) and phosphate on the biological oxidation of a sulfidic black-schist ore which contained pyrrhotite as the main iron sulfide. Iron was initially solubilized as Fe from the ore and subsequently oxidized to Fe in shake flask experiments. Under these experimental conditions, iron dissolution from pyrrhotite was mainly a chemical reaction, with some enhancement by bacteria, whereas the subsequent Fe oxidation was bacterially mediated, with negligible contribution from chemical oxidation. Phosphate amendment did not enhance Fe oxidation. Chemical analysis of leach solutions with no exogenous phosphate revealed that phosphate was solubilized from the black-schist ore. Ammonium amendment (6 mM) enhanced Fe oxidation, whereas the addition of nitrate (6 and 12 mM) had a negative effect. An increase in the temperature from 30 to 35 degrees C slightly enhanced Fe oxidation, but the effect was statistically not significant. The precipitation of potassium jarosite was indicative of Fe oxidation and was absent in nitrate-inhibited cultures because of the lack of Fe oxidation. The black-schist ore also contained phlogopite, which was altered to vermiculite in iron-oxidizing cultures. PMID:16349236

  10. Nutrient Effect on the Biological Leaching of a Black-Schist Ore

    PubMed Central

    Niemelä, Seppo I.; Riekkola-Vanhanen, Marja; Sivelä, Carita; Viguera, Felipe; Tuovinen, Olli H.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the influence of inorganic N (NH4+, NO3-) and phosphate on the biological oxidation of a sulfidic black-schist ore which contained pyrrhotite as the main iron sulfide. Iron was initially solubilized as Fe2+ from the ore and subsequently oxidized to Fe3+ in shake flask experiments. Under these experimental conditions, iron dissolution from pyrrhotite was mainly a chemical reaction, with some enhancement by bacteria, whereas the subsequent Fe2+ oxidation was bacterially mediated, with negligible contribution from chemical oxidation. Phosphate amendment did not enhance Fe2+ oxidation. Chemical analysis of leach solutions with no exogenous phosphate revealed that phosphate was solubilized from the black-schist ore. Ammonium amendment (6 mM) enhanced Fe2+ oxidation, whereas the addition of nitrate (6 and 12 mM) had a negative effect. An increase in the temperature from 30 to 35°C slightly enhanced Fe2+ oxidation, but the effect was statistically not significant. The precipitation of potassium jarosite was indicative of Fe2+ oxidation and was absent in nitrate-inhibited cultures because of the lack of Fe2+ oxidation. The black-schist ore also contained phlogopite, which was altered to vermiculite in iron-oxidizing cultures. PMID:16349236

  11. Biofilm establishment and heavy metal removal capacity of an indigenous mining algal-microbial consortium in a photo-rotating biological contactor.

    PubMed

    Orandi, S; Lewis, D M; Moheimani, N R

    2012-09-01

    An indigenous mining algal-microbial consortium was immobilised within a laboratory-scale photo-rotating biological contactor (PRBC) that was used to investigate the potential for heavy metal removal from acid mine drainage (AMD). The microbial consortium, dominated by Ulothrix sp., was collected from the AMD at the Sar Cheshmeh copper mine in Iran. This paper discusses the parameters required to establish an algal-microbial biofilm used for heavy metal removal, including nutrient requirements and rotational speed. The PRBC was tested using synthesised AMD with the multi-ion and acidic composition of wastewater (containing 18 elements, and with a pH of 3.5 ± 0.5), from which the microbial consortium was collected. The biofilm was successfully developed on the PRBC's disc consortium over 60 days of batch-mode operation. The PRBC was then run continuously with a 24 h hydraulic residence time (HRT) over a ten-week period. Water analysis, performed on a weekly basis, demonstrated the ability of the algal-microbial biofilm to remove 20-50 % of the various metals in the order Cu > Ni > Mn > Zn > Sb > Se > Co > Al. These results clearly indicate the significant potential for indigenous AMD microorganisms to be exploited within a PRBC for AMD treatment. PMID:22644382

  12. Effects of Eichhornia crassipes and Ceratophyllum demersum on Soil and Water Environments and Nutrient Removal in Wetland Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kijune; Lee, Geun-Joo; Munster, Clyde

    2015-01-01

    Wetland plants are important components that influence the biogeochemistry of wetland ecosystems. Therefore, remediation performance in wetlands can differ depending on the growth forms of plants. In this study, the effects of Eichhornia crassipes (floating plant) and Ceratophyllum demersum (submerged plant) on the wetland soil and water environments were investigated using a microcosm study with simulated hydrology of retention-type wetlands between rainfall events. The C. demersum microcosm (SP) showed the fastest recovery with a diel fluctuation pattern of dissolved oxygen, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) from the impacts of nutrient inflow. Moreover, SP exhibited the lowest decrease in sediment ORP, the highest dehydrogenase activity, and more organic forms of nitrogen and phosphorus. E. crassipes microcosms exhibited the lowest water temperature, and efficiently controlled algae. In the presence of plants, the total nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in water rapidly decreased, and the composition of organic and inorganic nutrient forms was altered along with a decrease in concentration. The results indicate that wetland plants help retain nutrients in the system, but the effects varied based on the wetland plant growth forms. PMID:25581097

  13. Seasonal nutrient and plankton dynamics in a physical-biological model of Crater Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fennel, K.; Collier, R.; Larson, G.; Crawford, G.; Boss, E.

    2007-01-01

    A coupled 1D physical-biological model of Crater Lake is presented. The model simulates the seasonal evolution of two functional phytoplankton groups, total chlorophyll, and zooplankton in good quantitative agreement with observations from a 10-year monitoring study. During the stratified period in summer and early fall the model displays a marked vertical structure: the phytoplankton biomass of the functional group 1, which represents diatoms and dinoflagellates, has its highest concentration in the upper 40 m; the phytoplankton biomass of group 2, which represents chlorophyta, chrysophyta, cryptomonads and cyanobacteria, has its highest concentrations between 50 and 80 m, and phytoplankton chlorophyll has its maximum at 120 m depth. A similar vertical structure is a reoccurring feature in the available data. In the model the key process allowing a vertical separation between biomass and chlorophyll is photoacclimation. Vertical light attenuation (i.e., water clarity) and the physiological ability of phytoplankton to increase their cellular chlorophyll-to-biomass ratio are ultimately determining the location of the chlorophyll maximum. The location of the particle maxima on the other hand is determined by the balance between growth and losses and occurs where growth and losses equal. The vertical particle flux simulated by our model agrees well with flux measurements from a sediment trap. This motivated us to revisit a previously published study by Dymond et al. (1996). Dymond et al. used a box model to estimate the vertical particle flux and found a discrepancy by a factor 2.5-10 between their model-derived flux and measured fluxes from a sediment trap. Their box model neglected the exchange flux of dissolved and suspended organic matter, which, as our model and available data suggests is significant for the vertical exchange of nitrogen. Adjustment of Dymond et al.'s assumptions to account for dissolved and suspended nitrogen yields a flux estimate that is

  14. Removing Constraints on the Biomass Production of Freshwater Macroalgae by Manipulating Water Exchange to Manage Nutrient Flux

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Andrew J.; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater macroalgae represent a largely overlooked group of phototrophic organisms that could play an important role within an industrial ecology context in both utilising waste nutrients and water and supplying biomass for animal feeds and renewable chemicals and fuels. This study used water from the intensive aquaculture of freshwater fish (Barramundi) to examine how the biomass production rate and protein content of the freshwater macroalga Oedogonium responds to increasing the flux of nutrients and carbon, by either increasing water exchange rates or through the addition of supplementary nitrogen and CO2. Biomass production rates were highest at low flow rates (0.1–1 vol.day−1) using raw pond water. The addition of CO2 to cultures increased biomass production rates by between 2 and 25% with this effect strongest at low water exchange rates. Paradoxically, the addition of nitrogen to cultures decreased productivity, especially at low water exchange rates. The optimal culture of Oedogonium occurred at flow rates of between 0.5–1 vol.day−1, where uptake rates peaked at 1.09 g.m−2.day−1 for nitrogen and 0.13 g.m−2.day−1 for phosphorous. At these flow rates Oedogonium biomass had uptake efficiencies of 75.2% for nitrogen and 22.1% for phosphorous. In this study a nitrogen flux of 1.45 g.m−2.day−1 and a phosphorous flux of 0.6 g.m−2.day−1 was the minimum required to maintain the growth of Oedogonium at 16–17 g DW.m−2.day−1 and a crude protein content of 25%. A simple model of minimum inputs shows that for every gram of dry weight biomass production (g DW.m−2.day−1), Oedogonium requires 0.09 g.m−2.day−1 of nitrogen and 0.04 g.m−2.day−1 of phosphorous to maintain growth without nutrient limitation whilst simultaneously maintaining a high-nutrient uptake rate and efficiency. As such the integrated culture of freshwater macroalgae with aquaculture for the purposes of nutrient recovery is a feasible solution for the

  15. Removing constraints on the biomass production of freshwater macroalgae by manipulating water exchange to manage nutrient flux.

    PubMed

    Cole, Andrew J; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater macroalgae represent a largely overlooked group of phototrophic organisms that could play an important role within an industrial ecology context in both utilising waste nutrients and water and supplying biomass for animal feeds and renewable chemicals and fuels. This study used water from the intensive aquaculture of freshwater fish (Barramundi) to examine how the biomass production rate and protein content of the freshwater macroalga Oedogonium responds to increasing the flux of nutrients and carbon, by either increasing water exchange rates or through the addition of supplementary nitrogen and CO2. Biomass production rates were highest at low flow rates (0.1-1 vol.day-1) using raw pond water. The addition of CO2 to cultures increased biomass production rates by between 2 and 25% with this effect strongest at low water exchange rates. Paradoxically, the addition of nitrogen to cultures decreased productivity, especially at low water exchange rates. The optimal culture of Oedogonium occurred at flow rates of between 0.5-1 vol.day-1, where uptake rates peaked at 1.09 g.m-2.day-1 for nitrogen and 0.13 g.m-2.day-1 for phosphorous. At these flow rates Oedogonium biomass had uptake efficiencies of 75.2% for nitrogen and 22.1% for phosphorous. In this study a nitrogen flux of 1.45 g.m-2.day-1 and a phosphorous flux of 0.6 g.m-2.day-1 was the minimum required to maintain the growth of Oedogonium at 16-17 g DW.m-2.day-1 and a crude protein content of 25%. A simple model of minimum inputs shows that for every gram of dry weight biomass production (g DW.m-2.day-1), Oedogonium requires 0.09 g.m-2.day-1 of nitrogen and 0.04 g.m-2.day-1 of phosphorous to maintain growth without nutrient limitation whilst simultaneously maintaining a high-nutrient uptake rate and efficiency. As such the integrated culture of freshwater macroalgae with aquaculture for the purposes of nutrient recovery is a feasible solution for the bioremediation of wastewater and the supply of a

  16. Evaluation of Simultaneous Nutrient and COD Removal with Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Accumulation Using Mixed Microbial Consortia under Anoxic Condition and Their Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Jyotsnarani; Kumar, Ravindra; Dixit, Anshuman; Pandey, Sony; Das, Trupti

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous nitrate-N, phosphate and COD removal was evaluated from synthetic waste water using mixed microbial consortia in an anoxic environment under various initial carbon load (ICL) in a batch scale reactor system. Within 6 hours of incubation, enriched DNPAOs (Denitrifying Polyphosphate Accumulating Microorganisms) were able to remove maximum COD (87%) at 2g/L of ICL whereas maximum nitrate-N (97%) and phosphate (87%) removal along with PHB accumulation (49 mg/L) was achieved at 8 g/L of ICL. Exhaustion of nitrate-N, beyond 6 hours of incubation, had a detrimental effect on COD and phosphate removal rate. Fresh supply of nitrate-N to the reaction medium, beyond 6 hours, helped revive the removal rates of both COD and phosphate. Therefore, it was apparent that in spite of a high carbon load, maximum COD and nutrient removal can be maintained, with adequate nitrate-N availability. Denitrifying condition in the medium was evident from an increasing pH trend. PHB accumulation by the mixed culture was directly proportional to ICL; however the time taken for accumulation at higher ICL was more. Unlike conventional EBPR, PHB depletion did not support phosphate accumulation in this case. The unique aspect of all the batch studies were PHB accumulation was observed along with phosphate uptake and nitrate reduction under anoxic conditions. Bioinformatics analysis followed by pyrosequencing of the mixed culture DNA from the seed sludge revealed the dominance of denitrifying population, such as Corynebacterium, Rhodocyclus and Paraccocus (Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria). Rarefaction curve indicated complete bacterial population and corresponding number of OTUs through sequence analysis. Chao1 and Shannon index (H’) was used to study the diversity of sampling. “UCI95” and “LCI95” indicated 95% confidence level of upper and lower values of Chao1 for each distance. Values of Chao1 index supported the results of rarefaction curve. PMID:25689047

  17. Rare taxa have potential to make metabolic contributions in enhanced biological phosphorus removal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Christopher E; Strachan, Blake J; Hanson, Niels W; Hahn, Aria S; Hall, Eric R; Rabinowitz, Barry; Mavinic, Donald S; Ramey, William D; Hallam, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) relies on diverse but specialized microbial communities to mediate the cycling and ultimate removal of phosphorus from municipal wastewaters. However, little is known about microbial activity and dynamics in relation to process fluctuations in EBPR ecosystems. Here, we monitored temporal changes in microbial community structure and potential activity across each bioreactor zone in a pilot-scale EBPR treatment plant by examining the ratio of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) to SSU rRNA gene (rDNA) over a 120 day study period. Although the majority of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the EBPR ecosystem were rare, many maintained high potential activities based on SSU rRNA : rDNA ratios, suggesting that rare OTUs contribute substantially to protein synthesis potential in EBPR ecosystems. Few significant differences in OTU abundance and activity were observed between bioreactor redox zones, although differences in temporal activity were observed among phylogenetically cohesive OTUs. Moreover, observed temporal activity patterns could not be explained by measured process parameters, suggesting that other ecological drivers, such as grazing or viral lysis, modulated community interactions. Taken together, these results point towards complex interactions selected for within the EBPR ecosystem and highlight a previously unrecognized functional potential among low abundance microorganisms in engineered ecosystems. PMID:25857222

  18. Optimization of a full-scale Unitank wastewater treatment plant for biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Xing, Can; Wu, Zhichao; Tong, Fei; Wang, Junru

    2014-01-01

    The Unitank process combines the advantages of traditional continuous-flow activated sludge processes and sequencing batch reactors, and has been extensively employed in many wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in China. Biological phosphorus removal (BPR) of a full-scale Unitank WWTP was optimized by increasing anaerobic time from 80 to 120 min in an operation cycle of 360 min and reducing solid retention time (SRT) from 21.3 to 13.1 d. The BPR efficiency of the full-scale Unitank system increased from 63.8% (SRT of 21.3 d) to 83.2% for a SRT of 13.1 d. When the anaerobic time increased from 80 to 120 min, the net anaerobic phosphorus release amount increased from 0.25 to 1.06 mg L(-1), and sludge phosphorus content rose from 13.8 to 15.0 mgP x (gSS)(-1). During half an operation cycle, the average specific phosphorus release rate increased from 0.097mgP x (gVSS x h)(-1) in 0-40 min to 0.825 mgP x (gVSS x h)(-1) in 40-60 min. Reducing SRT and increasing anaerobic time account for 84.6% and 15.4% in the total increment of phosphorus removal of 1.15 mgL(-1). PMID:24645458

  19. Removal of nitrate and sulphate from biologically treated municipal wastewater by electrocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Arun Kumar; Chopra, A. K.

    2015-07-01

    The present investigation observed the effect of current density (j), electrocoagulation (EC) time, inter electrode distance, electrode area, initial pH and settling time on the removal of nitrate (NO3 -) and sulphate (SO4 2-) from biologically treated municipal wastewater (BTMW), and optimization of the operating conditions of the EC process. A glass chamber of two-liter volume was used for the experiments with DC power supply using two electrode plates of aluminum (Al-Al). The maximum removal of NO3 - (63.21 %) and SO4 2- (79.98 %) of BTMW was found with the optimum operating conditions: current density: 2.65 A/m2, EC time: 40 min, inter electrode distance: 0.5 cm, electrode area: 160 cm2, initial pH: 7.5 and settling time: 60 min. The EC brought down the concentration of NO3 - within desirable limit of the Bureau of Indian Standard (BIS)/WHO for drinking water. Under optimal operating conditions, the operating cost was found to be 1.01/m3 of water in terms of the electrode consumption (23.71 × 10-5 kg Al/m3) and energy consumption (101.76 kWh/m3).

  20. Metabolic versatility in full-scale wastewater treatment plants performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Lanham, Ana B; Oehmen, Adrian; Saunders, Aaron M; Carvalho, Gilda; Nielsen, Per H; Reis, Maria A M

    2013-12-01

    This study analysed the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) microbial community and metabolic performance of five full-scale EBPR systems by using fluorescence in situ hybridisation combined with off-line batch tests fed with acetate under anaerobic-aerobic conditions. The phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) in all systems were stable and showed little variability between each plant, while glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) were present in two of the plants. The metabolic activity of each sludge showed the frequent involvement of the anaerobic tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) in PAO metabolism for the anaerobic generation of reducing equivalents, in addition to the more frequently reported glycolysis pathway. Metabolic variability in the use of the two pathways was also observed, between different systems and in the same system over time. The metabolic dynamics was linked to the availability of glycogen, where a higher utilisation of the glycolysis pathway was observed in the two systems employing side-stream hydrolysis, and the TCA cycle was more active in the A(2)O systems. Full-scale plants that showed higher glycolysis activity also exhibited superior P removal performance, suggesting that promotion of the glycolysis pathway over the TCA cycle could be beneficial towards the optimisation of EBPR systems. PMID:24210547

  1. Exploring the Shift in Structure and Function of Microbial Communities Performing Biological Phosphorus Removal.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yanping; Wang, Zhiping; Li, Liguan; Jiang, Xiaotao; Zhang, Xuxiang; Ren, Hongqiang; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor fed mainly by acetate was operated to perform enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). A short-term pH shock from 7.0 to 6.0 led to a complete loss of phosphate-removing capability and a drastic change of microbial communities. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed that large proportions of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) (accounted for 16% of bacteria) bloomed, including Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis and Defluviicoccus-related tetrad-forming organism, causing deteriorated EBPR performance. The EBPR performance recovered with time and the dominant Candidatus Accumulibacter (Accumulibacter) clades shifted from Clade IIC to IIA while GAOs populations shrank significantly. The Accumulibacter population variation provided a good opportunity for genome binning using a bi-dimensional coverage method, and a genome of Accumulibacter Clade IIC was well retrieved with over 90% completeness. Comparative genomic analysis demonstrated that Accumulibacter clades had different abilities in nitrogen metabolism and carbon fixation, which shed light on enriching different Accumulibacter populations selectively. PMID:27547976

  2. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B H

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions. PMID:27193869

  3. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions. PMID:27193869

  4. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-05-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions.

  5. Exploring the Shift in Structure and Function of Microbial Communities Performing Biological Phosphorus Removal

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yanping; Wang, Zhiping; Li, Liguan; Jiang, Xiaotao; Zhang, Xuxiang; Ren, Hongqiang; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    A sequencing batch reactor fed mainly by acetate was operated to perform enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). A short-term pH shock from 7.0 to 6.0 led to a complete loss of phosphate-removing capability and a drastic change of microbial communities. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed that large proportions of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) (accounted for 16% of bacteria) bloomed, including Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis and Defluviicoccus-related tetrad-forming organism, causing deteriorated EBPR performance. The EBPR performance recovered with time and the dominant Candidatus Accumulibacter (Accumulibacter) clades shifted from Clade IIC to IIA while GAOs populations shrank significantly. The Accumulibacter population variation provided a good opportunity for genome binning using a bi-dimensional coverage method, and a genome of Accumulibacter Clade IIC was well retrieved with over 90% completeness. Comparative genomic analysis demonstrated that Accumulibacter clades had different abilities in nitrogen metabolism and carbon fixation, which shed light on enriching different Accumulibacter populations selectively. PMID:27547976

  6. A metagenome of a full-scale microbial community carrying out enhanced biological phosphorus removal

    PubMed Central

    Albertsen, Mads; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely used for removal of phosphorus from wastewater. In this study, a metagenome (18.2 Gb) was generated using Illumina sequencing from a full-scale EBPR plant to study the community structure and genetic potential. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (qFISH) was applied as an independent method to evaluate the community structure. The results were in qualitative agreement, but a DNA extraction bias against gram positive bacteria using standard extraction protocols was identified, which would not have been identified without the use of qFISH. The genetic potential for community function showed enrichment of genes involved in phosphate metabolism and biofilm formation, reflecting the selective pressure of the EBPR process. Most contigs in the assembled metagenome had low similarity to genes from currently sequenced genomes, underlining the need for more reference genomes of key EBPR species. Only the genome of ‘Candidatus Accumulibacter', a genus of phosphorus-removing organisms, was closely enough related to the species present in the metagenome to allow for detailed investigations. Accumulibacter accounted for only 4.8% of all bacteria by qFISH, but the depth of sequencing enabled detailed insight into their microdiversity in the full-scale plant. Only 15% of the reads matching Accumulibacter had a high similarity (>95%) to the sequenced Accumulibacter clade IIA strain UW-1 genome, indicating the presence of some microdiversity. The differences in gene complement between the Accumulibacter clades were limited to genes for extracellular polymeric substances and phage-related genes, suggesting a selective pressure from phages on the Accumulibacter diversity. PMID:22170425

  7. COD, nutrient removal and disinfection efficiency of a combined subsurface and surface flow constructed wetland: A case study.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Laura; Canobbio, Sergio; Fornaroli, Riccardo; Cabrini, Riccardo; Marazzi, Francesca; Mezzanotte, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    A constructed wetland system composed of a subsurface flow wetland, a surface flow wetland and a facultative pond was studied from July 2008 until May 2012. It was created to treat the domestic sewage produced by a hamlet of 150 inhabitants. Monthly physicochemical and microbiological analyses were carried out in order to evaluate the removal efficiency of each stage of the process and of the total treatment system. Pair-wise Student's t-tests showed that the mean removal of each considered parameter was significantly different (α = 0.05) between the various treatment phases. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests were used to find significant differences between wetland types and seasons in the removal efficiency of the considered water quality parameters. Significant differences in percent removal efficiency between the treatment phases were observed for total phosphorus, total nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen and organic load (expressed as Chemical Oxygen Demand). In general, the wastewater treatment was carried by the sub-superficial flow phase mainly, both in growing season and in quiescence season. Escherichia coli removal ranged from 98% in quiescence season to >99% in growing season (approximately 2-3 orders of magnitude). The inactivation of fecal bacteria was not influenced by the season, but only by the treatment phase. PMID:26552725

  8. Is anaerobic digestion effective for the removal of organic micropollutants and biological activities from sewage sludge?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, L; Papa, M; Feretti, D; Ceretti, E; Mazzoleni, G; Steimberg, N; Pedrazzani, R; Bertanza, G; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of emerging organic micropollutants (OMPs) in sewage sludge has been widely reported; nevertheless, their fate during sludge treatment remains unclear. The objective of this work was to study the fate of OMPs during mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion (AD), the most common processes used for sludge stabilization, by using raw sewage sludge without spiking OMPs. Moreover, the results of analytical chemistry were complemented with biological assays in order to verify the possible adverse effects (estrogenic and genotoxic) on the environment and human health in view of an agricultural (re)use of digested sludge. Musk fragrances (AHTN, HHCB), ibuprofen (IBP) and triclosan (TCS) were the most abundant compounds detected in sewage sludge. In general, the efficiency of the AD process was not dependent on operational parameters but compound-specific: some OMPs were highly biotransformed (e.g. sulfamethoxazole and naproxen), while others were only slightly affected (e.g. IBP and TCS) or even unaltered (e.g. AHTN and HHCB). The MCF-7 assay evidenced that estrogenicity removal was driven by temperature. The Ames test did not show point mutation in Salmonella typhimurium while the Comet test exhibited a genotoxic effect on human leukocytes attenuated by AD. This study highlights the importance of combining chemical analysis and biological activities in order to establish appropriate operational strategies for a safer disposal of sewage sludge. Actually, it was demonstrated that temperature has an insignificant effect on the disappearance of the parent compounds while it is crucial to decrease estrogenicity. PMID:27344252

  9. Simultaneous biological removal of phenol, sulfide, and nitrate using expanded granular sludge bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunshuang; Han, Kang; Lee, Duu-Jong; Wang, Qilin

    2016-05-01

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate, and phenol at loading rates of 600 g S/(m(3) day), 900 g N/(m(3) day), and 450 g C/(m(3) day), respectively, from synthetic wastewaters was achieved in an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor, whose rates are much higher than literature works and are considered feasible for handling high-strength petrochemical wastewaters without dilution. Effects of C/S ratio (2-2.5:1) on EGSB performance were noted insignificantly. The strains Bacillus sp., Thauera sp., and Pseudomonas sp. were the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Thiobacillus sp., Azoarcus sp., and Sulfurovum sp. were the autotrophic denitrifiers in the EGSB granules. The EGSB reactor experienced biological breakdown at loadings higher than 1200 g S/(m(3) day), 1800 g N/(m(3) day), and 900 g C/(m(3) day) by the following mechanism: high sulfide first inhibits heterotrophic denitrifies (Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas sp.), thereby accumulating nitrite in the system; then, the accumulated nitrite inhibits autotrophic denitrifiers (Thiobacillus sp., Azoarcus sp., and Sulfurovum sp.) to complete breakdown of the system. PMID:26762389

  10. The Microbial Database for Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal (MiDas-DK) - a tool for understanding activated sludge population dynamics and community stability.

    PubMed

    Mielczarek, A T; Saunders, A M; Larsen, P; Albertsen, M; Stevenson, M; Nielsen, J L; Nielsen, P H

    2013-01-01

    Since 2006 more than 50 Danish full-scale wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal have been investigated in a project called 'The Microbial Database for Danish Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment Plants with Nutrient Removal (MiDas-DK)'. Comprehensive sets of samples have been collected, analyzed and associated with extensive operational data from the plants. The community composition was analyzed by quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) supported by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and deep metagenomics. MiDas-DK has been a powerful tool to study the complex activated sludge ecosystems, and, besides many scientific articles on fundamental issues on mixed communities encompassing nitrifiers, denitrifiers, bacteria involved in P-removal, hydrolysis, fermentation, and foaming, the project has provided results that can be used to optimize the operation of full-scale plants and carry out trouble-shooting. A core microbial community has been defined comprising the majority of microorganisms present in the plants. Time series have been established, providing an overview of temporal variations in the different plants. Interestingly, although most microorganisms were present in all plants, there seemed to be plant-specific factors that controlled the population composition thereby keeping it unique in each plant over time. Statistical analyses of FISH and operational data revealed some correlations, but less than expected. MiDas-DK (www.midasdk.dk) will continue over the next years and we hope the approach can inspire others to make similar projects in other parts of the world to get a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities in wastewater engineering. PMID:23752384

  11. Recovery and removal of nutrients from swine wastewater by using a novel integrated reactor for struvite decomposition and recycling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiming; Xiao, Dean; Liu, Jiahui; Hou, Li; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, struvite decomposition was performed by air stripping for ammonia release and a novel integrated reactor was designed for the simultaneous removal and recovery of total ammonia-nitrogen (TAN) and total orthophosphate (PT) from swine wastewater by internal struvite recycling. Decomposition of struvite by air stripping was found to be feasible. Without supplementation with additional magnesium and phosphate sources, the removal ratio of TAN from synthetic wastewater was maintained at >80% by recycling of the struvite decomposition product formed under optimal conditions, six times. Continuous operation of the integrated reactor indicated that approximately 91% TAN and 97% PT in the swine wastewater could be removed and recovered by the proposed recycling process with the supplementation of bittern. Economic evaluation of the proposed system showed that struvite precipitation cost can be saved by approximately 54% by adopting the proposed recycling process in comparison with no recycling method. PMID:25960246

  12. Membrane bioreactor and nanofiltration hybrid system for reclamation of municipal wastewater: removal of nutrients, organic matter and micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Chon, Kangmin; KyongShon, Ho; Cho, Jaeweon

    2012-10-01

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR) and nanofiltration (NF) hybrid system was investigated to demonstrate the performance of treating nitrogen, phosphorus and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in municipal wastewater. With the MBR and NF (molecular weight cut off (MWCO): 210 Da), the concentration of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) was effectively reduced by nitrification by MBR and negatively charged surface of NF (TN: 8.67 mgN/L and TP: 0.46 mgP/L). Biosorption and microbial decomposition in MBR seem to be major removal mechanisms for the removal of PPCPs. Among various parameters affecting the removal of PPCPs by NF, namely, physicochemical properties of the PPCPs (charge characteristics, hydrophobicity and M(W)) and membranes (MWCO and surface charge), the MWCO effect was found to be the most critical aspect. PMID:22608290

  13. Recovery and removal of nutrients from swine wastewater by using a novel integrated reactor for struvite decomposition and recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiming; Xiao, Dean; Liu, Jiahui; Hou, Li; Ding, Li

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, struvite decomposition was performed by air stripping for ammonia release and a novel integrated reactor was designed for the simultaneous removal and recovery of total ammonia-nitrogen (TAN) and total orthophosphate (PT) from swine wastewater by internal struvite recycling. Decomposition of struvite by air stripping was found to be feasible. Without supplementation with additional magnesium and phosphate sources, the removal ratio of TAN from synthetic wastewater was maintained at >80% by recycling of the struvite decomposition product formed under optimal conditions, six times. Continuous operation of the integrated reactor indicated that approximately 91% TAN and 97% PT in the swine wastewater could be removed and recovered by the proposed recycling process with the supplementation of bittern. Economic evaluation of the proposed system showed that struvite precipitation cost can be saved by approximately 54% by adopting the proposed recycling process in comparison with no recycling method.

  14. The effect of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on nutrient removal in SBR with biomass adapted to dairy wastewater.

    PubMed

    Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Czaplicka, Kamila; Kłodowska, Izabella; Mielcarek, Artur

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of volatile fatty acids on nitrates and orthophosphate removal in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with activated sludge biomass adapted to process dairy wastewater. The research also determine whether it is the type of fatty acid applied that is responsible for the effectiveness of denitrification and dephosphatation at varying nitrate:orthophosphate ratios, or whether these processes are additionally affected by the presence of microorganisms that have adapted to the specific carbon composition of the wastewater being treated. At the beginning of an operating cycle SBRs were dosed with VFAs to provide a source of carbon. A comparative analysis was performed of nitrate and orthophosphate removal at initial nitrate concentrations of 1.22, 7.3 and 15.2 mgN(NO3)L⁻¹. Doses of fatty acids were approximately 10.5 mg⁻¹COD·mgP(PO4). They consisted of acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, isovaleric and caproic acids. Increases of nitrate concentration from 1.22 to 15.2 mg N(NO3)L⁻¹ were observed to reduce the quantity of removed orthophosphate depending on the fatty acid applied, from 7.2-9.2 mgP(PO4)L to 4.5 - 6.7 mgP(PO4)L. Every increase in the removed nitrates by 5.0 mgN(NO3)L⁻¹ was accompanied by a decrease in the removed orthophosphate of around 1 mgP(PO4)L⁻¹. The reactor containing acetic acid was found to remove the highest amount of orthophosphate irrespective of the nitrates concentration. Acids present in significant amount in dairy wastewaters (i.e. acetic, propionic and butyric) were more effective source of carbon in the denitrification process compared to low concentration acids. PMID:23445424

  15. The correlations between system treatment efficiencies and aboveground emergent macrophyte nutrient removal for the Hsin-Hai Bridge phase II constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chun-Han; Lee, Tsai-Ming; Chang, Fang-Chih; Liao, Shu-Ping

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the correlations between the system treatment efficiencies and total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) accumulations of aboveground tissues of the wetland macrophytes of Hsin-Hai Bridge phase II constructed wetland. Among 19 emergent macrophytes studied, the optimal TN contents, 3.82% and 3.52% (w/w) were found for water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) and Ludwigia x taiwanensis; while the optimal TP contents were found for the above two macrophytes at 0.64% and 0.83% (w/w). The accumulations of total plant TN and TP uptakes increased from 213 to 403 kg and 41 to 75 kg from March 2007 to the peak at September 2007, respectively. The TN ratios between plant tissue accumulations and the removals from the influents were 1.57%, 2.76%, 1.51% and 3.2% from March 2007 to March 2008. In the same period, the TP ratios between plant tissue accumulations and the removals from influents were 1.71%, 8.0%, 0.58% and 10.1%. The roles of the uptakes by aboveground portions of emergent macrophytes in system nutrient removals from the influents were more significant during growth seasons. PMID:21106369

  16. Evaluation of the treatment performance of lab-scaled vertical flow constructed wetlands in removal of organic compounds, color and nutrients in azo dye-containing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dogdu, Gamze; Yalcuk, Arda

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the treatment performance of vertical flow intermittent feeding constructed wetland (VFCW) in removal of organic pollution, nutrients and color in azo-dye containing wastewater. The systems consisted of PVC reactors, some filling materials such as gravel, sand and zeolite and wetland plants including Typha angustifolia and Canna indica. The average treatment efficiency of the systems for COD, color, sulphate, NH4-N, and PO4-P were in the range of 57-63%, 94-99%, 44-48%, 39-44%, and 84-88%, respectively among the VFCW reactors. It is concluded that VFCW reactor system can effectively be used in the treatment of dye-rich wastewater, especially for the removal of color and in the reduction of COD. Biofilm formation and cleavage of azo bonds could be observed by SEM and FTIR results, respectively. Almost similar NH4-N and PO4-P removal were obtained in all reactors by using same amount of zeolite media. PMID:26248021

  17. Relations of biological indicators to nutrient data for lakes and streams in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, 1990-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brightbill, Robin A.; Koerkle, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    The Clean Water Action Plan of 1998 provides a blueprint for federal agencies to work with states, tribes, and other stakeholders to protect and restore the Nation?s water resources. The plan includes an initiative that addresses the nutrientenrichment problem of lakes and streams across the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is working to set nutrient criteria by nationwide nutrient ecoregions that are an aggregation of the Omernik level III ecoregions.Because low levels of nutrients are necessary for healthy streams and elevated concentrations can cause algal blooms that deplete available oxygen and kill off aquatic organisms, criteria levels are to be set, in part, using the relation between chlorophyll a and concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus. Data from Pennsylvania and West Virginia, collected between 1990 and 1998, were analyzed for relations between chlorophyll a, nutrients, and other explanatory variables. Both phytoplankton and periphyton chlorophyll a concentrations from lakes and streams were analyzed separately within each of the USEPA nutrient ecoregions located within the boundaries of the two states. These four nutrient ecoregions are VII (Mostly Glaciated Dairy), VIII (Nutrient Poor, Largely Glaciated Upper Midwest and Northeast), IX (Southeastern Temperate Forested Plains and Hills), and XI (Central and Eastern Forested Uplands).ytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations in lakes were related to total nitrogen, total phosphorus, Secchi depth, concentration of dissolved oxygen, pH, water temperature, and specific conductivity. In nutrient ecoregion VII, nutrients were not significant predictors of chlorophyll a concentrations. Total nitrogen, Secchi depth, and pH were significantly related to phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations in nutrient ecoregion IX. Lake periphyton chlorophyll a concentrations from nutrient ecoregion XI were related to total phosphorus rather than total nitrogen, Secchi depth

  18. Environmental and Biological Data of the Nutrient Enrichment Effects on Stream Ecosystems Project of the National Water Quality Assessment Program, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brightbill, Robin A.; Munn, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    In 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began the process of developing regional nutrient criteria for streams and rivers. In response to concerns about nutrients by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and others, the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program began studying the effects of nutrient enrichment on agricultural stream ecosystems to aid in the understanding of how nutrients affect the biota in agricultural streams. Streams within five study areas were sampled either in 2003 or 2004. These five study areas were located within six NAWQA study units: the combined Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin (ACFB) and Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain Drainages (GAFL), Central Columbia Plateau?Yakima River Basin (CCYK), Central Nebraska Basins (CNBR), Potomac River?Delmarva Peninsula (PODL), and the White-Miami River Basin (WHMI). Data collected included nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorous) and other chemical parameters, biological samples (chlorophyll, algal assemblages, invertebrate assemblages, and some fish assemblages), stream habitat, and riparian and basin information. This report describes and presents the data collected from these study areas.

  19. Nutrients removal and lipids production by Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation using anaerobic digested starch wastewater and alcohol wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Libin; Tan, Xiaobo; Li, Deyi; Chu, Huaqiang; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei; Yu, Hong

    2015-04-01

    The cultivation of microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) using anaerobic digested starch wastewater (ADSW) and alcohol wastewater (AW) was evaluated in this study. Different proportions of mixed wastewater (AW/ADSW=0.176:1, 0.053:1, 0.026:1, v/v) and pure ADSW, AW were used for C. pyrenoidosa cultivation. The different proportions between ADSW and AW significantly influenced biomass growth, lipids production and pollutants removal. The best performance was achieved using mixed wastewater (AW/ADSW=0.053:1, v/v), leading to a maximal total biomass of 3.01±0.15 g/L (dry weight), lipids productivity of 127.71±6.31 mg/L/d and pollutants removal of COD=75.78±3.76%, TN=91.64±4.58% and TP=90.74±4.62%. PMID:25638404

  20. Growth and nutrient removal properties of the diatoms, Chaetoceros curvisetus and C. simplex under different nitrogen sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, Panneerselvam; Manimaran, Kuppusamy; Sampathkumar, Pitchai; Rameshkumar, Lakshmanan

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the suitability of the marine diatoms, Chaetoceros curvisetus and C. simplex for the removal of macronutrients from different wastewater, the growth and nitrate-phosphate removal properties were studied with nitrate, ammonium and urea nitrogen sources. Three separate experiments were conducted using modified F/2 medium with 12.35 mg L-1 total nitrogen and 1.12 mg L-1 total phosphorous (simulating the typical concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in secondary effluent) as growth medium. The maximum cell densities of C. curvisetus and C. simplex were 7.16 ± 0.34 × 104 cells mL-1 in {{NO}}3^{ - } and 3.88 ± 0.32 × 105 cells mL-1 in urea, respectively. The maximum chlorophyll a per cell was 1.7 and 4.7 pg for C. simplex and C. curvisetus, cultured with urea and nitrate, respectively. The high protein contents of 4.7 pg cell-1 in C. simplex with urea and 19.7 pg cell-1 in C. curvisetus nitrate nitrogen sources were found. The higher cell density and protein content of both species from urea and nitrate nitrogen sources ( p < 0.05) have shown that these were utilized by microalgae and were converted to protein. The C. simplex and C. curvisetus showed maximum removal efficiencies of nitrate by 97.86 and 91.62 % and phosphate by 98.5 and 100 %, respectively when urea used as nitrogen source than ammonia. The results indicated the C. simplex was more efficient than C. curvisetus and suitable for the removal of macronutrients when cultured with urea and nitrate nitrogen sources.

  1. Biological nitrogen removal from plating wastewater by submerged membrane bioreactor packed with granular sulfur.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jinyoung; Hwang, Yongwoo; Kim, Junbeum; Kwak, Inho

    2016-01-01

    Recent toughened water quality standards have necessitated improvements for existing sewer treatment facilities through advanced treatment processes. Therefore, an advanced treatment process that can be installed through simple modification of existing sewer treatment facilities needs to be developed. In this study, a new submerged membrane bioreactor process packed with granular sulfur (MBR-GS) was developed and operated to determine the biological nitrogen removal behaviors of plating wastewater containing a high concentration of NO3(-). Continuous denitrification was carried out at various nitrogen loading rates at 20 °C using synthetic wastewater, which was comprised of NO3(-) and HCO3(-), and actual plating wastewater, which was collected from the effluent water of a plating company called 'H Metals'. High-rate denitrification in synthetic plating wastewater was accomplished at 0.8 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)·day at a nitrogen loading rate of 0.9 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)·day. The denitrification rate further increased in actual plating wastewater to 0.91 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)·day at a nitrogen loading rate of 1.11 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)·day. Continuous filtration was maintained for up to 30 days without chemical cleaning with a transmembrane pressure in the range of 20 cmHg. Based on stoichiometry, SO4(2-) production and alkalinity consumption could be calculated theoretically. Experimental alkalinity consumption was lower than the theoretical value. This newly proposed MBR-GS process, capable of high-rate nitrogen removal by compulsive flux, is expected to be applicable as an alternative renovation technique for nitrogen treatment of plating wastewater as well as municipal wastewater with a low C/N ratio. PMID:27533855

  2. The effect of amino acids on lipid production and nutrient removal by Rhodotorula glutinis cultivation in starch wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the components of amino acids in mixed starch wastewater (corn steep water/corn gluten water=1/3, v/v) were analyzed by GC-MS. Effects of amino acids on lipid production by Rhodotorula glutinis and COD removal were studied. The results showed that mixed starch wastewater contained 9 kinds of amino acids and these amino acids significantly improved the biomass (13.63g/L), lipid yield (2.48g/L) and COD removal compared to the basic medium (6.23g/L and 1.56g/L). In a 5L fermentor containing mixed starch wastewater as substrate to culture R. glutinis, the maximum biomass, lipid content and lipid yield reached 26.38g/L, 28.90% and 7.62g/L, with the associated removal rates of COD, TN and TP reaching 77.41%, 69.12% and 73.85%, respectively. The results revealed a promising approach for lipid production with using amino acids present in starch wastewater as an alternative nitrogen source. PMID:27420158

  3. Dissolved Nutrient Retention Dynamics in River Networks: A Modeling Investigation of Transient Flow and Scale Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Sheng; Covino, Timothy P.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Basu, Nandita; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Shaowen

    2012-06-30

    In this paper, we use a dynamic network flow model, coupled with a transient storage zone biogeochemical model, to simulate dissolved nutrient removal processes at the channel network scale. We have explored several scenarios in respect of the combination of rainfall variability, and the biological and geomorphic characteristics of the catchment, to understand the dominant controls on removal and delivery of dissolved nutrients (e.g., nitrate). These model-based theoretical analyses suggested that while nutrient removal efficiency is lower during flood events compared to during baseflow periods, flood events contribute significantly to bulk nutrient removal, whereas bulk removal during baseflow periods is less. This is due to the fact that nutrient supply is larger during flood events; this trend is even stronger in large rivers. However, the efficiency of removal during both periods decreases in larger rivers, however, due to (i) increasing flow velocities and thus decreasing residence time, and (ii) increasing flow depth, and thus decreasing nutrient uptake rates. Besides nutrient removal processes can be divided into two parts: in the main channel and in the hyporheic transient storage zone. When assessing their relative contributions the size of the transient storage zone is a dominant control, followed by uptake rates in the main channel and in the transient storage zone. Increasing size of the transient storage zone with downstream distance affects the relative contributions to nutrient removal of the water column and the transient storage zone, which also impacts the way nutrient removal rates scale with increasing size of rivers. Intra-annual hydrologic variability has a significant impact on removal rates at all scales: the more variable the streamflow is, compared to mean discharge, the less nutrient is removed in the channel network. A scale-independent first order uptake coefficient, ke, estimated from model simulations, is highly dependent on the

  4. Development of peptoid-based ligands for the removal of cadmium from biological media

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Abigail S.; Zhou, Effie Y.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-05-14

    Cadmium poisoning poses a serious health concern due to cadmium's increasing industrial use, yet there is currently no recommended treatment. The selective coordination of cadmium in a biological environment—i.e. in the presence of serum ions, small molecules, and proteins—is a difficult task. To address this challenge, a combinatorial library of peptoid-based ligands has been evaluated to identify structures that selectively bind to cadmium in human serum with minimal chelation of essential metal ions. Eighteen unique ligands were identified in this screening procedure, and the binding affinity of each was measured using metal titrations monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy. To evaluate the significance of each chelating moiety, sequence rearrangements and substitutions were examined. Analysis of a metal–ligand complex by NMR spectroscopy highlighted the importance of particular residues. Depletion experiments were performed in serum mimetics and human serum with exogenously added cadmium. These depletion experiments were used to compare and demonstrate the ability of these peptoids to remove cadmium from blood-like mixtures. In one of these depletion experiments, the peptoid sequence was able to deplete the cadmium to a level comparable to the reported acute toxicity limit. Evaluation of the metal selectivity in buffered solution and in human serum was performed to verify minimal off-target binding. These studies highlight a screening platform for the identification of metal–ligands that are capable of binding in a complex environment. They additionally demonstrate the potential utility of biologically-compatible ligands for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning.

  5. Development of peptoid-based ligands for the removal of cadmium from biological media

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knight, Abigail S.; Zhou, Effie Y.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-05-14

    Cadmium poisoning poses a serious health concern due to cadmium's increasing industrial use, yet there is currently no recommended treatment. The selective coordination of cadmium in a biological environment—i.e. in the presence of serum ions, small molecules, and proteins—is a difficult task. To address this challenge, a combinatorial library of peptoid-based ligands has been evaluated to identify structures that selectively bind to cadmium in human serum with minimal chelation of essential metal ions. Eighteen unique ligands were identified in this screening procedure, and the binding affinity of each was measured using metal titrations monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy. To evaluate themore » significance of each chelating moiety, sequence rearrangements and substitutions were examined. Analysis of a metal–ligand complex by NMR spectroscopy highlighted the importance of particular residues. Depletion experiments were performed in serum mimetics and human serum with exogenously added cadmium. These depletion experiments were used to compare and demonstrate the ability of these peptoids to remove cadmium from blood-like mixtures. In one of these depletion experiments, the peptoid sequence was able to deplete the cadmium to a level comparable to the reported acute toxicity limit. Evaluation of the metal selectivity in buffered solution and in human serum was performed to verify minimal off-target binding. These studies highlight a screening platform for the identification of metal–ligands that are capable of binding in a complex environment. They additionally demonstrate the potential utility of biologically-compatible ligands for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning.« less

  6. Development of Peptoid-Based Ligands for the Removal of Cadmium from Biological Media

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Abigail S.; Zhou, Effie Y.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium poisoning poses a serious health concern due to cadmium’s increasing industrial use, yet there is currently no recommended treatment. The selective coordination of cadmium in a biological environment—i.e. in the presence of serum ions, small molecules, and proteins—is a difficult task. To address this challenge, a combinatorial library of peptoid-based ligands has been evaluated to identify structures that selectively bind to cadmium in human serum with minimal chelation of essential metal ions. Eighteen unique ligands were identified in this screening procedure, and the binding affinity of each was measured using metal titrations monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy. To evaluate the significance of each chelating moiety, sequence rearrangements and substitutions were examined. Analysis of a metal-ligand complex by NMR spectroscopy highlighted the importance of particular residues. Depletion experiments were performed in serum mimetics and human serum with exogenously added cadmium. These depletion experiments were used to compare and demonstrate the ability of these peptoids to remove cadmium from blood-like mixtures. In one of these depletion experiments, the peptoid sequence was able to deplete the cadmium to a level comparable to the reported acute toxicity limit. Evaluation of the metal selectivity in buffered solution and in human serum was performed to verify minimal off-target binding. These studies highlight a screening platform for of the identification of metal-ligands that are capable of binding in a complex environment. They additionally demonstrate the potential utility of biologically-compatible ligands for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. PMID:26918113

  7. Summer nutrient dynamics and biological carbon uptake rate in the Changjiang River plume inferred using a three end-member mixing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kui; Chen, Jianfang; Jin, Haiyan; Li, Hongliang; Gao, Shengquan; Xu, Jie; Lu, Yong; Huang, Daji; Hao, Qiang; Weng, Huanxin

    2014-12-01

    A three end-member (Changjiang River Plume, CRP; Outer-shelf Surface Water, OSW; and Outer-shelf Deep Water, ODW) mixing model based on quasi-conservative temperature and salinity was adopted to identify the relative contribution of different water masses to nutrient inventory and to estimate biological nutrient uptake in the plume-impacted area by considering the difference between the model-predicted and ambient concentration of nutrients up to a depth of PZD10 (photic zone depth to 10% of surface photosynthetically active radiance (PAR)). The end-member composite suggested that the mixing of CRP and OSW was the main process regulating nutrient dynamics and phytoplankton growth, while the correlation of ODW with ΔP indicated that the outcropped upwelling water contributed to the replenishment of P leading to Chl a accumulation to some extent. The ratio ΔDIN:ΔP:ΔSi:excess O2 in the euphotic zone where excess O2>10 μmol L-1 was estimated to be 28±9:1:33±13:145±71. A simple box model was used to evaluate biological carbon uptake rate in the euphotic zone based on nutrient deviation, Redfield ratio (6.6 C:1 DIN), and residence time of nutrients, assuming that the Changjiang River was the unique source of nutrients in the quasi-static box. The biological carbon uptake rates derived from the DIN, P and Si deviation were 465, 344, and 626 mg C m-2 d-1, respectively; these values were comparable to the POC flux (486±275 mg C m-2 d-1) derived from sediment trap. This finding suggested that the Changjiang River Plume was responsible for phytoplankton growth and subsequent high POC flux out of the euphotic zone. Furthermore, the community respiration rate was estimated to be 634 mg C m-2 d-1 based on the integrated 14C-based gross primary production of 1260 mg C m-2 d-1 and the net community production of 626 mg C m-2 d-1 in the euphotic zone of the region.

  8. Effects of injection of acetic acid and propionic acid for total phosphorus removal at high temperature in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process.

    PubMed

    Ki, C Y; Kwon, K H; Kim, S W; Min, K S; Lee, T U; Park, D J

    2014-01-01

    In summer, wastewater treatment plant total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency is low in South Korea. The reason is because of high temperatures or significant fluctuation of inflow characteristics caused by frequent rainfall. Hence, this study tried to raise TP removal efficiency by injecting fixed external carbon sources in real sewage. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) compete to occupy microorganisms at high temperature. Propionate is known to restrain GAOs. Thus, acetate and propionate were chosen as the external carbon source in this study to find out the suitable volume and ratio of carbon source which ensured the dominance of PAOs. An external carbon source was supplied in the anaerobic reactor of the biological phosphorus removal process at high temperature (above 25 °C). TP removal efficiency was improved by injecting an external carbon source compared to that without an external carbon source. Also, it remained relatively stable when injecting an external carbon source, despite the variation in temperature. TP removal efficiency was the highest when injecting acetate and propionate in the proportion of 2:1 (total concentration as chemical oxygen demand (COD) is 12 mg/L in influent). PMID:24845316

  9. Effects of operation parameters on nutrient removal from wastewater and high-protein biomass production in a duckweed-based (Lemma aequinoctialis) pilot-scale system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yonggui; Fang, Yang; Jin, Yanling; Huang, Jun; Bao, Shu; He, Zhiming; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Hai

    2014-01-01

    The effects of water depth, coverage rate and harvest regime on nutrient removal from wastewater and high-protein biomass production were assessed in a duckweed-based (Lemna aequinoctialis) pilot-scale wastewater treatment system (10 basins × 12 m(2)) that is located near Dianchi Lake in China. The results indicated that a water depth of 50 cm, a coverage rate of 150% and a harvest regime of 4 days were preferable conditions, under which excellent records of high-protein duckweed (dry matter production of 6.65 g/m(2)/d with crude protein content of 36.16% and phosphorus content of 1.46%) were obtained at a temperature of 12-21 °C. At the same time, the system achieved a removal efficiency of 66.16, 23.1, 48.3 and 76.52% for NH4(+)-N, TN, TP and turbidity, respectively, with the considerable removal rate of 0.465 g/m(2)/d for TN and 0.134 g/m(2)/d for TP at a hydraulic retention time of 6 days. In additionally, it was found that a lower duckweed density could lead to higher dissolved oxygen in the water and then a higher removal percentage of NH4(+)-N by nitrobacteria. This study obtains the preferable operation conditions for wastewater treatment and high-protein biomass production in a duckweed-based pilot-scale system, supplying an important reference for further large-scale applications of duckweed. PMID:25325544

  10. Biological potential of extraterrestrial materials. 2. Microbial and plant responses to nutrients in the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mautner, M. N.; Conner, A. J.; Killham, K.; Deamer, D. W.

    1997-01-01

    Meteoritic materials are investigated as potential early planetary nutrients. Aqueous extracts of the Murchison C2 carbonaceous meteorite are utilized as a sole carbon source by microorganisms, as demonstrated by the genetically modified Pseudomonas fluorescence equipped with the lux gene. Nutrient effects are observed also with the soil microorganisms Nocardia asteroides and Arthrobacter pascens that reach populations up to 5 x 10(7) CFU/ml in meteorite extracts, similar to populations in terrestrial soil extracts. Plant tissue cultures of Asparagus officinalis and Solanum tuberosum (potato) exhibit enhanced pigmentation and some enhanced growth when meteorite extracts are added to partial nutrient media, but inhibited growth when added to full nutrient solution. The meteorite extracts lead to large increases in S, Ca, Mg, and Fe plant tissue contents as shown by X-ray fluorescence, while P, K, and Cl contents show mixed effects. In both microbiological and plant tissue experiments, the nutrient and inhibitory effects appear to be best balanced for growth at about 1:20 (extracted solid : H2O) ratios. The results suggest that solutions in cavities in meteorites can provide efficient concentrated biogenic and early nutrient environments, including high phosphate levels, which may be the limiting nutrient. The results also suggest that carbonaceous asteroid resources can sustain soil microbial activity and provide essential macronutrients for future space-based ecosystems.

  11. Project summary: Emerging technology assessment of phostrip, a/o, and bardenpho processes for biological phosphorus removal

    SciTech Connect

    1985-03-01

    This technology assessment addresses the process capabilities and limitations of three proprietary processes (PhoStrip, A/O, and Bardenpho) to biologically remove phosphorus from municipal wastewaters. The primary objective of this report is to provide guidance to individuals involved with reviewing new processes as part of the Innovative and Alternative Technology Program.

  12. Monitoring intracellular polyphosphate accumulation in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems by quantitative image analysis.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Daniela P; Amaral, A Luís; Leal, Cristiano; Carvalheira, Mónica; Cunha, Jorge R; Oehmen, Adrian; Reis, Maria A M; Ferreira, Eugénio C

    2014-01-01

    A rapid methodology for intracellular storage polyphosphate (poly-P) identification and monitoring in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems is proposed based on quantitative image analysis (QIA). In EBPR systems, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) is usually combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to evaluate the microbial community. The proposed monitoring technique is based on a QIA procedure specifically developed for determining poly-P inclusions within a biomass suspension using solely DAPI by epifluorescence microscopy. Due to contradictory literature regarding DAPI concentrations used for poly-P detection, the present work assessed the optimal DAPI concentration for samples acquired at the end of the EBPR aerobic stage when the accumulation occurred. Digital images were then acquired and processed by means of image processing and analysis. A correlation was found between average poly-P intensity values and the analytical determination. The proposed methodology can be seen as a promising alternative procedure for quantifying intracellular poly-P accumulation in a faster and less labour-intensive way. PMID:24901627

  13. Genome reconstruction and gene expression of "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" Clade IB performing biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yanping; Yu, Ke; Xia, Yu; Chao, Yuanqing; Zhang, Tong

    2014-09-01

    We report the first integrated metatranscriptomic and metagenomic analysis of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) sludge. A draft genome of Candidatus Accumulibacter spp. strain HKU-1, a member of Clade IB, was retrieved. It was estimated to be ∼90% complete and shared average nucleotide identities of 83% and 88% with the finished genome CAP IIA UW-1 and the draft genome CAP IA UW-2, respectively. Different from CAP IIA UW-1, the phosphotransferase (pap) in polyphosphate metabolism and V-ATPase in orthophosphate transport were absent from CAP IB HKU-1. Additionally, unlike CAP IA UW-2, CAP IB HKU-1 carried the genes for carbon fixation and nitrogen fixation. Despite these differences, the key genes required for acetate uptake, glycolysis and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis were conserved in all these Accumulibacter genomes. The preliminary metatranscriptomic results revealed that the most significantly up-regulated genes of CAP IB HKU-1 from the anaerobic to the aerobic phase were responsible for assimilatory sulfate reduction, genetic information processing and phosphorus absorption, while the down-regulated genes were related to N2O reduction, PHA synthesis and acetyl-CoA formation. This study yielded another important Accumulibacter genome, revealed the functional difference within the Accumulibacter Type I, and uncovered the genetic responses to EBPR stimuli at a higher resolution. PMID:25089581

  14. Understanding the role of extracellular polymeric substances in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal granular sludge system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Randeng; Peng, Yongzhen; Cheng, Zhanli; Ren, Nanqi

    2014-10-01

    The role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process was investigated in a P-accumulating granular sludge system by analyzing the distribution and transfer of P, K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) in the sludge phase, EPS, and the bulk liquid. In the sludge phase, about 30% P, 44.7% K(+), 27.7% Mg(2+), 28% Ca(2+) accumulated in the EPS at the end of aeration. The rate of P, K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) released from the EPS matrix into the bulk liquid in the anaerobic phase was faster than the rate they were adsorbed from the bulk liquid into the EPS in the aerobic phase. P, K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) were retained in EPS before transferring into the phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs). These results suggest that EPS play a critical role in facilitating the accumulation and transfer of P, K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) between PAO cells and bulk liquid. PMID:25063972

  15. Phenol removal from waste gases with a biological filter by Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Zilli, M.; Coverti, A.; Lodi, A.; Del Borghi, M.; Ferraiolo, G. )

    1993-03-25

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of biologically removing phenol from waste gases by means of a biofilter using a Pseudomonas putida strain. Two series of both batch and continuous test have been performed in order to ascertain the microbial degradation of phenol. For the preliminary batch tests, carried out in order to test the effective feasibility of the process and to investigate their kinetic behavior, two different microbial cultures belonging to the Pseudomonas genus have been employed, a heterogeneous culture and a pure strain of P. putida. The results of these comparative investigations showed that the pure culture is more efficient than the mixed one, even when the latter has undergone three successive acclimatization test. The continuous experiments have been conducted during a period of about 1 year in a laboratory-scale column, packed with a mixture of peat and glass beads, and utilizing the pure culture of P. putida as microflora and varying the inlet phenol concentration from 50 up to 2,000 mg m[sup [minus]3]. The results obtained show that high degrees of conversion can be obtained (0.93/0.996) operating at a residence time of 54 s.

  16. Removal of Penicillin G and Erythromycin with Ionizing Radiation Followed by Biological Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Issam; Mezni, Mohamed; Boulila, Abdennacer; Hamdi, Mokhtar; Saidi, Mouldi

    2016-10-01

    The decomposition of penicillin G and erythromycin antibiotics at concentration of 0.2 mg ml(-1) by gamma irradiation at 50 kGy followed by biological treatment with Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 was evaluated. Degradation of penicillin G and erythromycin was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance analysis (NMR), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and chemical oxygen demand (COD). The exposure to the absorbed dose of 50 kGy caused degradation of penicillin G and erythromycin in the aqueous solution. The complete disappearance of NMR and FTIR peaks following irradiation confirmed the breakage of the β-lactam ring in penicillin G, and the decarboxylation and cleavage of the thiazolidine ring and for erythromycin, the complete destruction of the three aromatic rings. Irradiation alone removed 52.8 and 65.5 % of penicillin G and erythromycin, respectively. Further reduction to 12.6 and 14 % of the original penicillin G and erythromycin COD, respectively, was achieved using treatment of the irradiation products with C. metallidurans. PMID:27447798

  17. Continuous biological waste gas treatment in stirred trickle-bed reactor with discontinuous removal of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Laurenzis, A.; Heits, H.; Wuebker, S.M.; Heinze, U.; Friedrich, C.; Werner, U.

    1998-02-20

    A new reactor for biological waste gas treatment was developed to eliminate continuous solvents from waste gases. A trickle-bed reactor was chosen with discontinuous movement of the packed bed and intermittent percolation. The reactor was operated with toluene as the solvent and an optimum average biomass concentration of between 5 and 30 kg dry cell weight per cubic meter packed bed (m{sub pb}{sup 3}). This biomass concentration resulted in a high volumetric degradation rate. Reduction of surplus biomass by stirring and trickling caused a prolonged service life and prevented clogging of the trickle bed and a pressure drop increase. The pressure drop after biomass reduction was almost identical to the theoretical pressure drop as calculated for the irregular packed bed without biomass. The reduction in biomass and intermittent percolation of mineral medium resulted in high volumetric degradation rates of about 100 g of toluene m{sub pb}{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1} at a load of 150 g of toluene m{sub pb}{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1}. Such a removal rate with a trickle-bed reactor was not reported before.

  18. Efficiency of biological activator formulated material (BAFM) for volatile organic compounds removal--preliminary batch culture tests with activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Corre, Charline; Couriol, Catherine; Amrane, Abdeltif; Dumont, Eric; Andrès, Yves; Le Cloirec, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    During biological degradation, such as biofiltration of air loaded with volatile organic compounds, the pollutant is passed through a bed packed with a solid medium acting as a biofilm support. To improve microorganism nutritional equilibrium and hence to enhance the purification capacities, a Biological Activator Formulated Material (BAFM) was developed, which is a mixture of solid nutrients dissolving slowly in a liquid phase. This solid was previously validated on mineral pollutants: ammonia and hydrogen sulphide. To evaluate the efficiency of such a material for biodegradation of some organic compounds, a simple experiment using an activated sludge batch reactor was carried out. The pollutants (sodium benzoate, phenol, p-nitrophenol and 2-4-dichlorophenol) were in the concentration range 100 to 1200 mg L(-1). The positive impact of the formulated material was shown. The improvement of the degradation rates was in the range 10-30%. This was the consequence of the low dissolution of the nutrients incorporated during material formulation, followed by their consumption by the biomass, as shown for urea used as a nitrogen source. Owing to its twofold interest (mechanical resistance and nutritional supplementation), the Biological Activator Formulated Material seems to be a promising material. Its addition to organic or inorganic supports should be investigated to confirm its relevance for implementation in biofilters. PMID:22988627

  19. Comparative assessment of phthalate removal and risk in biological wastewater treatment systems of developing countries and small communities.

    PubMed

    Gani, Khalid Muzamil; Kazmi, Absar Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Phthalates are widely used in plastic and personnel care products. Being non-steroid endocrine disrupting compounds, their exposure have toxic effects on aquatic life and human health. The aim of this study was a comparative assessment of their fate and risk in full scale wastewater treatment along with influence of seasonal variations. Four priority phthalates, Diethylphthalate (DEP), Dibutylphthalate (DBP), Benzylbutyl phthalate (BBP) and Diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were chosen for this study and wastewater treatment plants investigated were designed as nutrient removal based sequencing batch reactor (SBR), conventional activated sludge process (ASP) and up flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) with polishing pond. Results showed that the main removal mechanism of phthalates was biotransformation with removal contribution of 74% in SBR, 65% in conventional ASP and 37% in UASB. Overall removal of phthalates was maximum in the treatment combination of UASB and pond (83%) followed by SBR (80%) and conventional ASP (74%). Seasonal influences on occurrence, removal and risk of these phthalates were also studied. The concentration of DEP, DBP and DEHP in untreated wastewater increased by 2, 7 and 2μg/L, respectively in summer. However in sludge, only large molecular weight phthalates BBP and DEHP increased in winter by 3mg/kg and 12mg/kg, respectively. Seasonal variations in removal of phthalates were discrepant in each process with better removal during summer. Risk assessment of phthalates to aquatic life showed that there is no potential risk of DEP, DBP and BBP from effluents of treatment plants however risk quotient of DEHP was in the range of 27-73 in both seasons which indicate probable risk to aquatic organisms. Phthalate risk to human beings estimated by daily intake of phthalates was in the range of 0.3±0.1 to 20±0.7ng/kg/d and far below their respective reference dosages, demonstrating the potential of these treatment plants to reduce the risk of

  20. Simultaneous nutrient removal, optimised CO2 mitigation and biofuel feedstock production by Chlorogonium sp. grown in secondary treated non-sterile saline sewage effluent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan Yin; Ng, Tsz Wai; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Kwan, Ka Ki; Chan, King Ming; Huang, Guocheng; Yip, Ho Yin; Wong, Po Keung

    2015-10-30

    The phycoremediation process has great potential for effectively addressing environmental pollution. To explore the capabilities of simultaneous algal nutrient removal, CO2 mitigation and biofuel feedstock production from spent water resources, a Chlorogonium sp. isolated from a tilapia pond in Hong Kong was grown in non-sterile saline sewage effluent for a bioremediation study. With high removal efficiencies of NH3-N (88.35±14.39%), NO3(-)-N (85.39±14.96%), TN (93.34±6.47%) and PO4(3-)-P (91.80±17.44%), Chlorogonium sp. achieved a CO2 consumption rate of 58.96 mg L(-1) d(-1), which was optimised by the response surface methodology. Under optimised conditions, the lipid content of the algal biomass reached 24.26±2.67%. Overall, the isolated Chlorogonium sp. showed promising potential in the simultaneous purification of saline sewage effluent in terms of tertiary treatment and CO2 sequestration while delivering feedstock for potential biofuel production in a waste-recycling manner. PMID:25967099

  1. Equatorial Pacific peak in biological production regulated by nutrient and upwelling during the late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etourneau, J.; Robinson, R. S.; Martinez, P.; Schneider, R.

    2013-03-01

    The largest increase in export production in the eastern Pacific of the last 5.3 Myr (million years) occurred between 2.2 and 1.6 Myr, a time of major climatic and oceanographic reorganization in the region. Here, we investigate the causes of this event using reconstructions of export production, nutrient supply and oceanic conditions across the Pliocene-Pleistocene in the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) for the last 3.2 Myr. Our results indicate that the export production peak corresponds to a cold interval marked by high nutrient supply relative to consumption, as revealed by the low bulk sedimentary 15N/14N (δ15N) and alkenone-derived sea surface temperature (SST) values. This ~ 0.6 million years long episode of enhanced delivery of nutrients to the surface of the EEP was predominantly initiated through the upwelling of nutrient-enriched water sourced in high latitudes. In addition, this phenomenon was likely promoted by the regional intensification of upwelling in response to the development of intense Walker and Hadley atmospheric circulations. Increased nutrient consumption in the polar oceans and enhanced denitrification in the equatorial regions restrained nutrient supply and availability and terminated the high export production event.

  2. Equatorial Pacific peak in biological production regulated by nutrient and upwelling during the late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etourneau, J.; Robinson, R. S.; Martinez, P.; Schneider, R.

    2013-08-01

    The largest increase in export production in the eastern Pacific of the last 5.3 Myr (million years) occurred between 2.2 and 1.6 Myr, a time of major climatic and oceanographic reorganization in the region. Here, we investigate the causes of this event using reconstructions of export production, nutrient supply and oceanic conditions across the Pliocene-Pleistocene in the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) for the last 3.2 Myr. Our results indicate that the export production peak corresponds to a cold interval marked by high nutrient supply relative to consumption, as revealed by the low bulk sedimentary 15N/14N (δ15N) and alkenone-derived sea surface temperature (SST) values. This ∼0.6 million year long episode of enhanced delivery of nutrients to the surface of the EEP was predominantly initiated through the upwelling of nutrient-enriched water sourced in high latitudes. In addition, this phenomenon was likely promoted by the regional intensification of upwelling in response to the development of intense Walker and Hadley atmospheric circulations. Increased nutrient consumption in the polar oceans and enhanced denitrification in the equatorial regions restrained nutrient supply and availability and terminated the high export production event.

  3. A novel approach for phosphorus recovery and no wasted sludge in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process with external COD addition.

    PubMed

    Xia, Cheng-Wang; Ma, Yun-Jie; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J

    2014-01-01

    In enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process, phosphorus (P) in wastewater is removed via wasted sludge without actual recovery. A novel approach to realize phosphorus recovery with special external chemical oxygen demand (COD) addition in EBPR process was proposed. During the new operating approach period, it was found that (1) no phosphorus was detected in the effluent; (2) with an external addition of 10 % of influent COD amount, 79 % phosphorus in the wastewater influent was recovered; (3) without wasted sludge, the MLVSS concentration in the system increased from 2,010 to 3,400 mg/L and kept stable after day 11 during 24-day operating period. This demonstrates that the novel approach is feasible to realize phosphorus recovery with no wasted sludge discharge in EBPR process. Furthermore, this approach decouples P removal and sludge age, which may enhance the application of membrane bioreactor for P removal. PMID:24122666

  4. Ammonium removal of drinking water at low temperature by activated carbon filter biologically enhanced with heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wen; Li, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Duo-Ying; Huang, Xiao-Fei; Song, Yang

    2016-03-01

    We sought to confirm whether use of Acinetobacter strains Y7 and Y16, both strains of heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria, was practical for removing ammonium (NH4 (+)-N) from drinking water at low temperatures. To test this, ammonium-containing drinking water was treated with strains Y7 and Y16 at 8 and 2 °C. Continuous ammonium treatment was conducted in order to evaluate the performance of three biologically enhanced activated carbon (BEAC) filters in removing ammonium. The three BEAC filters were inoculated with strain Y7, strain Y16, and a mixture of strains Y7 and Y16, respectively. A granular activated carbon (GAC) filter, without inoculation by any strains, was tested in parallel with the BEAC filters as control. The results indicated that NH4 (+)-N removal was significant when a BEAC filter was inoculated with the mixture of strains Y7 and Y16 (BEAC-III filter). Amounts of 0.44 ± 0.05 and 0.25 ± 0.05 mg L(-1) NH4 (+)-N were removed using the BEAC-III filter at 8 and 2 °C, respectively. These values were 2.8-4.0-fold higher than the values of ammonium removal acquired using the GAC filter. The synergistic effect of using strains Y7 and Y16 in concert was the cause of the high-ammonium removal efficiency achieved by using the BEAC-III filter at low temperatures. In addition, a high C/N ratio may promote NH4 (+)-N removal efficiency by improving biomass and microbial activity. This study provides new insight into the use of biofilters to achieve biological removal of ammonium at low temperature. PMID:26527340

  5. The potential role of 'Candidatus Microthrix parvicella' in phosphorus removal during sludge bulking in two full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Qi, Rong; Liu, Miaomiao; Li, Qian; Bao, Haipeng; Li, Yaming; Wang, Shen; Tandoi, Valter; Yang, Min

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the bacterial community compositions and phosphorus removal performance under sludge bulking and non-bulking conditions in two biological wastewater treatment systems (conventional A²/O (anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic) and inverted A²/O (anoxic/anaerobic/aerobic) processes) receiving the same raw wastewater. Sludge bulking resulted in significant shift in bacterial compositions from Proteobacteria dominance to Actinobacteria dominance, characterized by the significant presence of filamentous 'Candidatus Microthrix parvicella'. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed that the relative abundance of 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis', a key polyphosphate-accumulating organism responsible for phosphorus removal, with respect to 16s rRNA genes of total bacteria was 0.8 and 0.7%, respectively, for the conventional and inverted A²/O systems when sludge bulking occurred, which increased to 8.2 and 12.3% during the non-bulking period. However, the total phosphorus removal performance during the bulking period (2-week average: 97 ± 1 and 96 ± 1%, respectively) was not adversely affected comparable to that during the non-bulking period (2-week average: 96 ± 1 and 96 ± 1%, respectively). Neisser staining revealed the presence of large polyphosphate granules in 'Candidatus Microthrix parvicella', suggesting that this microbial group might have been responsible for phosphorus removal during the sludge bulking period when 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' was excluded from the systems. PMID:25051486

  6. Metabolic modelling of full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal sludge.

    PubMed

    Lanham, Ana B; Oehmen, Adrian; Saunders, Aaron M; Carvalho, Gilda; Nielsen, Per H; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates, for the first time, the application of metabolic models incorporating polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) towards describing the biochemical transformations of full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) activated sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). For this purpose, it was required to modify previous metabolic models applied to lab-scale systems by incorporating the anaerobic utilisation of the TCA cycle and the aerobic maintenance processes based on sequential utilisation of polyhydroxyalkanoates, followed by glycogen and polyphosphate. The abundance of the PAO and GAO populations quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridisation served as the initial conditions of each biomass fraction, whereby the models were able to describe accurately the experimental data. The kinetic rates were found to change among the four different WWTPs studied or even in the same plant during different seasons, either suggesting the presence of additional PAO or GAO organisms, or varying microbial activities for the same organisms. Nevertheless, these variations in kinetic rates were largely found to be proportional to the difference in acetate uptake rate, suggesting a viable means of calibrating the metabolic model. The application of the metabolic model to full-scale sludge also revealed that different Accumulibacter clades likely possess different acetate uptake mechanisms, as a correlation was observed between the energetic requirement for acetate transport across the cell membrane with the diversity of Accumulibacter present. Using the model as a predictive tool, it was shown that lower acetate concentrations in the feed as well as longer aerobic retention times favour the dominance of the TCA metabolism over glycolysis, which could explain why the anaerobic TCA pathway seems to be more relevant in full-scale WWTPs than in lab-scale systems. PMID:25222332

  7. Biological Redox Cycling Of Iron In Nontronite And Its Potential Application In Nitrate Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zeng, Qiang; Edelmann, Richard E.; Pentrak, Martin; Agrawal, Abinash

    2015-05-05

    Redox cycling of structural Fe in phyllosilicates provides a potential method to remediate nitrate contamination in natural environment. Past research has only studied chemical redox cycles or a single biologically mediated redox cycle of Fe in phyllosilicates. The objective of this research was to study three microbially driven redox cycles of Fe in one phyllosilicate, nontronite (NAu-2). During the reduction phase structural Fe(III) in NAu-2 served as electron acceptor, lactate as electron donor, AQDS as electron shuttle, and dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 as mediator in bicarbonate-buffered and PIPES-buffered media. During the oxidation phase, biogenic Fe(II) served an electron donor, nitrate as electron acceptor, and nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002 as mediator in the same media. For all three cycles, structural Fe in NAu-2 was able to reversibly undergo 3 redox cycles without significant reductive or oxidative dissolution. X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that NAu-2 was the dominant residual mineral throughout the 3 redox cycles with some dissolution textures but no significant secondary mineralization. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(II) in bio-reduced samples likely occurred in two distinct environments, at edges and the interior of the NAu-2 structure. Nitrate was completely reduced to nitrogen gas under both buffer conditions and this extent and rate did not change with Fe redox cycles. Mössbauer spectroscopy further revealed that nitrate reduction was coupled to predominant/preferred oxidation of edge Fe(II). These results suggest that structural Fe in phyllosilicates may represent a renewable source to continuously remove nitrate in natural environments.

  8. Biological mechanisms associated with triazophos (TAP) removal by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSFCW).

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Feng, Yuqin; Dai, Yanran; Cui, Naxin; Anderson, Bruce; Cheng, Shuiping

    2016-05-15

    Triazophos (TAP) is a widely used pesticide that is easily accumulated in the environment due to its relatively high stability: this accumulation from agricultural runoff results in potential hazards to aquatic ecosystems. Constructed wetlands are generally considered to be an effective technology for treating TAP polluted surface water. However, knowledge about the biological mechanisms of TAP removal is still lacking. This study investigates the responses of a wetland plant (Canna indica), substrate enzymes and microbial communities in bench-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (HSCWs) loaded with different TAP concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5 and 5 mg · L(-1)). The results indicate that TAP stimulated the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) in the roots of C. indica. The highest TAP concentrations significantly inhibited photosynthetic activities, as shown by a reduced effective quantum yield of PS II (ΦPS II) and lower electron transport rates (ETR). However, interestingly, the lower TAP loadings exhibited some favorable effects on these two variables, suggesting that C. indica is a suitable species for use in wetlands designed for treatment of low TAP concentrations. Urease and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in the wetland substrate were activated by TAP. Two-way ANOVA demonstrated that urease activity was influenced by both the TAP concentrations and season, while acidphosphatase (ACP) only responded to seasonal variations. Analysis of high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed seasonal variations in the microbial community structure of the wetland substrate at the phylum and family levels. In addition, urease activity had a greater correlation with the relative abundance of some functional microbial groups, such as the Bacillaceae family, and the ALP and ACP may be influenced by the plant more than substrate microbial communities. PMID:26897579

  9. Comparative genomics of two ‘Candidatus Accumulibacter' clades performing biological phosphorus removal

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Jason J; He, Shaomei; Malfatti, Stephanie; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tringe, Susannah G; Hugenholtz, Philip; McMahon, Katherine D

    2013-01-01

    Members of the genus Candidatus Accumulibacter are important in many wastewater treatment systems performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). The Accumulibacter lineage can be subdivided phylogenetically into multiple clades, and previous work showed that these clades are ecologically distinct. The complete genome of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis strain UW-1, a member of Clade IIA, was previously sequenced. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Candidatus Accumulibacter spp. strain UW-2, a member of Clade IA, assembled following shotgun metagenomic sequencing of laboratory-scale bioreactor sludge. We estimate the genome to be 80–90% complete. Although the two clades share 16S rRNA sequence identity of >98.0%, we observed a remarkable lack of synteny between the two genomes. We identified 2317 genes shared between the two genomes, with an average nucleotide identity (ANI) of 78.3%, and accounting for 49% of genes in the UW-1 genome. Unlike UW-1, the UW-2 genome seemed to lack genes for nitrogen fixation and carbon fixation. Despite these differences, metabolic genes essential for denitrification and EBPR, including carbon storage polymer and polyphosphate metabolism, were conserved in both genomes. The ANI from genes associated with EBPR was statistically higher than that from genes not associated with EBPR, indicating a high selective pressure in EBPR systems. Further, we identified genomic islands of foreign origins including a near-complete lysogenic phage in the Clade IA genome. Interestingly, Clade IA appeared to be more phage susceptible based on it containing only a single Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats locus as compared with the two found in Clade IIA. Overall, the comparative analysis provided a genetic basis to understand physiological differences and ecological niches of Accumulibacter populations, and highlights the importance of diversity in maintaining system functional resilience. PMID:23887171

  10. Comparative genomics of two 'Candidatus Accumulibacter' clades performing biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Jason J; He, Shaomei; Malfatti, Stephanie; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tringe, Susannah G; Hugenholtz, Philip; McMahon, Katherine D

    2013-12-01

    Members of the genus Candidatus Accumulibacter are important in many wastewater treatment systems performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). The Accumulibacter lineage can be subdivided phylogenetically into multiple clades, and previous work showed that these clades are ecologically distinct. The complete genome of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis strain UW-1, a member of Clade IIA, was previously sequenced. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Candidatus Accumulibacter spp. strain UW-2, a member of Clade IA, assembled following shotgun metagenomic sequencing of laboratory-scale bioreactor sludge. We estimate the genome to be 80-90% complete. Although the two clades share 16S rRNA sequence identity of >98.0%, we observed a remarkable lack of synteny between the two genomes. We identified 2317 genes shared between the two genomes, with an average nucleotide identity (ANI) of 78.3%, and accounting for 49% of genes in the UW-1 genome. Unlike UW-1, the UW-2 genome seemed to lack genes for nitrogen fixation and carbon fixation. Despite these differences, metabolic genes essential for denitrification and EBPR, including carbon storage polymer and polyphosphate metabolism, were conserved in both genomes. The ANI from genes associated with EBPR was statistically higher than that from genes not associated with EBPR, indicating a high selective pressure in EBPR systems. Further, we identified genomic islands of foreign origins including a near-complete lysogenic phage in the Clade IA genome. Interestingly, Clade IA appeared to be more phage susceptible based on it containing only a single Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats locus as compared with the two found in Clade IIA. Overall, the comparative analysis provided a genetic basis to understand physiological differences and ecological niches of Accumulibacter populations, and highlights the importance of diversity in maintaining system functional resilience. PMID:23887171

  11. The impact of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on biological nitrogen removal from wastewater and bacterial community shifts in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Cui, Fuyi; Zhao, Zhiwei; Liu, Dongmei; Xu, Yongpeng; Li, Huiting; Yang, Xiaonan

    2014-04-01

    The potential impact of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) on nitrogen removal from wastewater in activated sludge was investigated using a sequencing batch reactor. The addition of 2-50 mg L(-1) of TiO2 NPs did not adversely affect nitrogen removal. However, when the activated sludge was exposed to 100-200 mg L(-1) of TiO2 NPs, the effluent total nitrogen removal efficiencies were 36.5 % and 20.3 %, respectively, which are markedly lower than the values observed in the control test (80 %). Further studies showed that the decrease in biological nitrogen removal induced by higher concentrations of TiO2 NPs was due to an inhibitory effect on the de-nitrification process. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles showed that 200 mg L(-1) of TiO2 NPs significantly reduced microbial diversity in the activated sludge. The effect of light on the antibacterial activity of TiO2 NPs was also investigated, and the results showed that the levels of TiO2-dependent inhibition of biological nitrogen removal were similar under both dark and light conditions. Additional studies revealed that different TiO2 concentrations had a significant effect on dehydrogenase activity, and this effect was most likely the result of decreased microbial activity. PMID:23660752

  12. Determination of biological removal of recalcitrant organic contaminants in coal gasification waste water.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qinhong; Tabassum, Salma; Yu, Guangxin; Chu, Chunfeng; Zhang, Zhenjia

    2015-01-01

    Coal gasification waste water treatment needed a sustainable and affordable plan to eliminate the organic contaminants in order to lower the potential environmental and human health risk. In this paper, a laboratory-scale anaerobic-aerobic intermittent system carried out 66 operational cycles together for the treatment of coal gasification waste water and the removal capacity of each organic pollutant. Contaminants included phenols, carboxylic acids, long-chain hydrocarbons, and heterocyclic compounds, wherein the relative content of phenol is up to 57.86%. The long-term removal of 77 organic contaminants was evaluated at different hydraulic retention time (anaerobic24 h + aerobic48 h and anaerobic48 h +aerobic48 h). Contaminant removal ranged from no measurable removal to near-complete removal with effluent concentrations below the detection limit. Contaminant removals followed one of four trends: steady-state removal throughout, increasing removal to steady state (acclimation), decreasing removal, and no removal. Organic degradation and transformation in the reaction were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technology. PMID:25951900

  13. Removal of nutrient limitations in forest gaps enhances growth rate and resistance to cavitation in subtropical canopy tree species differing in shade tolerance.

    PubMed

    Villagra, Mariana; Campanello, Paula I; Montti, Lia; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-03-01

    A 4-year fertilization experiment with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) was carried out in natural gaps of a subtropical forest in northeastern Argentina. Saplings of six dominant canopy species differing in shade tolerance were grown in five control and five N + P fertilized gaps. Hydraulic architectural traits such as wood density, the leaf area to sapwood area ratio (LA : SA), vulnerability to cavitation (P50) and specific and leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity were measured, as well as the relative growth rate, specific leaf area (SLA) and percentage of leaf damage by insect herbivores. Plant growth rates and resistance to drought-induced embolisms increased when nutrient limitations were removed. On average, the P50 of control plants was -1.1 MPa, while the P50 of fertilized plants was -1.6 MPa. Wood density and LA : SA decreased with N + P additions. A trade-off between vulnerability to cavitation and efficiency of water transport was not observed. The relative growth rate was positively related to the total leaf surface area per plant and negatively related to LA : SA, while P50 was positively related to SLA across species and treatments. Plants with higher growth rates and higher total leaf area in fertilized plots were able to avoid hydraulic dysfunction by becoming less vulnerable to cavitation (more negative P50). Two high-light-requiring species exhibited relatively low growth rates due to heavy herbivore damage. Contrary to expectations, shade-tolerant plants with relatively high resistance to hydraulic dysfunction and reduced herbivory damage were able to grow faster. These results suggest that during the initial phase of sapling establishment in gaps, species that were less vulnerable to cavitation and exhibited reduced herbivory damage had faster realized growth rates than less shade-tolerant species with higher potential growth rates. Finally, functional relationships between hydraulic traits and growth rate across species and treatments

  14. Shifts in biological productivity inferred from nutrient drawdown in the southern Beaufort Sea (2003-2011) and northern Baffin Bay (1997-2011), Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Myriam; Tremblay, Jean-Éric

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the first in situ evidence of change in the net biological productivity of high-latitude western Arctic seas. Estimates of seasonal drawdown for major plant nutrients show that net community production (NCP) shifted differently in two contrasted Canadian oceanographic settings. In the stratified southeast Beaufort Sea, seasonal nitrate consumption increased 1.6-fold between 2003-2004 and 2010-2011. The concomitant thickening of the nitrate-depleted layer in summer/fall implies that subsurface chlorophyll maxima now consume nutrients over a larger extent of the water column. Meanwhile, nitrate consumption in the once productive North Water Polynya declined by 65% and is now nearly on par with the oligotrophic coastal Beaufort Sea. This decline is attributed to freshening and increased stratification. Commensurate changes in silicate and phosphate drawdown in the two regions indicate that diatoms drove the spatial and temporal shifts in NCP.

  15. Biological removal of pharmaceutical compounds using white-rot fungi with concomitant FAME production of the residual biomass.

    PubMed

    Vasiliadou, I A; Sánchez-Vázquez, R; Molina, R; Martínez, F; Melero, J A; Bautista, L F; Iglesias, J; Morales, G

    2016-09-15

    The efficiency of two white-rot fungi (WRF), Trametes versicolor and Ganoderma lucidum, to eliminate thirteen pharmaceutical pollutants with concomitant biodiesel production from the accumulating lipid content after treatment, was examined. The removal efficiency was studied using both individual and combined strains. The results of individual and combined strains showed a total removal (100%) of diclofenac (DCF), gemfibrozil (GFZ), ibuprofen (IBP), progesterone (PGT) and ranitidine (RNT). Lower removals were achieved for 4-acetamidoantipyrin (AAA), clofibric acid (ACF), atenolol (ATN), caffeine (CFN), carbamazepine (CZP), hydrochlorothiazide (HCT), sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulpiride (SPD), although the combination of both strains enhanced the system's efficiency, with removals ranging from 15 to 41%. This increase of the removal efficiency when combining both strains was attributed to the interactions developed between them (i.e., competition). Results from enzymatic and cytochrome P450 examination suggested that both extracellular (laccase, MnP, LiP) and intracellular oxidation mechanisms participate in the biological removal of pharmaceuticals. On the other hand, the "green" potential of the fungal sludge generated during the biological removal process was assessed for biodiesel production by means of one-step direct (in-situ) transformation. This process consists of the simultaneous extraction and conversion of lipids contained in the sludge by catalytic esterification/transesterification using a robust acid heterogeneous Zr-SBA-15 catalyst. This catalytic system provided conversions close to 80% of the saponifiable fraction (including free fatty acids and glycerides) in the presence of high amount of impurities. The overall weight FAME yield, based on the initial dried mass, was close to 30% for both strains. PMID:27233048

  16. A comparison of biologically active filters for the removal of ozone by-products, turbidity, and particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, B.M.; Krasner, S.W.; Sclimenti, M.J.; Hacker, P.A.; Gramith, J.T.

    1996-11-01

    Biofiltration tests were performed at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California`s 5.5-mgd (21,000 m{sup 3}d) demonstration plant using two 400 ft{sup 2} (37 m{sup 2}) anthracite/sand filters and a 6 ft{sup 2} (0.56 m{sup 2}) granular activated carbon (GAC)/sand filter operated in parallel. The empty-bed contact time (EBCT) within the GAC and anthracite ranged from 2.1-3.1 min. The filters were evaluated based on (1) conventional filtration performance (turbidity, particle removal, and headloss); (2) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products (assimilable organic carbon [AOC], aldehydes, and aldoketoacids) after startup; (3) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products at steady state; and (4) resistance to short-term process upsets such as intermittent chlorination or filter out-of-service time. Approximately 80 percent formaldehyde removal was achieved by the anthracite/sand filter operated at a 2.1-min EBCT (6 gpm/ft{sup 2} [15 m/h]) within 8 days of ozone operation. The GAC/sand filter operated at the same rate achieved 80 percent removal within 1 day, possibly as an additive effect of adsorption and biological removal. In-depth aldehyde monitoring at four depths (0.5-min EBCT intervals) provided additional insight into the removal kinetics. During periods of warmer water temperature, from 20 to 48 percent of the AOC was removed in the flocculation/sedimentation basins by 40-75 percent. This percentage removal typically resulted in AOC concentrations within 40 {mu}g C/L of the raw, unozonated water levels.

  17. Biological phosphorus removal from abattoir wastewater at very short sludge ages mediated by novel PAO clade Comamonadaceae.

    PubMed

    Ge, Huoqing; Batstone, Damien J; Keller, Jürg

    2015-02-01

    Recent increases in global phosphorus costs, together with the need to remove phosphorus from wastewater to comply with water discharge regulations, make phosphorus recovery from wastewater economically and environmentally attractive. Biological phosphorus (Bio-P) removal process can effectively capture the phosphorus from wastewater and concentrate it in a form that is easily amendable for recovery in contrast to traditional (chemical) phosphorus removal processes. However, Bio-P removal processes have historically been operated at medium to long solids retention times (SRTs, 10-20 days typically), which inherently increases the energy consumption while reducing the recoverable carbon fraction and hence makes it incompatible with the drive towards energy self-sufficient wastewater treatment plants. In this study, a novel high-rate Bio-P removal process has been developed as an energy efficient alternative for phosphorus removal from wastewater through operation at an SRT of less than 4 days. The process was most effective at an SRT of 2-2.5 days, achieving >90% phosphate removal. Further reducing the SRT to 1.7 days resulted in a loss of Bio-P activity. 16S pyrotag sequencing showed the community changed considerably with changes in the SRT, but that Comamonadaceae was consistently abundant when the Bio-P activity was evident. FISH analysis combined with DAPI staining confirmed that bacterial cells of Comamonadaceae arranged in tetrads contained polyphosphate, identifying them as the key polyphosphate accumulating organisms at these low SRT conditions. Overall, this paper demonstrates a novel, high-rate phosphorus removal process that can be effectively integrated with short SRT, energy-efficient carbon removal and recovery processes. PMID:25481076

  18. Processes, Controls, and Potential for In-situ Nutrient Removal During Managed Aquifer Recharge in an Agricultural Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C. M.; Fisher, A. T.; Los Huertos, M.; Lockwood, B.

    2008-12-01

    We are conducting research on rates and dynamics of water quality improvement that occur during managed aquifer recharge (MAR), with a focus on reducing the load of nitrate exported during recharge. Nitrate is the most common nonpoint source pollutant in surface and ground water in the United States, and is a problem particularly in basins developed for agriculture. Our study site is located in central coastal California, where diversion from a slough (wetland) is permitted during periods of high flow for use in MAR. Diverted water is recharged into an eolian and fluvial, unconfined aquifer using a 3-km2 percolation pond, then subsequently recovered and distributed to local farmers. As a result of agricultural and other activities in the basin, diverted slough water is often rich in nitrate (historical values as high as 4 mM); similarly high nitrate values have been measured in water from the underlying aquifer. Prior to the start of the 2007-08 water year, we surveyed, sampled, and instrumented the recharge pond in order to quantify local seepage rates and sample recharging water to assess changes in water quality during infiltration through the base of the pond. Nests of piezometers and lysimeters were screened at depths of 50 to 150 cm beneath the base of the pond and sampled weekly throughout the recharge season. Total MAR was 7.4 × 105 m3 (600 ac-ft) during the 2007-08 water year, with initial nitrate concentrations of 10 μM to 100 μM in the diverted water. Point-specific infiltration rates were greater than 10 m/day in some locations below the pond, and much lower in other locations. Nitrate concentrations were reduced by 50 to 90% beneath the pond, with the greatest reductions occurring at lower concentrations and slower infiltration rates. Suboxic conditions developed beneath the pond during recharge, which is consistent with removal of nitrate by denitrification. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations were elevated during the recharge season throughout

  19. BIODESULF(TM), A Novel Biological Technology for the Removal of H2S From Sour Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, K.C.; Stashick, J.J.; Johnson, P.E.; Kaushik, N.K.

    1997-10-01

    The state-of-the-art technologies for the removal of sulfur compounds from Sour Natural Gas (SNG) are not cost-effective when scaled down to approximately 2-5 MMSCFD. At the same time, the SNG Production is increasing at 3-6 TCF/Yr and -78 TCF potential reserves are also sour. Assuming only 3% treatment of this potential SNG market is for small volume processing, the potential U.S. Market is worth $0.14 to $0.28 billion. Therefore, the Gas Processing Industry is seeking novel, cost-effective, environmentally compatible and operator friendly technologies applicable to the small volume producers in the range of less than 1 MMSCFD to - 5 MMSCFD. A novel biological process, BIODESTJLFTM (patent pending), developed at ARCTECH removes H{sub 2}S and other sulfur contaminants that make the Natural Gas Sour. The removal is accomplished by utilizing an adapted mixed microbial culture (consortium). A variety of anaerobic microbial consortia from ARCTECH`s Microbial Culture Collection were grown and tested for removal of H{sub 2}S. One of these consortia, termed SS-11 was found to be particularly effective. Utilizing the SS-11 consortium, a process has been developed on a laboratory-scale to remove sulfur species from Sour Natural Gas at well head production pressures and temperatures. The process has been independently evaluated and found to be promising in effectively removing H{sub 2}S and other sulfur species cost effectively.

  20. The Potato Systems Planner: Integrating Cropping System Impacts on Crop Yield and Quality, Soil Biology, Nutrient Cycling, Diseases, and Economics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Finding and developing profitable cropping systems is a high priority for the potato industry. Consequently, an interdisciplinary team of ARS scientists from the New England Plant, Soil, & Water Laboratory evaluated 14 different rotations for their impacts on crop yield and quality, nutrient availa...

  1. Biological Oxidation of As (III) in a Full-Scale Iron Removal Plant

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effectiveness of arsenic removal from water is largely dependent on the oxidation state of the arsenic. As (III) is much more difficult to remove relative to the oxidized As (V) form. Arsenic in ground waters across the Midwest is typically in the form of As (III), and ther...

  2. NITRIFICATION, AND IRON AND ARSENIC REMOVAL IN BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE FILTERS: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effectiveness of arsenic removal from water is largely dependent on the oxidation state of the arsenic. As (III) is much more difficult to remove relative to the oxidized As(V) form. Unlike Fe(II) that can be oxidized by oxygen, efficient As(III) oxidation requires a strong...

  3. Long term operation of continuous-flow system with enhanced biological phosphorus removal granules at different COD loading.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Lv, Yufeng; Zeng, Huiping; Zhang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a continuous-flow system with enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) granules was operated at different COD concentrations (200, 300 and 400mgL(-)(1)) to investigate the effect of COD loading on this system. The results showed that when the COD concentration in influent was increased to 400mgL(-)(1), the anaerobic COD removal efficiency and total phosphorus removal efficiency reduced obviously and the settling ability of granules deteriorated due to the proliferation of filamentous bacteria. Moreover, high COD loading inhibited the EPS secretion and destroyed the stability of granules. Results of high-through pyrosequencing indicated that filamentous bacteria had a competitive advantage over polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) at high COD loading. The performance of system, settling ability of granules and proportion of PAOs gradually recovered to the initial level after the COD concentration was reduced to 200mgL(-)(1) on day 81. PMID:27295254

  4. NO(x) removal from simulated flue gas by chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated approach in a biofilter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Han; Cai, Ling-Lin; Mi, Xu-Hong; Jiang, Jin-Lin; Li, Wei

    2008-05-15

    A chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated approach, which combines the advantages of both the chemical and biological technologies, is employed to achieve the removal of nitrogen monoxide (NO) from the simulated flue gas. The biological reduction of NO to nitrogen gas (N2) and regeneration of the absorbent Fe(II)EDTA (EDTA:ethylenediaminetetraacetate) take place under thermophilic conditions (50 +/- 0.5 degrees C). The performance of a laboratory-scale biofilter was investigated for treating NO(x) gas in this study. Shock loading studies were performed to ascertain the response of the biofilter to fluctuations of inlet loading rates (0.48 approximately 28.68 g NO m(-3) h(-1)). A maximum elimination capacity (18.78 g NO m(-3) h(-1)) was achieved at a loading rate of 28.68 g NO m(-3) h(-1) and maintained 5 h operation at the steady state. Additionally, the effect of certain gaseous compounds (e.g., O2 and SO2) on the NO removal was also investigated. A mathematical model was developed to describe the system performance. The model has been able to predict experimental results for different inlet NO concentrations. In summary, both theoretical prediction and experimental investigation confirm that biofilter can achieve high removal rate for NO in high inlet concentrations under both steady and transient states. PMID:18546728

  5. Rain Garden Research at EPA’s Urban Watershed Research Facility: Promoting Nitrate Removal through Rain Garden Design

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens are designed to infiltrate stormwater, capture suspended solids, sorb heavy metals and phosphorus, and transform nutrients through biological processes. Most studies have found a low capacity for stormwater nitrate removal. Research at the Urban Watershed Managemen...

  6. Artificial neural network modelling in biological removal of organic carbon and nitrogen for the treatment of slaughterhouse wastewater in a batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Pradyut; Debsarkar, Anupam; Mukherjee, Somnath; Kumar, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater containing high concentration of oxygen-demanding carbonaceous organics and nitrogenous materials (chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN)) as nutrients emanated from small- to large-scale slaughterhouse units cause depletion of dissolved oxygen in water bodies and attributes to the threat of eutrophication. Biological treatment of wastewater is a useful tool through ages for the treatment of wastewater owing to its cost-effectiveness, reliability along with its innocuous output features. This paper deals with the treatment of slaughter house wastewater by conducting a laboratory scale batch reactor with different input characterized samples, and the experimental results were explored for the formulation of feed-forward back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) to predict the combined removal of COD and TKN. The ANN modelling was carried out using neural network tool box of MATLAB (version 7.0), with the Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm. Various trials were examined for the training of the ANN model using the number of neurons in the hidden layer varying from 2 to 30. The mean square error function and regression analysis were also applied for performance analysis of the ANN model. All the input data were logged-in after carrying out detailed experiment in the laboratory with a view to examine the performance of the batch reactor for the treatment of slaughterhouse wastewater. The experimental results were used for testing and validating the ANN model. PMID:24701927

  7. Biological and chemical interaction of oxygen on the reduction of Fe(III)EDTA in a chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated NOx removal system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Han; Shi, Yao; Li, Wei

    2012-03-01

    A promising chemical absorption-biological reduction integrated process has been proposed. A major problem of the process is oxidation of the active absorbent, ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Fe(II)EDTA), to the ferric species, leading to a significant decrease in NO removal efficiency. Thus the biological reduction of Fe(III)EDTA is vitally important for the continuous NO removal. Oxygen, an oxidizing agent and biological inhibitor, is typically present in the flue gas. It can significantly retard the application of the integrated process. This study investigated the influence mechanism of oxygen on the regeneration of Fe(II)EDTA in order to provide insight on how to eliminate or decrease the oxygen influence. The experimental results revealed that the dissolved oxygen and Fe(III)EDTA simultaneously served as electron acceptor for the microorganism. The Fe(III)EDTA reduction activity were directly inhibited by the dissolved oxygen. When the bioreactor was supplied with 3% and 8% oxygen in the gas phase, the concentration of initial dissolved oxygen in the liquid phase was 0.28 and 0.68 mg l(-1). Correspondingly, the instinct Fe(III)EDTA reduction activity of the microorganism determined under anoxic condition in a rotation shaker decreased from 1.09 to 0.84 and 0.49 mM h(-1). The oxidation of Fe(II)EDTA with dissolved oxygen prevented more dissolved oxygen access to the microorganism and eased the inhibition of dissolved oxygen on the microorganisms. PMID:21931973

  8. Biological nitrate removal processes from drinking water supply-a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews both heterotrophic and autotrophic processes for the removal of nitrate from water supplies. The most commonly used carbon sources in heterotrophic denitrification are methanol, ethanol and acetic acid. Process performance for each feed stock is compared with particular reference nitrate and nitrite residual and to toxicity potential. Autotrophic nitrate removal has the advantages of not requiring an organic carbon source; however the slow growth rate of autotrophic bacteria and low nitrate removal rate have contributed to the fact that relatively few full scale plants are in operation at the present time. PMID:24355262

  9. Biological nitrate removal processes from drinking water supply-a review.

    PubMed

    Mohseni-Bandpi, Anoushiravan; Elliott, David Jack; Zazouli, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews both heterotrophic and autotrophic processes for the removal of nitrate from water supplies. The most commonly used carbon sources in heterotrophic denitrification are methanol, ethanol and acetic acid. Process performance for each feed stock is compared with particular reference nitrate and nitrite residual and to toxicity potential. Autotrophic nitrate removal has the advantages of not requiring an organic carbon source; however the slow growth rate of autotrophic bacteria and low nitrate removal rate have contributed to the fact that relatively few full scale plants are in operation at the present time. PMID:24355262

  10. A DO- and pH-based early warning system of nitrification inhibition for biological nitrogen removal processes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seil; Choi, Il; Lim, Byung Jin; Kim, Hyunook

    2012-01-01

    In Korea, more than 80% of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with capacities of 500 m3·d-1 or more are capable of removing nitrogen from wastewater through biological nitrification and denitrification processes. Normally, these biological processes show excellent performance, but if a toxic chemical is present in the influent to a WWTP, the biological processes (especially, the nitrification process) may be affected and fail to function normally; nitrifying bacteria are known very vulnerable to toxic substances. Then, the toxic compound as well as the nitrogen in wastewater may be discharged into a receiving water body without any proper treatment. Moreover, it may take significant time for the process to return back its normal state. In this study, a DO- and pH-based strategy to identify potential nitrification inhibition was developed to detect early the inflow of toxic compounds to a biological nitrogen removal process. This strategy utilizes significant changes observed in the oxygen uptake rate and the pH profiles of the mixed liquor when the activity of nitrifying bacteria is inhibited. Using the strategy, the toxicity from test wastewater with 2.5 mg·L-1 Hg2+, 0.5 mg·L-1 allythiourea, or 0.25 mg·L-1 chloroform could be successfully detected. PMID:23443381

  11. A DO- and pH-Based Early Warning System of Nitrification Inhibition for Biological Nitrogen Removal Processes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seil; Choi, Il; Lim, Byung Jin; Kim, Hyunook

    2012-01-01

    In Korea, more than 80% of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with capacities of 500 m3·d−1 or more are capable of removing nitrogen from wastewater through biological nitrification and denitrification processes. Normally, these biological processes show excellent performance, but if a toxic chemical is present in the influent to a WWTP, the biological processes (especially, the nitrification process) may be affected and fail to function normally; nitrifying bacteria are known very vulnerable to toxic substances. Then, the toxic compound as well as the nitrogen in wastewater may be discharged into a receiving water body without any proper treatment. Moreover, it may take significant time for the process to return back its normal state. In this study, a DO- and pH-based strategy to identify potential nitrification inhibition was developed to detect early the inflow of toxic compounds to a biological nitrogen removal process. This strategy utilizes significant changes observed in the oxygen uptake rate and the pH profiles of the mixed liquor when the activity of nitrifying bacteria is inhibited. Using the strategy, the toxicity from test wastewater with 2.5 mg·L−1 Hg2+, 0.5 mg·L−1 allythiourea, or 0.25 mg·L−1 chloroform could be successfully detected. PMID:23443381

  12. Atmospheric deposition impacts on nutrients and biological budgets of the Mediterranean Sea, results from the high resolution coupled model NEMOMED12/PISCES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richon, Camille; Dutay, Jean-Claude; Dulac, François; Desboeufs, Karine; Nabat, Pierre; Guieu, Cécile; Aumont, Olivier; Palmieri, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition is at present not included in regional oceanic biogeochemical models of the Mediterranean Sea, whereas, along with river inputs, it represents a significant source of nutrients at the basin scale, especially through intense desert dust events. Moreover, observations (e.g. DUNE campaign, Guieu et al. 2010) show that these events significantly modify the biogeochemistry of the oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea. We use a high resolution (1/12°) version of the 3D coupled model NEMOMED12/PISCES to investigate the effects of high resolution atmospheric dust deposition forcings on the biogeochemistry of the Mediterranean basin. The biogeochemical model PISCES represents the evolution of 24 prognostic tracers including five nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, silicate and iron) and two phytoplankton and zooplanktons groups (Palmiéri, 2014). From decadal simulations (1982-2012) we evaluate the influence of natural dust and anthropogenic nitrogen deposition on the budget of nutrients in the basin and its impact on the biogeochemistry (primary production, plankton distributions...). Our results show that natural dust deposition accounts for 15% of global PO4 budget and that it influences primarily the southern part of the basin. Anthropogenic nitrogen accounts for 50% of bioavailable N supply for the northern part. Deposition events significantly affect biological production; primary productivity enhancement can be as high as 30% in the areas of high deposition, especially during the stratified period. Further developments of the model will include 0D and 1D modeling of bacteria in the frame of the PEACETIME project.

  13. Removal of Review and Reclassification Procedures for Biological Products Licensed Prior to July 1, 1972. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-02-12

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, the Agency, or we) is removing two regulations that prescribe procedures for FDA's review and classification of biological products licensed before July 1, 1972. FDA is taking this action because the two regulations are obsolete and no longer necessary in light of other statutory and regulatory authorities established since 1972, which allow FDA to evaluate and monitor the safety and effectiveness of all biological products. In addition, other statutory and regulatory authorities authorize FDA to revoke a license for biological products because they are not safe and effective, or are misbranded. FDA is taking this action as part of its retrospective review of its regulations to promote improvement and innovation. PMID:26878738

  14. Biological removal of phenol from saline wastewater using a moving bed biofilm reactor containing acclimated mixed consortia.

    PubMed

    Nakhli, Seyyed Ali Akbar; Ahmadizadeh, Kimia; Fereshtehnejad, Mahmood; Rostami, Mohammad Hossein; Safari, Mojtaba; Borghei, Seyyed Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the performance of an aerobic moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was assessed for the removal of phenol as the sole substrate from saline wastewater. The effect of several parameters namely inlet phenol concentration (200-1200 mg/L), hydraulic retention time (8-24 h), inlet salt content (10-70 g/L), phenol shock loading, hydraulic shock loading and salt shock loading on the performance of the 10 L MBBR inoculated with a mixed culture of active biomass gradually acclimated to phenol and salt were evaluated in terms of phenol and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies. The results indicated that phenol and COD removal efficiencies are affected by HRT, phenol and salt concentration in the bioreactor saline feed. The MBBR could remove up to 99% of phenol and COD from the feed saline wastewater at inlet phenol concentrations up to 800 mg/L, HRT of 18 h and inlet salt contents up to 40 g/L. The reactor could also resist strong shock loads. Furthermore, measuring biological quantitative parameters indicated that the biofilm plays a main role in phenol removal. Overall, the results of this investigation revealed that the developed MBBR system with high concentration of the active mixed biomass can play a prominent role in order to treat saline wastewaters containing phenol in industrial applications as a very efficient and flexible technology. PMID:24616843

  15. [Removal of AOX and Chroma in Biologically Treated Effluent of Chemical Dyestuff Wastewater with Nanoscale Ni/Fe].

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiao-ming; Xu, Can-can; Liu, Rui; Zhao, Yuan; Chen, Lü-jun

    2016-02-15

    Nanoscale Ni/Fe was applied to biologically treated effluent of chemical dyestuff wastewater. The removal rates of absorbable organic halogens (AOX) and chroma were investigated at different Ni loadings (0-5%), initial wastewater pH (4.1-10.0), Ni/Fe dosage (1-5 g x L(-1)) and reaction time (0.5-96 h). The results showed that the removal rates of AOX and chroma firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of the Ni loading, while continuously increased with the decrease of the initial wastewater pH and the increase of Ni/Fe dosage. The optimal condition was Ni loading of 1%, initial wastewater pH of 4.1 and Ni/Fe dosage of 3 g x L(-1), under which 29.2% of AOX and 79.6% of chroma were removed after 24 h reaction, and 50.6% of AOX and 80.7% of chroma were removed after 96 h reaction. GC-MS analysis revealed that toxicants such as chlorinated anilines, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-2-nitroaniline and halogenated hydrocarbons were efficiently removed. PMID:27363157

  16. Nutrient loading and selected water-quality and biological characteristics of Dickinson Bayou near Houston, Texas, 1995-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffery W.; Paul, Edna M.; Porter, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    Algal samples were collected at seven stations and were analyzed for periphyton identification and enumeration, and chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b concentrations. The large relative abundance of soil algae at stations in the middle of the watershed likely indicates the cumulative effects on water quality of agricultural nonpoint sources. Farther downstream near the State Highway 3 bridge, and downstream of three major tributary inflows, the increase in abundance of soil algae to a larger-than-expected level might reflect water-quality influences from predominantly urban nonpoint sources in the drainage basins of the three major tributary inflows. Nutrient concentrations do not appear to limit algal production in the upper (non-tidal) reach of Dickinson Bayou; but nutrient concentrations could have been limiting benthicalgal production in the lower (tidal) reach of the bayou during the time of the synoptic survey. If nitrogen is the limiting resource for algal productivity in the tidal reach of Dickinson Bayou, eutrophi

  17. Dynamics of the biological properties of soil and the nutrient release of Amorpha fruticosa L. litter in soil polluted by crude oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxi; Liu, Zengwen; Luc, Nhu Trung; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Xiaobo

    2015-11-01

    Litter from Amorpha fruticosa, a potential phytoremediating plant, was collected and used in a decomposition experiment that involved the litterbag in soil polluted by crude oil. The dynamics of the biological properties of soil and the nutrient release of the litter were detected. The results indicated that (1) in lightly polluted soil (LP, petroleum concentration was 15 g kg(-1)), the bacteria (including actinomycetes), and fungi populations were significant higher than those in unpolluted soil (CK) at the 1st month after pollution, and the bacteria (including actinomycetes) populations were higher than those in the CK at the 6th and 12th months. In moderately polluted soil (MP, 30 g kg(-1)), the bacteria (including actinomycetes) populations were higher than those in the CK at the 1st and 6th months, whereas only the actinomycetes population was greater than that in the CK at the 12th month. In seriously polluted soil (SP, 45 g kg(-1)), only the fungi population was higher than that in the CK at the 6th month. (2) The activities of soil protease, carboxymethyl cellulase, and sucrase were generally inhibited in polluted soil. Peroxidase activity was generally inhibited in the LP and MP soil, and polyphenol oxidase activity was inhibited in the SP soil at 6-12 months. (3) At the end of litter decomposition, the LP soil significantly increased the release rate of all nutrients, except for K. The MP soil reduced the release rate of Fe and Mn, whereas it increased that of C and Cu. The SP soil decreased the release rate of all nutrients except for Cu and Zn. In conclusion, SP by crude oil would lead to limitations in the release of nutrients from the litter and to decreases in the community stability of a phytoremediating plant. A. fruticosa could only be used in phytoremediation of polluted soil at concentrations below 45 g kg(-1) (crude). PMID:26087933

  18. Efficacy and reliability of upgraded industrial treatment plant at Porto Marghera, near Venice, Italy, in removing nutrients and dangerous micropollutants from petrochemical wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Verlicchi, Paola; Cattaneo, Serena; Marciano, Ferdinando; Masotti, Luigi; Vecchiato, Giuseppe; Zaffaroni, Carlo

    2011-08-01

    Chemical and petrochemical wastewaters contain a host of contaminants that require different treatment strategies. Regulation of macropollutants and micropollutants in the final discharge from industrial wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have become increasingly stringent in recent decades, requiring many WWTPs to be upgraded. This article presents an analysis of a WWTP treating petrochemicals in Porto Marghera, Italy, that recently was upgraded following legislative changes. Because of strict legal limits for macropollutants and micropollutants and a lack of space necessary for a full-scale WWTP overhaul, the existing activated sludge tank was converted into a membrane biological reactor. The paper presents experimental data collected during a five-month investigation showing the removal rates achieved by the upgraded plant for macropollutants (particularly nitrogen compounds) and micropollutants (heavy metals and organic and inorganic toxic compounds). PMID:21905411

  19. Algal remediation of CO₂ and nutrient discharges: A review.

    PubMed

    Judd, Simon; van den Broeke, Leo J P; Shurair, Mohamed; Kuti, Yussuf; Znad, Hussein

    2015-12-15

    The recent literature pertaining to the application of algal photobioreactors (PBRs) to both carbon dioxide mitigation and nutrient abatement is reviewed and the reported data analysed. The review appraises the influence of key system parameters on performance with reference to (a) the absorption and biological fixation of CO2 from gaseous effluent streams, and (b) the removal of nutrients from wastewaters. Key parameters appraised individually with reference to CO2 removal comprise algal speciation, light intensity, mass transfer, gas and hydraulic residence time, pollutant (CO2 and nutrient) loading, biochemical and chemical stoichiometry (including pH), and temperature. Nutrient removal has been assessed with reference to hydraulic residence time and reactor configuration, along with C:nutrient ratios and other factors affecting carbon fixation, and outcomes compared with those reported for classical biological nutrient removal (BNR). Outcomes of the review indicate there has been a disproportionate increase in algal PBR research outputs over the past 5-8 years, with a significant number of studies based on small, bench-scale systems. The quantitative impacts of light intensity and loading on CO2 uptake are highly dependent on the algal species, and also affected by solution chemical conditions such as temperature and pH. Calculations based on available data for biomass growth rates indicate that a reactor CO2 residence time of around 4 h is required for significant CO2 removal. Nutrient removal data indicate residence times of 2-5 days are required for significant nutrient removal, compared with <12 h for a BNR plant. Moreover, the shallow depth of the simplest PBR configuration (the high rate algal pond, HRAP) means that its footprint is at least two orders of magnitude greater than a classical BNR plant. It is concluded that the combined carbon capture/nutrient removal process relies on optimisation of a number of process parameters acting synergistically

  20. Removal of pharmaceuticals in biologically treated wastewater by chlorine dioxide or peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Hey, G; Ledin, A; Jansen, J la Cour; Andersen, H R

    2012-01-01

    Removal of six active pharmaceutical ingredients in wastewater was investigated using chlorine dioxide (ClO2) or peracetic acid (PAA) as chemical oxidants. Four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac and mefenamic acid) and two lipid-regulating agents (gemfibrozil and clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate) were used as target substances at 40 microg/L initial concentration. Three different wastewaters types originating from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were used. One wastewater was collected after extended nitrogen removal in activated sludge, one after treatment with high-loaded activated sludge without nitrification, and one from the final effluent from the same plant where nitrogen removal was made in trickling filters for nitrification and moving-bed biofilm reactors for denitrification following the high-loaded plant. Of the six investigated compounds, only clofibric acid and ibuprofen were not removed when treated with ClO2 up to 20 mg/L. With increasing PAA dose up to 50 mg/L, significant removal of most of the pharmaceuticals was observed except for the wastewater with the highest chemical oxygen demand (COD). This indicates that chemical oxidation with ClO2 could be used for tertiary treatment at WWTPs for active pharmaceutical ingredients, whereas PAA was not sufficiently efficient. PMID:22720432

  1. Effect of Sludge Type on Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal in Sequencing Batch Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xing; Gao, Dawen; Zhang, Baihui

    2010-11-01

    Aerobic granulation technology has become a novel biotechnology for wastewater treatment. However, the study of distinct properties and characteristics of phosphorus removal between granules and flocculent sludge are still sparse in EBPR. Two SBRs were concurrently operated to investigate the different phosphorus removal characteristics between granules (R1) and flocculate sludge (R2). Results indicated that R2 had a faster progress for enriching phosphorus-accumulating organisms compared with R1, and the phosphorus removal reached the steady state after 40 days in R1 but only 30 days in R2. The moisture content of granules (85.63%) was smaller than that (91.36%) in R2, and the granules had a higher removal efficiency of NH4+-N. However, flocculent sludge could release and take up more phosphorus. The special phosphorus release rate (SPRR) and special phosphorus uptake rate (SPUR) were 8.818 mg/gVSSṡh and 9.921 mg/gVSSṡh in R2 which were consistently larger than that (0.999 mg/gVSSṡh and 0.754 mg/gVSSṡh) in R1. The results of DGGE of PCR-amplified 16SrDNA fragments revealed that the diversity and the amount of phosphorus accumulating microbial of bacteria in flocculent sludge were much more than that in the granules. It can be concluded that the flocculent sludge showed a better