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Sample records for biological part assembly

  1. BioPartsBuilder: a synthetic biology tool for combinatorial assembly of biological parts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Luo, Jingchuan; Boeke, Jef D.; Bader, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Combinatorial assembly of DNA elements is an efficient method for building large-scale synthetic pathways from standardized, reusable components. These methods are particularly useful because they enable assembly of multiple DNA fragments in one reaction, at the cost of requiring that each fragment satisfies design constraints. We developed BioPartsBuilder as a biologist-friendly web tool to design biological parts that are compatible with DNA combinatorial assembly methods, such as Golden Gate and related methods. It retrieves biological sequences, enforces compliance with assembly design standards and provides a fabrication plan for each fragment. Availability and implementation: BioPartsBuilder is accessible at http://public.biopartsbuilder.org and an Amazon Web Services image is available from the AWS Market Place (AMI ID: ami-508acf38). Source code is released under the MIT license, and available for download at https://github.com/baderzone/biopartsbuilder. Contact: joel.bader@jhu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26568632

  2. The case for decoupling assembly and submission standards to maintain a more flexible registry of biological parts.

    PubMed

    Alnahhas, Razan N; Slater, Ben; Huang, Yunle; Mortensen, Catherine; Monk, Jordan W; Okasheh, Yousef; Howard, Marco D; Gottel, Neil R; Hammerling, Michael J; Barrick, Jeffrey E

    2014-01-01

    The Registry of Standard Biological Parts only accepts genetic parts compatible with the RFC 10 BioBrick format. This combined assembly and submission standard requires that four unique restriction enzyme sites must not occur in the DNA sequence encoding a part. We present evidence that this requirement places a nontrivial burden on iGEM teams developing large and novel parts. We further argue that the emergence of inexpensive DNA synthesis and versatile assembly methods reduces the utility of coupling submission and assembly standards and propose a submission standard that is compatible with current quality control strategies while nearly eliminating sequence constraints on submitted parts. PMID:25525459

  3. Unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly of repetitive DNA parts for synthetic biology applications

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Joseph P.; Lienert, Florian; Boehm, Christian R.; Chen, Jan-Hung; Way, Jeffrey C.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination-based DNA construction methods, such as Gibson assembly, have made it possible to easily and simultaneously assemble multiple DNA parts and hold promise for the development and optimization of metabolic pathways and functional genetic circuits. Over time, however, these pathways and circuits have become more complex, and the increasing need for standardization and insulation of genetic parts has resulted in sequence redundancies — for example repeated terminator and insulator sequences — that complicate recombination-based assembly. We and others have recently developed DNA assembly methods that we refer to collectively as unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly, in which individual DNA parts are flanked with UNSs to facilitate the ordered, recombination-based assembly of repetitive sequences. Here we present a detailed protocol for UNS-guided assembly that enables researchers to convert multiple DNA parts into sequenced, correctly-assembled constructs, or into high-quality combinatorial libraries in only 2–3 days. If the DNA parts must be generated from scratch, an additional 2–5 days are necessary. This protocol requires no specialized equipment and can easily be implemented by a student with experience in basic cloning techniques. PMID:25101822

  4. Unique nucleotide sequence-guided assembly of repetitive DNA parts for synthetic biology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Torella, JP; Lienert, F; Boehm, CR; Chen, JH; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2014-08-07

    Recombination-based DNA construction methods, such as Gibson assembly, have made it possible to easily and simultaneously assemble multiple DNA parts, and they hold promise for the development and optimization of metabolic pathways and functional genetic circuits. Over time, however, these pathways and circuits have become more complex, and the increasing need for standardization and insulation of genetic parts has resulted in sequence redundancies-for example, repeated terminator and insulator sequences-that complicate recombination-based assembly. We and others have recently developed DNA assembly methods, which we refer to collectively as unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly, in which individual DNA parts are flanked with UNSs to facilitate the ordered, recombination-based assembly of repetitive sequences. Here we present a detailed protocol for UNS-guided assembly that enables researchers to convert multiple DNA parts into sequenced, correctly assembled constructs, or into high-quality combinatorial libraries in only 2-3 d. If the DNA parts must be generated from scratch, an additional 2-5 d are necessary. This protocol requires no specialized equipment and can easily be implemented by a student with experience in basic cloning techniques.

  5. CIDAR MoClo: Improved MoClo Assembly Standard and New E. coli Part Library Enable Rapid Combinatorial Design for Synthetic and Traditional Biology.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Sonya V; Haddock, Traci L; Beal, Jacob; Densmore, Douglas M

    2016-01-15

    Multipart and modular DNA part libraries and assembly standards have become common tools in synthetic biology since the publication of the Gibson and Golden Gate assembly methods, yet no multipart modular library exists for use in bacterial systems. Building upon the existing MoClo assembly framework, we have developed a publicly available collection of modular DNA parts and enhanced MoClo protocols to enable rapid one-pot, multipart assembly, combinatorial design, and expression tuning in Escherichia coli. The Cross-disciplinary Integration of Design Automation Research lab (CIDAR) MoClo Library is openly available and contains promoters, ribosomal binding sites, coding sequence, terminators, vectors, and a set of fluorescent control plasmids. Optimized protocols reduce reaction time and cost by >80% from that of previously published protocols. PMID:26479688

  6. Method of forming and assembly of parts

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2010-12-28

    A method of assembling two or more parts together that may be metal, ceramic, metal and ceramic parts, or parts that have different CTE. Individual parts are formed and sintered from particles that leave a network of interconnecting porosity in each sintered part. The separate parts are assembled together and then a fill material is infiltrated into the assembled, sintered parts using a method such as capillary action, gravity, and/or pressure. The assembly is then cured to yield a bonded and fully or near-fully dense part that has the desired physical and mechanical properties for the part's intended purpose. Structural strength may be added to the parts by the inclusion of fibrous materials.

  7. Magnetic self-assembly of small parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetye, Sheetal B.

    Modern society's propensity for miniaturized end-user products is compelling electronic manufacturers to assemble and package different micro-scale, multi-technology components in more efficient and cost-effective manners. As the size of the components gets smaller, issues such as part sticking and alignment precision create challenges that slow the throughput of conventional robotic pick-n-place systems. As an alternative, various self-assembly approaches have been proposed to manipulate micro to millimeter scale components in a parallel fashion without human or robotic intervention. In this dissertation, magnetic self-assembly (MSA) is demonstrated as a highly efficient, completely parallel process for assembly of millimeter scale components. MSA is achieved by integrating permanent micromagnets onto component bonding surfaces using wafer-level microfabrication processes. Embedded bonded powder methods are used for fabrication of the magnets. The magnets are then magnetized using pulse magnetization methods, and the wafers are then singulated to form individual components. When the components are randomly mixed together, self-assembly occurs when the intermagnetic forces overcome the mixing forces. Analytical and finite element methods (FEM) are used to study the force interactions between the micromagnets. The multifunctional aspects of MSA are presented through demonstration of part-to-part and part-to-substrate assembly of 1 mm x 1mm x 0.5 mm silicon components. Part-to-part assembly is demonstrated by batch assembly of free-floating parts in a liquid environment with the assembly yield of different magnetic patterns varying from 88% to 90% in 20 s. Part-to-substrate assembly is demonstrated by assembling an ordered array onto a fixed substrate in a dry environment with the assembly yield varying from 86% to 99%. In both cases, diverse magnetic shapes/patterns are used to control the alignment and angular orientation of the components. A mathematical model is

  8. Directed Assembly of Biological Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Aline

    2009-03-01

    The self-assembly of polypeptides into beta-sheet rich nanofibrils has attracted considerable attention in recent years to both understand amyloidgenesis and for their potential biomaterials applications. This self-assembly process is generic to all proteins where fibrillation is typically induced under harsh conditions of low pH and/or high temperature, which are of course not suitable for biomaterials applications. Here we will outline the method developed in our laboratory to create thermo-reversible fibrillar hydrogels from aqueous solutions of a series of proteins by adding a reductant. Proteins studied include beta-lactoglobulin, ovalbimum, lysozyme and bovine serum albimum; all contain an increasing number of disulfide bridges that are disrupted by the reductant. Such disruption destabilises the native state of the protein and this allows us to form transparent, self-supporting hydrogels under physiological conditions. The potential to control and manipulate the gel properties, including mechanical strength and structure (fibre diameter and mesh size of hydrogel) has been explored by varying the protein (consequently the number of disulfide bridges), protein concentration, reductant concentration and ionic strength of the matrix. Our results will be presented here and similarities and differences highlighted. Furthermore we will present both our 2- and 3-dimensional cell culture experiments that show the gel matrix promotes both fibroblast and chondrocyte cell spreading, attachment and proliferation; indicating our hydrogels gels are biocompatible and they can provide a viable support for different cell types.

  9. Indentured Parts List Maintenance and Part Assembly Capture Tool - IMPACT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Bobby; Morris, Jill; Sharpe, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) indentured parts list (IPL) maintenance and parts assembly capture tool (IMPACT) is an easy-to-use graphical interface for viewing and maintaining the complex assembly hierarchies of large databases. IMPACT, already in use at JSC to support the International Space Station (ISS), queries, updates, modifies, and views data in IPL and associated resource data, functions that it can also perform, with modification, for any large commercial database. By enabling its users to efficiently view and manipulate IPL hierarchical data, IMPACT performs a function unlike that of any other tool. Through IMPACT, users will achieve results quickly, efficiently, and cost effectively.

  10. The biological microprocessor, or how to build a computer with biological parts.

    PubMed

    Moe-Behrens, Gerd Hg

    2013-01-01

    Systemics, a revolutionary paradigm shift in scientific thinking, with applications in systems biology, and synthetic biology, have led to the idea of using silicon computers and their engineering principles as a blueprint for the engineering of a similar machine made from biological parts. Here we describe these building blocks and how they can be assembled to a general purpose computer system, a biological microprocessor. Such a system consists of biological parts building an input / output device, an arithmetic logic unit, a control unit, memory, and wires (busses) to interconnect these components. A biocomputer can be used to monitor and control a biological system. PMID:24688733

  11. The biological microprocessor, or how to build a computer with biological parts

    PubMed Central

    Moe-Behrens, Gerd HG

    2013-01-01

    Systemics, a revolutionary paradigm shift in scientific thinking, with applications in systems biology, and synthetic biology, have led to the idea of using silicon computers and their engineering principles as a blueprint for the engineering of a similar machine made from biological parts. Here we describe these building blocks and how they can be assembled to a general purpose computer system, a biological microprocessor. Such a system consists of biological parts building an input / output device, an arithmetic logic unit, a control unit, memory, and wires (busses) to interconnect these components. A biocomputer can be used to monitor and control a biological system. PMID:24688733

  12. Engineering colloidal assembly via biological adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiddessen, Amy Lynn

    Due to highly specialized recognition properties, biological receptor-ligand interactions offer valuable tools for engineering the assembly of novel colloidal materials. A unique sub-class of these macromolecules, called selectins, was exploited to develop binary suspensions where particles are programmed to associate reversibly or irreversibly via specific biomolecular cross-linking. Flow cytometry and videomicroscopy were used to examine factors controlling suspension assembly and structure, including biomolecular affinity and density, and individual and total particle volume fractions. By functionalizing small (RA = 0.47 mum) and larger (RB = 2.75 mum) particles with high surface densities of complementary E-selectin/sialyl Lewis X (sLeX) carbohydrate chemistry, a series of structures, from colloidal micelles (large particle coated with smaller particles) and clusters, to rings and elongated chains, was synthesized by decreasing the number ratio, NA/NB, of small (A) to large (B) particles (2 ≤ NA/NB ≤ 200) at low total volume fraction (10-4 ≤ φT ≤ 10-3 ). Using significantly lower surface densities, the low affinity binding between E-selectin and sLeX was exploited to create particles that interact reversibly, and average particle interaction lifetimes were tuned from minutes down to single selectin-carbohydrate bond lifetimes (≈1 s) by reducing sLeX density, a significant step toward assembling ordered microstructures. Particle binding lifetimes were analyzed with a receptor-ligand binding model, yielding estimates for molecular parameters, including on rate, 10-2 s-1 < kon < 10-1 s-1, and unstressed off rate, 0.25 s-1 ≤ kor ≤ 1.0 s-1, that characterize the docking dynamics of particles. Finally, at significantly higher volume fraction (φ T ≥ 10-1) and low number ratio, the rheology of space-filling networks crosslinked by high affinity streptavidin-biotin chemistry was probed to acquire knowledge on bulk properties of biocolloidal suspensions

  13. BASIC: A New Biopart Assembly Standard for Idempotent Cloning Provides Accurate, Single-Tier DNA Assembly for Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Storch, Marko; Casini, Arturo; Mackrow, Ben; Fleming, Toni; Trewhitt, Harry; Ellis, Tom; Baldwin, Geoff S

    2015-07-17

    The ability to quickly and reliably assemble DNA constructs is one of the key enabling technologies for synthetic biology. Here we define a new Biopart Assembly Standard for Idempotent Cloning (BASIC), which exploits the principle of orthogonal linker based DNA assembly to define a new physical standard for DNA parts. Further, we demonstrate a new robust method for assembly, based on type IIs restriction enzyme cleavage and ligation of oligonucleotides with single stranded overhangs that determine the assembly order. It allows for efficient, parallel assembly with great accuracy: 4 part assemblies achieved 93% accuracy with single antibiotic selection and 99.7% accuracy with double antibiotic selection, while 7 part assemblies achieved 90% accuracy with double antibiotic selection. The linkers themselves may also be used as composable parts for RBS tuning or the creation of fusion proteins. The standard has one forbidden restriction site and provides for an idempotent, single tier organization, allowing all parts and composite constructs to be maintained in the same format. This makes the BASIC standard conceptually simple at both the design and experimental levels. PMID:25746445

  14. Liquid crystal assemblies in biologically inspired systems

    PubMed Central

    Safinya, Cyrus R.; Deek, Joanna; Beck, Roy; Jones, Jayna B.; Leal, Cecilia; Ewert, Kai K.; Li, Youli

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, which is part of a collection in honor of Noel Clark's remarkable career on liquid crystal and soft matter research, we present examples of biologically inspired systems, which form liquid crystal (LC) phases with their LC nature impacting biological function in cells or being important in biomedical applications. One area focuses on understanding network and bundle formation of cytoskeletal polyampholytes (filamentous-actin, microtubules, and neurofilaments). Here, we describe studies on neurofilaments (NFs), the intermediate filaments of neurons, which form open network nematic liquid crystal hydrogels in axons. Synchrotron small-angle-x-ray scattering studies of NF-protein dilution experiments and NF hydrogels subjected to osmotic stress show that neurofilament networks are stabilized by competing long-range repulsion and attractions mediated by the neurofilament's polyampholytic sidearms. The attractions are present both at very large interfilament spacings, in the weak sidearm-interpenetrating regime, and at smaller interfilament spacings, in the strong sidearm-interpenetrating regime. A second series of experiments will describe the structure and properties of cationic liposomes (CLs) complexed with nucleic acids (NAs). CL-NA complexes form liquid crystalline phases, which interact in a structure-dependent manner with cellular membranes enabling the design of complexes for efficient delivery of nucleic acid (DNA, RNA) in therapeutic applications. PMID:24558293

  15. Method of forming and assembly of metal and ceramic parts

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B

    2014-04-22

    A method of forming and assembling at least two parts together that may be metal, ceramic, or a combination of metal and ceramic parts. Such parts may have different CTE. Individual parts that are formed and sintered from particles leave a network of interconnecting porosity in each sintered part. The separate parts are assembled together and then a fill material is infiltrated into the assembled parts using a method such as capillary action, gravity, and/or pressure. The assembly is then cured to yield a bonded and fully or near-fully dense part that has the desired physical and mechanical properties for the part's intended purpose. Structural strength may be added to the parts by the inclusion of fibrous materials.

  16. Synthetic Self-Assembled Materials in Biological Environments.

    PubMed

    Versluis, Frank; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic self-assembly has long been recognized as an excellent approach for the formation of ordered structures on the nanoscale. Although the development of synthetic self-assembling materials has often been inspired by principles observed in nature (e.g., the assembly of lipids, DNA, proteins), until recently the self-assembly of synthetic molecules has mainly been investigated ex vivo. The past few years however, have witnessed the emergence of a research field in which synthetic, self-assembling systems are used that are capable of operating as bioactive materials in biological environments. Here, this up-and-coming field, which has the potential of becoming a key area in chemical biology and medicine, is reviewed. Two main categories of applications of self-assembly in biological environments are identified and discussed, namely therapeutic and imaging agents. Within these categories key concepts, such as triggers and molecular constraints for in vitro/in vivo self-assembly and the mode of interaction between the assemblies and the biological materials will be discussed. PMID:27042774

  17. PaperClip: rapid multi-part DNA assembly from existing libraries

    PubMed Central

    Trubitsyna, Maryia; Michlewski, Gracjan; Cai, Yizhi; Elfick, Alistair; French, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Assembly of DNA ‘parts’ to create larger constructs is an essential enabling technique for bioengineering and synthetic biology. Here we describe a simple method, PaperClip, which allows flexible assembly of multiple DNA parts from currently existing libraries cloned in any vector. No restriction enzymes, mutagenesis of internal restriction sites, or reamplification to add end homology are required. Order of assembly is directed by double stranded oligonucleotides—‘Clips’. Clips are formed by ligation of pairs of oligonucleotides corresponding to the ends of each part. PaperClip assembly can be performed by polymerase chain reaction or by cell extract-mediated recombination. Once multi-use Clips have been prepared, assembly of at least six DNA parts in any order can be accomplished with high efficiency within several hours. PMID:25200084

  18. Method of forming and assembly of metal parts and ceramic parts

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2011-11-22

    A method of forming and assembling at least two parts together that may be metal, ceramic, or a combination of metal and ceramic parts. Such parts may have different CTE. Individual parts that are formed and sintered from particles leave a network of interconnecting porosity in each sintered part. The separate parts are assembled together and then a fill material is infiltrated into the assembled parts using a method such as capillary action, gravity, and/or pressure. The assembly is then cured to yield a bonded and fully or near-fully dense part that has the desired physical and mechanical properties for the part's intended purpose. Structural strength may be added to the parts by the inclusion of fibrous materials.

  19. Readout electrode assembly for measuring biological impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Moody, D. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The invention comprises of a pair of readout ring electrodes which are used in conjunction with apparatus for measuring the electrical impedance between different points in the body of a living animal to determine the amount of blood flow therebetween. The readout electrodes have independently adjustable diameters to permit attachment around different parts of the body between which it is desired to measure electric impedance. The axial spacing between the electrodes is adjusted by a pair of rods which have a first pair of ends fixedly attached to one electrode and a second pair of ends slidably attached to the other electrode. Indicia are provided on the outer surface of the ring electrodes and on the surface of the rods to permit measurement of the circumference and spacing between the ring electrodes.

  20. Targeted Development of Registries of Biological Parts

    PubMed Central

    Peccoud, Jean; Blauvelt, Megan F.; Cai, Yizhi; Cooper, Kristal L.; Crasta, Oswald; DeLalla, Emily C.; Evans, Clive; Folkerts, Otto; Lyons, Blair M.; Mane, Shrinivasrao P.; Shelton, Rebecca; Sweede, Matthew A.; Waldon, Sally A.

    2008-01-01

    Background The design and construction of novel biological systems by combining basic building blocks represents a dominant paradigm in synthetic biology. Creating and maintaining a database of these building blocks is a way to streamline the fabrication of complex constructs. The Registry of Standard Biological Parts (Registry) is the most advanced implementation of this idea. Methods/Principal Findings By analyzing inclusion relationships between the sequences of the Registry entries, we build a network that can be related to the Registry abstraction hierarchy. The distribution of entry reuse and complexity was extracted from this network. The collection of clones associated with the database entries was also analyzed. The plasmid inserts were amplified and sequenced. The sequences of 162 inserts could be confirmed experimentally but unexpected discrepancies have also been identified. Conclusions/Significance Organizational guidelines are proposed to help design and manage this new type of scientific resources. In particular, it appears necessary to compare the cost of ensuring the integrity of database entries and associated biological samples with their value to the users. The initial strategy that permits including any combination of parts irrespective of its potential value leads to an exponential and economically unsustainable growth that may be detrimental to the quality and long-term value of the resource to its users. PMID:18628824

  1. One-pot DNA construction for synthetic biology: the Modular Overlap-Directed Assembly with Linkers (MODAL) strategy.

    PubMed

    Casini, Arturo; MacDonald, James T; De Jonghe, Joachim; Christodoulou, Georgia; Freemont, Paul S; Baldwin, Geoff S; Ellis, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Overlap-directed DNA assembly methods allow multiple DNA parts to be assembled together in one reaction. These methods, which rely on sequence homology between the ends of DNA parts, have become widely adopted in synthetic biology, despite being incompatible with a key principle of engineering: modularity. To answer this, we present MODAL: a Modular Overlap-Directed Assembly with Linkers strategy that brings modularity to overlap-directed methods, allowing assembly of an initial set of DNA parts into a variety of arrangements in one-pot reactions. MODAL is accompanied by a custom software tool that designs overlap linkers to guide assembly, allowing parts to be assembled in any specified order and orientation. The in silico design of synthetic orthogonal overlapping junctions allows for much greater efficiency in DNA assembly for a variety of different methods compared with using non-designed sequence. In tests with three different assembly technologies, the MODAL strategy gives assembly of both yeast and bacterial plasmids, composed of up to five DNA parts in the kilobase range with efficiencies of between 75 and 100%. It also seamlessly allows mutagenesis to be performed on any specified DNA parts during the process, allowing the one-step creation of construct libraries valuable for synthetic biology applications. PMID:24153110

  2. Precise Truss Assembly using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    We describe an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly of commodity parts with low-precision bonding. We present preliminary experiments in 2D that are motivated by the problem of assembling a space telescope optical bench on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local assembly site in place while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (in this case, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. We report the challenges of designing the IPJR hardware and software, analyze the error in assembly, document the test results over several experiments including a large-scale ring structure, and describe future work to implement the IPJR in 3D and with micron precision.

  3. Precise Truss Assembly Using Commodity Parts and Low Precision Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Reishus, Dustin; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, W. R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Hardware and software design and system integration for an intelligent precision jigging robot (IPJR), which allows high precision assembly using commodity parts and low-precision bonding, is described. Preliminary 2D experiments that are motivated by the problem of assembling space telescope optical benches and very large manipulators on orbit using inexpensive, stock hardware and low-precision welding are also described. An IPJR is a robot that acts as the precise "jigging", holding parts of a local structure assembly site in place, while an external low precision assembly agent cuts and welds members. The prototype presented in this paper allows an assembly agent (for this prototype, a human using only low precision tools), to assemble a 2D truss made of wooden dowels to a precision on the order of millimeters over a span on the order of meters. The analysis of the assembly error and the results of building a square structure and a ring structure are discussed. Options for future work, to extend the IPJR paradigm to building in 3D structures at micron precision are also summarized.

  4. Diversity in virus assembly: biology makes things complicated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnick, Adam

    2008-03-01

    Icosahedral viruses have an elegance of geometry that implies a general path of assembly. However, structure alone provides insufficient information. Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV), an important system for studying virus assembly, consists of 90 coat protein (CP) homodimers condensed around an RNA genome. The crystal structure (Speir et al, 1995) reveals that assembly causes burial of hydrophobic surface and formation of β hexamers, the intertwining of N-termini of the CPs surrounding a quasi-sixfold. This structural view leads to reasonable and erroneous predictions: (i) CCMV capsids are extremely stable, and (ii) β hexamer formation is critical to assembly. Experimentally, we have found that capsids are based on a network of extremely weak (4-5 kT) pairwise interactions and that pentamer formation is the critical step in assembly kinetics. Because of the fragility of CP-Cp interaction, we can redirect assembly to generate and dissociate tubular nanostructures. The dynamic behavior of CCMV reflects the requirements and peculiarities of an evolved biological system; it does not necessarily reflect the behavior predicted from a more static picture of the virus.

  5. Mining Environmental Plasmids for Synthetic Biology Parts and Devices.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Esteban; Benedetti, Ilaria; Hueso, Angeles; De Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-02-01

    The scientific and technical ambition of contemporary synthetic biology is the engineering of biological objects with a degree of predictability comparable to those made through electric and industrial manufacturing. To this end, biological parts with given specifications are sequence-edited, standardized, and combined into devices, which are assembled into complete systems. This goal, however, faces the customary context dependency of biological ingredients and their amenability to mutation. Biological orthogonality (i.e., the ability to run a function in a fashion minimally influenced by the host) is thus a desirable trait in any deeply engineered construct. Promiscuous conjugative plasmids found in environmental bacteria have evolved precisely to autonomously deploy their encoded activities in a variety of hosts, and thus they become excellent sources of basic building blocks for genetic and metabolic circuits. In this article we review a number of such reusable functions that originated in environmental plasmids and keep their properties and functional parameters in a variety of hosts. The properties encoded in the corresponding sequences include inter alia origins of replication, DNA transfer machineries, toxin-antitoxin systems, antibiotic selection markers, site-specific recombinases, effector-dependent transcriptional regulators (with their cognate promoters), and metabolic genes and operons. Several of these sequences have been standardized as BioBricks and/or as components of the SEVA (Standard European Vector Architecture) collection. Such formatting facilitates their physical composability, which is aimed at designing and deploying complex genetic constructs with new-to-nature properties. PMID:26104565

  6. A precision press-fit instrument for assembling small parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Zhifeng; Wang, Xiaodong; You, Bo; Xu, Yang

    2015-02-01

    In the paper, a precision press-fit instrument for assembling small interference fitting parts is introduced, which includes pressing module and parts alignment module. The pressing module was used to clamp and position parts, and parts alignment module was used for the two parts' alignment. Through analyzing press-fit control method, component alignment and adjustment strategy, and machine vision device calibration method, the instrument meets the pressing requirements of precision small components. Finite element method is used to predict the reasonable range of press-fit force, and pressing result of the instrument is tested by experiments.

  7. An Easy-to-Assemble Three-Part Galvanic Cell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Per-Odd; Skaugrud, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The galvanic cell presented in this article is made of only three parts, is easy to assemble, and can light a red light emitting diode (LED). The three cell components consist of a piece of paper with copper sulfate, a piece of paper with sodium sulfate, and a piece of magnesium ribbon. Within less than 1 h, students have time to discuss the…

  8. Assembly of hair bundles, an amazing problem for cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Gillespie, Peter-G.

    2015-01-01

    The hair bundle—the sensory organelle of inner-ear hair cells of vertebrates—exemplifies the ability of a cell to assemble complex, elegant structures. Proper construction of the bundle is required for proper mechanotransduction in response to external forces and to transmit information about sound and movement. Bundles contain tightly controlled numbers of actin-filled stereocilia, which are arranged in defined rows of precise heights. Indeed, many deafness mutations that disable hair-cell cytoskeletal proteins also disrupt bundles. Bundle assembly is a tractable problem in molecular and cellular systems biology; the sequence of structural changes in stereocilia is known, and a modest number of proteins may be involved. PMID:26229154

  9. Assembly of hair bundles, an amazing problem for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Barr-Gillespie, Peter-G

    2015-08-01

    The hair bundle--the sensory organelle of inner-ear hair cells of vertebrates--exemplifies the ability of a cell to assemble complex, elegant structures. Proper construction of the bundle is required for proper mechanotransduction in response to external forces and to transmit information about sound and movement. Bundles contain tightly controlled numbers of actin-filled stereocilia, which are arranged in defined rows of precise heights. Indeed, many deafness mutations that disable hair-cell cytoskeletal proteins also disrupt bundles. Bundle assembly is a tractable problem in molecular and cellular systems biology; the sequence of structural changes in stereocilia is known, and a modest number of proteins may be involved. PMID:26229154

  10. Autonomous parts assembly: comparison of ART and neocognitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosandich, Ryan G.; Ozbayoglu, Murat A.; Roddiger, Eric W.; Dagli, Cihan H.

    1993-09-01

    In this paper, we present the performance analysis of three different neural network paradigms, ART-1, ARTMAP inspired ART-1 and Neocognitron, for part recognition in an autonomous assembly system. This intelligent manufacturing system integrates machine vision, neural networks and robotics in order to identify, locate and assemble randomly places components on printed circuit boards requiring precision assembly. The system uses an IBM 7547 robot controlled by an IBM PS/2 computer, a CCD camera and an image capture card. The electronic components are identified and located by using artificial neural networks. The system's component location and identification accuracy are tested on all test components. The results show that the neocognitron-based system performed better than the other two systems.

  11. Directed self-assembly, genomic assembly complexity and the formation of biological structure, or, what are the genes for nacre?

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E

    2016-03-13

    Biology uses dynamical mechanisms of self-organization and self-assembly of materials, but it also choreographs and directs these processes. The difference between abiotic self-assembly and a biological process is rather like the difference between setting up and running an experiment to make a material remotely compared with doing it in one's own laboratory: with a remote experiment-say on the International Space Station-everything must be set up beforehand to let the experiment run 'hands off', but in the laboratory one can intervene at any point in a 'hands-on' approach. It is clear that the latter process, of directed self-assembly, can allow much more complicated experiments and produce far more complex structures than self-assembly alone. This control over self-assembly in biology is exercised at certain key waypoints along a trajectory and the process may be quantified in terms of the genomic assembly complexity of a biomaterial. PMID:26857670

  12. Eugene – A Domain Specific Language for Specifying and Constraining Synthetic Biological Parts, Devices, and Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bilitchenko, Lesia; Liu, Adam; Cheung, Sherine; Weeding, Emma; Xia, Bing; Leguia, Mariana; Anderson, J. Christopher; Densmore, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthetic biological systems are currently created by an ad-hoc, iterative process of specification, design, and assembly. These systems would greatly benefit from a more formalized and rigorous specification of the desired system components as well as constraints on their composition. Therefore, the creation of robust and efficient design flows and tools is imperative. We present a human readable language (Eugene) that allows for the specification of synthetic biological designs based on biological parts, as well as provides a very expressive constraint system to drive the automatic creation of composite Parts (Devices) from a collection of individual Parts. Results We illustrate Eugene's capabilities in three different areas: Device specification, design space exploration, and assembly and simulation integration. These results highlight Eugene's ability to create combinatorial design spaces and prune these spaces for simulation or physical assembly. Eugene creates functional designs quickly and cost-effectively. Conclusions Eugene is intended for forward engineering of DNA-based devices, and through its data types and execution semantics, reflects the desired abstraction hierarchy in synthetic biology. Eugene provides a powerful constraint system which can be used to drive the creation of new devices at runtime. It accomplishes all of this while being part of a larger tool chain which includes support for design, simulation, and physical device assembly. PMID:21559524

  13. Standards for plant synthetic biology: a common syntax for exchange of DNA parts.

    PubMed

    Patron, Nicola J; Orzaez, Diego; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Warzecha, Heribert; Matthewman, Colette; Youles, Mark; Raitskin, Oleg; Leveau, Aymeric; Farré, Gemma; Rogers, Christian; Smith, Alison; Hibberd, Julian; Webb, Alex A R; Locke, James; Schornack, Sebastian; Ajioka, Jim; Baulcombe, David C; Zipfel, Cyril; Kamoun, Sophien; Jones, Jonathan D G; Kuhn, Hannah; Robatzek, Silke; Van Esse, H Peter; Sanders, Dale; Oldroyd, Giles; Martin, Cathie; Field, Rob; O'Connor, Sarah; Fox, Samantha; Wulff, Brande; Miller, Ben; Breakspear, Andy; Radhakrishnan, Guru; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Loqué, Dominique; Granell, Antonio; Tissier, Alain; Shih, Patrick; Brutnell, Thomas P; Quick, W Paul; Rischer, Heiko; Fraser, Paul D; Aharoni, Asaph; Raines, Christine; South, Paul F; Ané, Jean-Michel; Hamberger, Björn R; Langdale, Jane; Stougaard, Jens; Bouwmeester, Harro; Udvardi, Michael; Murray, James A H; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Schäfer, Patrick; Denby, Katherine; Edwards, Keith J; Osbourn, Anne; Haseloff, Jim

    2015-10-01

    Inventors in the field of mechanical and electronic engineering can access multitudes of components and, thanks to standardization, parts from different manufacturers can be used in combination with each other. The introduction of BioBrick standards for the assembly of characterized DNA sequences was a landmark in microbial engineering, shaping the field of synthetic biology. Here, we describe a standard for Type IIS restriction endonuclease-mediated assembly, defining a common syntax of 12 fusion sites to enable the facile assembly of eukaryotic transcriptional units. This standard has been developed and agreed by representatives and leaders of the international plant science and synthetic biology communities, including inventors, developers and adopters of Type IIS cloning methods. Our vision is of an extensive catalogue of standardized, characterized DNA parts that will accelerate plant bioengineering. PMID:26171760

  14. FLOAT OPERATED RADIAL GATE HOIST ASSEMBLY LIST OF PARTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FLOAT OPERATED RADIAL GATE HOIST ASSEMBLY - LIST OF PARTS - BASE-CRANK. WASTEWAY NO. 1. WELLTON-MOHAWK CANAL - STA. 99+23.50. United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation; Gila Project, Arizona, Wellton-Mohawk Division. Drawing No. 50-D-2511, dated May 3, 1949, Denver Colorado. Sheet 1 of 2 - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Wasteway No. 1, Wellton-Mohawk Canal, North side of Wellton-Mohawk Canal, bounded by Gila River to North & the Union Pacific Railroad & Gila Mountains to south, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  15. Micro-grippers for assembly of LIGA parts

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.; Polosky, M.; Christenson, T.; Spletzer, B.; Simon, R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes ongoing testing of two microgrippers for assembly of LIGA (Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung) parts. The goal is to place 100 micron outside diameter (OD) LIGA gears with a 50 micron inner diameter hole onto pins ranging from 35 to 49 microns. The first micro gripper is a vacuum gripper made of a 100 micron OD stainless steel tube. The second micro gripper is a set of tweezers fabricated using the LIGA process. Nickel, Permalloy, and copper materials are tested. The tweezers are actuated by a collet mechanism which is closed by a DC linear motor.

  16. Prions and Protein Assemblies that Convey Biological Information in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, David W; Kaufman, Sarah K; Holmes, Brandon B; Diamond, Marc I

    2016-02-01

    Prions derived from the prion protein (PrP) were first characterized as infectious agents that transmit pathology between individuals. However, the majority of cases of neurodegeneration caused by PrP prions occur sporadically. Proteins that self-assemble as cross-beta sheet amyloids are a defining pathological feature of infectious prion disorders and all major age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. In fact, multiple non-infectious proteins exhibit properties of template-driven self-assembly that are strikingly similar to PrP. Evidence suggests that like PrP, many proteins form aggregates that propagate between cells and convert cognate monomer into ordered assemblies. We now recognize that numerous proteins assemble into macromolecular complexes as part of normal physiology, some of which are self-amplifying. This review highlights similarities among infectious and non-infectious neurodegenerative diseases associated with prions, emphasizing the normal and pathogenic roles of higher-order protein assemblies. We propose that studies of the structural and cellular biology of pathological versus physiological aggregates will be mutually informative. PMID:26844828

  17. Molecular self-assembly for biological investigations and nanoscale lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheunkar, Sarawut

    Small, diffusible molecules when recognized by their binding partners, such as proteins and antibodies, trigger enzymatic activity, cell communication, and immune response. Progress in analytical methods enabling detection, characterization, and visualization of biological dynamics at the molecular level will advance our exploration of complex biological systems. In this dissertation, analytical platforms were fabricated to capture membrane-associated receptors, which are essential proteins in cell signaling pathways. The neurotransmitter serotonin and its biological precursor were immobilized on gold substrates coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol)alkanethiols and their reactive derivatives. The SAM-coated substrates present the biologically selective affinity of immobilized molecules to target native membrane-associated receptors. These substrates were also tested for biospecificity using antibodies. In addition, small-molecule-functionalized platforms, expressing neurotransmitter pharmacophores, were employed to examine kinetic interactions between G-protein-coupled receptors and their associated neurotransmitters. The binding interactions were monitored using a quartz crystal microbalance equipped with liquid-flow injection. The interaction kinetics of G-protein-coupled serotonin 1A receptor and 5-hydroxytyptophan-functionalized surfaces were studied in a real-time, label-free environment. Key binding parameters, such as equilibrium dissociation constants, binding rate constants, and dissociative half-life, were extracted. These parameters are critical for understanding and comparing biomolecular interactions in modern biomedical research. By integrating self-assembly, surface functionalization, and nanofabrication, small-molecule microarrays were created for high-throughput screening. A hybrid soft-lithography, called microcontact insertion printing, was used to pattern small molecules at the dilute scales necessary for highly

  18. Part identification in robotic assembly using vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabantaray, Bunil Kumar; Biswal, Bibhuti Bhusan

    2013-12-01

    Machine vision system acts an important role in making robotic assembly system autonomous. Identification of the correct part is an important task which needs to be carefully done by a vision system to feed the robot with correct information for further processing. This process consists of many sub-processes wherein, the image capturing, digitizing and enhancing, etc. do account for reconstructive the part for subsequent operations. Interest point detection of the grabbed image, therefore, plays an important role in the entire image processing activity. Thus it needs to choose the correct tool for the process with respect to the given environment. In this paper analysis of three major corner detection algorithms is performed on the basis of their accuracy, speed and robustness to noise. The work is performed on the Matlab R2012a. An attempt has been made to find the best algorithm for the problem.

  19. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed. PMID:24320063

  20. Electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A program to develop an engineering model of an electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals is summarized. An extensive mathematical modeling study and numerous ground based tests were included. Focus was placed on developing an actual electrophoretic separator of the continuous flow type, configured and suitable for flight testing as a space processing applications rocket payload.

  1. A biologically active surface enzyme assembly that attenuates thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zheng; Muthukrishnan, Sharmila; Urlam, Murali K.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Marzec, Ulla M.; Elkasabi, Yaseen; Lahann, Joerg; Hanson, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of hemostatic pathways by blood-contacting materials remains a major hurdle in the development of clinically durable artificial organs and implantable devices. We postulate that surface-induced thrombosis may be attenuated by the reconstitution onto blood contacting surfaces of bioactive enzymes that regulate the production of thrombin, a central mediator of both clotting and platelet activation cascades. Thrombomodulin (TM), a transmembrane protein expressed by endothelial cells, is an established negative regulator of thrombin generation in the circulatory system. Traditional techniques to covalently immobilize enzymes on solid supports may modify residues contained within or near the catalytic site, thus reducing the bioactivity of surface enzyme assemblies. In this report, we present a molecular engineering and bioorthogonal chemistry approach to site-specifically immobilize a biologically active recombinant human TM fragment onto the luminal surface of small diameter prosthetic vascular grafts. Bioactivity and biostability of TM modified grafts is confirmed in vitro and the capacity of modified grafts to reduce platelet activation is demonstrated using a non-human primate model. These studies indicate that molecularly engineered interfaces that display TM actively limit surface-induced thrombus formation. PMID:23532366

  2. Plant and Animal Gravitational Biology. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA2 includes short reports covering: (1) The Interaction of Microgravity and Ethylene on Soybean Growth and Metabolism; (2) Structure and G-Sensitivity of Root Statocytes under Different Mass Acceleration; (3) Extracellular Production of Taxanes on Cell Surfaces in Simulated Microgravity and Hypergravity; (4) Current Problems of Space Cell Phytobiology; (5) Biological Consequences of Microgravity-Induced Alterations in Water Metabolism of Plant Cells; (6) Localization of Calcium Ions in Chlorella Cells Under Clinorotation; (7) Changes of Fatty Acids Content of Plant Cell Plasma Membranes under Altered Gravity; (8) Simulation of Gravity by Non-Symmetrical Vibrations and Ultrasound; and (9) Response to Simulated weightlessness of In Vitro Cultures of Differentiated Epithelial Follicular Cells from Thyroid.

  3. Electromagnetic fields-Part 1; Biological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, I.; Morgan, M.G. )

    1990-08-01

    It is known that low-frequency electric and magnetic fields can produce a variety of effects in biological systems. Pulsed magnetic fields, for instance, are used to mend broken bones, and other beneficial medical applications are being developed. But in more chronic and less controlled environments, can exposure to such fields also pose health risks No one knows. Today that possibility, however, requires serious consideration. Though present knowledge is fragmentary, and a coherent theory to explain the observations seems far off, the continuous presence of power-frequency fields in the modern environment makes potential health effects a matter of serious scientific and public health policy concern. That concern has focused on cancer - especially leukemia and brain tumors - and developmental abnormalities, and, to a lesser extent on endocrine and nervous system disorders, including chronic depression. The authors focus on 60-hertz fields, where the mechanism of interaction probably involves the cell membrane, is nonlinear, and may act by causing some cooperative phenomena among the components of the cell membrane.

  4. The precision measurement and assembly for miniature parts based on double machine vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. D.; Zhang, L. F.; Xin, M. Z.; Qu, Y. Q.; Luo, Y.; Ma, T. M.; Chen, L.

    2015-02-01

    In the process of miniature parts' assembly, the structural features on the bottom or side of the parts often need to be aligned and positioned. The general assembly equipment integrated with one vertical downward machine vision system cannot satisfy the requirement. A precision automatic assembly equipment was developed with double machine vision systems integrated. In the system, a horizontal vision system is employed to measure the position of the feature structure at the parts' side view, which cannot be seen with the vertical one. The position measured by horizontal camera is converted to the vertical vision system with the calibration information. By careful calibration, the parts' alignment and positioning in the assembly process can be guaranteed. The developed assembly equipment has the characteristics of easy implementation, modularization and high cost performance. The handling of the miniature parts and assembly procedure were briefly introduced. The calibration procedure was given and the assembly error was analyzed for compensation.

  5. A unified convention for biological assemblies with helical symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-08-01

    A new representation of helical structure by four parameters, [n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, twist, rise], is able to generate an entire helical construct from asymmetric units, including cases of helical assembly with a seam. Assemblies with helical symmetry can be conveniently formulated in many distinct ways. Here, a new convention is presented which unifies the two most commonly used helical systems for generating helical assemblies from asymmetric units determined by X-ray fibre diffraction and EM imaging. A helical assembly is viewed as being composed of identical repetitive units in a one- or two-dimensional lattice, named 1-D and 2-D helical systems, respectively. The unification suggests that a new helical description with only four parameters [n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, twist, rise], which is called the augmented 1-D helical system, can generate the complete set of helical arrangements, including coverage of helical discontinuities (seams). A unified four-parameter characterization implies similar parameters for similar assemblies, can eliminate errors in reproducing structures of helical assemblies and facilitates the generation of polymorphic ensembles from helical atomic models or EM density maps. Further, guidelines are provided for such a unique description that reflects the structural signature of an assembly, as well as rules for manipulating the helical symmetry presentation.

  6. Scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation

    DOEpatents

    Hillson, Nathan J.

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides a method of a method of designing an implementation of a DNA assembly. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) receiving a list of DNA sequence fragments to be assembled together and an order in which to assemble the DNA sequence fragments, (2) designing DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for each of the DNA sequence fragments, and (3) creating a plan for adding flanking homology sequences to each of the DNA oligos. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) receiving a list of DNA sequence fragments to be assembled together and an order in which to assemble the DNA sequence fragments, (2) designing DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for each of the DNA sequence fragments, and (3) creating a plan for adding optimized overhang sequences to each of the DNA oligos.

  7. Agents, assemblers, and ANTS: scheduling assembly with market and biological software mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Fejel, Tihamer T.

    2000-06-01

    Nanoscale assemblers will need robust, scalable, flexible, and well-understood mechanisms such as software agents to control them. This paper discusses assemblers and agents, and proposes a taxonomy of their possible interaction. Molecular assembly is seen as a special case of general assembly, subject to many of the same issues, such as the advantages of convergent assembly, and the problem of scheduling. This paper discusses the contract net architecture of ANTS, an agent-based scheduling application under development. It also describes an algorithm for least commitment scheduling, which uses probabilistic committed capacity profiles of resources over time, along with realistic costs, to provide an abstract search space over which the agents can wander to quickly find optimal solutions.

  8. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203—Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203—Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203—Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly...

  11. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203—Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly...

  12. 16 CFR Figure 10 to Part 1203 - Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 1203—Center of Gravity for Drop Assembly...

  13. Solid-state NMR: An emerging technique in structural biology of self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Protein self-assemblies are ubiquitous biological systems involved in many cellular processes, ranging from bacterial and viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Studying the atomic three-dimensional structures of protein self-assemblies is a particularly demanding task, as these systems are usually insoluble, non-crystalline and of large size. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is an emerging method that can provide atomic-level structural data on intact macromolecular assemblies. We here present recent progress in magic-angle spinning ssNMR to study protein assemblies and give an overview on its combination with complementary techniques such as cryo-EM, mass-per-length measurements, SAXS and X-ray diffraction. Applications of ssNMR on its own and in hybrid approaches have revealed precious atomic details and first high-resolution structures of complex biological assemblies, including amyloid fibrils, bacterial filaments, phages or virus capsids. PMID:26234527

  14. Measurements of Gene Expression at Steady State Improve the Predictability of Part Assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoqian M; Chen, Shuobing; Shi, Handuo; Ji, Weiyue; Zong, Yeqing; Ouyang, Qi; Lou, Chunbo

    2016-03-18

    Mathematical modeling of genetic circuits generally assumes that gene expression is at steady state when measurements are performed. However, conventional methods of measurement do not necessarily guarantee that this assumption is satisfied. In this study, we reveal a bi-plateau mode of gene expression at the single-cell level in bacterial batch cultures. The first plateau is dynamically active, where gene expression is at steady state; the second plateau, however, is dynamically inactive. We further demonstrate that the predictability of assembled genetic circuits in the first plateau (steady state) is much higher than that in the second plateau where conventional measurements are often performed. By taking the nature of steady state into consideration, our method of measurement promises to directly capture the intrinsic property of biological parts/circuits regardless of circuit-host or circuit-environment interactions. PMID:26652307

  15. Interest in biology. Part I: A multidimensional construct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Paul L.; Tamir, Pinchas

    Interest in a school subject (e.g., biology) is conceptualized in terms of three components: topics, activities, and motives, each of which has several dimensions. In this study, seven instruments were developed and administered to grade-10 biology students in Israel. Factor analysis provided support for the conceptualization which underlies the development of the instruments. Topic dimensions included biochemical processes, nonhuman organisms, human biology, personal hygiene, and practical applications; the activity dimensions were experiential learning, reception learning, writing/summarizing and group discussion; motives included environmental issues, moral issues, examination success, personal independence, problem solving, and four career dimensions (research, high-status professions, lower-status careers, woodsy-birdsy careers). In an analysis described in Part II of this paper, the students were classified into four groups on the basis of their grade-11 subject enrollment intentions: H (high-level biology), L (low-level biology), P (physical science), and N (no science). Zero-order and multiple correlations were found between interest and other variables and membership/nonmembership of the four groups. Students in Group H were characterized by higher achievement in year-10 biology, higher levels of enjoyment of biology, career orientations towards research or high-status biology-based professions, greater interest in various biology topics, especially reproduction/cell division/genetics, and a greater tendency to regard the Bagrut (grade-12) examination as interesting. Students in Group N displayed lower levels of interest in various topics (especially the microscope, plants, and reproduction), were less motivated to solve problems, had poorer grades in biology (and chemistry), were less likely to perceive biology as useful, were less likely to regard the Bagrut examination as fair, and were less likely to be interested in social modes of learning. There

  16. Controlled Assembly of Viral Surface Proteins into Biological Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani-Webster, Eri

    In recent years, therapeutic use of engineered particles on the 1-1,000 nm scale has gained popularity; these nanoparticles have been developed for use in drug delivery, gene therapy, vaccine preparation, and diagnostics. Often, viral proteins are utilized in the design of such species, and outlined here are completed studies on the in vitro assembly of nanoparticles derived from two very different viral systems. The incorporation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein precursor gp160 into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs is discussed as a potential platform for vaccine design; efforts were successful, however yield currently limits the practical application of this approach. The utility of bacteriophage lambda procapsids and virus-like particles in therapeutic nanoparticle design is also outlined, as are efforts toward the structural and thermodynamic characterization of a urea-triggered capsid maturation event. It is demonstrated that lambda virus-like particles can be assembled from purified capsid and scaffolding proteins, and that these particles undergo urea-triggered maturation and in vitro decoration protein addition similar to that seen in lambda procapsids. The studies on lambda provided materials for the further development of nanoparticles potentially useful in a clinical setting, as well as shedding light on critical viral assembly and maturation events as they may take place in vivo.

  17. Conformational assembly and biological properties of collagen mimetic peptides and their thermally responsive polymer conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Ohm Divyam

    2011-12-01

    Collagens are one of the most abundant proteins found in body tissues and organs, endowing structural integrity, mechanical strength, and multiple biological functions. Destabilized collagen inside human body leads to various degenerative diseases (ex. osteoarthritis) and ageing. This has continued to motivate the design of synthetic peptides and bio-synthetic polypeptides to closely mimic the native collagens in terms of triple helix structure and stability, potential for higher order assembly, and biological properties. However, the widespread application of de novo collagens has been limited in part by the need for hydroxylated proline in the formation of stable triple helical structures. To address this continued need, a hydroxyproline-free, thermally stable collagen-mimetic peptide (CLP-Cys) was rationally designed via the incorporation of electrostatically stabilized amino acid triplets. CLP-Cys was synthesized via solid phase peptide synthesis. The formation and stability of the triple helical structure were indicated via circular dichroism (CD) experiments and confirmed via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results. CLP-Cys also self-assembled into nano-rods and micro-fibrils, as evidenced via a combination of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Given the high thermal stability and its propensity for higher-order assembly, CLP-Cys was further functionalized at both the ends with a thermally responsive polymer, poly(diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate), (PDEGMEMA) to synthesize a biohybrid triblock copolymer. The CD results indicated that the triple helical form is retained, the thermal unfolding is sustained and helix to coil transition is reversible in the triblock hybrid context. The LCST of PDEGMEMA homopolymer (26 °C) is increased (to 35 °C) upon conjugation to the hydrophilic collagen peptide domain. Further, a combination of static light scattering, Cryo-SEM, TEM and confocal microscopy elucidated that the

  18. Automated selection of synthetic biology parts for genetic regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Fusun; Bhatia, Swapnil; Adler, Aaron; Densmore, Douglas; Beal, Jacob

    2012-08-17

    Raising the level of abstraction for synthetic biology design requires solving several challenging problems, including mapping abstract designs to DNA sequences. In this paper we present the first formalism and algorithms to address this problem. The key steps of this transformation are feature matching, signal matching, and part matching. Feature matching ensures that the mapping satisfies the regulatory relationships in the abstract design. Signal matching ensures that the expression levels of functional units are compatible. Finally, part matching finds a DNA part sequence that can implement the design. Our software tool MatchMaker implements these three steps. PMID:23651287

  19. Chemically directed assembly of nanoparticles for material and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myoung-Hwan

    The unique electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of nanoparticles (NPs) make them useful building blocks for nanodevices and biofabrication. Site-selective immobilization/deposition of NPs on surfaces at desired positions is an important fabrication step in realizing the potential of nanomaterials in these applications. In this thesis, my research has focused on developing new strategies for mono- and multilayered-NP deposition on surfaces, increasing the stability of NP-assembles upon various surfaces for practical use of NP-based devices. Chemically directed dithiocarbamate binding of amine groups to NPs in the presence of CS2 was used for enhancing the robustness of NP assembles. Such patterning methodologies have allowed me to use site-directed NP immobilization in applications as diverse as microcontact printing, nanomolding in capillaries, nanoimprint lithography, and photolithography. Also, I have developed a simple and reliable one-step technique to form robust dendrimer-NP nanocomposites using dithiocarbamate-based chemistry. These composites are able to encapsulate and release various therapeutics, providing controllable sustained release and to separate small molecules and biomacromolecules.

  20. Weak Polyelectrolyte-Clay Assemblies: Physical Mechanisms of Biological Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhishvili, Svetlana; Pavlukhina, Svetlana; Zhuk, Iryna

    2014-03-01

    We report on a highly efficient, non-leachable antibacterial coating, consisting of an ultrathin nanocomposite hydrogel capable of hosting, protecting and delivering antibiofilm agents in response to bacterial infection. Constructed using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of clay nanoplatelets and a weak polyelectrolyte and loaded with an antimicrobial agent (AmA), the coatings was highly resistant to colonization by Staphylococcus aureus. The high antibiofilm activity of the coating results from a combination of highly localized, bacteria-triggered AmA release and hydrogel swelling, as well as retention of AmA by clay nanoplatelets. We discuss the dependence of rheological and swelling properties of weak polyelectrolyte-clay assemblies on film thickness, clay platelet orientation and environmental pH.

  1. Directed self-assembly defectivity assessment. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencher, Chris; Yi, He; Zhou, Jessica; Cai, Manping; Smith, Jeffrey; Miao, Liyan; Montal, Ofir; Blitshtein, Shiran; Lavi, Alon; Dotan, Kfir; Dai, Huixiong; Cheng, Joy Y.; Sanders, Daniel P.; Tjio, Melia; Holmes, Steven

    2012-03-01

    The main concern for the commercialization of directed self-assembly (DSA) for semiconductor manufacturing continues to be the uncertainty in capability and control of defect density. Our research investigates the defect densities of various DSA process applications in the context of a 300mm wafer fab cleanroom environment; this paper expands substantially on the previously published DSA defectivity study by reporting a defect density process window relative to chemical epitaxial pre-pattern registration lines; as well as investigated DSA based contact hole shrinking and report critical dimension statistics for the phase separated polymers before and after etch, along with positional accuracy measurements and missing via defect density.

  2. Building DNA nanostructures for molecular computation, templated assembly, and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Rangnekar, Abhijit; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA is a critical biomolecule well-known for its roles in biology and genetics. Moreover, its double-helical structure and the Watson-Crick pairing of its bases make DNA structurally predictable. This predictability enables design and synthesis of artificial DNA nanostructures by suitable programming of the base sequences of DNA strands. Since the advent of the field of DNA nanotechnology in 1982, a variety of DNA nanostructures have been designed and used for numerous applications. In this Account, we discuss the progress made by our lab which has contributed toward the overall advancement of the field. Tile-based DNA nanostructures are an integral part of structural DNA nanotechnology. These structures are formed using several short, chemically synthesized DNA strands by programming their base sequences so that they self-assemble into desired constructs. Design and assembly of several DNA tiles will be discussed in this Account. Tiles include, for example, TX tiles with three parallel, coplanar duplexes, 4 × 4 cross-tiles with four arms, and weave-tiles with weave-like architecture. Another category of tiles we will present involve multiple parallel duplexes that assemble to form closed tubular structures. All of these tile types have been used to form micrometer-scale one- and two-dimensional arrays and lattices. Origami-based structures constitute another category where a long single-stranded DNA scaffold is folded into desired shapes by association with multiple short staple strands. This Account will describe the efforts by our lab in devising new strategies to improve the maximum size of origami structures. The various DNA nanostructures detailed here have been used in a wide variety of different applications. This Account will discuss the use of DNA tiles for logical computation, encoding information as molecular barcodes, and functionalization for patterning of other nanoscale organic and inorganic materials. Consequently, we have used DNA

  3. DNA assembly of nanoparticle superstructures for controlled biological delivery and elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Leo Y. T.; Zagorovsky, Kyryl; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2014-02-01

    The assembly of nanomaterials using DNA can produce complex nanostructures, but the biological applications of these structures remain unexplored. Here, we describe the use of DNA to control the biological delivery and elimination of inorganic nanoparticles by organizing them into colloidal superstructures. The individual nanoparticles serve as building blocks, whose size, surface chemistry and assembly architecture dictate the overall superstructure design. These superstructures interact with cells and tissues as a function of their design, but subsequently degrade into building blocks that can escape biological sequestration. We demonstrate that this strategy reduces nanoparticle retention by macrophages and improves their in vivo tumour accumulation and whole-body elimination. Superstructures can be further functionalized to carry and protect imaging or therapeutic agents against enzymatic degradation. These results suggest a different strategy to engineer nanostructure interactions with biological systems and highlight new directions in the design of biodegradable and multifunctional nanomedicine.

  4. YeastFab: the design and construction of standard biological parts for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yakun; Dong, Junkai; Zhou, Tong; Auxillos, Jamie; Li, Tianyi; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Lihui; Shen, Yue; Luo, Yisha; Zheng, Yijing; Lin, Jiwei; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Qingyu; Cai, Yizhi; Dai, Junbiao

    2015-01-01

    It is a routine task in metabolic engineering to introduce multicomponent pathways into a heterologous host for production of metabolites. However, this process sometimes may take weeks to months due to the lack of standardized genetic tools. Here, we present a method for the design and construction of biological parts based on the native genes and regulatory elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have developed highly efficient protocols (termed YeastFab Assembly) to synthesize these genetic elements as standardized biological parts, which can be used to assemble transcriptional units in a single-tube reaction. In addition, standardized characterization assays are developed using reporter constructs to calibrate the function of promoters. Furthermore, the assembled transcription units can be either assayed individually or applied to construct multi-gene metabolic pathways, which targets a genomic locus or a receiving plasmid effectively, through a simple in vitro reaction. Finally, using β-carotene biosynthesis pathway as an example, we demonstrate that our method allows us not only to construct and test a metabolic pathway in several days, but also to optimize the production through combinatorial assembly of a pathway using hundreds of regulatory biological parts. PMID:25956650

  5. A biological approach to assembling tissue modules through endothelial capillary network formation.

    PubMed

    Riesberg, Jeremiah J; Shen, Wei

    2015-09-01

    To create functional tissues having complex structures, bottom-up approaches to assembling small tissue modules into larger constructs have been emerging. Most of these approaches are based on chemical reactions or physical interactions at the interface between tissue modules. Here we report a biological assembly approach to integrate small tissue modules through endothelial capillary network formation. When adjacent tissue modules contain appropriate extracellular matrix materials and cell types that support robust endothelial capillary network formation, capillary tubules form and grow across the interface, resulting in assembly of the modules into a single, larger construct. It was shown that capillary networks formed in modules of dense fibrin gels seeded with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); adjacent modules were firmly assembled into an integrated construct having a strain to failure of 117 ± 26%, a tensile strength of 2208 ± 83 Pa and a Young's modulus of 2548 ± 574 Pa. Under the same culture conditions, capillary networks were absent in modules of dense fibrin gels seeded with either HUVECs or MSCs alone; adjacent modules disconnected even when handled gently. This biological assembly approach eliminates the need for chemical reactions or physical interactions and their associated limitations. In addition, the integrated constructs are prevascularized, and therefore this bottom-up assembly approach may also help address the issue of vascularization, another key challenge in tissue engineering. PMID:25694020

  6. Understanding the self-assembly of nanoscale biological systems through computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Daniel R.

    There has recently been much interest in exploiting or guiding the self-assembling of biological systems for fabricating functional nanoscale devices or components that requiring precise placement and alignment of components. Biological materials such as proteins, DNA, and some plant virus components are especially suited to this task due to their well- understood chemistry, interactions with inorganic components, and size-commensurability with templates designed for practical bionanotechnological applications. Due to experimental limitations on precisely tracking and controlling the assembly processes of these nanoscale systems, a fundamental understanding of the physical mechanisms governing nanobiological organization onto surfaces and templates has not yet been developed. This thesis aims to use classical molecular dynamics to simulate the organization behaviour of two unique nanobiological systems (viruses and collagen assembled on surfaces) and provide insight into the key processes and conditions driving organization.

  7. The Didactics of Biology. A Selected Bibliography for 1979. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1979 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 18 journals representing 11 different countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  8. The Didactics of Biology. Selected Bibliography for 1980. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1979 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 19 journals representing 11 different countres are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  9. Didactics of Biology. Selective Bibliography, 1981. Part I [and] Part II. Information Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1980 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 19 journals representing 11 different countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  10. GoldenBraid 2.0: A Comprehensive DNA Assembly Framework for Plant Synthetic Biology1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Vazquez-Vilar, Marta; Palací, Jorge; Castelijns, Bas; Forment, Javier; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Plant synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to plant genetic design. One strategic requirement of plant synthetic biology is the adoption of common standardized technologies that facilitate the construction of increasingly complex multigene structures at the DNA level while enabling the exchange of genetic building blocks among plant bioengineers. Here, we describe GoldenBraid 2.0 (GB2.0), a comprehensive technological framework that aims to foster the exchange of standard DNA parts for plant synthetic biology. GB2.0 relies on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for DNA assembly and proposes a modular cloning schema with positional notation that resembles the grammar of natural languages. Apart from providing an optimized cloning strategy that generates fully exchangeable genetic elements for multigene engineering, the GB2.0 toolkit offers an ever-growing open collection of DNA parts, including a group of functionally tested, premade genetic modules to build frequently used modules like constitutive and inducible expression cassettes, endogenous gene silencing and protein-protein interaction tools, etc. Use of the GB2.0 framework is facilitated by a number of Web resources that include a publicly available database, tutorials, and a software package that provides in silico simulations and laboratory protocols for GB2.0 part domestication and multigene engineering. In short, GB2.0 provides a framework to exchange both information and physical DNA elements among bioengineers to help implement plant synthetic biology projects. PMID:23669743

  11. Evolving together: the biology of symbiosis, part 1

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Symbioses, prolonged associations between organisms often widely separated phylogenetically, are more common in biology than we once thought and have been neglected as a phenomenon worthy of study on its own merits. Extending along a dynamic continuum from antagonistic to cooperative and often involving elements of both antagonism and mutualism, symbioses involve pathogens, commensals, and mutualists interacting in myriad ways over the evolutionary history of the involved “partners.” In this first of 2 parts, some remarkable examples of symbiosis will be explored, from the coral-algal symbiosis and nitrogen fixation to the great diversity of dietary specializations enabled by the gastrointestinal microbiota of animals. PMID:16389385

  12. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions. PMID:25756068

  13. Biological colloid engineering: Self-assembly of dipolar ferromagnetic chains in a functionalized biogenic ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruder, Warren C.; Hsu, Chia-Pei D.; Edelman, Brent D.; Schwartz, Russell; LeDuc, Philip R.

    2012-08-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of nanoparticles in ferrofluids consisting of single-domain, biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) isolated from Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (MS-1). Although dipolar chains form in magnetic colloids in zero applied field, when dried upon substrates, the solvent front disorders nanoparticle aggregation. Using avidin-biotin functionalization of the particles and substrate, we generated self-assembled, linear chain motifs that resist solvent front disruption in zero-field. The engineered self-assembly process we describe here provides an approach for the creation of ordered magnetic structures that could impact fields ranging from micro-electro-mechanical systems development to magnetic imaging of biological structures.

  14. Biological passivation of porous silicon by a self-assembled nanometric biofilm of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stefano, Luca; Rea, Ilaria; de Tommasi, Eduardo; Giardina, Paola; Armenante, Annunziata; Longobardi, Sara; Giocondo, Michele; Rendina, Ivo

    2009-10-01

    Self-assembled monolayers are surfaces consisting of a single layer of molecules on a substrate: widespread examples of chemical and biological nature are alkylsiloxane, fatty acids, and alkanethiolate which can be deposited by different techniques on a large variety of substrates ranging from metals to oxides. We have found that a self-assembled biofilm of proteins can passivate porous silicon (PSi) based optical structures without affecting the transducing properties. Moreover, the protein coated PSi layer can also be used as a functionalized surface for proteomic applications.

  15. Assembling new technologies at the interface of materials science and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stendahl, John C.

    Molecular self-assembly can be used to construct advanced materials by taking cues from nature and harnessing noncovalent interactions. This bottom-up approach affords molecular level precision that can cultivate pathways to improved materials function. The graduate research presented in this thesis integrates molecular self-assembly with traditional concepts in chemistry and materials science, with the ultimate goal of developing innovative solutions in technology and medicine. In the field of polymer engineering, self-assembly was used to create supramolecular nanoribbons that, when incorporated into polystyrene, modify its microstructure and significantly enhance its toughness and ductility. In medicine, self-assembly was used to create ordered, chemically functional materials to improve interactions with cells and other constituents of the biological environment. One system that was investigated is based on a triblock molecule in which cholesterol is connected to a lysine dendron by a flexible oligo-(L-lactic acid) spacer. These molecules self-assemble into polar surface coatings on fibrous poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds that improve the scaffold's wettability and increase its retention of cells during seeding. Another self-assembling system that was investigated for biomedical applications is a family of molecules referred to as peptide amphiphiles (PA's). PA's consist of hydrophobic alkyl tails connected to short, hydrophilic peptides that incorporate biological signaling epitopes. These molecules spontaneously assemble into networks of well-defined nanofibers in aqueous environments, with the signaling epitopes presented in high density on the nanofiber exteriors. Nanofiber assembly is triggered by charge screening on the peptides and is able to produce self-supporting gels in concentrations of less than 1.0 wt.-%. The assembly process and mechanical properties of PA gels was investigated in detail with vibrational spectroscopy and oscillatory rheology. PA

  16. DNASynth: A Computer Program for Assembly of Artificial Gene Parts in Decreasing Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert M.; Wojtowicz-Krawiec, Anna; Plucienniczak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Artificial gene synthesis requires consideration of nucleotide sequence development as well as long DNA molecule assembly protocols. The nucleotide sequence of the molecule must meet many conditions including particular preferences of the host organism for certain codons, avoidance of specific regulatory subsequences, and a lack of secondary structures that inhibit expression. The chemical synthesis of DNA molecule has limitations in terms of strand length; thus, the creation of artificial genes requires the assembly of long DNA molecules from shorter fragments. In the approach presented, the algorithm and the computer program address both tasks: developing the optimal nucleotide sequence to encode a given peptide for a given host organism and determining the long DNA assembly protocol. These tasks are closely connected; a change in codon usage may lead to changes in the optimal assembly protocol, and the lack of a simple assembly protocol may be addressed by changing the nucleotide sequence. The computer program presented in this study was tested with real data from an experiment in a wet biological laboratory to synthesize a peptide. The benefit of the presented algorithm and its application is the shorter time, compared to polymerase cycling assembly, needed to produce a ready synthetic gene. PMID:25629047

  17. Oral Mucosal Lesions: Oral Cavity Biology-Part I.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Syed, Nazim Hussain; Aggarwal, Ashok; Sehgal, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the background of oral cavity biology to define morphologic abrasions in oral mucosa following a host of local and/ or systemic disorders. The oral cavity is not only the beginning of the digestive system, but it also plays a significant role in communication; the voice (although the voice is produced in the throat), tongue, lips, and jaw are its essential components to produce the range of sounds. The vestibule and the oral cavity are its major parts, and are usually moist. The lips and the teeth are in approximation, marking its start up. The anatomy of the oral cavity in brief has been reviewed in right prospective for disease related changed morphology, thus facilitating interpretation. PMID:26861428

  18. Supramolecular disassembly of facially amphiphilic dendrimer assemblies in response to physical, chemical, and biological stimuli.

    PubMed

    Raghupathi, Krishna R; Guo, Jing; Munkhbat, Oyuntuya; Rangadurai, Poornima; Thayumanavan, S

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Supramolecular assemblies formed from spontaneous self-assembly of amphiphilic macromolecules are explored as biomimetic architectures and for applications in areas such as sensing, drug delivery, and diagnostics. Macromolecular assemblies are usually preferred, compared with their simpler small molecule counterparts, due to their low critical aggregate concentrations (CAC) and high thermodynamic stability. This Account focuses on the structural and functional aspects of assemblies formed from dendrimers, specifically facially amphiphilic dendrons that form micelle or inverse micelle type supramolecular assemblies depending on the nature of the solvent medium. The micelle type assemblies formed from facially amphiphilic dendrons sequester hydrophobic guest molecules in their interiors. The stability of these assemblies is dependent on the relative compatibility of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic functionalities with water, often referred to as hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). Disruption of the HLB, using an external stimulus, could lead to disassembly of the aggregates, which can then be utilized to cause an actuation event, such as guest molecule release. Studying these possibilities has led to (i) a robust and general strategy for stimulus-induced disassembly and molecular release and (ii) the introduction of a new approach to protein-responsive supramolecular disassembly. The latter strategy provides a particularly novel avenue for impacting biomedical applications. Most of the stimuli-sensitive supramolecular assemblies have been designed to be responsive to factors such pH, temperature, and redox conditions. The reason for this interest stems from the fact that certain disease microenvironments have aberrations in these factors. However, these variations are the secondary imbalances in biology. Imbalances in protein activity are the primary reasons for most, if not all, human pathology. There have been no robust strategies in stimulus

  19. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1633 - Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A) 1 Figure 1 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633,...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1633 - Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A) 1 Figure 1 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633,...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1633 - Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A) 1 Figure 1 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633,...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1633 - Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A) 1 Figure 1 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633,...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1633 - Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test Assembly, Shown in Furniture Calorimeter (Configuration A) 1 Figure 1 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633,...

  4. Frameworks for programming biological function through RNA parts and devices

    PubMed Central

    Win, Maung Nyan; Liang, Joe C.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2009-01-01

    One of the long-term goals of synthetic biology is to reliably engineer biological systems that perform human-defined functions. Currently, researchers face several scientific and technical challenges in designing and building biological systems, one of which is associated with our limited ability to access, transmit, and control molecular information through the design of functional biomolecules exhibiting novel properties. The fields of RNA biology and nucleic acid engineering, along with the tremendous interdisciplinary growth of synthetic biology, are fueling advances in the emerging field of RNA programming in living systems. Researchers are designing functional RNA molecules that exhibit increasingly complex functions and integrating these molecules into cellular circuits to program higher-level biological functions. The continued integration and growth of RNA design and synthetic biology presents exciting potential to transform how we interact with and program biology. PMID:19318211

  5. Parts plus pipes: synthetic biology approaches to metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Patrick M.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic biologists combine modular biological “parts” to create higher-order devices. Metabolic engineers construct biological “pipes” by optimizing the microbial conversion of basic substrates to desired compounds. Many scientists work at the intersection of these two philosophies, employing synthetic devices to enhance metabolic engineering efforts. These integrated approaches promise to do more than simply improve product yields; they can expand the array of products that are tractable to produce biologically. In this review, we explore the application of synthetic biology techniques to next-generation metabolic engineering challenges, as well as the emerging engineering principles for biological design. PMID:22037345

  6. The Dynamics of Microtubule/Motor-Protein Assemblies in Biology and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Many important processes in the cell are mediated by stiff microtubule polymers and the active motor proteins moving on them. This includes the transport of subcellular structures (nuclei, chromosomes, organelles) and the self-assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle. Little is understood of these processes, but they present fascinating problems in fluid-structure interactions. Microtubules and motor proteins are also the building blocks of new biosynthetic active suspensions driven by motor-protein activity. These reduced systems can be probed—and modeled—more easily than can the fully biological ones and demonstrate their own aspects of self-assembly and complex dynamics. I review recent work modeling such systems as fluid-structure interaction problems and as multiscale complex fluids.

  7. Biological colloid engineering: Self-assembly of dipolar ferromagnetic chains in a functionalized biogenic ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Warren C; Hsu, Chia-Pei D; Edelman, Brent D; Schwartz, Russell; Leduc, Philip R

    2012-08-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of nanoparticles in ferrofluids consisting of single-domain, biogenic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) isolated from Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum (MS-1). Although dipolar chains form in magnetic colloids in zero applied field, when dried upon substrates, the solvent front disorders nanoparticle aggregation. Using avidin-biotin functionalization of the particles and substrate, we generated self-assembled, linear chain motifs that resist solvent front disruption in zero-field. The engineered self-assembly process we describe here provides an approach for the creation of ordered magnetic structures that could impact fields ranging from micro-electro-mechanical systems development to magnetic imaging of biological structures. PMID:22952408

  8. The space exposure biology assembly (SEBA)-results of the phase a study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, W.; Hofmann, P.; König, H.

    In the past ESA has successfully flown several experiment facilities for research in space biology, such as the `Exobiology Radiation Assembly' on the EURECA free-flyer and the exposure facility `BIOPAN' on Russian retrievable FOTON satellites. A flight opportunity in the mid-term future well suited to experiments in the field of exobiology and radiation research will be the `Space Exposure Biology Assembly' (SEBA). This new multi-user facility will be installed as an external payload on one of the EXPRESS Pallets that are attached to the truss structure of the International Space Station. In its baseline configuration SEBA consists of two multi-user experiment units: ■ EXPOSE, a sun exposed experiment unit, designed for photobiology and photoprocessing experiments; this unit will be mounted on a sun pointing device ■ MATROSHKA, an experiment unit for the simulation of extravehicular activities of man by using a phantom of a human body equipped with sensors for radiation dosimetric measurements. In addition, SEBA will provide resources to accommodate further self-standing biological or dosimetry add-on experiments. All SEBA elements will be installed on a single EXPRESS Pallet Adapter with an exchange interval of one to three years.

  9. Electrostatically self-assembled biodegradable microparticles from pseudoproteins and polysaccharide: fabrication, characterization, and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Potuck, Alicia N; Weed, Beth L; Leifer, Cynthia A; Chu, C C

    2015-02-01

    Electrostatically self-assembling hybrid microparticles derived from novel cationic unsaturated arginine-based poly(ester amide) polymers (UArg-PEA) and anionic hyaluronic acid (HA) were fabricated into sub-micron-sized particles in aqueous medium with subsequent UV crosslinking treatment to stabilize the structure. These hybrid microparticles were characterized for size, charge, viscosity, chemical structure, morphology, and biological properties. Depending on the feed ratio of cationic UArg-PEA to anionic HA, the crosslinked microparticles formed spherical structures of 0.772-22.08 μm in diameter, whereas the uncrosslinked microparticles formed a core with an outer petal-like structure of 2.49-15 μm in diameter. It was discovered that the morphological structure of the self-assembled microparticles had a profound influence on their biological properties. At a 1:1 feed ratio of UArg-PEA to HA, the uncrosslinked microparticles showed no cytotoxicity toward NIH 3T3 fibroblasts at concentrations up to 20 μg/mL, and the crosslinked particles exhibited no cytotoxicity at concentrations up to 10 μg/mL. The UArg-PEA/HA hybrid microparticles exhibited a significantly lower macrophage-induced proinflammatory response (via TNF-α) than that from a pure hyaluronic acid control while retaining the beneficial anti-inflammatory IL-10 production by HA. The UArg-PEA/HA microparticles also stimulated size-dependent induction of arginase activity. Therefore, self-assembling these two types of biomaterials in a favorable nontoxic aqueous environment, having complementary biological properties like those of the currently reported UArg-PEA/HA hybrid microparticles, may provide a new class of biomaterials to improve the overall tissue microenvironment for promoting wound healing. PMID:25531946

  10. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  11. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  12. In vivo evolution of metabolic pathways: Assembling old parts to build novel and functional structures

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Alejandro; Sebai, Sarra C; Sauveplane, Vincent; Ramaen, Odile; Pandjaitan, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    In our recent article “In vivo evolution of metabolic pathways by homeologous recombination in mitotic cells” we proposed a useful alternative to directed evolution methods that permits the generation of yeast cell libraries containing recombinant metabolic pathways from counterpart genes. The methodology was applied to generate single mosaic genes and intragenic mosaic pathways. We used flavonoid metabolism genes as a working model to assembly and express evolved pathways in DNA repair deficient cells. The present commentary revises the principles of gene and pathway mosaicism and explores the scope and perspectives of our results as an additional tool for synthetic biology. PMID:25482082

  13. Luminescent/paramagnetic xanthane probes in the study of labeled biological assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghardt, Thomas P.; Toft, Daniel J.; Ajtai, Katalin

    1993-05-01

    The techniques for specifying the angular distribution of luminescent and paramagnetic probes on biological assemblies have been combined in the investigation of probe orientation and order of labeled myosin cross-bridges muscle fibers. This combination has been accomplished on two levels involving: (1) a mathematical formalism that permits the combination of data from individual luminescent and paramagnetic probes, and (2) the introduction of a family of specific extrinsic probes that are capable of producing an interpretable luminescent and paramagnetic signal when attached to a muscle fiber. The mathematical formalism has been applied to several probes of the myosin cross-bridge in muscle fibers to establish that the cross-bridge rotates during muscle contraction to produce muscle shortening (Burghardt & Ajtai, 1992 Biochemistry 31, 200; Ajtai et al., 1992 Biochemistry 31, 207). The luminescent/paramagnetic probes have also been employed in the investigation of order and orientation of cross-bridge in muscle fibers (Ajtai & Burghardt, 1992 Biochemistry 31, 4265). The properties of these dual nature probes invites further development of experimental techniques exploiting the high orientation sensitivity of paramagnetic probes with the ability of the probe to absorb and emit light. Flash-photolysis electron paramagnetic resonance is one such technique that may prove useful in the investigation of probe order in biological assemblies.

  14. Invasion Ecology and School Biology--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that invasion biology can supply subject matter for teaching evolution, genetics, ecological relationships, and conservation. Describes flowering and non-flowering plant invaders, vertebrates and invertebrates, and two ecological invasions on the southern coast of England. (JN)

  15. Strontium: Part II. Chemistry, Biological Aspects and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, G. C.; Johnson, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews basic information on the Chemistry of strontium and its compounds. Explains biological aspects of strontium and its pharmaceutical applications. Highlights industrial application of strontium and its components. (ML)

  16. Politics & Prejudice: Dissection in Biology Education. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, David R.

    1991-01-01

    The ideological basis from which dissection activities spring is discussed. Speciesism, the widely held belief that the human species is entitled to certain rights and privileges, is examined as the cause for dissection activities occurring in biology classrooms. (KR)

  17. Biological stimuli and biomolecules in the assembly and manipulation of nanoscale polymeric particles

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Lyndsay M.; Chien, Miao-Ping; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2013-01-01

    Living systems are replete with complex, stimuli-responsive nanoscale materials and molecular self-assemblies. There is an ever increasing and intense interest within the chemical sciences to understand, mimic and interface with these biological systems utilizing synthetic and/or semi-synthetic tools. Our aim in this review is to give perspective on this emerging field of research by highlighting examples of polymeric nanoparticles and micelles that are prepared utilizing biopolymers together with synthetic polymers for the purpose of developing nanomaterials capable of interacting and responding to biologically relevant stimuli. It is expected that with the merging of evolved biological molecules with synthetic materials, will come the ability to prepare complex, functional devices. A variety of applications will become accessible including self-healing materials, self-replicating systems, biodiagnostic tools, drug targeting materials and autonomous, adaptive sensors. Most importantly, the success of this type of strategy will impact how biomolecules are stabilized and incorporated into synthetic devices and at the same time, will influence how synthetic materials are utilized within biomedical applications. PMID:24353895

  18. River Pollution: Part II. Biological Methods for Assessing Water Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods used in the biological assessment of river quality and such indicators of clean and polluted waters as the Trent Biotic Index, Chandler Score System, and species diversity indexes. Includes a summary of a river classification scheme based on quality criteria related to water use. (JN)

  19. Engineering biological structures of prescribed shape using self-assembling multicellular systems

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, Karoly; Neagu, Adrian; Mironov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger R.; Forgacs, Gabor

    2004-01-01

    Self-assembly is a fundamental process that drives structural organization in both inanimate and living systems. It is in the course of self-assembly of cells and tissues in early development that the organism and its parts eventually acquire their final shape. Even though developmental patterning through self-assembly is under strict genetic control it is clear that ultimately it is physical mechanisms that bring about the complex structures. Here we show, both experimentally and by using computer simulations, how tissue liquidity can be used to build tissue constructs of prescribed geometry in vitro. Spherical aggregates containing many thousands of cells, which form because of tissue liquidity, were implanted contiguously into biocompatible hydrogels in circular geometry. Depending on the properties of the gel, upon incubation, the aggregates either fused into a toroidal 3D structure or their constituent cells dispersed into the surrounding matrix. The model simulations, which reproduced the experimentally observed shapes, indicate that the control parameter of structure evolution is the aggregate–gel interfacial tension. The model-based analysis also revealed that the observed toroidal structure represents a metastable state of the cellular system, whose lifetime depends on the magnitude of cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions. Thus, these constructs can be made long-lived. We suggest that spherical aggregates composed of organ-specific cells may be used as “bio-ink” in the evolving technology of organ printing. PMID:14981244

  20. Engineering biological structures of prescribed shape using self-assembling multicellular systems.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Karoly; Neagu, Adrian; Mironov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger R; Forgacs, Gabor

    2004-03-01

    Self-assembly is a fundamental process that drives structural organization in both inanimate and living systems. It is in the course of self-assembly of cells and tissues in early development that the organism and its parts eventually acquire their final shape. Even though developmental patterning through self-assembly is under strict genetic control it is clear that ultimately it is physical mechanisms that bring about the complex structures. Here we show, both experimentally and by using computer simulations, how tissue liquidity can be used to build tissue constructs of prescribed geometry in vitro. Spherical aggregates containing many thousands of cells, which form because of tissue liquidity, were implanted contiguously into biocompatible hydrogels in circular geometry. Depending on the properties of the gel, upon incubation, the aggregates either fused into a toroidal 3D structure or their constituent cells dispersed into the surrounding matrix. The model simulations, which reproduced the experimentally observed shapes, indicate that the control parameter of structure evolution is the aggregate-gel interfacial tension. The model-based analysis also revealed that the observed toroidal structure represents a metastable state of the cellular system, whose lifetime depends on the magnitude of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Thus, these constructs can be made long-lived. We suggest that spherical aggregates composed of organ-specific cells may be used as "bio-ink" in the evolving technology of organ printing. PMID:14981244

  1. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 1: Identifying Proteins Based on Molecular Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    Biological mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. Currently, few hands-on opportunities exist for undergraduate students to learn about this technique. With the 2002 Nobel Prize being awarded, in part, for the development of biological mass…

  2. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of... ECCNs 2B350 and 2B351; (ii) Equipment and materials (for producing biological agents) described in...

  3. Design, implementation and practice of JBEI-ICE: an open source biological part registry platform and tools

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Timothy S.; Dmytriv, Zinovii; Plahar, Hector; Chen, Joanna; Hillson, Nathan J.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute Inventory of Composable Elements (JBEI-ICEs) is an open source registry platform for managing information about biological parts. It is capable of recording information about ‘legacy’ parts, such as plasmids, microbial host strains and Arabidopsis seeds, as well as DNA parts in various assembly standards. ICE is built on the idea of a web of registries and thus provides strong support for distributed interconnected use. The information deposited in an ICE installation instance is accessible both via a web browser and through the web application programming interfaces, which allows automated access to parts via third-party programs. JBEI-ICE includes several useful web browser-based graphical applications for sequence annotation, manipulation and analysis that are also open source. As with open source software, users are encouraged to install, use and customize JBEI-ICE and its components for their particular purposes. As a web application programming interface, ICE provides well-developed parts storage functionality for other synthetic biology software projects. A public instance is available at public-registry.jbei.org, where users can try out features, upload parts or simply use it for their projects. The ICE software suite is available via Google Code, a hosting site for community-driven open source projects. PMID:22718978

  4. Multicomponent, Mannich-type assembly process for generating novel, biologically-active 2-arylpiperidines and derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Simon; Martin, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    A multicomponent, Mannich-type assembly process commencing with commercially available bromobenzaldehydes was sequenced with [3+2] dipolar cycloaddition reactions involving nitrones and azomethine ylides to generate collections of fused, bicyclic scaffolds based on the 2-arylpiperidine subunit. Use of the 4-pentenoyl group, which served both as an activator in the Mannich-type reaction and a readily-cleaved amine protecting group, allowed sub-libraries to be prepared through piperidine N-functionalization and cross-coupling of the aryl bromide. A number of these derivatives displayed biological activities that had not previously been associated with this substructure. Methods were also developed that allowed rapid conversion of these scaffolds to novel, polycyclic dihydroquinazolin-2-ones, 2-imino-1,3-benzothiazinanes, dihydroisoquinolin-3-ones and bridged tetrahydroquinolines. PMID:25267860

  5. Harnessing biological motors to engineer systems for nanoscale transport and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Anita; Vogel, Viola

    2008-08-01

    Living systems use biological nanomotors to build life's essential molecules-such as DNA and proteins-as well as to transport cargo inside cells with both spatial and temporal precision. Each motor is highly specialized and carries out a distinct function within the cell. Some have even evolved sophisticated mechanisms to ensure quality control during nanomanufacturing processes, whether to correct errors in biosynthesis or to detect and permit the repair of damaged transport highways. In general, these nanomotors consume chemical energy in order to undergo a series of shape changes that let them interact sequentially with other molecules. Here we review some of the many tasks that biomotors perform and analyse their underlying design principles from an engineering perspective. We also discuss experiments and strategies to integrate biomotors into synthetic environments for applications such as sensing, transport and assembly.

  6. Exploring DNA assembler, a synthetic biology tool for characterizing and engineering natural product gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    The majority of existing antibacterial and anticancer drugs are natural products or their derivatives. However, the characterization and engineering of these compounds are often hampered by limited ability to manipulate the corresponding biosynthetic pathways. Recently, we developed a genomics-driven, synthetic biology-based method, DNA assembler, for discovery, characterization, and engineering of natural product biosynthetic pathways (Shao et al., 2011). By taking advantage of the highly efficient yeast in vivo homologous recombination mechanism, this method synthesizes the entire expression vector containing the target biosynthetic pathway and the genetic elements needed for DNA maintenance and replication in individual hosts in a single-step manner. In this chapter, we describe the general guidelines for construct design. By using two distinct biosynthetic pathways, we demonstrate that DNA assembler can perform multiple tasks, including heterologous expression, introduction of single or multiple point mutations, scar-less gene deletion, generation of product derivatives and creation of artificial gene clusters. As such, this method offers unprecedented flexibility and versatility in pathway manipulations. PMID:23084940

  7. Protein folding and misfolding: a paradigm of self-assembly and regulation in complex biological systems.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Michele; Zurdo, Jesús; MacPhee, Cait E; Dobson, Christopher M

    2003-06-15

    Understanding biological complexity is one of the grand scientific challenges for the future. A living organism is a highly evolved system made up of a large number of interwoven molecular networks. These networks primarily involve proteins, the macromolecules that enable and control virtually every chemical process that takes place in the cell. Proteins are also key elements in the essential characteristic of living systems, their ability to function and replicate themselves through controlled molecular interactions. Recent progress in understanding the most fundamental aspect of polypeptide self-organization, the process by which proteins fold to attain their active conformations, provides a global platform to gain knowledge about the function of biological systems and the regulatory mechanisms that underpin their ability to adapt to changing conditions. In order to exploit such progress effectively, we are developing a variety of approaches, including procedures that use experimental data to restrain the properties of complex systems in computer simulations, to describe their behaviour under a wide variety of conditions. We believe that such approaches can lead to significant advances in understanding biological complexity, in general, and protein folding and misfolding in particular. These advances would contribute to: a more effective exploitation of the information from genome sequences; more rational therapeutic approaches to diseases, particularly those associated with ageing; the responsible control of our own evolution; and the development of new technologies based on mimicking the principles of biological self-assembly, for instance in nanotechnology. More fundamentally, we believe that this research will result in a more coherent understanding of the origin, evolution and functional properties of living systems. PMID:12816607

  8. [Research under reduced gravity. Part I: bases of gravitational biology].

    PubMed

    Volkmann, D; Sievers, A

    1992-02-01

    The orientation of organisms in space and their morphogenesis in relation to the gravitational field of the Earth are the main topics of research in the field of gravitational biology. For more than 100 years clinostats provided the only possibility to simulate physiological weightlessness. In contrast to animals, plants are characterized by intracellular gravireceptors. Nevertheless, there are some indications, e.g., the minimal energy of approx. 10(-18) J triggering a gravity-dependent response, for similar mechanisms of gravity perception. Stretch-activated ion channels might be the common structural basis. PMID:11536493

  9. Evolving together: the biology of symbiosis, part 2.

    PubMed

    Dimijian, G G

    2000-10-01

    Symbiotic trade-offs dominate the world of biology and medicine in colonist-host relationships and between separate, mutually dependent organisms of different species. Infectious and parasitic diseases can be better understood by exploring the dynamic continuum between pathogenicity and mutualism, between antagonism and cooperation-the sliding scale along which microorganisms can move in a moment's notice with a single nucleotide substitution. Organisms practicing piracy or pastoralism may be close genetic relatives. Mergers occur not only between cells but also between genomes; viruses co-opt host genes and in turn insert themselves into host genomes. Separate organisms, from ants to fungi to plants, establish symbiotic ties with each other that bind over deep time, generating much of the diversity we see in nature. PMID:16389348

  10. Rapid and enzyme-free nucleic acid detection based on exponential hairpin assembly in complex biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cuiping; Zhang, Menghua; Chen, Shan; Liang, Chao; Shi, Chao

    2016-05-10

    Herein, we have developed a rapid and enzyme-free nucleic acid amplification detection method that combined the exponential self-assembly of four DNA hairpins and the FRET pair Cy3 and Cy5. This strategy was very ingenious and rapid, and could detect nucleic acids at concentrations as low as 10 pM in 15 min in biological fluids. PMID:27138054

  11. Application of the Modular Automated Reconfigurable Assembly System (MARAS) concept to adaptable vision gauging and parts feeding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    By, Andre Bernard; Caron, Ken; Rothenberg, Michael; Sales, Vic

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the first phase results of a collaborative effort between university researchers and a flexible assembly systems integrator to implement a comprehensive modular approach to flexible assembly automation. This approach, named MARAS (Modular Automated Reconfigurable Assembly System), has been structured to support multiple levels of modularity in terms of both physical components and system control functions. The initial focus of the MARAS development has been on parts gauging and feeding operations for cylinder lock assembly. This phase is nearing completion and has resulted in the development of a highly configurable system for vision gauging functions on a wide range of small components (2 mm to 100 mm in size). The reconfigurable concepts implemented in this adaptive Vision Gauging Module (VGM) are now being extended to applicable aspects of the singulating, selecting, and orienting functions required for the flexible feeding of similar mechanical components and assemblies.

  12. Amyloids assemble as part of recognizable structures during oogenesis in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hallmark of Alzheimer's, Huntington's and similar diseases is the assembly of proteins into amyloids rather than folding into their native state. There is an increasing appreciation that amyloids, under specific conditions, may be non-pathogenic. Here we show that amyloids form as a normal part of Xenopus oocyte development. Amyloids are detectable in the cytosol and the nucleus using an amyloid binding dye and antibodies that recognize amyloid structure. In the cytosol, yolk platelets are amyloid reactive, as are a number of yet to be characterized particles. In the nucleus, we find particles associated with transcription by RNA polymerase I, II and III and RNA processing contain amyloids. Nuclear amyloids remain intact for hours following isolation; however, RNase treatment rapidly disrupts nuclear amyloids. PMID:27215327

  13. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC Export Licensing Authority C Appendix C to Part 110 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Pt. 110, App. C Appendix C to Part 110—Illustrative List...

  14. Self-Assembling Multidomain Peptides Tailor Biological Responses through Biphasic Release

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek A.; Taylor, Nichole L.; Shi, Siyu; Wickremasinghe, Navindee C.; D’Souza, Rena N.; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of small molecules and drugs to tissues is a mainstay of several tissue engineering strategies. Next generation treatments focused on localized drug delivery offer a more effective means in dealing with refractory healing when compared to systemic approaches. Here we describe a novel multidomain peptide hydrogel that capitalizes on synthetic peptide chemistry, supramolecular self-assembly and cytokine delivery to tailor biological responses. This material is biomimetic, shows shear stress recovery and offers a nanofibrous matrix that sequesters cytokines. The biphasic pattern of cytokine release results in the spatio-temporal activation of THP-1 monocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, macrophage-material interactions are promoted without generation of a proinflammatory environment. Subcutaneous implantation of injectable scaffolds showed a marked increase in macrophage infiltration and polarization dictated by cytokine loading as early as 3 days, with complete scaffold resorption by day 14. Macrophage interaction and response to the peptide composite facilitated the (i) recruitment of monocytes/macrophages, (ii) sustained residence of immune cells until degradation, and (iii) promotion of a pro-resolution M2 environment. Our results suggest the potential use of this injectable cytokine loaded hydrogel scaffold in a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:25818414

  15. 1994 Baseline biological studies for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Y.E.; Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes environmental work performed at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in 1994 by the Basic Environmental Monitoring and Compliance Program (BECAMP). The DAF is located near the Mojave-Great Basin desert transition zone 27 km north of Mercury. The area immediately around the DAF building complex is a gentle slope cut by 1 to 3 m deep arroyos, and occupied by transitional vegetation. In 1994, construction activities were largely limited to work inside the perimeter fence. The DAF was still in a preoperational mode in 1994, and no nuclear materials were present. The DAF facilities were being occupied so there was water in the sewage settling pond, and the roads and lights were in use. Sampling activities in 1994 represent the first year in the proposed monitoring scheme. The proposed biological monitoring plan gives detailed experimental protocols. Plant, lizard, tortoise, small mammal, and bird surveys were performed in 1994. The authors briefly outline procedures employed in 1994. Studies performed on each taxon are reviewed separately then summarized in a concluding section.

  16. Self-assembling multidomain peptides tailor biological responses through biphasic release.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek A; Taylor, Nichole L; Shi, Siyu; Wickremasinghe, Navindee C; D'Souza, Rena N; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2015-06-01

    Delivery of small molecules and drugs to tissues is a mainstay of several tissue engineering strategies. Next generation treatments focused on localized drug delivery offer a more effective means in dealing with refractory healing when compared to systemic approaches. Here we describe a novel multidomain peptide hydrogel that capitalizes on synthetic peptide chemistry, supramolecular self-assembly and cytokine delivery to tailor biological responses. This material is biomimetic, shows shear stress recovery and offers a nanofibrous matrix that sequesters cytokines. The biphasic pattern of cytokine release results in the spatio-temporal activation of THP-1 monocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, macrophage-material interactions are promoted without generation of a proinflammatory environment. Subcutaneous implantation of injectable scaffolds showed a marked increase in macrophage infiltration and polarization dictated by cytokine loading as early as 3 days, with complete scaffold resorption by day 14. Macrophage interaction and response to the peptide composite facilitated the (i) recruitment of monocytes/macrophages, (ii) sustained residence of immune cells until degradation, and (iii) promotion of a pro-resolution M2 environment. Our results suggest the potential use of this injectable cytokine loaded hydrogel scaffold in a variety of tissue engineering applications. PMID:25818414

  17. Probing self assembly in biological mixed colloids by SANS, deuteration and molecular manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Hoffman, A.; Alkan-Onyuksel, H.

    1994-12-31

    Small-angle neutron scattering was used to obtain information on the form and molecular arrangement of particles in mixed colloids of bile salts with phosphatidylcholine, and bile salts with monoolein. Both types of systems showed the same general characteristics. The particle form was highly dependent on total lipid concentration. At the highest concentrations the particles were globular mixed micelles with an overall size of 50{Angstrom}. As the concentration was reduced the mixed micelles elongated, becoming rodlike with diameter about 50{Angstrom}. The rods had a radial core-shell structure in which the phosphatidylcholine or monoolein fatty tails were arranged radially to form the core with the headgroups pointing outward to form the shell. The bile salts were at the interface between the shell and core with the hydrophilic parts facing outward as part of the shell. The lengths of the rods increased and became more polydispersed with dilution. At sufficiently low concentrations the mixed micelles transformed into single bilayer vesicles. These results give insight on the physiological function of bile and on the rules governing the self assembly of bile particles in the hepatic duct and the small intestine.

  18. Characterization of Delayed-Particle Emission Signatures for Pyroprocessing. Part 1: ABTR Fuel Assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Durkee, Jr., Joe W.

    2015-06-19

    A three-part study is conducted using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo radiation-transport code to calculate delayed-neutron (DN) and delayed-gamma (DG) emission signatures for nondestructive assay (NDA) metal-fuel pyroprocessing. In Part 1, MCNP6 is used to produce irradiation-induced used nuclear fuel (UNF) isotopic inventories for an Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) preconceptual design fuel assembly (FA) model. The initial fuel inventory consists of uranium mixed with light-water-reactor transuranic (TRU) waste and 10 wt% zirconium (U-LWR-SFTRU-10%Zr). To facilitate understanding, parametric evaluation is done using models for 3% and 5% initial 235U a% enrichments, burnups of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, …, 120 GWd/MTIHM, and 3-, 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30- year cooling times. Detailed delayed-particle radioisotope source terms for the irradiate FA are created using BAMF-DRT and SOURCES3A. Using simulation tallies, DG activity ratios (DGARs) are developed for 134Cs/137Cs 134Cs/154Eu, and 154Eu/137Cs markers as a function of (1) burnup and (2) actinide mass, including elemental uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Spectral-integrated DN emission is also tallied. The study reveals a rich assortment of DGAR behavior as a function of DGAR type, enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Similarly, DN emission plots show variation as a function of burnup and of actinide mass. Sensitivity of DGAR and DN signatures to initial 235U enrichment, burnup, and cooling time is evident. Comparisons of the ABTR radiation signatures and radiation signatures previously reported for a generic Westinghouse oxide-fuel assembly indicate that there are pronounced differences in the ABTR and Westinghouse oxide-fuel DN and DG signatures. These differences are largely attributable to the initial TRU inventory in the ABTR fuel. The actinide and nonactinide inventories for the

  19. TiO2 thin films self-assembled with a partly fluorinated surfactant template.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Mark J; Zimny, Kevin; Blin, Jean-Luc; Delorme, Nicolas; Bardeau, Jean-François; Gibaud, Alain

    2010-01-19

    New TiO(2) films have been self-assembled on solid substrate by dip-coating using TiCl(4) as the titanium source and the partly fluorinated surfactant F(CF(2))(8)C(2)H(4)(OC(2)H(4))(9)OH as the liquid crystal template. By control over the dip-withdrawal speed, film thicknesses from a minimum of 43 nm were produced with rms roughnesses of 0.5-0.7 nm. The films were characterized by X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. Their GI-SAXS patterns are characteristic of a 2-D hexagonal structure in which tubular rods of the fluorinated surfactant are packed hexagonally and aligned parallel to the substrate. Reflectivity and contact angle measurements of the as-prepared film indicate that a low-density hydrophilic TiO(2) surface presents to the air. PMID:19754061

  20. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height...

  1. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant... Appendix C to Part 110—Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components... for gaseous diffusion enrichment plants are the systems of plant needed to feed UF6 to the...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant... Appendix C to Part 110—Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components... for gaseous diffusion enrichment plants are the systems of plant needed to feed UF6 to the...

  3. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA booster subcritical assembly, Part III : low enriched uranium conversion analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-05-12

    This study investigates the performance of the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly, located in Belarus, during operation with high (90%), medium (36%), and low (21%) enriched uranium fuels in the assembly's fast zone. The YALINA Booster is a zero-power, subcritical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was constructed for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven subcritical systems, and to serve as a fast neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinides. The first part of this study analyzes the assembly's performance with several fuel types. The MCNPX and MONK Monte Carlo codes were used to determine effective and source neutron multiplication factors, effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, neutron flux profiles and spectra, and neutron reaction rates produced from the use of three neutron sources: californium, deuterium-deuterium, and deuterium-tritium. In the latter two cases, the external neutron source operates in pulsed mode. The results discussed in the first part of this report show that the use of low enriched fuel in the fast zone of the assembly diminishes neutron multiplication. Therefore, the discussion in the second part of the report focuses on finding alternative fuel loading configurations that enhance neutron multiplication while using low enriched uranium fuel. It was found that arranging the interface absorber between the fast and the thermal zones in a circular rather than a square array is an effective method of operating the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly without downgrading neutron multiplication relative to the original value obtained with the use of the high enriched uranium fuels in the fast zone.

  4. [Pattern formation in microcosm: the role of self-assembly in complex biological envelopes development].

    PubMed

    Gabaraeva, N I; Hemsley, A R

    2010-01-01

    The data on the development of pollen/spore walls (of sporoderm) were reconsidered in the light of our hypothesis regarding a considerable role of self-assembling processes in the formation of this complex pattern. The premises that (1) glycocalyx (cell surface coating) is a self-assembling colloidal solution, and that (2) exine, formed on a glycocalyx framework, appears as a result of the self-assembly of the biopolymer (sporopollenin microemulsion), were independently suggested by the authors of this paper (Gabarayeva, 1990, 1993; Hemsley et al., 1992). Afterwards a joint hypothesis has been worked out which interpreted the processes of sporoderm development through regularities of colloidal chemistry. It was shown that all of the successive developmental stages, seen in transmission electron microscope (TEM) in the course of pollen wall development, correspond to successive micelle mesophases of a colloidal solution of surface-active substances which self-assemble when their concentration increases. Such an interpretation implies that all of the microstructures, observed in mature pollen walls (granules; rods-columellae; hexagonally packed layers of rods; bilayers, separated with a gap) are somewhat like "stiff history" of their appearance as a micellar sequence, immortalized by chemically resistant sporopollenin. Since self-assembling processes have nonlinear, spasmodic character, and microstructures of pollen wall, mentioned above, are arranged, as a rule, in successive layers, it has been suggested that these layers of heterogeneous microstructures occur as a result of the abrupt phase transitions typical for self-assembling micellar systems. PMID:20865932

  5. Biological materials: (Part A): Temperature-responsive polymers and drug delivery, and, (Part B): Polymer modification of fish scale and their nano-mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xu

    This research has three parts. Two parts deal with novel nanoparticle assemblies for drug delivery, and are described in Part A, while the third part looks at properties of fish scales, an abundant and little-used waste resource, that can be modified to have value in medical and other areas. Part A describes fundamental research into the affects of block sequence of amphiphilic block copolymers prepared from on a new and versatile class of monomers, oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (OEGA) and the more hydrophobic di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA). Polymers from these monomers are biologically safe and give polymers with thermoresponsive properties that can be manipulated over a broader temperature range than the more researched N-isopropylacrylamide polymers. Using RAFT polymerization and different Chain Transfer Agents (CTAs) amphiphilic block copolymers were prepared to study the effect of block sequence (hydrophilic OEGA and more hydrophobic DEGMA) on their thermo-responsive properties. Pairing hydrophilic chain ends to a hydrophobic DEGMA block and hydrophobic chain ends to hydrophilic blocks ("mis-matched polarity") significantly affected thermoresponsive properties for linear and star diblock copolymers, but little affected symmetric triblock copolymers. Specifically matching polarity in diblock copolymers yielded nanoparticles with higher cloud points (CP), narrow temperature ranges for coil collapse above CP, and smaller hydrodynamic diameter than mis-matched polarity. Using this knowledge two linear OEGA/DEGMA diblock copolymers were prepared with thiol end groups and assembled into hybrid nanoparticles with a gold nanoparticle core (GNP-polymer hybrids). This design was made using the hypothesis that a hybrid polymer drug carrier with a high CP (50-60 °C) and a diblock structure could be designed with low levels of drug release below 37 °C (body temperature) allowing the drug carrier to reach a target (tumor) site with

  6. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed. PMID:26691180

  7. GenoLIB: a database of biological parts derived from a library of common plasmid features.

    PubMed

    Adames, Neil R; Wilson, Mandy L; Fang, Gang; Lux, Matthew W; Glick, Benjamin S; Peccoud, Jean

    2015-05-26

    Synthetic biologists rely on databases of biological parts to design genetic devices and systems. The sequences and descriptions of genetic parts are often derived from features of previously described plasmids using ad hoc, error-prone and time-consuming curation processes because existing databases of plasmids and features are loosely organized. These databases often lack consistency in the way they identify and describe sequences. Furthermore, legacy bioinformatics file formats like GenBank do not provide enough information about the purpose of features. We have analyzed the annotations of a library of ∼2000 widely used plasmids to build a non-redundant database of plasmid features. We looked at the variability of plasmid features, their usage statistics and their distributions by feature type. We segmented the plasmid features by expression hosts. We derived a library of biological parts from the database of plasmid features. The library was formatted using the Synthetic Biology Open Language, an emerging standard developed to better organize libraries of genetic parts to facilitate synthetic biology workflows. As proof, the library was converted into GenoCAD grammar files to allow users to import and customize the library based on the needs of their research projects. PMID:25925571

  8. GenoLIB: a database of biological parts derived from a library of common plasmid features

    PubMed Central

    Adames, Neil R.; Wilson, Mandy L.; Fang, Gang; Lux, Matthew W.; Glick, Benjamin S.; Peccoud, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biologists rely on databases of biological parts to design genetic devices and systems. The sequences and descriptions of genetic parts are often derived from features of previously described plasmids using ad hoc, error-prone and time-consuming curation processes because existing databases of plasmids and features are loosely organized. These databases often lack consistency in the way they identify and describe sequences. Furthermore, legacy bioinformatics file formats like GenBank do not provide enough information about the purpose of features. We have analyzed the annotations of a library of ∼2000 widely used plasmids to build a non-redundant database of plasmid features. We looked at the variability of plasmid features, their usage statistics and their distributions by feature type. We segmented the plasmid features by expression hosts. We derived a library of biological parts from the database of plasmid features. The library was formatted using the Synthetic Biology Open Language, an emerging standard developed to better organize libraries of genetic parts to facilitate synthetic biology workflows. As proof, the library was converted into GenoCAD grammar files to allow users to import and customize the library based on the needs of their research projects. PMID:25925571

  9. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 1--Biological Health Benefits)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been promoting and incorporating physical activities into their community-based programs and improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the first of a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: 1) biological health benefits of…

  10. Didactics of Biology. Selected Bibliography for 1982. Parts I and II. Information Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Paula, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1982 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 25 journals representing 12 countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia; Federal…

  11. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory. PMID:26701126

  12. Molecular Self-Assembly of Short Aromatic Peptides: From Biology to Nanotechnology and Material Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazit, Ehud

    2013-03-01

    The formation of ordered amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several diseases of unrelated origin. In spite of grave clinical consequence, the mechanism of amyloid formation is not fully understood. We have suggested, based on experimental and bioinformatic analysis, that aromatic interactions may provide energetic contribution as well as order and directionality in the molecular-recognition and self-association processes that lead to the formation of these assemblies. This is in line with the well-known central role of aromatic-stacking interactions in self-assembly processes. Our works on the mechanism of aromatic peptide self-assembly, lead to the discovery that the diphenylalanine recognition motif self-assembles into peptide nanotubes with a remarkable persistence length. Other aromatic homodipeptides could self-assemble in nano-spheres, nano-plates, nano-fibrils and hydrogels with nano-scale order. We demonstrated that the peptide nanostructures have unique chemical, physical and mechanical properties including ultra-rigidity as aramides, semi-conductive, piezoelectric and non-linear optic properties. We also demonstrated the ability to use these peptide nanostructures as casting mold for the fabrication of metallic nano-wires and coaxial nano-cables. The application of the nanostructures was demonstrated in various fields including electrochemical biosensors, tissue engineering, and molecular imaging. Finally, we had developed ways for depositing of the peptide nanostructures and their organization. We had use inkjet technology as well as vapour deposition methods to coat surface and from the peptide ``nano-forests''. We recently demonstrated that even a single phenylalanine amino-acid can form well-ordered fibrilar assemblies.

  13. Pre-Assembly of Near-Infrared Fluorescent Multivalent Molecular Probes for Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Peck, Evan M; Battles, Paul M; Rice, Douglas R; Roland, Felicia M; Norquest, Kathryn A; Smith, Bradley D

    2016-05-18

    A programmable pre-assembly method is described and shown to produce near-infrared fluorescent molecular probes with tunable multivalent binding properties. The modular assembly process threads one or two copies of a tetralactam macrocycle onto a fluorescent PEGylated squaraine scaffold containing a complementary number of docking stations. Appended to the macrocycle periphery are multiple copies of a ligand that is known to target a biomarker. The structure and high purity of each threaded complex was determined by independent spectrometric methods and also by gel electrophoresis. Especially helpful were diagnostic red-shift and energy transfer features in the absorption and fluorescence spectra. The threaded complexes were found to be effective multivalent molecular probes for fluorescence microscopy and in vivo fluorescence imaging of living subjects. Two multivalent probes were prepared and tested for targeting of bone in mice. A pre-assembled probe with 12 bone-targeting iminodiacetate ligands produced more bone accumulation than an analogous pre-assembled probe with six iminodiacetate ligands. Notably, there was no loss in probe fluorescence at the bone target site after 24 h in the living animal, indicating that the pre-assembled fluorescent probe maintained very high mechanical and chemical stability on the skeletal surface. The study shows how this versatile pre-assembly method can be used in a parallel combinatorial manner to produce libraries of near-infrared fluorescent multivalent molecular probes for different types of imaging and diagnostic applications, with incremental structural changes in the number of targeting groups, linker lengths, linker flexibility, and degree of PEGylation. PMID:27088305

  14. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to Portable Frame Allowing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  15. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  16. Cartwheel assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The cartwheel is a subcentriolar structure consisting of a central hub and nine radially arranged spokes, located at the proximal end of the centriole. It appears at the initial stage of the centriole assembly process as the first ninefold symmetrical structure. The cartwheel was first described more than 50 years ago, but it is only recently that its pivotal role in establishing the ninefold symmetry of the centriole was demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding its fine structure and assembly mechanism. Most importantly, the central part of the cartwheel, from which the ninefold symmetry originates, is shown to form by self-association of nine dimers of the protein SAS-6. This finding, together with emerging data on other components of the cartwheel, has opened new avenues in centrosome biology. PMID:25047612

  17. Stable and fluid multilayer phospholipid-silica thin films: mimicking active multi-lamellar biological assemblies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gautam; Iyer, Srinivas; Leasure, Kara; Virdone, Nicole; Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Atanassov, Plamen B; López, Gabriel P

    2013-06-25

    Phospholipid-based nanomaterials are of interest in several applications including drug delivery, sensing, energy harvesting, and as model systems in basic research. However, a general challenge in creating functional hybrid biomaterials from phospholipid assemblies is their fragility, instability in air, insolubility in water, and the difficulty of integrating them into useful composites that retain or enhance the properties of interest, therefore limiting there use in integrated devices. We document the synthesis and characterization of highly ordered and stable phospholipid-silica thin films that resemble multilamellar architectures present in nature such as the myelin sheath. We have used a near room temperature chemical vapor deposition method to synthesize these robust functional materials. Highly ordered lipid films are exposed to vapors of silica precursor resulting in the formation of nanostructured hybrid assemblies. This process is simple, scalable, and offers advantages such as exclusion of ethanol and no (or minimal) need for exposure to mineral acids, which are generally required in conventional sol-gel synthesis strategies. The structure of the phospholipid-silica assemblies can be tuned to either lamellar or hexagonal organization depending on the synthesis conditions. The phospholipid-silica films exhibit long-term structural stability in air as well as when placed in aqueous solutions and maintain their fluidity under aqueous or humid conditions. This platform provides a model for robust implementation of phospholipid multilayers and a means toward future applications of functional phospholipid supramolecular assemblies in device integration. PMID:23706112

  18. Comparison of self-assembled and micelle encapsulated QD chemosensor constructs for biological sensing.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Christopher M; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    Whereas a variety of covalent conjugation strategies have been utilized to prepare quantum dot (QD)-based nanosensors, supramolecular approaches of self-assembly have been underexplored. A major advantage of self-assembly is the ability to circumvent laborious synthetic efforts attendant to covalent conjugation of a chemosensor to functionalized QDs. Here, we combine a CdSe/ZnS core-shell QD with gold(III) corroles using both self-assembly and micelle encapsulation to form QD nanosensors. Appreciable spectral overlap between QD emission and corrole absorption results in efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), which may be initiated by one- or two-photon excitation. The triplet state of the gold(III) corroles is quenched by molecular oxygen, enabling these constructs to function as optical O2 sensors, which is useful for the metabolic profiling of tumours. The photophysical properties, including QD and corrole lifetimes, FRET efficiency, and O2 sensitivity, have been determined for each construct. The relative merits of each conjugation strategy are assessed with regard to their implementation as sensors. PMID:26399200

  19. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS : Part of the Activity Report to the IUPAP General Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, Bob; Paalanen, Mikko

    2009-03-01

    Below you find part of the Activity Report to the IUPAP General Assembly, October 2008, by the present and previous Chairmen of C5. It provides an overview of the most important and recent developments in low temperature physics, much in line with the program of LT25. For the field of experimental low temperature physics, the ability to conduct research has been damaged by the dramatic increase in the price of liquid helium. In the United States for example, the price of liquid helium has approximately doubled over the past two years. This has led to a reduction in activity in many laboratories as the funding agencies have not quickly increased support in proportion. The increase in price of liquid helium has accelerated interest in the development and use of alternative cooling systems. In particular, pulse tube coolers are now available that will allow cryostats with modest cooling needs to operate dilution refrigerators without the need for repeated refills of liquid helium from external supply sources. Solid helium research has seen a dramatic resurgence. Torsional oscillator experiments have been interpreted to show that solid helium may undergo a transition to a state in which some of the atoms in the container do not follow the motion of the container, e.g. may be 'supersolid'. The observation is robust, but the interpretation is controversial. The shear modulus of solid helium undergoes a similar signature with respect to temperature. Experiments that should be expected to cause helium to flow give conflicting results. Theory predicts that a perfect solid cannot show supersolid behavior, but novel superfluid-like behavior should be seen in various defects that can exist in the solid, and vorticity may play a significant role. And, recently there have been reports of unusual mass decoupling in films of pure 4He on graphite surfaces as well as 3He-4He mixture films on solid hydrogen surfaces. These may be other examples of unusual superfluid-like behavior

  20. The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

    1995-02-01

    This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

  1. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 63 - Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp Mills Under Unsafe Sampling Conditions E Appendix..., App. E Appendix E to Part 63—Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment... pollutants (HAP) concentrations from an open biological treatment unit. It is assumed that inlet and...

  2. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time of... to be not adulterated. (b) When a lot of poultry suspected of containing biological residues...

  3. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time of... to be not adulterated. (b) When a lot of poultry suspected of containing biological residues...

  4. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time of... to be not adulterated. (b) When a lot of poultry suspected of containing biological residues...

  5. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time of... to be not adulterated. (b) When a lot of poultry suspected of containing biological residues...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 63 - Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp Mills Under Unsafe Sampling Conditions E Appendix..., App. E Appendix E to Part 63—Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment... pollutants (HAP) concentrations from an open biological treatment unit. It is assumed that inlet and...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 63 - Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp Mills Under Unsafe Sampling Conditions E Appendix..., App. E Appendix E to Part 63—Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment... pollutants (HAP) concentrations from an open biological treatment unit. It is assumed that inlet and...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 63 - Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp Mills Under Unsafe Sampling Conditions E Appendix..., App. E Appendix E to Part 63—Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment... pollutants (HAP) concentrations from an open biological treatment unit. It is assumed that inlet and...

  9. 9 CFR 381.78 - Condemnation of carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. 381.78 Section 381.78 Animals and Animal... carcasses and parts: separation of poultry suspected of containing biological residues. (a) At the time of... to be not adulterated. (b) When a lot of poultry suspected of containing biological residues...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 63 - Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mixed Open Biological Treatment Systems at Kraft Pulp Mills Under Unsafe Sampling Conditions E Appendix E to Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS..., App. E Appendix E to Part 63—Monitoring Procedure for Nonthoroughly Mixed Open Biological...

  11. Wholes that cause their parts: organic self-reproduction and the reality of biological teleology.

    PubMed

    Teufel, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    A well-rehearsed move among teleological realists in the philosophy of biology is to base the idea of genuinely teleological forms of organic self-reproduction on a type of causality derived from Kant. Teleological realists have long argued for the causal possibility of this form of causality--in which a whole is considered the cause of its parts--as well as formulated a set of teleological criteria of adequacy for it. What is missing, to date, is an account of the mereological principles that govern the envisioned whole-to-part causality. When the latter principles are taken into account, we find that there is no version of whole-to-part causality that is mereologically, causally and teleologically possible all at once, as teleological realism requires. PMID:21486664

  12. Bioreactive self-assembled monolayers on hydrogen-passivated Si(111) as a new class of atomically flat substrates for biological scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, P; Nock, S; Spudich, J A; Volkmuth, W D; Chu, S; Cicero, R L; Wade, C P; Linford, M R; Chidsey, C E

    1997-07-01

    This is the first report of bioreactive self-assembled monolayers, covalently bound to atomically flat silicon surfaces and capable of binding biomolecules for investigation by scanning probe microscopy and other surface-related assays and sensing devices. These monolayers are stable under a wide range of conditions and allow tailor-made functionalization for many purposes. We describe the substrate preparation and present an STM and SFM characterization, partly performed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes as tapping-mode supertips. Furthermore, we present two strategies of introducing in situ reactive headgroup functionalities. One method entails a free radical chlorosulfonation process with subsequent sulfonamide formation. A second method employs singlet carbenemediated hydrogen-carbon insertion of a heterobifunctional, amino-reactive trifluoromethyl-diazirinyl crosslinker. We believe that this new substrate is advantageous to others, because it (i) is atomically flat over large areas and can be prepared in a few hours with standard equipment, (ii) is stable under most conditions, (iii) can be modified to adjust a certain degree of reactivity and hydrophobicity, which allows physical adsorption or covalent crosslinking of the biological specimen, (iv) builds the bridge between semiconductor microfabrication and organic/biological molecular systems, and (v) is accessible to nanopatterning and applications requiring conductive substrates. PMID:9245759

  13. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-22

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

  14. Electrostatic self-assembly between biological polymers & macroions: Interactions of F-actin & DNA with lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Matthews, Brian W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2005-03-01

    The pathological self-assembly of polyelectrolytes such as DNA and F-actin with cationic antimicrobial proteins such as lysozyme may have significant clinical consequences in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung infections. Wild-type lysozyme is a compact, cationic, globular protein which carries a net charge of +9e at neutral pH. Our Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments on F-actin-lysozyme complexes indicate that the wild-type lysozyme close packs into 1-D columns between hexagonally organized F-actin filaments. We will present SAXS results of the interactions of F-actin and DNA with genetically engineered lysozyme mutants that carry a reduced charge of +5e. We have also used fluorescence microscopy to investigate the morphologies and sizes of such bundles induced with divalent cations, wild-type lysozyme, and mutant lysozymes.

  15. Biological activities and phytochemical profiles of extracts from different parts of bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akinobu; Zhu, Qinchang; Tan, Hui; Horiba, Hiroki; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Mori, Yasuhiro; Yamauchi, Ryoko; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Iwamoto, Akira; Kawahara, Hiroharu; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Besides being a useful building material, bamboo also is a potential source of bioactive substances. Although some studies have been performed to examine its use in terms of the biological activity, only certain parts of bamboo, especially the leaves or shoots, have been studied. Comprehensive and comparative studies among different parts of bamboo would contribute to a better understanding and application of this knowledge. In this study, the biological activities of ethanol and water extracts from the leaves, branches, outer culm, inner culm, knots, rhizomes and roots of Phyllostachys pubescens, the major species of bamboo in Japan, were comparatively evaluated. The phytochemical profiles of these extracts were tentatively determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The results showed that extracts from different parts of bamboo had different chemical compositions and different antioxidative, antibacterial and antiallergic activities, as well as on on melanin biosynthesis. Outer culm and inner culm were found to be the most important sources of active compounds. 8-C-Glucosylapigenin, luteolin derivatives and chlorogenic acid were the most probable compounds responsible for the anti-allergy activity of these bamboo extracts. Our study suggests the potential use of bamboo as a functional ingredient in cosmetics or other health-related products. PMID:24945578

  16. Methods for disassembling, replacing and assembling parts of a steam cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Ian D.; Wesorick, Ronald R.

    2002-01-01

    The steam cooling circuit for a gas turbine includes a bore tube assembly supplying steam to circumferentially spaced radial tubes coupled to supply elbows for transitioning the radial steam flow in an axial direction along steam supply tubes adjacent the rim of the rotor. The supply tubes supply steam to circumferentially spaced manifold segments located on the aft side of the 1-2 spacer for supplying steam to the buckets of the first and second stages. Spent return steam from these buckets flows to a plurality of circumferentially spaced return manifold segments disposed on the forward face of the 1-2 spacer. Crossover tubes couple the steam supply from the steam supply manifold segments through the 1-2 spacer to the buckets of the first stage. Crossover tubes through the 1-2 spacer also return steam from the buckets of the second stage to the return manifold segments. Axially extending return tubes convey spent cooling steam from the return manifold segments to radial tubes via return elbows. The bore tube assembly, radial tubes, elbows, manifold segments and crossover tubes are removable from the turbine rotor and replaceable.

  17. [Nutrition and biological value of food parts of a trade bivalve mollusk Anadara broughtoni].

    PubMed

    Tabakaeva, O V; Tabakaev, A V

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the human diet includes different new products of seafishing, including non-fish--bivalves and gastropods, holothurias, echinoderms, jellyfishes that demands careful studying of their chemical composition. The purpose of the study was to determine the nutritional and biological value of all soft parts of the burrowing bivalve MOLLUSK Anadara broughtoni from the Far East region. It was established thatfood parts of a bivalve were significantly flooded (water content--73.5-84.2%), with the minimum water content in the adductor and maximum in the mantle. Dry solids are presented by organic (89-93%) and mineral (7-11%) components. Organic components consist of protein (14.6-20.7%), lipids (1.8-2.3%), carbohydrates (2.1-2.6%). The analysis of amino-acid composition of proteins of food parts of the mollusk of Anadara broughtonishowed the presence of all essential amino acids with slight differences in their content depending on the localization of the protein. All edible parts have tryptophan as the limiting amino acid. Muscle proteins have maximum level of lysine, methionine, cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine; mantle proteins--leucine, isoleucine and threonine; adductor proteins--valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, methionine and cysteine. Predominant nonessential amino acids forproteins of all food pieces are glycine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine. The coefficient of amino-acid score differences of adductor protein (31.7%) is less than the same of cloak by 3.7%. The indicator "biological value" is maximal for adductor (68.3%), but the differenceformuscle is only 0.83%. Mantle proteins are characterized by minimum biological value (64.6%). The coefficient of utility of amino acid composition of protein is maximalfor muscle (57.83%), and values for a cloak and an adductor differ slightly (55.81 and 55.96%). Taurine content in food parts of a mollusk Anadara broughtoni is rather high compared to with other bivalve mollusks of the Far East region

  18. MEMBRANE ATTACK BY COMPLEMENT: THE ASSEMBLY AND BIOLOGY OF TERMINAL COMPLEMENT COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Tegla, Cosmin A.; Cudrici, Cornelia; Patel, Snehal; Trippe, Richard; Rus, Violeta; Niculescu, Florin; Rus, Horea

    2013-01-01

    Complement system activation plays an important role in both innate and acquired immunity. Activation of complement and the subsequent formation of C5b-9 channels (the membrane attack complex) on cell membranes lead to cell death. However, when the number of channels assembled on the surface of nucleated cells is limited, sublytic C5b-9 can induce cell cycle progression by activating signal transduction pathways and transcription factors and inhibiting apoptosis. This induction by C5b-9 is dependent upon the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/FOXO1 and ERK1 pathways in a Gi protein-dependent manner. C5b-9 induces sequential activation of CDK4 and CDK2, enabling the G1/S-phase transition and cellular proliferation. In addition, it induces RGC-32, a novel gene that plays a role in cell cycle activation by interacting with Akt and the cyclin B1-CDC2 complex. C5b-9 also inhibits apoptosis by inducing the phosphorylation of Bad and blocking the activation of FLIP, caspase-8, and Bid cleavage. Thus, sublytic C5b-9 plays an important role in cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation, thereby contributing to the maintenance of cell and tissue homeostasis. PMID:21850539

  19. A U. S. Perspective on Fast Reactor Fuel Fabrication Technology and Experience Part I: Metal Fuels and Assembly Design

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas E. Burkes; Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Porter; Douglas C. Crawford; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2009-06-01

    This paper is Part I of a review focusing on the United States experience with metallic fast reactor fuel fabrication and assembly design for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility, and it also refers to the impact of development in other nations. Experience with metal fuel fabrication in the United States is extensive, including over 60 years of research conducted by the government, national laboratories, industry, and academia. This experience has culminated into a foundation of research and resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate metallic fast reactor fuel. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies for metallic fuels, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  20. A US perspective on fast reactor fuel fabrication technology and experience part I: metal fuels and assembly design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Fielding, Randall S.; Porter, Douglas L.; Crawford, Douglas C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.

    2009-06-01

    This paper is part I of a review focusing on the United States experience with metallic fast reactor fuel fabrication and assembly design for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Experience with metal fuel fabrication in the United States is extensive, including over 60 years of research conducted by the government, national laboratories, industry, and academia. This experience has culminated in a considerable amount of research that resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate metallic fast reactor fuel. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies for metallic fuels, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  1. Systematic, spatial imaging of large multimolecular assemblies and the emerging principles of supramolecular order in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Understanding biological systems at the level of their relational (emergent) molecular properties in functional protein networks relies on imaging methods, able to spatially resolve a tissue or a cell as a giant, non-random, topologically defined collection of interacting supermolecules executing myriads of subcellular mechanisms. Here, the development and findings of parameter-unlimited functional super-resolution microscopy are described—a technology based on the fluorescence imaging cycler (IC) principle capable of co-mapping thousands of distinct biomolecular assemblies at high spatial resolution and differentiation (<40 nm distances). It is shown that the subcellular and transcellular features of such supermolecules can be described at the compositional and constitutional levels; that the spatial connection, relational stoichiometry, and topology of supermolecules generate hitherto unrecognized functional self-segmentation of biological tissues; that hierarchical features, common to thousands of simultaneously imaged supermolecules, can be identified; and how the resulting supramolecular order relates to spatial coding of cellular functionalities in biological systems. A large body of observations with IC molecular systems microscopy collected over 20 years have disclosed principles governed by a law of supramolecular segregation of cellular functionalities. This pervades phenomena, such as exceptional orderliness, functional selectivity, combinatorial and spatial periodicity, and hierarchical organization of large molecular systems, across all species investigated so far. This insight is based on the high degree of specificity, selectivity, and sensitivity of molecular recognition processes for fluorescence imaging beyond the spectral resolution limit, using probe libraries controlled by ICs. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Molecular Recognition published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24375580

  2. Single Cell and Metagenomic Assemblies: Biology Drives Technical Choices and Goals (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2011-10-13

    DOE JGI's Tanja Woyke, chair of the Single Cells and Metagenomes session, delivers an introduction, followed by Bigelow Laboratory's Ramunas Stepanauskas on "Single Cell and Metagenomic Assemblies: Biology Drives Technical Choices and Goals" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  3. Single Cell and Metagenomic Assemblies: Biology Drives Technical Choices and Goals (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Stepanauskas, Ramunas [Bigelow Laboratory

    2013-01-22

    DOE JGI's Tanja Woyke, chair of the Single Cells and Metagenomes session, delivers an introduction, followed by Bigelow Laboratory's Ramunas Stepanauskas on "Single Cell and Metagenomic Assemblies: Biology Drives Technical Choices and Goals" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  4. Waterborne firm coating for temporary protection of parts, providing controlled lubrication during assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hayner, R.E.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a protective, emulsified oil in water, dispersible, lubricant coating composition having a pH in the range of about 7.0 to 10, and capable of application and flow on a threaded solid substrate consisting essentially of: A. about 65 to 99% by weight of a composition comprising: (1) about 0.5 to 30 parts by weight of organic wax components having a melting point above 50/sup 0/C, the wax container ester groups; (2) about 0.5 to 6 parts of a surfactant comprising 2 to 8% of carboxylic acid and about 1 to 5% of an amine, the acid and the amine forming a salt providing at least a portion of a surfactant; (3) about 10 to 30 parts of a coupling agent comprising a C/sub 5/-C/sub 30/ liquid hydrocarbon coupling component and a C/sub 2/-C/sub 20/ alcohol in the ratio of between 1:1 and 10:1 by weight respectively, selected from the group consisting of: mineral spirits, kerosene, ethylene glycol ether, butyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monopropyl ether, propyl cellosolve, ethyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monoacetate, diethylene glycol monoproprionate, diethylene glycol monoacetate, propylene glycol monoacetate, ethanol, isopropanol and isobutanol; and (4) about 30 to 97 parts of water the sum of all parts being equal to 100; and (B) about 3.5 to 9% total pigment comprising about 0.4 to 4% by weight carbon black.

  5. Facile synthesis of AIE-active amphiphilic polymers: Self-assembly and biological imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Long, Zi; Liu, Meiying; Wang, Ke; Deng, Fengjie; Xu, Dazhuang; Liu, Liangji; Wan, Yiqun; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we reported a rather facile method for fabrication of ultrabright, well dispersible and biocompatible fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) properties through combination of esterification and ring-opening reaction. The hydroxyl groups of Pluronic F127 was first reacted with the chloride of trimellitic anhydride chloride (TMAC), and its anhydride groups were further reacted with the amino groups of amino-terminated AIE dye (PhNH2) through ring-opening reaction. The optical properties, biocompatibility as well as cell uptake behavior of these obtained AIE-active nanoparticles (F127-TMAC-PhNH2 FONs) were examined by a series of characterization techniques and assays. We demonstrated that uniform organic nanoparticles with high water dispersibility, strong luminescence and desirable biocompatibility can be facilely obtained, which are promising for biological imaging applications. More importantly, a number of carboxyl groups were introduced into these AIE-active nanoparticles, which can be further utilized for further conjugation reaction and carrying anticancer drugs such as cisplatin. Therefore, the strategy of described in this work should be a simple and useful route for fabrication of multifunctional AIE-active luminescent nanotheranostic systems. PMID:27207057

  6. Bottom-Up Engineering of Biological Systems through Standard Bricks: A Modularity Study on Basic Parts and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pasotti, Lorenzo; Politi, Nicolò; Zucca, Susanna; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Magni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Background Modularity is a crucial issue in the engineering world, as it enables engineers to achieve predictable outcomes when different components are interconnected. Synthetic Biology aims to apply key concepts of engineering to design and construct new biological systems that exhibit a predictable behaviour. Even if physical and measurement standards have been recently proposed to facilitate the assembly and characterization of biological components, real modularity is still a major research issue. The success of the bottom-up approach strictly depends on the clear definition of the limits in which biological functions can be predictable. Results The modularity of transcription-based biological components has been investigated in several conditions. First, the activity of a set of promoters was quantified in Escherichia coli via different measurement systems (i.e., different plasmids, reporter genes, ribosome binding sites) relative to an in vivo reference promoter. Second, promoter activity variation was measured when two independent gene expression cassettes were assembled in the same system. Third, the interchangeability of input modules (a set of constitutive promoters and two regulated promoters) connected to a fixed output device (a logic inverter) expressing GFP was evaluated. The three input modules provide tunable transcriptional signals that drive the output device. If modularity persists, identical transcriptional signals trigger identical GFP outputs. To verify this, all the input devices were individually characterized and then the input-output characteristic of the logic inverter was derived in the different configurations. Conclusions Promoters activities (referred to a standard promoter) can vary when they are measured via different reporter devices (up to 22%), when they are used within a two-expression-cassette system (up to 35%) and when they drive another device in a functionally interconnected circuit (up to 44%). This paper provides a

  7. Supramolecular assembly of biological molecules purified from bovine nerve cells: from microtubule bundles and necklaces to neurofilament networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needleman, Daniel J.; Jones, Jayna B.; Raviv, Uri; Ojeda-Lopez, Miguel A.; Miller, H. P.; Li, Y.; Wilson, L.; Safinya, C. R.

    2005-11-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, the biosciences community is beginning the daunting task of understanding the structures and functions of a large number of interacting biological macromolecules. Examples include the interacting molecules involved in the process of DNA condensation during the cell cycle, and in the formation of bundles and networks of filamentous actin proteins in cell attachment, motility and cytokinesis. In this proceedings paper we present examples of supramolecular assembly based on proteins derived from the vertebrate nerve cell cytoskeleton. The axonal cytoskeleton in vertebrate neurons provides a rich example of bundles and networks of neurofilaments, microtubules (MTs) and filamentous actin, where the nature of the interactions, structures, and structure-function correlations remains poorly understood. We describe synchrotron x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical imaging data, in reconstituted protein systems purified from bovine central nervous system, which reveal unexpected structures not predicted by current electrostatic theories of polyelectrolyte bundling, including three-dimensional MT bundles and two-dimensional MT necklaces.

  8. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA-booster subcritical assembly part 1: analytical models and main neutronics parameters.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-09-11

    This study was carried out to model and analyze the YALINA-Booster facility, of the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus, with the long term objective of advancing the utilization of accelerator driven systems for the incineration of nuclear waste. The YALINA-Booster facility is a subcritical assembly, driven by an external neutron source, which has been constructed to study the neutron physics and to develop and refine methodologies to control the operation of accelerator driven systems. The external neutron source consists of Californium-252 spontaneous fission neutrons, 2.45 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Deuterium reactions, or 14.1 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Tritium reactions. In the latter two cases a deuteron beam is used to generate the neutrons. This study is a part of the collaborative activity between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus. In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a coordinated research project benchmarking and comparing the results of different numerical codes with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility and ANL has a leading role coordinating the IAEA activity. The YALINA-Booster facility has been modeled according to the benchmark specifications defined for the IAEA activity without any geometrical homogenization using the Monte Carlo codes MONK and MCNP/MCNPX/MCB. The MONK model perfectly matches the MCNP one. The computational analyses have been extended through the MCB code, which is an extension of the MCNP code with burnup capability because of its additional feature for analyzing source driven multiplying assemblies. The main neutronics parameters of the YALINA-Booster facility were calculated using these computer codes with different nuclear data libraries based on ENDF/B-VI-0, -6, JEF-2.2, and JEF-3.1.

  9. Mode 3 Project-Based O-Level: Part II Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greatorex, D.; Lock, R.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a British biology course for the O-level which aims to promote the understanding of broad biological principles through an environmental approach. Results of proper assessment and overall examination performance are also revealed. (HM)

  10. Modelling of a biologically inspired robotic fish driven by compliant parts.

    PubMed

    El Daou, Hadi; Salumäe, Taavi; Chambers, Lily D; Megill, William M; Kruusmaa, Maarja

    2014-03-01

    Inspired by biological swimmers such as fish, a robot composed of a rigid head, a compliant body and a rigid caudal fin was built. It has the geometrical properties of a subcarangiform swimmer of the same size. The head houses a servo-motor which actuates the compliant body and the caudal fin. It achieves this by applying a concentrated moment on a point near the compliant body base. In this paper, the dynamics of the compliant body driving the robotic fish is modelled and experimentally validated. Lighthill's elongated body theory is used to define the hydrodynamic forces on the compliant part and Rayleigh proportional damping is used to model damping. Based on the assumed modes method, an energetic approach is used to write the equations of motion of the compliant body and to compute the relationship between the applied moment and the resulting lateral deflections. Experiments on the compliant body were carried out to validate the model predictions. The results showed that a good match was achieved between the measured and predicted deformations. A discussion of the swimming motions between the real fish and the robot is presented. PMID:24451164

  11. Biological and biophysical principles in extracorporal bone tissue engineering. Part I.

    PubMed

    Meyer, U; Joos, U; Wiesmann, H P

    2004-06-01

    Advances in the field of bone tissue engineering have encouraged physicians to introduce these techniques into clinical practice. Bone tissue engineering is the construction, repair or replacement of damaged or missing bone in humans or animals. Engineering of bone can take place within the animal body or extracorporal in a bioreactor for later grafting into the body. Appropriate cell types and non-living substrata are minimal requirements for an extracorporal tissue engineering approach. This review discusses the biological and biophysical background of in vitro bone tissue engineering. Biochemical and biophysical stimuli of cell growth and differentiation are regarded as potent tools to improve bone formation in vitro. The paper focuses on basic principles in extracorporal engineering of bone-like tissues, intended to be implanted in animal experiments and clinical studies. Particular attention is given in this part to the contributions of cell and material science to the development of bone-like tissues. Several approaches are at the level of clinical applicability and it can be expected that widespread use of engineered bone constructs will change the surgeon's work in the near future. PMID:15145032

  12. Qualification Testing of Solid Rocket Booster Diagonal Strut Restraint Cable Assembly Part Number 10176-0031-102/103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, T. W.

    2006-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum presents qualification test results for solid rocket booster diagonal strut restraint cable part number 101276-00313-102/103. During flight this assembly is exposed to a range of temperatures. MIL-W-83420 shows the breaking strength of the cable as 798 kg (1,760 lb) at room temperature but does not define cable strength at the maximum temperature to which the cable is exposed during the first 2 min of flight; 669 C (1,236 F). The cable, which can be built from different corrosion resistant steel alloys, may also vary in its chemical, physical, and mechanical properties at temperature. Negative margins of safety were produced by analysis of the cable at temperature using standard knockdown factors. However, MSFC-HDBK-5 allows the use of a less conservative safety factor of 1.4 and knockdown factors verified by testing. Test results allowed a calculated knockdown factor of 0.1892 to be determined for the restraint cables, which provides a minimum breaking strength of 151 kg (333 lb) at 677 C (1,250 F) when combined with the minimum breaking strength of 0.317-cm (0.125- or 1/8-in) diameter, type 1 composition rope.

  13. BioBrick assembly standards and techniques and associated software tools.

    PubMed

    Røkke, Gunvor; Korvald, Eirin; Pahr, Jarle; Oyås, Ove; Lale, Rahmi

    2014-01-01

    The BioBrick idea was developed to introduce the engineering principles of abstraction and standardization into synthetic biology. BioBricks are DNA sequences that serve a defined biological function and can be readily assembled with any other BioBrick parts to create new BioBricks with novel properties. In order to achieve this, several assembly standards can be used. Which assembly standards a BioBrick is compatible with, depends on the prefix and suffix sequences surrounding the part. In this chapter, five of the most common assembly standards will be described, as well as some of the most used assembly techniques, cloning procedures, and a presentation of the available software tools that can be used for deciding on the best method for assembling of different BioBricks, and searching for BioBrick parts in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts database. PMID:24395353

  14. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 63 - Determination of the Fraction Biodegraded (Fbio) in a Biological Treatment Unit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of the Fraction Biodegraded (Fbio) in a Biological Treatment Unit C Appendix C to Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 63 - Determination of the Fraction Biodegraded (Fbio) in a Biological Treatment Unit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of the Fraction Biodegraded (Fbio) in a Biological Treatment Unit C Appendix C to Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  16. Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Response of a Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer. Part 1; Stringer-Feet Imperfections and Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Elliott, Kenny B.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Warren, Jerry E.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic, large-deflection nonlinear stress analyses are performed for the external hat-shaped stringers (or stiffeners) on the intertank portion of the Space Shuttle s external tank. These stringers are subjected to assembly strains when the stringers are initially installed on an intertank panel. Four different stringer-feet configurations including the baseline flat-feet, the heels-up, the diving-board, and the toes-up configurations are considered. The assembly procedure is analytically simulated for each of these stringer configurations. The location, size, and amplitude of the strain field associated with the stringer assembly are sensitive to the assumed geometry and assembly procedure. The von Mises stress distributions from these simulations indicate that localized plasticity will develop around the first eight fasteners for each stringer-feet configuration examined. However, only the toes-up configuration resulted in high assembly hoop strains.

  17. Biological materials: Part A. tuning LCST of raft copolymers and gold/copolymer hybrid nanoparticles and Part B. Biobased nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ning

    The research described in this dissertation is comprised of two major parts. The first part studied the effects of asymmetric amphiphilic end groups on the thermo-response of diblock copolymers of (oligo/di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether (meth)acrylates, OEGA/DEGMA) and the hybrid nanoparticles of these copolymers with a gold nanoparticle core. Placing the more hydrophilic end group on the more hydrophilic block significantly increased the cloud point compared to a similar copolymer composition with the end group placement reversed. For a given composition, the cloud point was shifted by as much as 28 °C depending on the placement of end groups. This is a much stronger effect than either changing the hydrophilic/hydrophobic block ratio or replacing the hydrophilic acrylate monomer with the equivalent methacrylate monomer. The temperature range of the coil-globule transition was also altered. Binding these diblock copolymers to a gold core decreased the cloud point by 5-15 °C and narrowed the temperature range of the coil-globule transition. The effects were more pronounced when the gold core was bound to the less hydrophilic block. Given the limited numbers of monomers that are approved safe for in vivo use, employing amphiphilic end group placement is a useful tool to tune a thermo-response without otherwise changing the copolymer composition. The second part of the dissertation investigated the production of value-added nanomaterials from two biorefinery "wastes": lignin and peptidoglycan. Different solvents and spinning methods (melt-, wet-, and electro-spinning) were tested to make lignin/cellulose blended and carbonized fibers. Only electro-spinning yielded fibers having a small enough diameter for efficient carbonization (≤ 5-10 μm), but it was concluded that cellulose was not a suitable binder. Cellulose lignin fibers before carbonization showed up to 90% decrease in moisture uptake compared to pure cellulose. Peptidoglycan (a bacterial cell wall

  18. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 2. Structures of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of the proceedings of the 1982 Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The volume contains papers on DNA methylation, DNA replication, gene recombination, organization of genes along DNA, molecular structure and enzymology of DNA.

  19. [Topical issues of biological safety under current conditions. Part 3. Scientific provision for the national regulation of the biological safety framework in its broad interpretation].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Smolensky, V Yu; Ezhlova, E B; Demina, Yu V; Toporkov, V P; Toporkov, A V; Lyapin, M N; Kutyrev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Consequent of investigation concerned with biological safety (BS) framework development in its broad interpretation, reflected in the Russian Federation State Acts, identified have been conceptual entity parameters of the up-to-date broad interpretation of BS, which have formed a part of the developed by the authors system for surveillance (prophylaxis, localization, indication, identification, and diagnostics) and control (prophylaxis, localization, and response/elimination) over the emergency situations of biological (sanitary-epidemiological) character. The System functionality is activated through supplying the content with information data which are concerned with monitoring and control of specific internal and external threats in the sphere of BS provision fixed in the Supplement 2 of the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005), and with the previously characterized nomenclature of hazardous biological factors. The system is designed as a network-based research-and-practice tool for evaluation of the situation in the sphere of BS provision, as well as assessment of efficacy of management decision making as regards BS control and proper State policy implementation. Most of the system elements either directly or indirectly relate to the scope of activities conducted by Federal Service for Surveillance in the Sphere of Consumers Rights Protection and Human Welfare, being substantial argument for allocating coordination functions in the sphere of BS provision to this government agency and consistent with its function as the State Coordinator on IHR (2005). The data collected serve as materials to Draft Federal Law "Concerning biological safety provision of the population". PMID:25971137

  20. Thematic mapper flight model preshipment review data package. Volume 4: Appendix. Part D: Focal plane assembly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The data obtained for the Band 1 thematic mapper flight full band assembly (P/N 50797) are summarized. The data were collected from half band, post amplifier, and full band acceptance test data records.

  1. Nanoscale device architectures derived from biological assemblies: The case of tobacco mosaic virus and (apo)ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calò, Annalisa; Eiben, Sabine; Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2016-03-01

    Virus particles and proteins are excellent examples of naturally occurring structures with well-defined nanoscale architectures, for example, cages and tubes. These structures can be employed in a bottom-up assembly strategy to fabricate repetitive patterns of hybrid organic-inorganic materials. In this paper, we review methods of assembly that make use of protein and virus scaffolds to fabricate patterned nanostructures with very high spatial control. We chose (apo)ferritin and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as model examples that have already been applied successfully in nanobiotechnology. Their interior space and their exterior surfaces can be mineralized with inorganic layers or nanoparticles. Furthermore, their native assembly abilities can be exploited to generate periodic architectures for integration in electrical and magnetic devices. We introduce the state of the art and describe recent advances in biomineralization techniques, patterning and device production with (apo)ferritin and TMV.

  2. Large-scale study of the interactions between proteins involved in type IV pilus biology in Neisseria meningitidis: characterization of a subcomplex involved in pilus assembly.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Michaella; Castagnini, Marta; Karimova, Gouzel; Ladant, Daniel; Pelicic, Vladimir

    2012-06-01

    The functionally versatile type IV pili (Tfp) are one of the most widespread virulence factors in bacteria. However, despite generating much research interest for decades, the molecular mechanisms underpinning the various aspects of Tfp biology remain poorly understood, mainly because of the complexity of the system. In the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis for example, 23 proteins are dedicated to Tfp biology, 15 of which are essential for pilus biogenesis. One of the important gaps in our knowledge concerns the topology of this multiprotein machinery. Here we have used a bacterial two-hybrid system to identify and quantify the interactions between 11 Pil proteins from N. meningitidis. We identified 20 different binary interactions, many of which are novel. This represents the most complex interaction network between Pil proteins reported to date and indicates, among other things, that PilE, PilM, PilN and PilO, which are involved in pilus assembly, indeed interact. We focused our efforts on this subset of proteins and used a battery of assays to determine the membrane topology of PilN and PilO, map the interaction domains between PilE, PilM, PilN and PilO, and show that a widely conserved N-terminal motif in PilN is essential for both PilM-PilN interactions and pilus assembly. Finally, we show that PilP (another protein involved in pilus assembly) forms a complex with PilM, PilN and PilO. Taken together, these findings have numerous implications for understanding Tfp biology and provide a useful blueprint for future studies. PMID:22486968

  3. The Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics Assembles the Largest Proteome Database Resource for Plant Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Weckwerth, Wolfram; Baginsky, Sacha; Van Wijk, Klass; Heazlewood, Joshua; Millar, Harvey

    2009-12-01

    In the past 10 years, we have witnessed remarkable advances in the field of plant molecular biology. The rapid development of proteomic technologies and the speed with which these techniques have been applied to the field have altered our perception of how we can analyze proteins in complex systems. At nearly the same time, the availability of the complete genome for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was released; this effort provides an unsurpassed resource for the identification of proteins when researchers use MS to analyze plant samples. Recognizing the growth in this area, the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) established a subcommittee for A. thaliana proteomics in 2006 with the objective of consolidating databases, technique standards, and experimentally validated candidate genes and functions. Since the establishment of the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics (MASCP), many new approaches and resources have become available. Recently, the subcommittee established a webpage to consolidate this information (www.masc-proteomics.org). It includes links to plant proteomic databases, general information about proteomic techniques, meeting information, a summary of proteomic standards, and other relevant resources. Altogether, this website provides a useful resource for the Arabidopsis proteomics community. In the future, the website will host discussions and investigate the cross-linking of databases. The subcommittee members have extensive experience in arabidopsis proteomics and collectively have produced some of the most extensive proteomics data sets for this model plant (Table S1 in the Supporting Information has a list of resources). The largest collection of proteomics data from a single study in A. thaliana was assembled into an accessible database (AtProteome; http://fgcz-atproteome.unizh.ch/index.php) and was recently published by the Baginsky lab.1 The database provides links to major Arabidopsis online

  4. Space biology class as part of science education programs for high schools in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Motoshi; Takaoki, Muneo

    2004-11-01

    Declining incentives and scholastic abilities in science class has been concerned in Japan. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology encourages schools to cooperate with research institutions to raise student's interest in natural sciences. The Science Partnership Program (SPP) and the Super Science High-School (SSH) are among such efforts. Our short SPP course consists of an introductory lecture on space biology in general and a brief laboratory practice on plant gravitropism. Space biology class is popular to students, despite of the absence of flight experiments. We suppose that students are delighted when they find that their own knowledge is not a mere theory, but has very practical applications. Space biology is suitable in science class, since it synthesizes mathematics, physics, chemistry and many other subjects that students might think uninteresting. PMID:15858363

  5. Herpes simplex virus infection: part I--Biology, clinical presentation and latency.

    PubMed

    Yarom, N; Buchner, A; Dayan, D

    2005-01-01

    Oro-facial manifestations of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are very common, and include primary herpetic gingivo-stomatitis, recurrent herpes labialis and recurrent intra-oral herpes. Recent research in molecular biology has advanced our knowledge of the HSV pathogenesis and behavior. Understanding the exact mechanism of HSV latency and reactivation enables improvement of drug therapy and prevention strategies of HSV infections. The aim of this review is to update the recent development in the biological and clinical research related to HSV infection, focusing on oral and perioral lesions. PMID:15786655

  6. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF SOME METALS AS AIR POLLUTANTS. PART II. MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was undertaken in order to elucidate the association between low atmospheric mercury levels and changes in some biological parameters likely to react to such exposures. The study covered four populations believed to be exposed to four different levels of atmospheric mer...

  7. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  8. Biology-Chemistry-Physics, Teachers' Guide, a Three-Year Sequence, Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Arthur; And Others

    This is one of two teacher's guides for a three-year integrated biology, chemistry, and physics course being prepared by the Portland Project Committee. This committee reviewed and selected material developed by the national course improvement groups--Physical Science Study Committee, Chemical Bond Approach, Chemical Education Materials Study,…

  9. From microbiology to cell biology: when an intracellular bacterium becomes part of its host cell.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, John P

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts are now called organelles, but they used to be bacteria. As they transitioned from endosymbionts to organelles, they became more and more integrated into the biochemistry and cell biology of their hosts. Work over the last 15 years has shown that other symbioses show striking similarities to mitochondria and chloroplasts. In particular, many sap-feeding insects house intracellular bacteria that have genomes that overlap mitochondria and chloroplasts in terms of size and coding capacity. The massive levels of gene loss in some of these bacteria suggest that they, too, are becoming highly integrated with their host cells. Understanding these bacteria will require inspiration from eukaryotic cell biology, because a traditional microbiological framework is insufficient for understanding how they work. PMID:27267617

  10. [Contemporary place of the electroconvulsive therapy Part 1. The historical context arnd the biological basis].

    PubMed

    Zyss, Tomasz; Datka, Wojciech; Rachel, Wojciech; Hese, Robert T; Gorczyca, Piotr; Zięba, Andrzej; Szwajca, Krzysztof; Piekoszewskl, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a former physical therapy method in psychiatry which is applicable up till today in relation to its high effectiveness and the safety. Centuries of applying nonconvulsive methods of the electric stimulation preceded introducing this method into the clinical practice. ECT is arousing a lot of controversies; populous myths are connected with its applying--that demands explanations. Numerous biological mechanisms explaining the clinical efficacy of ECT action are well-known. PMID:25951704

  11. Thematic mapper flight model preshipment review data package. Volume 4: Appendix. Part B: Scan mirror assembly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Data from the thematic mapper scan mirror assembly (SMA) acceptance test are presented. Documentation includes: (1) a list of the acceptance test discrepancies; (2) flight 1 SMA test data book; (3) flight 1 SMA environmental report; (4) the configuration verification index; (5) the flight 1 SMA test failure reports; (6) the flight 1 data tapes log; and (7) the requests for deviation/waivers.

  12. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  13. Geometric adaption of biodegradable magnesium alloy scaffolds to stabilise biological myocardial grafts. Part I.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; Schilling, T; Weidling, M; Hartung, D; Biskup, Ch; Wriggers, P; Wacker, F; Bach, Fr-W; Haverich, A; Hassel, T

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic patch materials currently in use have major limitations, such as high susceptibility to infections and lack of contractility. Biological grafts are a novel approach to overcome these limitations, but do not always offer sufficient mechanical durability in early stages after implantation. Therefore, a stabilising structure based on resorbable magnesium alloys could support the biological graft until its physiologic remodelling. To prevent early breakage in vivo due to stress of non-determined forming, these scaffolds should be preformed according to the geometry of the targeted myocardial region. Thus, the left ventricular geometry of 28 patients was assessed via standard cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting data served as a basis for a finite element simulation (FEM). Calculated stresses and strains of flat and preformed scaffolds were evaluated. Afterwards, the structures were manufactured by abrasive waterjet cutting and preformed according to the MRI data. Finally, the mechanical durability of the preformed and flat structures was compared in an in vitro test rig. The FEM predicted higher durability of the preformed scaffolds, which was proven in the in vitro test. In conclusion, preformed scaffolds provide extended durability and will facilitate more widespread use of regenerative biological grafts for surgical left ventricular reconstruction. PMID:24264726

  14. Endobiogeny: A Global Approach to Systems Biology (Part 2 of 2)

    PubMed Central

    Lapraz, Jean-Claude; Pauly, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Endobiogeny and the biology of functions are based on four scientific concepts that are known and generally accepted: (1) human physiology is complex and multifactorial and exhibits the properties of a system; (2) the endocrine system manages metabolism, which is the basis of the continuity of life; (3) the metabolic activity managed by the endocrine system results in the output of biomarkers that reflect the functional achievement of specific aspects of metabolism; and (4) when biomarkers are related to each other in ratios, it contextualizes one type of function relative to another to which is it linked anatomically, sequentially, chronologically, biochemically, etc. PMID:24416662

  15. Endobiogeny: A Global Approach to Systems Biology (Part 1 of 2)

    PubMed Central

    Lapraz, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Endobiogeny is a global systems approach to human biology that may offer an advancement in clinical medicine based in scientific principles of rigor and experimentation and the humanistic principles of individualization of care and alleviation of suffering with minimization of harm. Endobiogeny is neither a movement away from modern science nor an uncritical embracing of pre-rational methods of inquiry but a synthesis of quantitative and qualitative relationships reflected in a systems-approach to life and based on new mathematical paradigms of pattern recognition. PMID:24381827

  16. Endobiogeny: a global approach to systems biology (part 1 of 2).

    PubMed

    Lapraz, Jean-Claude; Hedayat, Kamyar M

    2013-01-01

    Endobiogeny is a global systems approach to human biology that may offer an advancement in clinical medicine based in scientific principles of rigor and experimentation and the humanistic principles of individualization of care and alleviation of suffering with minimization of harm. Endobiogeny is neither a movement away from modern science nor an uncritical embracing of pre-rational methods of inquiry but a synthesis of quantitative and qualitative relationships reflected in a systems-approach to life and based on new mathematical paradigms of pattern recognition. PMID:24381827

  17. New glycosylated conjugate copolymer N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminyl-pluronic: Synthesis, self-assembly and biological assays.

    PubMed

    Frizon, Tiago Elias Allievi; Micheletto, Yasmine Miguel Serafini; Westrup, José Luiz; Wakabayashi, Priscila Sayoko Silva; Serafim, Francieli Rocha; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Longaretti, Luiza Martins; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes; Giacomelli, Fernando Carlos; Fort, Sébastien; Dal Bó, Alexandre Gonçalves

    2015-09-01

    This work describes the synthesis of a new glycosylated conjugate copolymer, GlcNAc-PEO75-PPO30-PEO75-GlcNAc (GlcNAc-PluronicF68-GlcNAc), using click chemistry from Pluronic(®) F68 and propargyl-2-N-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranoside. Micelles were prepared by the self-assembly of GlcNAc-PluronicF68-GlcNAc in phosphate-buffered solution. The critical micelle concentration was determined by fluorescence spectroscopy, and the value was found to be equal to 5.8mgmL(-1). The Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of micellization is negative, indicating that the organization of amphiphiles is governed by the hydrophobic effects in an entropy-driven process. The scattering characterization of GlcNAc-PluronicF68-GlcNAc micelles showed a hydrodynamic radius of 8.7nm and negative zeta potential (-21.0±0.9mV). The TEM image evidences the spherical shape of the objects self-assemble into highly regular micelles having a mean diameter of 10nm. The SAXS profile confirmed the spherical shape of the assemblies comprising a swollen PPO core (Rcore=2.25nm) stabilized by PEO chains following Gaussian statistics. The results of the comet assay showed that the GlcNAc-PluronicF68-GlcNAc micelles were not genotoxic, and the cell viability test was higher than 97% for all concentrations, demonstrating that GlcNAc-PluronicF68-GlcNAc is not toxic. PMID:26123853

  18. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype-phenotype maps.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, S F; Ahnert, S E

    2015-12-01

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype-phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into 'constrained' and 'unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As 'constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. 'Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with 'coding' and 'non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps. PMID:26609063

  19. The organization of biological sequences into constrained and unconstrained parts determines fundamental properties of genotype–phenotype maps

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, S. F.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Biological information is stored in DNA, RNA and protein sequences, which can be understood as genotypes that are translated into phenotypes. The properties of genotype–phenotype (GP) maps have been studied in great detail for RNA secondary structure. These include a highly biased distribution of genotypes per phenotype, negative correlation of genotypic robustness and evolvability, positive correlation of phenotypic robustness and evolvability, shape-space covering, and a roughly logarithmic scaling of phenotypic robustness with phenotypic frequency. More recently similar properties have been discovered in other GP maps, suggesting that they may be fundamental to biological GP maps, in general, rather than specific to the RNA secondary structure map. Here we propose that the above properties arise from the fundamental organization of biological information into ‘constrained' and ‘unconstrained' sequences, in the broadest possible sense. As ‘constrained' we describe sequences that affect the phenotype more immediately, and are therefore more sensitive to mutations, such as, e.g. protein-coding DNA or the stems in RNA secondary structure. ‘Unconstrained' sequences, on the other hand, can mutate more freely without affecting the phenotype, such as, e.g. intronic or intergenic DNA or the loops in RNA secondary structure. To test our hypothesis we consider a highly simplified GP map that has genotypes with ‘coding' and ‘non-coding' parts. We term this the Fibonacci GP map, as it is equivalent to the Fibonacci code in information theory. Despite its simplicity the Fibonacci GP map exhibits all the above properties of much more complex and biologically realistic GP maps. These properties are therefore likely to be fundamental to many biological GP maps. PMID:26609063

  20. Study of cardiovascular disease biomarkers among tobacco consumers, part 2: biomarkers of biological effect

    PubMed Central

    Nordskog, Brian K.; Brown, Buddy G.; Marano, Kristin M.; Campell, Leanne R.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Borgerding, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An age-stratified, cross-sectional study was conducted in the US among healthy adult male cigarette smokers, moist snuff consumers, and non-tobacco consumers to evaluate cardiovascular biomarkers of biological effect (BoBE). Physiological assessments included flow-mediated dilation, ankle-brachial index, carotid intima-media thickness and expired carbon monoxide. Approximately one-half of the measured serum BoBE showed statistically significant differences; IL-12(p70), sICAM-1 and IL-8 were the BoBE that best differentiated among the three groups. A significant difference in ABI was observed between the cigarette smokers and non-tobacco consumer groups. Significant group and age effect differences in select biomarkers were identified. PMID:25787701

  1. Study of cardiovascular disease biomarkers among tobacco consumers, part 2: biomarkers of biological effect.

    PubMed

    Nordskog, Brian K; Brown, Buddy G; Marano, Kristin M; Campell, Leanne R; Jones, Bobbette A; Borgerding, Michael F

    2015-02-01

    An age-stratified, cross-sectional study was conducted in the US among healthy adult male cigarette smokers, moist snuff consumers, and non-tobacco consumers to evaluate cardiovascular biomarkers of biological effect (BoBE). Physiological assessments included flow-mediated dilation, ankle-brachial index, carotid intima-media thickness and expired carbon monoxide. Approximately one-half of the measured serum BoBE showed statistically significant differences; IL-12(p70), sICAM-1 and IL-8 were the BoBE that best differentiated among the three groups. A significant difference in ABI was observed between the cigarette smokers and non-tobacco consumer groups. Significant group and age effect differences in select biomarkers were identified. PMID:25787701

  2. Biological methods for archiving and maintaining mutant laboratory mice. Part I: conserving mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Fray, Martin D

    2009-01-01

    The mouse is now firmly established as the model organism of choice for scientists studying mammalian biology and human disease. Consequently, a plethora of novel, genetically altered (GA) mouse lines have been created. In addition, the output from the large scale mutagenesis programmes currently under way around the world will increase the collection of GA mouse strains still further. Because of the implications for animal welfare and the constraints on resources, it would be unreasonable to expect anything other than those strains essential for ongoing research programmes to be maintained as breeding colonies. Unfortunately, unless the redundant strains are preserved using robust procedures, which guarantee their recovery, they will be lost to future generations of researchers.This chapter describes some of the preservation methods currently used in laboratories around the world to archive novel mouse strains. PMID:19504080

  3. A steady-state model for aerobic biological treatment: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    McHarg, W.H. )

    1993-12-01

    In the aerobic biological treatment of wastewater, microorganisms use oxygen to decompose organic contaminants. Carbon dioxide, water and biosolids -- or sludge -- are the primary products. After a predetermined time in the reactor or aeration basin, the sludge is either removed from the process or sent to a clarifier, where it settles. Some of this sludge is recycled back to the aeration basin to initiate further oxidation, and some is removed from the process. In many aerobic processes, the average retention time of the sludge in the aeration basin -- called the sludge age -- is the main design parameter. However, other parameters, such as the rate of oxygen transfer rates and the capacity of the clarifier can affect the quality of the effluent. A simple mathematical model can be used to calculate these parameters.

  4. Impact of Two Ant Species on Egg Parasitoids Released as Part of a Biological Control Program

    PubMed Central

    Kergunteuil, Alan; Basso, César; Pintureau, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Biological control using Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae), an egg parasitoid wasp, was tested in Uruguay to reduce populations of lepidopteran pests on soybeans. It was observed that the commercial parasitoid dispensers, which were made of cardboard, were vulnerable to small predators that succeeded in entering and emptying the containers of all the eggs parasitized by T. pretiosum. Observations in a soybean crop showed that the only small, common predators present were two ant species. The species responsible for the above mentioned predation was determined from the results of a laboratory experiment in which the behavior of the two common ants was tested. A modification of the dispensers to prevent introduction of this ant has been proposed and successfully tested in the laboratory and in the field. PMID:24738954

  5. Biological autoxidation. II. Cholesterol esters as inert barrier antioxidants. Self-assembly of porous membrane sacs. An hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kon, S H

    1978-01-01

    The antioxidation defenses recognized thus far appear too weak. Needed are inert barriers to encapsulate foci of activated oxygen (FAOs) and contain their spreading. These capsules must: 1. self-assemble nonenzymatically and spontaneously in face of adversity; 2. resist oxidation and dissolution in water; and 3. be moderately fluid and elastic enough to withstand flexing by tissues. Evidence shows activated oxygen: a. is produced by common cholesterolester (CE)-raising agents; b. boosts accumulation of CEs; and c. splits low-density lipoproteins (LDL), thus releasing CE-rich coalescence-prone lipid micelles. I am proposing that CEs, combined with polar lipids, are uniquely suited to form inert-lipid antioxidation barriers (ILABs). Porous ILAB capsules self-assemble from lipid micelles released by oxidatively degraded LDL. The capsules are thermodynamically unstable but elastic, durable and capable of self-repair through oxidation of ambient LDL. All capsules tend to contract into spheres. Enclosed needle-like "foreign bodies", such as asbestos, puncture the contracting capsules. Hence the odd bulbous architecture of asbestos bodies. ILABs protect from--and their failure initiates and promotes--carcinogenesis and atherosclerosis. ILABs may be mediators of membrane biogenesis. The loss of arterial flexibility in atherosclerosis protects ILAB capsules from breakage. PMID:748727

  6. Programmable Self-Assembly of DNA-Protein Hybrid Hydrogel for Enzyme Encapsulation with Enhanced Biological Stability.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lan; Chen, Qiaoshu; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Huang, Jin; Li, Li; Guo, Xi; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Kemin

    2016-04-11

    A DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel was constructed based on a programmable assembly approach, which served as a biomimetic physiologic matrix for efficient enzyme encapsulation. A dsDNA building block tailored with precise biotin residues was fabricated based on supersandwich hybridization, and then the addition of streptavidin triggered the formation of the DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel. The biocompatible hydrogel, which formed a flower-like porous structure that was 6.7 ± 2.1 μm in size, served as a reservoir system for enzyme encapsulation. Alcohol oxidase (AOx), which served as a representative enzyme, was encapsulated in the hybrid hydrogel using a synchronous assembly approach. The enzyme-encapsulated hydrogel was utilized to extend the duration time for ethanol removal in serum plasma and the enzyme retained 78% activity after incubation with human serum for 24 h. The DNA-protein hybrid hydrogel can mediate the intact immobilization on a streptavidin-modified and positively charged substrate, which is very beneficial to solid-phase biosensing applications. The hydrogel-encapsulated enzyme exhibited improved stability in the presence of various denaturants. For example, the encapsulated enzyme retained 60% activity after incubation at 55 °C for 30 min. The encapsulated enzyme also retains its total activity after five freeze-thaw cycles and even suspended in solution containing organic solvents. PMID:27008186

  7. Observations on the biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera). Part 6. Hesperiinae incertae sedis: palm feeders.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W; Congdon, T Colin E; Collins, Steve C

    2014-01-01

    Partial life histories for 12 Hesperiinae incertae sedis that feed on palms (Arecaceae) are described and illustrated. The genera dealt with are: Perrotia (part), Ploetzia, Zophopetes, Gretna (part), Pteroteinon, Leona, and Caenides (part) (all from Evans' Ploetzia genera group). Although Gamia spp. have been reported to feed on palms, these records are considered to be in error, as caterpillars of this genus feed on Dracaena spp. (Asparagaceae). The life histories of the species documented are fairly uniform, in that caterpillars of most species have rounded brown heads, wider basally, with or without limited black markings, smooth bodies and make simple shelters by rolling leaves. Variation in caterpillar markings and male genitalia of Zophopetes dysmephila (Trimen) and caterpillar and adult markings of Gretna carmen Evans merit further study. In G. carmen, G. waga (Plötz) and G. balenge (Holland), the caterpillars' head and body are covered with hair-like setae, and develop an extensive covering of white waxy powder, which in G. balenge also covers the long setae. Furthermore, the pupa of G. balenge is unusual in having a pair of large, elaborate processes frontally on the head; when disturbed, the pupa vibrates violently and rattles noisily against the sides of the shelter. Ploetzia amygdalis (Mabille) and Pteroteinon laufella (Hewitson) have gregarious caterpillars, whereas the remaining species are solitary. After eclosion, the first instar caterpillars of Gretna spp. moult to the second instar without feeding. The implications of a palm-feeding life-style are discussed, and economic damage and plant quarantine risks to coconut, oil palm and ornamental palms pointed out. The known life histories suggest that all Afrotropical palm-feeding Hesperiidae will belong in the same tribe when the incertae sedis section is further elucidated, although the affinities of Gretna deserve further consideration.  PMID:25081274

  8. Water Complexes Take Part in Biological Effect Created by Weak Combined Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykina, Nadiia

    2016-07-01

    It was revealed experimentally that at small level of magnetic field's noise (less than 4µT/Hz0.5) the dependence of gravitropc reaction of cress roots on frequency had a fine structure/ The peak that corresponded to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ ions for the static component of combined magnetic field that was equal to 40µT became split up into three peaks ( f1 = 31/3Hz, f2 = 32.5Hz i f3 = 34 Hz./ . The frequency f1 corresponded to the Ca2+ ion (theoretical value 31.6 Hz), the frequency f2 corresponded to the hydronium ion H3O+ (theoretical value 32.9 Hz), the frequency f3 corresponded to OH- ion (theoretical value 35 Hz). Taking into account the influence of combined magnetic field on hydronium ions and Del Giudice' hypothesis one may throw away doubts about the possibility of ion cyclotron resonance. The hydronium ions are unusual because they have a long free path length. It was revealed that pH of the distillated water changed under the treatment in combined magnetic field tuned to cyclotron frequency of hydronium ion. Such changes in pH had to lead to the biological effects on the molecular ,cell and organism levels.

  9. Fixed-wing MAV attitude stability in atmospheric turbulence-Part 2: Investigating biologically-inspired sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, A.; Watkins, S.; Clothier, R.; Abdulrahim, M.; Massey, K.; Sabatini, R.

    2014-11-01

    Challenges associated with flight control of agile fixed-wing Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) operating in complex environments is significantly different to any larger scale vehicle. The micro-scale of MAVs can make them particularly sensitive to atmospheric disturbances thus limiting their operation. As described in Part 1, current conventional reactive attitude sensing systems lack the necessary response times for attitude control in high turbulence environments. This paper reviews in greater detail novel and emerging biologically inspired sensors, which can sense the disturbances before a perturbation is induced. A number of biological mechanoreceptors used by flying animals are explored for their utility in MAVs. Man-made attempts of replicating mechanoreceptors have thus been reviewed. Bio-inspired flow and pressure-based sensors were found to be the most promising for complementing or replacing current inertial-based reactive attitude sensors. Achieving practical implementations that meet the size, weight and power constraints of MAVs remains a significant challenge. Biological systems were found to rely on multiple sensors, potentially implying a number of research opportunities in the exploration of heterogeneous bio-inspired sensing solutions.

  10. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of combretastatin nitrogen-containing derivatives as inhibitors of tubulin assembly and vascular disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Monk, Keith A; Siles, Rogelio; Hadimani, Mallinath B; Mugabe, Benon E; Ackley, J Freeland; Studerus, Scott W; Edvardsen, Klaus; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Garner, Charles M; Rhodes, Monte R; Pettit, George R; Pinney, Kevin G

    2006-05-01

    A series of analogs with nitro or serinamide substituents at the C-2'-, C-5'-, or C-6'-position of the combretastatin A-4 (CA4) B-ring was synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxic effects against heart endothelioma cells, blood flow reduction to tumors in SCID mice, and as inhibitors of tubulin polymerization. The synthesis of these analogs typically featured a Wittig reaction between a suitably functionalized arylaldehyde and an arylphosphonium salt followed by separation of the resultant E- and Z-isomers. Several of these nitrogen-modified CA4 derivatives (both amino and nitro) demonstrate significant inhibition of tubulin assembly as well as cytotoxicity and in vivo blood flow reduction. 2'-Aminostilbenoid 7 and 2'-amino-3'-hydroxystilbenoid 29 proved to be the most active in this series. Both compounds, 7 and 29, have the potential for further pro-drug modification and development as vascular disrupting agents for treatment of solid tumor cancers and certain ophthalmological diseases. PMID:16442292

  11. Thermodynamically consistent force fields for the assembly of inorganic, organic, and biological nanostructures: the INTERFACE force field.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Hendrik; Lin, Tzu-Jen; Mishra, Ratan Kishore; Emami, Fateme S

    2013-02-12

    The complexity of the molecular recognition and assembly of biotic-abiotic interfaces on a scale of 1 to 1000 nm can be understood more effectively using simulation tools along with laboratory instrumentation. We discuss the current capabilities and limitations of atomistic force fields and explain a strategy to obtain dependable parameters for inorganic compounds that has been developed and tested over the past decade. Parameter developments include several silicates, aluminates, metals, oxides, sulfates, and apatites that are summarized in what we call the INTERFACE force field. The INTERFACE force field operates as an extension of common harmonic force fields (PCFF, COMPASS, CHARMM, AMBER, GROMACS, and OPLS-AA) by employing the same functional form and combination rules to enable simulations of inorganic-organic and inorganic-biomolecular interfaces. The parametrization builds on an in-depth understanding of physical-chemical properties on the atomic scale to assign each parameter, especially atomic charges and van der Waals constants, as well as on the validation of macroscale physical-chemical properties for each compound in comparison to measurements. The approach eliminates large discrepancies between computed and measured bulk and surface properties of up to 2 orders of magnitude using other parametrization protocols and increases the transferability of the parameters by introducing thermodynamic consistency. As a result, a wide range of properties can be computed in quantitative agreement with experiment, including densities, surface energies, solid-water interface tensions, anisotropies of interfacial energies of different crystal facets, adsorption energies of biomolecules, and thermal and mechanical properties. Applications include insight into the assembly of inorganic-organic multiphase materials, the recognition of inorganic facets by biomolecules, growth and shape preferences of nanocrystals and nanoparticles, as well as thermal transitions and

  12. Development and evaluation of a pliable biological valved conduit. Part II: Functional and hemodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sung, H W; Witzel, T H; Hata, C; Tu, R; Shen, S H; Lin, D; Noishiki, Y; Tomizawa, Y; Quijano, R C

    1993-04-01

    Many congenital cardiac malformations may require a valved conduit for the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract. In spite of many endeavors made in the last 25 years, the clinical results of right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction with currently available valved conduits are still not satisfactory. Specific problems encountered clinically include suboptimal hemodynamic performance, conduit kinking or compression, and fibrous peeling from the luminal surface. To address these deficiencies, we undertook the development of a biological valved conduit: a bovine external jugular vein graft with a retained native valve cross-linked with a diglycidyl ether (DE). This study, using a canine model, was to evaluate the functional and hemodynamic performance of this newly developed valved conduit. Three 14 mm conduits, implanted as bypass grafts, right ventricle to pulmonary artery, were evaluated. The evaluation was conducted with a noninvasive color Doppler flow mapping system at pre-implantation, immediately post implantation, one- and three-months post implantation, and prior to retrieval (five-months post implantation). The two-dimensional tomographic inspection of the leaflet motion at various periods post implantation showed that the valvular leaflets in the DE treated conduit was quite pliable. No cardiac failure or valvular dysfunction was observed in any of the studied cases. The color Doppler flow mapping study demonstrated that the valve in the DE treated conduit was competent, with no conduit kinking or compression observed in any of the three cases. The spectral Doppler velocity study evidenced that the transvalvular pressure gradients of the DE treated conduit were minimal as compared to those of the currently available conduits. In conclusion, from the functional and hemodynamic performance points of view, this newly developed valved conduit is superior to those currently available. PMID:8325697

  13. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART I: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS ON RESPIRATORY COMPLEX SUBUNITS OR ASSEMBLY FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Torraco, Alessandra; Peralta, Susana; Iommarini, Luisa; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are the most common inborn errors of metabolism affecting the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Because the poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms, a cure for these disorders is still unavailable and all the treatments currently in use are supportive more than curative. Therefore, in the past decade a great variety of mouse models have been developed to assess the in vivo function of several mitochondrial proteins involved in human diseases. Due to the genetic and physiological similarity to humans, mice represent reliable models to study the pathogenic mechanisms of mitochondrial disorders and are precious to test new therapeutic approaches. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to defects in subunits of the OXPHOS complexes or in assembly factors. We discuss how these models recapitulate many human conditions and how they have contributed to the understanding of mitochondrial function in health and disease. PMID:25660179

  14. The Subcritical Assembly in Dubna (SAD)—Part II: Research program for ADS-demo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowski, Waclaw; Shvetsov, Valery; Polanski, Aleksander; Broeders, Cornelis

    2006-06-01

    Subcritical Assembly in Dubna (SAD), a project funded by the International Science and Technology Centre, driven in collaboration with many European partners, may become the first Accelerator Driven Subcritical experiment coupling an existing proton accelerator of 660 MeV with a compact MQX-fuelled subcritical core. The main objective of the SAD experiment is to study physics of Accelerator Driven System ranging from a very deep subcriticality up to keff of 0.98. All experiences with subcriticality monitoring from previous subcritical experiments like MUSE, Yalina and IBR-30 booster mode will be verified in order to select the most reliable subcriticality monitoring technique. Particular attention will be given to validation of the core power-beam current relation. Moreover, some studies have been done to assess possibility of power upgrade for SAD.

  15. Developments in the Tools and Methodologies of Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Kelwick, Richard; MacDonald, James T.; Webb, Alexander J.; Freemont, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is principally concerned with the rational design and engineering of biologically based parts, devices, or systems. However, biological systems are generally complex and unpredictable, and are therefore, intrinsically difficult to engineer. In order to address these fundamental challenges, synthetic biology is aiming to unify a “body of knowledge” from several foundational scientific fields, within the context of a set of engineering principles. This shift in perspective is enabling synthetic biologists to address complexity, such that robust biological systems can be designed, assembled, and tested as part of a biological design cycle. The design cycle takes a forward-design approach in which a biological system is specified, modeled, analyzed, assembled, and its functionality tested. At each stage of the design cycle, an expanding repertoire of tools is being developed. In this review, we highlight several of these tools in terms of their applications and benefits to the synthetic biology community. PMID:25505788

  16. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit virtually gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound to which we added PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells). We observed that, even if the gas-phase pollutants are not

  17. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 1: Simple VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-02-01

    This is the first of a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOC), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model indicators. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. The exposure systems permit gas-only- or PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure. Our simple experiments in this part of the study were designed to eliminate many competing atmospheric processes to reduce ambiguity in our results. Simple volatile and semi-volatile organic gases that have inherent cellular toxic properties were tested individually for biological effect in the dark (at constant humidity). Airborne mixtures were then created with each compound and PM that has no inherent cellular toxic properties for another cellular exposure. Acrolein and p-tolualdehyde were used as model VOCs and mineral oil aerosol (MOA) was selected as a surrogate for organic-containing PM. MOA is appropriately complex in composition to represent ambient PM, and it exhibits no inherent cellular toxic effects and thus did not contribute any biological detrimental effects on its own. Chemical measurements, combined with the responses of our biological exposures, clearly demonstrate that gas-phase pollutants can modify the composition of PM (and its resulting detrimental effects on lung cells) - even if the gas-phase pollutants are not considered likely to

  18. Synthesis, characterization, molecular docking and biological studies of self assembled transition metal dithiocarbamates of substituted pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Nami, Shahab A A; Ullah, Irfan; Alam, Mahboob; Lee, Dong-Ung; Sarikavakli, Nursabah

    2016-07-01

    A series of self assembled 3d transition metal dithiocarbamate, M(pdtc) [where M=Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II)] have been synthesized and spectroscopically characterized. The bidentate dithiocarbamate ligand Na2pdtc (Disodium-1,4-phenyldiaminobis (pyrrole-1-sulfino)dithioate) was prepared by insertion reaction of carbondisulfide with Schiff base, N,N'-bis-(1H-pyrrol-2-ylmethylene)-benzene-1,4-diamine (L1) in basic medium. The simple substitution reaction between the metal halide and Na2pdtc yielded the title complexes in moderate yields. However, the in situ procedure gives high yield with the formation of single product as evident by TLC. Elemental analysis, IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, UV-vis., magnetic susceptibility and conductance measurements were done to characterize the complexes, M(pdtc). All the evidences suggest that the complexes have tetrahedral geometry excepting Cu(II) which is found to be square planar. A symmetrical bidentate coordination of the dithiocarbamato moiety has been observed in all the complexes. The conductivity data show that the complexes are non-electrolyte in nature. The anti-oxidant activity of the ligand, Na2pdtc and its transition metal complexes, M(pdtc) have been carried out using DPPH and Cu(pdtc) was found to be most effective. The anti-microbial activity of the Na2pdtc and M(pdtc) complexes have been carried out and on this basis the molecular docking study of the most effective complex, Cu(pdtc) has also been reported. PMID:27197060

  19. Implementation and evaluation of a training program as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program in Azerbaijan

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, April; Akhundova, Gulshan; Aliyeva, Saida; Strelow, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    A training program for animal and human health professionals has been implemented in Azerbaijan through a joint agreement between the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Government of Azerbaijan. The training program is administered as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program, and targets key employees in Azerbaijan's disease surveillance system including physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, and laboratory personnel. Training is aimed at improving detection, diagnosis, and response to especially dangerous pathogens (EDPs), although the techniques and methodologies can be applied to other pathogens and diseases of concern. Biosafety and biosecurity training is provided to all trainees within the program. Prior to 2014, a variety of international agencies and organizations provided training, which resulted in gaps related to lack of coordination of training materials and content. In 2014 a new training program was implemented in order to address those gaps. This paper provides an overview of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program training program in Azerbaijan, a description of how the program fits into existing national training infrastructure, and an evaluation of the new program's effectiveness to date. Long-term sustainability of the program is also discussed. PMID:26501051

  20. Test design description for the Fusion Materials Open Test Assembly (Fusion MOTA-2A): Volume 1A, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.E.

    1988-11-01

    This document encompasses the test requirements, hardware design, fabrication, and safety analysis for the Fusion Materials Open Test Assembly experiment for irradiation in FFTF Cycle 11 (Fusion MOTA-2A). Fusion MOTA is equally shared by the US Fusion Material (DOE), Japanese Fusion Materials (MONBUSHO), and BEATRIX-II (IEA) programs. In the interest of providing optimum use of the irradiation space in the Fusion MOTA-2A and LMR MOTA-1G, eight of the Fusion MOTA canisters will be placed in MOTA-1G and an equal number of LMR canisters placed in Fusion MOTA-2A (Powell/Doran 1988). This eliminates the need to process Fusion MOTA-2A through the IEM cell prior to insertion for FFTF Cycle 11A. The LMR MOTA design and safety analysis (Greenslade 1984) is the basis for much of this design and safety analysis report. This design description and safety analysis for the Fusion MOTA-2A is presented per the outline given in Chapter IV of the FTR User`s Guide (Taylor 1978). 35 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Blueprints for green biotech: development and application of standards for plant synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Patron, Nicola J

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to the design and modification of biological systems and to the construction of biological parts and devices. The ability to programme cells by providing new instructions written in DNA is a foundational technology of the field. Large-scale de novo DNA synthesis has accelerated synthetic biology by offering custom-made molecules at ever decreasing costs. However, for large fragments and for experiments in which libraries of DNA sequences are assembled in different combinations, assembly in the laboratory is still desirable. Biological assembly standards allow DNA parts, even those from multiple laboratories and experiments, to be assembled together using the same reagents and protocols. The adoption of such standards for plant synthetic biology has been cohesive for the plant science community, facilitating the application of genome editing technologies to plant systems and streamlining progress in large-scale, multi-laboratory bioengineering projects. PMID:27284031

  2. Sample preparation of biological macromolecular assemblies for the determination of high-resolution structures by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stark, Holger; Chari, Ashwin

    2016-02-01

    Single particle cryo-EM has recently developed into a powerful tool to determine the 3D structure of macromolecular complexes at near-atomic resolution, which allows structural biologists to build atomic models of proteins. All technical aspects of cryo-EM technology have been considerably improved over the last two decades, including electron microscopic hardware, image processing software and the ever growing speed of computers. This leads to a more widespread use of the technique, and it can be anticipated that further automation of electron microscopes and image processing tools will soon fully shift the focus away from the technological aspects, onto biological questions that can be answered. In single particle cryo-EM, no crystals of a macromolecule are required. In contrast to X-ray crystallography, this significantly facilitates structure determination by cryo-EM. Nevertheless, a relatively high level of biochemical control is still essential to obtain high-resolution structures by cryo-EM, and it can be anticipated that the success of the cryo-EM technology goes hand in hand with further developments of sample purification and preparation techniques. This will allow routine high-resolution structure determination of the many macromolecular complexes of the cell that until now represent evasive targets for X-ray crystallographers. Here we discuss the various biochemical tools that are currently available and the existing sample purification and preparation techniques for cryo-EM grid preparation that are needed to obtain high-resolution images for structure determination. PMID:26671943

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations and neutron reflectivity as an effective approach to characterize biological membranes and related macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Darré, L; Iglesias-Fernandez, J; Kohlmeyer, A; Wacklin, H; Domene, C

    2015-10-13

    In combination with other spectroscopy, microscopy, and scattering techniques, neutron reflectivity is a powerful tool to characterize biological systems. Specular reflection of neutrons provides structural information at the nanometer and subnanometer length scales, probing the composition and organization of layered materials. Currently, analysis of neutron reflectivity data involves several simplifying assumptions about the structure of the sample under study, affecting the extraction and interpretation of information from the experimental data. Computer simulations can be used as a source of structural and dynamic data with atomic resolution. We present a novel tool to compare the structural properties determined by neutron reflectivity experiments with those obtained from molecular simulations. This tool allows benchmarking the ability of molecular dynamics simulations to reproduce experimental data, but it also promotes unbiased interpretation of experimentally determined quantities. Two application examples are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the new tool. The first example is the generation of reflectivity profiles for a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer from molecular dynamics simulations using data from both atomistic and coarse-grained models, and comparison with experimentally measured data. The second example is the calculation of lipid volume changes with temperature and composition from all atoms simulations of single and mixed 1,2-di-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers. PMID:26574275

  4. Y-12 development organization technical progress report. Part 4, Assembly technology/compatibility and surveillance period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    1993-12-27

    The Super Collider is a high-energy scientific instrument composed of a 53-mile-long ring of proton accelerators designed to collide protons and evaluate the emanating particles. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is under contract to perform work for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) and has been asked to develop manufacturing processes for components of the gammas, electrons, muons (GEM) detector. Three welded subassemblies are involved in the fabrication of these conductors. The superconducting cable is enclosed in a stainless steel conduit, which is then enclosed in an aluminum sheath. The ends of the conductor are terminated with a connector assembly joined to the superconductor, the conduit, and the sheath. Initially, the conduit weld was to be a single-pass, autogenous gas-tungsten arc weld. The authors made a great effort to get full penetration without root reinforcement on the inside of the tube. When the authors were unable to meet all of the weld requirements with an autogenous weld, they shifted development efforts to making the weld using an automatic gas-tungsten arc tube welding head with an integral wire feeder. Because reinforcement at the root continued to be a problem, the authors decided to make the weld in two passes. To achieve the desired weld reinforcement on the outside of the tube, the authors developed a welding procedure in which an autogenous pass is used to join the tube ends with the necessary minimum pushthrough on the inside of the tube and filler metal is supplied during the second pass. This two-pass weld required a weld joint with a flat butt for the root pass and a V-groove for the filler metal pass. A 272-ft conduit was made using this two-pass welding procedure for a test at the University of Wisconsin.

  5. Nitric Oxide and Redox Regulation in the Liver: Part II Redox biology in Pathologic Hepatocytes and Implications for intervention

    PubMed Central

    Diesen, Diana L.; Kuo, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are created in normal hepatocytes and are critical for normal physiological processes including oxidative respiration, growth, regeneration, apoptosis, and microsomal defense. When the levels of oxidation products exceed the capacity of normal antioxidant systems, oxidative stress occurs. This type of stress, in the form of ROS and RNS, can be damaging to all liver cells, including hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, stellate cells, and endothelial cells, through induction of inflammation, ischemia, fibrosis, necrosis, apoptosis, or through malignant transformation by damaging lipids, proteins, and/or DNA. In part I of this review, we will discuss basic redox biology in the liver, including a review of ROS, RNS, and antioxidants, with a focus on nitric oxide as a common source of RNS. We will then review the evidence for oxidative stress as a mechanism of liver injury in hepatitis (alcoholic, viral, non-alcoholic). In part II of this review, we will review oxidative stress in common pathophysiological conditions including ischemia/reperfusion injury, fibrosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, iron overload, Wilson’s disease, sepsis and acetaminophen overdose. Finally, biomarkers, proteomic, and antioxidant therapies will be discussed as areas for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:20400112

  6. Nitric Oxide and Redox Regulation in the Liver: Part I General Considerations and Redox biology in Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Diesen, Diana L.; Kuo, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are created in normal hepatocytes and are critical for normal physiological processes including oxidative respiration, growth, regeneration, apoptosis, and microsomal defense. When the levels of oxidation products exceed the capacity of normal antioxidant systems, oxidative stress occurs. This type of stress, in the form of ROS and RNS, can be damaging to all liver cells, including hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, stellate cells, and endothelial cells, through induction of inflammation, ischemia, fibrosis, necrosis, apoptosis, or through malignant transformation by damaging lipids, proteins, and/or DNA. In part I of this review, we will discuss basic redox biology in the liver, including a review of ROS, RNS, and antioxidants, with a focus on nitric oxide as a common source of RNS. We will then review the evidence for oxidative stress as a mechanism of liver injury in hepatitis (alcoholic, viral, non-alcoholic). In part II of this review, we will review oxidative stress in common pathophysiological conditions including ischemia/reperfusion injury, fibrosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, iron overload, Wilson's disease, sepsis and acetaminophen overdose. Finally, biomarkers, proteomic, and antioxidant therapies will be discussed as areas for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:20444470

  7. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a), we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004) for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA). That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise) as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM for "effect

  8. Gaseous VOCs rapidly modify particulate matter and its biological effects - Part 2: Complex urban VOCs and model PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersviller, S.; Lichtveld, K.; Sexton, K. G.; Zavala, J.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jaspers, I.; Jeffries, H. E.

    2012-03-01

    This is the second study in a three-part study designed to demonstrate dynamic entanglements among gaseous organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and their subsequent potential biological effects. We study these entanglements in increasingly complex VOC and PM mixtures in urban-like conditions in a large outdoor chamber, both in the dark and in sunlight. To the traditional chemical and physical characterizations of gas and PM, we added new measurements of gas-only- and PM-only-biological effects, using cultured human lung cells as model living receptors. These biological effects are assessed here as increases in cellular damage or expressed irritation (i.e., cellular toxic effects) from cells exposed to chamber air relative to cells exposed to clean air. Our exposure systems permit side-by-side, gas-only- and PM-only-exposures from the same air stream containing both gases and PM in equilibria, i.e., there are no extractive operations prior to cell exposure for either gases or PM. In Part 1 (Ebersviller et al., 2012a), we demonstrated the existence of PM "effect modification" (NAS, 2004) for the case of a single gas-phase toxicant and an inherently non-toxic PM (mineral oil aerosol, MOA). That is, in the presence of the single gas-phase toxicant in the dark, the initially non-toxic PM became toxic to lung cells in the PM-only-biological exposure system. In this Part 2 study, we used sunlit-reactive systems to create a large variety of gas-phase toxicants from a complex mixture of oxides of nitrogen and 54 VOCs representative of those measured in US city air. In these mostly day-long experiments, we have designated the period in the dark just after injection (but before sunrise) as the "Fresh" condition and the period in the dark after sunset as the "Aged" condition. These two conditions were used to expose cells and to collect chemical characterization samples. We used the same inherently non-toxic PM from the Part 1 study as the target PM for "effect

  9. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler G.; Garzon, Max H.; Deaton, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are “strong” assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly

  10. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tyler G; Garzon, Max H; Deaton, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly systems

  11. Peptide-directed self-assembly of functionalized polymeric nanoparticles part I: design and self-assembly of peptide-copolymer conjugates into nanoparticle fibers and 3D scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaochu; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Thompson, Martin; Heiden, Patricia A

    2014-06-01

    A robust self-assembly of nanoparticles into fibers and 3D scaffolds is designed and fabricated by functionalizing a RAFT-polymerized amphiphilic triblock copolymer with designer ionic complementary peptides so that the assembled core-shell polymeric nanoparticles are directed by peptide assembly into continuous "nanoparticle fibers," ultimately leading to 3D fiber scaffolds. The assembled nanostructure is confirmed by FESEM and optical microscopy. The assembly is not hindered when a protein (insulin) is incorporated within the nanoparticles as an active ingredient. MTS cytotoxicity tests on SW-620 cell lines show that the peptides, copolymers, and peptide-copolymer conjugates are biocompatible. The methodology of self-assembled nanoparticle fibers and 3D scaffolds is intended to combine the advantages of a flexible hydrogel scaffold with the versatility of controlled release nanoparticles to offer unprecedented ability to incorporate desired drug(s) within a self-assembled scaffold system with individual control over the release of each drug. PMID:24610743

  12. The Arabidopsis Protein CONSERVED ONLY IN THE GREEN LINEAGE160 Promotes the Assembly of the Membranous Part of the Chloroplast ATP Synthase[W

    PubMed Central

    Rühle, Thilo; Razeghi, Jafar Angouri; Vamvaka, Evgenia; Viola, Stefania; Gandini, Chiara; Kleine, Tatjana; Schünemann, Danja; Barbato, Roberto; Jahns, Peter; Leister, Dario

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplast F1Fo-ATP synthase/ATPase (cpATPase) couples ATP synthesis to the light-driven electrochemical proton gradient. The cpATPase is a multiprotein complex and consists of a membrane-spanning protein channel (comprising subunit types a, b, b′, and c) and a peripheral domain (subunits α, β, γ, δ, and ε). We report the characterization of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CONSERVED ONLY IN THE GREEN LINEAGE160 (AtCGL160) protein (AtCGL160), conserved in green algae and plants. AtCGL160 is an integral thylakoid protein, and its carboxyl-terminal portion is distantly related to prokaryotic ATP SYNTHASE PROTEIN1 (Atp1/UncI) proteins that are thought to function in ATP synthase assembly. Plants without AtCGL160 display an increase in xanthophyll cycle activity and energy-dependent nonphotochemical quenching. These photosynthetic perturbations can be attributed to a severe reduction in cpATPase levels that result in increased acidification of the thylakoid lumen. AtCGL160 is not an integral cpATPase component but is specifically required for the efficient incorporation of the c-subunit into the cpATPase. AtCGL160, as well as a chimeric protein containing the amino-terminal part of AtCGL160 and Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 Atp1, physically interact with the c-subunit. We conclude that AtCGL160 and Atp1 facilitate the assembly of the membranous part of the cpATPase in their hosts, but loss of their functions provokes a unique compensatory response in each organism. PMID:24664203

  13. Introduction of customized inserts for streamlined assembly and optimization of BioBrick synthetic genetic circuits

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background BioBrick standard biological parts are designed to make biological systems easier to engineer (e.g. assemble, manipulate, and modify). There are over 5,000 parts available in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts that can be easily assembled into genetic circuits using a standard assembly technique. The standardization of the assembly technique has allowed for wide distribution to a large number of users -- the parts are reusable and interchangeable during the assembly process. The standard assembly process, however, has some limitations. In particular it does not allow for modification of already assembled biological circuits, addition of protein tags to pre-existing BioBrick parts, or addition of non-BioBrick parts to assemblies. Results In this paper we describe a simple technique for rapid generation of synthetic biological circuits using introduction of customized inserts. We demonstrate its use in Escherichia coli (E. coli) to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) at pre-calculated relative levels and to add an N-terminal tag to GFP. The technique uses a new BioBrick part (called a BioScaffold) that can be inserted into cloning vectors and excised from them to leave a gap into which other DNA elements can be placed. The removal of the BioScaffold is performed by a Type IIB restriction enzyme (REase) that recognizes the BioScaffold but cuts into the surrounding sequences; therefore, the placement and removal of the BioScaffold allows the creation of seamless connections between arbitrary DNA sequences in cloning vectors. The BioScaffold contains a built-in red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter; successful insertion of the BioScaffold is, thus, accompanied by gain of red fluorescence and its removal is manifested by disappearance of the red fluorescence. Conclusions The ability to perform targeted modifications of existing BioBrick circuits with BioScaffolds (1) simplifies and speeds up the iterative design-build-test process through direct

  14. Biologically controlled synthesis and assembly of magnetite nanoparticles† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4fd00240g Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Bennet, Mathieu; Bertinetti, Luca; Neely, Robert K.; Schertel, Andreas; Körnig, André; Flors, Cristina; Müller, Frank D.; Schüler, Dirk; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles have size- and shape-dependent magnetic properties. In addition, assemblies of magnetite nanoparticles forming one-dimensional nanostructures have magnetic properties distinct from zero-dimensional or non-organized materials due to strong uniaxial shape anisotropy. However, assemblies of free-standing magnetic nanoparticles tend to collapse and form closed-ring structures rather than chains in order to minimize their energy. Magnetotactic bacteria, ubiquitous microorganisms, have the capability to mineralize magnetite nanoparticles, the so-called magnetosomes, and to direct their assembly in stable chains via biological macromolecules. In this contribution, the synthesis and assembly of biological magnetite to obtain functional magnetic dipoles in magnetotactic bacteria are presented, with a focus on the assembly. We present tomographic reconstructions based on cryo-FIB sectioning and SEM imaging of a magnetotactic bacterium to exemplify that the magnetosome chain is indeed a paradigm of a 1D magnetic nanostructure, based on the assembly of several individual particles. We show that the biological forces are a major player in the formation of the magnetosome chain. Finally, we demonstrate by super resolution fluorescence microscopy that MamK, a protein of the actin family necessary to form the chain backbone in the bacteria, forms a bundle of filaments that are not only found in the vicinity of the magnetosome chain but are widespread within the cytoplasm, illustrating the dynamic localization of the protein within the cells. These very simple microorganisms have thus much to teach us with regards to controlling the design of functional 1D magnetic nanoassembly. PMID:25932467

  15. The dynamics of nacre self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Julyan H.E; Checa, Antonio G

    2006-01-01

    We show how nacre and pearl construction in bivalve and gastropod molluscs can be understood in terms of successive processes of controlled self-assembly from the molecular- to the macro-scale. This dynamics involves the physics of the formation of both solid and liquid crystals and of membranes and fluids to produce a nanostructured hierarchically constructed biological composite of polysaccharides, proteins and mineral, whose mechanical properties far surpass those of its component parts. PMID:17251136

  16. Community assembly of biological soil crusts of different successional stages in a temperate sand ecosystem, as assessed by direct determination and enrichment techniques.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Tanja Margrit; Storm, Christian; Schwabe, Angelika

    2009-08-01

    In temperate regions, biological soil crusts (BSCs: complex communities of cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae, bryophytes, and lichens) are not well investigated regarding community structure and diversity. Furthermore, studies on succession are rare. For that reason, the community assembly of crusts representing two successional stages (initial, 5 years old; and stable, >20 years old) were analyzed in an inland sand ecosystem in Germany in a plot-based approach (2 x 18 plots, each 20 x 20 cm). Two different methods were used to record the cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae in these communities comprehensively: determination directly out of the soil and enrichment culture techniques. Additionally, lichens, bryophytes, and phanerogams were determined. We examine four hypotheses: (1) A combination of direct determination and enrichment culture technique is necessary to detect cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae comprehensively. In total, 45 species of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae were detected in the study area with both techniques, including 26 eukaryotic algae and 19 cyanobacteria species. With both determination techniques, 22 identical taxa were detected (11 eukaryotic algae and 11 cyanobacteria). Thirteen taxa were only found by direct determination, and ten taxa were only found in enrichment cultures. Hence, the hypothesis is supported. Additionally, five lichen species (three genera), five bryophyte species (five genera), and 24 vascular plant species occurred. (2) There is a clear difference between the floristic structure of initial and stable crusts. The different successional stages are clearly separated by detrended correspondence analysis, showing a distinct structure of the community assembly in each stage. In the initial crusts, Klebsormidium flaccidum, Klebsormidium cf. klebsii, and Stichococcus bacillaris were important indicator species, whereas the stable crusts are especially characterized by Tortella inclinata. (3) The biodiversity of BSC taxa

  17. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly.

    PubMed

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly ('Gibson assembly') that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology. PMID:27615025

  18. Automated assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sandanand; Dwivedi, Suren N.; Soon, Toh Teck; Bandi, Reddy; Banerjee, Soumen; Hughes, Cecilia

    1989-01-01

    The installation of robots and their use of assembly in space will create an exciting and promising future for the U.S. Space Program. The concept of assembly in space is very complicated and error prone and it is not possible unless the various parts and modules are suitably designed for automation. Certain guidelines are developed for part designing and for an easy precision assembly. Major design problems associated with automated assembly are considered and solutions to resolve these problems are evaluated in the guidelines format. Methods for gripping and methods for part feeding are developed with regard to the absence of gravity in space. The guidelines for part orientation, adjustments, compliances and various assembly construction are discussed. Design modifications of various fasteners and fastening methods are also investigated.

  19. Individuals at the center of biology: Rudolf Leuckart's Polymorphismus der Individuen and the ongoing narrative of parts and wholes. With an annotated translation.

    PubMed

    Nyhart, Lynn K; Lidgard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Rudolf Leuckart's 1851 pamphlet Ueber den Polymorphismus der Individuen (On the polymorphism of individuals) stood at the heart of naturalists' discussions on biological individuals, parts and wholes in mid-nineteenth-century Britain and Europe. Our analysis, which accompanies the first translation of this pamphlet into English, situates Leuckart's contribution to these discussions in two ways. First, we present it as part of a complex conceptual knot involving not only individuality and the understanding of compound organisms, but also the alternation of generations, the division of labor in nature, and the possibility of finding general laws of the organic world. Leuckart's pamphlet is important as a novel attempt to give order to the strands of this knot. It also solved a set of key biological problems in a way that avoided some of the drawbacks of an earlier teleological tradition. Second, we situate the pamphlet within a longer trajectory of inquiry into part-whole relations in biology from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. We argue that biological individuality, along with the problem-complexes with which it engaged, was as central a problem to naturalists before 1859 as evolution, and that Leuckart's contributions to it left a long legacy that persisted well into the twentieth century. As biologists' interests in part-whole relations are once again on the upswing, the longue durée of this problem merits renewed consideration. PMID:21308403

  20. Double fiber probe with a single fiber Bragg grating based on the capillary-driven self-assembly fabrication method for dimensional measurement of micro parts.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiwen; Feng, Kunpeng; Hu, Yang; Li, Junying; Dang, Hong; Tan, Jiubin

    2015-12-28

    Focusing on the ultra-precision dimensional measurement of parts with micro-scale dimensions and high aspect ratios, a two-dimensional double fiber probe with a single fiber Bragg grating (DS-FBG probe) is investigated in detail in this paper. The theoretical analysis of the sensing principle is verified by spectrum simulations of the DS-FBG probe with a modified transfer matrix method using the strain distribution within the DS-FBG probe. The fabrication process and physical principle of the capillary-driven self-assembly of double fibers in the UV adhesive with a low viscosity are demonstrated. Experimental results indicate that resolutions of 30 nm in radial direction and 15 nm in axial direction can be achieved, and the short-term displacement drifts within 90 seconds are 28.0 nm in radial direction and 7.9 nm in axial direction, and the long-term displacement drifts within 1 hour are 61.3 nm in radial direction and 17.3 nm in axial direction. The repeatability of the probing system can reach 60 nm and the measurement result of a standard nozzle is 300.49 μm with a standard deviation of 20 nm. PMID:26831960

  1. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF TOXIC TRACE METALS. VOLUME 2. TOXIC TRACE METALS IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE WORLD. PART III

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs and priorities in using biological accumulator organisms for monitoring toxic trace metals in plants and animals are analyzed. The toxic trace metals selected for study are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, se...

  2. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF TOXIC TRACE METALS. VOLUME 2. TOXIC TRACE METALS IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE WORLD. PART II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs and priorities in using biological accumulator organisms for monitoring toxic trace metals in plants and animals are analyzed. The toxic trace metals selected for study are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, se...

  3. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF TOXIC TRACE METALS. VOLUME 2. TOXIC TRACE METALS IN PLANTS AND ANIMALS OF THE WORLD. PART I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The needs and priorities in using biological accumulator organisms for monitoring toxic trace metals in plants and animals are analyzed. The toxic trace metals selected for study are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, se...

  4. What Part of NO Don't You Understand? Some Answers to the Cardinal Questions in Nitric Oxide Biology*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Bradford G.; Dranka, Brian P.; Bailey, Shannon M.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates biological processes through signaling mechanisms that exploit its unique biochemical properties as a free radical. For the last several decades, the key aspects of the chemical properties of NO relevant to biological systems have been defined, but it has been a challenge to assign these to specific cellular processes. Nevertheless, it is now clear that the high affinity of NO for transition metal centers, particularly iron, and the rapid reaction of NO with oxygen-derived free radicals can explain many of its biological and pathological properties. Emerging studies also highlight a growing importance of the secondary metabolites of NO-dependent reactions in the post-translational modification of key metabolic and signaling proteins. In this minireview, we emphasize the current understanding of the biochemistry of NO and place it in a biological context. PMID:20410298

  5. JAK/STAT signalling--an executable model assembled from molecule-centred modules demonstrating a module-oriented database concept for systems and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Blätke, Mary Ann; Dittrich, Anna; Rohr, Christian; Heiner, Monika; Schaper, Fred; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical models of molecular networks regulating biological processes in cells or organisms are most frequently designed as sets of ordinary differential equations. Various modularisation methods have been applied to reduce the complexity of models, to analyse their structural properties, to separate biological processes, or to reuse model parts. Taking the JAK/STAT signalling pathway with the extensive combinatorial cross-talk of its components as a case study, we make a natural approach to modularisation by creating one module for each biomolecule. Each module consists of a Petri net and associated metadata and is organised in a database publically accessible through a web interface (). The Petri net describes the reaction mechanism of a given biomolecule and its functional interactions with other components including relevant conformational states. The database is designed to support the curation, documentation, version control, and update of individual modules, and to assist the user in automatically composing complex models from modules. Biomolecule centred modules, associated metadata, and database support together allow the automatic creation of models by considering differential gene expression in given cell types or under certain physiological conditions or states of disease. Modularity also facilitates exploring the consequences of alternative molecular mechanisms by comparative simulation of automatically created models even for users without mathematical skills. Models may be selectively executed as an ODE system, stochastic, or qualitative models or hybrid and exported in the SBML format. The fully automated generation of models of redesigned networks by metadata-guided modification of modules representing biomolecules with mutated function or specificity is proposed. PMID:23443149

  6. Structural biological composites: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Marc A.; Lin, Albert Y. M.; Seki, Yasuaki; Chen, Po-Yu; Kad, Bimal K.; Bodde, Sara

    2006-07-01

    Biological materials are complex composites that are hierarchically structured and multifunctional. Their mechanical properties are often outstanding, considering the weak constituents from which they are assembled. They are for the most part composed of brittle (often, mineral) and ductile (organic) components. These complex structures, which have risen from millions of years of evolution, are inspiring materials scientists in the design of novel materials. This paper discusses the overall design principles in biological structural composites and illustrates them for five examples; sea spicules, the abalone shell, the conch shell, the toucan and hornbill beaks, and the sheep crab exoskeleton.

  7. Part A. Neutron activation analysis of selenium and vanadium in biological matrices. Part B. Isomeric transition activation in aqueous solutions of alkyl bromides

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahim, A.

    1988-01-01

    Several procedures were evaluated for determination of selenium in biological fluids and vanadium in biological tissues by neutron activation analysis (NAA) employing {sup 77m}Se and {sup 52}V isotopes, respectively. Procedures for determination of total selenium, trimethylselenonium (TMSe) ion and selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) ion in urine and serum and for total selenoamino acids in urine were developed by utilizing anion exchange chromatography and molecular NAA. A pre-column derivatization of selenoamino acids with o-phthalaldehyde was necessary for their determination. Also an analytical approach was developed for determination of trace vanadium in liver samples from normal and diabetic rats as well as human and cow. Reactions of bromine-80 activated by radiative neutron capture and bromine-82 activated by isomeric transition were investigated in aqueous solutions of bromomethane and 1-bromobutane. Bromine-80 organic yields decreased with decreasing solute concentrations. The tendency for aggregation of the solute molecules diminished as the solute concentration approached zero where the probable state of the solute approached a monomolecular dispersion. Unlike reactions of {sup 80}Br born by {sup 79}Br(n,{gamma}){sup 80}Br reaction, the total organic product yields resulting from the {sup 82m}Br(I.T.){sup 82}Br process showed no solute concentration dependence.

  8. Comparative Phytochemical Analysis of Essential Oils from Different Biological Parts of Artemisia herba alba and Their Cytotoxic Effect on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tilaoui, Mounir; Ait Mouse, Hassan; Jaafari, Abdeslam; Zyad, Abdelmajid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Carrying out the chemical composition and antiproliferative effects against cancer cells from different biological parts of Artemisia herba alba. Methods Essential oils were studied by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and their antitumoral activity was tested against P815 mastocytoma and BSR kidney carcinoma cell lines; also, in order to evaluate the effect on normal human cells, oils were tested against peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBMCs. Results Essential oils from leaves and aerial parts (mixture of capitulum and leaves) were mainly composed by oxygenated sesquiterpenes 39.89% and 46.15% respectively; capitulum oil contained essentially monoterpenes (22.86%) and monocyclic monoterpenes (21.48%); esters constituted the major fraction (62.8%) of stem oil. Essential oils of different biological parts studied demonstrated a differential antiproliferative activity against P815 and BSR cancer cells; P815 cells are the most sensitive to the cytotoxic effect. Leaves and capitulum essential oils are more active than aerial parts. Interestingly, no cytotoxic effect of these essential oils was observed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Conclusion Our results showed that the chemical composition variability of essential oils depends on the nature of botanical parts of Artemisia herba alba. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the differential cytotoxic effect depends not only on the essential oils concentration, but also on the target cells and the botanical parts of essential oils used. PMID:26196123

  9. DeviceEditor visual biological CAD canvas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological Computer Aided Design (bioCAD) assists the de novo design and selection of existing genetic components to achieve a desired biological activity, as part of an integrated design-build-test cycle. To meet the emerging needs of Synthetic Biology, bioCAD tools must address the increasing prevalence of combinatorial library design, design rule specification, and scar-less multi-part DNA assembly. Results We report the development and deployment of web-based bioCAD software, DeviceEditor, which provides a graphical design environment that mimics the intuitive visual whiteboard design process practiced in biological laboratories. The key innovations of DeviceEditor include visual combinatorial library design, direct integration with scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation, and a graphical user interface for the creation and modification of design specification rules. We demonstrate how biological designs are rendered on the DeviceEditor canvas, and we present effective visualizations of genetic component ordering and combinatorial variations within complex designs. Conclusions DeviceEditor liberates researchers from DNA base-pair manipulation, and enables users to create successful prototypes using standardized, functional, and visual abstractions. Open and documented software interfaces support further integration of DeviceEditor with other bioCAD tools and software platforms. DeviceEditor saves researcher time and institutional resources through correct-by-construction design, the automation of tedious tasks, design reuse, and the minimization of DNA assembly costs. PMID:22373390

  10. The biological restoration of central nervous system architecture and function: part 1-foundations and historical landmarks in contemporary stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Farin, Azadeh; Liu, Charles Y; Elder, James B; Langmoen, Iver A; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2009-01-01

    Since their discovery, stem cells have fascinated scientists with their ultimate potential: the ability to cure disease, repair altered physiology, and reverse neurological deficit. Stem cell science unquestionably promises to eliminate many of the tragic limitations contemporary medicine must acknowledge, and cloning may provide young cells for an aging population. Although it is widely believed that stem cells will transform the way medicine is practiced, therapeutic interventions using stem cell technology are still in their infancy. The 3 most common stem cell sources studied today are umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, and human embryos. Although cord blood is currently used to treat dozens of disorders and bone marrow stem cells have been used clinically since the 1960s, human embryonic stem cells have yet to be successfully applied to any disease. Undeniably, stem cell therapy has the potential to be one of the most powerful therapeutic options available. In this introductory article of a 5-part series on stem cells, we narrate the evolution of modern stem cell science, delineating major landmarks that will prove responsible for taking stem cell technology from the laboratory into revolutionary clinical applications: from the first milestone of identifying the mouse hematopoietic stem cell to the latest feats of producing pluripotent stem cells without embryos at all. In Part 2, we present the evidence demonstrating the certainty of adult mammalian neurogenesis; in Parts 3 and 4, we describe neurosurgical applications of stem cell technology; and in Part 5, we discuss the philosophical and ethical issues surrounding stem cell therapy, as well as future areas of exploration. PMID:19145154

  11. Interfacial and mechanical properties of self-assembling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Daniel

    Self-assembly is a fascinating phenomena where interactions between small subunits allow them to aggregate and form complex structures that can span many length scales. These self-assembled structures are especially important in biology where they are necessary for life as we know it. This dissertation is a study of three very different self-assembling systems, all of which have important connections to biology and biological systems. Drop shape analysis was used to study the interfacial assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers at the oil/water interface. When biologically functionalyzed copolymers are used, this system can serve as a model for receptor-ligand interactions that are used by cells to perform many activities, such as interact with their surroundings. The physical properties of a self-assembling membrane system were quantified using membrane inflation and swelling experiments. These types of membranes may have important applications in medicine such as drug eluting (growth factor eluting) scaffolds to aid in wound healing. The factors affecting the properties of bis(leucine) oxalamide gels were also explored. We believe that this particular system will serve as an appropriate model for biological gels that are made up of fiber-like and/or rod-like structures. During the course of the research presented in this dissertation, many new techniques were developed specifically to allow/aid the study of these distinct self-assembling systems. For example, numerical methods were used to predict drop stability for drop shape analysis experiments and the methods used to create reproducibly create self-assembling membranes were developed specifically for this purpose. The development of these new techniques is an integral part of the thesis and should aid future students who work on these projects. A number ongoing projects and interesting research directions for each one of the projects is also presented.

  12. Part I: A Review of Research on the Biological Basis of Dyslexia: The Neural Basis of Developmental Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeffiro, Thomas J.; Eden, Guinevere

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews recent evidence supporting a biological basis for developmental dyslexia. It concludes that the combined evidence demonstrating macroscopic morphologic, microscopic neuronal, and microstructural white matter abnormalities in dyslexia is consistent with a localization of the principle pathophysicological process to perisylvian…

  13. Orientational nanoparticle assemblies and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai

    2016-05-15

    Assemblies of nanoparticles (NPs) have regional correlated properties with new features compared to individual NPs or random aggregates. The orientational NP assembly contributes greatly to the collective interaction of individual NPs with geometrical dependence. Therefore, orientational NPs assembly techniques have emerged as promising tools for controlling inorganic NPs spatial structures with enhanced interesting properties. The research fields of orientational NP assembly have developed rapidly with characteristics related to the different methods used, including chemical, physical and biological techniques. The current and potential applications, important challenges remain to be investigated. An overview of recent developments in orientational NPs assemblies, the multiple strategies, biosensors and challenges will be discussed in this review. PMID:26708241

  14. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 3. Biomarkers of biological effect.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Michael W; Marano, Kristin M; Jones, Bobbette A; Morgan, Walter T; Stiles, Mitchell F

    2015-01-01

    A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) for 24 weeks was conducted. Evaluation of biomarkers of biological effect (e.g. inflammation, lipids, hypercoaguable state) indicated that the majority of consistent and statistically significant improvements over time within each group were observed in markers of inflammation. Consistent and statistically significant differences in pairwise comparisons between product groups were not observed. These findings are relevant to the understanding of biomarkers of biological effect related to cigarette smoking as well as the risk continuum across various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26525962

  15. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 3. Biomarkers of biological effect

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Michael W.; Marano, Kristin M.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Morgan, Walter T.; Stiles, Mitchell F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) for 24 weeks was conducted. Evaluation of biomarkers of biological effect (e.g. inflammation, lipids, hypercoaguable state) indicated that the majority of consistent and statistically significant improvements over time within each group were observed in markers of inflammation. Consistent and statistically significant differences in pairwise comparisons between product groups were not observed. These findings are relevant to the understanding of biomarkers of biological effect related to cigarette smoking as well as the risk continuum across various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26525962

  16. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank—Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Iain R.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G.; Zlotnicki, Jason P.; Mann, Barton J.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation. PMID:27099865

  17. Site Alteration Effects from Rocket Exhaust Impingement During a Simulated Viking Mars Landing. Part 2: Chemical and Biological Site Alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husted, R. R.; Smith, I. D.; Fennessey, P. V.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical and biological alteration of a Mars landing site was investigated experimentally and analytically. The experimental testing was conducted using a specially designed multiple nozzle configuration consisting of 18 small bell nozzles. The chemical test results indicate that an engine using standard hydrazine fuel will contaminate the landing site with ammonia (50-500ppm), nitrogen (5-50ppm), aniline (0.01-0.5ppm), hydrogen cyanide (0.01-0.5ppm), and water. A purified fuel, with impurities (mostly aniline) reduced by a factor of 50-100, limits the amount of hydrogen cyanide and aniline to below detectable limits for the Viking science investigations and leaves the amounts of ammonia, nitrogen, and water in the soil unchanged. The large amounts of ammonia trapped in the soil will make interpretation of the organic analysis investigation results more difficult. The biological tests indicate that the combined effects of plume gases, surface heating, surface erosion, and gas composition resulting from the retrorockets will not interfere with the Viking biology investigation.

  18. Shoreline ecology program for Prince William Sound, Alaska, following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Part 3: Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Gilfillan, E.S.; Page, D.S.; Harner, E.J.; Boehm, P.D.

    1995-12-31

    This study describes the biological results of a comprehensive shoreline ecology program designed to assess ecological recovery in Prince William Sound following the Exxon Valdez oil spill on march 24, 1989. The program is an application of the ``Sediment Quality Triad`` approach, combining chemical, toxicological, and biological measurements. The study was designed so that results could be extrapolated to the entire spill zone in Prince William Sound. The spill affected four major shoreline habitat types in Prince William Sound: pebble/gravel, boulder/cobble, sheltered bedrock, and exposed bedrock. The study design had two components: (1) one-time stratified random sampling at 64 sites representing four habitats and four oiling levels (including unoiled reference sites) and (2) periodic sampling at 12 nonrandomly chosen sites that included some of the most heavily oiled locations in the sound. Biological communities on rock surfaces and in intertidal and shallow subtidal sediments were analyzed for differences resulting from to oiling in each of 16 habitat/tide zone combinations. Statistical methods included univariate analyses of individual species abundances and community parameter variables (total abundance, species richness, and Shannon diversity), and multivariate correspondence analysis of community structure. 58 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank—Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnicki, Jason P.; Geeslin, Andrew G.; Murray, Iain R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Mann, Barton J.; Musahl, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting. PMID:27123466

  20. Assembly and infection process of bacteriophage T4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisaka, Fumio

    2005-12-01

    Bacterophage T4 consists of three parts, namely, a head, a tail, and six tail fibers, each of which is assembled along an independent pathway and then joined. In contrast to simple plant viruses such as tobacco mosaic virus, disassembly and reassembly of the virion is not possible. This is due mainly to the fact that the assembly involves not only irreversible steps such as cleavage of covalent bonds of some constituent proteins, but also that it requires a scaffold and involves the inner membrane of the host cell. Another unique feature of the assembly as a biological nanomachine is the involvement of specific protein devices such as a "ruler molecule," which determines the length of the tail, an ATP-driven DNA packaging protein complex, and phage-encoded molecular chaperones. Recent structural biological studies of the phage started to unveil the molecular mechanics of structural transformation of the tail upon infection.

  1. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia. Part 3: Update 2015 Management of special circumstances: Depression, Suicidality, substance use disorders and pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Falkai, Peter; Wobrock, Thomas; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Glenthøj, Birte; Gattaz, Wagner F; Thibaut, Florence; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    These updated guidelines are based on the first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in the years 2005 and 2006. For this 2015 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations which are clinically and scientifically relevant. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating patients with schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines a systematic review, as well as a data extraction from national guidelines have been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and subsequently categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5). This third part of the updated guidelines covers the management of the following specific treatment circumstances: comorbid depression, suicidality, various comorbid substance use disorders (legal and illegal drugs), and pregnancy and lactation. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25822804

  2. Observations on the biology of Afrotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera). Part 9. Hesperiinae incertae sedis: Zingiberales feeders, genera of unknown biology and an overview of the Hesperiinae incertae sedis.

    PubMed

    Cock, Matthew J W; Congdon, T Colin E; Collins, Steve C

    2016-01-01

    The Afrotropical genera that have been recorded to feed on Zingiberales are documented. Partial life histories are presented for Erionota torus Evans (a South-East Asian species established in Mauritius), Semalea arela (Mabille), S. pulvina (Plötz), Xanthodisca vibius (Hewitson), X. rega (Mabille), Hypoleucis ophiusa (Hewitson), Caenides dacena (Hewitson), Osmodes adon (Mabille), Gretna cylinda (Hewitson) and Moltena fiara (Butler). Additional notes from the literature are provided on the genera Leona and Rhabdomantis. Notes on natural enemies of E. torus and M. fiara are included. We find that the Zingiberaceae and Costaceae feeding genera, Semalea, Xanthodiscus, Hypoleucis and Caenides (part) are united by a C-shaped raised rim to the prothoracic spiracle of the pupa. The pupa of Osmodes adon indicates this genus may have no close affinities to other Afrotropical genera for which the life history is known. The pupa of G. cylinda is unlike any other that we have documented and may reflect that this is the only species which we have found to be formed on the open leaf under surface rather than in a shelter. The early stages of M. fiara indicate affinities with Zophopetes and related genera. The paper concludes with a brief comparative discussion of the early stages of the Afrotropical Hesperiinae incertae sedis as a whole. There appear to be useful characters to group species by the ova and pupae but less so by the caterpillars. Based on pupae alone, the Hesperiinae incertae sedis might be divided into nine groups. PMID:27395548

  3. Self-assembled Ni/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite anodes synthesized via electroless plating and atomic layer deposition on biological scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasopoulos, K; Chen, X L; Culver, J N; Wang, Chunsheng; Ghodssi, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Ni(core)/TiO{sub 2}(shell) nanocomposite anodes were fabricated on three-dimensional, self-assembled nanotemplates of Tobacco mosaic virus using atomic layer deposition, exhibiting high capacities and rate capability and extremely low average capacity fading ([similar]0.024% per cycle) for [similar]1000 cycles.

  4. Part-1: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel bromo-pyrimidine analogs as tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Munikrishnappa, Chandrashekar Suradhenupura; Puranik, Sangamesh B; Kumar, G V Suresh; Prasad, Y Rajendra

    2016-08-25

    A novel series of 5-bromo-pyrimidine derivatives (5a-l, 6a-h, 9a-m and 10a-d) were synthesized through multi step reactions starting from 5-bromo-2,4-dichloro pyrimidine. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized using elemental analysis and spectral data (IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS) analysis. The titled compounds were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines panel consisted of HCT116 (human colon cancer cell line), A549 (human lung cancer cell line), K562 (human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line), U937 (human acute monocytic myeloid leukemia cell line), and L02 (human normal cell line) by using MTT assay Mosmann's method. As most of the compounds are highly potent against K562 cells, all the synthesized compounds were evaluated for Bcr/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity by using well-established ADP-Glo assay method. Dasatinib was utilized as positive control to validate in both biological evaluations. The biological activity revealed that the compounds 5c, 5e, 6g, 9e, 9f and 10c were potent Bcr/Abl kinase inhibitors among the titled compounds. Thus these compounds may be promising lead compounds to be developed as an alternative for current Dasatinib therapy. PMID:27155464

  5. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, part II: Grafting of polyphenols extracted from grape skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Polyphenols, as one of the most important family of phytochemicals protective substances from grape fruit, possess various biological activities and health-promoting benefits, for example: inhibition of some degenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancers, reduction of plasma oxidative stress and slowing aging. The combination of polyphenols and biomaterials may have good potential to reach good bioavailability and controlled release, as well as to give biological signaling properties to the biomaterial surfaces. In this research, conventional solvent extraction was developed for obtaining polyphenols from dry grape skins. The Folin&Ciocalteu method was used to determine the amount of total polyphenols in the extracts. Surface functionalization of two bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2) was performed by grafting the extracted polyphenols on their surfaces. The effectiveness of the functionalization was tested by UV spectroscopy, which analyzes the amount of polyphenols in the uptake solution (before and after functionalization) and on solid samples, and XPS, which analyzes the presence of phenols on the material surface.

  6. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrrolidine-2,5-dione derivatives as potential antidepressant agents. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Martyna Z; Chodkowski, Andrzej; Herold, Franciszek; Gomółka, Anna; Kleps, Jerzy; Mazurek, Aleksander P; Pluciński, Franciszek; Mazurek, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel; Siwek, Agata; Stachowicz, Katarzyna; Sławińska, Anna; Wolak, Małgorzata; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Satała, Grzegorz; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Turło, Jadwiga

    2013-05-01

    A series of 3-(1H-indol-3-yl)pyrrolidine-2,5-dione derivatives was synthesized and their biological activity was evaluated. The chemical structures of the newly prepared compounds were confirmed by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and ESI-HRMS spectra data. All tested compounds proved to be potent 5-HT1A receptor and serotonin transporter protein (SERT) ligands. Among them, compounds 15, 18, 19 and 30 showed significant affinity for 5-HT1A and SERT. Computer docking simulations carried out for compounds 15, 31 and 32 to models of 5-HT1A receptor and SERT confirm the results of biological tests. Due to high affinity for the 5-HT1A receptor and moderate affinity for SERT, compounds 31, 32, 35, and 37 were evaluated for their affinity for D2L, 5-HT6, 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A receptors. In vivo tests, in turn, resulted in determining the functional activity of compounds 15, 18, 19 and 30 to the 5-HT1A receptor. The results of these tests indicate that all of the ligands possess properties characteristic of 5-HT1A receptor agonists. PMID:23524160

  7. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, Part I: Gallic acid as model molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) and its derivatives are a group of biomolecules (polyphenols) obtained from plants. They have effects which are potentially beneficial to heath, for example they are antioxidant, anticarcinogenic and antibacterial, as recently investigated in many fields such as medicine, food and plant sciences. The main drawbacks of these molecules are both low stability and bioavailability. In this research work the opportunity to graft GA to bioactive glasses is investigated, in order to deliver the undamaged biological molecule into the body, using the biomaterial surfaces as a localized carrier. GA was considered for functionalization since it is a good model molecule for polyphenols and presents several interesting biological activities, like antibacterial, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. Two different silica based bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2), with different reactivity, were employed as substrates. UV photometry combined with the Folin&Ciocalteu reagent was adopted to test the concentration of GA in uptake solution after functionalization. This test verified how much GA consumption occurred with surface modification and it was also used on solid samples to test the presence of GA on functionalized glasses. XPS and SEM-EDS techniques were employed to characterize the modification of material surface properties and functional group composition before and after functionalization.

  8. From self-organization to self-assembly: a new materialism?

    PubMed

    Vincent, Bernadette Bensaude

    2016-09-01

    While self-organization has been an integral part of academic discussions about the distinctive features of living organisms, at least since Immanuel Kant's Critique of Judgement, the term 'self-assembly' has only been used for a few decades as it became a hot research topic with the emergence of nanotechnology. Could it be considered as an attempt at reducing vital organization to a sort of assembly line of molecules? Considering the context of research on self-assembly I argue that the shift of attention from self-organization to self-assembly does not really challenge the boundary between chemistry and biology. Self-assembly was first and foremost investigated in an engineering context as a strategy for manufacturing without human intervention and did not raise new perspectives on the emergence of vital organization itself. However self-assembly implies metaphysical assumptions that this paper tries to disentangle. It first describes the emergence of self-assembly as a research field in the context of materials science and nanotechnology. The second section outlines the metaphysical implications and will emphasize a sharp contrast between the ontology underlying two practices of self-assembly developed under the umbrella of synthetic biology. And unexpectedly, we shall see that chemists are less on the reductionist side than most synthetic biologists. Finally, the third section ventures some reflections on the kind of design involved in self-assembly practices. PMID:27325057

  9. Biological methods for archiving and maintaining mutant laboratory mice. Part II: recovery and distribution of conserved mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Fray, Martin D

    2009-01-01

    The mouse is now firmly established as the model organism of choice for scientists studying mammalian biology and human disease. Consequently, large collections of novel genetically altered mouse lines have been deposited in secure archives around the world. If these resources are to be of value to the scientific community, they must be easily accessible to all researchers regardless of their embryological skills or geographical location.This chapter describes how the archiving centres attempt to make the strains they hold visible and accessible to all interested parties, and also outlines the methods currently used in laboratories around the world to recover mouse strains previously archived using the methods highlighted in this manual (see Chapter 20). PMID:19504081

  10. Persistence of biological traces at inside parts of a firearm from a case of multiple familial homicide.

    PubMed

    Courts, Cornelius; Gahr, Britta; Madea, Burkhard; Schyma, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Backspatter from wounds caused by contact shots against a biological target had before been shown to be propelled into firearms' barrels where they can persist and be retrieved from as relevant forensic evidence. Herein, that insight was applied to the investigation of a case of multiple familial homicide with a firearm. Samples of backspatter were collected from the firearm using DNA-free swabs. DNA was extracted from the swabs, and 16 STR systems were PCR-amplified to generate DNA profiles of all victims shot by the firearm. The quality of the resulting DNA profiles was sufficient to exclude the perpetrator as donor and to differentiate the three closely related victims thereby proving that all three victims had been shot by the same firearm from very close or contact distance. A key insight gained from this case was that not only a firearms' barrel inside but other inner surfaces may be charged with profilable DNA. PMID:24528165

  11. Micronucleus induction in Vicia faba roots. Part 2. Biological effects of neutrons below 1 cGy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, I; Bianchi, M

    1983-08-01

    A dose-effect relationship has been established for high-energy neutrons (maximum energy 600 MeV) within a dose range of 0.2 to 80 cGy and for low-energy neutrons produced by a 252Cf source (mean energy 2.35 MeV) for doses between 0.2 and 5 cGy. The frequency of micronuclei was found to increase linearly with dose. The relative biological effectiveness (r.b.e) values calculated using 60Co radiation as a reference were, in the high-dose region, 4.7 +/- 0.4 and 11.8 +/- 1.3 for the high- and low-energy neutrons, respectively. At doses below 1 cGy constant values of 25.4 +/- 4.4 and 63.7 +/- 12 were reached for the respective neutron energies. PMID:6603437

  12. Development and evaluation of a pliable biological valved conduit. Part I: Preparation, biochemical properties, and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Noishiki, Y; Hata, C; Tu, R; Shen, S H; Lin, D; Sung, H W; Witzel, T; Wang, E; Thyagarajan, K; Tomizawa, Y

    1993-04-01

    Different types of external valved conduits have been used for the repair of complex congenital cardiac anomalies that may have otherwise been inoperable. However, an ideal conduit has yet to be found due to complications such as stenosis, thrombosis, calcification of the valve and graft wall, and "peeling" of the neointima. To address those problems, a new extracardiac valved conduit made of bovine jugular vein was developed and evaluated in a preliminary animal study. Harvested bovine vein containing a naturally existing valve was initially incorporated with protamine on the inner surface and then was cross-linked in diglycidyl ether (DE). Fixation with DE allowed the vein and its leaflets to retain a tissue-like elasticity. To provide antithrombogenicity to the graft, heparin was introduced into the lumen to bind ionically to the pre-entrapped protamine. The biological valved conduit of approximately 14 mm diameter was implanted from the right ventricle to pulmonary artery as bypass graft in three dogs. After implantation, the native main pulmonary artery was ligated between the anastomotic sites of the bypass conduit. No anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs were administered after surgery. One DE-fixed valved conduit was retrieved at 3 months, and the others were removed at 5 months. Only small thrombus areas were found on the white luminal surfaces. The valves and the conduits maintained softness and pliability, similar to before implantation. Additionally, the collagen content, shrink temperature, and tanning index of this newly developed biological valved conduit before and after fixation were measured in the study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8325696

  13. Rapid construction of insulated genetic circuits via synthetic sequence-guided isothermal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Torella, JP; Boehm, CR; Lienert, F; Chen, JH; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2013-12-28

    In vitro recombination methods have enabled one-step construction of large DNA sequences from multiple parts. Although synthetic biological circuits can in principle be assembled in the same fashion, they typically contain repeated sequence elements such as standard promoters and terminators that interfere with homologous recombination. Here we use a computational approach to design synthetic, biologically inactive unique nucleotide sequences (UNSes) that facilitate accurate ordered assembly. Importantly, our designed UNSes make it possible to assemble parts with repeated terminator and insulator sequences, and thereby create insulated functional genetic circuits in bacteria and mammalian cells. Using UNS-guided assembly to construct repeating promoter-gene-terminator parts, we systematically varied gene expression to optimize production of a deoxychromoviridans biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli. We then used this system to construct complex eukaryotic AND-logic gates for genomic integration into embryonic stem cells. Construction was performed by using a standardized series of UNS-bearing BioBrick-compatible vectors, which enable modular assembly and facilitate reuse of individual parts. UNS-guided isothermal assembly is broadly applicable to the construction and optimization of genetic circuits and particularly those requiring tight insulation, such as complex biosynthetic pathways, sensors, counters and logic gates.

  14. Medicare program; competitive acquisition of outpatient drugs and biologicals under Part B. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2005-07-01

    This interim final rule with comment period implements provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 that require the implementation of a competitive acquisition program for certain Medicare Part B drugs not paid on a cost or prospective payment system basis. Beginning January 1, 2006, physicians will generally be given a choice between obtaining these drugs from vendors selected through a competitive bidding process or directly purchasing these drugs and being paid under the average sales price system. PMID:15999432

  15. Surface analysis of commercially pure titanium implant retrieved from rat bone. Part 1: initial biological response of sandblasted surface.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kouichi; Okawa, Seigo; Kanatani, Mitugu; Homma, Kikuo

    2009-03-01

    To gain insight on the early biological response to commercial pure titanium (cpTi), the surface properties of cpTi implants retrieved from rat bone were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). To this end, semi-cylindrical bullets, 1.1 mm in diameter and 3.5 mm in length, were implanted into the femurs of Wistar rats and then retrieved after either 3 hours or 7 days. Regardless of implantation interval, elements of Ti, O, C, and N were observed on the retrieved implants and that the thickness of the adsorbed film (mainly protein) was estimated to be about 2.5 nm. Small amounts of both Ca and P were also detected, whereby the Ca/P atomic ratios after 3 hours and 7 days were very small compared to that of hydroxyapatite. Furthermore, no correlation was found between the Ca and P distributions in the element maps. In conclusion, no calcium phosphate compounds were formed on the implant in vivo after 7 days. PMID:19496397

  16. SWIFT—Scalable Clustering for Automated Identification of Rare Cell Populations in Large, High-Dimensional Flow Cytometry Datasets, Part 2: Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mosmann, Tim R; Naim, Iftekhar; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Datta, Suprakash; Cavenaugh, James S; Weaver, Jason M; Sharma, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    A multistage clustering and data processing method, SWIFT (detailed in a companion manuscript), has been developed to detect rare subpopulations in large, high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets. An iterative sampling procedure initially fits the data to multidimensional Gaussian distributions, then splitting and merging stages use a criterion of unimodality to optimize the detection of rare subpopulations, to converge on a consistent cluster number, and to describe non-Gaussian distributions. Probabilistic assignment of cells to clusters, visualization, and manipulation of clusters by their cluster medians, facilitate application of expert knowledge using standard flow cytometry programs. The dual problems of rigorously comparing similar complex samples, and enumerating absent or very rare cell subpopulations in negative controls, were solved by assigning cells in multiple samples to a cluster template derived from a single or combined sample. Comparison of antigen-stimulated and control human peripheral blood cell samples demonstrated that SWIFT could identify biologically significant subpopulations, such as rare cytokine-producing influenza-specific T cells. A sensitivity of better than one part per million was attained in very large samples. Results were highly consistent on biological replicates, yet the analysis was sensitive enough to show that multiple samples from the same subject were more similar than samples from different subjects. A companion manuscript (Part 1) details the algorithmic development of SWIFT. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. PMID:24532172

  17. Development of drug loaded nanoparticles for tumor targeting. Part 1: synthesis, characterization, and biological evaluation in 2D cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H.; Puré, Ellen; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being extensively studied as carriers for drug delivery, but they often have limited penetration inside tumors. We envision that by targeting an endocytic receptor on the cell surface, the uptake of NPs can be significantly enhanced through receptor mediated endocytosis. In addition, if the receptor is recycled to the cell surface, the NP cargo can be transported out of the cells, which is then taken up by neighboring cells thus enhancing solid tumor penetration. To validate our hypothesis, in the first of two articles, we report the synthesis of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded, hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44, a receptor expressed on the cancer cell surface. HA was conjugated onto amine-functionalized SNPs prepared through an oil-water microemulsion method. The immobilization of the cytotoxic drug DOX was achieved through an acid sensitive hydrazone linkage. The NPs were fully characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV-vis absorbance, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Initial biological evaluation experiments demonstrated that compared to ligand-free SNPs, the uptake of HA-SNPs by the CD44-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells was significantly enhanced when evaluated in the 2D monolayer cell culture. Mechanistic studies suggested that cellular uptake of HA-SNPs was mainly through CD44 mediated endocytosis. HA-SNPs with immobilized DOX were endocytosed efficiently by the SKOV-3 cells as well. The enhanced tumor penetration and drug delivery properties of HA-SNPs will be evaluated in 3D tumor models in the subsequent paper.Nanoparticles (NPs) are being extensively studied as carriers for drug delivery, but they often have limited penetration inside tumors. We envision that by targeting an endocytic receptor on the cell surface, the uptake of NPs can be

  18. Development of drug loaded nanoparticles for tumor targeting. Part 1: synthesis, characterization, and biological evaluation in 2D cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H.; Puré, Ellen; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being extensively studied as carriers for drug delivery, but they often have limited penetration inside tumor. We envision that by targeting an endocytic receptor on cell surface, the uptake of NPs can be significantly enhanced through receptor mediated endocytosis. In addition, if the receptor is recycled to cell surface, the NP cargo can be transported out of the cells, which are then taken up by neighboring cells thus enhancing solid tumor penetration. To validate our hypothesis, in the first of two articles, we report the synthesis of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded, hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNP) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44, a receptor expressed on cancer cell surface. HA was conjugated onto amine-functionalized SNPs prepared through an oil/water microemulsion method. The immobilization of the cytotoxic drug DOX was achieved through an acid sensitive hydrazone linkage. The NPs were fully characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), UV-vis absorbance, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Initial biological evaluation experiments demonstrated that compared to ligand-free SNPs, the uptake of HA-SNP by the CD44-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells was significantly enhanced when evaluated in the 2D monolayer cell culture. Mechanistic studies suggested that cellular uptake of HA-SNP was mainly through CD44 mediated endocytosis. HA-SNPs with DOX immobilized were endocytosed efficiently by the SKOV-3 cells as well. The enhanced tumor penetration and drug delivery properties of HA-SNP will be evaluated in 3D tumor models in the subsequent paper. PMID:23529646

  19. Representations of mechanical assembly sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homem de Mello, Luiz S.; Sanderson, Arthur C.

    1991-04-01

    Five types of representations for assembly sequences are reviewed: the directed graph of feasible assembly sequences, the AND/OR graph of feasible assembly sequences, the set of establishment conditions, and two types of sets of precedence relationships. (precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection between parts and the establishment of another connection, and precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection and states of the assembly process). The mappings of one representation into the others are established. The correctness and completeness of these representations are established. The results presented are needed in the proof of correctness and completeness of algorithms for the generation of mechanical assembly sequences.

  20. Representations of mechanical assembly sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homem De Mello, Luiz S.; Sanderson, Arthur C.

    1991-01-01

    Five types of representations for assembly sequences are reviewed: the directed graph of feasible assembly sequences, the AND/OR graph of feasible assembly sequences, the set of establishment conditions, and two types of sets of precedence relationships. (precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection between parts and the establishment of another connection, and precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection and states of the assembly process). The mappings of one representation into the others are established. The correctness and completeness of these representations are established. The results presented are needed in the proof of correctness and completeness of algorithms for the generation of mechanical assembly sequences.

  1. Self-Assembly: How Nature Builds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Falvo, Michael R.; Broadwell, Bethany; Dotger, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly or spontaneous assembly is a process in which materials build themselves without assistance. This process plays a central role in the construction of biological structures and materials such as cells, viruses, and bone, and also in abiotic processes like phase transitions and crystal formation. The principles of self-assembly help…

  2. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  3. A Self-Assembled Aggregate Composed of a Fatty Acid Membrane and the Building Blocks of Biological Polymers Provides a First Step in the Emergence of Protocells.

    PubMed

    Black, Roy A; Blosser, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    We propose that the first step in the origin of cellular life on Earth was the self-assembly of fatty acids with the building blocks of RNA and protein, resulting in a stable aggregate. This scheme provides explanations for the selection and concentration of the prebiotic components of cells; the stabilization and growth of early membranes; the catalysis of biopolymer synthesis; and the co-localization of membranes, RNA and protein. In this article, we review the evidence and rationale for the formation of the proposed aggregate: (i) the well-established phenomenon of self-assembly of fatty acids to form vesicles; (ii) our published evidence that nucleobases and sugars bind to and stabilize such vesicles; and (iii) the reasons why amino acids likely do so as well. We then explain how the conformational constraints and altered chemical environment due to binding of the components to the membrane could facilitate the formation of nucleosides, oligonucleotides and peptides. We conclude by discussing how the resulting oligomers, even if short and random, could have increased vesicle stability and growth more than their building blocks did, and how competition among these vesicles could have led to longer polymers with complex functions. PMID:27529283

  4. New insights into the structure, assembly and biological roles of 10-12 nm connective tissue microfibrils from fibrillin-1 studies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sacha A; Handford, Penny A

    2016-04-01

    The 10-12 nm diameter microfibrils of the extracellular matrix (ECM) impart both structural and regulatory properties to load-bearing connective tissues. The main protein component is the calcium-dependent glycoprotein fibrillin, which assembles into microfibrils at the cell surface in a highly regulated process involving specific proteolysis, multimerization and glycosaminoglycan interactions. In higher metazoans, microfibrils act as a framework for elastin deposition and modification, resulting in the formation of elastic fibres, but they can also occur in elastin-free tissues where they perform structural roles. Fibrillin microfibrils are further engaged in a number of cell matrix interactions such as with integrins, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and the large latent complex of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ). Fibrillin-1 (FBN1) mutations are associated with a range of heritable connective disorders, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and the acromelic dysplasias, suggesting that the roles of 10-12 nm diameter microfibrils are pleiotropic. In recent years the use of molecular, cellular and whole-organism studies has revealed that the microfibril is not just a structural component of the ECM, but through its network of cell and matrix interactions it can exert profound regulatory effects on cell function. In this review we assess what is known about the molecular properties of fibrillin that enable it to assemble into the 10-12 nm diameter microfibril and perform such diverse roles. PMID:27026396

  5. 5-N-Substituted-2-(substituted benzenesulphonyl) glutamines as antitumor agents. Part II: synthesis, biological activity and QSAR study.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Soma; Srikanth, K; Banerjee, Suchandra; Debnath, Bikash; Gayen, Shovanlal; Jha, Tarun

    2004-03-15

    Cancer is a major killer disease throughout human history. Thus, cancer becomes a major point of interest in life science. It was proved that cancer is a nitrogen trap and tumor cells are avid glutamine consumers. The non-essential amino acid glutamine, which is a glutamic acid derivative, supplies its amide nitrogen to tumor cells in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine bases of nucleic acids as well as takes part in protein synthesis. Based on these and in continuation of our composite programme of development of new potential anticancer agents through rational drug design, 17 new 5-N-Substituted-2-(substituted benzenesulphonyl) glutamines were selected for synthesis. These compounds as well as 36 earlier synthesized glutamine analogues were screened for antitumor activity using percentage inhibition of tumor cell count as the activity parameter. QSAR study was performed with 53 compounds in order to design leads with increased effectiveness for antitumor activity using both physicochemical and topological parameters. QSAR study showed that steric effect on the aromatic ring is conducive to the activity. n-butyl substitution on aliphatic side chain and atom no 12 is important for antitumor activity of glutamine analogues. PMID:15018914

  6. Clean then Assemble Versus Assemble then Clean: Several Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, Roger W.

    2004-01-01

    Cleanliness of manufactured parts and assemblies is a significant issue in many industries including disk drives, semiconductors, aerospace, and medical devices. Clean manufacturing requires cleanroom floor space and cleaning technology that are both expensive to own and expensive to operate. Strategies to reduce these costs are an important consideration. One strategy shown to be effective at reducing costs is to assemble parts into subassemblies and then clean the subassembly, rather than clean the individual parts first and then assemble them. One advantage is that assembly outside of the cleanroom reduces the amount of cleanroom floor space and its associated operating cost premium. A second advantage is that this strategy reduces the number of individual parts that must be cleaned prior to assembly, reducing the number of cleaning baskets, handling and, possibly, reducing the number of cleaners. The assemble then clean strategy also results in a part that is significantly cleaner because contamination generated during the assembly steps are more effectively removed that normally can be achieved by hand wiping after assembly in the cleanroom.

  7. Geometric reasoning about assembly tools

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Planning for assembly requires reasoning about various tools used by humans, robots, or other automation to manipulate, attach, and test parts and subassemblies. This paper presents a general framework to represent and reason about geometric accessibility issues for a wide variety of such assembly tools. Central to the framework is a use volume encoding a minimum space that must be free in an assembly state to apply a given tool, and placement constraints on where that volume must be placed relative to the parts on which the tool acts. Determining whether a tool can be applied in a given assembly state is then reduced to an instance of the FINDPLACE problem. In addition, the author presents more efficient methods to integrate the framework into assembly planning. For tools that are applied either before or after their target parts are mated, one method pre-processes a single tool application for all possible states of assembly of a product in polynomial time, reducing all later state-tool queries to evaluations of a simple expression. For tools applied after their target parts are mated, a complementary method guarantees polynomial-time assembly planning. The author presents a wide variety of tools that can be described adequately using the approach, and surveys tool catalogs to determine coverage of standard tools. Finally, the author describes an implementation of the approach in an assembly planning system and experiments with a library of over one hundred manual and robotic tools and several complex assemblies.

  8. IAHS General Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Helen J.

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) General Assembly, held as part of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) Assembly, August 9-22, 1987, in Vancouver, Canada, had an estimated 500 attendees. At least 20 countries were represented by official delegates. Attendance from the United States is estimated at 120, with Helen J. Peters (California Department of Water Resources, Sacramento) as chief delegate and Marshall E. Moss (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Reston, Va.) as alternate delegate and future chief delegate for the 1991 General Assembly.The Canadian Organizing Committee had done a masterful job of organizing the assembly, with excellent housing and meeting facilities on the University of British Columbia campus. In addition to five symposia and nine workshops, the IAHS Bureau and all commissions and the committees held several meetings. Some excellent social events and tours were included.

  9. Biologically active and amidated cecropin produced in a baculovirus expression system from a fusion construct containing the antibody-binding part of protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Andersons, D; Engström, A; Josephson, S; Hansson, L; Steiner, H

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic antibody-binding part derived from protein A from Staphylococcus aureus was used as a fusion partner in a eukaryotic expression system employing Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis as a vector. This, in conjunction with an efficient signal sequence, facilitated the purification of the antibacterial peptide cecropin A from the medium of Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with a recombinant virus. In order to increase further the concentrations of fusion protein, Trichoplusia ni larvae were used as host. Cecropin A could be obtained after cleavage of the fusion protein with CNBr. Biological activity as well as the correct structure including the C-terminal amide group was shown using electrophoresis with detection of antibacterial proteins and mass spectroscopy. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1720614

  10. In response to an open invitation for comments on AAAS project 2061's Benchmark books on science. Part 1: documentation of serious errors in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ling, Gilbert

    2006-01-01

    Project 2061 was founded by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to improve secondary school science education. An in-depth study of ten 9 to 12th grade biology textbooks led to the verdict that none conveyed "Big Ideas" that would give coherence and meaning to the profusion of lavishly illustrated isolated details. However, neither the Project report itself nor the Benchmark books put out earlier by the Project carries what deserves the designation of "Big Ideas." Worse, in the two earliest-published Benchmark books, the basic unit of all life forms--the living cell--is described as a soup enclosed by a cell membrane, that determines what can enter or leave the cell. This is astonishing since extensive experimental evidence has unequivocally disproved this idea 60 years ago. A "new" version of the membrane theory brought in to replace the discredited (sieve) version is the pump model--currently taught as established truth in all high-school and college biology textbooks--was also unequivocally disproved 40 years ago. This comment is written partly in response to Bechmark's gracious open invitation for ideas to improve the books and through them, to improve US secondary school science education. PMID:17405412

  11. Liaison based assembly design

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, A.; Kholwadwala, D.; Wilson, R.H.

    1996-12-01

    Liaison Based Assembly Design extends the current information infrastructure to support design in terms of kinematic relationships between parts, or liaisons. These liaisons capture information regarding contact, degrees-of-freedom constraints and containment relationships between parts in an assembly. The project involved defining a useful collection of liaison representations, investigating their properties, and providing for maximum use of the data in downstream applications. We tested our ideas by implementing a prototype system involving extensions to Pro/Engineer and the Archimedes assembly planner. With an expanded product model, the design system is more able to capture design intent. When a product update is attempted, increased knowledge availability improves our ability to understand the effect of design changes. Manufacturing and analysis disciplines benefit from having liaison information available, so less time is wasted arguing over incomplete design specifications and our enterprise can be more completely integrated.

  12. On Constraints in Assembly Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.

    1998-12-17

    Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.

  13. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics.

    PubMed

    Patrick, William G; Nielsen, Alec A K; Keating, Steven J; Levy, Taylor J; Wang, Che-Wei; Rivera, Jaime J; Mondragón-Palomino, Octavio; Carr, Peter A; Voigt, Christopher A; Oxman, Neri; Kong, David S

    2015-01-01

    The process of connecting genetic parts-DNA assembly-is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology. PMID:26716448

  14. Active Biological Materials

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2011-01-01

    Cells make use of dynamic internal structures to control shape and create movement. By consuming energy to assemble into highly organized systems of interacting parts, these structures can generate force and resist compression, as well as adaptively change in response to their environment. Recent progress in reconstituting cytoskeletal structures in vitro has provided an opportunity to characterize the mechanics and dynamics of filament networks formed from purified proteins. Results indicate that a complex interplay between length scales and timescales underlies the mechanical responses of these systems and that energy consumption, as manifested in molecular motor activity and cytoskeletal filament growth, can drive transitions between distinct material states. This review discusses the basic characteristics of these active biological materials that set them apart from conventional materials and that create a rich array of unique behaviors. PMID:18999991

  15. GoldenBraid: An Iterative Cloning System for Standardized Assembly of Reusable Genetic Modules

    PubMed Central

    Sarrion-Perdigones, Alejandro; Falconi, Erica Elvira; Zandalinas, Sara I.; Juárez, Paloma; Fernández-del-Carmen, Asun; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic Biology requires efficient and versatile DNA assembly systems to facilitate the building of new genetic modules/pathways from basic DNA parts in a standardized way. Here we present GoldenBraid (GB), a standardized assembly system based on type IIS restriction enzymes that allows the indefinite growth of reusable gene modules made of standardized DNA pieces. The GB system consists of a set of four destination plasmids (pDGBs) designed to incorporate multipartite assemblies made of standard DNA parts and to combine them binarily to build increasingly complex multigene constructs. The relative position of type IIS restriction sites inside pDGB vectors introduces a double loop (“braid”) topology in the cloning strategy that allows the indefinite growth of composite parts through the succession of iterative assembling steps, while the overall simplicity of the system is maintained. We propose the use of GoldenBraid as an assembly standard for Plant Synthetic Biology. For this purpose we have GB-adapted a set of binary plasmids for A. tumefaciens-mediated plant transformation. Fast GB-engineering of several multigene T-DNAs, including two alternative modules made of five reusable devices each, and comprising a total of 19 basic parts are also described. PMID:21750718

  16. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  17. Dynamic Nanoparticles Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LIBING; XU, LIGUANG; KUANG, HUA; XU, CHUANLAI; KOTOV, NICHOLAS A.

    2012-01-01

    in the field may include different size dimensionalities: discrete assemblies (artificial molecules), one-dimensional (spaced chains) and two-dimensional (sheets) and three-dimensional (superlattices, twisted structures) assemblies. Notably, these dimensional attributes must be regarded as primarily topological in nature because all of these superstructures can acquire complex three-dimensional shapes. Preparation We discuss three primary strategies used to prepare NP superstructures: (1) anisotropy-based assemblies utilizing either intrinsic force field anisotropy around NPs or external anisotropy associated with templates and/or applied fields; (2) assembly methods utilizing uniform NPs with isotropic interactions; and (3) methods based on mutual recognition of biomolecules, such as DNA and antigen-antibody interactions. Applications We consider optical, electronic, and magnetic properties of dynamic superstructures, focusing primarily on multiparticle effects in NP superstructures as represented by surface plasmon resonance, NP-NP charge transport, and multibody magnetization. Unique properties of NP superstructures are being applied to biosensing, drug delivery, and nanoelectronics. For both Class 1 and Class 2 dynamic assemblies, biosensing is the most dominant and well-developed area of dynamic nanostructures being successfully transitioned into practice. We can foresee the rapid development of dynamic NP assemblies toward applications in harvesting of dissipated energy, photonics, and electronics. The final part of the review is devoted to the fundamental questions facing dynamic assemblies of NPs in the future. PMID:22449243

  18. The Emergence of Modularity in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Dirk M.; Jeng, Alice; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss modularity and hierarchy in biological systems. We review examples from protein structure, genetics, and biological networks of modular partitioning of the geometry of biological space. We review theories to explain modular organization of biology, with a focus on explaining how biology may spontaneously organize to a structured form. That is, we seek to explain how biology nucleated from among the many possibilities in chemistry. The emergence of modular organization of biological structure will be described as a symmetry-breaking phase transition, with modularity as the order parameter. Experimental support for this description will be reviewed. Examples will be presented from pathogen structure, metabolic networks, gene networks, and protein-protein interaction networks. Additional examples will be presented from ecological food networks, developmental pathways, physiology, and social networks. There once were two watchmakers, named Hora and Tempus, who manufactured very fine watches. Both of them were highly regarded, and the phones in their workshops rang frequently — new customers were constantly calling them. However, Hora prospered, while Tempus became poorer and poorer and finally lost his shop. What was the reason? The watches the men made consisted of about 1,000 parts each. Tempus had so constructed his that if he had one partly assembled and had to put it down — to answer the phone say— it immediately fell to pieces and had to be reassembled from the elements. The better the customers liked his watches, the more they phoned him, the more difficult it became for him to find enough uninterrupted time to finish a watch. The watches that Hora made were no less complex than those of Tempus. But he had designed them so that he could put together subassemblies of about ten elements each. Ten of these subassemblies, again, could be put together into a larger subassembly; and a system of ten of the latter sub-assemblies

  19. Crew Assembly

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to improve your dexterity and hand-eye coordination by assembling a puzzle.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to challenge students to set goals, practice ...

  20. Seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Roger Neal; Longfritz, William David

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that seals a gap formed by a groove comprises a seal body, a biasing element, and a connection that connects the seal body to the biasing element to form the seal assembly. The seal assembly further comprises a concave-shaped center section and convex-shaped contact portions at each end of the seal body. The biasing element is formed from an elastic material and comprises a convex-shaped center section and concave-shaped biasing zones that are opposed to the convex-shaped contact portions. The biasing element is adapted to be compressed to change a width of the seal assembly from a first width to a second width that is smaller than the first width. In the compressed state, the seal assembly can be disposed in the groove. After release of the compressing force, the seal assembly expands. The contact portions will move toward a surface of the groove and the biasing zones will move into contact with another surface of the groove. The biasing zones will bias the contact portions of the seal body against the surface of the groove.

  1. Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H S.

    2006-06-01

    The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most biologists because it took us into increasingly familiar territory. It took mysterious processes, such as the replication of genetic material and assigned them parts that could be readily understood by the human mind. When we think of ''molecular machines'' as being the underlying basis of life, we are using a paradigm derived from everyday experience. However, the price that we paid was a relentless drive towards reductionism and the attendant balkanization of biology. Now along comes ''systems biology'' that promises us a solution to the problem of ''knowing more and more about less and less''. Unlike molecular biology, systems biology appears to be taking us into unfamiliar intellectual territory, such as statistics, mathematics and computer modeling. Not surprisingly, systems biology has met with widespread skepticism and resistance. Why do we need systems biology anyway and how does this new area of research promise to change the face of biology in the next couple of decades?

  2. Impact of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 on Utilization and Spending for Medicare Part B Covered Biologicals in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Jalpa A.; Li, Pengxiang; Puig, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in utilization and expenditures for infliximab in RA patients associated with the two changes implemented by the Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) of 2003, namely (1) reductions in physician reimbursement for Part B drugs between 2003 and 2005 and (2) availability of alternative RA biologicals in 2006. Methods Using 2002 to 2006 5% Medicare files, nationally representative estimates of infliximab use and expenditures were estimated in annual cross-sectional samples of RA beneficiaries. Infliximab initiation and continuation rates were estimated in two-year longitudinal cohorts (2005–2006 vs. 2002–2003, 2003–2004, and 2004–2005). Results Total payments (in 2006 dollars) for infliximab increased from $357 million in 2002 to $492 million in 2006. The largest annual increase in infliximab payments occurred in the pre-MMA period from 2002 to 2003, wherein payments per RA patient increased by 31%. From 2003 to 2004, despite the reduction in payments brought by MMA, there was a 4% increase in total expenditures for infliximab per RA patient driven by an increase in utilization factors. Total payments for infliximab per RA patient actually decreased from 2004 to 2005, when reimbursement was further reduced. Continuation and initiation rates for infliximab use remained unchanged in 2006 as compared to previous years. Conclusion Infliximab expenditures increased from the 2002 to 2006, yet the passage of the MMA was associated with a remarkable slow down in the rate of increase in expenditures. There was no evidence of significant substitution of infliximab with other biologics made available in 2006. PMID:20391481

  3. Very large assemblies: Optimizing for automatic generation of assembly sequences

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.

    2000-02-01

    Sandia's Archimedes 3.0{copyright} Automated Assembly Analysis System has been applied successfully to several large industrial and weapon assemblies. These have included Sandia assemblies such as portions of the B61 bomb, and assemblies from external customers such as Cummins Engine Inc., Raytheon (formerly Hughes) Missile Systems and Sikorsky Aircraft. While Archimedes 3.0{copyright} represents the state-of-the-art in automated assembly planning software, applications of the software made prior to the technological advancements presented here showed several limitations of the system, and identified the need for extensive modifications to support practical analysis of assemblies with several hundred to a few thousand parts. It was believed that there was substantial potential for enhancing Archimedes 3.0{copyright} to routinely handle much larger models and/or to handle more modestly sized assemblies more efficiently. Such a mature assembly analysis capability was needed to support routine application to industrial assemblies that overstressed the system, such as full nuclear weapon assemblies or full-scale aerospace or military vehicles.

  4. Simple one step synthesis of nonionic dithiol surfactants and their self-assembling with silver nanoparticles: Characterization, surface properties, biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elaal, Ali A.; Tawfik, Salah M.; Shaban, Samy M.

    2015-07-01

    Simple esterification of 2-mercaptoacetic acid and polyethylene glycol with different molecular weights was done to form the desired nonionic dithiol surfactants. The chemical structures of synthesized thiol surfactants were confirmed using FT-IR and 1H NMR spectra. The surface activity of the synthesized surfactants was determined by measurement of the surface tension at different temperatures. The surface activity measurements showed their high tendency towards adsorption and micellization. The thermodynamic parameters of micellization (ΔGmic, ΔHmic and ΔSmic) and adsorption (ΔGads, ΔGads and ΔSads) showed their tendency toward adsorption at the interfaces and also micellization in the bulk of their solutions. The nanostructure of the synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants with silver nanoparticles was prepared and investigated using UV and TEM techniques. Screening tests of the synthesized dithiol surfactants and their nanostructure with silver nanoparticles, against gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Microccus luteus), gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bordatella pertussis) and fungi (Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) showed that they are highly active biocides. The presence of silver nanoparticles enhancement the biological activities of the individual synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants.

  5. BIOLOGICAL WARFARE

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, John

    1953-01-01

    The use of biological agents as controlled weapons of war is practical although uncertain. Three types of agents are feasible, including pathogenic organisms and biological pests, toxins, and synthetic hormones regulating plant growth. These agents may be chosen for selective effects varying from prolonged incipient illness to death of plants, man and domestic animals. For specific preventive and control measures required to combat these situations, there must be careful and detailed planning. The nucleus of such a program is available within the existing framework of public health activities. Additional research and expansion of established activities in time of attack are necessary parts of biological warfare defense. PMID:13059641

  6. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  7. Recent advances in DNA assembly technologies.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ran; Yuan, Yongbo; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-06-01

    DNA assembly is one of the most important foundational technologies for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. Since the development of the restriction digestion and ligation method in the early 1970s, a significant amount of effort has been devoted to developing better DNA assembly methods with higher efficiency, fidelity, and modularity, as well as simpler and faster protocols. This review will not only summarize the key DNA assembly methods and their recent applications, but also highlight the innovations in assembly schemes and the challenges in automating the DNA assembly methods. PMID:24903193

  8. Recent Advances in DNA Assembly Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Ran; Yuan, Yongbo; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    DNA assembly is one of the most important foundational technologies for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. Since the development of the restriction digestion and ligation method in the early 1970s, a significant amount of effort has been devoted to developing better DNA assembly methods with higher efficiency, fidelity, and modularity, as well as simpler and faster protocols. This review will not only summarize the key DNA assembly methods and their recent applications, but also highlight the innovations in assembly schemes and the challenges in automating the DNA assembly methods. PMID:24903193

  9. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, D.H.

    1999-08-31

    A hinge assembly is disclosed having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf. 8 figs.

  10. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, David Houston

    1999-01-01

    A hinge assembly having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf.

  11. The assembly of C. elegans lamins into macroscopic fibers.

    PubMed

    Zingerman-Koladko, Irena; Khayat, Maayan; Harapin, Jan; Shoseyov, Oded; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Salman, Ahmad; Medalia, Ohad; Ben-Harush, Kfir

    2016-10-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins are known mainly by their propensity to form viscoelastic filamentous networks within cells. In addition, IF-proteins are essential parts of various biological materials, such as horn and hagfish slime threads, which exhibit a range of mechanical properties from hard to elastic. These properties and their self-assembly nature made IF-proteins attractive building blocks for biomimetic and biological materials in diverse applications. Here we show that a type V IF-protein, the Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear lamin (Ce-lamin), is a promising building block for protein-based fibers. Electron cryo-tomography of vitrified sections enabled us to depict the higher ordered assembly of the Ce-lamin into macroscopic fibers through the creation of paracrystalline fibers, which are prominent in vitro structures of lamins. The lamin fibers respond to tensile force as other IF-protein-based fibers, i.e., hagfish slime threads, and possess unique mechanical properties that may potentially be used in certain applications. The self-assembly nature of lamin proteins into a filamentous structure, which is further assembled into a complex network, can be easily modulated. This knowledge may lead to a better understanding of the relationship in IF-proteins-based fibers and materials, between their hierarchical structures and their mechanical properties. PMID:27341289

  12. WHO: World Health Assembly.

    PubMed

    McGregor, A

    1992-05-23

    1200 delegates from 175 member countries attended the 45th World Health Assembly in Geneva. Everyone at the Assembly ratified measures to prevent and control AIDS. 12 countries intended to do long term planning for community based care for AIDS patients. Further the Assembly denounced instances where countries and individuals denied the gravity of the AIDS pandemic. In fact, it expressed the importance for urgent and intensive action against HIV/AIDS. The assembly backed proposals to prevent and control sexually transmitted diseases that affect AIDS patients, especially hepatitis B. For example, in countries with hepatitis B prevalence 8% (many countries in Sub-Sahara Africa, Asia, the Pacific region, and South America), health officials should introduce hepatitis B vaccine into their existing immunization programs by 1995. By 1997, this vaccine should be part of all immunization programs. The Assembly was aware of the obstacles of establishing reliable cold chains for nationwide distribution, however. Delegates in Committee A objected to the fact that 50% of the populations of developing countries continued to have limited access to essential drugs. They also expressed disapproval in implementation of WHO's 1988 ethical criteria for promotion of drugs which WHO entrusted to the Council for International Organisations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS). CIOMS lacked WHO's status and thus could not effectively monitor drug advertising. In fact, the pharmaceutical industry as well as WHO provided the funds for a meeting of 25 experts to discuss principles included in the ethical criteria. At least 4 countries insisted that WHO have the ultimate authority in monitoring drug advertising. Delegates did adopt a compromise resolution on this topic which required that industry promotion methods be reported to the 1994 Assembly via the Executive Board. The Assembly requested WHO to establish an international advisory committee on nursing and midwifery and to improve the network of

  13. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, J.R.; Harper, W.H.; Perez, R.

    1984-08-17

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing. 2 figs.

  14. Latch assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Frederickson, James R.; Harper, William H.; Perez, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing.

  15. Assembly Test Article (ATA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Glen A.

    1988-01-01

    The assembly test article (ATA) consisted of two live loaded redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) segments which were assembled and disassembled to simulate the actual flight segment stacking process. The test assembly joint was flight RSRM design, which included the J-joint insulation design and metal capture feature. The ATA test was performed mid-November through 24 December 1987, at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The purpose of the test was: certification that vertical RSRM segment mating and separation could be accomplished without any damage; verification and modification of the procedures in the segment stacking/destacking documents; and certification of various GSE to be used for flight assembly and inspection. The RSRM vertical segment assembly/disassembly is possible without any damage to the insulation, metal parts, or seals. The insulation J-joint contact area was very close to the predicted values. Numerous deviations and changes to the planning documents were made to ensure the flight segments are effectively and correctly stacked. Various GSE were also certified for use on flight segments, and are discussed in detail.

  16. BioFNet: biological functional network database for analysis and synthesis of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Onaka, Toshikazu; Takata, Takenori

    2014-09-01

    In synthetic biology and systems biology, a bottom-up approach can be used to construct a complex, modular, hierarchical structure of biological networks. To analyze or design such networks, it is critical to understand the relationship between network structure and function, the mechanism through which biological parts or biomolecules are assembled into building blocks or functional networks. A functional network is defined as a subnetwork of biomolecules that performs a particular function. Understanding the mechanism of building functional networks would help develop a methodology for analyzing the structure of large-scale networks and design a robust biological circuit to perform a target function. We propose a biological functional network database, named BioFNet, which can cover the whole cell at the level of molecular interactions. The BioFNet takes an advantage in implementing the simulation program for the mathematical models of the functional networks, visualizing the simulated results. It presents a sound basis for rational design of biochemical networks and for understanding how functional networks are assembled to create complex high-level functions, which would reveal design principles underlying molecular architectures. PMID:23894104

  17. The Archimedes 2 mechanical assembly planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, S.G.; Wilson, R.H.; Jones, R.E.; Calton, T.L.; Ames, A.L.

    1996-03-01

    We describe the implementation and performance of Archimedes 2, an integrated mechanical assembly planning system. Archimedes 2 includes two planners, two assembly sequence animation facilities, and an associated robotic workcell. Both planners use full 3 dimensional data. A rudimentary translator from high level assembly plans to control code for the robotic workcell has also been implemented. We can translate data from a commercial CAD system into input data for the system, which has allowed us to plan assembly sequences for many industrial assemblies. Archimedes 2 has been used to plan sequences for assemblies consisting of 5 to 109 parts. We have also successfully taken a CAD model of an assembly, produced an optimized assembly sequence for it, and translated the plan into robot code, which successfully assembles the device specified in the model.

  18. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, Nicholas F.; Green, Donald R.; Price, Larry S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  19. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, N.F.; Green, D.R.; Price, L.S.

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  20. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  1. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  2. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view. PMID:23515240

  3. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view. PMID:23515240

  4. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  5. Planning Assembly Of Large Truss Structures In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Mello, Luiz S. Homem; Desai, Rajiv S.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses developmental algorithm used in systematic planning of sequences of operations in which large truss structures assembled in outer space. Assembly sequence represented by directed graph called "assembly graph", in which each arc represents joining of two parts or subassemblies. Algorithm generates assembly graph, working backward from state of complete assembly to initial state, in which all parts disassembled. Working backward more efficient than working forward because it avoids intermediate dead ends.

  6. Seeing Circuits Assemble

    PubMed Central

    Lichtman, Jeff W.; Smith, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Developmental neurobiology has been greatly invigorated by a recent string of breakthroughs in molecular biology and optical physics that permit direct in vivo observation of neural circuit assembly. The imaging done thus far suggests that as brains are built, a significant amount of unbuilding is also occurring. We offer the view that this tumult is the result of the intersecting behaviors of the many single-celled creatures (i.e., neurons, glia, and progenitors) that inhabit brains. New tools will certainly be needed if we wish to monitor the myriad cooperative and competitive interactions at play in the cellular society that builds brains. PMID:18995818

  7. Characterization of assembled MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandric, Zoran; Randall, John N.; Saini, Rahul; Nolan, Michael; Skidmore, George

    2005-01-01

    Zyvex is developing a low-cost high-precision method for manufacturing MEMS-based three-dimensional structures/assemblies. The assembly process relies on compliant properties of the interconnecting components. The sockets and connectors are designed to benefit from their compliant nature by allowing the mechanical component to self-align, i.e. reposition themselves to their designed, stable position, independent of the initial placement of the part by the external robot. Thus, the self-aligning property guarantees the precision of the assembled structure to be very close to, or the same, as the precision of the lithography process itself. A three-dimensional (3D) structure is achieved by inserting the connectors into the sockets through the use of a passive end-effector. We have developed the automated, high-yield, assembly procedure which permits connectors to be picked up from any location within the same die, or a separate die. This general procedure allows for the possibility to assemble parts of dissimilar materials. We have built many 3D MEMS structures, including several 3D MEMS devices such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM) micro column, mass-spectrometer column, variable optical attenuator. For these 3D MEMS structures we characterize their mechanical strength through finite element simulation, dynamic properties by finite-element analysis and experimentally with UMECH"s MEMS motion analyzer (MMA), alignment accuracy by using an in-house developed dihedral angle measurement laser autocollimator, and impact properties by performing drop tests. The details of the experimental set-ups, the measurement procedures, and the experimental data are presented in this paper.

  8. Characterization of assembled MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandric, Zoran; Randall, John N.; Saini, Rahul; Nolan, Michael; Skidmore, George

    2004-12-01

    Zyvex is developing a low-cost high-precision method for manufacturing MEMS-based three-dimensional structures/assemblies. The assembly process relies on compliant properties of the interconnecting components. The sockets and connectors are designed to benefit from their compliant nature by allowing the mechanical component to self-align, i.e. reposition themselves to their designed, stable position, independent of the initial placement of the part by the external robot. Thus, the self-aligning property guarantees the precision of the assembled structure to be very close to, or the same, as the precision of the lithography process itself. A three-dimensional (3D) structure is achieved by inserting the connectors into the sockets through the use of a passive end-effector. We have developed the automated, high-yield, assembly procedure which permits connectors to be picked up from any location within the same die, or a separate die. This general procedure allows for the possibility to assemble parts of dissimilar materials. We have built many 3D MEMS structures, including several 3D MEMS devices such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM) micro column, mass-spectrometer column, variable optical attenuator. For these 3D MEMS structures we characterize their mechanical strength through finite element simulation, dynamic properties by finite-element analysis and experimentally with UMECH"s MEMS motion analyzer (MMA), alignment accuracy by using an in-house developed dihedral angle measurement laser autocollimator, and impact properties by performing drop tests. The details of the experimental set-ups, the measurement procedures, and the experimental data are presented in this paper.

  9. Chemical synthetic biology: a mini-review

    PubMed Central

    Chiarabelli, Cristiano; Stano, Pasquale; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Chemical synthetic biology (CSB) is a branch of synthetic biology (SB) oriented toward the synthesis of chemical structures alternative to those present in nature. Whereas SB combines biology and engineering with the aim of synthesizing biological structures or life forms that do not exist in nature – often based on genome manipulation, CSB uses and assembles biological parts, synthetic or not, to create new and alternative structures. A short epistemological note will introduce the theoretical concepts related to these fields, whereas the text will be largely devoted to introduce and comment two main projects of CSB, carried out in our laboratory in the recent years. The “Never Born Biopolymers” project deals with the construction and the screening of RNA and peptide sequences that are not present in nature, whereas the “Minimal Cell” project focuses on the construction of semi-synthetic compartments (usually liposomes) containing the minimal and sufficient number of components to perform the basic function of a biological cell. These two topics are extremely important for both the general understanding of biology in terms of function, organization, and development, and for applied biotechnology. PMID:24065964

  10. Sensor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  11. Design of polymer motifs for nucleic acid recognition and assembly stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhun

    This dissertation describes the synthesis and assembly of bio-functional polymers and the applications of these polymers to drug encapsulation, delivery, and multivalent biomimetic macromolecular recognition between synthetic polymer and nucleic acids. The main content is divided into three parts: (1) polyacidic domains as strongly stabilizing design elements for aqueous phase polyacrylate diblock assembly; (2) small molecule/polymer recognition triggered macromolecular assembly and drug encapsulation; (3) trizaine derivatized polymer as a novel class of "bifacial polymer nucleic acid" (bPoNA) and applications of bPoNA to nanoparticle loading of DNA/RNA, silencing delivery as well as control of aptamer function. Through the studies in part (1) and part (2), it was demonstrated that well-designed polymer motifs are not only able to enhance assemblies driven by non-specific hydrophobic effect, but are also able to direct assemblies based on specific recognitions. In part (3) of this dissertation, this concept was further extended by the design of polyacrylate polymers that are capable of discrete and robust hybridization with nucleic acids. This surprising finding demonstrated both fundamental and practical applications. Overall, these studies provided insights into the rational design elements for improving the bio-functions of synthetic polymers, and significantly expanded the scope of biological applications in which polymers synthesized via controlled radical polymerization may play a role.

  12. Ameliorated de novo transcriptome assembly using Illumina paired end sequence data with Trinity Assembler

    PubMed Central

    Bankar, Kiran Gopinath; Todur, Vivek Nagaraj; Shukla, Rohit Nandan; Vasudevan, Madavan

    2015-01-01

    Advent of Next Generation Sequencing has led to possibilities of de novo transcriptome assembly of organisms without availability of complete genome sequence. Among various sequencing platforms available, Illumina is the most widely used platform based on data quality, quantity and cost. Various de novo transcriptome assemblers are also available today for construction of de novo transcriptome. In this study, we aimed at obtaining an ameliorated de novo transcriptome assembly with sequence reads obtained from Illumina platform and assembled using Trinity Assembler. We found that, primary transcriptome assembly obtained as a result of Trinity can be ameliorated on the basis of transcript length, coverage, and depth and protein homology. Our approach to ameliorate is reproducible and could enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the assembled transcriptome which could be critical for validation of the assembled transcripts and for planning various downstream biological assays. PMID:26484285

  13. 49 CFR 572.74 - Thorax assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Thorax assembly and test procedure. 572.74 Section...-Year-Old Child § 572.74 Thorax assembly and test procedure. (a) Thorax assembly. The thorax consists of the part of the torso assembly designated as SA 106C 030 on drawing SA 106C 001, sheet 2, Revision...

  14. Space life sciences: biological research and space radiation. Proceedings of the F1.2, F1.3, F2.2 and F2.6 Symposia of COSPAR Scientific Commission F which were held during the Thirty-third COSPAR Scientific Assembly, Warsaw, Poland, July, 2000.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Advances in Space Research contains a large number of manuscripts in the discipline of Space Life Sciences including papers from the following sessions of the Warsaw COSPAR Assembly: Gravity-related research with animals--past, present, future; The nervous system: space flight environmental factors effects--present results and new perspectives; Investigating space radiation effects at particle accelerators--biology and physics experiments; Perspectives on radiation risks on long space missions: deterministic and stochastic effects. PMID:12528665

  15. Dump assembly

    DOEpatents

    Goldmann, L.H.

    1984-12-06

    This is a claim for a dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough. 4 figs.

  16. Pushrod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Jerry D.

    1987-01-01

    A pushrod assembly including a carriage mounted on a shaft for movement therealong and carrying a pushrod engageable with a load to be moved. A magnet is mounted on a supporting bracket for movement along such shaft. Means are provided for adjustably spacing said magnet away from said carriage to obtain a selected magnetic attractive or coupling force therebetween. Movement of the supporting bracket and the magnet carried thereby pulls the carriage along with it until the selected magnetic force is exceeded by a resistance load acting on the carriage.

  17. Shingle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2007-02-20

    A barrier, such as a PV module, is secured to a base by a support to create a shingle assembly with a venting region defined between the barrier and base for temperature regulation. The first edge of one base may be interengageable with the second edge of an adjacent base to be capable of resisting first and second disengaging forces oriented perpendicular to the edges and along planes oriented parallel to and perpendicular to the base. A deflector may be used to help reduce wind uplift forces.

  18. Biological effects and physics of solar and galactic cosmic radiation, Part B; Proceedings of a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Biological Effects and Physics of Solar and Galactic Cosmic Radiation, Algarve, Portugal, Oct. 13-23, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenberg, Charles E. (Editor); Horneck, Gerda (Editor); Stassinopoulos, E. G. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Since there is an increasing interest in establishing lunar bases and exploring Mars by manned missions, it is important to develop appropriate risk estimates and radiation protection guidelines. The biological effects and physics of solar and galactic cosmic radiation are examined with respect to the following: the radiation environment of interplanetary space, the biological responses to radiation in space, and the risk estimates for deep space missions. There is a need for a long-term program where ground-based studies can be augmented by flight experiments and an international standardization with respect to data collection, protocol comparison, and formulation of guidelines for future missions.

  19. Proceedings from the National Cancer Institute’s Second International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Part I. Biology of Relapse after Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gress, Ronald E.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Battiwalla, Minoo; Bishop, Michael R.; Giralt, Sergio A.; Hardy, Nancy M.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Wayne, Alan S.; Landau, Dan A.; Wu, Catherine J.

    2013-01-01

    In the National Cancer Institute’s Second Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, the Scientific/Educational Session on the Biology of Relapse discussed recent advances in understanding some of the host, disease and transplant-related contributions to relapse, emphasizing concepts with potential therapeutic implications. Relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents tumor escape – from the cytotoxic effects of the conditioning regimen and from immunologic control mediated by reconstituted lymphocyte populations. Factors influencing the biology of the therapeutic graft-versus-malignancy (GVM) effect – and relapse – include conditioning regimen effects upon lymphocyte populations and homeostasis, immunologic niches, and the tumor microenvironment; reconstitution of lymphocyte populations and establishment of functional immune competence; and genetic heterogeneity within the malignancy defining potential for clonal escape. Recent developments in T- and NK-cell homeostasis and reconstitution are reviewed, with implications for prevention and treatment of relapse, as is the application of modern genome sequencing to defining the biologic basis of GVM, clonal escape and relapse after HSCT. PMID:24018395

  20. Assembly auxiliary system for narrow cabins of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Shiqi; Wang, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    Due to the narrow space and complex structure of spacecraft cabin, the existing asssembly systems can not well suit for the assembly process of cabin products. This paper aims to introduce an assembly auxiliary system for cabin products. A hierarchical-classification method is proposed to re-adjust the initial assembly relationship of cabin into a new hierarchical structure for efficient assembly planning. An improved ant colony algorithm based on three assembly principles is established for searching a optimizational assembly sequence of cabin parts. A mixed reality assembly environment is constructed with enhanced information to promote interaction efficiency of assembly training and guidance. Based on the machine vision technology, the inspection of left redundant objects and measurement of parts distance in inner cabin are efficiently performed. The proposed system has been applied to the assembly work of a spacecraft cabin with 107 parts, which includes cabin assembly planning, assembly training and assembly quality inspection. The application result indicates that the proposed system can be an effective assistant tool to cabin assembly works and provide an intuitive and real assembly experience for workers. This paper presents an assembly auxiliary system for spacecraft cabin products, which can provide technical support to the spacecraft cabin assembly industry.

  1. Swivel assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael; Bradford, Kline; Rawle, Michael; Bartholomew, David B.; McPherson, James

    2007-03-20

    A swivel assembly for a downhole tool string comprises a first and second coaxial housing cooperatively arranged. The first housing comprises a first transmission element in communication with surface equipment. The second housing comprises a second transmission element in communication with the first transmission element. The second housing further comprises a third transmission element adapted for communication with a network integrated into the downhole tool string. The second housing may be rotational and adapted to transmit a signal between the downhole network and the first housing. Electronic circuitry is in communication with at least one of the transmission elements. The electronic circuitry may be externally mounted to the first or second housing. Further, the electronic circuitry may be internally mounted in the second housing. The electronic circuitry may be disposed in a recess in either first or second housing of the swivel.

  2. RETORT ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Loomis, C.C.; Ash, W.J.

    1957-11-26

    An improved retort assembly useful in the thermal reduction of volatilizable metals such as magnesium and calcium is described. In this process a high vacuum is maintained in the retort, however the retort must be heated to very high temperatures while at the same time the unloading end must bo cooled to condense the metal vapors, therefore the retention of the vacuum is frequently difficult due to the thermal stresses involved. This apparatus provides an extended condenser sleeve enclosed by the retort cover which forms the vacuum seal. Therefore, the seal is cooled by the fluid in the condenser sleeve and the extreme thermal stresses found in previous designs together with the deterioration of the sealing gasket caused by the high temperatures are avoided.

  3. Thermocouple assembly

    DOEpatents

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine; Rahal, Fadi Elias

    2002-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  4. Chemical Reactions Directed Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B.; Das, Apurba K.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly. PMID:25984603

  5. Zebrafish vimentin: molecular characterization, assembly properties and developmental expression.

    PubMed

    Cerdà, J; Conrad, M; Markl, J; Brand, M; Herrmann, H

    1998-11-01

    To provide a basis for the investigation of the intermediate filament (IF) protein vimentin in one of the most promising experimental vertebrate systems, the zebrafish (Danio rerio), we have isolated a cDNA clone of high sequence identity to and with the characteristic features of human vimentin. Using this clone we produced recombinant zebrafish vimentin and studied its assembly behaviour. Unlike other vimentins, zebrafish vimentin formed unusually thick filaments when assembled at temperatures below 21 degrees C. At 37 degrees C few filaments were observed, which often also terminated in aggregated masses, indicating that its assembly was severely disturbed at this temperature. Between 21 and 34 degrees C apparently normal IFs were generated. By viscometry, the temperature optimum of assembly was determined to be around 28 degrees C. At this temperature, zebrafish vimentin partially rescued, in mixing experiments, the temperature-dependent assembly defect of trout vimentin. Therefore it is apparently able to "instruct" the misorganized trout vimentin such that it can enter normal IFs. This feature, that assembly is best at the normal body temperature of various species, puts more weight on the assumption that vimentin is vital for some aspects of generating functional adult tissues. Remarkably, like in most other vertebrates, zebrafish vimentin appears to be an abundant factor in the lens and the retina as well as transiently, during development, in various parts of the central and peripheral nervous system. Therefore, promising cell biological investigations may now be performed with cells involved in the generation of the vertebrate eye and brain, and, in particular, the retina. Moreover, the power of genetics of the zebrafish system may be employed to investigate functional properties of vimentin in vivo. PMID:9860133

  6. The Search for More Effective Methods of Teaching High-School Biology to Slow Learners Through Interaction Analysis, Part II. The Effects of Various Constant Teaching Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citron, Irvin M.; Barnes, Cyrus W.

    1970-01-01

    Presents the procedures, results, and conclusions of a study designed to determine whether constant patterns of teaching of various kinds over an extended period could affect concept formation, problem solving, and total achievement of slow learners in a high school biology course. (LC)

  7. Impact of river overflowing on trace element contamination of volcanic soils in south Italy: part II. Soil biological and biochemical properties in relation to trace element speciation.

    PubMed

    D'Ascoli, R; Rao, M A; Adamo, P; Renella, G; Landi, L; Rutigliano, F A; Terribile, F; Gianfreda, L

    2006-11-01

    The effect of heavy metal contamination on biological and biochemical properties of Italian volcanic soils was evaluated in a multidisciplinary study, involving pedoenvironmental, micromorphological, physical, chemical, biological and biochemical analyses. Soils affected by recurring river overflowing, with Cr(III)-contaminated water and sediments, and a non-flooded control soil were analysed for microbial biomass, total and active fungal mycelium, enzyme activities (i.e., FDA hydrolase, dehydrogenase, beta-glucosidase, urease, arylsulphatase, acid phosphatase) and bacterial diversity (DGGE characterisation). Biological and biochemical data were related with both total and selected fractions of Cr and Cu (the latter deriving from agricultural chemical products) as well as with total and extractable organic C. The growth and activity of soil microbial community were influenced by soil organic C content rather than Cu or Cr contents. In fact, positive correlations between all studied parameters and organic C content were found. On the contrary, negative correlations were observed only between total fungal mycelium, dehydrogenase, arylsulphatase and acid phosphatase activities and only one Cr fraction (the soluble, exchangeable and carbonate bound). However, total Cr content negatively affected the eubacterial diversity but it did not determine changes in soil activity, probably because of the redundancy of functions within species of soil microbial community. On the other hand, expressing biological and biochemical parameters per unit of total organic C, Cu pollution negatively influenced microbial biomass, fungal mycelium and several enzyme activities, confirming soil organic matter is able to mask the negative effects of Cu on microbial community. PMID:16406624

  8. The PLOS ONE Synthetic Biology Collection: Six Years and Counting

    PubMed Central

    Peccoud, Jean; Isalan, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Since it was launched in 2006, PLOS ONE has published over fifty articles illustrating the many facets of the emerging field of synthetic biology. This article reviews these publications by organizing them into broad categories focused on DNA synthesis and assembly techniques, the development of libraries of biological parts, the use of synthetic biology in protein engineering applications, and the engineering of gene regulatory networks and metabolic pathways. Finally, we review articles that describe enabling technologies such as software and modeling, along with new instrumentation. In order to increase the visibility of this body of work, the papers have been assembled into the PLOS ONE Synthetic Biology Collection (www.ploscollections.org/synbio). Many of the innovative features of the PLOS ONE web site will help make this collection a resource that will support a lively dialogue between readers and authors of PLOS ONE synthetic biology papers. The content of the collection will be updated periodically by including relevant articles as they are published by the journal. Thus, we hope that this collection will continue to meet the publishing needs of the synthetic biology community. PMID:22916228

  9. Gold nanocage assemblies for selective second harmonic generation imaging of cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Demeritte, Teresa; Fan, Zhen; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Duan, Jinsong; Pachter, Ruth; Ray, Paresh C

    2014-01-20

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging using near infrared laser light is the key to improving penetration depths, leading to biological understanding. Unfortunately, currently SHG imaging techniques have limited capability due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio, resulting from the low SHG efficiency of available dyes. Targeted tumor imaging over nontargeted tissues is also a challenge that needs to be overcome. Driven by this need, in this study, the development of two-photon SHG imaging of live cancer cell lines selectively by enhancement of the nonlinear optical response of gold nanocage assemblies is reported. Experimental results show that two-photon scattering intensity can be increased by few orders of magnitude by just developing nanoparticle self-assembly. Theoretical modeling indicates that the field enhancement values for the nanocage assemblies can explain, in part, the enhanced nonlinear optical properties. Our experimental data also show that A9 RNA aptamer conjugated gold nanocage assemblies can be used for targeted SHG imaging of the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Experimental results with the HaCaT normal skin cell lines show that bioconjugated nanocage-based assemblies demonstrate SHG imaging that is highly selective and will be able to distinguish targeted cancer cell lines from other nontargeted cell types. After optimization, this reported SHG imaging assay could have considerable application for biology. PMID:24339156

  10. Biological effects and physics of solar and galactic cosmic radiation, Part B; Proceedings of a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Biological Effects and Physics of Solar and Galactic Cosmic Radiation, Algarve, Portugal, Oct. 13-23, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Swenberg, C.E.; Horneck, G.; Stassinopoulos, E.G.

    1993-12-31

    Since there is an increasing interest in establishing lunar bases and exploring Mars by manned missions, it is important to develop appropriate risk estimates and radiation protection guidelines. The biological effects and physics of solar and galactic cosmic radiation are examined with respect to the following: the radiation environment of interplanetary space, the biological responses to radiation in space, and the risk estimates for deep space missions. There is a need for a long-term program where ground-based studies can be augmented by flight experiments and an international standardization with respect to data collection, protocol comparison, and formulation of guidelines for future missions. For individual titles, see A95-81432 through A95-81454.

  11. The A, C, G, and T of Genome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Bilal; Sohail, Muhammad U; Ekti, Ali R; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    Genome assembly in its two decades of history has produced significant research, in terms of both biotechnology and computational biology. This contribution delineates sequencing platforms and their characteristics, examines key steps involved in filtering and processing raw data, explains assembly frameworks, and discusses quality statistics for the assessment of the assembled sequence. Furthermore, the paper explores recent Ubuntu-based software environments oriented towards genome assembly as well as some avenues for future research. PMID:27247941

  12. The A, C, G, and T of Genome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wajid, Bilal; Sohail, Muhammad U.; Ekti, Ali R.; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    Genome assembly in its two decades of history has produced significant research, in terms of both biotechnology and computational biology. This contribution delineates sequencing platforms and their characteristics, examines key steps involved in filtering and processing raw data, explains assembly frameworks, and discusses quality statistics for the assessment of the assembled sequence. Furthermore, the paper explores recent Ubuntu-based software environments oriented towards genome assembly as well as some avenues for future research. PMID:27247941

  13. Adaptive Accommodation Control Method for Complex Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Munsang; Park, Shinsuk

    Robotic systems have been used to automate assembly tasks in manufacturing and in teleoperation. Conventional robotic systems, however, have been ineffective in controlling contact force in multiple contact states of complex assemblythat involves interactions between complex-shaped parts. Unlike robots, humans excel at complex assembly tasks by utilizing their intrinsic impedance, forces and torque sensation, and tactile contact clues. By examining the human behavior in assembling complex parts, this study proposes a novel geometry-independent control method for robotic assembly using adaptive accommodation (or damping) algorithm. Two important conditions for complex assembly, target approachability and bounded contact force, can be met by the proposed control scheme. It generates target approachable motion that leads the object to move closer to a desired target position, while contact force is kept under a predetermined value. Experimental results from complex assembly tests have confirmed the feasibility and applicability of the proposed method.

  14. Constraint-based interactive assembly planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.; Calton, T.L.

    1997-03-01

    The constraints on assembly plans vary depending on the product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. This paper describes the principles and implementation of a framework that supports a wide variety of user-specified constraints for interactive assembly planning. Constraints from many sources can be expressed on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. All constraints are implemented as filters that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner`s algorithms. Replanning is fast enough to enable a natural plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to several complex assemblies. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. j5 DNA assembly design automation software.

    PubMed

    Hillson, Nathan J; Rosengarten, Rafael D; Keasling, Jay D

    2012-01-20

    Recent advances in Synthetic Biology have yielded standardized and automatable DNA assembly protocols that enable a broad range of biotechnological research and development. Unfortunately, the experimental design required for modern scar-less multipart DNA assembly methods is frequently laborious, time-consuming, and error-prone. Here, we report the development and deployment of a web-based software tool, j5, which automates the design of scar-less multipart DNA assembly protocols including SLIC, Gibson, CPEC, and Golden Gate. The key innovations of the j5 design process include cost optimization, leveraging DNA synthesis when cost-effective to do so, the enforcement of design specification rules, hierarchical assembly strategies to mitigate likely assembly errors, and the instruction of manual or automated construction of scar-less combinatorial DNA libraries. Using a GFP expression testbed, we demonstrate that j5 designs can be executed with the SLIC, Gibson, or CPEC assembly methods, used to build combinatorial libraries with the Golden Gate assembly method, and applied to the preparation of linear gene deletion cassettes for E. coli. The DNA assembly design algorithms reported here are generally applicable to broad classes of DNA construction methodologies and could be implemented to supplement other DNA assembly design tools. Taken together, these innovations save researchers time and effort, reduce the frequency of user design errors and off-target assembly products, decrease research costs, and enable scar-less multipart and combinatorial DNA construction at scales unfeasible without computer-aided design. PMID:23651006

  16. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2: Rotator Cuff.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain R; LaPrade, Robert F; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Mann, Barton J; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-03-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation. PMID:27099865

  17. Workload analyse of assembling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2015-11-01

    The workload is the most important indicator for managers responsible of industrial technological processes no matter if these are automated, mechanized or simply manual in each case, machines or workers will be in the focus of workload measurements. The paper deals with workload analyses made to a most part manual assembling technology for roller bearings assembling process, executed in a big company, with integrated bearings manufacturing processes. In this analyses the delay sample technique have been used to identify and divide all bearing assemblers activities, to get information about time parts from 480 minutes day work time that workers allow to each activity. The developed study shows some ways to increase the process productivity without supplementary investments and also indicated the process automation could be the solution to gain maximum productivity.

  18. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3: Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Petrigliano, Frank A; LaPrade, Robert F; Mann, Barton J; Musahl, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting. PMID:27123466

  19. Nano-enabled synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Doktycz, Mitchel J; Simpson, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Biological systems display a functional diversity, density and efficiency that make them a paradigm for synthetic systems. In natural systems, the cell is the elemental unit and efforts to emulate cells, their components, and organization have relied primarily on the use of bioorganic materials. Impressive advances have been made towards assembling simple genetic systems within cellular scale containers. These biological system assembly efforts are particularly instructive, as we gain command over the directed synthesis and assembly of synthetic nanoscale structures. Advances in nanoscale fabrication, assembly, and characterization are providing the tools and materials for characterizing and emulating the smallest scale features of biology. Further, they are revealing unique physical properties that emerge at the nanoscale. Realizing these properties in useful ways will require attention to the assembly of these nanoscale components. Attention to systems biology principles can lead to the practical development of nanoscale technologies with possible realization of synthetic systems with cell-like complexity. In turn, useful tools for interpreting biological complexity and for interfacing to biological processes will result. PMID:17625513

  20. M13 Bacteriophage-Based Self-Assembly Structures and Their Functional Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Kim, Won-Geun; Kim, Chuntae; Park, Geun-Tae; Heo, Jeong; Yoo, So Y; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the assembly of basic structural building blocks in a systematic and orderly fashion is an emerging issue in various areas of science and engineering such as physics, chemistry, material science, biological engineering, and electrical engineering. The self-assembly technique, among many other kinds of ordering techniques, has several unique advantages and the M13 bacteriophage can be utilized as part of this technique. The M13 bacteriophage (Phage) can easily be modified genetically and chemically to demonstrate specific functions. This allows for its use as a template to determine the homogeneous distribution and percolated network structures of inorganic nanostructures under ambient conditions. Inexpensive and environmentally friendly synthesis can be achieved by using the M13 bacteriophage as a novel functional building block. Here, we discuss recent advances in the application of M13 bacteriophage self-assembly structures and the future of this technology. PMID:26146494

  1. Dynamics of assembly production flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Yanagisawa, Daichi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent developments in management theory, maintaining a manufacturing schedule remains difficult because of production delays and fluctuations in demand and supply of materials. The response of manufacturing systems to such disruptions to dynamic behavior has been rarely studied. To capture these responses, we investigate a process that models the assembly of parts into end products. The complete assembly process is represented by a directed tree, where the smallest parts are injected at leaves and the end products are removed at the root. A discrete assembly process, represented by a node on the network, integrates parts, which are then sent to the next downstream node as a single part. The model exhibits some intriguing phenomena, including overstock cascade, phase transition in terms of demand and supply fluctuations, nonmonotonic distribution of stockout in the network, and the formation of a stockout path and stockout chains. Surprisingly, these rich phenomena result from only the nature of distributed assembly processes. From a physical perspective, these phenomena provide insight into delay dynamics and inventory distributions in large-scale manufacturing systems.

  2. Backward assembly planning with DFA analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sukhan

    1995-08-01

    An assembly planning system that operates based on a recursive decomposition of assembly into subassemblies, and analyzes assembly cost in terms of stability, directionality, and manipulability to guide the generation of preferred assembly plans is presented. The planning in this system incorporates the special processes, such as cleaning, testing, labeling, etc. that must occur during the assembly, and handles nonreversible as well as reversible assembly tasks through backward assembly planning. In order to increase the planning efficiency, the system avoids the analysis of decompositions that do not correspond to feasible assembly tasks. This is achieved by grouping and merging those parts that can not be decomposable at the current stage of backward assembly planning due to the requirement of special processes and the constraint of interconnection feasibility. The invention includes methods of evaluating assembly cost in terms of the number of fixtures (or holding devices) and reorientations required for assembly, through the analysis of stability, directionality, and manipulability. All these factors are used in defining cost and heuristic functions for an AO* search for an optimal plan.

  3. Backward assembly planning with DFA analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An assembly planning system that operates based on a recursive decomposition of assembly into subassemblies, and analyzes assembly cost in terms of stability, directionality, and manipulability to guide the generation of preferred assembly plans is presented. The planning in this system incorporates the special processes, such as cleaning, testing, labeling, etc. that must occur during the assembly, and handles nonreversible as well as reversible assembly tasks through backward assembly planning. In order to increase the planning efficiency, the system avoids the analysis of decompositions that do not correspond to feasible assembly tasks. This is achieved by grouping and merging those parts that can not be decomposable at the current stage of backward assembly planning due to the requirement of special processes and the constraint of interconnection feasibility. The invention includes methods of evaluating assembly cost in terms of the number of fixtures (or holding devices) and reorientations required for assembly, through the analysis of stability, directionality, and manipulability. All these factors are used in defining cost and heuristic functions for an AO* search for an optimal plan.

  4. Backward assembly planning with DFA analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An assembly planning system that operates based on a recursive decomposition of assembly into subassemblies is presented. The planning system analyzes assembly cost in terms of stability, directionality, and manipulability to guide the generation of preferred assembly plans. The planning in this system incorporates the special processes, such as cleaning, testing, labeling, etc., that must occur during the assembly. Additionally, the planning handles nonreversible, as well as reversible, assembly tasks through backward assembly planning. In order to decrease the planning efficiency, the system avoids the analysis of decompositions that do not correspond to feasible assembly tasks. This is achieved by grouping and merging those parts that can not be decomposable at the current stage of backward assembly planning due to the requirement of special processes and the constraint of interconnection feasibility. The invention includes methods of evaluating assembly cost in terms of the number of fixtures (or holding devices) and reorientations required for assembly, through the analysis of stability, directionality, and manipulability. All these factors are used in defining cost and heuristic functions for an AO* search for an optimal plan.

  5. Reconstitution of a nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Belousoff, Matthew J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Lu, Jingxiong; Holt, Stephen A.; Tan, Khershing; Selkrig, Joel; Webb, Chaille T.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    In biological membranes, various protein secretion devices function as nanomachines, and measuring the internal movements of their component parts is a major technological challenge. The translocation assembly module (the TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Magnetic Contrast Neutron Reflectrometry (MCNR). The MCNR studies provided structural resolution down to 1Å, enabling accurate measurement of protein domains projecting from the membrane layer. Here, we show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines. PMID:25341963

  6. Reconstitution of a nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Leyton, Denisse L.; Shiota, Takuya; Belousoff, Matthew J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Lu, Jingxiong; Holt, Stephen A.; Tan, Khershing; Selkrig, Joel; Webb, Chaille T.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2014-10-01

    In biological membranes, various protein secretion devices function as nanomachines, and measuring the internal movements of their component parts is a major technological challenge. The translocation and assembly module (TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and magnetic contrast neutron reflectrometry (MCNR). The MCNR studies provided structural resolution down to 1 Å, enabling accurate measurement of protein domains projecting from the membrane layer. Here we show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines.

  7. Self-Assembly of Peptides to Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Dindyal; Shirazi, Amir Nasrolahi; Parang, Keykavous

    2014-01-01

    The formation of well-ordered nanostructures through self-assembly of diverse organic and inorganic building blocks has drawn much attention owing to their potential applications in biology and chemistry. Among all organic building blocks, peptides are one of the most promising platforms due to their biocompatibility, chemical diversity, and resemblance with proteins. Inspired from the protein assembly in biological systems, various self-assembled peptide structures have been constructed using several amino acids and sequences. This review focuses on this emerging area, the recent advances in peptide self-assembly, and formation of different nanostructures, such as tubular, fibers, vesicles, spherical, and rod coil structures. While different peptide nanostructures are discovered, potential applications will be explored in drug delivery, tissue engineering, wound healing, and surfactants. PMID:24756480

  8. Nanoscale assemblies and their biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Tais A. P. F.; Raman, Senthilkumar; Dey, Raja; Burkhard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale assemblies are a unique class of materials, which can be synthesized from inorganic, polymeric or biological building blocks. The multitude of applications of this class of materials ranges from solar and electrical to uses in food, cosmetics and medicine. In this review, we initially highlight characteristic features of polymeric nanoscale assemblies as well as those built from biological units (lipids, nucleic acids and proteins). We give special consideration to protein nanoassemblies found in nature such as ferritin protein cages, bacterial microcompartments and vaults found in eukaryotic cells and designed protein nanoassemblies, such as peptide nanofibres and peptide nanotubes. Next, we focus on biomedical applications of these nanoscale assemblies, such as cell targeting, drug delivery, bioimaging and vaccine development. In the vaccine development section, we report in more detail the use of virus-like particles and self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticles as new vaccine delivery platforms. PMID:23303217

  9. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, William G.; Nielsen, Alec A. K.; Keating, Steven J.; Levy, Taylor J.; Wang, Che-Wei; Rivera, Jaime J.; Mondragón-Palomino, Octavio; Carr, Peter A.; Voigt, Christopher A.; Oxman, Neri; Kong, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The process of connecting genetic parts—DNA assembly—is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology. PMID:26716448

  10. [Pre-psychotic states--contemporary diagnostic and therapeutic issues. Part II. The biological markers of the risk of schizophrenia. Therapy of pre-psychotic states].

    PubMed

    Szulc, Agata; Czernikiewicz, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    The authors review the literature on the topic of early identification and intervention in "pre-psychotic" and "pre-schizophrenic" persons. Most of the early intervention programmes include more or less "false positive results". There is still no classic biological marker of schizophrenia available. Authors review the possible markers of schizophrenia, including some neurophysiological and neurocognitive disorders (eye-tracking dysfunction, sensory motor gating dysfunction, working memory and other neurocognitive dysfunctions) and also structural, neurochemical and functional brain abnormalities. Unfortunately, the marker of transition to psychosis is still unknown. Only the complex analysis of all possible factors: family, social, clinical and biological can be helpful in identification of the future schizophrenic persons. The authors also review the research on the treatment of "pre-psychotic" persons. The most frequent methods used in these cases are the generation antipsychotics in low doses and psychotherapy. The results are promising, but need further confirmation, both in every day practice and in randomized controlled trials. PMID:17494411

  11. U1-RNP and Toll-like receptors in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue diseasePart II. Endosomal TLRs and their biological significance in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a chronic autoimmune immunopathological disease of unknown etiology, which is characterized by the presence of various clinical symptoms and the presence of autoantibodies against U1-RNP particles. The U1-RNP component engages immune cells and their receptors in a complex network of interactions that ultimately lead to autoimmunity, inflammation, and tissue injury. The anti-U1-RNP autoantibodies form an immune complex with self-RNA, present in MCTD serum, which can act as endosomal Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Inhibition of TLRs by nucleic acids is a promising area of research for the development of novel therapeutic strategies against pathogenic infection, tumorigenesis and autoimmunity. In this review we summarize current knowledge of endogenous TLRs and discuss their biological significance in the pathogenesis of MCTD. In part I we described the structure, biological function and significance of the U1-RNP complex in MCTD.

  12. Biological Threats

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thunderstorms & Lightning Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may ...

  13. Part 1. Assessment of carcinogenicity and biologic responses in rats after lifetime inhalation of new-technology diesel exhaust in the ACES bioassay.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jacob D; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Seagrave, JeanClare; Gigliotti, Andrew P; Chow, Judith; Zielinska, Barbara; Mauderly, Joe L; Seilkop, Steven K; Miller, Rodney A

    2015-01-01

    The Health Effects Institute and its partners conceived and funded a program to characterize the emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines compliant with the 2007 and 2010 on-road emissions standards in the United States and to evaluate indicators of lung toxicity in rats and mice exposed repeatedly to 2007-compliant new-technology diesel exhaust (NTDE*). The a priori hypothesis of this Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was that 2007-compliant on-road diesel emissions "... will not cause an increase in tumor formation or substantial toxic effects in rats and mice at the highest concentration of exhaust that can be used ... although some biological effects may occur." This hypothesis was tested at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI) by exposing rats by chronic inhalation as a carcinogenicity bioassay. Indicators of pulmonary toxicity in rats were measured after 1, 3, 12, 24, and 28-30 months of exposure. Similar indicators of pulmonary toxicity were measured in mice, as an interspecies comparison of the effects of subchronic exposure, after 1 and 3 months of exposure. A previous HEI report (Mauderly and McDonald 2012) described the operation of the engine and exposure systems and the characteristics of the exposure atmospheres during system commissioning. Another HEI report described the biologic responses in mice and rats after subchronic exposure to NTDE (McDonald et al. 2012). The primary motivation for the present chronic study was to evaluate the effects of NTDE in rats in the context of previous studies that had shown neoplastic lung lesions in rats exposed chronically to traditional technology diesel exhaust (TDE) (i.e., exhaust from diesel engines built before the 2007 U.S. requirements went into effect). The hypothesis was largely based on the marked reduction of diesel particulate matter (DPM) in NTDE compared with emissions from older diesel engine and fuel technologies, although other emissions were also reduced. The DPM

  14. Hapsembler: An Assembler for Highly Polymorphic Genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Nilgun; Brudno, Michael

    As whole genome sequencing has become a routine biological experiment, algorithms for assembly of whole genome shotgun data has become a topic of extensive research, with a plethora of off-the-shelf methods that can reconstruct the genomes of many organisms. Simultaneously, several recently sequenced genomes exhibit very high polymorphism rates. For these organisms genome assembly remains a challenge as most assemblers are unable to handle highly divergent haplotypes in a single individual. In this paper we describe Hapsembler, an assembler for highly polymorphic genomes, which makes use of paired reads. Our experiments show that Hapsembler produces accurate and contiguous assemblies of highly polymorphic genomes, while performing on par with the leading tools on haploid genomes. Hapsembler is available for download at http://compbio.cs.toronto.edu/hapsembler.

  15. Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

    2010-05-17

    One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for

  16. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  17. Archimedes : An experiment in automating mechanical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Strip, D. ); Maciejewski, A.A. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Archimedes is a prototype mechanical assembly system which generates and executes robot assembly programs from a CAD model input. The system addresses the unrealized potential for flexibility in robotic mechanical assembly applications by automating the programming task. Input is a solid model of the finished assembly. Using this model. Archimedes deduces geometric assembly constraints and then produces an assembly plan that satisfies the geometric constraints, as well as other constraints such as stability and accessibility. A retargetable plan compiler converts the generic plan into robot and cell specific code, including recognition routines for a vision system. In the prototype system the code is executed in a workcell containing an Adept Two robot, a vision system, and other parts handling equipment. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Protein self-assembly via supramolecular strategies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yushi; Luo, Quan; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-05-21

    Proteins, as the elemental basis of living organisms, mostly execute their biological tasks in the form of supramolecular self-assemblies with subtle architectures, dynamic interactions and versatile functionalities. Inspired by the structural harmony and functional beauty of natural protein self-assemblies to fabricate sophisticated yet highly ordered protein superstructures represents an adventure in the pursuit of nature's supreme wisdom. In this review, we focus on building protein self-assembly systems based on supramolecular strategies and classify recent progress by the types of utilized supramolecular driving forces. Especially, the design strategy, structure control and the thermodynamic/kinetic regulation of the self-assemblies, which will in turn provide insights into the natural biological self-assembly mechanism, are highlighted. In addition, recently, this research field is starting to extend its interest beyond constructing complex morphologies towards the potential applications of the self-assembly systems; several attempts to design functional protein complexes are also discussed. As such, we hope that this review will provide a panoramic sketch of the field and draw a roadmap towards the ultimate construction of advanced protein self-assemblies that even can serve as analogues of their natural counterparts. PMID:27080059

  19. Marine biology

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  20. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Precechtel, Donald R.; Smith, Bob G.; Knight, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  1. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Knight, R.C.; Precechtel, D.R.; Smith, B.G.

    1985-09-09

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  2. Structural assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. W.; Pruett, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    A cost algorithm for predicting assembly costs for large space structures is given. Assembly scenarios are summarized which describe the erection, deployment, and fabrication tasks for five large space structures. The major activities that impact total costs for structure assembly from launch through deployment and assembly to scientific instrument installation and checkout are described. Individual cost elements such as assembly fixtures, handrails, or remote minipulators are also presented.

  3. Synthetic Biology: Putting Synthesis into Biology

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Luo, Yunzi; Zhao, Huimin

    2010-01-01

    The ability to manipulate living organisms is at the heart of a range of emerging technologies that serve to address important and current problems in environment, energy, and health. However, with all its complexity and interconnectivity, biology has for many years been recalcitrant to engineering manipulations. The recent advances in synthesis, analysis, and modeling methods have finally provided the tools necessary to manipulate living systems in meaningful ways, and have led to the coining of a field named synthetic biology. The scope of synthetic biology is as complicated as life itself – encompassing many branches of science, and across many scales of application. New DNA synthesis and assembly techniques have made routine the customization of very large DNA molecules. This in turn has allowed the incorporation of multiple genes and pathways. By coupling these with techniques that allow for the modeling and design of protein functions, scientists have now gained the tools to create completely novel biological machineries. Even the ultimate biological machinery – a self-replicating organism – is being pursued at this moment. It is the purpose of this review to dissect and organize these various components of synthetic biology into a coherent picture. PMID:21064036

  4. Statistical Tolerance and Clearance Analysis for Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Yi, C.

    1996-01-01

    Tolerance is inevitable because manufacturing exactly equal parts is known to be impossible. Furthermore, the specification of tolerances is an integral part of product design since tolerances directly affect the assemblability, functionality, manufacturability, and cost effectiveness of a product. In this paper, we present statistical tolerance and clearance analysis for the assembly. Our proposed work is expected to make the following contributions: (i) to help the designers to evaluate products for assemblability, (ii) to provide a new perspective to tolerance problems, and (iii) to provide a tolerance analysis tool which can be incorporated into a CAD or solid modeling system.

  5. Tilt assembly for tracking solar collector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Almy, Charles; Peurach, John; Sandler, Reuben

    2012-01-24

    A tilt assembly is used with a solar collector assembly of the type comprising a frame, supporting a solar collector, for movement about a tilt axis by pivoting a drive element between first and second orientations. The tilt assembly comprises a drive element coupler connected to the drive element and a driver, the driver comprising a drive frame, a drive arm and a drive arm driver. The drive arm is mounted to the drive frame for pivotal movement about a drive arm axis. Movement on the drive arm mimics movement of the drive element. Drive element couplers can extend in opposite directions from the outer portion of the drive arm, whereby the assembly can be used between adjacent solar collector assemblies in a row of solar collector assemblies.

  6. Metabolites from nematophagous fungi and nematicidal natural products from fungi as alternatives for biological control. Part II: metabolites from nematophagous basidiomycetes and non-nematophagous fungi.

    PubMed

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    In this second section of a two-part mini-review article, we introduce 101 further nematicidal and non-nematicidal secondary metabolites biosynthesized by nematophagous basidiomycetes or non-nematophagous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. Several of these compounds have promising nematicidal activity and deserve further and more detailed analysis. Thermolides A and B, omphalotins, ophiobolins, bursaphelocides A and B, illinitone A, pseudohalonectrins A and B, dichomitin B, and caryopsomycins A-C are excellent candidates or lead compounds for the development of biocontrol strategies for phytopathogenic nematodes. Paraherquamides, clonostachydiol, and nafuredins offer promising leads for the development of formulations against the intestinal nematodes of ruminants. PMID:26728016

  7. Pentoxifylline as a modulator of anticancer drug doxorubicin. Part II: Reduction of doxorubicin DNA binding and alleviation of its biological effects.

    PubMed

    Gołuński, Grzegorz; Borowik, Agnieszka; Derewońko, Natalia; Kawiak, Anna; Rychłowski, Michał; Woziwodzka, Anna; Piosik, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    Anticancer drug doxorubicin is commonly used in cancer treatment. However, drug's severe side effects make toxicity reduction important matter. Another biologically active aromatic compound, pentoxifylline, can sequester aromatic compounds in stacking complexes reducing their bioactivity. This work deals with the problem of alleviating doxorubicin side effects by pentoxifylline. We employed a wide spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular assays. In addition, we used the doxorubicin-pentoxifylline mixed association constant to quantitatively assess pentoxifylline influence on the doxorubicin mutagenic activity. Obtained results indicate strong protective effects of pentoxifylline towards doxorubicin, observed on bacteria and human keratinocytes with no such effects observed on the cancer cells. It may be hypothesized that, considering much shorter half-life of pentoxifylline than doxorubicin, simultaneous administration of doxorubicin and pentoxifylline will lead to gradual release of doxorubicin from complexes with pentoxifylline to reach desired therapeutic concentration. Proposed results shed light on the possible doxorubicin chemotherapy modification and its side effects reduction without the loss of its therapeutic potential. PMID:26855172

  8. Orthogonal array design as a chemometric method for the optimization of analytical procedures. Part 5. Three-level design and its application in microwave dissolution of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Lan, W G; Wong, M K; Chen, N; Sin, Y M

    1995-04-01

    The theory and methodology of a three-level orthogonal array design as a chemometric method for the optimization of analytical procedures were developed. In the theoretical section, firstly, the matrix of a three-level orthogonal array design is described and orthogonality is proved by a quadratic regression model. Next, the assignment of experiments in a three-level orthogonal array design and the use of the triangular table associated with the corresponding orthogonal array matrix are illustrated, followed by the data analysis strategy, in which significance of the different factor effects is quantitatively evaluated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique and the percentage contribution method. Then, a quadratic regression equation representing the response surface is established to estimate each factor that has a significant influence. Finally, on the basis of the quadratic regression equation established, the derivative algorithm is used to find the optimum value for each variable considered. In the application section, microwave dissolution for the determination of selenium in biological samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry is employed, as a practical example, to demonstrate the application of the proposed three-level orthogonal array design in analytical chemistry. PMID:7771675

  9. Assessment of some innate immune responses in dab (Limanda limanda L.) from the North Sea as part of an integrated biological effects monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouras, Andreas; Lang, Thomas; Vobach, Michael; Danischewski, Dirk; Wosniok, Werner; Scharsack, Jörn Peter; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2003-10-01

    The marine flatfish dab (Limanda limanda), which lives in direct contact with contaminated sediments, is frequently used as a sentinel species in international monitoring programmes on the biological effects of contaminants. In this study, immune responses were recorded as indicators of sublethal chronic effects of contaminants, in addition to measurement of the induction of mono-oxygenase ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) in liver cells, the inhibition of acetylcholin esterase (AChE) in muscle and a quantification of grossly visible diseases and parasites. In total, 336 dab were analysed from five sampling areas in the North Sea, including the German Bight, the Dogger Bank, the Firth of Forth, and two locations close to oil and gas platforms (Ekofisk and Danfield). When considering plasma lysozyme levels, pinocytosis and respiratory burst activity of head kidney leucocytes, a clear gradient could be observed with decreased levels in individuals collected from the Firth of Forth and locations near the oil or gas platforms compared with dab from the Dogger Bank or the German Bight. Individuals with induced EROD activity displayed reduced lysozyme and respiratory burst activities. Lysozyme levels were also reduced in dab with lymphocystis or with nematodes. The data obtained indicate that the assessment of innate immune parameters in a monitoring programme provides supplementary information about immunomodulatory effects associated with the exposure of fish to contaminants. In particular, concentrations of plasma lysozyme, which can be analysed in an easy and inexpensive assay, are considered to be an appropriate parameter for use in a battery of other bioindicators.

  10. Seal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salt, Jonathan G.; Korzun, Ronald W.; Abbott, David R.

    1993-01-01

    A unitary annular seal structure is provided for attachment to a turbine nozzle in a gas turbine engine. The nozzle includes an annular platform disposed about a longitudinal axis of the engine. An annular array of vanes is secured to the platform. The seal structure includes an abradable annular seal member, a seal backing member, and a seal attachment ring. The ring includes an annular, radially extending, axially acting spring member positioned to cooperate with a plurality of radially extending tabs on the backing member. In use, the seal structure is positioned within a circular opening within the turbine nozzle. The nozzle includes a radially depending appendage formed as part of the nozzle platform. The spring member abuts one side of the appendage and the tabs are positioned to abut another side of the appendage for holding the annular spring member in gas sealing engagement with the appendage to thus provide a seal against gas leakage and to restrain the seal structure axially. The spring member and tabs comprise a radially slideable joint for the seal structure. To restrict circumferential motion of the structure, slots are formed in the appendage for receiving the tabs. The seal is easily replaced by bending the tabs and sliding the seal structure axially out of the nozzle. Differential thermal expansion is accommodated by the slideable seal arrangement.

  11. Chemical composition and biological evaluation of the volatile constituents from the aerial parts of Nephrolepis exaltata (L.) and Nephrolepis cordifolia (L.) C. Presl grown in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Tantawy, Mona E; Shams, Manal M; Afifi, Manal S

    2016-01-01

    The essential oil from the aerial parts of Nephrolepis exaltata and Nephrolepis cordifolia obtained by hydro-distillation were analyzed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry. The essential oils exhibited potential antibacterial and antifungal activities against a majority of the selected microorganisms. NEA oil showed promising cytotoxicity in breast, colon and lung carcinoma cells. The results presented indicate that NEA oil could be useful alternative for the treatment of dermatophytosis. Comparative investigation of hydro-distilled volatile constituents from aerial parts (A) of Nephrolepis exaltata (NE) and Nephrolepis cordifolia (NC) (Family Nephrolepidaceae) was carried out. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed that oils differ in composition and percentages of components. Oxygenated compounds were dominant in NEA and NCA. 2,4-Hexadien-1-ol (16.1%), nonanal (14.4%), β-Ionone (6.7%) and thymol (2.7%) were predominant in NEA. β-Ionone (8.0%), eugenol (7.2%) and anethol (4.6%) were the main constituents in NCA. Volatile samples were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities using agar diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentrations. The cytotoxic activity was evaluated using viability assay in breast (MCF-7), colon (HCT-116) and lung carcinoma (A-549) cells by the MTT assay. The results revealed that NEA oil exhibited potential antimicrobial activity against most of the tested organisms and showed promising cytotoxicity. PMID:26211503

  12. Toward a theory for design of kinematically constrained mechanical assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, D.E.; Mantripragada, R.; Adams, J.D.; Rhee, S.J.

    1999-12-01

    This paper summarizes a theory to support the design of assemblies. It describes a top-down process for designing kinematically constrained assemblies that deliver geometric key characteristics (KCs) that achieve top-level customer requirements. The theory applies to assemblies that take the form of mechanisms (e.g., engines) or structures (e.g., aircraft fuselages). The process begins by creating a kinematic constraint structure and a systematic scheme by which parts are located in space relative to each other, followed by declaration of assembly features that join parts in such a way as to create the desired constraint relationships. This process creates a connective data model containing information to support relevant analyses such as variation buildup, constraint analysis, and establishment of constraining-consistent assembly sequences. Adjustable assemblies, assemblies built using fixtures, and selective assemblies can also be described by this theory.

  13. Pattern formation in centrosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mahen, Robert; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2012-02-01

    A striking but poorly explained feature of cell division is the ability to assemble and maintain organelles not bounded by membranes, from freely diffusing components in the cytosol. This process is driven by information transfer across biological scales such that interactions at the molecular scale allow pattern formation at the scale of the organelle. One important example of such an organelle is the centrosome, which is the main microtubule organising centre in the cell. Centrosomes consist of two centrioles surrounded by a cloud of proteins termed the pericentriolar material (PCM). Profound structural and proteomic transitions occur in the centrosome during specific cell cycle stages, underlying events such as centrosome maturation during mitosis, in which the PCM increases in size and microtubule nucleating capacity. Here we use recent insights into the spatio-temporal behaviour of key regulators of centrosomal maturation, including Polo-like kinase 1, CDK5RAP2 and Aurora-A, to propose a model for the assembly and maintenance of the PCM through the mobility and local interactions of its constituent proteins. We argue that PCM structure emerges as a pattern from decentralised self-organisation through a reaction-diffusion mechanism, with or without an underlying template, rather than being assembled from a central structural template alone. Self-organisation of this kind may have broad implications for the maintenance of mitotic structures, which, like the centrosome, exist stably as supramolecular assemblies on the micron scale, based on molecular interactions at the nanometer scale. PMID:22245706

  14. Structural assembly demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The experiment is of an operational variety, designed to assess crew capability in Large Space System (LSS) assembly. The six Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment objectives include: (1) the establishment of a quantitative correlation between LSS neutral buoyancy simulation and on-orbit assembly operations in order to enhance the validity of those assembly simulations; (2) the quantitative study of the capabilities and mechanics of human assembly in an Extravehicular Activity environment; (3) the further corroboration of the LSS Assembly Analysis cost algorithm through the obtainment of hard data base information; (4) the verification of LSS assembly techniques and timeless, as well as the identification of crew imposed loads and assembly aid requirements and concepts; (5) verification of a Launch/Assembly Platform structure concept for other LSS missions; and (6) lastly, to advance thermal control concepts through a flexible heat pipe.

  15. Persistent organic pollutants in a marine bivalve on the Marennes-Oléron Bay and the Gironde Estuary (French Atlantic Coast) - part 2: potential biological effects.

    PubMed

    Luna-Acosta, A; Bustamante, P; Budzinski, H; Huet, V; Thomas-Guyon, H

    2015-05-01

    Contaminant effects on defence responses of ecologically and economically important organisms, such as the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, are likely to influence their ability to resist infectious diseases, particularly at the young stages. The aim of this study was to explore the potential relationships between organic contaminants accumulated in the soft tissues of juvenile oysters, defence responses and physiological condition. Oysters were transplanted during summer and winter periods in different sites in the Marennes-Oléron Bay, the first area of oyster production in France, and in the Gironde Estuary, the biggest estuary in Occidental Europe. Amongst the battery of biochemical and physiological biomarkers applied in the present work [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondyaldehyde (MDA), catecholase, laccase and lysozyme in gills, digestive glands, mantle and haemolymph, glycogen, proteins and lipids in the digestive gland and the condition index at the whole-organism level], MDA and lysozyme in the digestive gland and SOD, GPx and laccase in plasma contributed in order to significantly discriminate the sites in which oysters bioaccumulated different levels of heavy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HPAHs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), polybromodiphenylethers (PBDEs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and lindane. These results strengthen the hypothesis that it is possible to differentiate sites depending on their contamination levels and biological effects by carrying out studies with transplanted juvenile oysters. In addition, correlations were found between antioxidant and immune-defence responses, and PAH and DDT body burdens in the first area of oyster production in France (the Marennes-Oléron Bay) and where considerable oyster mortalities have been reported. This result suggests that the presence of organic chemical contaminants in the Marennes-Oléron Bay may influence defence responses in juveniles of C

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel N-phenyl ureidobenzenesulfonate derivatives as potential anticancer agents. Part 2. Modulation of the ring B.

    PubMed

    Gagné-Boulet, Mathieu; Moussa, Hanane; Lacroix, Jacques; Côté, Marie-France; Masson, Jean-Yves; Fortin, Sébastien

    2015-10-20

    DNA double strand-breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious lesions that can affect the genome of living beings and are lethal if not quickly and properly repaired. Recently, we discovered a new family of anticancer agents designated as N-phenyl ureidobenzenesulfonates (PUB-SOs) that are blocking the cells cycle progression in S-phase and inducing DNA DSBs. Previously, we have studied the effect of several modifications on the molecular scaffold of PUB-SOs on their cytocidal properties. However, the effect of the nature and the position of substituents on the aromatic ring B is still poorly studied. In this study, we report the preparation and the biological evaluation of 45 new PUB-SO derivatives substituted by alkyl, alkoxy, halogen and nitro groups at different positions on the aromatic ring B. All PUB-SOs were active in the submicromolar to low micromolar range (0.24-20 μM). The cell cycle progression analysis showed that PUB-SOs substituted at position 2 by alkyl, halogen or nitro groups or substituted at position 4 by a hydroxyl group arrest the cell cycle progression in S-phase. Interestingly, all others PUB-SOs substituted at positions 3 and 4 arrested the cell cycle in G2/M-phase. PUB-SOs arresting the cell cycle progression in S-phase also induced the phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX) which is indicating the generation of DNA DSBs. We evidenced that few modifications on the ring B of PUB-SOs scaffold lead to cytocidal derivatives arresting the cell cycle in S-phase and inducing γH2AX and DSBs. In addition, this study shows that these new anticancer agents are promising and could be used as alternative to circumvent some of the biopharmaceutical complications that might be encountered during the development of PUB-SOs. PMID:26408815

  17. Bricks and blueprints: methods and standards for DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Casini, Arturo; Storch, Marko; Baldwin, Geoffrey S; Ellis, Tom

    2015-09-01

    DNA assembly is a key part of constructing gene expression systems and even whole chromosomes. In the past decade, a plethora of powerful new DNA assembly methods - including Gibson Assembly, Golden Gate and ligase cycling reaction (LCR) - have been developed. In this Innovation article, we discuss these methods as well as standards such as the modular cloning (MoClo) system, GoldenBraid, modular overlap-directed assembly with linkers (MODAL) and PaperClip, which have been developed to facilitate a streamlined assembly workflow, to aid the exchange of material between research groups and to create modular reusable DNA parts. PMID:26081612

  18. Determination of gold and platinum traces in biological materials as a part of a multi-element radiochemical activation analysis system.

    PubMed

    Tjioe, P S; Volkers, K J; Kroon, J J; de Goeij, J J; The, S K

    1984-01-01

    For the analysis of human tissues for traces of gold and platinum--being used as constituents of therapeutic agents--a radiochemical neutron activation method has been developed. The radiochemical separation involves the selective removal of radioactive gold--formed by the reaction 197Au (n, gamma)198Au and the reaction 198Pt (n, gamma) 199Pt ---- 199Au --as small metallic nuggets . The determination of gold and platinum is carried out as a part of an automated multi-element radiochemical separation scheme, allowing the determination of about 20 additional trace elements, and thus giving the possibility to study interelement relations. The analytical characteristics of the determination are evaluated. Gold and platinum levels measured in Bowen's Kale, NBS Bovine Liver and NBS Orchard Leaves are presented. Values are shown for gold, platinum, and 20 other trace elements in various healthy and cancerous tissues from patients treated with cis-platin. (Cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum II). PMID:6724783

  19. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    DOEpatents

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  20. Firearm trigger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  1. Complexation of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in gene delivery and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklovskii, Boris

    2009-03-01

    Charge inversion of a DNA double helix by a positively charged flexible polymer (polyelectrolyte) is widely used to facilitate DNA contact with negative cell membranes for gene delivery. Motivated by this application in the first part of the talk I study the phase diagram a solution of long polyanions (PA) with a shorter polycations (PC) as a function the ratio of total charges of PC and PA in the solution, x, and the concentration of monovalent salt. Each PA attracts many PCs to form a complex. When x= 1, the complexes are neutral and condense in a macroscopic drop. When x is far away from 1, complexes are strongly charged and stable. PA are overcharged by PC at x > 1 and undercharged by PC at x < 1. As x approaches 1, PCs attached to PA disproportionate between complexes. Some complexes become neutral and condensed in a macroscopic drop while others become even stronger charged and stay free. The second part of the talk deals with biological example of PA -PC complexes namely self-assembly of vegetable viruses from long ss-RNA molecule paying role of scaffold and identical capsid proteins with long positive tails. I show that optimization Coulomb energy of the virus leads to the charge of RNA twice larger than the total charge of the capsid, in agreement with the experimental data. Then I discuss kinetics of the Coulomb complexation driven virus self-assembly. Capsid proteins stick to unassembled chain of ss RNA (which we call ``antenna'') and slide on it towards the assembly site. I show that at excess of capsid proteins such one-dimensional diffusion accelerates self-assembly more than ten times. On the other hand at excess of ss-RNA, antenna slows self-assembly down. Several experiments are proposed to verify the role of ss-RNA antenna in self-assembly.

  2. Self-assembly-driven nematization.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh Thuy; Sciortino, Francesco; De Michele, Cristiano

    2014-04-29

    The anisotropy of attractive interactions between particles can favor, through a self-assembly process, the formation of linear semi-flexible chains. In the appropriate temperatures and concentration ranges, the growing aspect ratio of the aggregates can induce formation of a nematic phase, as recently experimentally observed in several biologically relevant systems. We present here a numerical study of the isotropic-nematic phase boundary for a model of bifunctional polymerizing hard cylinders, to provide an accurate benchmark for recent theoretical approaches and to assess their ability to capture the coupling between self-assembly and orientational ordering. The comparison indicates the importance of properly modeling excluded volume and orientational entropy and provides a quantitative confirmation of some theoretical predictions. PMID:24701976

  3. An end-to-end workflow for engineering of biological networks from high-level specifications.

    PubMed

    Beal, Jacob; Weiss, Ron; Densmore, Douglas; Adler, Aaron; Appleton, Evan; Babb, Jonathan; Bhatia, Swapnil; Davidsohn, Noah; Haddock, Traci; Loyall, Joseph; Schantz, Richard; Vasilev, Viktor; Yaman, Fusun

    2012-08-17

    We present a workflow for the design and production of biological networks from high-level program specifications. The workflow is based on a sequence of intermediate models that incrementally translate high-level specifications into DNA samples that implement them. We identify algorithms for translating between adjacent models and implement them as a set of software tools, organized into a four-stage toolchain: Specification, Compilation, Part Assignment, and Assembly. The specification stage begins with a Boolean logic computation specified in the Proto programming language. The compilation stage uses a library of network motifs and cellular platforms, also specified in Proto, to transform the program into an optimized Abstract Genetic Regulatory Network (AGRN) that implements the programmed behavior. The part assignment stage assigns DNA parts to the AGRN, drawing the parts from a database for the target cellular platform, to create a DNA sequence implementing the AGRN. Finally, the assembly stage computes an optimized assembly plan to create the DNA sequence from available part samples, yielding a protocol for producing a sample of engineered plasmids with robotics assistance. Our workflow is the first to automate the production of biological networks from a high-level program specification. Furthermore, the workflow's modular design allows the same program to be realized on different cellular platforms simply by swapping workflow configurations. We validated our workflow by specifying a small-molecule sensor-reporter program and verifying the resulting plasmids in both HEK 293 mammalian cells and in E. coli bacterial cells. PMID:23651286

  4. Design, synthesis and biological activity of new neurohypophyseal hormones analogues conformationally restricted in the N-terminal part of the molecule. Highly potent OT receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Ptach, Monika; Borovičková, Lenka; Slaninová, Jiřina; Lammek, Bernard; Prahl, Adam

    2012-08-01

    In this study we present the synthesis and some pharmacological properties of fourteen new analogues of neurohypophyseal hormones conformationally restricted in the N-terminal part of the molecule. All new peptides were substituted at position 2 with cis-1-amino-4-phenylcyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid (cis-Apc). Moreover, one of the new analogues: [cis-Apc(2), Val(4)]AVP was also prepared in N-acylated forms with various bulky acyl groups. All the peptides were tested for pressor, antidiuretic, and in vitro uterotonic activities. We also determined the binding affinity of the selected compounds to human OT receptor. Our results showed that introduction of cis -Apc(2) in position 2 of either AVP or OT resulted in analogues with high antioxytocin potency. Two of the new compounds, [Mpa(1),cis-Apc(2)]AVP and [Mpa(1),cis-Apc(2),Val(4)]AVP, were exceptionally potent antiuterotonic agents (pA(2) = 8.46 and 8.40, respectively) and exhibited higher affinities for the human OT receptor than Atosiban (K (i) values 5.4 and 9.1 nM). Moreover, we have demonstrated for the first time that N -terminal acylation of AVP analogue can improve its selectivity. Using this approach, we obtained compound Aba[cis-Apc(2),Val(4)]AVP (XI) which turned out to be a moderately potent and exceptionally selective OT antagonist (pA(2) = 7.26). PMID:22038179

  5. Flavonoid and phenolic acid profile by LC-MS/MS and biological activity of crude extracts from Chenopodium hybridum aerial parts.

    PubMed

    Podolak, I; Olech, M; Galanty, A; Załuski, D; Grabowska, K; Sobolewska, D; Michalik, M; Nowak, R

    2016-08-01

    Extracts from leaves and stems of Chenopodium hybridum were characterised for the presence and quantity of flavonoids and phenolic acids by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Five flavonoids and eight phenolic acids were detected for the first time in aerial parts of this plant species, the most abundant compounds being rutin (2.80 μg/g DW), 3-kaempferol rutinoside (2.91 μg/g DW), 4-OH-benzoic (1.86 μg/g DW) and syringic acids (2.31 μg/g DW). Extracts were tested for anti-inflammatory/antiarthritic, antihyaluronidase and cytotoxic activities against human prostate cancer (Du145, PC3) and melanoma cell lines (A375, HTB140 and WM793) of different malignancy. None of the extracts protected bovine serum albumin from heat-induced denaturation. Antihyaluronidase effect at the tested concentration was higher than standard naringenin. Cytotoxic activity was generally low with an exception of the extract from the leaves, which was found most effective against prostate Du145 cell line with 98.28 ± 1.13% of dead cells at 100 μg/mL. PMID:26810568

  6. Metabolites from nematophagous fungi and nematicidal natural products from fungi as an alternative for biological control. Part I: metabolites from nematophagous ascomycetes.

    PubMed

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are estimated to cause global annual losses of more than US$ 100 billion. The number of registered nematicides has declined substantially over the last 25 years due to concerns about their non-specific mechanisms of action and hence their potential toxicity and likelihood to cause environmental damage. Environmentally beneficial and inexpensive alternatives to chemicals, which do not affect vertebrates, crops, and other non-target organisms, are therefore urgently required. Nematophagous fungi are natural antagonists of nematode parasites, and these offer an ecophysiological source of novel biocontrol strategies. In this first section of a two-part review article, we discuss 83 nematicidal and non-nematicidal primary and secondary metabolites found in nematophagous ascomycetes. Some of these substances exhibit nematicidal activities, namely oligosporon, 4',5'-dihydrooligosporon, talathermophilins A and B, phomalactone, aurovertins D and F, paeciloxazine, a pyridine carboxylic acid derivative, and leucinostatins. Blumenol A acts as a nematode attractant. Other substances, such as arthrosporols and paganins, play a decisive role in the life cycle of the producers, regulating the formation of reproductive or trapping organs. We conclude by considering the potential applications of these beneficial organisms in plant protection strategies. PMID:26715220

  7. Synthetic biology: insights into biological computation.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Romilde; Urrios, Arturo; Velazquez-Garcia, Silvia; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc

    2016-04-18

    Organisms have evolved a broad array of complex signaling mechanisms that allow them to survive in a wide range of environmental conditions. They are able to sense external inputs and produce an output response by computing the information. Synthetic biology attempts to rationally engineer biological systems in order to perform desired functions. Our increasing understanding of biological systems guides this rational design, while the huge background in electronics for building circuits defines the methodology. In this context, biocomputation is the branch of synthetic biology aimed at implementing artificial computational devices using engineered biological motifs as building blocks. Biocomputational devices are defined as biological systems that are able to integrate inputs and return outputs following pre-determined rules. Over the last decade the number of available synthetic engineered devices has increased exponentially; simple and complex circuits have been built in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. These devices can manage and store information, take decisions based on past and present inputs, and even convert a transient signal into a sustained response. The field is experiencing a fast growth and every day it is easier to implement more complex biological functions. This is mainly due to advances in in vitro DNA synthesis, new genome editing tools, novel molecular cloning techniques, continuously growing part libraries as well as other technological advances. This allows that digital computation can now be engineered and implemented in biological systems. Simple logic gates can be implemented and connected to perform novel desired functions or to better understand and redesign biological processes. Synthetic biological digital circuits could lead to new therapeutic approaches, as well as new and efficient ways to produce complex molecules such as antibiotics, bioplastics or biofuels. Biological computation not only provides possible biomedical and

  8. Coarse-grained Simulations of Viral Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrad, Oren M.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of viral capsids is a marvel of natural engineering and design. A large number (from 60 to thousands) of protein subunits assemble into complete, reproducible structures under a variety of conditions while avoiding kinetic and thermodynamic traps. Small single-stranded RNA viruses not only assemble their coat proteins in this fashion but also package their genome during the self-assembly process. Recent experiments have shown that the coat proteins are competent to assemble not merely around their own genomes but heterologous RNA, synthetic polyanions and even functionalized gold nanoparticles. Remarkably these viruses can even assemble around cargo not commensurate with their native state by adopting different morphologies. Understanding the properties that confer such exquisite precision and flexibility to the assembly process could aid biomedical research in the search for novel antiviral remedies, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents used in bioimaging. At the same time, viral assembly provides an excellent model system for the development of a statistical mechanical understanding of biological self-assembly, in the hopes of that we will identify some universal principles that underly such processes. This work consists of computational studies using coarse-grained representations of viral coat proteins and their cargoes. We find the relative strength of protein-cargo and protein-protein interactions has a profound effect on the assembly pathway, in some cases leading to assembly mechanisms that are markedly different from those found in previous work on the assembly of empty capsids. In the case of polymeric cargo, we find the first evidence for a previously theorized mechanism in which the polymer actively participates in recruiting free subunits to the assembly process through cooperative polymer-protein motions. We find that successful assembly is non-monotonic in protein-cargo affinity, such affinity can be detrimental to assembly if it

  9. Comparison of de novo short read assemblers on metagenomic data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have potentials to revolutionize genomics and biological researches. A flurry of short-read assemblers have been developed recently to facilitate the analysis of the short sequences generated using these technologies. However, none of these assemblers has spec...

  10. Self-assembling magnetic "snakes"

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Nickel particles float peacefully in a liquid medium until a giant snake seems to swim by and snatch several particles up, adding to its own mass. The self-assembled "snakes" act like biological systems, but they are not alive and are driven by a magnetic field. The research may someday offer some insight into the organization of life itself. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/03/snakes/ Research and video by Alex Snezhko and Igor Aronson, Argonne National Laboratory.

  11. Medicare program; revisions to payment policies under the physician fee schedule for calendar year 2006 and certain provisions related to the Competitive Acquisitions Program of outpatient drugs and biologicals under Part B. Final rule with comment.

    PubMed

    2005-11-21

    This rule addresses Medicare Part B payment policy, including the physician fee schedule that are applicable for calendar year (CY) 2006; and finalizes certain provisions of the interim final rule to implement the Competitive Acquisition Program (CAP) for Part B Drugs. It also revises Medicare Part B payment and related policies regarding: Physician work; practice expense (PE) and malpractice relative value units (RVUs); Medicare telehealth services; multiple diagnostic imaging procedures; covered outpatient drugs and biologicals; supplemental payments to Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs); renal dialysis services; coverage for glaucoma screening services; National Coverage Decision (NCD) timeframes; and physician referrals for nuclear medicine services and supplies to health care entities with which they have financial relationships. In addition, the rule finalizes the interim RVUs for CY 2005 and issues interim RVUs for new and revised procedure codes for CY 2006. This rule also updates the codes subject to the physician self-referral prohibition and discusses payment policies relating to teaching anesthesia services, therapy caps, private contracts and opt-out, and chiropractic and oncology demonstrations. As required by the statute, it also announces that the physician fee schedule update for CY 2006 is -4.4 percent, the initial estimate for the sustainable growth rate for CY 2006 is 1.7 percent and the conversion factor for CY 2006 is $36.1770. PMID:16299947

  12. Space assembly methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, J. W.; Watters, H. H.

    1981-02-01

    Large space structure assembly analysis techniques are defined and simulation activities are described. The simulations included are: an extravehicular activity assembly simulation; a fabricated beam assembly series using a beam generating machine end caps, and cross beam brackets; deployment of a deployable truss, using the neutral buoyancy remote manipulator system with crewman assistance; and a series aboard the KC-135 zero g aircraft.

  13. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  14. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, J.

    1994-03-15

    A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

  15. Forwardly movable assembly for a firearm

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2007-06-05

    A forwardly movable assembly for a firearm, the forwardly movable assembly adapted to be disposed in operative relationship relative to the other operative parts of a firearm, the firearm having in operative relationship each with one or more of the others: a barrel, a receiver, and at least one firing mechanism; the forwardly movable assembly comprising: the barrel and the receiver operatively connected with each other; a movable hand support structure to which at least one of the barrel and the receiver is connected, the barrel being movable therewith, the movable hand support structure being adapted to be gripped by an operator of the firearm; the forwardly movable assembly being adapted to be moved forward by an operator upon gripping the movable hand support structure and manually maneuvering the hand support structure forwardly; and, as the forwardly movable assembly is moved forwardly, the firing mechanism is completely disengaged therefrom and held substantially stationary relative thereto.

  16. Hemoprotein-based supramolecular assembling systems.

    PubMed

    Oohora, Koji; Hayashi, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Hemoproteins are metalloproteins which include iron porphyrin as a cofactor. These proteins have received much attention as promising building blocks for development of new types of biomaterials. This review summarizes recent efforts in the rational design of supramolecular hemoprotein assemblies using myoglobin, horseradish peroxidase, cytochrome b562 and cytochrome c as a monomer unit. The processes of coordination bond-mediated assembly or domain swapping-mediated assembly provide defined oligomers, while hemoprotein reconstitution with synthetic heme derivatives provides submicrometer-sized structures such as fibrils, vesicles/micelles, or networks. Interestingly, several of these assembled structures maintain the intrinsic functions of monomer units. The chemical and/or biological strategies described in this review will lead to the creation of unique hemoprotein-based functional biomaterials. PMID:24658057

  17. Bioinformatics for the synthetic biology of natural products: integrating across the Design-Build-Test cycle.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Currin, Andrew; Jervis, Adrian J; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Swainston, Neil; Yan, Cunyu; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer

    2016-08-27

    Covering: 2000 to 2016Progress in synthetic biology is enabled by powerful bioinformatics tools allowing the integration of the design, build and test stages of the biological engineering cycle. In this review we illustrate how this integration can be achieved, with a particular focus on natural products discovery and production. Bioinformatics tools for the DESIGN and BUILD stages include tools for the selection, synthesis, assembly and optimization of parts (enzymes and regulatory elements), devices (pathways) and systems (chassis). TEST tools include those for screening, identification and quantification of metabolites for rapid prototyping. The main advantages and limitations of these tools as well as their interoperability capabilities are highlighted. PMID:27185383

  18. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David H.

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  19. Assembly planning at the micro scale

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Xavier, P.; Brown, R.

    1998-05-14

    This paper investigates a new aspect of fine motion planning for the micro domain. As parts approach 1--10 {micro}m or less in outside dimensions, interactive forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces become major factors which greatly change the assembly sequence and path plans. It has been experimentally shown that assembly plans in the micro domain are not reversible, motions required to pick up a part are not the reverse of motions required to release a part. This paper develops the mathematics required to determine the goal regions for pick up, holding, and release of a micro-sphere being handled by a rectangular tool.

  20. Long-read sequence assembly of the gorilla genome.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David; Huddleston, John; Chaisson, Mark J P; Hill, Christopher M; Kronenberg, Zev N; Munson, Katherine M; Malig, Maika; Raja, Archana; Fiddes, Ian; Hillier, LaDeana W; Dunn, Christopher; Baker, Carl; Armstrong, Joel; Diekhans, Mark; Paten, Benedict; Shendure, Jay; Wilson, Richard K; Haussler, David; Chin, Chen-Shan; Eichler, Evan E

    2016-04-01

    Accurate sequence and assembly of genomes is a critical first step for studies of genetic variation. We generated a high-quality assembly of the gorilla genome using single-molecule, real-time sequence technology and a string graph de novo assembly algorithm. The new assembly improves contiguity by two to three orders of magnitude with respect to previously released assemblies, recovering 87% of missing reference exons and incomplete gene models. Although regions of large, high-identity segmental duplications remain largely unresolved, this comprehensive assembly provides new biological insight into genetic diversity, structural variation, gene loss, and representation of repeat structures within the gorilla genome. The approach provides a path forward for the routine assembly of mammalian genomes at a level approaching that of the current quality of the human genome. PMID:27034376

  1. A trait-based approach for examining microbial community assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prest, T. L.; Nemergut, D.

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms regulate all of Earth's major biogeochemical cycles and an understanding of how microbial communities assemble is a key part in evaluating controls over many types of ecosystem processes. Rapid advances in technology and bioinformatics have led to a better appreciation for the variation in microbial community structure in time and space. Yet, advances in theory are necessary to make sense of these data and allow us to generate unifying hypotheses about the causes and consequences of patterns in microbial biodiversity and what they mean for ecosystem function. Here, I will present a metaanalysis of microbial community assembly from a variety of successional and post-disturbance systems. Our analysis shows various distinct patterns in community assembly, and the potential importance of nutrients and dispersal in shaping microbial community beta diversity in these systems. We also used a trait-based approach to generate hypotheses about the mechanisms driving patterns of microbial community assembly and the implications for function. Our work reveals the importance of rRNA operon copy number as a community aggregated trait in helping to reconcile differences in community dynamics between distinct types of successional and disturbed systems. Specifically, our results demonstrate that decreases in average copy number can be a common feature of communities across various drivers of ecological succession, supporting a transition from an r-selected to a K-selected community. Importantly, our work supports the scaling of the copy number trait over multiple levels of biological organization, from cells to populations and communities, and has implications for both ecology and evolution. Trait-based approaches are an important next step to generate and test hypotheses about the forces structuring microbial communities and the subsequent consequences for ecosystem function.

  2. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49... shown in 49 CFR Part 572 Figure 15, at the instant the pendulum makes contact with the...

  3. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49... CFR Part 572 Figure 15, at the instant the pendulum makes contact with the decelerating mechanism;...

  4. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49... CFR Part 572 Figure 15, at the instant the pendulum makes contact with the decelerating mechanism;...

  5. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49... shown in 49 CFR Part 572 Figure 15, at the instant the pendulum makes contact with the...

  6. Emerging Technologies for Assembly of Microscale Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kavaz, Doga; Demirel, Melik C.; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of cell encapsulating building blocks (i.e., microscale hydrogels) has significant applications in areas including regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and cell-based in vitro assays for pharmaceutical research and drug discovery. Inspired by the repeating functional units observed in native tissues and biological systems (e.g., the lobule in liver, the nephron in kidney), assembly technologies aim to generate complex tissue structures by organizing microscale building blocks. Novel assembly technologies enable fabrication of engineered tissue constructs with controlled properties including tunable microarchitectural and predefined compositional features. Recent advances in micro- and nano-scale technologies have enabled engineering of microgel based three dimensional (3D) constructs. There is a need for high-throughput and scalable methods to assemble microscale units with a complex 3D micro-architecture. Emerging assembly methods include novel technologies based on microfluidics, acoustic and magnetic fields, nanotextured surfaces, and surface tension. In this review, we survey emerging microscale hydrogel assembly methods offering rapid, scalable microgel assembly in 3D, and provide future perspectives and discuss potential applications. PMID:23184717

  7. Parallel Assembly of LIGA Components

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, T.R.; Feddema, J.T.

    1999-03-04

    In this paper, a prototype robotic workcell for the parallel assembly of LIGA components is described. A Cartesian robot is used to press 386 and 485 micron diameter pins into a LIGA substrate and then place a 3-inch diameter wafer with LIGA gears onto the pins. Upward and downward looking microscopes are used to locate holes in the LIGA substrate, pins to be pressed in the holes, and gears to be placed on the pins. This vision system can locate parts within 3 microns, while the Cartesian manipulator can place the parts within 0.4 microns.

  8. Spacer conformation in biologically active molecules. Part 2. Structure and conformation of 4-[2-(diphenylmethylamino)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl) piperazine and its diphenylmethoxy analog—potential 5-HT 1A receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolak-Wojciechowska, J.; Fruziński, A.; Czylkowski, R.; Paluchowska, M. H.; Mokrosz, M. J.

    2003-09-01

    As a part of studies on biologically active molecule structures with aliphatic linking chain, the structures of 4-[2-diphenylmethylamino)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine dihydrochloride ( 1) and 4-[2-diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine fumarate ( 2) have been reported. In both compounds, four atomic non-all-carbons linking chains (N)C-C-X-C are present. The conformation of that linking spacer depends on the nature of the X-atom. The preferred conformation for chain with XNH has been found to be fully extended while for that with XO—the bend one. It was confirmed by conformational calculations (strain energy distribution and random search) and crystallographic data, including statistics from CCDC.

  9. Biological Technicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important ... Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important ...

  10. Self-Assembly of an Alphavirus Core-like Particle Is Distinguished by Strong Intersubunit Association Energy and Structural Defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Chen, Chao; Rayaprolu, Vamseedhar; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-09-22

    Weak association energy can lead to uniform nanostructures: defects can anneal due to subunit lability. What happens when strong association energy leads to particles where defects are trapped? Alphaviruses are enveloped viruses whose icosahedral nucleocapsid core can assemble independently. We used a simplest case system to study Ross River virus (RRV) core-like particle (CLP) self-assembly using purified capsid protein and a short DNA oligomer. We find that capsid protein binds the oligomer with high affinity to form an assembly competent unit (U). Subsequently, U assembles with concentration dependence into CLPs. We determined that U-U pairwise interactions are very strong (ca. -6 kcal/mol) compared to other virus assembly systems. Assembled RRV CLPs appeared morphologically uniform and cryo-EM image reconstruction with imposed icosahedral symmetry yielded a T = 4 structure. However, 2D class averages of the CLPs show that virtually every class had disordered regions. These results suggested that irregular cores may be present in RRV virions. To test this hypothesis, we determined 2D class averages of RRV virions using authentic virions or only the core from intact virions isolated by computational masking. Virion-based class averages were symmetrical, geometric, and corresponded well to projections of image reconstructions. In core-based class averages, cores and envelope proteins in many classes were disordered. These results suggest that partly disordered components are common even in ostensibly well-ordered viruses, a biological realization of a patchy particle. Biological advantages of partly disordered complexes may arise from their ease of dissociation and asymmetry. PMID:26275088

  11. Interconnect assembly for an electronic assembly and assembly method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Gerbsch, Erich William

    2003-06-10

    An interconnect assembly and method for a semiconductor device, in which the interconnect assembly can be used in lieu of wirebond connections to form an electronic assembly. The interconnect assembly includes first and second interconnect members. The first interconnect member has a first surface with a first contact and a second surface with a second contact electrically connected to the first contact, while the second interconnect member has a flexible finger contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member. The first interconnect member is adapted to be aligned and registered with a semiconductor device having a contact on a first surface thereof, so that the first contact of the first interconnect member electrically contacts the contact of the semiconductor device. Consequently, the assembly method does not require any wirebonds, but instead merely entails aligning and registering the first interconnect member with the semiconductor device so that the contacts of the first interconnect member and the semiconductor device make electrically contact, and then contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member with the flexible finger of the second interconnect member.

  12. Telerobotic truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Philip L.

    1987-01-01

    The ACCESS truss was telerobotically assembled in order to gain experience with robotic assembly of hardware designed for astronaut extravehicular (EVA) assembly. Tight alignment constraints of the ACCESS hardware made telerobotic assembly difficult. A wider alignment envelope and a compliant end effector would have reduced the problem. The manipulator had no linear motion capability, but many of the assembly operations required straight line motion. The manipulator was attached to a motion table in order to provide the X, Y, and Z translations needed. A programmable robot with linear translation capability would have eliminated the need for the motion table and streamlined the assembly. Poor depth perception was a major problem. Shaded paint schemes and alignment lines were helpful in reducing this problem. The four cameras used worked well for only some operations. It was not possible to identify camera locations that worked well for all assembly steps. More cameras or movable cameras would have simplified some operations. The audio feedback system was useful.

  13. Precedence relationship representations of mechanical assembly sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homendemello, L. S.; Sanderson, A. C.

    1989-01-01

    Two types of precedence relationship representations for mechanical assembly sequences are presented: precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection between two parts and the establishment of another connection, and precedence relationships between the establishment of one connection and states of the assembly process. Precedence relationship representations have the advantage of being very compact. The problem with these representations was how to guarantee their correctness and completeness. Two theorems are presented each of which leads to the generation of one type of precedence relationship representation guaranteeing its correctness and completeness for a class of assemblies.

  14. Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits

    SciTech Connect

    James N Culver; Michael T Harris

    2011-08-31

    The goals of this project were directed at the identification and characterization of bio-mineralization processes and patterning methods for the development of nano scale materials and structures with novel energy and conductive traits. This project utilized a simple plant virus as a model template to investigate methods to attach and coat metals and other inorganic compounds onto biologically based nanotemplates. Accomplishments include: the development of robust biological nanotemplates with enhanced inorganic coating activities; novel coating strategies that allow for the deposition of a continuous inorganic layer onto a bio-nanotemplate even in the absence of a reducing agent; three-dimensional patterning methods for the assemble of nano-featured high aspect ratio surfaces and the demonstrated use of these surfaces in enhancing battery and energy storage applications. Combined results from this project have significantly advanced our understanding and ability to utilize the unique self-assembly properties of biologically based molecules to produce novel materials at the nanoscale level.

  15. Applications of statistical physics to genome assembly and protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, Nicholas Helms

    This dissertation describes work on computational approaches to two problems of biological relevance, one practical and one theoretical. Both have a statistical ensemble at their heart. One is the practical problem of reconstructing a genome sequence from sequences sampled by the Whole Genome Shotgun method. A new method is described which has been successfully applied as part of ten genome sequencing projects and uses an iterative self-consistent approach to finding a solution. The method is robust enough to assemble polymorphic datasets. The second, theoretical, problem describes an investigation of the nature of the folding transition state of a simplified model for protein folding. Here, simplified dynamics of various model proteins are used to collect model protein conformations which have the defining properties of the transition state, and this ensemble of conformations is characterized. For each model, transition state conformations can be classified into one or two classes. The conformations in each class share a common partially-structured nucleus.

  16. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyaninov, Igor; Smolyaninova, Vera; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Gresock, Thomas; Narimanov, Evgenii

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the photonic hyper-crystal, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant DMR-1104676, NSF Center for Photonic and Multiscale Nanomaterials, ARO MURI and Gordon and Berry Moore Foundation.

  17. Construction and engineering of large biochemical pathways via DNA assembler

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA assembler enables rapid construction and engineering of biochemical pathways in a one-step fashion by exploitation of the in vivo homologous recombination mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It has many applications in pathway engineering, metabolic engineering, combinatorial biology, and synthetic biology. Here we use two examples including the zeaxanthin biosynthetic pathway and the aureothin biosynthetic gene cluster to describe the key steps in the construction of pathways containing multiple genes using the DNA assembler approach. Methods for construct design, pathway assembly, pathway confirmation, and functional analysis are shown. The protocol for fine genetic modifications such as site-directed mutagenesis for engineering the aureothin gene cluster is also illustrated. PMID:23996442

  18. Algorithms for automated DNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Densmore, Douglas; Hsiau, Timothy H.-C.; Kittleson, Joshua T.; DeLoache, Will; Batten, Christopher; Anderson, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Generating a defined set of genetic constructs within a large combinatorial space provides a powerful method for engineering novel biological functions. However, the process of assembling more than a few specific DNA sequences can be costly, time consuming and error prone. Even if a correct theoretical construction scheme is developed manually, it is likely to be suboptimal by any number of cost metrics. Modular, robust and formal approaches are needed for exploring these vast design spaces. By automating the design of DNA fabrication schemes using computational algorithms, we can eliminate human error while reducing redundant operations, thus minimizing the time and cost required for conducting biological engineering experiments. Here, we provide algorithms that optimize the simultaneous assembly of a collection of related DNA sequences. We compare our algorithms to an exhaustive search on a small synthetic dataset and our results show that our algorithms can quickly find an optimal solution. Comparison with random search approaches on two real-world datasets show that our algorithms can also quickly find lower-cost solutions for large datasets. PMID:20335162

  19. A Highly Characterized Yeast Toolkit for Modular, Multipart Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael E; DeLoache, William C; Cervantes, Bernardo; Dueber, John E

    2015-09-18

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an increasingly attractive host for synthetic biology because of its long history in industrial fermentations. However, until recently, most synthetic biology systems have focused on bacteria. While there is a wealth of resources and literature about the biology of yeast, it can be daunting to navigate and extract the tools needed for engineering applications. Here we present a versatile engineering platform for yeast, which contains both a rapid, modular assembly method and a basic set of characterized parts. This platform provides a framework in which to create new designs, as well as data on promoters, terminators, degradation tags, and copy number to inform those designs. Additionally, we describe genome-editing tools for making modifications directly to the yeast chromosomes, which we find preferable to plasmids due to reduced variability in expression. With this toolkit, we strive to simplify the process of engineering yeast by standardizing the physical manipulations and suggesting best practices that together will enable more straightforward translation of materials and data from one group to another. Additionally, by relieving researchers of the burden of technical details, they can focus on higher-level aspects of experimental design. PMID:25871405

  20. Nanopropulsion by biocatalytic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Joy; Hope, Alexander; Hughes, Meghan; Debnath, Sisir; Fleming, Scott; Wark, Alastair W; Ulijn, Rein V; Haw, Mark D

    2014-09-23

    A number of organisms and organelles are capable of self-propulsion at the micro- and nanoscales. Production of simple man-made mimics of biological transportation systems may prove relevant to achieving movement in artificial cells and nano/micronscale robotics that may be of biological and nanotechnological importance. We demonstrate the propulsion of particles based on catalytically controlled molecular self-assembly and fiber formation at the particle surface. Specifically, phosphatase enzymes (acting as the engine) are conjugated to a quantum dot (the vehicle), and are subsequently exposed to micellar aggregates (fuel) that upon biocatalytic dephosphorylation undergo fibrillar self-assembly, which in turn causes propulsion. The motion of individual enzyme/quantum dot conjugates is followed directly using fluorescence microscopy. While overall movement remains random, the enzyme-conjugates exhibit significantly faster transport in the presence of the fiber forming system, compared to controls without fuel, a non-self-assembling substrate, or a substrate which assembles into spherical, rather than fibrous structures upon enzymatic dephosphorylation. When increasing the concentration of the fiber-forming fuel, the speed of the conjugates increases compared to non-self-assembling substrate, although directionality remains random. PMID:25162764

  1. Laser light stripe measurements assure correct piston assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Norbert; Frohn, Heiko

    1993-12-01

    Two VIKON-3D optical inspection systems assure the correct assembly of piston rings and guard rings in a new Volkswagen piston/rod assembly line. Both systems use laser light stripe measurements to locate and identify the relevant parts with high accuracy. The piston ring assembly is checked dynamically in video real time using laser light stripe and parallel projection techniques. In addition structured light is used to verify the correct piston/rod assembly. Both inspection systems are fully integrated into the manufacturing line. All types of pistons assembled can be checked without any mechanical changes to the measurement setup.

  2. Plant and Animal Gravitational Biology. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session WA2 includes short reports concerning: (1) The Asymmetrical Growth of Otoliths in Fish Affected by Altered Gravity and Causes Kinetosis; (2) Neurobiological Responses of Fish to Altered Gravity conditions: A Review; (3) An Age-Dependent Sensitivity of the Roll-Induced Vestibulocular Reflex to Hypergravity Exposure of Several Days in an Amphibian (Xenopus Laevis); (4) Mechanically-Induced Membrane Wounding During Parabolic Flight; and (5) Erythropoietin Stimulates Increased F Cell Numbers in Bone Marrow Cultures Established in Gravity and Microgravity Conditions.

  3. Viral channel forming proteins - How to assemble and depolarize lipid membranes in silico.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Wolfgang B; Kalita, Monoj Mon; Heermann, Dieter

    2016-07-01

    Viral channel forming proteins (VCPs) have been discovered in the late 70s and are found in many viruses to date. Usually they are small and have to assemble to form channels which depolarize the lipid membrane of the host cells. Structural information is just about to emerge for just some of them. Thus, computational methods play a pivotal role in generating plausible structures which can be used in the drug development process. In this review the accumulation of structural data is introduced from a historical perspective. Computational performances and their predictive power are reported guided by biological questions such as the assembly, mechanism of function and drug-protein interaction of VCPs. An outlook of how coarse grained simulations can contribute to yet unexplored issues of these proteins is given. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26806161

  4. Development of simulation tools for virus shell assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Bonnie

    2001-01-05

    Prof. Berger's major areas of research have been in applying computational and mathematical techniques to problems in biology, and more specifically to problems in protein folding and genomics. Significant progress has been made in the following areas relating to virus shell assembly: development has been progressing on a second-generation self-assembly simulator which provides a more versatile and physically realistic model of assembly; simulations are being developed and applied to a variety of problems in virus assembly; and collaborative efforts have continued with experimental biologists to verify and inspire the local rules theory and the simulator. The group has also worked on applications of the techniques developed here to other self-assembling structures in the material and biological sciences. Some of this work has been conducted in conjunction with Dr. Sorin Istrail when he was at Sandia National Labs.

  5. Self-assembly and application of diphenylalanine-based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuehai; Zhu, Pengli; Li, Junbai

    2010-06-01

    Micro- and nanostructures fabricated from biological building blocks have attracted tremendous attention owing to their potential for application in biology and in nanotechnology. Many biomolecules, including peptides and proteins, can interact and self-assemble into highly ordered supramolecular architectures with functionality. By imitating the processes where biological peptides or proteins are assembled in nature, one can delicately design and synthesize various peptide building blocks composed of several to dozens of amino acids for the creation of biomimetic or bioinspired nanostructured materials. This tutorial review aims to introduce a new kind of peptide building block, the diphenylalanine motif, extracted with inspiration of a pathogenic process towards molecular self-assembly. We highlight recent and current advances in fabrication and application of diphenylalanine-based peptide nanomaterials. We also highlight the preparation of such peptide-based nanostructures as nanotubes, spherical vesicles, nanofibrils, nanowires and hybrids through self-assembly, the improvement of their properties and the extension of their applications. PMID:20502791

  6. EDITORIAL: MEMS in biology and medicine MEMS in biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, Beth L.; Herr, Amy E.

    2011-05-01

    Stimulating—the first word that springs to mind regarding the emerging and expanding role of MEMS in biological inquiry. When invited to guest-edit this special issue on 'MEMS in biology and medicine' for JMM, we jumped at the opportunity. Partly owing to the breadth of the stimulating research in this nascent area and partly owing to the stimulating of biological function made possible with MEMS accessible length and time scales, we were eager to assemble manuscripts detailing some of the most cutting edge biological research being conducted around the globe. In addition to cutting edge engineering, this special issue features challenging biological questions addressed with innovative MEMS technologies. Topics span from Yetisen and colleagues' inquiry into quantifying pollen tube behaviour in response to pistil tissues [1] to Morimoto and colleagues' engineering efforts to produce monodisperse droplets capable of encapsulating single cells (without surface modification) [2]. Questions are bold, including a means to achieve therapeutically-relevant scaling for enrichment of leukocytes from blood (Inglis et al [3]), assessing the dependence of Escherichia coli biofilm formation on bacterial signalling (Meyer et al [4]), and elucidation of adhesion dynamics of circulating tumour cells (Cheung et al [5]) among others. Technologies are diverse, including microfabricated magnetic actuators (Lee et al [6]), stimuli-responsive polymer nanocomposites (Hess et al [7]), and SU-8 electrothermal microgrippers (Chu et al [8]) to name but a few. Contributing authors do indeed span a large swathe of the globe, with contributions from Australia, Italy, China, Canada, Denmark, Japan, the USA and numerous other locations. Collaboration finds a home here—with researchers from macromolecular science and electrical engineering collaborating with the Veterans Affairs Medical Center or neurosurgery researchers working with biological and electrical engineers. The questions posed by

  7. Wind turbine rotor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, H. W.

    1984-11-20

    A vertical axis wind turbine having a horizontal arm member which supports an upright blade assembly. Bearing structure coupling the blade assembly to the turbine arm permits blade movement about its longitudinal axis as well as flexing motion of the blade assembly about axes perpendicular to the longitudinal axis. A latching mechanism automatically locks the blade assembly to its supporting arm during normal turbine operation and automatically unlocks same when the turbine is at rest. For overspeed prevention, a centrifugally actuated arm functions to unlatch the blade assembly permitting same to slipstream or feather into the wind. Manually actuated means are also provided for unlatching the moving blade assembly. The turbine arm additionally carries a switching mechanism in circuit with a turbine generator with said mechanism functioning to open and hence protect the generator circuit in the event of an overspeed condition of the turbine.

  8. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  10. Splice assembly tool and method of splicing

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1980-01-01

    A splice assembly tool for assembling component parts of an electrical conductor while producing a splice connection between electrical cables therewith, comprises a first structural member adaptable for supporting force applying means thereon, said force applying means enabling a rotary force applied manually thereto to be converted to a longitudinal force for subsequent application against a first component part of said electrical connection, a second structural member adaptable for engaging a second component part in a manner to assist said first structural member in assembling the component parts relative to one another and transmission means for conveying said longitudinal force between said first and said second structural members, said first and said second structural members being coupled to one another by said transmission means, wherein at least one of said component parts comprises a tubular elastomeric sleeve and said force applying means provides a relatively high mechanical advantage when said rotary force is applied thereto so as to facilitate assembly of said at least one tubular elastomeric sleeve about said other component part in an interference fit manner.

  11. Cell-free protein synthesis and assembly on a biochip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, Yael; Buxboim, Amnon; Wolf, Sharon G.; Daube, Shirley S.; Bar-Ziv, Roy H.

    2012-06-01

    Biologically active complexes such as ribosomes and bacteriophages are formed through the self-assembly of proteins and nucleic acids. Recapitulating these biological self-assembly processes in a cell-free environment offers a way to develop synthetic biodevices. To visualize and understand the assembly process, a platform is required that enables simultaneous synthesis, assembly and imaging at the nanoscale. Here, we show that a silicon dioxide grid, used to support samples in transmission electron microscopy, can be modified into a biochip to combine in situ protein synthesis, assembly and imaging. Light is used to pattern the biochip surface with genes that encode specific proteins, and antibody traps that bind and assemble the nascent proteins. Using transmission electron microscopy imaging we show that protein nanotubes synthesized on the biochip surface in the presence of antibody traps efficiently assembled on these traps, but pre-assembled nanotubes were not effectively captured. Moreover, synthesis of green fluorescent protein from its immobilized gene generated a gradient of captured proteins decreasing in concentration away from the gene source. This biochip could be used to create spatial patterns of proteins assembled on surfaces.

  12. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  13. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health. PMID:26030272

  14. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  15. Self-assembly of colloidal surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegel, Willem

    2012-02-01

    We developed colloidal dumbbells with a rough and a smooth part, based on a method reported in Ref. [1]. Specific attraction between the smooth parts occurs upon addition of non-adsorbing polymers of appropriate size. We present the first results in terms of the assemblies that emerge in these systems. [4pt] [1] D.J. Kraft, W.S. Vlug, C.M. van Kats, A. van Blaaderen, A. Imhof and W.K. Kegel, Self-assembly of colloids with liquid protrusions, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1182, (2009)

  16. Brain oncology. Biology, diagnosis and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatel, M.; Darcel, F.; Pecker, J.

    1987-01-01

    The book's contents are as follows: Part I: Oncogenesis. Part II: Neuropathology. Part III: Tumoral Immunobiology and Oncobiology. Part IV: Biological and Diagnostic Imaging. Part V: Clinico-Pathological Studies. Part VI: Neurosurgical Procedures and Radiotherapy Trends. Part VII: Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy.

  17. Assembly design system based on engineering connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wensheng

    2016-05-01

    An assembly design system is an important part of computer-aided design systems, which are important tools for realizing product concept design. The traditional assembly design system does not record the connection information of production on the engineering layer; consequently, the upstream design idea cannot be fully used in the downstream design. An assembly design model based on the relationship of engineering connection is presented. In this model, all nodes are divided into two categories: The component and the connection. Moreover, the product is constructed on the basis of the connection relationship of the components. The model is an And/Or graph and has the ability to record all assembly schemes. This model records only the connection information that has engineering application value in the product design. In addition, this model can significantly reduce the number of combinations, and is very favorable for the assembly sequence planning in the downstream. The system contains a connection knowledge system that can be mapped to the connection node, and the connection knowledge obtained in practice can be returned to the knowledge system. Finally, VC++ 6.0 is used to develop a prototype system called Connect-based Assembly Planning (CAP). The relationship between the CAP system and the commercial assembly design system is also established.

  18. Exact Length Distribution of Filamentous Structures Assembled from a Finite Pool of Subunits.

    PubMed

    Harbage, David; Kondev, Jané

    2016-07-01

    Self-assembling filamentous structures made of protein subunits are ubiquitous in cell biology. These structures are often highly dynamic, with subunits in a continuous state of flux, binding to and falling off of filaments. In spite of this constant turnover of their molecular parts, many cellular structures seem to maintain a well-defined size over time, which is often required for their proper functioning. One widely discussed mechanism of size regulation involves the cell maintaining a finite pool of protein subunits available for assembly. This finite pool mechanism can control the length of a single filament by having assembly proceed until the pool of free subunits is depleted to the point when assembly and disassembly are balanced. Still, this leaves open the question of whether the same mechanism can provide size control for multiple filamentous structures that are assembled from a common pool of protein subunits, as is often the case in cells. We address this question by solving the steady-state master equation governing the stochastic assembly and disassembly of multifilament structures made from a shared finite pool of subunits. We find that, while the total number of subunits within a multifilament structure is well-defined, individual filaments within the structure have a wide, power-law distribution of lengths. We also compute the phase diagram for two multifilament structures competing for the same pool of subunits and identify conditions for coexistence when both have a well-defined size. These predictions can be tested in cell experiments in which the size of the subunit pool or the number of filament nucleators is tuned. PMID:27135597

  19. [Biological weapons].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, K; Becker, S; Wulf, H; Densow, D

    2010-08-01

    Biological weapons are weapons of mass destruction that use pathogens (bacteria, viruses) or the toxins produced by them to target living organisms or to contaminate non-living substances. In the past, biological warfare has been repeatedly used. Anthrax, plague and smallpox are regarded as the most dangerous biological weapons by various institutions. Nowadays it seems quite unlikely that biological warfare will be employed in any military campaigns. However, the possibility remains that biological weapons may be used in acts of bioterrorism. In addition all diseases caused by biological weapons may also occur naturally or as a result of a laboratory accident. Risk assessment with regard to biological danger often proves to be difficult. In this context, an early identification of a potentially dangerous situation through experts is essential to limit the degree of damage. PMID:20717866

  20. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  1. Liquid rocket valve assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of valve assemblies used in liquid propellant rocket engines are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) valve selection parameters, (2) major design aspects, (3) design integration of valve subassemblies, and (4) assembly of components and functional tests. Information is provided on engine, stage, and spacecraft checkout procedures.

  2. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  3. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  4. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  5. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  6. Demisable Reaction-Wheel Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell; Ahronovich, Eliezer; Davis, Milton C., III

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the concept of a demisable motor-drive-and-flywheel assembly [reaction-wheel assembly (RWA)] used in controlling the attitude of a spacecraft. Demisable as used here does not have its traditional legal meaning; instead, it signifies susceptible to melting, vaporizing, and/or otherwise disintegrating during re-entry of the spacecraft into the atmosphere of the Earth so as not to pose a hazard to anyone or anything on the ground. Prior RWAs include parts made of metals (e.g., iron, steel, and titanium) that melt at high temperatures and include structures of generally closed character that shield some parts (e.g., magnets) against re-entry heating. In a demisable RWA, the flywheel would be made of aluminum, which melts at a lower temperature. The flywheel web would not be a solid disk but would have a more open, nearly-spoke-like structure so that it would disintegrate more rapidly; hence, the flywheel rim would separate more rapidly so that parts shielded by the rim would be exposed sooner to re-entry heating. In addition, clearances between the flywheel and other components would be made greater, imparting a more open character and thus increasing the exposure of those components.

  7. Assembly partitioning with a constant number of translations

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, D.; Wilson, R.H.

    1994-08-24

    The authors consider the following problem that arises in assembly planning: given an assembly, identify a subassembly that can be removed as a rigid object without disturbing the rest of the assembly. This is the assembly partitioning problem. Specifically, they consider planar assemblies of simple polygons and subassembly removal paths consisting of a single finite translation followed by a translation to infinity. They show that such a subassembly and removal path can be determined in O(n{sup 1.46}N{sup 6}) time, where n is the number of polygons in the assembly and N is the total number of edges and vertices of all the parts together. They then extend this formulation to removal paths consisting of a small number of finite translations, followed by a translation to infinity. In this case the algorithm runs in time polynomial in the number of parts, but exponential in the number of translations a path may contain.

  8. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI.

    PubMed

    Kitts, Paul A; Church, Deanna M; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-01

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site. PMID:26578580

  9. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI

    PubMed Central

    Kitts, Paul A.; Church, Deanna M.; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G.; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D.; Pruitt, Kim D.; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-01

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site. PMID:26578580

  10. Mechanisms of Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Jason D.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are nanoscale entities containing a nucleic acid genome encased in a protein shell called a capsid, and in some cases surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane. This review summarizes the physics that govern the processes by which capsids assembles within their host cells and in vitro. We describe the thermodynamics and kinetics for assembly of protein subunits into icosahedral capsid shells, and how these are modified in cases where the capsid assembles around a nucleic acid or on a lipid bilayer. We present experimental and theoretical techniques that have been used to characterize capsid assembly, and we highlight aspects of virus assembly which are likely to receive significant attention in the near future. PMID:25532951

  11. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  12. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  13. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  14. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  15. Dissipative self-assembly of vesicular nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Subhabrata; Fortunati, Ilaria; Ferrante, Camilla; Scrimin, Paolo; Prins, Leonard J

    2016-07-01

    Dissipative self-assembly is exploited by nature to control important biological functions, such as cell division, motility and signal transduction. The ability to construct synthetic supramolecular assemblies that require the continuous consumption of energy to remain in the functional state is an essential premise for the design of synthetic systems with lifelike properties. Here, we show a new strategy for the dissipative self-assembly of functional supramolecular structures with high structural complexity. It relies on the transient stabilization of vesicles through noncovalent interactions between the surfactants and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which acts as the chemical fuel. It is shown that the lifetime of the vesicles can be regulated by controlling the hydrolysis rate of ATP. The vesicles sustain a chemical reaction but only as long as chemical fuel is present to keep the system in the out-of-equilibrium state. The lifetime of the vesicles determines the amount of reaction product produced by the system. PMID:27325101

  16. A continuum model for hierarchical fibril assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lith, B. S.; Muntean, A.; Storm, C.

    2014-06-01

    Most of the biological polymers that make up our cells and tissues are hierarchically structured. For biopolymers ranging from collagen, to actin, to fibrin and amyloid fibrils this hierarchy provides vitally important versatility. The structural hierarchy must be encoded in the self-assembly process, from the earliest stages onward, in order to produce the appropriate substructures. In this letter, we explore the kinetics of multistage self-assembly processes in a model system which allows comparison to bulk probes such as light scattering. We apply our model to recent turbidimetry data on the self-assembly of collagen fibrils. Our analysis suggests a connection between diffusion-limited aggregation kinetics and fibril growth, supported by slow, power-law growth at very long time scales.

  17. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  18. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Gary C.; Gregg, Charles T.; Grace, W. Kevin; Hiebert, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  19. Flexible, symmetry-directed approach to assembling protein cages.

    PubMed

    Sciore, Aaron; Su, Min; Koldewey, Philipp; Eschweiler, Joseph D; Diffley, Kelsey A; Linhares, Brian M; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Bardwell, James C A; Skiniotis, Georgios; Marsh, E Neil G

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of individual protein subunits into large-scale symmetrical structures is widespread in nature and confers new biological properties. Engineered protein assemblies have potential applications in nanotechnology and medicine; however, a major challenge in engineering assemblies de novo has been to design interactions between the protein subunits so that they specifically assemble into the desired structure. Here we demonstrate a simple, generalizable approach to assemble proteins into cage-like structures that uses short de novo designed coiled-coil domains to mediate assembly. We assembled eight copies of a C3-symmetric trimeric esterase into a well-defined octahedral protein cage by appending a C4-symmetric coiled-coil domain to the protein through a short, flexible linker sequence, with the approximate length of the linker sequence determined by computational modeling. The structure of the cage was verified using a combination of analytical ultracentrifugation, native electrospray mass spectrometry, and negative stain and cryoelectron microscopy. For the protein cage to assemble correctly, it was necessary to optimize the length of the linker sequence. This observation suggests that flexibility between the two protein domains is important to allow the protein subunits sufficient freedom to assemble into the geometry specified by the combination of C4 and C3 symmetry elements. Because this approach is inherently modular and places minimal requirements on the structural features of the protein building blocks, it could be extended to assemble a wide variety of proteins into structures with different symmetries. PMID:27432965

  20. Assembly of objects with not fully predefined shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arlotti, M. A.; Dimartino, V.

    1989-01-01

    An assembly problem in a non-deterministic environment, i.e., where parts to be assembled have unknown shape, size and location, is described. The only knowledge used by the robot to perform the assembly operation is given by a connectivity rule and geometrical constraints concerning parts. Once a set of geometrical features of parts has been extracted by a vision system, applying such a rule allows the dtermination of the composition sequence. A suitable sensory apparatus allows the control the whole operation.

  1. Supramolecular Assembly of DNA on Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Reuven, Darkeyah G.; Shashikala, H. B. Mihiri; Mandal, Sanjay; Williams, Myron N. V.; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2013-01-01

    Graphene’s adhesive and charge delocalization properties offer the opportunity for the direct study of biological molecule in the nanoscale regime. The inherent charge on DNA base pairs and the associated phosphate backbone can be probed by non-covalent interactions with graphene, which is a useful platform for the creation of anisotropic nanopatterned biological assemblies. Here, we report the graphene nanoribbon (GNR) supported anisotropic supramolecular self-assembly of single stranded adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), thymine (T), AT, and GC 20mer oligonucleotides, as well as the unique ordering of double stranded plasmid (circular) and Herring sperm (linear) DNA. The GNRs serve as a double sided adhesive platform for attachment to the SiO2 substrate, as well as DNA oligomers and polymers. The self-assembly is attributed to donor-acceptor interactions between DNA and graphene. These findings demonstrate that the DNA-GNR assembly yields a prospective route to novel bio-relevant nanostructures. PMID:24032074

  2. Protective helmet assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, Frederic S. (Inventor); Weiss, Fred R. (Inventor); Eck, John D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a protective helmet assembly with improved safety and impact resistance, high resistance to ignition and combustion, and reduced offgassing. The assembly comprises a hard rigid ballistic outer shell with one or more impact absorbing pads fitted to the interior surface. The pads are made of open cell flexible polyimide foam material, each of which is attached to the inner surface of the ballistic outer shell by cooperative VELCRO fastener strips of hook-and-loop material affixed respectively to the rigid outer shell and the impact absorbing pads. The helmet assembly with shell and pads is sized to fit relatively close over a wearer's head.

  3. DC source assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  4. 49 CFR 572.186 - Abdomen assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... part of the dummy assembly shown in drawing 175-0000 including load sensors specified in § 572.189(e... measuring sensor in the abdomen as shown in Figure U5; (5) The impactor impacts the dummy's abdomen at 4.0 m... of the forces of the three abdominal load sensors, specified in 572.189(e), shall be not less...

  5. 49 CFR 572.186 - Abdomen assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... part of the dummy assembly shown in drawing 175-0000 including load sensors specified in § 572.189(e... measuring sensor in the abdomen as shown in Figure U5; (5) The impactor impacts the dummy's abdomen at 4.0 m... of the forces of the three abdominal load sensors, specified in 572.189(e), shall be not less...

  6. Report to the General Assembly [of Illinois].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    In this nine-part report to Illinois' General Assembly, the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB) reviews Board powers and duties, and systemwide goals, financial resources, student characteristics and outcomes, educational programs, training and economic development activities, programs for special populations, and current issues of importance…

  7. 49 CFR 572.193 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j); (2) Attach the neck-headform assembly, as shown in Figure V2-A or V2-B in appendix A to this subpart, to the 49 CFR Part 572 pendulum test fixture (Figure 22, 49 CFR 572.33) in either the left or right lateral impact orientations, respectively, so that...

  8. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  9. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  10. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  11. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  12. Measurement Protocols for Optimized Fuel Assembly Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

    2008-11-01

    This report describes the measurement protocols for optimized tags that can be applied to standard fuel assemblies used in light water reactors. This report describes work performed by the authors at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for NA-22 as part of research to identify specific signatures that can be developed to support counter-proliferation technologies.

  13. Internal Aspects of the Skill Transfer of Manual Assembly Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyo, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    In manual assembly work, parts are often assembled by applying force with a simple tool or by hand. A worker thus needs control the force he or she applies in working, as an appropriate level of force is requisite for minimizing work failures and improving efficiency. The object of this study is to clarify the relationship between the level of…

  14. Self-assembly of smallest magnetic particles

    PubMed Central

    Mehdizadeh Taheri, Sara; Michaelis, Maria; Friedrich, Thomas; Förster, Beate; Drechsler, Markus; Römer, Florian M.; Bösecke, Peter; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Weber, Birgit; Rehberg, Ingo; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Förster, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of tiny magnetic particles in external magnetic fields is important for many applications ranging from data storage to medical technologies. The development of ever smaller magnetic structures is restricted by a size limit, where the particles are just barely magnetic. For such particles we report the discovery of a kind of solution assembly hitherto unobserved, to our knowledge. The fact that the assembly occurs in solution is very relevant for applications, where magnetic nanoparticles are either solution-processed or are used in liquid biological environments. Induced by an external magnetic field, nanocubes spontaneously assemble into 1D chains, 2D monolayer sheets, and large 3D cuboids with almost perfect internal ordering. The self-assembly of the nanocubes can be elucidated considering the dipole–dipole interaction of small superparamagnetic particles. Complex 3D geometrical arrangements of the nanodipoles are obtained under the assumption that the orientation of magnetization is freely adjustable within the superlattice and tends to minimize the binding energy. On that basis the magnetic moment of the cuboids can be explained. PMID:26554000

  15. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    PubMed

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms. PMID:26205204

  16. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of biology to be used in biology courses in secondary schools. Among those experiments presented are demonstrating the early stages of ferns and mosses and simple culture methods for fern prothalli. (HM)

  17. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including chi-square tests on a microcomputer, an integrated biology game, microscope slides of leaf stomata, culturing soil nematodes, technique for watering locust egg-laying tubes, hazards of biological chemicals (such as benzene, benzidene, calchicine,…

  18. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including use of dwarf cichlids (fishes) in secondary school biology, teaching edge effects on stomatal diffusion, computer program on effects of selection on gene frequencies, biological oxidation/reduction reactions, short cuts with Drosophila, computer program…

  19. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  20. Direct assembling methodologies for high-throughput bioscreening

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Dévora, Jorge I.; Shi, Zhi-dong; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades, high-throughput (HT) bioscreening, a technique that allows rapid screening of biochemical compound libraries against biological targets, has been widely used in drug discovery, stem cell research, development of new biomaterials, and genomics research. To achieve these ambitions, scaffold-free (or direct) assembly of biological entities of interest has become critical. Appropriate assembling methodologies are required to build an efficient HT bioscreening platform. The development of contact and non-contact assembling systems as a practical solution has been driven by a variety of essential attributes of the bioscreening system, such as miniaturization, high throughput, and high precision. The present article reviews recent progress on these assembling technologies utilized for the construction of HT bioscreening platforms. PMID:22021162