Science.gov

Sample records for biological pattern formation

  1. On the mechanical theory for biological pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentil, D. E.; Murray, J. D.

    1993-02-01

    We investigate the pattern-forming potential of mechanical models in embryology proposed by Oster, Murray and their coworkers. We show that the presence of source terms in the tissue extracellular matrix and cell density equations give rise to spatio-temporal oscillations. An extension of one such model to include ‘biologically realistic long range effects induces the formation of stationary spatial patterns. Previous attempts to solve the full system were in one dimension only. We obtain solutions in one dimension and extend our simulations to two dimensions. We show that a single mechanical model alone is capable of generating complex but regular spatial patterns rather than the requirement of model interaction as suggested by Nagorcka et al. and Shaw and Murray. We discuss some biological applications of the models among which are would healing and formation of dermatoglyphic (fingerprint) patterns.

  2. Biological pattern formation: from basic mechanisms to complex structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.J.; Meinhardt, H. )

    1994-10-01

    The reliable development of highly complex organisms is an intriguing and fascinating problem. The genetic material is, as a rule, the same in each cell of an organism. How then do cells, under the influence of their common genes, produce spatial patterns Simple models are discussed that describe the generation of patterns out of an initially nearly homogeneous state. They are based on nonlinear interactions of at least two chemicals and on their diffusion. The concepts of local autocatalysis and of long-range inhibition play a fundamental role. Numerical simulations show that the models account for many basic biological observations such as the regeneration of a pattern after excision of tissue or the production of regular (or nearly regular) arrays of organs during (or after) completion of growth. Very complex patterns can be generated in a reproducible way by hierarchical coupling of several such elementary reactions. Applications to animal coats and to the generation of polygonally shaped patterns are provided. It is further shown how to generate a strictly periodic pattern of units that themselves exhibit a complex and polar fine structure. This is illustrated by two examples: the assembly of photoreceptor cells in the eye of [ital Drosophila] and the positioning of leaves and axillary buds in a growing shoot. In both cases, the substructures have to achieve an internal polarity under the influence of some primary pattern-forming system existing in the fly's eye or in the plant. The fact that similar models can describe essential steps in organisms as distantly related as animals and plants suggests that they reveal some universal mechanisms.

  3. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  4. A Formative Evaluation of Biological Science: Patterns and Processes, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, William V.; And Others

    Reported is a formative evaluation of the Biological Science Curriculum Study "Biological Science: Patterns and Processes", designed for academically unsuccessful students. "Criterion referenced" tests were developed, with items selected to indicate the extent of students' learning rather than to discriminate between students. An alternate form,…

  5. Three-dimensional pattern formation of magnetically labeled microgel beads for biological tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, H.; Inoue, H.; Nakamura, M.

    2009-03-01

    We commenced basic research on the three-dimensional (3D) pattern formation of microgel beads for applications in biological tissue engineering. In this new technique, microgel beads are premagnetized by doping them with magnetic nanoparticles. Living cells will be included in the beads for actual use. If a nonuniform magnetic field is applied to a solution containing these magnetized beads, the beads will align, contact, and form a 3D structure. The structure is controlled by the seed pattern of the magnetic particles plugged in a substrate and the profile of the magnetic field distribution. We constructed tubes, which imitate blood vessels, for demonstration using gel beads whose diameters are of the order of several tens of micrometers. The diameter of the demonstrated tube was less than 0.5 mm and its length was 6.6 mm, although living cells were not included in the beads. Numerical calculations by using the discrete element method were conducted to confirm the formation of the tube and to predict the effect of centrifugal force, which will be applied to fill cells in the space between magnetically patterned beads. Although this unique technology is in the nascent stage, this 3D pattern formation technique by the control of the magnetic field has potential to be one of the effective engineering technologies for manufacturing 3D patterned biological tissues in the future.

  6. The Intersection of Theory and Application in Elucidating Pattern Formation in Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Othmer, Hans G.; Painter, Kevin; Umulis, David; Xue, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    We discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to three distinct developmental systems that illustrate how theory can influence experimental work and vice-versa. The chosen systems – Drosophila melanogaster, bacterial pattern formation, and pigmentation patterns – illustrate the fundamental physical processes of signaling, growth and cell division, and cell movement involved in pattern formation and development. These systems exemplify the current state of theoretical and experimental understanding of how these processes produce the observed patterns, and illustrate how theoretical and experimental approaches can interact to lead to a better understanding of development. As John Bonner said long ago ‘We have arrived at the stage where models are useful to suggest experiments, and the facts of the experiments in turn lead to new and improved models that suggest new experiments. By this rocking back and forth between the reality of experimental facts and the dream world of hypotheses, we can move slowly toward a satisfactory solution of the major problems of developmental biology.’ PMID:19844610

  7. Pattern formation today

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Richardson, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Patterns are orders embedded in randomness. They may appear as spatial arrangements or temporal series, and the elements may appear identical or with variations. Patterns exist in the physical world as well as in living systems. In the biological world, patterns can range from simple to complex, forming the basic building blocks of life. The process which generates this ordering in the biological world was termed pattern formation. Since Wolpert promoted this concept four decades ago, scientists from molecular biology, developmental biology, stem cell biology, tissue engineering, theoretical modeling and other disciplines have made remarkable progress towards understanding its mechanisms. It is time to review and re-integrate our understanding. Here, we explore the origin of pattern formation, how the genetic code is translated into biological form, and how complex phenotypes are selected over evolutionary time. We present four topics: Principles, Evolution, Development, and Stem Cells and Regeneration. We have interviewed several leaders in the field to gain insight into how their research and the field of pattern formation have shaped each other. We have learned that both molecular process and physico-chemical principles are important for biological pattern formation. New understanding will emerge through integration of the analytical approach of molecular-genetic manipulation and the systemic approach of model simulation. We regret that we could not include every major investigator in the field, but hope that this Special Issue of the Int. J. Dev. Biol. represents a sample of our knowledge of pattern formation today, which will help to stimulate more research on this fundamental process. PMID:19557673

  8. Waves and patterning in developmental biology: vertebrate segmentation and feather bud formation as case studies

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ruth E.; Schnell, Santiago; Maini, Philip K.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we will discuss the integration of developmental patterning mechanisms with waves of competency that control the ability of a homogeneous field of cells to react to pattern forming cues and generate spatially heterogeneous patterns. We base our discussion around two well known patterning events that take place in the early embryo: somitogenesis and feather bud formation. We outline mathematical models to describe each patterning mechanism, present the results of numerical simulations and discuss the validity of each model in relation to our example patterning processes. PMID:19557684

  9. Pattern formation in Dictyostelium via the dynamics of cooperative biological entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David A.; Levine, Herbert

    1993-12-01

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum exhibits a variety of spatial patterns as it aggregates to form a multicellular slug. These patterns arise via the interaction of the aggregating amoebae, either via contact or as mediated by chemical signals involving cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP). We model this system as a set of reaction-diffusion equations coupled to dynamical biological entities (bions), each of which is endowed with signal receptors and response rules. Simulations of our model reveal a close correspondence with the observed structures. Also, the general framework we propose should be suitable for modeling other biological pattern-forming processes.

  10. Pattern Formation in Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2011-04-01

    Pattern formation is ubiquitous in nature, from sand ripples formed by wind to the development of a complex biological organism with different organs and a central nervous system. In the realm of materials, patterns are formed invariably when matter is transformed between different solid, liquid or gaseous states far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Material failure is itself mediated by the propagation of cracks that form intricate patterns. Understanding how patterns form and evolve is key to design materials with desired properties and to optimize their performance and safety. This talk will discuss recent progress made to understand three distinct class of patterns including the highly branched snow-flake-like dendritic patterns formed during the solidification process, polycrystalline patterns shaped by grain boundaries, and crack patterns.

  11. Distinguishing Pattern Formation Phenotypes: Applying Minkowski Functionals to Cell Biology Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rericha, Erin; Guven, Can; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    Spatial Clustering of proteins within cells or cells themselves frequently occur in cell biology systems. However quantifying the underlying order and determining the regulators of these cluster patterns have proved difficult due to the inherent high noise levels in the systems. For instance the patterns formed by wild type and cyclic-AMP regulatory mutant Dictyostelium cells are visually distinctive, yet the large error bars in measurements of the fractal number, area, Euler number, eccentricity, and wavelength making it difficult to quantitatively distinguish between the patterns. We apply a spatial analysis technique based on Minkowski functionals and develop metrics which clearly separate wild type and mutant cell lines into distinct categories. Having such a metric facilitated the development of a computational model for cellular aggregation and its regulators. Supported by NIH-NGHS Nanotechnology (R01GM085574) and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  12. Biologic Patterns of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Carl V.; Linn, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of Rasch analysis to elucidate biological patterns of disability present in the functional ability of persons undergoing medical rehabilitation. Uses two measures, one for inpatients and one for outpatients, to illustrate the approach and provides examples of some biological patterns of disability associated with specific types…

  13. [Pattern formation in microcosm: the role of self-assembly in complex biological envelopes development].

    PubMed

    Gabaraeva, N I; Hemsley, A R

    2010-01-01

    The data on the development of pollen/spore walls (of sporoderm) were reconsidered in the light of our hypothesis regarding a considerable role of self-assembling processes in the formation of this complex pattern. The premises that (1) glycocalyx (cell surface coating) is a self-assembling colloidal solution, and that (2) exine, formed on a glycocalyx framework, appears as a result of the self-assembly of the biopolymer (sporopollenin microemulsion), were independently suggested by the authors of this paper (Gabarayeva, 1990, 1993; Hemsley et al., 1992). Afterwards a joint hypothesis has been worked out which interpreted the processes of sporoderm development through regularities of colloidal chemistry. It was shown that all of the successive developmental stages, seen in transmission electron microscope (TEM) in the course of pollen wall development, correspond to successive micelle mesophases of a colloidal solution of surface-active substances which self-assemble when their concentration increases. Such an interpretation implies that all of the microstructures, observed in mature pollen walls (granules; rods-columellae; hexagonally packed layers of rods; bilayers, separated with a gap) are somewhat like "stiff history" of their appearance as a micellar sequence, immortalized by chemically resistant sporopollenin. Since self-assembling processes have nonlinear, spasmodic character, and microstructures of pollen wall, mentioned above, are arranged, as a rule, in successive layers, it has been suggested that these layers of heterogeneous microstructures occur as a result of the abrupt phase transitions typical for self-assembling micellar systems. PMID:20865932

  14. The role of mathematical models in understanding pattern formation in developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Umulis, David M; Othmer, Hans G

    2015-05-01

    In a Wall Street Journal article published on April 5, 2013, E. O. Wilson attempted to make the case that biologists do not really need to learn any mathematics-whenever they run into difficulty with numerical issues, they can find a technician (aka mathematician) to help them out of their difficulty. He formalizes this in Wilsons Principle No. 1: "It is far easier for scientists to acquire needed collaboration from mathematicians and statisticians than it is for mathematicians and statisticians to find scientists able to make use of their equations." This reflects a complete misunderstanding of the role of mathematics in all sciences throughout history. To Wilson, mathematics is mere number crunching, but as Galileo said long ago, "The laws of Nature are written in the language of mathematics[Formula: see text] the symbols are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without whose help it is impossible to comprehend a single word." Mathematics has moved beyond the geometry-based model of Galileo's time, and in a rebuttal to Wilson, E. Frenkel has pointed out the role of mathematics in synthesizing the general principles in science (Both point and counter-point are available in Wilson and Frenkel in Notices Am Math Soc 60(7):837-838, 2013). We will take this a step further and show how mathematics has been used to make new and experimentally verified discoveries in developmental biology and how mathematics is essential for understanding a problem that has puzzled experimentalists for decades-that of how organisms can scale in size. Mathematical analysis alone cannot "solve" these problems since the validation lies at the molecular level, but conversely, a growing number of questions in biology cannot be solved without mathematical analysis and modeling. Herein, we discuss a few examples of the productive intercourse between mathematics and biology. PMID:25280665

  15. The Role of Mathematical Models in Understanding Pattern Formation in Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Umulis, David M.

    2016-01-01

    In a Wall Street Journal article published on April 5, 2013, E. O. Wilson attempted to make the case that biologists do not really need to learn any mathematics—whenever they run into difficulty with numerical issues, they can find a technician (aka mathematician) to help them out of their difficulty. He formalizes this in Wilsons Principle No. 1: “It is far easier for scientists to acquire needed collaboration from mathematicians and statisticians than it is for mathematicians and statisticians to find scientists able to make use of their equations.” This reflects a complete misunderstanding of the role of mathematics in all sciences throughout history. To Wilson, mathematics is mere number crunching, but as Galileo said long ago, “The laws of Nature are written in the language of mathematics…the symbols are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without whose help it is impossible to comprehend a single word.” Mathematics has moved beyond the geometry-based model of Galileo’s time, and in a rebuttal to Wilson, E. Frenkel has pointed out the role of mathematics in synthesizing the general principles in science (Both point and counter-point are available in Wilson and Frenkel in Notices Am Math Soc 60(7):837–838, 2013). We will take this a step further and show how mathematics has been used to make new and experimentally verified discoveries in developmental biology and how mathematics is essential for understanding a problem that has puzzled experimentalists for decades—that of how organisms can scale in size. Mathematical analysis alone cannot “solve” these problems since the validation lies at the molecular level, but conversely, a growing number of questions in biology cannot be solved without mathematical analysis and modeling. Herein, we discuss a few examples of the productive intercourse between mathematics and biology. PMID:25280665

  16. Pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Czirok, Andras; Little, Charles D

    2012-06-01

    Vasculogenesis, the assembly of the first vascular network, is an intriguing developmental process that yields the first functional organ system of the embryo. In addition to being a fundamental part of embryonic development, vasculogenic processes also have medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how morphogenesis of tissue level structures can be controlled through cell behavior patterns that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes. Mathematical analyses and computer simulations can help conceptualize how to bridge organizational levels and thus help in evaluating hypotheses regarding the formation of vascular networks. Here, we discuss the ideas that have been proposed to explain the formation of the first vascular pattern: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. PMID:22692888

  17. Biological patterns: Novel indicators for pharmacological assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jacqueline U.

    1991-01-01

    Variable gravity testing using the KC-135 demonstrated clearly that biological pattern formation was definitely shown to result from gravity alone, and not from oxygen gradients in solution. Motile pattern formation of spermatozoa are driven by alternate mechanisms, and apparently not affected by short-term changes in gravity. The chemical effects found appear to be secondary to the primary effect of gravity. Cryopreservation may be the remedy to the problem of 'spare' or 'standing order' biological samples for testing of space lab investigations, but further studies are necessary.

  18. Space Biology: Patterns of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Frank B.

    1971-01-01

    Present knowledge about Mars is compared with past beliefs about the planet. Biological experiments that indicate life may exist on Mars are interpreted. Life patterns or biological features that might be postulated for extraterrestrial life are presented at the molecular, cellular, organism, and ecosystem levels. (DS)

  19. Pattern formation in centrosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mahen, Robert; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2012-02-01

    A striking but poorly explained feature of cell division is the ability to assemble and maintain organelles not bounded by membranes, from freely diffusing components in the cytosol. This process is driven by information transfer across biological scales such that interactions at the molecular scale allow pattern formation at the scale of the organelle. One important example of such an organelle is the centrosome, which is the main microtubule organising centre in the cell. Centrosomes consist of two centrioles surrounded by a cloud of proteins termed the pericentriolar material (PCM). Profound structural and proteomic transitions occur in the centrosome during specific cell cycle stages, underlying events such as centrosome maturation during mitosis, in which the PCM increases in size and microtubule nucleating capacity. Here we use recent insights into the spatio-temporal behaviour of key regulators of centrosomal maturation, including Polo-like kinase 1, CDK5RAP2 and Aurora-A, to propose a model for the assembly and maintenance of the PCM through the mobility and local interactions of its constituent proteins. We argue that PCM structure emerges as a pattern from decentralised self-organisation through a reaction-diffusion mechanism, with or without an underlying template, rather than being assembled from a central structural template alone. Self-organisation of this kind may have broad implications for the maintenance of mitotic structures, which, like the centrosome, exist stably as supramolecular assemblies on the micron scale, based on molecular interactions at the nanometer scale. PMID:22245706

  20. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  1. Pattern formation in multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Kouvaris, Nikos E.; Hata, Shigefumi; Guilera, Albert Díaz-

    2015-01-01

    The advances in understanding complex networks have generated increasing interest in dynamical processes occurring on them. Pattern formation in activator-inhibitor systems has been studied in networks, revealing differences from the classical continuous media. Here we study pattern formation in a new framework, namely multiplex networks. These are systems where activator and inhibitor species occupy separate nodes in different layers. Species react across layers but diffuse only within their own layer of distinct network topology. This multiplicity generates heterogeneous patterns with significant differences from those observed in single-layer networks. Remarkably, diffusion-induced instability can occur even if the two species have the same mobility rates; condition which can never destabilize single-layer networks. The instability condition is revealed using perturbation theory and expressed by a combination of degrees in the different layers. Our theory demonstrates that the existence of such topology-driven instabilities is generic in multiplex networks, providing a new mechanism of pattern formation. PMID:26042606

  2. Pattern formation with proportionate growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Deepak

    It is a common observation that as baby animals grow, different body parts grow approximately at same rate. This property, called proportionate growth is remarkable in that it is not encountered easily outside biology. The models of growth that have been studied in Physics so far, e.g diffusion -limited aggregation, surface deposition, growth of crystals from melt etc. involve only growth at the surface, with the inner structure remaining frozen. Interestingly, patterns formed in growing sandpiles provide a very wide variety of patterns that show proportionate growth. One finds patterns with different features, with sharply defined boundaries. In particular, even with very simple rules, one can produce patterns that show striking resemblance to those seen in nature. We can characterize the asymptotic pattern exactly in some special cases. I will discuss in particular the patterns grown on noisy backgrounds. Supported by J. C. Bose fellowship from DST (India).

  3. Pattern Formation in Convective Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    The present article reviews recent progress in the study of pattern formation in convective instabilities. After a brief discussion of the relevant basic hydrodynamic equations as well as a short outline of the mathematical treatment of pattern formation in complex systems the self-organization of spatial and spatio-temporal structures due to convective instabilities is considered. The formation of various forms of convective patterns arising in the Bénard experiment, i.e. in a horizontal fluid layer heated from below, is discussed. Then the review considers pattern formation in the Bénard instability in spherical geometries. In that case it can be demonstrated how the interaction among several convective cells may lead to time dependent as well as chaotic evolution of the spatial structures. Finally, the convective instability in a binary fluid mixture is discussed. In contrast to the instability in a single component fluid the instability may be oscillatory. In that case convection sets in in the form of travelling wave patterns which in addition to a complicated and chaotic temporal behaviour exhibit more or less spatial irregularity already close to threshold.

  4. Pattern formation in the geosciences

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation is a natural property of nonlinear and non-equilibrium dynamical systems. Geophysical examples of such systems span practically all observable length scales, from rhythmic banding of chemical species within a single mineral crystal, to the morphology of cusps and spits along hundreds of kilometres of coastlines. This article briefly introduces the general principles of pattern formation and argues how they can be applied to open problems in the Earth sciences. Particular examples are then discussed, which summarize the contents of the rest of this Theme Issue. PMID:24191107

  5. Pattern Formation and Functionality in Swarm Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Erik; Millonas, Mark; Chialvo, Dante

    1996-03-01

    We explore a simplified class of models we call swarms, which are inspired by the collective behavior of social insects. We perform a mean-field type stability analysis and numerical simulations of the model. Several interesting types of functional behavior appear in the vicinity of a second order phase transition, including the formation of stable lines of traffic flow, memory consolidation, and bootstrapping. In addition to providing an understanding of certain classes of biological behavior, these models bear a generic resemblence to a number of pattern formation processes in the physical sciences.

  6. Mechanisms of scaling in pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Umulis, David M.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    Many organisms and their constituent tissues and organs vary substantially in size but differ little in morphology; they appear to be scaled versions of a common template or pattern. Such scaling involves adjusting the intrinsic scale of spatial patterns of gene expression that are set up during development to the size of the system. Identifying the mechanisms that regulate scaling of patterns at the tissue, organ and organism level during development is a longstanding challenge in biology, but recent molecular-level data and mathematical modeling have shed light on scaling mechanisms in several systems, including Drosophila and Xenopus. Here, we investigate the underlying principles needed for understanding the mechanisms that can produce scale invariance in spatial pattern formation and discuss examples of systems that scale during development. PMID:24301464

  7. Pattern formation in oscillatory media without lateral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehman; Harris, Jeremy; Ermentrout, Bard

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking instabilities are the most common mechanism for how biological, chemical, and physical systems produce spatial patterns. Beginning with Turing's original paper, so-called lateral inhibition-in which negative feedback has greater spread than positive feedback-has been the underlying mechanism for pattern formation in biological models. Despite this, there are many biological systems that exhibit pattern formation but do not have lateral inhibition. In this paper, we present an example of such a system that is able to generate robust patterns emerging from a spatially homogeneous state. In fact, patterns can arise when there is only spatial spread of the activator. Unlike classic Turing pattern formation, these patterns arise from a spatially homogeneous oscillation rather than from a constant steady state. PMID:27575169

  8. Pattern formations and optimal packing.

    PubMed

    Mityushev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Patterns of different symmetries may arise after solution to reaction-diffusion equations. Hexagonal arrays, layers and their perturbations are observed in different models after numerical solution to the corresponding initial-boundary value problems. We demonstrate an intimate connection between pattern formations and optimal random packing on the plane. The main study is based on the following two points. First, the diffusive flux in reaction-diffusion systems is approximated by piecewise linear functions in the framework of structural approximations. This leads to a discrete network approximation of the considered continuous problem. Second, the discrete energy minimization yields optimal random packing of the domains (disks) in the representative cell. Therefore, the general problem of pattern formations based on the reaction-diffusion equations is reduced to the geometric problem of random packing. It is demonstrated that all random packings can be divided onto classes associated with classes of isomorphic graphs obtained from the Delaunay triangulation. The unique optimal solution is constructed in each class of the random packings. If the number of disks per representative cell is finite, the number of classes of isomorphic graphs, hence, the number of optimal packings is also finite. PMID:26852668

  9. Waves and Patterns in Chemical and Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinney, Harry L.; Krinsky, Valentin I.

    1991-12-01

    These 28 contributions by leading researchers - from such diverse disciplines as chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, and physiology - describe recent experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical analyses of the formation of spatial patterns in chemical and biological systems. Chemical patterns have been systematically studied since the field was established by Alan Turing's landmark 1952 paper, "The chemical basis for morphogenesis," yet only recently have new experimental techniques and numerical analyses of reaction-diffusion equations opened the way to understanding stationary and traveling wave patterns. This collection summarizes the exciting developments in this rapidly growing field. It shows that some biological patterns have been found to be strikingly similar to patterns found in simple, well-controlled laboratory chemical systems, that new chemical reactor designs make it possible to sustain chemical patterns and to study transitions between different kinds of patterns, and that nearly 40 years after Turing's paper, the patterns predicted by Turing have finally been observed in laboratory experiments. Harry L. Swinney is Sid Richardson Foundation Regents Chair, Department of Physics, and Director of the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics at the University of Texas at Austin. Valentin I. Krinsky is Head of the Autowave Laboratory, Institute of Biological Physics, Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, USSR. Chapters cover: Spiral, Ring, and Scroll Patterns: Experiments. Spiral, Ring, and Scroll Patterns: Theory and Simulations. Fronts and Turing Patterns. Waves and Patterns in Biological Systems.

  10. Formation of superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns by combination of nanostructure-imprinted perfluoropolymer and nanostructured silicon oxide for biological droplet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Taizo; Shimizu, Kazunori; Kaizuma, Yoshihiro; Konishi, Satoshi

    2011-03-01

    In this letter, we report a technology for fabricating superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns using a combination of a nanostructure-imprinted perfluoropolymer and nanostructured silicon oxide. In our previous study, we used a combination of hydrophobic and superhydrophilic materials. However, it was difficult to split low-surface-tension liquids such as biological liquids into droplets solely using hydrophobic/hydrophilic patterns. In this study, the contact angle of the hydrophobic region was enhanced from 109.3° to 155.6° by performing nanostructure imprinting on a damage-reduced perfluoropolymer. The developed superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns allowed the splitting of even those media that contained fetal bovine serum into droplets of a desired shape.

  11. Zonal flow as pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A.

    2013-10-01

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  12. Zonal flow as pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A.

    2013-10-15

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  13. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  14. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  15. Cellular pattern formation during Dictyostelium aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfer, Thomas; Sherratt, Jonathan A.; Maini, Philip K.

    The development of multicellularity in the life cycle of Dictyostelium discoideum provides a paradigm model system for biological pattern formation. Previously, mathematical models have shown how a collective pattern of cell communication by waves of the messenger molecule cyclic adenosine 3‧5‧-monophosphate (cAMP) arises from excitable local cAMP kinetics and cAMP diffusion. Here we derive a model of the actual cell aggregation process by considering the chemotactic cell response to cAMP and its interplay with the cAMP dynamics. Cell density, which previously has been treated as a spatially homogeneous parameter, is a crucial variable of the aggregation model. We find that the coupled dynamics of cell chemotaxis and cAMP reaction-diffusion lead to the break-up of the initially uniform cell layer and to the formation of the striking cell stream morphology which characterizes the aggregation process in situ. By a combination of stability analysis and two-dimensional simulations of the model equations, we show cell streaming to be the consequence of the growth of a small-amplitude pattern in cell density forced by the large-amplitude cAMP waves, thus representing a novel scenario of spatial patterning in a cell chemotaxis system. The instability mechanism is further analysed by means of an analytic caricature of the model, and the condition for chemotaxis-driven instability is found to be very similar to the one obtained for the standard (non-oscillatory) Keller-Segel system. The growing cell stream pattern feeds back into the cAMP dynamics, which can explain in some detail experimental observations on the time evolution of the cAMP wave pattern, and suggests the characterization of the Dictyostelium aggregation field as a self-organized excitable medium.

  16. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  17. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system.

  18. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns.

    PubMed

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  19. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in Δ EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems. PMID:26739566

  20. Frequent patterns mining in multiple biological sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Existing algorithms for mining frequent patterns in multiple biosequences may generate multiple projected databases and short candidate patterns, which can increase computation time and memory requirement. In order to overcome such shortcomings, we propose a fast and efficient algorithm for mining frequent patterns in multiple biological sequences (MSPM). We first present the concept of a primary pattern, which can be extended to form larger patterns in the sequence. To detect frequent primary patterns, a prefix tree is constructed. Based on this prefix tree, a pattern-extending approach is also presented to mine frequent patterns without producing a large number of irrelevant candidate patterns. The experimental results show that the MSPM algorithm can achieve not only faster speed, but also higher quality results as compared with other methods. PMID:24034736

  1. Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, William Nash

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenon of excitability is observed in a wide variety of physical and biological systems. In this work, spatially extended excitable systems are examined from several different perspectives. First, a pedagogical introduction is used to motivate the derivation of the dynamics of one dimensional excitable pulses. In the second part, coupled map techniques for numerical simulation of excitable media and other interfacial systems are described. Examples are given for both excitable media and crystal growth. The third chapter addresses the phenomenon of spiral formation in excitable media. Exact rotating solutions are found for a class of models of excitable media. The solutions consist of two regions: an outer region, consisting of the spiral proper, which exhibits a singularity at its tip, and the core region, obtained by rescaling space in the vicinity of the tip. The tip singularity is resolved in the core region, leading to a consistent solution in all of space. The stability of both the spiral and the core is investigated, with the result that the spiral is found to be stable, and the core unstable. Finally, the stability of excitable waves of the chemical cAMP traveling over aggregating colonies of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is examined by coupling the excitable dynamics of the cAMP signalling system to a simple model of chemotaxis, with result that cellular motion is found to destabilize the waves, causing the initially uniform field of cells to break up into streams.

  2. Single cell pattern formation and transient cytoskeletal arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bement, William M.; von Dassow, George

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of developmental biology is to explain the emergence of pattern in cell layers, tissues and organs. Developmental biologists now accept that reaction diffusion-based mechanisms are broadly employed in developing organisms to direct pattern formation. Here we briefly consider these mechanisms and then apply some of the concepts derived from them to several processes that occur in single cells: wound repair, yeast budding, and cytokinesis. Two conclusions emerge from this analysis: first, there is considerable overlap at the level of general mechanisms between developmental and single cell pattern formation; second, dynamic structures based on the actin cytoskeleton may be far more ordered than is generally recognized. PMID:24529246

  3. Pattern formation, logistics, and maximum path probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkaldy, J. S.

    1985-05-01

    The concept of pattern formation, which to current researchers is a synonym for self-organization, carries the connotation of deductive logic together with the process of spontaneous inference. Defining a pattern as an equivalence relation on a set of thermodynamic objects, we establish that a large class of irreversible pattern-forming systems, evolving along idealized quasisteady paths, approaches the stable steady state as a mapping upon the formal deductive imperatives of a propositional function calculus. In the preamble the classical reversible thermodynamics of composite systems is analyzed as an externally manipulated system of space partitioning and classification based on ideal enclosures and diaphragms. The diaphragms have discrete classification capabilities which are designated in relation to conserved quantities by descriptors such as impervious, diathermal, and adiabatic. Differentiability in the continuum thermodynamic calculus is invoked as equivalent to analyticity and consistency in the underlying class or sentential calculus. The seat of inference, however, rests with the thermodynamicist. In the transition to an irreversible pattern-forming system the defined nature of the composite reservoirs remains, but a given diaphragm is replaced by a pattern-forming system which by its nature is a spontaneously evolving volume partitioner and classifier of invariants. The seat of volition or inference for the classification system is thus transferred from the experimenter or theoretician to the diaphragm, and with it the full deductive facility. The equivalence relations or partitions associated with the emerging patterns may thus be associated with theorems of the natural pattern-forming calculus. The entropy function, together with its derivatives, is the vehicle which relates the logistics of reservoirs and diaphragms to the analog logistics of the continuum. Maximum path probability or second-order differentiability of the entropy in isolation are

  4. Pattern formation in quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ilki; Mahler, Günter

    1999-03-01

    We investigate the iteration of a sequence of local and pair unitary transformations (quantum gate approximation), which can be interpreted to result from a Turing-head (pseudo-spin S) rotating along a closed Turing-tape (M additional pseudo-spins). The dynamical evolution of the Bloch-vector of S, which can be decomposed into 2M primitive pure state Turing-head trajectories, gives rise to fascinating geometrical patterns reflecting the entanglement between head and tape. For specific initial states ("input"), these patterns ("output") can be easily calculated for any tape size. We thus show intuitive examples for quantum parallelism and, at the same time, means for local testing of quantum network dynamics.

  5. Femtosecond laser patterning of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Jeon, Hojeong; Hidai, Hirofumi; Hwang, David J.

    2011-03-01

    This paper aims at presenting a review of work at the Laser Thermal Laboratory on the microscopic laser modification of biological materials using ultrafast laser pulses. We have devised a new method for fabricating high aspect ratio patterns of varying height by using two-photon polymerization process in order to study contact guidance and directed growth of biological cells. Studies using NIH-3T3 and MDCK cells indicate that cell morphology on fiber scaffolds is influenced by the pattern of actin microfilament bundles. Cells experienced different strength of contact guidance depending on the ridge height. Cell morphology and motility was investigated on micronscale anisotropic cross patterns and parallel line patterns having different aspect ratios. A significant effect on cell alignment and directionality of migration was observed. Cell morphology and motility were influenced by the aspect ratio of the cross pattern, the grid size, and the ridge height. Cell contractility was examined microscopically in order to measure contractile forces generated by individual cells on self-standing fiber scaffolds.

  6. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis. PMID:26988066

  7. Pattern Formation in Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymko, Katherine

    Model colloidal particles of two types, driven in opposite directions, will in two dimensions segregate into lanes, a phenomenon studied extensively by Lowen and co-workers [Dzubiella et al. Phys. Rev. E 65, 021402 (2002)]. We have simulated mixtures of oppositely-driven particles using three numerical protocols. We find that laning results from enhanced diffusion, in the direction perpendicular to the drive, of particles surrounded by particles of the opposite type, consistent with the observation of Vissers et al. [Soft Matter 7, 6, 2352 (2011)]. By comparing protocols we find that enhanced diffusion follows from a simple geometrical constraint: oppositely-driven particles must, in the time taken to encounter each other in the direction of the drive, diffuse in the perpendicular direction by about one particle diameter. This constraint implies that the effective lateral diffusion constant grows linearly with drive speed and as the square root of the packing fraction, a prediction supported by our numerics. By invoking an analogy between hard particles with environment-dependent mobilities and mutually attractive particles we argue that there exists an equilibrium system whose pattern-forming properties are similar to those of the driven system. Katherine Klymko acknowledges support from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  8. Drumlins: A Classic Example of Pattern Formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Jeremy C.; Clark, Chris D.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Hahn, Ute; Hughes, Anna L. C.

    2014-05-01

    Drumlins are elongate streamlined hills, typically 250-1000 m long and 120-300 m wide, formed beneath ice sheets. They occur in fields or swarms, covering vast swathes of previously glaciated terrain, and are the most common variant of a continuum of subglacial bedforms. The processes of drumlin formation are currently elusive and contentious, hindering our understanding of the ice-bed interface. Yet, insight into drumlin formation can be gained through studying their spatial distribution and morphometric properties. When viewed from above, drumlins display striking regularity and self-similarity, suggesting that they form through a self-organising pattern forming process. However, the difficulty of observing drumlins forming in situ (i.e. beneath an ice sheet), and a focus upon individual drumlin forms, has hindered both the recognition and understanding of drumlin pattern formation. Hence, the nature of drumlin patterning is poorly understood, especially in comparison to bedforms generated by other geomorphic agents (e.g. dunes and ripples). To address these issues, here we analyse the morphometric properties of a large database of drumlins mapped from palaeo-ice sheet beds at a variety of geological and glaciological settings. Spatial statistical point pattern tests suggest that drumlins are regularly spaced across drumlin fields. However, defects to this regularity occur due to differences in preservation and initial formation conditions. Furthermore, drumlin morphometric parameters frequently conform to a log-normal distribution, common for phenomena which experience incremental growth or fragmentation. Hence, drumlin morphometrics can provide us with insight into how drumlin patterns have evolved. Between separate drumlin fields, variations in patterning and morphometrics vary, highlighting the response of drumlin patterning to local glaciological and geological factors. Hence, we suggest that many of the patterning principles which have been applied to other

  9. A biologically inspired model for pattern recognition*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Eduardo; Liljenström, Hans; Ruiz, Yusely; Li, Guang

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a novel bionic model and its performance in pattern recognition are presented and discussed. The model is constructed from a bulb model and a three-layered cortical model, mimicking the main features of the olfactory system. The olfactory bulb and cortex models are connected by feedforward and feedback fibers with distributed delays. The Breast Cancer Wisconsin dataset consisting of data from 683 patients divided into benign and malignant classes is used to demonstrate the capacity of the model to learn and recognize patterns, even when these are deformed versions of the originally learned patterns. The performance of the novel model was compared with three artificial neural networks (ANNs), a back-propagation network, a support vector machine classifier, and a radial basis function classifier. All the ANNs and the olfactory bionic model were tested in a benchmark study of a standard dataset. Experimental results show that the bionic olfactory system model can learn and classify patterns based on a small training set and a few learning trials to reflect biological intelligence to some extent. PMID:20104646

  10. Theory of ocular dominance pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherf, O.; Pawelzik, K.; Wolf, F.; Geisel, T.

    1999-06-01

    We investigate a general and analytically tractable model for the activity-dependent formation of neuronal connectivity patterns. Previous models are contained as limiting cases. As an important example we analyze the formation of ocular dominance patterns in the visual cortex. A linear stability analysis reveals that the model undergoes a Turing-type instability as a function of interaction range and receptive field size. The phase transitions is of second order. After the linear instability the patterns may reorganize which we analyze in terms of a potential for the dynamics. Our analysis demonstrates that the experimentally observed dependency of ocular dominance patterns on interocular correlations of visual experience during development can emerge according to two generic scenarios: either the system is driven through the phase transition during development thereby selecting and stabilizing the first unstable mode or a primary pattern reorganizes towards larger wavelength according their lower energy. Experimentally observing the time course of ocular dominance pattern formation will decide which scenario is realized in the brain.

  11. Taming contact line instability for pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Deblais, A; Harich, R; Colin, A; Kellay, H

    2016-01-01

    Coating surfaces with different fluids is prone to instability producing inhomogeneous films and patterns. The contact line between the coating fluid and the surface to be coated is host to different instabilities, limiting the use of a variety of coating techniques. Here we take advantage of the instability of a receding contact line towards cusp and droplet formation to produce linear patterns of variable spacings. We stabilize the instability of the cusps towards droplet formation by using polymer solutions that inhibit this secondary instability and give rise to long slender cylindrical filaments. We vary the speed of deposition to change the spacing between these filaments. The combination of the two gives rise to linear patterns into which different colloidal particles can be embedded, long DNA molecules can be stretched and particles filtered by size. The technique is therefore suitable to prepare anisotropic structures with variable properties. PMID:27506626

  12. Taming contact line instability for pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Deblais, A.; Harich, R.; Colin, A.; Kellay, H.

    2016-01-01

    Coating surfaces with different fluids is prone to instability producing inhomogeneous films and patterns. The contact line between the coating fluid and the surface to be coated is host to different instabilities, limiting the use of a variety of coating techniques. Here we take advantage of the instability of a receding contact line towards cusp and droplet formation to produce linear patterns of variable spacings. We stabilize the instability of the cusps towards droplet formation by using polymer solutions that inhibit this secondary instability and give rise to long slender cylindrical filaments. We vary the speed of deposition to change the spacing between these filaments. The combination of the two gives rise to linear patterns into which different colloidal particles can be embedded, long DNA molecules can be stretched and particles filtered by size. The technique is therefore suitable to prepare anisotropic structures with variable properties. PMID:27506626

  13. Taming contact line instability for pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deblais, A.; Harich, R.; Colin, A.; Kellay, H.

    2016-08-01

    Coating surfaces with different fluids is prone to instability producing inhomogeneous films and patterns. The contact line between the coating fluid and the surface to be coated is host to different instabilities, limiting the use of a variety of coating techniques. Here we take advantage of the instability of a receding contact line towards cusp and droplet formation to produce linear patterns of variable spacings. We stabilize the instability of the cusps towards droplet formation by using polymer solutions that inhibit this secondary instability and give rise to long slender cylindrical filaments. We vary the speed of deposition to change the spacing between these filaments. The combination of the two gives rise to linear patterns into which different colloidal particles can be embedded, long DNA molecules can be stretched and particles filtered by size. The technique is therefore suitable to prepare anisotropic structures with variable properties.

  14. Pattern formation in Active Polar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Hagan, Michael; Baskaran, Aparna

    2011-03-01

    Systems such as bacterial suspensions or cytoskeletal filaments and motility assays can be described within the paradigm of active polar fluids. These systems have been shown to exhibit pattern formation raging from asters and vortices to traveling stripes. A coarse-grained description of such a fluid is given by a scalar density field and a vector polarization field. We study such a macroscopic description of the system using weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical simulations to map out the emergent pattern formation as a function of the hydrodynamic parameters in the context of two specific microscopic models - a quasi-2D suspension of cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins and a system of self propelled hard rods that interact through excluded volume interactions. The authors thank the Brandeis MRSEC center for financial support.

  15. Turing pattern formation in fractional activator-inhibitor systems.

    PubMed

    Henry, B I; Langlands, T A M; Wearne, S L

    2005-08-01

    Activator-inhibitor systems of reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe pattern formation in numerous applications in biology, chemistry, and physics. The rate of diffusion in these applications is manifest in the single parameter of the diffusion constant, and stationary Turing patterns occur above a critical value of d representing the ratio of the diffusion constants of the inhibitor to the activator. Here we consider activator-inhibitor systems in which the diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion rates are manifest in both a diffusion constant and a diffusion exponent. A consideration of this problem in terms of continuous-time random walks with sources and sinks leads to a reaction-diffusion system with fractional order temporal derivatives operating on the spatial Laplacian. We have carried out an algebraic stability analysis of the homogeneous steady-state solution in fractional activator-inhibitor systems, with Gierer-Meinhardt reaction kinetics and with Brusselator reaction kinetics. For each class of reaction kinetics we identify a Turing instability bifurcation curve in the two-dimensional diffusion parameter space. The critical value of d , for Turing instabilities, decreases monotonically with the anomalous diffusion exponent between unity (standard diffusion) and zero (extreme subdiffusion). We have also carried out numerical simulations of the governing fractional activator-inhibitor equations and we show that the Turing instability precipitates the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns. If the diffusion of the activator and inhibitor have the same anomalous scaling properties, then the surface profiles of these patterns for values of d slightly above the critical value varies from smooth stationary patterns to increasingly rough and nonstationary patterns as the anomalous diffusion exponent varies from unity towards zero. If the diffusion of the activator is anomalous subdiffusion but the diffusion of the inhibitor

  16. Evaporation-Induced Pattern Formation of Decanol Droplets.

    PubMed

    Čejková, Jitka; Štěpánek, František; Hanczyc, Martin M

    2016-05-17

    Pattern formation in far-from-equilibrium systems is observed in several disciplines including biology, geophysics, and reaction-diffusion chemistry, comprising both living and nonliving systems. We aim to study such nonequilibrium dynamics on the laboratory scale with materials of simple composition. We present a novel system based on a 1-decanol droplet placed in a solution of alkaline decanoate. Previously, we showed the short time scale behavior of this system, which included chemotaxis and maze solving. Here we explore long time scale dynamics of the system (several hours) when open to the environment. We observe dramatic morphological changes in the droplet including long tentacular structures, and we analyze the morphology of these structures at both the macroscopic and microscopic scales across a large range of initial conditions. Such reproducible morphological changes in simple droplets open a path to the exploration of shape-based effects in larger-scale pattern-formation studies. PMID:27116007

  17. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  18. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  19. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  20. Dynamics and pattern formation in a cancer network with diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qianqian; Shen, Jianwei

    2015-10-01

    Diffusion is ubiquitous inside cells, and it is capable of inducing spontaneous pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems on a spatially homogeneous domain. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a diffusive cancer network regulated by microRNA and obtain the condition that the network undergoes a Hopf bifurcation and a Turing pattern bifurcation. In addition, we also develop the amplitude equation of the network model by using Taylor series expansion, multi-scaling and further expansion in powers of a small parameter. As a result of these analyses, we obtain the explicit condition on how the dynamics of the diffusive cancer network evolve. These results reveal that this system has rich dynamics, such as spotted stripe and hexagon patterns. The bifurcation diagram helps us understand the biological mechanism in the cancer network. Finally, numerical simulations confirm our analytical results.

  1. Pattern formation in drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, D.; Sobac, B.; Loquet, B.; Sampol, J.

    2011-01-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood exhibits coupled physical mechanisms, such as Marangoni flow, evaporation and wettability. The final stage of a whole blood drop evaporation reveals regular patterns with a good reproducibility for a healthy person. Other experiments on anaemic and hyperlipidemic people were performed, and different patterns were revealed. The flow motion inside the blood drop is observed and analyzed with the use of a digital camera: the influence of the red blood cells (RBCs) motion is revealed at the drop periphery as well as its consequences on the final stage of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of the dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of haematology. The blood drop evaporation process is evidenced to be driven only by Marangoni flow. The same axisymetric pattern formation is observed, and can be forecast for different blood drop diameters. The evaporation mass flux can be predicted with a good agreement, assuming only the knowledge of the colloids mass concentration.

  2. Electrically induced structure formation and pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Erik; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.; Steiner, Ullrich

    2000-02-01

    The wavelength of light represents a fundamental technological barrier to the production of increasingly smaller features on integrated circuits. New technologies that allow the replication of patterns on scales less than 100nm need to be developed if increases in computing power are to continue at the present rate. Here we report a simple electrostatic technique that creates and replicates lateral structures in polymer films on a submicrometre length scale. Our method is based on the fact that dielectric media experience a force in an electric field gradient. Strong field gradients can produce forces that overcome the surface tension in thin liquid films, inducing an instability that features a characteristic hexagonal order. In our experiments, pattern formation takes place in polymer films at elevated temperatures, and is fixed by cooling the sample to room temperature. The application of a laterally varying electric field causes the instability to be focused in the direction of the highest electric field. This results in the replication of a topographically structured electrode. We report patterns with lateral dimensions of 140nm, but the extension of the technique to pattern replication on scales smaller than 100nm seems feasible.

  3. Pattern formation during early floral development.

    PubMed

    Vaddepalli, Prasad; Scholz, Sebastian; Schneitz, Kay

    2015-06-01

    Flowers are central to sexual reproduction in plants. The study of floral development proved tremendously successful in obtaining key insight into processes, such as fate determination, pattern formation, and growth regulation. Recent advances relate to the complex mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between phytohormone signaling, cell and tissue mechanics, and regulatory gene networks that positions floral buds at the apex and directs floral specification, initiation and outgrowth. Furthermore, progress has been made in elucidating the intercellular communication and temporal coordination necessary to organize the behavior of the various functional subdomains within the young flower. PMID:25687790

  4. Regulation of Spatiotemporal Patterns by Biological Variability: General Principles and Applications to Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Grace, Miriam; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns often emerge from local interactions in a self-organizing fashion. In biology, the resulting patterns are also subject to the influence of the systematic differences between the system's constituents (biological variability). This regulation of spatiotemporal patterns by biological variability is the topic of our review. We discuss several examples of correlations between cell properties and the self-organized spatiotemporal patterns, together with their relevance for biology. Our guiding, illustrative example will be spiral waves of cAMP in a colony of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. Analogous processes take place in diverse situations (such as cardiac tissue, where spiral waves occur in potentially fatal ventricular fibrillation) so a deeper understanding of this additional layer of self-organized pattern formation would be beneficial to a wide range of applications. One of the most striking differences between pattern-forming systems in physics or chemistry and those in biology is the potential importance of variability. In the former, system components are essentially identical with random fluctuations determining the details of the self-organization process and the resulting patterns. In biology, due to variability, the properties of potentially very few cells can have a driving influence on the resulting asymptotic collective state of the colony. Variability is one means of implementing a few-element control on the collective mode. Regulatory architectures, parameters of signaling cascades, and properties of structure formation processes can be "reverse-engineered" from observed spatiotemporal patterns, as different types of regulation and forms of interactions between the constituents can lead to markedly different correlations. The power of this biology-inspired view of pattern formation lies in building a bridge between two scales: the patterns as a collective state of a very large number of cells on the one hand, and the internal

  5. Regulation of Spatiotemporal Patterns by Biological Variability: General Principles and Applications to Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Miriam; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns often emerge from local interactions in a self-organizing fashion. In biology, the resulting patterns are also subject to the influence of the systematic differences between the system’s constituents (biological variability). This regulation of spatiotemporal patterns by biological variability is the topic of our review. We discuss several examples of correlations between cell properties and the self-organized spatiotemporal patterns, together with their relevance for biology. Our guiding, illustrative example will be spiral waves of cAMP in a colony of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. Analogous processes take place in diverse situations (such as cardiac tissue, where spiral waves occur in potentially fatal ventricular fibrillation) so a deeper understanding of this additional layer of self-organized pattern formation would be beneficial to a wide range of applications. One of the most striking differences between pattern-forming systems in physics or chemistry and those in biology is the potential importance of variability. In the former, system components are essentially identical with random fluctuations determining the details of the self-organization process and the resulting patterns. In biology, due to variability, the properties of potentially very few cells can have a driving influence on the resulting asymptotic collective state of the colony. Variability is one means of implementing a few-element control on the collective mode. Regulatory architectures, parameters of signaling cascades, and properties of structure formation processes can be "reverse-engineered" from observed spatiotemporal patterns, as different types of regulation and forms of interactions between the constituents can lead to markedly different correlations. The power of this biology-inspired view of pattern formation lies in building a bridge between two scales: the patterns as a collective state of a very large number of cells on the one hand, and the internal

  6. Pattern formation in confined chemical gardens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wit, Anne; Haudin, Florence; Brau, Fabian; Cartwright, Julyan

    2014-05-01

    Chemical gardens are plant-like mineral structures first described in the seventeenth century and popularly known from chemistry sets for children. They are classically grown in three-dimensional containers by placing a solid metal-salt seed into a silicate solution. When the metal salt starts dissolving in the silicate solution, a semi-permeable membrane forms by precipitation across which water is pumped by osmosis from the silicate solution into the metal salt solution, further dissolving the salt. Above a given pressure, the membrane breaks. The dissolved metal salt solution being generally less dense than the reservoir silicate solution, it rises as a buoyant jet through the broken membrane and further precipitates in contact with the silicate solution, producing a collection of mineral forms that resemble a garden. Such gardens are the subject of increased interest as a model system to understand pattern formation in sea-ice brinicles and hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, among others. All these self-organized precipitation structures at the interface between chemistry, fluid dynamics and mechanics share indeed common chemical, mechanical and electrical properties. In this framework, we study experimentally spatial patterns resulting from the growth of chemical gardens in confined quasi-two-dimensional (2D) geometries upon radial injection of a metallic salt solution into a silicate solution in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell. We find a large variety of patterns including spirals, fingers, worms, filiform tubes, and flower-like patterns. By exploring the phase space of reactant concentrations and injection flow rates, we observe transitions between these spatio-temporal structures resulting from a coupling between the precipitation reaction, mechanical effects and hydrodynamic instabilities.

  7. Patterning and Compartment Formation in the Diencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Mallika; Li, James Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The diencephalon gives rise to structures that play an important role in connecting the anterior forebrain with the rest of the central nervous system. The thalamus is the major diencephalic derivative that functions as a relay station between the cortex and other lower order sensory systems. Almost two decades ago, neuromeric/prosomeric models were proposed describing the subdivision and potential segmentation of the diencephalon. Unlike the laminar structure of the cortex, the diencephalon is progressively divided into distinct functional compartments consisting principally of thalamus, epithalamus, pretectum, and hypothalamus. Neurons generated within these domains further aggregate to form clusters called nuclei, which form specific structural and functional units. We review the recent advances in understanding the genetic mechanisms that are involved in the patterning and compartment formation of the diencephalon. PMID:22593732

  8. Effects of patterned topography on biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Ravikumar

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a population of bacteria attached to each other and irreversibly to a surface, enclosed in a matrix of self-secreted polymers, among others polysaccharides, proteins, DNA. Biofilms cause persisting infections associated with implanted medical devices and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infections accounting for up to 40% of all hospital acquired infections. Several different strategies, including use of antibacterial agents and genetic cues, quorum sensing, have been adopted for inhibiting biofilm formation relevant to CAUTI surfaces. Each of these methods pertains to certain types of bacteria, processes and has shortcomings. Based on eukaryotic cell topography interaction studies and Ulva linza spore studies, topographical surfaces were suggested as a benign control method for biofilm formation. However, topographies tested so far have not included a systematic variation of size across basic topography shapes. In this study patterned topography was systematically varied in size and shape according to two approaches 1) confinement and 2) wetting. For the confinement approach, using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, orienting effects of tested topography based on staphylococcus aureus (s. aureus) (SH1000) and enterobacter cloacae (e. cloacae) (ATCC 700258) bacterial models were identified on features of up to 10 times the size of the bacterium. Psuedomonas aeruginosa (p. aeruginosa) (PAO1) did not show any orientational effects, under the test conditions. Another important factor in medical biofilms is the identification and quantification of phenotypic state which has not been discussed in the literature concerning bacteria topography characterizations. This was done based on antibiotic susceptibility evaluation and also based on gene expression analysis. Although orientational effects occur, phenotypically no difference

  9. Flow-driven instabilities during pattern formation of Dictyostelium discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, A.; Steinbock, O.; Zykov, V.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2015-06-01

    The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is a well known model system for the study of biological pattern formation. In the natural environment, aggregating populations of starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells may experience fluid flows that can profoundly change the underlying wave generation process. Here we study the effect of advection on the pattern formation in a colony of homogeneously distributed Dictyostelium discoideum cells described by the standard Martiel-Goldbeter model. The external flow advects the signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) downstream, while the chemotactic cells attached to the solid substrate are not transported with the flow. The evolution of small perturbations in cAMP concentrations is studied analytically in the linear regime and by corresponding numerical simulations. We show that flow can significantly influence the dynamics of the system and lead to a flow-driven instability that initiate downstream traveling cAMP waves. We also show that boundary conditions have a significant effect on the observed patterns and can lead to a new kind of instability.

  10. Chiral pattern formation in compact microbial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Kirill; Bino George, Ashish

    Chirality is ubiquitous in biology from single molecules to entire populations. Yet, we are still lacking a detailed understanding of how chiral patterns emerge from cell competition and growth, even in simple microbial colonies. Although many microbes grow as dense colonies with no apparent chirality, recent experiments with Escherichia coli have demonstrated that internal dynamics in such populations can be in fact chiral. We show that there is a unique way to extend the commonly-used reaction-diffusion models of colony growth to account for the emergent chirality. This new model connects microscopic and macroscopic chirality and explains the origin of logarithmic spirals separating different sub-populations in a colony. We also show that chirality is substantially enhanced by the cooperation among the cells at the expansion frontier. In heterogeneous populations composed of strains with different chiralities and growth rates, our model predicts a very rich set of possible dynamics. For example, different chiralities can result in either sharp boundaries between the strains or promote their intermixing depending on the preferred twisting directions of the strains.

  11. Instabilities and pattern formation in crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Several common modes of crystal growth provide particularly simple and elegant examples of spontaneous pattern formation in nature. Phenomena of interest here are those in which an advancing nonfaceted solidification front suffers an instability and subsequently reorganizes itself into a more complex mode of behavior. The purpose of this essay is to examine several such situations and, in doing this, to identify a few new theoretical ideas and a larger number of outstanding problems. The systems studied are those in which solidification is controlled entirely by a single diffusion process, either the flow of latent heat away from a moving interface or the analogous redistribution of chemical constituents. Convective effects are ignored, as are most effects of crystalline anisotropy. The linear theory of the Mullins-Sekerka instability is reviewed for simple planar and spherical cases and also for a special model of directional solidification. These techniques are then extended to the case of a freely growing dendrite, and it is shown how this analysis leads to an understanding of sidebranching and tip-splitting instabilities. A marginal-stability hypothesis is introduced; and it is argued that this intrinsically nonlinear theory, if valid, permits aone to use results of linear-stability analysis to predict dendritic growth rates. The review concludes with a discussion of nonlinear effects in directional solidication. The nonplanar, cellular interfaces which emerge in this situation have much in common with convection patterns in hydrodynamics. The cellular stability problem is discussed briefly, and some preliminary attempts to do calculations in the strongly nonlinear regime are summarized.

  12. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  13. Cooperativity To Increase Turing Pattern Space for Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is hard to bridge the gap between mathematical formulations and biological implementations of Turing patterns, yet this is necessary for both understanding and engineering these networks with synthetic biology approaches. Here, we model a reaction–diffusion system with two morphogens in a monostable regime, inspired by components that we recently described in a synthetic biology study in mammalian cells.1 The model employs a single promoter to express both the activator and inhibitor genes and produces Turing patterns over large regions of parameter space, using biologically interpretable Hill function reactions. We applied a stability analysis and identified rules for choosing biologically tunable parameter relationships to increase the likelihood of successful patterning. We show how to control Turing pattern sizes and time evolution by manipulating the values for production and degradation relationships. More importantly, our analysis predicts that steep dose–response functions arising from cooperativity are mandatory for Turing patterns. Greater steepness increases parameter space and even reduces the requirement for differential diffusion between activator and inhibitor. These results demonstrate some of the limitations of linear scenarios for reaction–diffusion systems and will help to guide projects to engineer synthetic Turing patterns. PMID:25122550

  14. Pattern formation in a sandpile of ternary granular mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Suetsugu, Yuki; Hiroshige, Ryoma; Hirano, Takeru; Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2015-06-01

    Pattern formation in a sandpile is investigated by pouring a ternary mixture of grains into a vertical narrow cell. Size segregation in avalanches causes the formation of patterns. Four kinds of patterns emerge: stratification, segregation, upper stratification-lower segregation, and upper segregation-lower stratification. A phase diagram is constructed in a parameter space of θ(11)/θ(33) and θ(22)/θ(33), where θ(11),θ(22), and θ(33) are the repose angles of small, intermediate, and large grains, respectively. To qualitatively understand pattern formation, a phenomenological model based on a roll-or-stay rule is proposed. A similar pattern formation is found in a numerical simulation of the phenomenological model. These results suggest that the ratios of the repose angles of three kinds of grains are important for pattern formation in a sandpile. PMID:26172703

  15. Pattern formation in a sandpile of ternary granular mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Suetsugu, Yuki; Hiroshige, Ryoma; Hirano, Takeru; Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2015-06-01

    Pattern formation in a sandpile is investigated by pouring a ternary mixture of grains into a vertical narrow cell. Size segregation in avalanches causes the formation of patterns. Four kinds of patterns emerge: stratification, segregation, upper stratification-lower segregation, and upper segregation-lower stratification. A phase diagram is constructed in a parameter space of θ11/θ33 and θ22/θ33 , where θ11,θ22 , and θ33 are the repose angles of small, intermediate, and large grains, respectively. To qualitatively understand pattern formation, a phenomenological model based on a roll-or-stay rule is proposed. A similar pattern formation is found in a numerical simulation of the phenomenological model. These results suggest that the ratios of the repose angles of three kinds of grains are important for pattern formation in a sandpile.

  16. Temporal control of self-organized pattern formation without morphogen gradients in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Stephen; Li, Bochong; Cao, Yangxiaolu; Schaeffer, David; Ryser, Marc D; You, Lingchong

    2013-01-01

    Diverse mechanisms have been proposed to explain biological pattern formation. Regardless of their specific molecular interactions, the majority of these mechanisms require morphogen gradients as the spatial cue, which are either predefined or generated as a part of the patterning process. However, using Escherichia coli programmed by a synthetic gene circuit, we demonstrate here the generation of robust, self-organized ring patterns of gene expression in the absence of an apparent morphogen gradient. Instead of being a spatial cue, the morphogen serves as a timing cue to trigger the formation and maintenance of the ring patterns. The timing mechanism enables the system to sense the domain size of the environment and generate patterns that scale accordingly. Our work defines a novel mechanism of pattern formation that has implications for understanding natural developmental processes. PMID:24104480

  17. Pattern-formation mechanisms in motility mutants of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Starruß, Jörn; Peruani, Fernando; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Bär, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Formation of spatial patterns of cells is a recurring theme in biology and often depends on regulated cell motility. Motility of the rod-shaped cells of the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus depends on two motility machineries, type IV pili (giving rise to S-motility) and the gliding motility apparatus (giving rise to A-motility). Cell motility is regulated by occasional reversals. Moving M. xanthus cells can organize into spreading colonies or spore-filled fruiting bodies, depending on their nutritional status. To ultimately understand these two pattern-formation processes and the contributions by the two motility machineries, as well as the cell reversal machinery, we analyse spatial self-organization in three M. xanthus strains: (i) a mutant that moves unidirectionally without reversing by the A-motility system only, (ii) a unidirectional mutant that is also equipped with the S-motility system, and (iii) the wild-type that, in addition to the two motility systems, occasionally reverses its direction of movement. The mutant moving by means of the A-engine illustrates that collective motion in the form of large moving clusters can arise in gliding bacteria owing to steric interactions of the rod-shaped cells, without the need of invoking any biochemical signal regulation. The two-engine strain mutant reveals that the same phenomenon emerges when both motility systems are present, and as long as cells exhibit unidirectional motion only. From the study of these two strains, we conclude that unidirectional cell motion induces the formation of large moving clusters at low and intermediate densities, while it results in vortex formation at very high densities. These findings are consistent with what is known from self-propelled rod models, which strongly suggests that the combined effect of self-propulsion and volume exclusion interactions is the pattern-formation mechanism leading to the observed phenomena. On the other hand, we learn that when cells occasionally reverse

  18. Pattern formation in a gene network model with boundary shape dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diambra, Luis; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano

    2006-03-01

    A fundamental task in developmental biology is to identify the mechanisms which drive morphogenesis. Traditionally pattern formation have been modeled mainly using Turing-type mechanisms, where complex patterns arise by symmetry breaking. However, there is a growing experimental evidence that the influence of signals derived from surrounding tissues can contribute to the patterning processes. In this paper, we show that the interplay between the shape of surrounding tissues and a hierarchically organized gene regulatory network can be able to induce stable complex patterns. The rise of these patterns depends strongly on the shape of the surrounding tissues.

  19. Pattern formation in a gene network model with boundary shape dependence.

    PubMed

    Diambra, Luis; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2006-03-01

    A fundamental task in developmental biology is to identify the mechanisms which drive morphogenesis. Traditionally pattern formation have been modeled mainly using Turing-type mechanisms, where complex patterns arise by symmetry breaking. However, there is a growing experimental evidence that the influence of signals derived from surrounding tissues can contribute to the patterning processes. In this paper, we show that the interplay between the shape of surrounding tissues and a hierarchically organized gene regulatory network can be able to induce stable complex patterns. The rise of these patterns depends strongly on the shape of the surrounding tissues. PMID:16605568

  20. Chemical Pattern Formation in Far-From Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John Evan

    The diffusive instability was proposed as a mechanism for pattern formation in chemical systems, in the context of biological morphogenesis, by Alan Turing in 1952. The instability gives rise to a chemical pattern with an intrinsic "chemical wavelength" that is independent of the system size. Since 1952, the diffusive instability, or Turing bifurcation, has been invoked to explain pattern formation in a variety of fields. To date there has been no unambiguous observation of such an instability. Model studies of the instability are usually carried out on systems containing two variables. Such works do not address issues that are of fundamental importance in experimental studies. How does one go about finding Turing bifurcations in systems with many parameters and for which the chemical kinetics are only partially known? What is the chemical wavelength? Turing bifurcations cannot occur in systems with all diffusion coefficients exactly equal. How unequal must the diffusion coefficients be for a system to undergo a Turing bifurcation?. Reacting and diffusing systems obey a partial -differential equation which is a sum of a diffusion term and a reaction term. Dropping the diffusion term results in an ordinary differential equation describing the reaction kinetics in a well-mixed system. In this dissertation it is shown that, for systems with an arbitrary number of variables, Turing bifurcations can occur with diffusion coefficients arbitrarily close to equal, provided the corresponding well-mixed system is sufficiently close to a point of coalescence of Hopf and saddle-node bifurcations. Since the bifurcation set can be obtained directly from experiments, one does not need a detailed microscopic theory of the reaction kinetics. Similarly, the chemical wavelength can be estimated from experimental measurements without knowledge of the reaction kinetics.

  1. Non-Linear Pattern Formation in Bone Growth and Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here – chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) – which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of “group intelligence” exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called “particle swarm optimization” (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating “socially” in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or “feedback” between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the

  2. Non-linear pattern formation in bone growth and architecture.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here - chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) - which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of "group intelligence" exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called "particle swarm optimization" (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating "socially" in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or "feedback" between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the emergent

  3. Pattern formation by a moving morphogen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zartman, Jeremiah J.; Cheung, Lily S.; Niepielko, Matthew G.; Bonini, Christine; Haley, Benjamin; Yakoby, Nir; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2011-08-01

    During Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis, the follicular epithelium that envelops the germline cyst gives rise to an elaborate eggshell, which houses the future embryo and mediates its interaction with the environment. A prominent feature of the eggshell is a pair of dorsal appendages, which are needed for embryo respiration. Morphogenesis of this structure depends on broad, a zinc-finger transcription factor, regulated by the EGFR pathway. While much has been learned about the mechanisms of broad regulation by EGFR, current understanding of processes that shape the spatial pattern of broad expression is incomplete. We propose that this pattern is defined by two different phases of EGFR activation: an early, posterior-to-anterior gradient of EGFR signaling sets the posterior boundary of broad expression, while the anterior boundary is set by a later phase of EGFR signaling, distributed in a dorsoventral gradient. This model can explain the wild-type pattern of broad in D. melanogaster, predicts how this pattern responds to genetic perturbations, and provides insight into the mechanisms driving diversification of eggshell patterning. The proposed model of the broad expression pattern can be used as a starting point for the quantitative analysis of a large number of gene expression patterns in Drosophila oogenesis.

  4. Pattern formation in flowing electrorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    von Pfeil, Karl; Graham, Michael D; Klingenberg, Daniel J; Morris, Jeffrey F

    2002-05-01

    A two-fluid continuum model is developed to describe mass transport in electro- and magnetorheological suspensions. The particle flux is related to the field-induced stresses. Solutions of the resulting mass balance show column formation in the absence of flow, and stripe formation when a suspension is subjected simultaneously to an applied electric field and shear flow. PMID:12005727

  5. Cellular pattern formation in circular domains.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Antonio; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.; Gorman, Michael; Robbins, Kay A.

    1997-09-01

    An analysis of stationary and nonstationary cellular patterns observed in premixed flames on a circular, porous plug burner is presented. A phenomenological model is introduced, that exhibits patterns similar to the experimental states. The primary modes of the model are combinations of Fourier-Bessel functions, whose radial parts have neighboring zeros. This observation explains several features of patterns, such as the existence of concentric rings of cells and the weak coupling between rings. Properties of rotating rings of cells, including the existence of modulated rotations and heteroclinic cycles can be deduced using mode coupling. For nonstationary patterns, the modal decomposition of experimental data can be carried out using the Karhunen-Loeve (KL) analysis. Experimental states are used to demonstrate the possibility of using KL analysis to differentiate between uniform and nonuniform rotations. The methodology can be extended to study more complicated nonstationary patterns. In particular, it is shown how the complexity of "hopping states" can be unraveled through the analysis. (c) 1997 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779674

  6. Pattern Formation in Growing Polar Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M.; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2013-03-01

    We analyze a continuum model of a bacterial suspension that includes motility suppression from steric repulsion, polar alignment, and bacteria reproduction and death. Using a combination of linear stability analysis and numerical solution of the nonlinear equations, we demonstrate that the model exhibits a rich variety of emergent structures, corresponding to generic patterns seen in experiments. Motility suppression in a crowded environment gives rise to a density phase separation, regulated by the growth/death of the bacteria, as demonstrated earlier by Cates et al. [PNAS 107, 11715-11720(2010)], with spherically symmetric patterns similar to those observed in S. typhimurium. The addition of polar alignment yields new ring/band and swirl/spiral structures resembling those observed in E.coli colonies. The stationary/traveling nature of the patterns and their symmetry is classified and summarized in a phase diagram. This work was supported by the NSF through grant DMR-1004789.

  7. Pattern formation exhibited by biofilm formation within microfluidic chambers.

    PubMed

    Cogan, N G; Donahue, M R; Whidden, Mark; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-05-01

    This article investigates the dynamics of an important bacterial pathogen, Xylella fastidiosa, within artificial plant xylem. The bacterium is the causative agent of a variety of diseases that strike fruit-bearing plants including Pierce's disease of grapevine. Biofilm colonization within microfluidic chambers was visualized in a laboratory setting, showing robust, regular spatial patterning. We also develop a mathematical model, based on a multiphase approach that is able to capture the spacing of the pattern and points to the role of the exopolymeric substance as the main source of control of the pattern dynamics. We concentrate on estimating the attachment/detachment processes within the chamber because these are two mechanisms that have the potential to be engineered by applying various chemicals to prevent or treat the disease. PMID:23663829

  8. Pattern Formation Exhibited by Biofilm Formation within Microfluidic Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, N.G.; Donahue, M.R.; Whidden, Mark; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the dynamics of an important bacterial pathogen, Xylella fastidiosa, within artificial plant xylem. The bacterium is the causative agent of a variety of diseases that strike fruit-bearing plants including Pierce’s disease of grapevine. Biofilm colonization within microfluidic chambers was visualized in a laboratory setting, showing robust, regular spatial patterning. We also develop a mathematical model, based on a multiphase approach that is able to capture the spacing of the pattern and points to the role of the exopolymeric substance as the main source of control of the pattern dynamics. We concentrate on estimating the attachment/detachment processes within the chamber because these are two mechanisms that have the potential to be engineered by applying various chemicals to prevent or treat the disease. PMID:23663829

  9. Characteristics of pattern formation and evolution in approximations of Physarum transport networks.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Most studies of pattern formation place particular emphasis on its role in the development of complex multicellular body plans. In simpler organisms, however, pattern formation is intrinsic to growth and behavior. Inspired by one such organism, the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, we present examples of complex emergent pattern formation and evolution formed by a population of simple particle-like agents. Using simple local behaviors based on chemotaxis, the mobile agent population spontaneously forms complex and dynamic transport networks. By adjusting simple model parameters, maps of characteristic patterning are obtained. Certain areas of the parameter mapping yield particularly complex long term behaviors, including the circular contraction of network lacunae and bifurcation of network paths to maintain network connectivity. We demonstrate the formation of irregular spots and labyrinthine and reticulated patterns by chemoattraction. Other Turing-like patterning schemes were obtained by using chemorepulsion behaviors, including the self-organization of regular periodic arrays of spots, and striped patterns. We show that complex pattern types can be produced without resorting to the hierarchical coupling of reaction-diffusion mechanisms. We also present network behaviors arising from simple pre-patterning cues, giving simple examples of how the emergent pattern formation processes evolve into networks with functional and quasi-physical properties including tensionlike effects, network minimization behavior, and repair to network damage. The results are interpreted in relation to classical theories of biological pattern formation in natural systems, and we suggest mechanisms by which emergent pattern formation processes may be used as a method for spatially represented unconventional computation. PMID:20067403

  10. Adolescent Sleep Patterns: Biological, Social, and Psychological Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carskadon, Mary A., Ed.

    Noting that healthy, adequate sleep fosters longevity and the optimal use of waking hours, and that adolescents, although rarely included in previous studies of sleep, are among the most sleep-deprived populations, this book explores the genesis and development of sleep patterns during adolescence, including biological and cultural factors that…

  11. Formation and control of Turing patterns in a coherent quantum fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ardizzone, Vincenzo; Lewandowski, Przemyslaw; Luk, M. H.; Tse, Y. C.; Kwong, N. H.; Lücke, Andreas; Abbarchi, Marco; Baudin, Emmanuel; Galopin, Elisabeth; Bloch, Jacqueline; Lemaitre, Aristide; Leung, P. T.; Roussignol, Philippe; Binder, Rolf; Tignon, Jerome; Schumacher, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Nonequilibrium patterns in open systems are ubiquitous in nature, with examples as diverse as desert sand dunes, animal coat patterns such as zebra stripes, or geographic patterns in parasitic insect populations. A theoretical foundation that explains the basic features of a large class of patterns was given by Turing in the context of chemical reactions and the biological process of morphogenesis. Analogs of Turing patterns have also been studied in optical systems where diffusion of matter is replaced by diffraction of light. The unique features of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities allow us to go one step further and to study Turing patterns in an interacting coherent quantum fluid. We demonstrate formation and control of these patterns. We also demonstrate the promise of these quantum Turing patterns for applications, such as low-intensity ultra-fast all-optical switches. PMID:24145394

  12. Formation and control of Turing patterns in a coherent quantum fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardizzone, Vincenzo; Lewandowski, Przemyslaw; Luk, M. H.; Tse, Y. C.; Kwong, N. H.; Lücke, Andreas; Abbarchi, Marco; Baudin, Emmanuel; Galopin, Elisabeth; Bloch, Jacqueline; Lemaitre, Aristide; Leung, P. T.; Roussignol, Philippe; Binder, Rolf; Tignon, Jerome; Schumacher, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Nonequilibrium patterns in open systems are ubiquitous in nature, with examples as diverse as desert sand dunes, animal coat patterns such as zebra stripes, or geographic patterns in parasitic insect populations. A theoretical foundation that explains the basic features of a large class of patterns was given by Turing in the context of chemical reactions and the biological process of morphogenesis. Analogs of Turing patterns have also been studied in optical systems where diffusion of matter is replaced by diffraction of light. The unique features of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities allow us to go one step further and to study Turing patterns in an interacting coherent quantum fluid. We demonstrate formation and control of these patterns. We also demonstrate the promise of these quantum Turing patterns for applications, such as low-intensity ultra-fast all-optical switches.

  13. Dendrites, viscous fingers, and the theory of pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of pattern formation in dendritic crystal growth and viscous fingering in fluids are reviewed. Consideration is given to the discovery that weak capillary forces act as singular perturbations which lead to selection mechanisms in dendritic crystal growth and fingering patterns. Other topics include the conventional thermodynamic model of the solidification of a pure substance from its melt, fingering instability, pattern selection, the solvability theory, dendritic growth rates, the bubble effect discovered by Couder et al. (1986), the dynamics of pattern-forming systems, and snowflake formation.

  14. Annular gel reactor for chemical pattern formation

    DOEpatents

    Nosticzius, Zoltan; Horsthemke, Werner; McCormick, William D.; Swinney, Harry L.; Tam, Wing Y.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an annular gel reactor suitable for the production and observation of spatiotemporal patterns created during a chemical reaction. The apparatus comprises a vessel having at least a first and second chamber separated one from the other by an annular polymer gel layer (or other fine porous medium) which is inert to the materials to be reacted but capable of allowing diffusion of the chemicals into it.

  15. Hypoxic adipocytes pattern early heterotopic bone formation.

    PubMed

    Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth; Gannon, Francis H; Ozen, Mustafa; Ittmann, Michael M; Gugala, Zbigniew; Hipp, John A; Moran, Kevin M; Fouletier-Dilling, Christine M; Schumara-Martin, Shannon; Lindsey, Ronald W; Heggeness, Michael H; Brenner, Malcolm K; Davis, Alan R

    2007-02-01

    The factors contributing to heterotopic ossification, the formation of bone in abnormal soft-tissue locations, are beginning to emerge, but little is known about microenvironmental conditions promoting this often devastating disease. Using a murine model in which endochondral bone formation is triggered in muscle by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), we studied changes near the site of injection of BMP2-expressing cells. As early as 24 hours later, brown adipocytes began accumulating in the lesional area. These cells stained positively for pimonidazole and therefore generated hypoxic stress within the target tissue, a prerequisite for the differentiation of stem cells to chondrocytes and subsequent heterotopic bone formation. We propose that aberrant expression of BMPs in soft tissue stimulates production of brown adipocytes, which drive the early steps of heterotopic endochondral ossification by lowering oxygen tension in adjacent tissue, creating the correct environment for chondrogenesis. Results in misty gray lean mutant mice not producing brown fat suggest that white adipocytes convert into fat-oxidizing cells when brown adipocytes are unavailable, providing a compensatory mechanism for generation of a hypoxic microenvironment. Manipulation of the transcriptional control of adipocyte fate in local soft-tissue environments may offer a means to prevent or treat development of bone in extraskeletal sites. PMID:17255330

  16. Quantification of layered patterns with structural anisotropy: a comparison of biological and geological systems.

    PubMed

    Smolyar, I; Bromage, T; Wikelski, M

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale patterns evident from satellite images of aeolian landforms on Earth and other planets; those of intermediate scale in marine and terrestrial sand ripples and sediment profiles; and small-scale patterns such as lamellae in the bones of vertebrates and annuli in fish scales are each represented by layers of different thicknesses and lengths. Layered patterns are important because they form a record of the state of internal and external factors that regulate pattern formation in these geological and biological systems. It is therefore potentially possible to recognize trends, periodicities, and events in the history of the formation of these systems among the incremental sequences. Though the structures and sizes of these 2-D patterns are typically scale-free, they are also characteristically anisotropic; that is, the number of layers and their absolute thicknesses vary significantly during formation. The aim of the present work is to quantify the structure of layered patterns and to reveal similarities and differences in the processing and interpretation of layered landforms and biological systems. To reach this goal we used N-partite graph and Boolean functions to quantify the structure of layers and plot charts for "layer thickness vs. layer number" and "layer area vs. layer number". These charts serve as a source of information about events in the history of formation of layered systems. The concept of synchronization of layer formation across a 2-D plane is introduced to develop the procedure for plotting "layer thickness vs. layer number" and "layer area vs. layer number", which takes into account the structural anisotropy of layered patterns and increase signal-to-noise ratio in charts. Examples include landforms on Mars and Earth and incremental layers in human and iguana bones. PMID:27441261

  17. Pattern formation in quantum Turing machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ilki; Mahler, Günter

    1999-07-01

    We investigate the iteration of a sequence of local and pair unitary transformations, which can be interpreted to result from a Turing-head (pseudospin S) rotating along a closed Turing tape (M additional pseudospins). The dynamical evolution of the Bloch vector of S, which can be decomposed into 2M primitive pure state Turing-head trajectories, gives rise to fascinating geometrical patterns reflecting the entanglement between head and tape. These machines thus provide intuitive examples for quantum parallelism and, at the same time, means for local testing of quantum network dynamics.

  18. Pattern formation and coarsening in crystalline membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Daniel A.; Pezzutti, Aldo D.

    2011-03-01

    We study through a Brazovskii-Helfrich Hamiltonian the process of defect formation, annealing and coarsening of two dimensional crystalline membranes. In good agreement with the cosmological model of Kibble and Zurek, proposed to determine the density of topological defects at the onset of a symmetry breaking phase transition, we found that the collision of orientationally uncorrelated domains produces a structure of grains with an average density of topological defects controlled by the temperature of the quench. The strain field of the dislocations and disclinations generated during the phase separation process can induce the buckling of the membrane, slowing down the Lifshitz-Safran mechanism of coarsening observed in flat systems.

  19. Turing pattern formation in the Brusselator system with nonlinear diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, G.; Lombardo, M. C.; Sammartino, M.; Sciacca, V.

    2013-10-01

    In this work we investigate the effect of density-dependent nonlinear diffusion on pattern formation in the Brusselator system. Through linear stability analysis of the basic solution we determine the Turing and the oscillatory instability boundaries. A comparison with the classical linear diffusion shows how nonlinear diffusion favors the occurrence of Turing pattern formation. We study the process of pattern formation both in one-dimensional and two-dimensional spatial domains. Through a weakly nonlinear multiple scales analysis we derive the equations for the amplitude of the stationary patterns. The analysis of the amplitude equations shows the occurrence of a number of different phenomena, including stable supercritical and subcritical Turing patterns with multiple branches of stable solutions leading to hysteresis. Moreover, we consider traveling patterning waves: When the domain size is large, the pattern forms sequentially and traveling wave fronts are the precursors to patterning. We derive the Ginzburg-Landau equation and describe the traveling front enveloping a pattern which invades the domain. We show the emergence of radially symmetric target patterns, and, through a matching procedure, we construct the outer amplitude equation and the inner core solution.

  20. Spatial pattern formation in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Graham M.; Kritter, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Clustered ventilation defects are a hallmark of asthma, typically seen via imaging studies during asthma attacks. The mechanisms underlying the formation of these clusters is of great interest in understanding asthma. Because the clusters vary from event to event, many researchers believe they occur due to dynamic, rather than structural, causes. To study the formation of these clusters, we formulate and analyze a lattice-based model of the lung, considering both the role of airway bistability and a mechanism for organizing the spatial structure. Within this model we show how and why the homogeneous ventilation solution becomes unstable, and under what circumstances the resulting heterogeneous solution is a clustered solution. The size of the resulting clusters is shown to arise from structure of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system, admitting not only clustered solutions but also (aphysical) checkerboard solutions. We also consider the breathing efficiency of clustered solutions in severely constricted lungs, showing that stabilizing the homogeneous solution may be advantageous in some circumstances. Extensions to hexagonal and cubic lattices are also studied. PMID:24810407

  1. Instability-induced pattern formation of photoactivated functional polymers

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Antonio; Maddalena, Pasqualino; Schenker, Iwan; Spolenak, Ralph; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Turing on the formation principles of animal coat patterns [Turing AM (1952) Phil Trans R Soc Lond B 237(641):37–72], such as the stripes of a tiger, great effort has been made to understand and explain various phenomena of self-assembly and pattern formation. Prominent examples are the spontaneous demixing in emulsions, such as mixtures of water and oil [Herzig EM, et al. (2007) Nat Mater 6:966–971]; the distribution of matter in the universe [Kibble TWB (1976) J Phys A: Math Gen 9(8):1387]; surface reconstruction in ionic crystals [Clark KW, et al. (2012) Nanotechnol 23(18):185306]; and the pattern formation caused by phase transitions in metal alloys, polymer mixtures and binary Bose–Einstein condensates [Sabbatini J, et al. (2011) Phys Rev Lett 107:230402]. Photoactivated pattern formation in functional polymers has attracted major interest due to its potential applications in molecular electronics and photoresponsive systems. Here we demonstrate that photoactivated pattern formation on azobenzene-containing polymer films can be entirely explained by the physical concept of phase separation. Using experiments and simulations, we show that phase separation is caused by an instability created by the photoactivated transitions between two immiscible states of the polymer. In addition, we have shown in accordance with theory, that polarized light has a striking effect on pattern formation indicated by enhanced phase separation. PMID:25404346

  2. Instability-induced pattern formation of photoactivated functional polymers.

    PubMed

    Galinski, Henning; Ambrosio, Antonio; Maddalena, Pasqualino; Schenker, Iwan; Spolenak, Ralph; Capasso, Federico

    2014-12-01

    Since the pioneering work of Turing on the formation principles of animal coat patterns [Turing AM (1952) Phil Trans R Soc Lond B 237(641):37-72], such as the stripes of a tiger, great effort has been made to understand and explain various phenomena of self-assembly and pattern formation. Prominent examples are the spontaneous demixing in emulsions, such as mixtures of water and oil [Herzig EM, et al. (2007) Nat Mater 6:966-971]; the distribution of matter in the universe [Kibble TWB (1976) J Phys A: Math Gen 9(8):1387]; surface reconstruction in ionic crystals [Clark KW, et al. (2012) Nanotechnol 23(18):185306]; and the pattern formation caused by phase transitions in metal alloys, polymer mixtures and binary Bose-Einstein condensates [Sabbatini J, et al. (2011) Phys Rev Lett 107:230402]. Photoactivated pattern formation in functional polymers has attracted major interest due to its potential applications in molecular electronics and photoresponsive systems. Here we demonstrate that photoactivated pattern formation on azobenzene-containing polymer films can be entirely explained by the physical concept of phase separation. Using experiments and simulations, we show that phase separation is caused by an instability created by the photoactivated transitions between two immiscible states of the polymer. In addition, we have shown in accordance with theory, that polarized light has a striking effect on pattern formation indicated by enhanced phase separation. PMID:25404346

  3. Using ILP to Identify Pathway Activation Patterns in Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Neaves, Samuel R; Millard, Louise A C; Tsoka, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    We show a logical aggregation method that, combined with propositionalization methods, can construct novel structured biological features from gene expression data. We do this to gain understanding of pathway mechanisms, for instance, those associated with a particular disease. We illustrate this method on the task of distinguishing between two types of lung cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and Adenocarcinoma (AC). We identify pathway activation patterns in pathways previously implicated in the development of cancers. Our method identified a model with comparable predictive performance to the winning algorithm of a recent challenge, while providing biologically relevant explanations that may be useful to a biologist. PMID:27478883

  4. Lateral inhibition-induced pattern formation controlled by the size and geometry of the cell.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-09-01

    Pattern formation in development biology is one of the fundamental processes by which cells change their functions. It is based on the communication of cells via intra- and intercellular dynamics of biochemicals. Thus, the cell is directly involved in biochemical interactions. However, many theoretical approaches describing biochemical pattern formation have usually neglected the cell's role or have simplified the subcellular process without considering cellular aspects despite the cell being the environment where biochemicals interact. On the other hand, recent experimental observations suggest that a change in the physical conditions of cell-to-cell contact can result in a change in cell fate and tissue patterning in a lateral inhibition system. Here we develop a mathematical model by which biochemical dynamics can be directly observed with explicitly expressed cell structure and geometry in higher dimensions, and reconsider pattern formation by lateral inhibition of the Notch-Delta signaling pathway. We explore how the physical characteristic of cell, such as cell geometry or size, influences the biochemical pattern formation in a multi-cellular system. Our results suggest that a property based on cell geometry can be a novel mechanism for symmetry breaking inducing cell asymmetry. We show that cell volume can critically influence cell fate determination and pattern formation at the tissue level, and the surface area of the cell-to-cell contact can directly affect the spatial range of patterning. PMID:27229622

  5. The relationship between growth and pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Susan V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Successful development depends on the creation of spatial gradients of transcription factors within developing fields, and images of graded distributions of gene products populate the pages of developmental biology journals. Therefore the challenge is to understand how the graded levels of intracellular transcription factors are generated across fields of cells. We propose that transcription factor gradients are generated as a result of an underlying gradient of cell cycle lengths. Very long cell cycles will permit accumulation of a high level of a gene product encoded by a large transcription unit, whereas shorter cell cycles will permit progressively fewer transcripts to be completed due to gating of transcription by the cell cycle. We also propose that the gradients of cell cycle lengths are generated by gradients of extracellular morphogens/growth factors. The model of cell cycle gated transcriptional regulation brings focus back to the functional role of morphogens as cell cycle regulators, and proposes a specific and testable mechanism by which morphogens, in their roles as growth factors (how they were originally discovered), also determine cell fate. PMID:27499882

  6. Pattern Formation in Spatially Discrete Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Vicenç; Fedotov, Sergei; Horsthemke, Werner

    The preceding chapters have dealt with the spatiotemporal behavior of spatially continuous systems. We now turn our attention to the dynamical behavior and stability properties of spatially discrete systems. A wide variety of phenomena in chemistry, biology, physics, and other fields involve the coupling between nonlinear, discrete units. Examples include arrays of Josephson junctions, chains of coupled diode resonators, coupled chemical or biochemical reactors, myelinated nerve fibers, neuronal networks, and patchy ecosystems. Such networks of coupled nonlinear units often combine dynamical and structural complexity [422]. Cells in living tissues, for example, are arranged in a variety of geometries. One-dimensional rings of cells were already considered by Turing [440]. Other types of lattices, such as open-ended linear arrays, tubes, rectangular and hexagonal arrays, and irregular arrangements in two or three dimensions are also found, see for example [5]. Cells interact with adjacent cells in various distinct ways. For example, signaling between cells may occur via diffusion through gap junctions [352, 230] or by membrane-bound proteins, juxtacrine signaling [339, 340, 471].

  7. Optimal Vortex Formation as a Unifying Principle in Biological Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharib, Morteza

    2004-11-01

    The dynamics of vortex formation in starting flows are governed by limiting physical processes that have been observed in experiments and numerical simulations. For several years it has been suggested that the principles of optimal vortex ring formation discovered in the laboratory might also occur naturally in biological systems. Pulsed-jet swimming (e.g. squid and jellyfish) and cardiac blood transport are among the most commonly cited examples of systems which could benefit from a strategy of optimal vortex ring formation. However, previous efforts to quantify the biological mechanisms of vortex formation have encountered difficulties in resolving the effects of transient boundary conditions such as valve and orifice motion. We have combined new vortex generation techniques with in vivo measurements to determine the effects of time-dependent boundary conditions on vortex formation by starting-flow propulsors. Results indicate that vortex formation across various biological systems is manipulated by these kinematics in order to maximize thrust and/or propulsive efficiency. Hence, it is important to include these effects in realistic models of the bio-fluid mechanics. We also examine possible extension of these results to organisms that generate more complex vortical structures, such as fishes and birds. An emphasis on observed vortex dynamics and transient boundary conditions facilitates quantitative comparisons across propulsion schemes irrespective of their individual biological functions.

  8. The formation of labyrinths, spots and stripe patterns in a biochemical approach to cardiovascular calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, A.; Tintut, Y.; Demer, L. L.; Garfinkel, A.

    2008-05-01

    Calcification and mineralization are fundamental physiological processes, yet the mechanisms of calcification, in trabecular bone and in calcified lesions in atherosclerotic calcification, are unclear. Recently, it was shown in in vitro experiments that vascular-derived mesenchymal stem cells can display self-organized calcified patterns. These patterns were attributed to activator/inhibitor dynamics in the style of Turing, with bone morphogenetic protein 2 acting as an activator, and matrix GLA protein acting as an inhibitor. Motivated by this qualitative activator-inhibitor dynamics, we employ a prototype Gierer-Meinhardt model used in the context of activator-inhibitor-based biological pattern formation. Through a detailed analysis in one and two spatial dimensions, we explore the pattern formation mechanisms of steady state patterns, including their dependence on initial conditions. These patterns range from localized holes to labyrinths and localized peaks, or in other words, from dense to sparse activator distributions (respectively). We believe that an understanding of the wide spectrum of activator-inhibitor patterns discussed here is prerequisite to their biochemical control. The mechanisms of pattern formation suggest therapeutic strategies applicable to bone formation in atherosclerotic lesions in arteries (where it is pathological) and to the regeneration of trabecular bone (recapitulating normal physiological development).

  9. The formation of labyrinths, spots and stripe patterns in a biochemical approach to cardiovascular calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, A.; Tintut, Y.; Demer, L. L.; Garfinkel, A.

    2008-05-01

    Calcification and mineralization are fundamental physiological processes, yet the mechanisms of calcification, in trabecular bone and in calcified lesions in atherosclerotic calcification, are unclear. Recently, it was shown in in vitro experiments that vascular-derived mesenchymal stem cells can display self-organized calcified patterns. These patterns were attributed to activator/inhibitor dynamics in the style of Turing, with bone morphogenetic protein 2 acting as an activator, and matrix GLA protein acting as an inhibitor. Motivated by this qualitative activator inhibitor dynamics, we employ a prototype Gierer Meinhardt model used in the context of activator inhibitor-based biological pattern formation. Through a detailed analysis in one and two spatial dimensions, we explore the pattern formation mechanisms of steady state patterns, including their dependence on initial conditions. These patterns range from localized holes to labyrinths and localized peaks, or in other words, from dense to sparse activator distributions (respectively). We believe that an understanding of the wide spectrum of activator inhibitor patterns discussed here is prerequisite to their biochemical control. The mechanisms of pattern formation suggest therapeutic strategies applicable to bone formation in atherosclerotic lesions in arteries (where it is pathological) and to the regeneration of trabecular bone (recapitulating normal physiological development).

  10. Geological pattern formation by growth and dissolution in aqueous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin

    2010-03-01

    Although many geological processes take place on time scales that are very long compared with the human experience, essentially all geological processes, fast or slow, are far from equilibrium processes. Surprisingly often, geological processes lead to the formation of quite simple and distinctive patterns, which hint at an underlying simplicity in many complex geological systems.. The ability to predict the seasons was critically important to early human society, and Halley’s prediction of the return of the comet that bears his name is still considered to be a scientific milestone. Spatial patterns have also attracted attention because of their aesthetic appeal, which depends in subtle ways on a combination of regularity and irregularity. In recent decades, rapid growth in the capabilities of digital computers has facilitated the simulation of pattern formation processes, and computer simulations have become an important tool for evaluating theoretical concepts and for scientific discovery. Computer technology in combination with other technologies such as high resolution digital cameras, scanning microprobes (atomic force microscopy AFM), confocal microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), for example) has facilitated the quantitative characterization of patterns over a wide range of scales and has enabled rapid advances in our ability to understand the links between large scale pattern formation and microscopic processes. The ability to quantitatively characterize patterns is important because it enables a more rigorous comparison between the predictions of computer models and real world patterns and their formation.In some cases, the idea that patterns with a high degree of regularity have simple origins appears to be justified, but in other cases, such as the formation of almost perfectly circular stone rings due to freeze-thaw cycles simple patterns appear to be the consequence of quite complex processes. In other cases, it has been shown that

  11. Optical pattern formation with a two-level nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camara, A.; Kaiser, R.; Labeyrie, G.; Firth, W. J.; Oppo, G.-L.; Robb, G. R. M.; Arnold, A. S.; Ackemann, T.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of spontaneous pattern formation in the transverse section of a single retroreflected laser beam passing through a cloud of cold rubidium atoms. In contrast to previously investigated systems, the nonlinearity at work here is that of a two-level atom, which realizes the paradigmatic situation considered in many theoretical studies of optical pattern formation. In particular, we are able to observe the disappearance of the patterns at high intensity due to the intrinsic saturable character of two-level atomic transitions.

  12. Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Alexander A.; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A.

    Nano-science and nano-technology are rapidly developing scientific and technological areas that deal with physical, chemical and biological processes that occur on nano-meter scale -- one millionth of a millimeter. Self-organization and pattern formation play crucial role on nano-scales and promise new, effective routes to control various nano-scales processes. This book contains lecture notes written by the lecturers of the NATO Advanced Study Institute "Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems" that took place in St Etienne de Tinee, France, in the fall 2004.

  13. Pattern formation and morphology transitions in bacterial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arouh, Scott

    Bacteria grown on a semi-solid agar surface have been observed to form branching, chiral, and ring patterns as the colony envelope propagates outward. We model transitions between the branching and chiral patterns, analyze the effect of directed bacterial motion (chemotaxis) on the branching instability, and analyze a model for ring generation. Our model for transitions between branching and chiral patterns is a variant of Ben-Jacob's Communicating Walkers Models. We demonstrate that arbitrarily small nucleation regions of the new phase may be sufficient for the transformation to proceed. We also illustrate the phase transformations with plots of the colony envelope velocities as a function of environmental parameters. Based on the appearance of simulated colony patterns, we propose that experimentally observed global morphology transitions may be the result of single genetic mutations, and we predict biological values for the corresponding mutation rate. Our analysis of the effect of chemotaxis on a branching instability starts with an existing model for a branching instability. This instability is fundamentally caused by the need for limited nutrient to diffuse towards the colony. We add to this model the effect of bacteria moving chemotactically in response to the nutrient gradient. Our results show that this additional effect has a tendency to suppress the instability. Although we perform our calculations within the context of a simple "cutoff" model of colony dynamics, we expect our results to apply for more complex and hence more realistic approaches. We also analyze a model proposed by Medvedev, Kaper, and Kopell for ring formation. We perform a linear stability calculation for the model equations and find critical spatial decay rates to stability, but we later find that these are not relevant to the ring generation mechanism. By observing numerical bacterial density profiles near the colony edge, we identify a consolidation front distinct from the colony

  14. Predicting spiral wave patterns from cell properties in a model of biological self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geberth, Daniel; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2008-09-01

    In many biological systems, biological variability (i.e., systematic differences between the system components) can be expected to outrank statistical fluctuations in the shaping of self-organized patterns. In principle, the distribution of single-element properties should thus allow predicting features of such patterns. For a mathematical model of a paradigmatic and well-studied pattern formation process, spiral waves of cAMP signaling in colonies of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, we explore this possibility and observe a pronounced anticorrelation between spiral waves and cell properties (namely, the firing rate) and particularly a clustering of spiral wave tips in regions devoid of spontaneously firing (pacemaker) cells. Furthermore, we observe local inhomogeneities in the distribution of spiral chiralities, again induced by the pacemaker distribution. We show that these findings can be explained by a simple geometrical model of spiral wave generation.

  15. Patterning and characterization of surfaces with organic and biological molecules by the scanning electrochemical microscope.

    PubMed

    Turyan, I; Matsue, T; Mandler, D

    2000-08-01

    A novel approach for micropatterning of surfaces with organic and biological microstructures using the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) is described. The approach is based on the introduction of the spatial resolution by local deposition of gold particles followed by monolayer formation and functionalization. Specifically, gold patterns were deposited locally on silicon wafers with the SECM as a result of the controlled anodic dissolution of a gold microelectrode. The gold patterns were further used as microsubstrates for assembling cystamine monolayers to which either fluoresceine isothiocyanate (FIT) or glucose oxidase (GOD) were covalently attached. Characterization of the organic monolayers, as well as the biological activity of the enzyme patterns, was carried out by fluorescence microscopy and the SECM, respectively. PMID:10952523

  16. Pattern formation in a minimal model of continuum dislocation plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The spontaneous emergence of heterogeneous dislocation patterns is a conspicuous feature of plastic deformation and strain hardening of crystalline solids. Despite long-standing efforts in the materials science and physics of defect communities, there is no general consensus regarding the physical mechanism which leads to the formation of dislocation patterns. In order to establish the fundamental mechanism, we formulate an extremely simplified, minimal model to investigate the formation of patterns based on the continuum theory of fluxes of curved dislocations. We demonstrate that strain hardening as embodied in a Taylor-type dislocation density dependence of the flow stress, in conjunction with the structure of the kinematic equations that govern dislocation motion under the action of external stresses, is already sufficient for the formation of dislocation patterns that are consistent with the principle of similitude.

  17. Neural pattern formation in networks with dendritic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, P. C.; De Souza, B.

    1998-04-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a recently proposed model of neural pattern formation that is based on the combined effect of diffusion along a neuron's dendritic tree and recurrent interactions along axo-dendritic synaptic connections. For concreteness, we consider a one-dimensional array of analog neurons with the dendritic tree idealized as a one-dimensional cable. Linear stability analysis and bifurcation theory together with numerical simulations are used to establish conditions for the onset of a Turing instability leading to the formation of stable spatial patterns of network output activity. It is shown that the presence of dendritic structure can induce dynamic (time-periodic) spatial pattern formation. Moreover, correlations between the dendritic location of a synapse and the relative positions of neurons in the network are shown to result in spatially oscillating patterns of activity along the dendrites of each neuron.

  18. Trapping and patterning of biological objects using photovoltaic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubera, M.; Elvira, I.; García-Cabañes, A.; Bella, J. L.; Carrascosa, M.

    2016-01-01

    Photovoltaic tweezers are a recently proposed technique for manipulation and patterning of micro- and nano-objects. It is based in the dielectrophoretic forces associated to the electric fields induced by illumination of certain ferroelectrics due to the bulk photovoltaic effect. The technique has been applied to the patterning of dielectric and metal micro- and nano-particles. In this work, we report the use of photovoltaic tweezers to pattern biological objects on LiNbO3:Fe. Specifically, spores and pollen grains and their nanometric fragments have been trapped and patterned. 1D and 2D arrangements have been achieved by deposition in air or from a hexane suspension. The quality of patterns obtained with nanometric fragments is even better than previous results using photovoltaic tweezers with inorganic micro- and nano-particles. In fact, 1D patterns with a period of 2 μm, almost half of the minimum reported period achieved with photovoltaic tweezers, have been obtained with pollen fragments.

  19. Pattern Formation in Drying Drops of Polystyrene/Water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    We study the pattern formation and the evaporation dynamics of drying drops of polystyrene/water based nanofluids with concentrations ranging from 0.01% to 6%. Cracks formation is evidenced to depend on the nanoparticles concentration. The dynamics of evaporation is recorded using an electronic balance with an accuracy of 10 μg. A top view recording enables to analyze the pattern formation in relation with the mass evolution. We determine several key parameters such as the time of evaporation, the wetting diameter, the final solid deposition diameter, the number and the spacing of the cracks. We evidence a ring formation above a critical concentration. We evidenced by change of the surrounding humidity in the range of 10 to 90% that this pattern remains constant. The pattern formation is influenced by the liquid phase evaporation dynamics but only depends on the concentration in nanoparticles. These results are of great interest regarding the formation of droplets in several areas such as inkjet printing, pharmacology...

  20. Cortical instability drives periodic supracellular actin pattern formation in epithelial tubes.

    PubMed

    Hannezo, Edouard; Dong, Bo; Recho, Pierre; Joanny, Jean-François; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2015-07-14

    An essential question of morphogenesis is how patterns arise without preexisting positional information, as inspired by Turing. In the past few years, cytoskeletal flows in the cell cortex have been identified as a key mechanism of molecular patterning at the subcellular level. Theoretical and in vitro studies have suggested that biological polymers such as actomyosin gels have the property to self-organize, but the applicability of this concept in an in vivo setting remains unclear. Here, we report that the regular spacing pattern of supracellular actin rings in the Drosophila tracheal tubule is governed by a self-organizing principle. We propose a simple biophysical model where pattern formation arises from the interplay of myosin contractility and actin turnover. We validate the hypotheses of the model using photobleaching experiments and report that the formation of actin rings is contractility dependent. Moreover, genetic and pharmacological perturbations of the physical properties of the actomyosin gel modify the spacing of the pattern, as the model predicted. In addition, our model posited a role of cortical friction in stabilizing the spacing pattern of actin rings. Consistently, genetic depletion of apical extracellular matrix caused strikingly dynamic movements of actin rings, mirroring our model prediction of a transition from steady to chaotic actin patterns at low cortical friction. Our results therefore demonstrate quantitatively that a hydrodynamical instability of the actin cortex can trigger regular pattern formation and drive morphogenesis in an in vivo setting. PMID:26077909

  1. Cortical instability drives periodic supracellular actin pattern formation in epithelial tubes

    PubMed Central

    Hannezo, Edouard; Dong, Bo; Recho, Pierre; Joanny, Jean-François; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    An essential question of morphogenesis is how patterns arise without preexisting positional information, as inspired by Turing. In the past few years, cytoskeletal flows in the cell cortex have been identified as a key mechanism of molecular patterning at the subcellular level. Theoretical and in vitro studies have suggested that biological polymers such as actomyosin gels have the property to self-organize, but the applicability of this concept in an in vivo setting remains unclear. Here, we report that the regular spacing pattern of supracellular actin rings in the Drosophila tracheal tubule is governed by a self-organizing principle. We propose a simple biophysical model where pattern formation arises from the interplay of myosin contractility and actin turnover. We validate the hypotheses of the model using photobleaching experiments and report that the formation of actin rings is contractility dependent. Moreover, genetic and pharmacological perturbations of the physical properties of the actomyosin gel modify the spacing of the pattern, as the model predicted. In addition, our model posited a role of cortical friction in stabilizing the spacing pattern of actin rings. Consistently, genetic depletion of apical extracellular matrix caused strikingly dynamic movements of actin rings, mirroring our model prediction of a transition from steady to chaotic actin patterns at low cortical friction. Our results therefore demonstrate quantitatively that a hydrodynamical instability of the actin cortex can trigger regular pattern formation and drive morphogenesis in an in vivo setting. PMID:26077909

  2. Physical Mechanisms of Pattern Formation in the Early Chick Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balter, Ariel; Glazier, James; Zaitlen, Benji; Chaplain, Mark; Weijer, Cornelis

    2007-03-01

    Gastrulation marks a critical step in early embryogenesis when the first recognizable patterns are laid down. Although the genome maintains ultimate responsibility for this pattern formation, it cannot actually control the organization of individual cells. The robustness of embryogenic pattern formation suggests that a few simple, physical mechanisms are unleashed and that self-organization results. We perform numerical simulations of early chick gastrulation using an agent based method in which individual cells interact via a handful of behaviors including adhesivity, secretion and chemotaxis. Through these simulations we have identified certain behaviors as being important for various stages and morphological events. For instance, experimental results on primitive streak formation are best reproduced by a model in which the Kohler's Sickle secretes a chemo repellant for streak tip cells, and cell polarization appears to be important for initiating polonaise motion during streak elongation.

  3. Pattern formation via intermittence from microscopic deterministic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Marco; Escaff, Daniel; Finger, Ricardo

    2012-05-01

    We propose a one-dimensional lattice model, inspired by population dynamics interaction. The model combines a variable coupling range with the Allee effect. The system is capable of exhibiting pattern formation that is similar to what occurs in similar continuous models for population dynamics. However, the formation features are quite different; in this case the pattern emerges from a disorder state via intermittence. We analytically estimated the selected wavelength of the formed pattern and numerically studied fluctuations around the mean wavelength. We also comment on the relationship between intermittence and the edge of chaos as well as sensitivity to initial conditions. Next, we present an analytical prediction of the influence of the world size on the intermittent regime which is in good agreement with the numerical observations. Moreover, the last calculation provided us an alternative way to compute the pattern wavelength. Finally, we discuss the continuous limit of our lattice model.

  4. Pattern Formation in Nature: What Could Be Behind It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkre, V. M.

    2012-10-01

    Pattern formation in nature is a ubiquitous and fascinating phenomenon. A simple description will be given of one possible mechanism among many: spatial nonlocality in competitive interactions [1-2]. A tutorial explanation will be presented of random walks or diffusion, then of the logistic equation, then of their combination to produce the Fisher equation, and finally of a generalization of the Fisher equation with spatial nonlocality which is capable of producing patterns. The role of diffusion in the pattern formation process will be discussed with possibilities of a remarkable shape shifting consequence of controlled motion that we have discovered recently [3].[4pt] [1] Nonlocal Interaction Effects on Pattern Formation in Population Dynamics, M. A. Fuentes, M. N. Kuperman, and V.M. Kenkre: Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 158104-1 (2003).[2] Analytical Considerations in the Study of Spatial Patterns Arising from Nonlocal Interaction Effects, M. A. Fuentes, M. Kuperman, and V. M. Kenkre: J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 10505-10508(2004).[3] Shape Shifting in Patterns Produced by Control of Diffusion: Theoretical Considerations, M. Kuperman and V. M. Kenkre, Consortium Preprint, UNM (2012).

  5. Biological agent detection and identification using pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jerome J.; Glina, Yan; Judson, Nicholas; Transue, Kevin D.

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses a novel approach for the automatic identification of biological agents. The essence of the approach is a combination of gene expression, microarray-based sensing, information fusion, machine learning and pattern recognition. Integration of these elements is a distinguishing aspect of the approach, leading to a number of significant advantages. Amongst them are the applicability to various agent types including bacteria, viruses, toxins, and other, ability to operate without the knowledge of a pathogen's genome sequence and without the need for bioagent-speciific materials or reagents, and a high level of extensibility. Furthermore, the approach allows detection of uncatalogued agents, including emerging pathogens. The approach offers a promising avenue for automatic identification of biological agents for applications such as medical diagnostics, bioforensics, and biodefense.

  6. Spongiosa Primary Development: A Biochemical Hypothesis by Turing Patterns Formations

    PubMed Central

    López-Vaca, Oscar Rodrigo; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We propose a biochemical model describing the formation of primary spongiosa architecture through a bioregulatory model by metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is assumed that MMP13 regulates cartilage degradation and the VEGF allows vascularization and advances in the ossification front through the presence of osteoblasts. The coupling of this set of molecules is represented by reaction-diffusion equations with parameters in the Turing space, creating a stable spatiotemporal pattern that leads to the formation of the trabeculae present in the spongy tissue. Experimental evidence has shown that the MMP13 regulates VEGF formation, and it is assumed that VEGF negatively regulates MMP13 formation. Thus, the patterns obtained by ossification may represent the primary spongiosa formation during endochondral ossification. Moreover, for the numerical solution, we used the finite element method with the Newton-Raphson method to approximate partial differential nonlinear equations. Ossification patterns obtained may represent the primary spongiosa formation during endochondral ossification. PMID:23193429

  7. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and multicellular sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. All of these processes yield emergent patterns, thus endothelial cells can form an interconnected structure autonomously, without guidance from an external pre-pattern. PMID:23857825

  8. Cortical Folding Pattern and its Consistency Induced by Biological Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jalil Razavi, Mir; Zhang, Tuo; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-01-01

    Cortical folding, characterized by convex gyri and concave sulci, has an intrinsic relationship to the brain’s functional organization. Understanding the mechanism of the brain’s convoluted patterns can provide useful clues into normal and pathological brain function. In this paper, the cortical folding phenomenon is interpreted both analytically and computationally, and, in some cases, the findings are validated with experimental observations. The living human brain is modeled as a soft structure with a growing outer cortex and inner core to investigate its developmental mechanism. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into critical growth ratios for instability and crease formation of the developing brain. Since the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution of cortical complex convolution after instability, non-linear finite element models are employed to study the crease formation and secondary morphological folds of the developing brain. Results demonstrate that the growth ratio of the cortex to core of the brain, the initial thickness, and material properties of both cortex and core have great impacts on the morphological patterns of the developing brain. Lastly, we discuss why cortical folding is highly correlated and consistent by presenting an intriguing gyri-sulci formation comparison. PMID:26404042

  9. Cortical Folding Pattern and its Consistency Induced by Biological Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalil Razavi, Mir; Zhang, Tuo; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-09-01

    Cortical folding, characterized by convex gyri and concave sulci, has an intrinsic relationship to the brain’s functional organization. Understanding the mechanism of the brain’s convoluted patterns can provide useful clues into normal and pathological brain function. In this paper, the cortical folding phenomenon is interpreted both analytically and computationally, and, in some cases, the findings are validated with experimental observations. The living human brain is modeled as a soft structure with a growing outer cortex and inner core to investigate its developmental mechanism. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into critical growth ratios for instability and crease formation of the developing brain. Since the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution of cortical complex convolution after instability, non-linear finite element models are employed to study the crease formation and secondary morphological folds of the developing brain. Results demonstrate that the growth ratio of the cortex to core of the brain, the initial thickness, and material properties of both cortex and core have great impacts on the morphological patterns of the developing brain. Lastly, we discuss why cortical folding is highly correlated and consistent by presenting an intriguing gyri-sulci formation comparison.

  10. How does tidal flow affect pattern formation in mussel beds?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Mackenzie, Julia J

    2016-10-01

    In the Wadden Sea, mussel beds self-organise into spatial patterns consisting of bands parallel to the shore. A leading explanation for this phenomenon is that mussel aggregation reduces losses from dislodgement and predation, because of the adherence of mussels to one another. Previous mathematical modelling has shown that this can lead to spatial patterning when it is coupled to the advection from the open sea of algae-the main food source for mussels in the Wadden Sea. A complicating factor in this process is that the advection of algae will actually oscillate with the tidal flow. This has been excluded from previous modelling studies, and the present paper concerns the implications of this oscillation for pattern formation. The authors initially consider piecewise constant ("square-tooth") oscillations in advection, which enables analytical investigation of the conditions for pattern formation. They then build on this to study the more realistic case of sinusoidal oscillations. Their analysis shows that future research on the details of pattern formation in mussel beds will require an in-depth understanding of how the tides affect long-range inhibition among mussels. PMID:27343625

  11. Pattern formation in miniature: the female gametophyte of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Venkatesan; Alandete-Saez, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Plant reproduction involves gamete production by a haploid generation, the gametophyte. For flowering plants, a defining characteristic in the evolution from the 'naked-seed' plants, or gymnosperms, is a reduced female gametophyte, comprising just seven cells of four different types--a microcosm of pattern formation and gamete specification about which only little is known. However, several genes involved in the differentiation, fertilization and post-fertilization functions of the female gametophyte have been identified and, recently, the morphogenic activity of the plant hormone auxin has been found to mediate patterning and egg cell specification. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the pattern formation, maternal effects and evolution of this essential unit of plant reproduction. PMID:20040485

  12. Pattern formation in wet granular matter under vertical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Butzhammer, Lorenz; Völkel, Simeon; Rehberg, Ingo; Huang, Kai

    2015-07-01

    Experiments on a thin layer of cohesive wet granular matter under vertical vibrations reveal kink-separated domains that collide with the container at different phases. Due to the strong cohesion arising from the formation of liquid bridges between adjacent particles, the domains move collectively upon vibrations. Depending on the periodicity of this collective motion, the kink fronts may propagate, couple with each other, and form rotating spiral patterns in the case of period tripling or stay as standing wave patterns in the case of period doubling. Moreover, both patterns may coexist with granular "gas bubbles"-phase separation into a liquidlike and a gaslike state. Stability diagrams for the instabilities measured with various granular layer mass m and container height H are presented. The onsets for both types of patterns and their dependency on m and H can be quantitatively captured with a model considering the granular layer as a single particle colliding completely inelastically with the container. PMID:26274155

  13. Wavenumber Locking And Pattern Formation In Spatially Forced Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud; Manor, Rotem

    2008-01-01

    We study wavenumber locking and pattern formation resulting from weak spatially periodic one-dimensional forcing of two-dimensional systems. We consider systems that support stationary or traveling stripe patterns in the absence of the forcing, and assume that the one-dimensional forcing is aligned with the direction of the stripe patterns. When the forcing wavenumber is about twice as large as the wavenumber of the unforced system we find that the forcing can either select or stabilize a resonant stripe solution at half the forcing wavenumber, or create a new resonant solution. When the wavenumber mismatch is high we find that the wave-vector component of the pattern in the direction of the forcing can stilI lock at half the forcing wavenumber, but a wave-vector component in the orthogonal direction develops to compensate for the total wavenumber. As a result stationary two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns form. When the unforced system supports traveling waves resonant rectangular patterns remain stationary but the oblique patterns travel in a direction orthogonal to the traveling-waves.

  14. Perspective: network-guided pattern formation of neural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Kaiser, Marcus; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2014-10-01

    The understanding of neural activity patterns is fundamentally linked to an understanding of how the brain's network architecture shapes dynamical processes. Established approaches rely mostly on deviations of a given network from certain classes of random graphs. Hypotheses about the supposed role of prominent topological features (for instance, the roles of modularity, network motifs or hierarchical network organization) are derived from these deviations. An alternative strategy could be to study deviations of network architectures from regular graphs (rings and lattices) and consider the implications of such deviations for self-organized dynamic patterns on the network. Following this strategy, we draw on the theory of spatio-temporal pattern formation and propose a novel perspective for analysing dynamics on networks, by evaluating how the self-organized dynamics are confined by network architecture to a small set of permissible collective states. In particular, we discuss the role of prominent topological features of brain connectivity, such as hubs, modules and hierarchy, in shaping activity patterns. We illustrate the notion of network-guided pattern formation with numerical simulations and outline how it can facilitate the understanding of neural dynamics. PMID:25180302

  15. Dynamic phases, pinning, and pattern formation for driven dislocation assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-23

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Lastly, our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems.

  16. Dynamic phases, pinning, and pattern formation for driven dislocation assemblies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-23

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Lastly, our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation andmore » dynamics in these systems.« less

  17. Boundary-layer model of pattern formation in solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1984-01-01

    A model of pattern formation in crystal growth is proposed, and its analytic properties are investigated. The principal dynamical variables in this model are the curvature of the solidification front and the thickness (or heat content) of a thermal boundary layer, both taken to be functions of position along the interface. This model is mathematically much more tractable than the realistic, fully nonlocal version of the free-boundary problem, and still recaptures many of the features that seem essential for studying dendritic behavior, for example. Preliminary numerical solutions produce snowflakelike patterns similar to those seen in nature.

  18. Controlling Pattern Formation in Nanoparticle Assemblies via Directed Solvent Dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher P.; Blunt, Matthew O.; Pauliac-Vaujour, Emmanuelle; Stannard, Andrew; Moriarty, Philip; Vancea, Ioan; Thiele, Uwe

    2007-09-01

    We have achieved highly localized control of pattern formation in two-dimensional nanoparticle assemblies by direct modification of solvent dewetting dynamics. A striking dependence of nanoparticle organization on the size of atomic force microscope-generated surface heterogeneities is observed and reproduced in numerical simulations. Nanoscale features induce a rupture of the solvent-nanoparticle film, causing the local flow of solvent to carry nanoparticles into confinement. Microscale heterogeneities instead slow the evaporation of the solvent, producing a remarkably abrupt interface between different nanoparticle patterns.

  19. Controlling pattern formation in nanoparticle assemblies via directed solvent dewetting.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher P; Blunt, Matthew O; Pauliac-Vaujour, Emmanuelle; Stannard, Andrew; Moriarty, Philip; Vancea, Ioan; Thiele, Uwe

    2007-09-14

    We have achieved highly localized control of pattern formation in two-dimensional nanoparticle assemblies by direct modification of solvent dewetting dynamics. A striking dependence of nanoparticle organization on the size of atomic force microscope-generated surface heterogeneities is observed and reproduced in numerical simulations. Nanoscale features induce a rupture of the solvent-nanoparticle film, causing the local flow of solvent to carry nanoparticles into confinement. Microscale heterogeneities instead slow the evaporation of the solvent, producing a remarkably abrupt interface between different nanoparticle patterns. PMID:17930453

  20. Dynamic Phases, Pinning, and Pattern Formation for Driven Dislocation Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-01

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems. PMID:25613839

  1. Dynamic Phases, Pinning, and Pattern Formation for Driven Dislocation Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-01

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems.

  2. Nonequilibrium breakdown of a correlated insulator through pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Pedro; Antipov, Andrey E.; Rubtsov, Alexey N.

    2016-04-01

    We study the breakdown of an interaction-induced insulator under an imposed bias voltage. A rich voltage-temperature phase diagram is found that contains phases with a spatially patterned charge gap. Nonequilibrium conditions are shown to be able to change the antiferromagnetic nature of the equilibrium correlations. Above a threshold voltage, smaller than the charge gap, the formation of patterns occurs together with the emergence of midgap states yielding a finite conductance. We discuss the experimental implications of this proposed scenario for the breakdown of the insulating state.

  3. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E

    2015-12-18

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns. PMID:26722949

  4. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  5. Patterned Plasmonic Nanoparticle Arrays for Microfluidic and Multiplexed Biological Assays.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Boegli, Michelle; Bruzas, Ian; Lum, William; Sagle, Laura

    2015-11-17

    For applications ranging from medical diagnostics and drug screening to chemical and biological warfare detection, inexpensive, rapid-readout, portable devices are required. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) technologies show substantial promise toward meeting these goals, but the generation of portable, multiplexed and/or microfluidic devices incorporating sensitive nanoparticle arrays is only in its infancy. Herein, we have combined photolithography with Hole Mask Colloidal lithography to pattern uniform nanoparticle arrays for both microfluidic and multiplexed devices. The first proof-of-concept study is carried out with 5- and 7-channel microfluidic devices to acquire one-shot binding curves and protein binding kinetic data. The second proof-of-concept study involved the fabrication of a 96-spot plate that can be inserted into a standard plate reader for the multiplexed detection of protein binding. This versatile fabrication technique should prove useful in next generation chips for bioassays and genetic screening. PMID:26494412

  6. Femtosecond Laser Patterning of the Biopolymer Chitosan for Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Estevam-Alves, Regina; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique Dias; Coatrini, Andrey C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Mendonca, Cleber Renato

    2016-01-01

    Controlling microbial growth is crucial for many biomedical, pharmaceutical and food industry applications. In this paper, we used a femtosecond laser to microstructure the surface of chitosan, a biocompatible polymer that has been explored for applications ranging from antimicrobial action to drug delivery. The influence of energy density on the features produced on chitosan was investigated by optical and atomic force microscopies. An increase in the hydrophilic character of the chitosan surface was attained upon laser micromachining. Patterned chitosan films were used to observe Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilm formation, revealing an increase in the biofilm formation in the structured regions. Our results indicate that fs-laser micromachining is an attractive option to pattern biocompatible surfaces, and to investigate basic aspects of the relationship between surface topography and bacterial adhesion. PMID:27548153

  7. Femtosecond Laser Patterning of the Biopolymer Chitosan for Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Estevam-Alves, Regina; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique Dias; Coatrini, Andrey C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Mendonca, Cleber Renato

    2016-01-01

    Controlling microbial growth is crucial for many biomedical, pharmaceutical and food industry applications. In this paper, we used a femtosecond laser to microstructure the surface of chitosan, a biocompatible polymer that has been explored for applications ranging from antimicrobial action to drug delivery. The influence of energy density on the features produced on chitosan was investigated by optical and atomic force microscopies. An increase in the hydrophilic character of the chitosan surface was attained upon laser micromachining. Patterned chitosan films were used to observe Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilm formation, revealing an increase in the biofilm formation in the structured regions. Our results indicate that fs-laser micromachining is an attractive option to pattern biocompatible surfaces, and to investigate basic aspects of the relationship between surface topography and bacterial adhesion. PMID:27548153

  8. Modeling in pattern formation with applications to electrochemical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam G.

    In this work, we examine pattern formation as a generic phenomenon as well as its occurrence in electrochemical systems. First, a global feedback control of pattern formation in a wide class of systems described by the Swift-Hohenberg (SH) equation is investigated theoretically, by means of stability analysis and numerical simulations. Two cases are considered: (i) feedback control of the competition between hexagon and roll patterns described by a supercritical SH equation, and (ii) the use of feedback control to suppress the blow-up in a system described by a subcritical SH equation. In case (i), it is shown that feedback control can change the hexagon and roll stability regions in the parameter space as well as cause a transition from up- to down-hexagons and stabilize a skewed (mixed mode) hexagonal pattern. In case (ii), it is demonstrated that feedback control can suppress blow-up and lead to the formation of spatially-localized patterns in the weakly nonlinear regime. The effects of a delayed feedback are also investigated for both cases, and it is shown that delay can induce temporal oscillations as well as blow-up. Next, pattern formation resulting from the self-organization of porous nanostructures in anodic metal oxide is considered. Two possible mechanisms are proposed: (i) elastic stress caused by electrostrictive effects, and (ii) electrochemical transport of oxygen ions within the oxide layer. In each case, a mathematical model is developed which also incorporates the chemical reactions at the metal-oxide and oxide-electrolyte interfaces. It is then shown through linear stability analysis that a short-wave instability exists in certain parameter regimes for both cases which can lead to the formation of hexagonally ordered pores observed in anodized aluminum oxide. Numerical simulations of case (ii) validate these results. Finally, we consider the self-organization of intercalating particles within crystals induced by spinodal decomposition and the

  9. Influence of cell-to-cell variability on spatial pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Greese, B; Wester, K; Bensch, R; Ronneberger, O; Timmer, J; Huulskamp, M; Fleck, C

    2012-08-01

    Many spatial patterns in biology arise through differentiation of selected cells within a tissue, which is regulated by a genetic network. This is specified by its structure, parameterisation and the noise on its components and reactions. The latter, in particular, is not well examined because it is rather difficult to trace. The authors use suitable local mathematical measures based on the Voronoi diagram of experimentally determined positions of epidermal plant hairs (trichomes) to examine the variability or noise in pattern formation. Although trichome initiation is a highly regulated process, the authors show that the experimentally observed trichome pattern is substantially disturbed by cell-to-cell variations. Using computer simulations, they find that the rates concerning the availability of the protein complex that triggers trichome formation plays a significant role in noise-induced variations of the pattern. The focus on the effects of cell noise yields further insights into pattern formation of trichomes. The authors expect that similar strategies can contribute to the understanding of other differentiation processes by elucidating the role of naturally occurring fluctuations in the concentration of cellular components or their properties. PMID:23039695

  10. Pattern formation during the CO-oxidation involving subsurface oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotermund, Harm Hinrich; Pollmann, Michael; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2002-03-01

    This paper focuses on subsurface oxygen and its influence on pattern formation during CO-oxidation on platinum surfaces. For the observation of spatiotemporal pattern formation during catalytic reactions the photoelectron emission microscope (PEEM) has proven to be an excellent real-time imaging instrument, capable of tracking local work function changes. The existence of subsurface oxygen on platinumlike surfaces has been extensively discussed and for palladium its presence has been clearly established during rate oscillations. Subsurface oxygen is defined at this point as an atomic O species located directly underneath the uppermost metal crystal layer; its dipole moment therefore considerably lowers the work function of the surface. Here we review some of the investigations involving subsurface oxygen, focusing on the role subsurface oxygen might play in pattern formation during CO-oxidation on platinum. We will also present some new results, where this species clearly interacts with chemisorbed oxygen under restrictions by boundary conditions on the Pt(110) single crystal. These previously (through microlithography) constructed domain boundaries on the surface are made out of Rh or Pd, and they are acting as an additional source of CO molecules for the Pt surface.

  11. Spatial Pattern of Biological Soil Crust with Fractal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Abelardo; Florentino, Adriana; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Soil surface characteristics are subjected to changes driven by several interactions between water, air, biotic and abiotic components. One of the examples of such interactions is provided through biological soil crusts (BSC) in arid and semi-arid environments. BSC are communities composed of cyanobacteria, fungi, mosses, lichens, algae and liverworts covering the soil surface and play an important role in ecosystem functioning. The characteristics and formation of these BSC influence the soil hydrological balance, control the mass of eroded sediment, increase stability of soil surface, and influence plant productivity through the modification of nitrogen and carbon cycle. This study focus on characterize the spatial arrangements of the BSC based on image analysis and fractal concepts. To this end, RGB images of different types of biological soil crust where taken, each image corresponding to an area of 3.6 cm2 with a resolution of 1024x1024 pixels. For each image and channel, mass dimension and entropy were calculated. Preliminary results indicate that fractal methods are useful to describe changes associated to different types of BSC. Further research is necessary to apply these methodologies to several situations.

  12. Spontaneous Pattern Formation in an Antiferromagnetic Quantum Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kronjaeger, Jochen; Bongs, Kai; Becker, Christoph; Soltan-Panahi, Parvis; Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-08-27

    In this Letter we report on the spontaneous formation of surprisingly regular periodic magnetic patterns in an antiferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The structures evolve within a quasi-one-dimensional BEC of {sup 87}Rb atoms on length scales of a millimeter with typical periodicities of 20...30 {mu}m, given by the spin healing length. We observe two sets of characteristic patterns which can be controlled by an external magnetic field. We identify these patterns as linearly unstable modes within a mean-field approach and calculate their mode structure as well as time and energy scales, which we find to be in good agreement with observations. These investigations open new prospects for controlled studies of symmetry breaking and complex quantum magnetism in bulk BEC.

  13. Capillary-mediated interface perturbations: Deterministic pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.

    2016-09-01

    Leibniz-Reynolds analysis identifies a 4th-order capillary-mediated energy field that is responsible for shape changes observed during melting, and for interface speed perturbations during crystal growth. Field-theoretic principles also show that capillary-mediated energy distributions cancel over large length scales, but modulate the interface shape on smaller mesoscopic scales. Speed perturbations reverse direction at specific locations where they initiate inflection and branching on unstable interfaces, thereby enhancing pattern complexity. Simulations of pattern formation by several independent groups of investigators using a variety of numerical techniques confirm that shape changes during both melting and growth initiate at locations predicted from interface field theory. Finally, limit cycles occur as an interface and its capillary energy field co-evolve, leading to synchronized branching. Synchronous perturbations produce classical dendritic structures, whereas asynchronous perturbations observed in isotropic and weakly anisotropic systems lead to chaotic-looking patterns that remain nevertheless deterministic.

  14. Pattern formation gains interest in the Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durant, Dolores G.

    A huge diversity of intricate patterns can be found in our environment, ranging from zoned crystals, sand ripples, and columnar basalts to multiringed meteorite impact craters.Fundamental concepts of pattern formation in the Earth sciences can be traced back through time from Jean Perrin to Mandelbrot, and their studies of the lengths of coastlines. Similar concepts of fractal dimensions, multifractals, and diffusion-limited aggregation models can be applied to the study of many phenomena including the random walk of molecules in gases and liquids, avalanche dynamics, three-dimensional basin modeling, salt tectonics, and the spontaneous self-organization of sand grains. The largest terrestrial pattern is that of the Earth itself, forming from an undifferentiated solar dust cloud into the well-organized Earth of today (P. Ortoleva).

  15. A Model of Filamentous Cyanobacteria Leading to Reticulate Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tamulonis, Carlos; Kaandorp, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena, has been shown to produce reticulate patterns that are thought to be the result of its gliding motility. Similar fossilized structures found in the geological record constitute some of the earliest signs of life on Earth. It is difficult to tie these fossils, which are billions of years old, directly to the specific microorganisms that built them. Identifying the physicochemical conditions and microorganism properties that lead microbial mats to form macroscopic structures can lead to a better understanding of the conditions on Earth at the dawn of life. In this article, a cell-based model is used to simulate the formation of reticulate patterns in cultures of Pseudanabaena. A minimal system of long and flexible trichomes capable of gliding motility is shown to be sufficient to produce stable patterns consisting of a network of streams. Varying model parameters indicate that systems with little to no cohesion, high trichome density and persistent movement are conducive to reticulate pattern formation, in conformance with experimental observations. PMID:25370380

  16. Multiscale analysis of pattern formation via intercellular signalling.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, R D; King, J R

    2011-06-01

    Lateral inhibition, a juxtacrine signalling mechanism by which a cell adopting a particular fate inhibits neighbouring cells from doing likewise, has been shown to be a robust mechanism for the formation of fine-grained spatial patterns (in which adjacent cells in developing tissues diverge to achieve contrasting states of differentiation), provided that there is sufficiently strong feedback. The fine-grained nature of these patterns poses problems for analysis via traditional continuum methods since these require that significant variation takes place only over lengthscales much larger than an individual cell and such systems have therefore been investigated primarily using discrete methods. Here, however, we apply a multiscale method to derive systematically a continuum model from the discrete Delta-Notch signalling model of Collier et al. (J.R. Collier, N.A.M. Monk, P.K. Maini, J.H. Lewis, Pattern formation by lateral inhibition with feedback: a mathematical model of Delta-Notch intercellular signalling, J. Theor. Biol., 183, 1996, 429-446) under particular assumptions on the parameters, which we use to analyse the generation of fine-grained patterns. We show that, on the macroscale, the contact-dependent juxtacrine signalling interaction manifests itself as linear diffusion, motivating the use of reaction-diffusion-based models for such cell-signalling systems. We also analyse the travelling-wave behaviour of our system, obtaining good quantitative agreement with the discrete system. PMID:21385590

  17. Rimming flows and pattern formation inside rapidly rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polezhaev, Denis; Dyakova, Veronika; Kozlov, Victor

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of fluid and granular medium in a rotating horizontal cylinder is experimentally studied. In a rapidly rotating cylinder liquid and granular medium coat the cylindrical wall under centrifugal force. In the cavity frame gravity field performs rotation and produces oscillatory fluid flow which is responsible for the series of novel effects of pattern formation, namely, axial segregation of heavy particles and pattern formation in the form of sand regular hills extended along the axis of rotation. At least two types of axial segregation are found: a) patterns of spatial period of the same order of magnitude as fluid layer thickness which induced by steady flows generated by inertial waves; b) fine patterns which manifests Gortler - Taylor vortices developing as a consequence of centrifugal instability of viscous boundary layer near the cylindrical wall. Under gravity, intensive fluid shear flow induces partial fluidization of annular layer of granular medium. The oscillatory motion is followed by onset of regular ripples extended along the axis of rotation. The work is supported by Russian Scientific Foundation (project 14-11-00476).

  18. Processing biological literature with customizable Web services supporting interoperable formats

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Rafal; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Carter, Jacob; Rowley, Andrew; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Web services have become a popular means of interconnecting solutions for processing a body of scientific literature. This has fuelled research on high-level data exchange formats suitable for a given domain and ensuring the interoperability of Web services. In this article, we focus on the biological domain and consider four interoperability formats, BioC, BioNLP, XMI and RDF, that represent domain-specific and generic representations and include well-established as well as emerging specifications. We use the formats in the context of customizable Web services created in our Web-based, text-mining workbench Argo that features an ever-growing library of elementary analytics and capabilities to build and deploy Web services straight from a convenient graphical user interface. We demonstrate a 2-fold customization of Web services: by building task-specific processing pipelines from a repository of available analytics, and by configuring services to accept and produce a combination of input and output data interchange formats. We provide qualitative evaluation of the formats as well as quantitative evaluation of automatic analytics. The latter was carried out as part of our participation in the fourth edition of the BioCreative challenge. Our analytics built into Web services for recognizing biochemical concepts in BioC collections achieved the highest combined scores out of 10 participating teams. Database URL: http://argo.nactem.ac.uk. PMID:25006225

  19. Processing biological literature with customizable Web services supporting interoperable formats.

    PubMed

    Rak, Rafal; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Carter, Jacob; Rowley, Andrew; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Web services have become a popular means of interconnecting solutions for processing a body of scientific literature. This has fuelled research on high-level data exchange formats suitable for a given domain and ensuring the interoperability of Web services. In this article, we focus on the biological domain and consider four interoperability formats, BioC, BioNLP, XMI and RDF, that represent domain-specific and generic representations and include well-established as well as emerging specifications. We use the formats in the context of customizable Web services created in our Web-based, text-mining workbench Argo that features an ever-growing library of elementary analytics and capabilities to build and deploy Web services straight from a convenient graphical user interface. We demonstrate a 2-fold customization of Web services: by building task-specific processing pipelines from a repository of available analytics, and by configuring services to accept and produce a combination of input and output data interchange formats. We provide qualitative evaluation of the formats as well as quantitative evaluation of automatic analytics. The latter was carried out as part of our participation in the fourth edition of the BioCreative challenge. Our analytics built into Web services for recognizing biochemical concepts in BioC collections achieved the highest combined scores out of 10 participating teams. Database URL: http://argo.nactem.ac.uk. PMID:25006225

  20. How to Build Transcriptional Network Models of Mammalian Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kioussi, Chrissa; Gross, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetic regulatory networks of sequence specific transcription factors underlie pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Deciphering and representing the mammalian networks is a central problem in development, neurobiology, and regenerative medicine. Transcriptional networks specify intermingled embryonic cell populations during pattern formation in the vertebrate neural tube. Each embryonic population gives rise to a distinct type of adult neuron. The homeodomain transcription factor Lbx1 is expressed in five such populations and loss of Lbx1 leads to distinct respecifications in each of the five populations. Methodology/Principal Findings We have purified normal and respecified pools of these five populations from embryos bearing one or two copies of the null Lbx1GFP allele, respectively. Microarrays were used to show that expression levels of 8% of all transcription factor genes were altered in the respecified pool. These transcription factor genes constitute 20–30% of the active nodes of the transcriptional network that governs neural tube patterning. Half of the 141 regulated nodes were located in the top 150 clusters of ultraconserved non-coding regions. Generally, Lbx1 repressed genes that have expression patterns outside of the Lbx1-expressing domain and activated genes that have expression patterns inside the Lbx1-expressing domain. Conclusions/Significance Constraining epistasis analysis of Lbx1 to only those cells that normally express Lbx1 allowed unprecedented sensitivity in identifying Lbx1 network interactions and allowed the interactions to be assigned to a specific set of cell populations. We call this method ANCEA, or active node constrained epistasis analysis, and think that it will be generally useful in discovering and assigning network interactions to specific populations. We discuss how ANCEA, coupled with population partitioning analysis, can greatly facilitate the systematic dissection of transcriptional networks that

  1. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a checkerboard pattern staged process

    SciTech Connect

    de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre; Pingo-Almada, Monica M; Miller, David Scott

    2009-06-02

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to two or more first sections of the formation with one or more first heaters in two or more of the first sections. The provided heat may mobilize first hydrocarbons in two or more of the first sections. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons are produced through production wells located in two or more second sections of the formation. The first sections and the second sections are arranged in a checkerboard pattern. A portion of at least one of the second sections proximate at least one production well is provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second sections with one or more second heaters in the second sections to further heat the second sections.

  2. Multiple stable states and pattern formation in tidal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marani, M.

    2012-12-01

    Tidal environments display typical and widely occurring patterns on several scales. At the large scale, characteristic tidal morphological structures can be identified: subtidal areas, which are permanently flooded, tidal flats, usually non-vegetated expanses located between mean low water level and mean sea level, and tidal marshes, vegetated landforms located between mean sea level and mean high water level. At a smaller scale, marshes display zonation patterns, patches of nearly homogeneous vegetation species characterized by very sharp transitions in species composition and in the associated soil elevation. This contribution describes modelling and observational results which identify a common mechanism for the emergence of bio-geomorphic patterns in tidal environments. Our analyses show that the coupled dynamics of inorganic sediment transport and local biogenic soil formation leads to multiple stable states. Such states correspond to distinct geomorphic structures at the large scale (subtidal platforms, tidal flats, and marshes) and to zonation patterns at the marsh scale. In both cases the interaction between biotic and biotic processes turns out to be crucial for the emergence of the observed patterns.

  3. Whorl morphogenesis in the dasycladalean algae: the pattern formation viewpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Dumais, J; Harrison, L G

    2000-01-01

    The dasycladalean algae produce diverse whorled structures, among which the best known are the vegetative and reproductive whorls of Acetabularia acetabulum. In this paper, we review the literature pertaining to the origin of these structures. The question is addressed in terms of the necessary pattern-forming events and the possible mechanisms involved, an outlook we call the pattern formation viewpoint. The pattern-forming events involved in the morphogenesis of the vegetative and reproductive whorls of Acetabularia have been used to define five and six morphogenetic stages, respectively. We discuss three published mechanisms which account, at least in part, for the pattern-forming events. The mechanisms are mechanical buckling of the cell wall, reaction-diffusion of morphogen molecules along the cell membrane, and mechanochemical interactions between Ca2+ ions and the cytoskeleton in the cytosol. The numerous differences between these mechanisms provide experimental grounds to test their validity. To date, the results of these experiments point towards reaction diffusion as the most likely patterning mechanism. Finally, we consider the evolutionary origin of the vegetative and reproductive whorls and provide mechanistic explanations for some of the major evolutionary advances. PMID:10724462

  4. Pattern Formation in Keller-Segel Chemotaxis Models with Logistic Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ling; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Zengyan

    In this paper, we investigate pattern formation in Keller-Segel chemotaxis models over a multidimensional bounded domain subject to homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. It is shown that the positive homogeneous steady state loses its stability as chemoattraction rate χ increases. Then using Crandall-Rabinowitz local theory with χ being the bifurcation parameter, we obtain the existence of nonhomogeneous steady states of the system which bifurcate from this homogeneous steady state. Stability of the bifurcating solutions is also established through rigorous and detailed calculations. Our results provide a selection mechanism of stable wavemode which states that the only stable bifurcation branch must have a wavemode number that minimizes the bifurcation value. Finally, we perform extensive numerical simulations on the formation of stable steady states with striking structures such as boundary spikes, interior spikes, stripes, etc. These nontrivial patterns can model cellular aggregation that develop through chemotactic movements in biological systems.

  5. Biological traits and growth patterns of pejerrey Odontesthes argentinensis.

    PubMed

    Llompart, F M; Colautti, D C; Maiztegui, T; Cruz-Jiménez, A M; Baigún, C R M

    2013-02-01

    This study assesses for the first time the relationship between annual cycles of different biological indices with growth patterns of a marine pejerrey Odontesthes argentinensis population near its southern-distribution boundary in North Patagonia. The reproductive period is between September and November evidenced by an increase in the gonado-somatic index with a peak in October corresponding to spawning. The reproductive cycle was also coupled with metabolic processes related to energy allocation as shown by changes in the hepato-somatic index and body condition. Total length (L(T) ) at maturity was 270 for females and 282 mm for males, whereas fecundity was estimated at mean ±s.d. = 9380 ± 1797 mature oocytes. Based on the marginal increment analysis, most of the scales showed a maximum value during summer, with a sharp decline thereafter during autumn and winter, indicating that scale rings are formed during the latter period and only once a year. Growth fitted by the von Bertalanffy model for both males and females did not show significant differences and showed a rapid growth during the first 2 years. The shorter reproductive period compared with that of the northern O. argentinensis populations inhabiting tropical and subtropical areas was interpreted as an adjustment to temperate environmental conditions. The larger maximum L(T) and L(T) at first maturity are in agreement with the counter-gradient hypothesis and could be related to the selective effects of low temperature and a shorter growing season. This latitude dependency argues strongly against the application of the same fishing regulations for different O. argentinensis populations as a whole and reinforces the need to assess basic biological features at a population scale to promote local sustainable fisheries management. PMID:23398062

  6. Dynamics of laser induced metal nanoparticle and pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Peláez, R. J. Kuhn, T.; Rodríguez, C. E.; Afonso, C. N.

    2015-02-09

    Discontinuous metal films are converted into either almost round, isolated, and randomly distributed nanoparticles (NPs) or fringed patterns of alternate non transformed film and NPs by exposure to single pulses (20 ns pulse duration and 193 nm wavelength) of homogeneous or modulated laser beam intensity. The dynamics of NPs and pattern formation is studied by measuring in real time the transmission and reflectivity of the sample upon homogeneous beam exposure and the intensity of the diffraction orders 0 and 1 in transmission configuration upon modulated beam exposure. The results show that laser irradiation induces melting of the metal either completely or at regions around intensity maxima sites for homogeneous and modulated beam exposure, respectively, within ≤10 ns. The aggregation and/or coalescence of the initially irregular metal nanostructures is triggered upon melting and continues after solidification (estimated to occur at ≤80 ns) for more than 1 μs. The present results demonstrate that real time transmission rather than reflectivity measurements is a valuable and easy-to-use tool for following the dynamics of NPs and pattern formation. They provide insights on the heat-driven processes occurring both in liquid and solid phases and allow controlling in-situ the process through the fluence. They also evidence that there is negligible lateral heat release in discontinuous films upon laser irradiation.

  7. The role of optimal vortex formation in biological fluid transport

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, John O; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-01-01

    Animal phyla that require macro-scale fluid transport for functioning have repeatedly and often independently converged on the use of jet flows. During flow initiation these jets form fluid vortex rings, which facilitate mass transfer by stationary pumps (e.g. cardiac chambers) and momentum transfer by mobile systems (e.g. jet-propelled swimmers). Previous research has shown that vortex rings generated in the laboratory can be optimized for efficiency or thrust, based on the jet length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), with peak performance occurring at 3.5biological jets achieve this optimization have been inconclusive, due to the inability to properly account for the diversity of jet kinematics found across animal phyla. We combine laboratory experiments, in situ observations and a framework that reduces the kinematics to a single parameter in order to quantitatively show that individual animal kinematics can be tuned in correlation with optimal vortex ring formation. This new approach identifies simple rules for effective fluid transport, facilitates comparative biological studies of jet flows across animal phyla irrespective of their specific functions and can be extended to unify theories of optimal jet-based and flapping-based vortex ring formation. PMID:16048770

  8. The role of optimal vortex formation in biological fluid transport.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, John O; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-08-01

    Animal phyla that require macro-scale fluid transport for functioning have repeatedly and often independently converged on the use of jet flows. During flow initiation these jets form fluid vortex rings, which facilitate mass transfer by stationary pumps (e.g. cardiac chambers) and momentum transfer by mobile systems (e.g. jet-propelled swimmers). Previous research has shown that vortex rings generated in the laboratory can be optimized for efficiency or thrust, based on the jet length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), with peak performance occurring at 3.5biological jets achieve this optimization have been inconclusive, due to the inability to properly account for the diversity of jet kinematics found across animal phyla. We combine laboratory experiments, in situ observations and a framework that reduces the kinematics to a single parameter in order to quantitatively show that individual animal kinematics can be tuned in correlation with optimal vortex ring formation. This new approach identifies simple rules for effective fluid transport, facilitates comparative biological studies of jet flows across animal phyla irrespective of their specific functions and can be extended to unify theories of optimal jet-based and flapping-based vortex ring formation. PMID:16048770

  9. The Developmental Genetics of Vertebrate Color Pattern Formation: Lessons from Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Irion, Uwe; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Color patterns are prominent features of many animals; they are highly variable and evolve rapidly leading to large diversities even within a single genus. As targets for natural as well as sexual selection, they are of high evolutionary significance. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become an important model organism for developmental biology and biomedical research in general, and it is the model organism to study color pattern formation in vertebrates. The fish display a conspicuous pattern of alternating blue and golden stripes on the body and on the anal and tail fins. This pattern is produced by three different types of pigment cells (chromatophores) arranged in precise layers in the hypodermis of the fish. In this essay, we will summarize the recent advances in understanding the developmental and genetic basis for stripe formation in the zebrafish. We will describe the cellular events leading to the formation of stripes during metamorphosis based on long-term lineage imaging. Mutant analysis has revealed that a number of signaling pathways are involved in the establishment and maintenance of the individual pigment cells. However, the striped pattern itself is generated by self-organizing mechanisms requiring interactions between all three pigment cell types. The involvement of integral membrane proteins, including connexins and potassium channels, suggests that direct physical contacts between chromatophores are involved, and that the directed transport of small molecules or bioelectrical coupling is important for these interactions. This mode of patterning by transmitting spatial information between adjacent tissues within three superimposed cell layers is unprecedented in other developmental systems. We propose that variations in the patterns among Danio species are caused by allelic differences in the genes responsible for these interactions. PMID:26969976

  10. Formation of Arbitrary Patterns in Ultraviolet Cured Polymer Film via Electrohydrodynamic Patterning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic patterning of arbitrary patterns is achieved by optimizing the critical parameters (applied voltage and spacer height). The applied voltage has a great influence on the fidelity of L-shaped line structures with different sizes. The L-shaped line structures with high fidelity are obtained by using the moderate applied voltage. The spacer height has a great influence on the fidelity of square structures with different sizes. The square structures with high fidelity are obtained by using the low height spacer. The multi-field coupling transient finite element simulation demonstrates that the lack of polymer owing to the high height spacer leads to the formation of defects. PMID:24723831

  11. The theory of pattern formation on directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asllani, Malbor; Challenger, Joseph D.; Pavone, Francesco Saverio; Sacconi, Leonardo; Fanelli, Duccio

    2014-07-01

    Dynamical processes on networks have generated widespread interest in recent years. The theory of pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems defined on symmetric networks has often been investigated, due to its applications in a wide range of disciplines. Here we extend the theory to the case of directed networks, which are found in a number of different fields, such as neuroscience, computer networks and traffic systems. Owing to the structure of the network Laplacian, the dispersion relation has both real and imaginary parts, at variance with the case for a symmetric, undirected network. The homogeneous fixed point can become unstable due to the topology of the network, resulting in a new class of instabilities, which cannot be induced on undirected graphs. Results from a linear stability analysis allow the instability region to be analytically traced. Numerical simulations show travelling waves, or quasi-stationary patterns, depending on the characteristics of the underlying graph.

  12. Pattern formation in transparent media using ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J.; Bernard, R.; Alti, K.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Bhatnagar, A.; Santhosh, C.; Mathur, D.

    2013-09-01

    We report results of a systematic study of the morphology of laser-written structures within transparent media like fused silica, borosilicate glass (BK7), and polymethylmethylacrylate (PMMA) using a high-energy, 5.1 MHz repetition rate, femtosecond laser oscillator. Depending on experimental conditions, both smooth channels as well as dot patterns can be laser-written. The periodicity of the written dots is readily controlled by the energy dose, a single parameter that encompasses laser energy, translation speed at fixed repetition rate, and focusing conditions. We discover the importance of the direction in which laser-writing is carried out: the periodicity of the dot patterns written at fixed energy dose but with opposite writing directions is significantly different. In PMMA, extremely large rod-like structures (˜200 µm) are observed whose formation is also dependent on writing direction. We quantify guidance of 632 nm and 830 nm light in structures written in BK7.

  13. Localised pattern formation in a model for dryland vegetation.

    PubMed

    Dawes, J H P; Williams, J L M

    2016-07-01

    We analyse the model for vegetation growth in a semi-arid landscape proposed by von Hardenberg et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 87:198101, 2001), which consists of two parabolic partial differential equations that describe the evolution in space and time of the water content of the soil and the level of vegetation. This model is a generalisation of one proposed by Klausmeier but it contains additional terms that capture additional physical effects. By considering the limit in which the diffusion of water in the soil is much faster than the spread of vegetation, we reduce the system to an asymptotically simpler parabolic-elliptic system of equations that describes small amplitude instabilities of the uniform vegetated state. We carry out a thorough weakly nonlinear analysis to investigate bifurcations and pattern formation in the reduced model. We find that the pattern forming instabilities are subcritical except in a small region of parameter space. In the original model at large amplitude there are localised solutions, organised by homoclinic snaking curves. The resulting bifurcation structure is well known from other models for pattern forming systems. Taken together our results describe how the von Hardenberg model displays a sequence of (often hysteretic) transitions from a non-vegetated state, to localised patches of vegetation that exist with uniform low-level vegetation, to periodic patterns, to higher-level uniform vegetation as the precipitation parameter increases. PMID:26454759

  14. The physics of pattern formation at liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, J.V.

    1992-06-01

    During the past year we have submitted six papers for publication, three related to the dynamics of macroscopic interfaces, and ultimately all related to solidification, and three related to the internal structure of disorderly materials, with possible applications to the processing of composite materials. In addition to completing all these projects during the past year, we have begun two new projects, one on pattern formation and one on aggregation within a composite system. A brief description is given of this research in this paper.

  15. Changing patterns of marriage and household formation in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tan, P C; Jones, G W

    1990-01-01

    "Based on surveys conducted among different ethnic groups in rural and urban settings in Peninsular Malaysia in 1981-82, this paper analyses changes in patterns of marriage and household formation among Malays, Chinese, and Indians. Aspects covered include social mixing before marriage, choice of spouse, comparison of spouses' characteristics, and place of residence after marriage. There are important cultural differences between the main Malaysian ethnic groups in matters related to marriage, but in many important respects, attitudes and practice are tending to converge...." PMID:12283691

  16. Pattern formation in granular binary mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clement; Rozier, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    We study numerically the formation and evolution of bed forms using a binary granular mixture. The two types of particles may have different dynamic properties and angle of repose. We associate these changes to two different grain sizes, the so-called coarse and thin particles. Our computation are based on a real-space cellular automaton that combines a model of sediment transport with a lattice-gas cellular automaton. Thus, we implement the permanent feedbacks between fluid flow and topography. Keeping constant the strength of the flow, we explore a parameter-space by varying the size of the coarse particles and their proportion within the bed. As a result of avalanches and sediment transport, we systematically find regions of segregation and stratification. In a vast majority of cases, we also observe the formation of an armoring layer mainly composed of coarse particles. Its depth is mainly controlled by the proportion of coarse grains and not by the size of these larger particles. When there is a larger proportion of thin particles, transverse dunes develop on the top of the armoring layer. As this proportion decreases, we may observe barchans or even no clear bed forms. We conclude that the main control parameter for dune pattern formation is the thin sediment availability. Finally, we discuss the processes responsible for the formation of the armoring layer and show how it controls the overall sediment transport.

  17. Pattern formation in electrohydrodynamic convection of a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Nadina

    2003-10-01

    The first part of this dissertation is a study of the selection mechanism for the dendritic growth pattern of electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC). The cell gap d, the magnetic field H, and the voltage V are systematically varied. The transition from the non-convective state to the convective state is first order-like, although in this case it occurs in a nonequilibrium one-phase system. In the layer plane, the two-fold dendritic pattern grows about the only anisotropy direction, perpendicular to the homogeneous director alignment. While for crystalline dendrites the tip radius of curvature rho and the growth speed v are sharply selected, these dendrites show partial selection. At fixed d, H, and V, rho or v for different dendrites varies each within a band. There is no systematic dependence of rho on V. Thus, these dendrites represent an entirely new selection problem for pattern formation. The non-convective state is anisotropic in the plane of the pattern within a (magnetic coherence) length xim of each substrate. The degree of anisotropy decays with xim/d and the selection becomes less sharp. In contrast to sharply interfaced solidification patterns, these dendrites are outlined by a diffuse boundary, which width w ˜ 2xim. While anisotropic surface tension stabilizes crystalline growth, the magnetic field stabilizes this dendritic growth. Finding where and what scale convection first starts is important for understanding pattern selection in EHC. In the second part of this dissertation, fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy (FCPM) is employed to study normal dielectric rolls (NDRs) in a NLC. While polarizing microscopy gives a two-dimensional information of the integrated three-dimensional (3D) pattern of optical birefringence, FCPM can uniquely map 3D orientational patterns in LC. FCPM visualizes the intensity of polarized fluorescence light emitted by the dye molecules aligned by the LC molecules. The fluorescence

  18. Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML): an open format for representing quantitative biological dynamics data

    PubMed Central

    Kyoda, Koji; Tohsato, Yukako; Ho, Kenneth H. L.; Onami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Recent progress in live-cell imaging and modeling techniques has resulted in generation of a large amount of quantitative data (from experimental measurements and computer simulations) on spatiotemporal dynamics of biological objects such as molecules, cells and organisms. Although many research groups have independently dedicated their efforts to developing software tools for visualizing and analyzing these data, these tools are often not compatible with each other because of different data formats. Results: We developed an open unified format, Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML; current version: 0.2), which provides a basic framework for representing quantitative biological dynamics data for objects ranging from molecules to cells to organisms. BDML is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML). Its advantages are machine and human readability and extensibility. BDML will improve the efficiency of development and evaluation of software tools for data visualization and analysis. Availability and implementation: A specification and a schema file for BDML are freely available online at http://ssbd.qbic.riken.jp/bdml/. Contact: sonami@riken.jp Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25414366

  19. G-jitter Effects on Transport and Pattern Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    The research performed under this grant has led to an number of new insights into two general categories of fluid flows in the presence of time-dependent acceleration, as outlined briefly below. These results have been widely communicated in the scientific community through seven presentations at international conferences (4 invited, 3 contributed), five published papers (4 journal articles and 1 conference proceeding), and images from the research featured on the cover of all 2003 editions of the research journal, Nonlinearity. The work performed under this proposal also contained a substantial educational component by contributed significantly to the scientific training of one postdoctoral associate, one Ph.D. student and five undergraduate researchers. One main area of focus in this research was convective flow with time-dependent acceleration. Convection is one class of behavior that can arise from g-jitter effects. Our research focused on studies of Rayleigh-Benard system, which is an important model for understanding thermal convection; studies of this problem in the presence of acceleration modulations provided insight into the nature of g-jitter induced flow and of the effects of modulation and noise on non-equilibrium pattern formation. Our experiments on vertically vibrated Rayleigh-Benard convection demonstrated the existence of two classes of pure flow patterns (synchronous & subharmonic) patterns) that had long been predicted by theory but never before observed experimentally. Detailed studies of ranges of parameters where both classes of patterns exist simultaneously led to the discovery of a new type of patterns (called superlattices) in systems driven out of thermodynamic equilibrium.

  20. Pattern formation of Rho GTPases in single cell wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Cory M.; Vaughan, Emily M.; Bement, William M.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2013-01-01

    The Rho GTPases—Rho, Rac, and Cdc42—control an enormous variety of processes, many of which reflect activation of these GTPases in spatially confined and mutually exclusive zones. By using mathematical models and experimental results to establish model parameters, we analyze the formation and segregation of Rho and Cdc42 zones during Xenopus oocyte wound repair and the role played by Abr, a dual guanine nucleotide exchange factor–GTPase-activating protein, in this process. The Rho and Cdc42 zones are found to be best represented as manifestations of spatially modulated bistability, and local positive feedback between Abr and Rho can account for the maintenance and dynamic properties of the Rho zone. In contrast, the invocation of an Abr-independent positive feedback loop is required to account for Cdc42 spatial bistability. In addition, the model replicates the results of previous in vivo experiments in which Abr activity is manipulated. Further, simulating the model with two closely spaced wounds made nonintuitive predictions about the Rho and Cdc42 patterns; these predictions were confirmed by experiment. We conclude that the model is a useful tool for analysis of Rho GTPase signaling and that the Rho GTPases can be fruitfully considered as components of intracellular pattern formation systems. PMID:23264464

  1. Interfacial pattern formation in confined power-law fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Rodolfo; Fontana, João V.; Miranda, José A.

    2014-07-01

    The interfacial pattern formation problem in an injection-driven radial Hele-Shaw flow is studied for the situation in which a Newtonian fluid of negligible viscosity displaces a viscous non-Newtonian power-law fluid. By utilizing a Darcy-law-like formulation, we tackle the fluid-fluid interface evolution problem perturbatively, and we derive second-order mode-coupling equations that describe the time evolution of the perturbation amplitudes. This allows us to investigate analytically how the non-Newtonian nature of the dislocated fluid determines the morphology of the emerging interfacial patterns. If the pushed fluid is shear-thinning, our results indicate the development of side-branching structures. On the other hand, if the displaced fluid is shear-thickening, one detects the formation of petal-like shapes, markedly characterized by strong tip-splitting events. Finally, a time-dependent injection protocol is presented that is able to restrain finger proliferation via side-branching and tip-splitting. This permits the emergence of symmetric n-fold interfacial shapes for which the number of fingers remains fixed as time progresses. This procedure generalizes existing controlling strategies for purely Newtonian flow circumstances to the case of a non-Newtonian, displaced power-law fluid.

  2. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler G.; Garzon, Max H.; Deaton, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are “strong” assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self

  3. Probabilistic Analysis of Pattern Formation in Monotonic Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tyler G; Garzon, Max H; Deaton, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by biological systems, self-assembly aims to construct complex structures. It functions through piece-wise, local interactions among component parts and has the potential to produce novel materials and devices at the nanoscale. Algorithmic self-assembly models the product of self-assembly as the output of some computational process, and attempts to control the process of assembly algorithmically. Though providing fundamental insights, these computational models have yet to fully account for the randomness that is inherent in experimental realizations, which tend to be based on trial and error methods. In order to develop a method of analysis that addresses experimental parameters, such as error and yield, this work focuses on the capability of assembly systems to produce a pre-determined set of target patterns, either accurately or perhaps only approximately. Self-assembly systems that assemble patterns that are similar to the targets in a significant percentage are "strong" assemblers. In addition, assemblers should predominantly produce target patterns, with a small percentage of errors or junk. These definitions approximate notions of yield and purity in chemistry and manufacturing. By combining these definitions, a criterion for efficient assembly is developed that can be used to compare the ability of different assembly systems to produce a given target set. Efficiency is a composite measure of the accuracy and purity of an assembler. Typical examples in algorithmic assembly are assessed in the context of these metrics. In addition to validating the method, they also provide some insight that might be used to guide experimentation. Finally, some general results are established that, for efficient assembly, imply that every target pattern is guaranteed to be assembled with a minimum common positive probability, regardless of its size, and that a trichotomy exists to characterize the global behavior of typical efficient, monotonic self-assembly systems

  4. Patterns and controls on nitrogen cycling of biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barger, Nichole N.; Zaady, Eli; Weber, Bettina; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Belnap, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Biocrusts play a significant role in the nitrogen [N ] cycle within arid and semi-arid ecosystems, as they contribute major N inputs via biological fixation and dust capture, harbor internal N transformation processes, and direct N losses via N dissolved, gaseous and erosional loss processes (Fig. 1). Because soil N availability in arid and semi-arid ecosystems is generally low and may limit net primary production (NPP), especially during periods when adequate water is available, understanding the mechanisms and controls of N input and loss pathways in biocrusts is critically important to our broader understanding of N cycling in dryland environments. In particular, N cycling by biocrusts likely regulates short-term soil N availability to support vascular plant growth, as well as long-term N accumulation and maintenance of soil fertility. In this chapter, we review the influence of biocrust nutrient input, internal cycling, and loss pathways across a range of biomes. We examine linkages between N fixation capabilities of biocrust organisms and spatio-temporal patterns of soil N availability that may influence the longer-term productivity of dryland ecosystems. Lastly, biocrust influence on N loss pathways such as N gas loss, leakage of N compounds from biocrusts, and transfer in wind and water erosion are important to understand the maintenance of dryland soil fertility over longer time scales. Although great strides have been made in understanding the influence of biocrusts on ecosystem N cycling, there are important knowledge gaps in our understanding of the influence of biocrusts on ecosystem N cycling that should be the focus of future studies. Because work on the interaction of N cycling and biocrusts was reviewed in Belnap and Lange (2003), this chapter will focus primarily on research findings that have emerged over the last 15 years (2000-2015).

  5. Pattern formation and mass transfer under stationary solutal Marangoni instability.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Karin; Köllner, Thomas; Linde, Hartmut; Boeck, Thomas; Odenbach, Stefan; Eckert, Kerstin

    2014-04-01

    According to the seminal theory by Sternling and Scriven, solutal Marangoni convection during mass transfer of surface-active solutes may occur as either oscillatory or stationary instability. With strong support of Manuel G. Velarde, a combined initiative of experimental works, in particular to mention those of Linde, Wierschem and coworkers, and theory has enabled a classification of dominant wave types of the oscillatory mode and their interactions. In this way a rather comprehensive understanding of the nonlinear evolution of the oscillatory instability could be achieved. A comparably advanced state-of-the-art with respect to the stationary counterpart seemed to be out of reach a short time ago. Recent developments on both the numerical and experimental side, in combination with assessing an extensive number of older experiments, now allow one to draw a more unified picture. By reviewing these works, we show that three main building blocks exist during the nonlinear evolution: roll cells, relaxation oscillations and relaxation oscillations waves. What is frequently called interfacial turbulence results from the interaction between these partly coexisting basic patterns which may additionally occur in different hierarchy levels. The second focus of this review lies on the practical importance of such convection patterns concerning their influence on mass transfer characteristics. Particular attention is paid here to the interaction between Marangoni and buoyancy effects which frequently complicates the pattern formation even more. To shed more light on these dependencies, new simulations regarding the limiting case of stabilizing density stratification and vanishing buoyancy are incorporated. PMID:24456800

  6. One-dimensional daisyworld: spatial interactions and pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Adams, B; Carr, J; Lenton, T M; White, A

    2003-08-21

    The zero-dimensional daisyworld model of Watson and Lovelock (1983) demonstrates that life can unconsciously regulate a global environment. Here that model is extended to one dimension, incorporating a distribution of incoming solar radiation and diffusion of heat consistent with a spherical planet. Global regulatory properties of the original model are retained. The daisy populations are initially restricted to hospitable regions of the surface but exert both global and local feedback to increase this habitable area, eventually colonizing the whole surface. The introduction of heat diffusion destabilizes the coexistence equilibrium of the two daisy types. In response, a striped pattern consisting of blocks of all black or all white daisies emerges. There are two mechanisms behind this pattern formation. Both are connected to the stability of the system and an overview of the mathematics involved is presented. Numerical experiments show that this pattern is globally determined. Perturbations in one region have an impact over the whole surface but the regulatory properties of the system are not compromised by transient perturbations. The relevance of these results to the Earth and the wider climate modelling field is discussed. PMID:12875827

  7. 5-methylcytosine in RNA: detection, enzymatic formation and biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Motorin, Yuri; Lyko, Frank; Helm, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The nucleobase modification 5-methylcytosine (m5C) is widespread both in DNA and different cellular RNAs. The functions and enzymatic mechanisms of DNA m5C-methylation were extensively studied during the last decades. However, the location, the mechanism of formation and the cellular function(s) of the same modified nucleobase in RNA still remain to be elucidated. The recent development of a bisulfite sequencing approach for efficient m5C localization in various RNA molecules puts ribo-m5C in a highly privileged position as one of the few RNA modifications whose detection is amenable to PCR-based amplification and sequencing methods. Additional progress in the field also includes the characterization of several specific RNA methyltransferase enzymes in various organisms, and the discovery of a new and unexpected link between DNA and RNA m5C-methylation. Numerous putative RNA:m5C-MTases have now been identified and are awaiting characterization, including the identification of their RNA substrates and their related cellular functions. In order to bring these recent exciting developments into perspective, this review provides an ordered overview of the detection methods for RNA methylation, of the biochemistry, enzymology and molecular biology of the corresponding modification enzymes, and discusses perspectives for the emerging biological functions of these enzymes. PMID:20007150

  8. An Integrative Approach for Modeling and Simulation of Heterocyst Pattern Formation in Cyanobacteria Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Falo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Heterocyst differentiation in cyanobacteria filaments is one of the simplest examples of cellular differentiation and pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Despite of the many experimental studies addressing the evolution and sustainment of heterocyst patterns and the knowledge of the genetic circuit underlying the behavior of single cyanobacterium under nitrogen deprivation, there is still a theoretical gap connecting these two macroscopic and microscopic processes. As an attempt to shed light on this issue, here we explore heterocyst differentiation under the paradigm of systems biology. This framework allows us to formulate the essential dynamical ingredients of the genetic circuit of a single cyanobacterium into a set of differential equations describing the time evolution of the concentrations of the relevant molecular products. As a result, we are able to study the behavior of a single cyanobacterium under different external conditions, emulating nitrogen deprivation, and simulate the dynamics of cyanobacteria filaments by coupling their respective genetic circuits via molecular diffusion. These two ingredients allow us to understand the principles by which heterocyst patterns can be generated and sustained. In particular, our results point out that, by including both diffusion and noisy external conditions in the computational model, it is possible to reproduce the main features of the formation and sustainment of heterocyst patterns in cyanobacteria filaments as observed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the validity and possible improvements of the model. PMID:25816286

  9. An Investigation of the Relative Effectiveness of Two Scheduling Patterns of an Introductory College Biology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chanin, Lynne Sheppard

    Students in an introductory biology course had laboratory sessions in one of two patterns: as one three-hour session per week, or as two one-and-one-half hour sessions, one after each lecture. Each of the twelve instructors involved taught one section using each pattern. The Nelson Biology Test, the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, and a…

  10. Pattern formation in granular binary mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.

    2012-12-01

    Polydisperse granular materials are ubiquitous in the field of geomorphology. Nevertheless, it remains a challenge to address the impact of segregation, stratification and mixing on landscape dynamics and sediment transport. Here, we study numerically the formation and evolution of bed forms using a binary granular mixture. The two types of particles may have different dynamic properties and angle of repose. We associate these changes to two different grain sizes, the so-called coarse and thin particles. Our computation are based on a real-space cellular automaton that combines a model of sediment transport with a lattice-gas cellular automaton. Thus, we implement the permanent feedbacks between fluid flow and topography. Keeping constant the strength of the flow, we explore a parameter-space by varying the size of the coarse particles and their proportion within the bed. As a result of avalanches and sediment transport, we systematically find regions of segregation and stratification. In a vast majority of cases, we also observe the formation of an armoring layer mainly composed of coarse particles. Its depth is mainly controlled by the proportion of coarse grains and not by the size of these larger particles. When there is a larger proportion of thin particles, transverse dunes develop on the top of the armoring layer. As this proportion decreases, we may observe barchans or even no clear bed forms. Not surprisingly, we conclude that the main control parameter for dune pattern formation is the thin sediment availability. Finally, we discuss the processes responsible for the formation of the armoring layer and show how it controls the overall sediment transport.

  11. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  12. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying.

    PubMed

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  13. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  14. Pattern formation and three-dimensional instability in rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Erik A.; Aubry, Nadine; Sorensen, Jens N.

    1997-03-01

    A fluid flow enclosed in a cylindrical container where fluid motion is created by the rotation of one end wall as a centrifugal fan is studied. Direct numerical simulations and spatio-temporal analysis have been performed in the early transition scenario, which includes a steady-unsteady transition and a breakdown of axisymmetric to three-dimensional flow behavior. In the early unsteady regime of the flow, the central vortex undergoes a vertical beating motion, accompanied by axisymmetric spikes formation on the edge of the breakdown bubble. As traveling waves, the spikes move along the central vortex core toward the rotating end-wall. As the Reynolds number is increased further, the flow undergoes a three-dimensional instability. The influence of the latter on the previous patterns is studied.

  15. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  16. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  17. Time-Dependence and Pattern Formation in Flowing Granular Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, George William, III

    1990-01-01

    We study the time dependence and pattern formation of gravity driven flows of granular media in three experiments. In three dimensional flows of sand, the normal stress on the wall of a conical hopper is measured. There is no evidence of characteristic time scales predicted by a linear stability analysis of a current continuum theory of granular media. Instead, the signal is characterized by a power law power spectrum, and the time variation of the normal stress obeys a scaling law consistent with fractional Brownian motion with H ~ 0.2. As one of the best examples to date of fractional Brownian motion in a physical experiment, this provides a unique opportunity for a study of the theory's application. In digital subtraction radiography studies of sand flow through a thin (nearly two dimensional) wedge, density waves are found. The formation and motion of these depends on the geometry of the wedge and the roughness of the sand grains. The waves form in rough sand but not in smooth sand of the same approximate size, demonstrating that grain structure has a dramatic effect on the flow. Also, the position of stagnant regions along the sides of the wedge is found to scale as a power law of the wedge angle. Neither the density waves nor the position of the stagnant regions are predicted by current theories. Finally, a cellular automata model is proposed to model the two dimensional flow of ellipsoidal grains (such as grass seed) through a wedge. By including particle shape and orientation as degrees of freedom, this model is able to capture many features of real physical flows. In sum, these experiments demonstrate that flows of even simple materials like sand or grass seed contain time dependent patterns that are not predicted by current theoretical models. This demonstrates the need to include particle structure and orientation. Finally, the cellular automata model shows that even relatively simple models which include these added degrees of freedom can reproduce the

  18. Pattern Formation in Populations with Density-Dependent Movement and Two Interaction Scales.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Ricardo; Murgui, Clara; Hernández-García, Emilio; López, Cristóbal

    2015-01-01

    We study the spatial patterns formed by a system of interacting particles where the mobility of any individual is determined by the population crowding at two different spatial scales. In this way we model the behavior of some biological organisms (like mussels) that tend to cluster at short ranges as a defensive strategy, and strongly disperse if there is a high population pressure at large ranges for optimizing foraging. We perform stochastic simulations of a particle-level model of the system, and derive and analyze a continuous density description (a nonlinear diffusion equation). In both cases we show that this interplay of scale-dependent-behaviors gives rise to a rich formation of spatial patterns ranging from labyrinths to periodic cluster arrangements. In most cases these clusters have the very peculiar appearance of ring-like structures, i.e., organisms arranging in the perimeter of the clusters, which we discuss in detail. PMID:26147351

  19. Quantifying Contributions of Climate Feedbacks to Global Warming Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Zhang, G. J.; Cai, M.

    2013-12-01

    The ';';climate feedback-response analysis method'' (CFRAM) was applied to the NCAR CCSM3.0 simulation to analyze the strength and spatial distribution of climate feedbacks and to quantify their contributions to global and regional surface temperature changes in response to a doubling of CO2. Instead of analyzing the climate sensitivity, the CFRAM directly attributes the temperature change to individual radiative and non-radiative feedbacks. The radiative feedback decomposition is based on hourly model output rather than monthly mean data that are commonly used in climate feedback analysis. This gives a more accurate quantification of the cloud and albedo feedbacks. The process-based decomposition of non-radiative feedback enables us to understand the roles of GCM physical and dynamic processes in climate change. The pattern correlation, the centered root-mean-square (RMS) difference and the ratio of variations (represented by standard deviations) between the partial surface temperature change due to each feedback process and the total surface temperature change in CCSM3.0 simulation are examined to quantify the roles of each feedback process in the global warming pattern formation. The contributions of climate feedbacks to the regional warming are also discussed.

  20. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties.

    PubMed

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendrites → dendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations. PMID:25903891

  1. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás; Mohri, Tetsuo; Gránásy, László

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendrites → dendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  2. Territorial pattern formation in the absence of an attractive potential.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jonathan R; Lewis, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Territoriality is a phenomenon exhibited throughout nature. On the individual level, it is the processes by which organisms exclude others of the same species from certain parts of space. On the population level, it is the segregation of space into separate areas, each used by subsections of the population. Proving mathematically that such individual-level processes can cause observed population-level patterns to form is necessary for linking these two levels of description in a non-speculative way. Previous mathematical analysis has relied upon assuming animals are attracted to a central area. This can either be a fixed geographical point, such as a den- or nest-site, or a region where they have previously visited. However, recent simulation-based studies suggest that this attractive potential is not necessary for territorial pattern formation. Here, we construct a partial differential equation (PDE) model of territorial interactions based on the individual-based model (IBM) from those simulation studies. The resulting PDE does not rely on attraction to spatial locations, but purely on conspecific avoidance, mediated via scent-marking. We show analytically that steady-state patterns can form, as long as (i) the scent does not decay faster than it takes the animal to traverse the terrain, and (ii) the spatial scale over which animals detect scent is incorporated into the PDE. As part of the analysis, we develop a general method for taking the PDE limit of an IBM that avoids destroying any intrinsic spatial scale in the underlying behavioral decisions. PMID:25822451

  3. Controlled Formation of Surface Patterns in Metal Films Deposited on Elasticity-Gradient PDMS Substrates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Senjiang; Sun, Yadong; Ni, Yong; Zhang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Controlled surface patterns are useful in a wide range of applications including flexible electronics, elastomeric optics, fluidic channels, surface engineering, measurement technique, biological templates, stamps, and sensors. In this work, we report on the controlled formation of surface patterns in metal films deposited on elasticity-gradient polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. Because of the temperature gradient during the curing process, the PDMS substrate in each sample successively changes from a purely liquid state at one side to a purely elastic state at the opposite side. It is found that surface folds appear in the liquid or viscous PDMS region while wrinkles form in the elastic region. In the transition region from the liquid to elastic PDMS, a nested pattern (i.e., the coexisting of folds and wrinkles) can be observed. The folding wave is triggered by the intrinsic stress during the film deposition and its wavelength is independent of the film thickness. The wrinkling wave is induced by the thermal compression after deposition and its wavelength is proportional to the film thickness. The report in this work could promote better understanding of the effect of substrate elasticity on the surface patterns and fabrication of such patterns (folds and wrinkles) by tuning the substrate property. PMID:26859513

  4. Segment formation in Annelids: patterns, processes and evolution.

    PubMed

    Balavoine, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the origin of segmentation is a central question in the study of body plan evolution in metazoans. Annelids are the most conspicuously metameric animals as most of the trunk is formed of identical anatomical units. In this paper, I summarize the various patterns of evolution of the metameric body plan in annelids, showing the remarkable evolvability of this trait, similar to what is also found in arthropods. I then review the different modes of segment formation in the annelid tree, taking into account the various processes taking place in the life histories of these animals, including embryogenesis, post-embryonic development, regeneration and asexual reproduction. As an example of the variations that occur at the cellular and genetic level in annelid segment formation, I discuss the processes of teloblastic growth or posterior addition in key groups in the annelid tree. I propose a comprehensive definition for the teloblasts, stem cells that are responsible for sequential segment addition. There are a diversity of different mechanisms used in annelids to produce segments depending on the species, the developmental time and also the life history processes of the worm. A major goal for the future will be to reconstitute an ancestral process (or several ancestral processes) in the ancestor of the whole clade. This in turn will provide key insights in the current debate on ancestral bilaterian segmentation. PMID:25690963

  5. Tree island pattern formation in the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Joel; D'Odorico, P.; Engel, Victor C.; Redwine, Jed

    2016-01-01

    The Florida Everglades freshwater landscape exhibits a distribution of islands covered by woody vegetation and bordered by marshes and wet prairies. Known as “tree islands”, these ecogeomorphic features can be found in few other low gradient, nutrient limited freshwater wetlands. In the last few decades, however, a large percentage of tree islands have either shrank or disappeared in apparent response to altered water depths and other stressors associated with human impacts on the Everglades. Because the processes determining the formation and spatial organization of tree islands remain poorly understood, it is still unclear what controls the sensitivity of these landscapes to altered conditions. We hypothesize that positive feedbacks between woody plants and soil accretion are crucial to emergence and decline of tree islands. Likewise, positive feedbacks between phosphorus (P) accumulation and trees explain the P enrichment commonly observed in tree island soils. Here, we develop a spatially-explicit model of tree island formation and evolution, which accounts for these positive feedbacks (facilitation) as well as for long range competition and fire dynamics. It is found that tree island patterns form within a range of parameter values consistent with field data. Simulated impacts of reduced water levels, increased intensity of drought, and increased frequency of dry season/soil consuming fires on these feedback mechanisms result in the decline and disappearance of tree islands on the landscape.

  6. Intracellular Trafficking in Drosophila Visual System Development: A Basis for Pattern Formation Through Simple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chih-Chiang; Epstein, Daniel; Hiesinger, P. Robin

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking underlies cellular functions ranging from membrane remodeling to receptor activation. During multicellular organ development, these basic cell biological functions are required as both passive machinery and active signaling regulators. Exocytosis, endocytosis, and recycling of several key signaling receptors have long been known to actively regulate morphogenesis and pattern formation during Drosophila eye development. Hence, intracellular membrane trafficking not only sets the cell biological stage for receptor-mediated signaling but also actively controls signaling through spatiotemporally regulated receptor localization. In contrast to eye development, the role of intracellular trafficking for the establishment of the eye-to-brain connectivity map has only recently received more attention. It is still poorly understood how guidance receptors are spatiotemporally regulated to serve as meaningful synapse formation signals. Yet, the Drosophila visual system provides some of the most striking examples for the regulatory role of intracellular trafficking during multicellular organ development. In this review we will first highlight the experimental and conceptual advances that motivate the study of intracellular trafficking during Drosophila visual system development. We will then illuminate the development of the eye, the eye-to-brain connectivity map and the optic lobe from the perspective of cell biological dynamics. Finally, we provide a conceptual framework that seeks to explain how the interplay of simple genetically encoded intracellular trafficking events governs the seemingly complex cellular behaviors, which in turn determine the developmental product. PMID:21714102

  7. Refinement and Pattern Formation in Neural Circuits by the Interaction of Traveling Waves with Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James E M; Bair, Wyeth

    2015-08-01

    Traveling waves in the developing brain are a prominent source of highly correlated spiking activity that may instruct the refinement of neural circuits. A candidate mechanism for mediating such refinement is spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), which translates correlated activity patterns into changes in synaptic strength. To assess the potential of these phenomena to build useful structure in developing neural circuits, we examined the interaction of wave activity with STDP rules in simple, biologically plausible models of spiking neurons. We derive an expression for the synaptic strength dynamics showing that, by mapping the time dependence of STDP into spatial interactions, traveling waves can build periodic synaptic connectivity patterns into feedforward circuits with a broad class of experimentally observed STDP rules. The spatial scale of the connectivity patterns increases with wave speed and STDP time constants. We verify these results with simulations and demonstrate their robustness to likely sources of noise. We show how this pattern formation ability, which is analogous to solutions of reaction-diffusion systems that have been widely applied to biological pattern formation, can be harnessed to instruct the refinement of postsynaptic receptive fields. Our results hold for rich, complex wave patterns in two dimensions and over several orders of magnitude in wave speeds and STDP time constants, and they provide predictions that can be tested under existing experimental paradigms. Our model generalizes across brain areas and STDP rules, allowing broad application to the ubiquitous occurrence of traveling waves and to wave-like activity patterns induced by moving stimuli. PMID:26308406

  8. Refinement and Pattern Formation in Neural Circuits by the Interaction of Traveling Waves with Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, James E. M.; Bair, Wyeth

    2015-01-01

    Traveling waves in the developing brain are a prominent source of highly correlated spiking activity that may instruct the refinement of neural circuits. A candidate mechanism for mediating such refinement is spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), which translates correlated activity patterns into changes in synaptic strength. To assess the potential of these phenomena to build useful structure in developing neural circuits, we examined the interaction of wave activity with STDP rules in simple, biologically plausible models of spiking neurons. We derive an expression for the synaptic strength dynamics showing that, by mapping the time dependence of STDP into spatial interactions, traveling waves can build periodic synaptic connectivity patterns into feedforward circuits with a broad class of experimentally observed STDP rules. The spatial scale of the connectivity patterns increases with wave speed and STDP time constants. We verify these results with simulations and demonstrate their robustness to likely sources of noise. We show how this pattern formation ability, which is analogous to solutions of reaction-diffusion systems that have been widely applied to biological pattern formation, can be harnessed to instruct the refinement of postsynaptic receptive fields. Our results hold for rich, complex wave patterns in two dimensions and over several orders of magnitude in wave speeds and STDP time constants, and they provide predictions that can be tested under existing experimental paradigms. Our model generalizes across brain areas and STDP rules, allowing broad application to the ubiquitous occurrence of traveling waves and to wave-like activity patterns induced by moving stimuli. PMID:26308406

  9. A biologically active surface enzyme assembly that attenuates thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zheng; Muthukrishnan, Sharmila; Urlam, Murali K.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Marzec, Ulla M.; Elkasabi, Yaseen; Lahann, Joerg; Hanson, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of hemostatic pathways by blood-contacting materials remains a major hurdle in the development of clinically durable artificial organs and implantable devices. We postulate that surface-induced thrombosis may be attenuated by the reconstitution onto blood contacting surfaces of bioactive enzymes that regulate the production of thrombin, a central mediator of both clotting and platelet activation cascades. Thrombomodulin (TM), a transmembrane protein expressed by endothelial cells, is an established negative regulator of thrombin generation in the circulatory system. Traditional techniques to covalently immobilize enzymes on solid supports may modify residues contained within or near the catalytic site, thus reducing the bioactivity of surface enzyme assemblies. In this report, we present a molecular engineering and bioorthogonal chemistry approach to site-specifically immobilize a biologically active recombinant human TM fragment onto the luminal surface of small diameter prosthetic vascular grafts. Bioactivity and biostability of TM modified grafts is confirmed in vitro and the capacity of modified grafts to reduce platelet activation is demonstrated using a non-human primate model. These studies indicate that molecularly engineered interfaces that display TM actively limit surface-induced thrombus formation. PMID:23532366

  10. DETERMINATION OF APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD SPECTRA FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY LABILE PHOTOPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantum yield spectra for the photochemical formation of biologically labile photoproducts from dissolved organic matter (DOM) have not been available previously, although they would greatly facilitate attempts to model photoproduct formation rates across latitudinal, seasonal, a...

  11. Switch and template pattern formation in a discrete reaction-diffusion system inspired by the Drosophila eye

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Matthew W.; Lubensky, David K.

    2011-01-01

    We examine a spatially discrete reaction diffusion model based on the interactions that create a periodic pattern in the Drosophila eye imaginal disc. This model is known to be capable of generating a regular hexagonal pattern of gene expression behind a moving front, as observed in the fly system. In order to better understand the novel “switch and template” mechanism behind this pattern formation, we present here a detailed study of the model's behavior in one dimension, using a combination of analytic methods and numerical searches of parameter space. We find that patterns are created robustly provided that there is an appropriate separation of timescales and that self-activation is sufficiently strong, and we derive expressions in this limit for the front speed and the pattern wavelength. Moving fronts in pattern-forming systems near an initial linear instability generically select a unique pattern, but our model operates in a strongly nonlinear regime where the final pattern depends on the initial conditions as well as on parameter values. Our work highlights the important role that cellularization and cell-autonomous feedback can play in biological pattern formation. PMID:20862598

  12. Family formation patterns among migrant women in Sydney.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, F; Siedlecky, S

    1996-01-01

    A demographic survey among a probability sample of 980 married migrant women was carried out in Sydney in 1988. The sample included 507 Lebanese, 250 Turkish and 223 Vietnamese women. The study revealed differences in family formation patterns within and between the three groups and between them and the general population. Family size had declined among all three groups compared with their family of origin, and it was clear that the younger women would not achieve the same family sizes as the older women. Migrant women tended to marry earlier than the general population and to start their families earlier. While they showed a strong preference for their children to marry within their own ethnic and religious group, nearly one-third said it was up to the choice of the individual. Overall, the future family size of younger migrant women is expected to converge towards the Australian norm. Migrant families are in a state of transition between two cultures which needs to be recognised by health and family planning service providers. PMID:8690746

  13. Pathological pattern formation and cortical propagation of epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Mark A; Kirsch, Heidi E; Szeri, Andrew J

    2005-01-01

    The stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) stated by Steyn-Ross and co-workers constitute a model of mesoscopic electrical activity of the human cortex. A simplification in which spatial variation and stochastic input are neglected yields ordinary differential equations (ODEs), which are amenable to analysis by techniques of dynamical systems theory. Bifurcation diagrams are developed for the ODEs with increased subcortical excitation, showing that the model predicts oscillatory electrical activity in a large range of parameters. The full SPDEs with increased subcortical excitation produce travelling waves of electrical activity. These model results are compared with electrocortical data recorded at two subdural electrodes from a human subject undergoing a seizure. The model and observational results agree in two important respects during seizure: (i) the average frequency of maximum power, and (ii) the speed of spatial propagation of voltage peaks. This suggests that seizing activity on the human cortex may be understood as an example of pathological pattern formation. Included is a discussion of the applications and limitations of these results. PMID:16849171

  14. Spatial pattern formation facilitates eradication of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, Dirk; Thulke, Hans-Hermann

    2008-04-01

    Control of animal-born diseases is a major challenge faced by applied ecologists and public health managers. To improve cost-effectiveness, the effort required to control such pathogens needs to be predicted as accurately as possible. In this context, we reviewed the anti-rabies vaccination schemes applied around the world during the past 25 years.We contrasted predictions from classic approaches based on theoretical population ecology (which governs rabies control to date) with a newly developed individual-based model. Our spatially explicit approach allowed for the reproduction of pattern formation emerging from a pathogen's spread through its host population.We suggest that a much lower management effort could eliminate the disease than that currently in operation. This is supported by empirical evidence from historic field data. Adapting control measures to the new prediction would save one-third of resources in future control programmes.The reason for the lower prediction is the spatial structure formed by spreading infections in spatially arranged host populations. It is not the result of technical differences between models.Synthesis and applications. For diseases predominantly transmitted by neighbourhood interaction, our findings suggest that the emergence of spatial structures facilitates eradication. This may have substantial implications for the cost-effectiveness of existing disease management schemes, and suggests that when planning management strategies consideration must be given to methods that reflect the spatial nature of the pathogen-host system. PMID:18784795

  15. Transcriptional Switches Direct Plant Organ Formation and Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Risueno, Miguel A.; Van Norman, Jaimie M.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    Development of multicellular organisms requires specification of diverse cell types. In plants, development is continuous and because plant cells are surrounded by rigid cell walls, cell division and specification of daughter cell fate must be carefully orchestrated. During embryonic and postembryonic plant development, the specification of cell types is determined both by positional cues and cell lineage. The establishment of distinct transcriptional domains is a fundamental mechanism for determining different cell fates. In this review, we focus on four examples from recent literature of switches operating in cell fate decisions that are regulated by transcriptional mechanisms. First, we highlight a transcriptional mechanism involving a mobile transcription factor in formation of the two ground tissue cell types in roots. Specification of vascular cell types is then discussed, including new details about xylem cell-type specification via a mobile microRNA. Next, transcriptional regulation of two key embryonic developmental events is considered: establishment of apical–basal polarity in the single-celled zygote and specification of distinct root and shoot stem cell populations in the plant embryo. Finally, a dynamic transcriptional mechanism for lateral organ positioning that integrates spatial and temporal information into a repeating pattern is summarized. PMID:22305165

  16. Control of Oscillation Patterns in a Symmetric Coupled Biological Oscillator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Tanaka, Reiko; Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2003-08-01

    A chain of three-oscillator system was constructed with living biological oscillators of phasmodial slime mold, Physarum polycehalum and the oscillation patterns were analyzed by the symmetric Hopf bifurcation theory using group theory. Multi-stability of oscillation patterns was observed, even when the coupling strength was fixed. This suggests that the coupling strength is not an effective parameter to obtain a desired oscillation pattern among the multiple patterns. Here we propose a method to control oscillation patterns using resonance to external stimulus and demonstrate pattern switching induced by frequency resonance given to only one of oscillators in the system.

  17. Global patterns in threats to vertebrates by biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Bellard, C; Genovesi, P; Jeschke, J M

    2016-01-27

    Biological invasions as drivers of biodiversity loss have recently been challenged. Fundamentally, we must know where species that are threatened by invasive alien species (IAS) live, and the degree to which they are threatened. We report the first study linking 1372 vertebrates threatened by more than 200 IAS from the completely revised Global Invasive Species Database. New maps of the vulnerability of threatened vertebrates to IAS permit assessments of whether IAS have a major influence on biodiversity, and if so, which taxonomic groups are threatened and where they are threatened. We found that centres of IAS-threatened vertebrates are concentrated in the Americas, India, Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand. The areas in which IAS-threatened species are located do not fully match the current hotspots of invasions, or the current hotspots of threatened species. The relative importance of biological invasions as drivers of biodiversity loss clearly varies across regions and taxa, and changes over time, with mammals from India, Indonesia, Australia and Europe are increasingly being threatened by IAS. The chytrid fungus primarily threatens amphibians, whereas invasive mammals primarily threaten other vertebrates. The differences in IAS threats between regions and taxa can help efficiently target IAS, which is essential for achieving the Strategic Plan 2020 of the Convention on Biological Diversity. PMID:26817767

  18. Metal nanoclusters: Protein corona formation and implications for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Shang, Li; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Metal nanoclusters (NCs) are a new type of nanoprobe with great potential in various biological applications. For biocompatible and efficient utilization of NCs, a thorough understanding of their interactions with biological systems is highly important. Herein, we focus on recent studies addressing interactions between metal NCs and proteins as well as implications for their further biological application. These findings show that protein adsorption not only affects the photophysical properties of NCs, but also influences their subsequent biological behavior, i.e., cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. Moreover, specific protein-NC interactions have also been harnessed to develop novel protein discrimination strategies. PMID:26408503

  19. A Comparative Atlas of Zooplankton: Biological Patterns in the Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Douglas C.

    Large-scale biogeographic trends in the distribution of marine zooplankton are the subject of this work. As the subtitle of this book clarifies, it is an illustrated compendium of distributional patterns rather than a taxonomic atlas of invertebrate zoology. About half the work is devoted to Mercator projection maps of global distribution of various species of zooplankton and of chemical and physical properties of their environment. The other half is a treatise on plankton ecology as it relates to speciation.

  20. Auxin distribution and transport during embryonic pattern formation in wheat.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Iglesias, C; Sundberg, B; Neuhaus, G; Jones, A M

    2001-04-01

    Inhibitors of auxin polar transport disrupt normal embryogenesis and thus specific spatial auxin distribution due to auxin movement may be important in establishing embryonic pattern formation in plants. In the present study, the distribution of the photoaffinity labeling agent tritiated 5-azidoindole-3-acetic acid ([3H],5-N3IAA), an analog of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), was visualized in zygotic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) embryos grown in vitro and in planta, and used to deduce auxin transport pathways in these embryos. This study provides the first direct evidence that the distribution of auxin, here [3H],5-N3IAA, is heterogeneous and changes during embryo development. In particular, the shift from radial to bilateral symmetry was correlated with a redistribution of [3H],5-N3IAA in the embryo. Furthermore, in bilaterally symmetrical embryos, that is, embryos in the late transition stage or older, the localization of [3H],5-N3IAA was altered by N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, a specific inhibitor of auxin polar transport. No significant effect was observed in radially symmetrical embryos, that is, globular embryos, or very early transition embryos. Thus, the shift from radial to bilateral symmetry is associated with the onset of active, directed auxin transport involved in auxin redistribution. A change in the distribution of [3H],5-N3IAA was also observed in morphologically abnormal embryos induced on media supplemented with auxin or auxin polar transport inhibitors. By means of a microscale technique, free IAA concentration was measured in in vitro- and in planta-grown embryos and was found to increase during development. Therefore, IAA may be synthesized or released from conjugates in bilaterally symmetrical embryos, although import from surrounding tissues cannot be excluded. PMID:11389754

  1. Instabilities and pattern formation on the pore scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juel, Anne

    What links a baby's first breath to adhesive debonding, enhanced oil recovery, or even drop-on-demand devices? All these processes involve moving or expanding bubbles displacing fluid in a confined space, bounded by either rigid or elastic walls. In this talk, we show how spatial confinement may either induce or suppress interfacial instabilities and pattern formation in such flows. We demonstrate that a simple change in the bounding geometry can radically alter the behaviour of a fluid-displacing air finger both in rigid and elastic vessels. A rich array of propagation modes, including steady and oscillatory fingers, is uncovered when air displaces oil from axially uniform tubes that have local variations in flow resistance within their cross-sections. Moreover, we show that the experimentally observed states can all be captured by a two-dimensional depth-averaged model for bubble propagation through wide channels. Viscous fingering in Hele-Shaw cells is a classical and widely studied fluid-mechanical instability: when air is injected into the narrow, liquid-filled gap between parallel rigid plates, the axisymmetrically expanding air-liquid interface tends to be unstable to non-axisymmetric disturbances. We show how the introduction of wall elasticity (via the replacement of the upper bounding plate by an elastic membrane) can weaken or even suppress the fingering instability by allowing changes in cell confinement through the flow-induced deflection of the boundary. The presence of a deformable boundary also makes the system prone to additional solid-mechanical instabilities, and these wrinkling instabilities can in turn enhance viscous fingering. The financial support of EPSRC and the Leverhulme Trust is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Surface induced phase separation and pattern formation at the isotropic interface in chiral nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zola, R S; Evangelista, L R; Yang, Y-C; Yang, D-K

    2013-02-01

    We study the pattern formation of a chiral nematic liquid crystal under a wetting transition. In the isotropic-liquid crystal transition, a surface-enhanced effect happens and a thin liquid crystal layer forms at the substrates of the cell. In this confined system, chirality, elastic anisotropy, surface anchoring, and wetting strength interplay. A striped pattern is formed due to the chiral nature of the material and the tilted anchoring at the isotropic boundary. As the wetting layer grows from cooling the sample, first the stripes rotate through a process where dislocation defects are formed. As the wetting layer grows further, the periodicity of the stripe structure changes, and finally a splitting of the stripes occurs. Because of the unique properties of this system, new insights about pitch-thickness ratio, interface anchoring, and elastic anisotropy effect are found. Since the anchoring at the isotropic boundary is weak, the critical ratio between the thickness of the wetting layer and the helical pitch is different from that reported in the literature. We also discover that the elastic anisotropy and elastic constant ratios play a critical role in stripe formation. Because of the similarity with biological fibrous composites (twisted plywood), our system may be used as a synthetic version to mimic the naturally occurring one. We carry out a simulation study to explain the experimental results. PMID:23414046

  3. Surface Induced Phase Separation and Pattern Formation at the Isotropic Interface in Chiral Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zola, R. S.; Evangelista, L. R.; Yang, Y.-C.; Yang, D.-K.

    2013-02-01

    We study the pattern formation of a chiral nematic liquid crystal under a wetting transition. In the isotropic-liquid crystal transition, a surface-enhanced effect happens and a thin liquid crystal layer forms at the substrates of the cell. In this confined system, chirality, elastic anisotropy, surface anchoring, and wetting strength interplay. A striped pattern is formed due to the chiral nature of the material and the tilted anchoring at the isotropic boundary. As the wetting layer grows from cooling the sample, first the stripes rotate through a process where dislocation defects are formed. As the wetting layer grows further, the periodicity of the stripe structure changes, and finally a splitting of the stripes occurs. Because of the unique properties of this system, new insights about pitch-thickness ratio, interface anchoring, and elastic anisotropy effect are found. Since the anchoring at the isotropic boundary is weak, the critical ratio between the thickness of the wetting layer and the helical pitch is different from that reported in the literature. We also discover that the elastic anisotropy and elastic constant ratios play a critical role in stripe formation. Because of the similarity with biological fibrous composites (twisted plywood), our system may be used as a synthetic version to mimic the naturally occurring one. We carry out a simulation study to explain the experimental results.

  4. Effects of Scoring by Section and Independent Scorers' Patterns on Scorer Reliability in Biology Essay Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebuoh, Casmir N.; Ezeudu, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of scoring by section, use of independent scorers and conventional patterns on scorer reliability in Biology essay tests. It was revealed from literature review that conventional pattern of scoring all items at a time in essay tests had been criticized for not being reliable. The study was true experimental study…

  5. Pattern Learning, Damage and Repair within Biological Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Theodore; Fitzgerald O'Neill, Kate; Shinbrot, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes damage to neural networks, potentially leading to disability or even death. Nearly one in ten of these patients die, and most of the remainder suffer from symptoms ranging from headaches and nausea to convulsions and paralysis. In vitro studies to develop treatments for TBI have limited in vivo applicability, and in vitro therapies have even proven to worsen the outcome of TBI patients. We propose that this disconnect between in vitro and in vivo outcomes may be associated with the fact that in vitro tests assess indirect measures of neuronal health, but do not investigate the actual function of neuronal networks. Therefore in this talk, we examine both in vitro and in silico neuronal networks that actually perform a function: pattern identification. We allow the networks to execute genetic, Hebbian, learning, and additionally, we examine the effects of damage and subsequent repair within our networks. We show that the length of repaired connections affects the overall pattern learning performance of the network and we propose therapies that may improve function following TBI in clinical settings.

  6. Combinatorial epigenetic patterns as quantitative predictors of chromatin biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method for characterizing the epigenetic states of chromatin on a genomic scale. With the recent availability of large genome-wide data sets, often comprising several epigenetic marks, novel approaches are required to explore functionally relevant interactions between histone modifications. Computational discovery of "chromatin states" defined by such combinatorial interactions enabled descriptive annotations of genomes, but more quantitative approaches are needed to progress towards predictive models. Results We propose non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) as a new unsupervised method to discover combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks that frequently co-occur in subsets of genomic regions. We show that this small set of combinatorial "codes" can be effectively displayed and interpreted. NMF codes enable dimensionality reduction and have desirable statistical properties for regression and classification tasks. We demonstrate the utility of codes in the quantitative prediction of Pol2-binding and the discrimination between Pol2-bound promoters and enhancers. Finally, we show that specific codes can be linked to molecular pathways and targets of pluripotency genes during differentiation. Conclusions We have introduced and evaluated a new computational approach to represent combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks as quantitative variables suitable for predictive modeling and supervised machine learning. To foster widespread adoption of this method we make it available as an open-source software-package – epicode at https://github.com/mcieslik-mctp/epicode. PMID:24472558

  7. Expression Patterns and Potential Biological Roles of Dip2a

    PubMed Central

    Palange, Norberto J.; Jia, Ruirui; Ma, Jun; Bah, Fatoumata Binta; Sah, Rajiv Kumar; Li, Dan; Wang, Daji; Bah, Fatoumata Binta Maci; Togo, Jacques; Jin, Honghong; Ban, Luying; Feng, Xuechao; Zheng, Yaowu

    2015-01-01

    Disconnected (disco)-interacting protein 2 homolog A is a member of the DIP2 protein family encoded by Dip2a gene. Dip2a expression pattern has never been systematically studied. Functions of Dip2a in embryonic development and adult are not known. To investigate Dip2a gene expression and function in embryo and adult, a Dip2a-LacZ mouse model was generated by insertion of β-Gal cDNA after Dip2a promoter using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Dip2a-LacZ mouse was designed to be a lacZ reporter mouse as well as a Dip2a knockout mouse. Heterozygous mice were used to study endogenous Dip2a expression and homozygotes to study DIP2A-associated structure and function. LacZ staining indicated that Dip2a is broadly expressed in neuronal, reproductive and vascular tissues, as well as in heart, kidney, liver and lung. Results demonstrate that Dip2a is expressed in ectoderm-derived tissues in developing embryos. Adult tissues showed rich staining in neurons, mesenchymal, endothelial, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes by cell types. The expression pattern highly overlaps with FSTL1 and supports previous report that DIP2A to be potential receptor of FSTL1 and its protective roles of cardiomyocytes. Broad and intense embryonic and adult expression of Dip2a has implied their multiple structural and physiological roles. PMID:26605542

  8. Expression Patterns and Potential Biological Roles of Dip2a.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luqing; Mabwi, Humphrey A; Palange, Norberto J; Jia, Ruirui; Ma, Jun; Bah, Fatoumata Binta; Sah, Rajiv Kumar; Li, Dan; Wang, Daji; Bah, Fatoumata Binta Maci; Togo, Jacques; Jin, Honghong; Ban, Luying; Feng, Xuechao; Zheng, Yaowu

    2015-01-01

    Disconnected (disco)-interacting protein 2 homolog A is a member of the DIP2 protein family encoded by Dip2a gene. Dip2a expression pattern has never been systematically studied. Functions of Dip2a in embryonic development and adult are not known. To investigate Dip2a gene expression and function in embryo and adult, a Dip2a-LacZ mouse model was generated by insertion of β-Gal cDNA after Dip2a promoter using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Dip2a-LacZ mouse was designed to be a lacZ reporter mouse as well as a Dip2a knockout mouse. Heterozygous mice were used to study endogenous Dip2a expression and homozygotes to study DIP2A-associated structure and function. LacZ staining indicated that Dip2a is broadly expressed in neuronal, reproductive and vascular tissues, as well as in heart, kidney, liver and lung. Results demonstrate that Dip2a is expressed in ectoderm-derived tissues in developing embryos. Adult tissues showed rich staining in neurons, mesenchymal, endothelial, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes by cell types. The expression pattern highly overlaps with FSTL1 and supports previous report that DIP2A to be potential receptor of FSTL1 and its protective roles of cardiomyocytes. Broad and intense embryonic and adult expression of Dip2a has implied their multiple structural and physiological roles. PMID:26605542

  9. Hydrologic Connectivity as a Window into Pattern Conditions and Formation Processes in Aquatic Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, L. G.; Choi, J.; Nungesser, M. K.; Harvey, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Patterned aquatic ecosystems exhibit different types and degrees of hydrologic connectivity, from isolated open-water patches in some inland marshes, to cross-slope strings and flarks of striped fens, to along-slope ridges and sloughs of low-gradient subtropical wetlands, to dendritic channels of coastal marshes. The nature and degree of this connectivity are closely linked to landscape function. For example, hydrologic connectivity perpendicular to river channel thalwegs relates to the exchange of sediment and nutrients between channels and floodplains, whereas connectivity parallel to a dominant flow direction affects fish migration or the likelihood of contaminant transport. Characteristics of hydrologic connectivity reflect not only the results of landscape pattern but also the mechanisms responsible for pattern creation. Quantifying those connectivity characteristics provides a robust means to identify landscapes likely formed under a consistent set of processes or to compare the output of landscape simulation models to actual landscapes in order to determine whether the models capture the most relevant landscape formation processes. However, established methods for quantifying isotropic patch connectivity are often ill suited for strongly patterned landscapes or hydroscapes in which directional flow is important. Using graph theory principles, we developed two alternative indices of directional hydrologic connectivity: the maximum flow index (MFI) and directional connectivity index (DCI), which quantify the connectivity of flow paths along a particular axis of interest. The MFI is sensitive to the existence of any hydrologic connection along the direction of interest, whereas the DCI is sensitive to the linearity of connections along that direction. Curves of directional connectivity over a range of angular bearings provide a quantitative, information-dense representation of landscape structure that can be related to subtle differences in the physical-biological

  10. The Search for More Effective Methods of Teaching High-School Biology to Slow Learners Through Interaction Analysis, Part II. The Effects of Various Constant Teaching Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citron, Irvin M.; Barnes, Cyrus W.

    1970-01-01

    Presents the procedures, results, and conclusions of a study designed to determine whether constant patterns of teaching of various kinds over an extended period could affect concept formation, problem solving, and total achievement of slow learners in a high school biology course. (LC)

  11. Pattern formation in polymer via electrohydrodynamic instabilities and glassy fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, Leonard Franklin, III

    Fabrication of micro and nano structures from polymeric materials has attracted significant attention due to their promise of inexpensive, fast throughput and ease of integration into existing fabrication processes. This dissertation describes our contributions to two such processes. In the first process, electrohydrodynamic flow drives a thin polymer film sandwiched between electrodes with an intervening gap into multidomained, hexagonally packed pillars or concentric rings. We model the initial stages of formation by performing a linear stability analysis under the lubrication approximation. We find the presence of free charge at the free interface both decreases the pillar-to-pillars spacing and increases the growth rate. We examined the possible sources of electrostatic field in the absence of an applied voltage to find static charge to be the most likely candidate. In practice, however, the lubrication approximation may not strictly apply in the situations of greatest interest. Accordingly, we contrasted results of the linear stability analysis with and without the lubrication approximation to show that the approximation fails where surface tension is small and electric fields are large, typical of experiments with a polymer/organic liquid instead of air in the gap---precisely the conditions that predict the smallest pillar arrays. Motivated by the discovery of concentric rings, we adapted the form of the perturbation from sinusoids to Bessel functions to predict constant ring-to-ring spacings, constant annular widths and growth rates in agreement with experiment. In the second patterning technique, a thin film sandwiched between two substrates fractures into periodic ridges upon insertion of a razor blade. We investigated the conditions that selected for the presence or absence of the gratings, their fractional coverage, their period, and their alignment. Our key findings indicated that the gratings form from all glassy materials tested with periods of

  12. Pattern formation in plastic liquid films on elastomers by ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiangshui; Yang, Jiawei; Jin, Lihua; Clarke, David R; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-04-20

    Plastic liquids, also known as Bingham liquids, retain their shape when loads are small, but flow when loads exceed a threshold. We discovered that plastic liquid films coated on elastomers develop wavy patterns under cyclic loads. As the number of cycles increases, the wavelength of the patterns remains unchanged, but the amplitude of the patterns increases and then saturates. Because the patterns develop progressively under cyclic loads, we call this phenomenon as "patterning by ratcheting". We observe the phenomenon in plastic liquids of several kinds, and studied the effects of thickness, the cyclic frequency of the stretch, and the range of the stretch. Finite element simulations show that the ratcheting phenomenon can occur in materials described by a commonly used model of elastic-plastic deformation. PMID:27008927

  13. A "lookup table" schema for synthetic biological patterning.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Frederick B

    2012-05-01

    A schema is proposed by which the three-dimensional structure and temporal development of a biological organism might be encoded and implemented via a genetic "lookup table". In the schema, diffusive morphogen gradients and/or the global concentration of a quickly diffusing signal index sets of kinase genes having promoters with logarithmically diminished affinity for the signal. Specificity of indexing is enhanced via concomitant expression of phosphatases undoing phosphorylation by "neighboring" kinases of greater affinity. Combinations of thus-selected kinases in turn jointly activate, via multiple phosphorylation, a particular enzyme from a virtual, multi-dimensional array thereof, at locations and times specified within the "lookup table". In principle, such a scheme could be employed to specify arbitrary gross anatomy, surface pigmentation, and/or developmental sequencing, extending the burgeoning toolset of the nascent field of synthetic morphology. A model of two-dimensional surface coloration using this scheme is specified, and LabVIEW software for its exploration is described and made available. PMID:22350667

  14. Optical Pattern Formation in Cold Atoms: Explaining the Red-Blue Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie; Gauthier, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The study of pattern formation in atomic systems has provided new insight into fundamental many-body physics and low-light-level nonlinear optics. Pattern formation in cold atoms in particular is of great interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because atoms undergo self-organization at ultralow input powers. We recently reported the first observation of pattern formation in cold atoms but found that our results were not accurately described by any existing theoretical model of pattern formation. Previous models describing pattern formation in cold atoms predict that pattern formation should occur using both red and blue-detuned pump beams, favoring a lower threshold for blue detunings. This disagrees with our recent work, in which we only observed pattern formation with red-detuned pump beams. Previous models also assume a two-level atom, which cannot account for the cooling processes that arise when beams counterpropagate through a cold atomic vapor. We describe a new model for pattern formation that accounts for Sisyphus cooling in multi-level atoms, which gives rise to a new nonlinearity via spatial organization of the atoms. This spatial organization causes a sharp red-blue detuning asymmetry, which agrees well with our experimental observations. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  15. Additivity of light-scattering patterns of aggregated biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Maltsev, Valeri P.; Yurkin, Maxim A.

    2014-08-01

    The paper is focused on light scattering by aggregates of optically soft particles with a size larger than the wavelength, in particular, blood platelets. We conducted a systematic simulation of light scattering by dimers and larger aggregates of blood platelets, each modeled as oblate spheroids, using the discrete dipole approximation. Two-dimensional (2-D) light scattering patterns (LSPs) and internal fields showed that the multiple scattering between constituent particles can be neglected. Additionally, we derived conditions of the scattering angle and orientation of the dimer, under which the averaging of the 2-D LSPs over the azimuthal scattering angle washes out interference in the far field, resulting in averaged LSPs of the aggregate being equal to the sum of that for its constituents. We verified theoretical conclusions using the averaged LSPs of blood platelets measured with the scanning flow cytometer (SFC). Moreover, we obtained similar results for a model system of aggregates of polystyrene beads, studied both experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we discussed the potential of discriminating platelet aggregates from monomers using the SFC.

  16. Dynamics of skeletal pattern formation in developing chick limb.

    PubMed

    Newman, S A; Frisch, H L

    1979-08-17

    During development of the embryonic chick limb the skeletal pattern is laid out as cartilaginous primordia, which emerge in a proximodistal sequence over a period of 4 days. The differentiation of cartilage is preceded by changes in cellular contacts at specific locations in the precartilage mesenchyme. Under realistic assumptions, the biosynthesis and diffusion through the extracellular matrix of a cell surface protein, such as fibronectin, will lead to spatial patterns of this molecule that could be the basis of the emergent primordia. As cellular differentiation proceeds, the size of the mesenchymal diffusion chamber is reduced in descrete steps, leading to sequential reorganizations of the morphogen pattern. The successive patterns correspond to observed rows of skeletal elements, whose emergence, in theory and in practice, depends on the maintenance of a unique boundary condition at the limb bud apex. PMID:462174

  17. Module Based Complexity Formation: Periodic Patterning in Feathers and Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Yeh, Chao-Yuan; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Patterns describe order which emerges from homogeneity. Complex patterns on the integument are striking because of their visibility throughout an organism's lifespan. Periodic patterning is an effective design because the ensemble of hair or feather follicles (modules) allows the generation of complexity, including regional variations and cyclic regeneration, giving the skin appendages a new lease on life. Spatial patterns include the arrangements of feathers and hairs in specified number, size, and spacing. We explore how a field of equivalent progenitor cells can generate periodically arranged modules based on genetic information, physical-chemical rules and developmental timing. Reconstitution experiments suggest a competitive equilibrium regulated by activators / inhibitors involving Turing reaction-diffusion. Temporal patterns result from oscillating stem cell activities within each module (micro-environment regulation), reflected as growth (anagen) and resting (telogen) phases during the cycling of feather and hair follicles. Stimulating modules with activators initiates the spread of regenerative hair waves, while global inhibitors outside each module (macro-environment) prevent this. Different wave patterns can be simulated by Cellular Automata principles. Hormonal status and seasonal changes can modulate appendage phenotypes, leading to “organ metamorphosis”, with multiple ectodermal organ phenotypes generated from the same precursors. We discuss potential evolutionary novel steps using this module based complexity in several amniote integument organs, exemplified by the spectacular peacock feather pattern. We thus explore the application of the acquired knowledge of patterning in tissue engineering. New hair follicles can be generated after wounding. Hairs and feathers can be reconstituted through self-organization of dissociated progenitor cells. PMID:23539312

  18. Video and HTML: Testing Online Tutorial Formats with Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cindy L.; Friehs, Curt G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared two common types of online information literacy tutorials: a streaming media tutorial using animation and narration and a text-based tutorial with static images. Nine sections of an undergraduate biology lab class (234 students total) were instructed by a librarian on how to use the BIOSIS Previews database. Three sections…

  19. Pattern Formation in Mississippi Valley-Type Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Alternating, monomineralic dark and white bands are common features of ore hosting dolostones which are generally termed Zebra textures. These structures consist of coarse grained light and fine grained dark layers and accompany ore bodies of the Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT) worldwide. These deposits frequently develop in large hydrothermal systems, located in the flanks of foreland basins or in fold and thrust belts. The microstructural- and microchemical analysis in this study were performed on samples which were collected in the San Vicente mine. This large MVT deposit is hosted in Triassic/Jurassic Platform Carbonates located in an east-vergent fold and thrust belt of the Peruvian Andes. The thin sections were analyzed with petrographic- and scanning electron microscope. It is observed that one common striking feature is the high density of second-phase particles in the dark bands, whereas the coarser grained layers are virtually particle free. Furthermore, the particle distribution is found to be non-random. The highest particle densities in the samples occur on grain boundaries in the dark bands implying that grain boundaries can capture particles. Based on recent theories and the additional analytical findings, we developed a numerical simulation to study the pattern formation. The modelling is performed in 2D at the scale of a thin section, using a boundary-model coupled with a lattice-particle-code. During the simulation two processes are active, first a reaction takes place that replaces calcite with dolomite driven by a fluid that infiltrates the model, followed by a grain growth processes with an average grain size increase as a function of surface energy reduction. Fluid infiltration in the rock is modelled assuming Darcy Flow and an advection-diffusion equation coupled with a reaction which is a function of concentration. The reaction increases permeability of the solid and thus enhances infiltration. The reaction front in the model shifts particles

  20. Simple and non-toxic fabrication of poly(vinyl alcohol)-patterned polymer surface for the formation of cell patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, In-Tae; Jin, Yu-Ran; Oh, Min-Suk; Jung, Chan-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hak

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a facile and non-toxic method for the formation of cell-adhesive poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) patterns on the surface of a non-biological polystyrene substrate (NPS) is developed to control cellular micro-organization. PVA thin films spin-coated onto the NPS are selectively irradiated with 150 keV H+ ions through a pattern mask and developed with deionized water to form negative-type PVA patterns. Well-defined stripe patterns of PVA with a width of 100 μm are created on the NPS at a higher fluence than 5 × 1015 ions/cm2, and their surface chemical compositions are changed by ion irradiation without any significant morphological change. Based on the results of the protein adsorption test and in vitro cell culture, cancer cells are preferentially adhered and proliferated onto the more hydrophilic PVA regions of the PVA-patterned NPS, resulting in well-defined cell patterns.

  1. Pattern formation of underwater sand ripples with a skewed drive.

    PubMed

    Bundgaard, F; Ellegaard, C; Scheibye-Knudsen, K; Bohr, T; Sams, T

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we present an experimental study of the dynamics of underwater sand ripples when a regular pattern of ripples is subjected to a skewed oscillatory flow, i.e., one not perpendicular to the direction of the ripple crests. Striking patterns with new, superposed ripples on top of the original ones occur very quickly with a characteristic angle, which is, in general, not perpendicular to the flow. A slower, more complex transition then follows, leading to the final state where the ripples are again perpendicular to the flow. We investigate the variation of the superposed pattern as a function of the direction, amplitude, and frequency of the drive, and as a function of the viscosity (by changing the temperature). We quantify the dynamics of the entire transition process and finally study the grain motion around idealized (solid) skewed ripples. This leads to a characteristic mean path of a single particle. The path has a shape close to a parallelogram, with no apparent connection to the pattern of real, superposed ripples. On the other hand, a thin layer of sand sprinkled on the solid ripples leads to qualitatively similar patterns. PMID:15697484

  2. Intergenerational Patterns of Union Formation and Relationship Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassler, Sharon; Cunningham, Anna; Lichter, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine whether young adults who experienced their parents' divorce and new relationships have different relationship trajectories than those who spent their childhoods living with biological parents in married-couple families. The analysis is based on longitudinal reports from more than 1,500 children from Wave 1 of the 1987-1988…

  3. Mathematical study on robust tissue pattern formation in growing epididymal tubule.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-21

    Tissue pattern formation during development is a reproducible morphogenetic process organized by a series of kinetic cellular activities, leading to the building of functional and stable organs. Recent studies focusing on mechanical aspects have revealed physical mechanisms on how the cellular activities contribute to the formation of reproducible tissue patterns; however, the understanding for what factors achieve the reproducibility of such patterning and how it occurs is far from complete. Here, I focus on a tube pattern formation during murine epididymal development, and show that two factors influencing physical design for the patterning, the proliferative zone within the tubule and the viscosity of tissues surrounding to the tubule, control the reproducibility of epididymal tubule pattern, using a mathematical model based on experimental data. Extensive numerical simulation of the simple mathematical model revealed that a spatially localized proliferative zone within the tubule, observed in experiments, results in more reproducible tubule pattern. Moreover, I found that the viscosity of tissues surrounding to the tubule imposes a trade-off regarding pattern reproducibility and spatial accuracy relating to the region where the tubule pattern is formed. This indicates an existence of optimality in material properties of tissues for the robust patterning of epididymal tubule. The results obtained by numerical analysis based on experimental observations provide a general insight on how physical design realizes robust tissue pattern formation. PMID:27396360

  4. Effect of gel network on pattern formation in the ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite reaction.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tomonaga; Yoshida, Ryo

    2011-06-01

    Stationary patterns have been researched experimentally since the discovery of the Turing pattern in the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (CIMA) reaction and the self-replicating spot pattern in the ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite (FIS) reaction. In this study, we reproduced the pattern formation in the FIS reaction by using poly(acrylamide) gels. Gels with different swelling ratios were prepared to use as a medium. The effect of the swelling ratio was compared with the effect of thickness. It was found that the swelling ratio greatly influenced pattern formation. Oscillating spot patterns appeared at high swelling ratios, and lamellar patterns appeared at a low swelling ratio. Self-replicating spot patterns appeared in between the two areas. The front velocities, which were observed in the initial stage of pattern formation, depended on the swelling ratio. Furthermore, this dependence obeys the free volume theory of diffusion. These results provide evidence that the change in front velocities is caused by a change in diffusion. Pattern formation can be controlled not only by thickness but also by swelling ratio, which may be useful for creating novel pattern templates. PMID:21557556

  5. Pattern formation in solutal convection: vermiculated rolls and isolated cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Piro, Oreste; Villacampa, Ana I.

    2002-11-01

    Observations of the peculiar behaviour of a drink of liqueur topped with cream led us to perform experiments showing that the instability is a convection phenomenon that arises through destabilizing surface-tension forces. The convection is solutal: driven by gradients of concentration of a solute, rather than by heat gradients as in the more commonly studied thermal convection. The convective patterns, vermiculated rolls and isolated cells, are quite unlike the usual planforms. They are associated with an elastic surface film, and the Marangoni number is high, characteristic of solutal convection. We have conducted further experiments that reproduce these patterns in simpler working fluids.

  6. Large-scale pattern formation in active particles suspensions: from interacting microtubules to swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor

    2006-03-01

    We consider two biological systems of active particles exhibiting large-scale collective behavior: microtubules interacting with molecular motors and hydrodynamically entrained swimming bacteria. Starting from a generic stochastic microscopic model of inelastically colliding polar rods with an anisotropic interaction kernel, we derive set of equations for the local rods concentration and orientation. Above certain critical density of rods the model exhibits orientational instability and onset of large-scale coherence. For the microtubules and molecular motors system we demonstrate that the orientational instability leads to the formation of vortices and asters seen in recent experiments. Similar approach is applied to colonies of swimming bacteria Bacillus subtilis confined in thin fluid film. The model is formulated in term of two-dimensional equations for local density and orientation of bacteria coupled to the low Reynolds number Navier-Stokes equation for the fluid flow velocity. The collective swimming of bacteria is represented by additional source term in the Navier-Stokes equation. We demonstrate that this system exhibits formation of dynamic large-scale patterns with the typical scale determined by the density of bacteria.

  7. Biological Basis of Tree-Ring Formation: A Crash Course

    PubMed Central

    Rathgeber, Cyrille B. K.; Cuny, Henri E.; Fonti, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Wood is of crucial importance for man and biosphere. In this mini review, we present the fundamental processes involved in tree-ring formation and intra-annual dynamics of cambial activity, along with the influences of the environmental factors. During wood formation, new xylem cells produced by the cambium are undergoing profound transformations, passing through successive differentiation stages, which enable them to perform their functions in trees. Xylem cell formation can be divided in five major phases: (1) the division of a cambial mother cell that creates a new cell; (2) the enlargement of this newly formed cell; (3) the deposition of its secondary wall; (4) the lignification of its cell wall; and finally, (5) its programmed cell death. In most regions of the world cambial activity follows a seasonal cycle. At the beginning of the growing season, when temperature increases, the cambium resumes activity, producing new xylem cells. These cells are disposed along radial files, and start their differentiation program according to their birth date, creating typical developmental strips in the forming xylem. The width of these strips smoothly changes along the growing season. Finally, when climatic conditions deteriorate (temperature or water availability in particular), cambial activity stops, soon followed by cell enlargement, and later on by secondary wall deposition. Without a clear understanding of the xylem formation process, it is not possible to comprehend how annual growth rings and typical wood structures are formed, recording normal seasonal variations of the environment as well as extreme climatic events. PMID:27303426

  8. A stochastic multicellular model identifies biological watermarks from disorders in self-organized patterns of phyllotaxis.

    PubMed

    Refahi, Yassin; Brunoud, Géraldine; Farcot, Etienne; Jean-Marie, Alain; Pulkkinen, Minna; Vernoux, Teva; Godin, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of developmental mechanisms classically relies on analysis of pattern regularities. Whether disorders induced by biological noise may carry information on building principles of developmental systems is an important debated question. Here, we addressed theoretically this question using phyllotaxis, the geometric arrangement of plant aerial organs, as a model system. Phyllotaxis arises from reiterative organogenesis driven by lateral inhibitions at the shoot apex. Motivated by recurrent observations of disorders in phyllotaxis patterns, we revisited in depth the classical deterministic view of phyllotaxis. We developed a stochastic model of primordia initiation at the shoot apex, integrating locality and stochasticity in the patterning system. This stochastic model recapitulates phyllotactic patterns, both regular and irregular, and makes quantitative predictions on the nature of disorders arising from noise. We further show that disorders in phyllotaxis instruct us on the parameters governing phyllotaxis dynamics, thus that disorders can reveal biological watermarks of developmental systems. PMID:27380805

  9. LETTER: Self-organized pattern formation and noise-induced control based on particle computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlf, Thimo; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2005-12-01

    We propose a new non-equilibrium model for spatial pattern formation based on local information transfer. Unlike most standard models of pattern formation it is not based on the Turing instability or initially laid down morphogen gradients. Information is transmitted through the system via particle-like excitations whose collective dynamics results in pattern formation and control. Here, a simple problem of domain formation is addressed by means of this model in an implementation as stochastic cellular automata, and then generalized to a system of coupled dynamical networks. One observes stable pattern formation, even in the presence of noise and cell flow. Noise contributes through the production of quasi-particles to de novo pattern formation as well as to robust control of the domain boundary position. Pattern proportions are scale independent as regards system size. The dynamics of pattern formation is stable over large parameter ranges, with a discontinuity at vanishing noise and a second-order phase transition at increased cell flow.

  10. Pattern formation in the wake of triggered pushed fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Ryan; Scheel, Arnd

    2016-08-01

    Pattern-forming fronts are often controlled by an external stimulus which progresses through a stable medium at a fixed speed, rendering it unstable in its wake. By controlling the speed of excitation, such stimuli, or ‘triggers’, can mediate pattern forming fronts which freely invade an unstable equilibrium and control which pattern is selected. In this work, we analytically and numerically study when the trigger perturbs an oscillatory pushed free front. In such a situation, the resulting patterned front, which we call a pushed trigger front, exhibits a variety of phenomenon, including snaking, non-monotonic wave-number selection, and hysteresis. Assuming the existence of a generic oscillatory pushed free front, we use heteroclinic bifurcation techniques to prove the existence of trigger fronts in an abstract setting motivated by the spatial dynamics approach. We then derive a leading order expansion for the selected wave-number in terms of the trigger speed. Furthermore, we show that such a bifurcation curve is governed by the difference of certain strong-stable and weakly-stable spatial eigenvalues associated with the decay of the free pushed front. We also study prototypical examples of these phenomena in the cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg Landau equation and a modified Cahn–Hilliard equation.

  11. Pattern Formations in Polymer-Molecular Motor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Humphrey, David; Duggan, Cynthia; Käs, Josef

    2001-03-01

    In previous studies with the microtubule-kinesin system, organized patterns such as asters and rotating vortices have been seen (Nedelec et al, Nature 1997), which were of a dynamic nature and dependent on active motors. A similar system was constructed using actin and myosin, which displays similar patterns, however, with drastically different dynamics. These patterns arise independent of the initial amount of immediate use energy (in the form of ATP), assembling only upon the near exhaustion of available ATP. Further studies have clearly shown that in fact these patterns are not dependent upon the motor activity of the myosin but its propensity to serve as a cross-linking element in an actin network, with the motor activity serving to prevent the arising of order in the system. We believe the dynamic differences inherent between the two polymer-motor systems studied lies primarily in the structural nature of the motor complexes, with the kinesin complex ordering the system by pushing multiple filaments in a parallel direction, and the myosin complexes disordering the system by pushing filaments in an antiparallel manner.

  12. Effect of Salt Concentration on the Pattern Formation of Colloidal Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenjie; Wang, Yuren

    We study the effect of salt concentration on the drying process and pattern of thin liquid layer colloidal suspension. Panasonic camera is used to capture the drying process and macroscopic pattern. Microscopic patterns are analyzed by optical microscopy. It is shown that broad-ring pattern is avoided by adding little amount of sodium chloide into colloidal suspension. with the increase of salt concentraion, convection strength and interface instability are weakened, thus the edge of film becomes smooth and more homogeneous film forms. Beautiful microscopic patterns demonstrate that the cooperative interaction between sodium chloide and silica spheres has important influence on the pattern formation.

  13. Alternatives to the 'water oxidation pathway' of biological ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Arnold N

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that ozone (O3) is endogenously generated in living tissues, where it makes both positive and negative physiological contributions. A pathway for the formation of both O3 and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was previously proposed, beginning with the antibody or amino acid-catalyzed oxidation of water by singlet oxygen ((1)O2) to form hydrogen trioxide (H2O3) as a key intermediate. A key pillar of this hypothesis is that some of the H2O2 molecules incorporate water-derived oxygen atoms. However, H2O3 decomposes extremely readily in water to form (1)O2 and water, rather than O3 and H2O2. This article highlights key literature indicating that the oxidation of organic molecules such as the amino acids methionine, tryptophan, histidine, and cysteine by (1)O2 is involved in ozone formation. Based on this, an alternative hypothesis for ozone formation is developed involving a further reaction of singlet oxygen with various oxidized organic intermediates. H2O2 having water-derived oxygen atoms is subsequently formed during ozone decomposition in water by known reactions. PMID:26855676

  14. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms—formation, biology, and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Tomas; Köller, Thomas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS) is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options. PMID:25717441

  15. Pattern formation induced by a differential Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucchi, L.; Vasquez, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Differential advection, where a reactant is advected while another one is immobilized, leads to instabilities in reaction-advection-diffusion systems. In particular, a homogeneous steady state looses stability for strong enough flows, leading to chemical patterns moving in the direction of the flow. In this paper we study the effects of differential advection due to a two-dimensional Poiseuille flow. We carry out a linear stability analysis on a homogeneous state using an activator-inhibitor reaction. We find that shear dispersion induced by the Poiseuille flow may lead to instabilities at slower flow rates. We find that contrary to the one-dimensional system, the instability depends on which substance is advected. We find a critical average flow speed for instability depending on tube size. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear reaction-advection-diffusion result in patterns of constant shape propagating along the tube.

  16. Forging patterns and making waves from biology to geology: a commentary on Turing (1952) 'The chemical basis of morphogenesis'.

    PubMed

    Ball, Philip

    2015-04-19

    Alan Turing was neither a biologist nor a chemist, and yet the paper he published in 1952, 'The chemical basis of morphogenesis', on the spontaneous formation of patterns in systems undergoing reaction and diffusion of their ingredients has had a substantial impact on both fields, as well as in other areas as disparate as geomorphology and criminology. Motivated by the question of how a spherical embryo becomes a decidedly non-spherical organism such as a human being, Turing devised a mathematical model that explained how random fluctuations can drive the emergence of pattern and structure from initial uniformity. The spontaneous appearance of pattern and form in a system far away from its equilibrium state occurs in many types of natural process, and in some artificial ones too. It is often driven by very general mechanisms, of which Turing's model supplies one of the most versatile. For that reason, these patterns show striking similarities in systems that seem superficially to share nothing in common, such as the stripes of sand ripples and of pigmentation on a zebra skin. New examples of 'Turing patterns' in biology and beyond are still being discovered today. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750229

  17. Self-organized pattern formation in motor-microtubule mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankararaman, Sumithra; Menon, Gautam I.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.

    2004-09-01

    We model the stable self-organized patterns obtained in the nonequilibrium steady states of mixtures of molecular motors and microtubules. In experiments [Nédélec , Nature (London) 389, 305 (1997); Surrey , Science 292, 1167 (2001)] performed in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry, microtubules are oriented by complexes of motor proteins. This interaction yields a variety of patterns, including arrangements of asters, vortices, and disordered configurations. We model this system via a two-dimensional vector field describing the local coarse-grained microtubule orientation and two scalar density fields associated to molecular motors. These scalar fields describe motors which either attach to and move along microtubules or diffuse freely within the solvent. Transitions between single aster, spiral, and vortex states are obtained as a consequence of confinement, as parameters in our model are varied. For systems in which the effects of confinement can be neglected, we present a map of nonequilibrium steady states, which includes arrangements of asters and vortices separately as well as aster-vortex mixtures and fully disordered states. We calculate the steady state distribution of bound and free motors in aster and vortex configurations of microtubules and compare these to our simulation results, providing qualitative arguments for the stability of different patterns in various regimes of parameter space. We study the role of crowding or “saturation” effects on the density profiles of motors in asters, discussing the role of such effects in stabilizing single asters. We also comment on the implications of our results for experiments.

  18. Pattern formation in Dictyostelium discoideum aggregates in confined microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallou, Adrien; Hersen, Pascal; di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Kabla, Alexandre

    Dictyostelium Discoideum (Dd) is often viewed as a model system to study the complex collective cell behaviours which shape an embryo. Under starvation, Dd cells form multicellular aggregates which soon elongate, starting to display an anterior-posterior axis by differentiating into two distinct cell populations; prestalk (front) and prespore (rear) cells zones. Different models, either based on positional information or on differentiation followed up by cell sorting, have been proposed to explain the origin and the regulation of this spatial pattern.To decipher between the proposed hypotheses, we have developed am experimental platform where aggregates, made of genetically engineered Dd cells to express fluorescent reporters of cell differentiation in either prestalk or prespore cells, are allowed to develop in 20 to 400 μm wide hydrogel channels. Such a setup allows us to both mimic Dd confined natural soil environment and to follow the patterning dynamics using time-lapse microscopy. Tracking cell lineage commitments and positions in space and time, we demonstrate that Dd cells differentiate first into prestalk and prespore cells prior to sorting into an organized spatial pattern on the basis of collective motions based on differential motility and adhesion mechanisms. A. Hallou would like to thank the University of Cambridge for the Award of an ``Oliver Gatty Studentship in Biophysical and Colloid Science''.

  19. Assessment of the Effectiveness of the Studio Format in Introductory Undergraduate Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montelone, Beth A.; Rintoul, David A.; Williams, Larry G.

    2008-01-01

    Kansas State University converted its introductory biology course, previously taught as an audio-tutorial (A-T), to a studio format in 1997. We share with others information about the process involved and present assessment data for the studio format course that address 1) student exam performance in A-T and studio; 2) student course grades in A-T…

  20. Miniaturized pattern formation in elastic films cast on sinusoidally patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Annepu, Hemalatha; Sarkar, Jayati

    2014-10-21

    The various morphologies that are formed when van der Waals forces or electric field is induced between film cast on a sinusoidal substrate and in contact proximity with a contactor or electrode are studied. Remarkably smaller length scales are achieved (λc < 2.96h) than those obtained with films cast on flat substrates. With van der Waals interactions, the patterns are uniformly formed throughout the film but are not regularly ordered. When electric field is used at critical voltage, more ordered, localized patterns are formed at the zones of large local interaction strengths. When these patterns are evolved by increasing the applied voltage, coexistence of all three phases-cavities, stripes, and columns-is observed throughout the film. The localized patterns that are initially formed vary with the voltage applied and strongly dictate the phases of evolution. A patterned substrate/patterned contactor assembly can be made to operate like its unpatterned counterpart by making the interaction strength same everywhere and yet yield uniform, regularly ordered, highly miniaturized patterns. Such patterns are very useful in various applications like microfluidics; they are formed with great ease and can be morphologically tuned by tuning the externally applied electric field. PMID:25238212

  1. Pulsed oxidation and biological evolution in the Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Kathleen A.; Huang, Jing; Chu, Xuelei; Jiang, Ganqing; Kaufman, Alan J.; Zhou, Chuanming; Yuan, Xunlai; Xiao, Shuhai

    2008-01-01

    Recent geochemical data from Oman, Newfoundland, and the western United States suggest that long-term oxidation of Ediacaran oceans resulted in progressive depletion of a large dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reservoir and potentially triggered the radiation of acanthomorphic acritarchs, algae, macroscopic Ediacara organisms, and, subsequently, motile bilaterian animals. However, the hypothesized coupling between ocean oxidation and evolution is contingent on the reliability of continuous geochemical and paleontological data in individual sections and of intercontinental correlations. Here we report high-resolution geochemical data from the fossil-rich Doushantuo Formation (635–551 Ma) in South China that confirm trends from other broadly equivalent sections and highlight key features that have not been observed in most sections or have received little attention. First, samples from the lower Doushantuo Formation are characterized by remarkably stable δ13Corg (carbon isotope composition of organic carbon) values but variable δ34SCAS (sulfur isotope composition of carbonate-associated sulfate) values, which are consistent with a large isotopically buffered DOC reservoir and relatively low sulfate concentrations. Second, there are three profound negative δ13Ccarb (carbon isotope composition of carbonate) excursions in the Ediacaran Period. The negative δ13Ccarb excursions in the middle and upper Doushantuo Formation record pulsed oxidation of the deep oceanic DOC reservoir. The oxidation events appear to be coupled with eukaryote diversity in the Doushantuo basin. Comparison with other early Ediacaran basins suggests spatial heterogeneity of eukaryote distribution and redox conditions. We hypothesize that the distribution of early Ediacaran eukaryotes likely tracked redox conditions and that only after ≈551 Ma (when Ediacaran oceans were pervasively oxidized) did evolution of oxygen-requiring taxa reach global distribution. PMID:18299566

  2. Patterns of Enquiry in Ecology: 1: Principles of Biological Enquiry and Problems of Ecological Enquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, F. Michael

    This is the first paper in a two-part series describing the patterns of inquiry used in ecology. Ecological knowledge and research are analyzed in terms of two sets of concepts: ecological problem areas, and principles of biological inquiry. Problem areas identified are classification and taxonomy, energetics, nutrition and metabolism, genecology,…

  3. The Dynamics of Visual Experience, an EEG Study of Subjective Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Mark A.; Twomey, Deirdre; Glennon, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the origin of psychological science a number of studies have reported visual pattern formation in the absence of either physiological stimulation or direct visual-spatial references. Subjective patterns range from simple phosphenes to complex patterns but are highly specific and reported reliably across studies. Methodology/Principal Findings Using independent-component analysis (ICA) we report a reduction in amplitude variance consistent with subjective-pattern formation in ventral posterior areas of the electroencephalogram (EEG). The EEG exhibits significantly increased power at delta/theta and gamma-frequencies (point and circle patterns) or a series of high-frequency harmonics of a delta oscillation (spiral patterns). Conclusions/Significance Subjective-pattern formation may be described in a way entirely consistent with identical pattern formation in fluids or granular flows. In this manner, we propose subjective-pattern structure to be represented within a spatio-temporal lattice of harmonic oscillations which bind topographically organized visual-neuronal assemblies by virtue of low frequency modulation. PMID:22292053

  4. Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Jing

    2007-01-01

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to

  5. Jamming and pattern formation in models of segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Tim; McKane, Alan J.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the Schelling model of social segregation, formulated as an intrinsically nonequilibrium system, in which the agents occupy districts (or patches) rather than sites on a grid. We show that this allows the equations governing the dynamical behavior of the model to be derived. Analysis of these equations reveals a jamming transition in the regime of low-vacancy density, and inclusion of a spatial dimension in the model leads to a pattern forming instability. Both of these phenomena exhibit unusual characteristics which may be studied through our approach.

  6. [The physics of pattern formation of liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Energy consumption in fabrication of materials for all applications is process dependent. Improvements in the ability to process materials are of great importance to the DOE mission. This project addresses basic science questions related to the processing of materials and is aimed at understanding growth of interfaces and evolution of patterns on interfaces, both macroscopic and microscopic. Three laboratory experiments are proposed: A study of the changes in patterns available to the growth of a macroscopic interface when that interface is grown over one of a variety of microscopic'' lattices; a study of reversible aggregation of colloidal particles in a mixed solvent, and of the interactions and relaxations of both solvent and suspended particles when thermodynamic conditions are changed for a liquid matrix with suspended particles or fibres; and, an investigation of the sedimentation of particles in a quasi-two-dimensional viscous fluid, with attention both to the dynamics of the flow and to the roughness of the resulting surface of settled particles.

  7. [The physics of pattern formation of liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    Energy consumption in fabrication of materials for all applications is process dependent. Improvements in the ability to process materials are of great importance to the DOE mission. This project addresses basic science questions related to the processing of materials and is aimed at understanding growth of interfaces and evolution of patterns on interfaces, both macroscopic and microscopic. Three laboratory experiments are proposed: A study of the changes in patterns available to the growth of a macroscopic interface when that interface is grown over one of a variety of ``microscopic`` lattices; a study of reversible aggregation of colloidal particles in a mixed solvent, and of the interactions and relaxations of both solvent and suspended particles when thermodynamic conditions are changed for a liquid matrix with suspended particles or fibres; and, an investigation of the sedimentation of particles in a quasi-two-dimensional viscous fluid, with attention both to the dynamics of the flow and to the roughness of the resulting surface of settled particles.

  8. Pattern Formation of Bacterial Colonies by Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Rie; Katoh, Takaki; Maeda, Yusuke; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Sano, Masaki; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the morphological diversity and change in bacterial colonies, using the bacterial species Escherichia coli, as a function of both agar concentration Ca and nutrient concentration Cn. We observed various colony patterns, classified them into four types by pattern characteristics and established a morphological diagram by dividing it into four regions. They are regions A [diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA)-like], B (Eden-like), C (concentric-ring), and D (fluid-spreading). In particular, we have observed a concentric-ring colony growth for E. coli. We focused on the periodic growth in region C and obtained the following results: (i) A colony grows cyclically with the growing front repeating an advance (migration phase) and a momentary rest (consolidation phase) alternately. (ii) The growth width L and the bulge width W in one cycle decrease asymptotically to certain values, when Ca is increased. (iii) L does not depend on Cn, while W is an increasing function of Cn. Plausible mechanisms are proposed to explain the experimental results, by comparing them with those obtained for other bacterial species such as Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus subtilis.

  9. Rethinking the nature of fibrolamellar bone: an integrative biological revision of sauropod plexiform bone formation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Koen; Prondvai, Edina

    2014-02-01

    We present novel findings on sauropod bone histology that cast doubt on general palaeohistological concepts concerning the true nature of woven bone in primary cortical bone and its role in the rapid growth and giant body sizes of sauropod dinosaurs. By preparing and investigating longitudinal thin sections of sauropod long bones, of which transverse thin sections were published previously, we found that the amount of woven bone in the primary complex has been largely overestimated. Using comparative cellular and light-extinction characteristics in the two section planes, we revealed that the majority of the bony lamina consists of longitudinally organized primary bone, whereas woven bone is usually represented only by a layer a few cells thin in the laminae. Previous arguments on sauropod biology, which have been based on the overestimated amount, misinterpreted formation process and misjudged role of woven bone in the plexiform bone formation of sauropod dinosaurs, are thereby rejected. To explain the observed pattern in fossil bones, we review the most recent advances in bone biology concerning bone formation processes at the cellular and tissue levels. Differentiation between static and dynamic osteogenesis (SO and DO) and the revealed characteristics of SO- versus DO-derived bone tissues shed light on several questions raised by our palaeohistological results and permit identification of these bone tissues in fossils with high confidence. By presenting the methods generally used for investigating fossil bones, we show that the major cause of overestimation of the amount of woven bone in previous palaeohistological studies is the almost exclusive usage of transverse sections. In these sections, cells and crystallites of the longitudinally organized primary bone are cut transversely, thus cells appear rounded and crystallites remain dark under crossed plane polarizers, thereby giving the false impression of woven bone. In order to avoid further confusion in

  10. Functional Skeletal Muscle Formation with a Biologic Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Jolene E.; Turner, Neill J.; Gilbert, Thomas W.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been used to reinforce or replace damaged or missing musculotendinous tissues in both preclinical studies and in human clinical applications. However, most studies have focused upon morphologic endpoints and few studies have assessed the in-situ functionality of newly formed tissue; especially new skeletal muscle tissue. The objective of the present study was to determine both the in-situ tetanic contractile response and histomorphologic characteristics of skeletal muscle tissue reconstructed using one of four test articles in a rodent abdominal wall model: 1) porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS)-ECM; 2) carbodiimide-crosslinked porcine SIS-ECM; 3) autologous tissue; or 4) polypropylene mesh. Six months after surgery, the remodeled SIS-ECM showed almost complete replacement by islands and sheets of skeletal muscle, which generated a similar maximal contractile force to native tissue but with greater resistance to fatigue. The autologous tissue graft was replaced by a mixture of collagenous connective tissue, adipose tissue with fewer islands of skeletal muscle compared to SIS-ECM and a similar fatigue resistance to native muscle. Carbodiimide-crosslinked SIS-ECM and polypropylene mesh were characterized by a chronic inflammatory response and produced little or no measureable tetanic force. The findings of this study show that non-crosslinked xenogeneic SIS scaffolds and autologous tissue are associated with the restoration of functional skeletal muscle with histomorphologic characteristics that resemble native muscle. PMID:20638716

  11. Pattern formation in the thiourea-iodate-sulfite system: Spatial bistability, waves, and stationary patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Judit; Szalai, István; De Kepper, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    We present a detailed study of the reaction-diffusion patterns observed in the thiourea-iodate-sulfite (TuIS) reaction, operated in open one-side-fed reactors. Besides spatial bistability and spatio-temporal oscillatory dynamics, this proton autoactivated reaction shows stationary patterns, as a result of two back-to-back Turing bifurcations, in the presence of a low-mobility proton binding agent (sodium polyacrylate). This is the third aqueous solution system to produce stationary patterns and the second to do this through a Turing bifurcation. The stationary pattern forming capacities of the reaction are explored through a systematic design method, which is applicable to other bistable and oscillatory reactions. The spatio-temporal dynamics of this reaction is compared with that of the previous ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite mixed Landolt system.

  12. Patterns of Family Formation in Response to Sex Ratio Variation.

    PubMed

    Schacht, Ryan; Kramer, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The impact that unbalanced sex ratios have on health and societal outcomes is of mounting contemporary concern. However, it is increasingly unclear whether it is male- or female-biased sex ratios that are associated with family and social instability. From a socio-demographic perspective, male-biased sex ratios leave many men unable to find a mate, elevating competition among males, disrupting family formation and negatively affecting social stability. In contrast, from a mating-market perspective, males are expected to be less willing to marry and commit to a family when the sex ratio is female-biased and males are rare. Here we use U.S. data to evaluate predictions from these competing frameworks by testing the relationship between the adult sex ratio and measures of family formation. We find that when women are rare men are more likely to marry, be part of a family and be sexually committed to a single partner. Our results do not support claims that male-biased sex ratios lead to negative family outcomes due to a surplus of unmarried men. Rather, our results highlight the need to pay increased attention to female-biased sex ratios. PMID:27556401

  13. Patterns of Family Formation in Response to Sex Ratio Variation

    PubMed Central

    Schacht, Ryan; Kramer, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The impact that unbalanced sex ratios have on health and societal outcomes is of mounting contemporary concern. However, it is increasingly unclear whether it is male- or female-biased sex ratios that are associated with family and social instability. From a socio-demographic perspective, male-biased sex ratios leave many men unable to find a mate, elevating competition among males, disrupting family formation and negatively affecting social stability. In contrast, from a mating-market perspective, males are expected to be less willing to marry and commit to a family when the sex ratio is female-biased and males are rare. Here we use U.S. data to evaluate predictions from these competing frameworks by testing the relationship between the adult sex ratio and measures of family formation. We find that when women are rare men are more likely to marry, be part of a family and be sexually committed to a single partner. Our results do not support claims that male-biased sex ratios lead to negative family outcomes due to a surplus of unmarried men. Rather, our results highlight the need to pay increased attention to female-biased sex ratios. PMID:27556401

  14. STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J. E.

    2010-11-20

    The solar photosphere is depleted in refractory elements compared to most solar twins, with the degree of depletion increasing with an element's condensation temperature. Here, I show that adding 4 Earth masses of Earth-like and carbonaceous-chondrite-like material to the solar convection zone brings the Sun's composition into line with the mean value for the solar twins. The observed solar composition could have arisen if the Sun's convection zone accreted material from the solar nebula that was depleted in refractory elements due to the formation of the terrestrial planets and ejection of rocky protoplanets from the asteroid belt. Most solar analogs are missing 0-10 Earth masses of rocky material compared to the most refractory-rich stars, providing an upper limit to the mass of rocky terrestrial planets that they possess. The missing mass is correlated with stellar metallicity. This suggests that the efficiency of planetesimal formation increases with stellar metallicity. Stars with and without known giant planets show a similar distribution of abundance trends. If refractory depletion is a signature of the presence of terrestrial planets, this suggests that there is not a strong correlation between the presence of terrestrial and giant planets in the same system.

  15. Morphology-Induced Collective Behaviors: Dynamic Pattern Formation in Water-Floating Elements

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kohei; Ngouabeu, Aubery Marchel Tientcheu; Miyashita, Shuhei; Göldi, Maurice; Füchslin, Rudolf Marcel; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Complex systems involving many interacting elements often organize into patterns. Two types of pattern formation can be distinguished, static and dynamic. Static pattern formation means that the resulting structure constitutes a thermodynamic equilibrium whose pattern formation can be understood in terms of the minimization of free energy, while dynamic pattern formation indicates that the system is permanently dissipating energy and not in equilibrium. In this paper, we report experimental results showing that the morphology of elements plays a significant role in dynamic pattern formation. We prepared three different shapes of elements (circles, squares, and triangles) floating in a water-filled container, in which each of the shapes has two types: active elements that were capable of self-agitation with vibration motors, and passive elements that were mere floating tiles. The system was purely decentralized: that is, elements interacted locally, and subsequently elicited global patterns in a process called self-organized segregation. We showed that, according to the morphology of the selected elements, a different type of segregation occurs. Also, we quantitatively characterized both the local interaction regime and the resulting global behavior for each type of segregation by means of information theoretic quantities, and showed the difference for each case in detail, while offering speculation on the mechanism causing this phenomenon. PMID:22715370

  16. Noise-induced pattern formation in a semiconductor nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, G; Balanov, A G; Schöll, E

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the influence of noise upon the dynamics of the current density distribution in a model of a semiconductor nanostructure, namely, a double barrier resonant tunneling diode. We fix the parameters of the device below the Hopf bifurcation, where the only stable state of the system is a spatially inhomogeneous "filamentary" steady state. We show that the addition of weak Gaussian white noise to the system gives rise to spatially inhomogeneous oscillations that can be quite coherent. As the noise intensity grows, the oscillations tend to become more and more spatially homogeneous, while simultaneously the temporal correlation of the oscillations decreases. Thus, while on one hand noise destroys temporal coherence, on the other hand it enhances the spatial coherence of the current density pattern. PMID:15697712

  17. Pattern formation in crystal growth under parabolic shear flow.

    PubMed

    Ueno, K

    2003-08-01

    Morphological instability of the solid-liquid interface occurring in a crystal growing from an undercooled thin liquid bounded on one side by a free surface and flowing down inclined plane, is investigated by a linear stability analysis under shear flow. It is found that restoring forces due to gravity and surface tension is an important factor for stabilization of the solid-liquid interface on long length scales. This is a stabilizing effect different from the Gibbs-Thomson effect. A particular long wavelength mode of about 1 cm of wavy pattern, observed on the surface of icicles covered with a thin layer of flowing water is obtained from the dispersion relation, including the effect of flow and restoring forces. PMID:14524982

  18. Experimental study of pattern formation during carbon dioxide mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuszter, Gabor; Brau, Fabian; de Wit, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Injection of supercritical carbon dioxide in deep porous aquifers, where mineral carbonation takes place via chemical reactions, is one of the possible long-term storage of this greenhouse gas. This mineralization process is investigated experimentally under controlled conditions in a confined horizontal Hele-Shaw geometry where an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate is injected radially into a solution of calcium chloride. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in various finger, flower or tube-like patterns is observed in the mixing zone between the two solutions. These precipitation structures and their growth dynamics are studied quantitatively as a function of the parameters of the problem, which are the injection rate and the reactant concentrations. In particular, we show the existence of critical concentrations of reactants above which the amount of the calcium carbonate precipitate produced drops significantly.

  19. Merging Worlds of Nanomaterials and Biological Environment: Factors Governing Protein Corona Formation on Nanoparticles and Its Biological Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroozandeh, Parisa; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2015-05-01

    Protein corona has became a prevalent subject in the field of nanomedicine owing to its diverse role in determining the efficiency, efficacy, and the ultimate biological fate of the nanomaterials used as a tool to treat and diagnose various diseases. For instance, protein corona formation on the surface of nanoparticles can modify its physicochemical properties and interfere with its intended functionalities in the biological microenvironments. As such, much emphasis should be placed in understanding these complex phenomena that occur at the bio-nano interface. The main aim of this review is to present different factors that are influencing protein-nanoparticle interaction such as physicochemical properties of nanoparticle ( i.e., size and size distribution, shape, composition, surface chemistry, and coatings) and the effect of biological microenvironments. Apart from that, the effect of ignored factors at the bio-nano interface such as temperature, plasma concentration, plasma gradient effect, administration route, and cell observer were also addressed.

  20. Identification of biologically recycled continental materials in banded iron formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.

    2015-12-01

    The controversy on the origin of banded iron formations (BIFs) has lasted for many decades. Studies prior to the 1970s suggested that Fe in BIFs was supplied from continental riverine inputs[1], but discovery of midocean ridge hydrothermal systems in the 1970s and identification of positive Eu anomaly in BIF samples led to an alternative model where hydrothermal vents provided Fe in BIFs[2]. Although the latter model has became widely accepted, it should be noted that interpretations of Fe sources for BIFs using the abundance and isotopic composition of rare earth elements (REEs) are based on an assumption that transport and deposition of REEs and Fe were coupled. We address the question of Fe sources and pathways for BIFs by combining stable Fe isotopes with radiogenic Nd isotopes as well as REE measurements to test proposals that Fe in BIFs was hydrothermally sourced. The samples investigated are from a type section of the Dales Gorge member of the 2.5 Ga Brockman Iron Formation, the world's most extensive Superior-type BIF that represents the climax of BIF deposition in the geologic record. Large variations were observed in both Fe and Nd isotope compositions of the BIF samples, and there is a positive correlation between the bulk rock ɛNd and δ56Fe values. In addition, there is a negative corelation between ɛNd and Sm/Nd ratios. In order to explain the observed correlations in those isotopic and elemental data, a two-component model, where mixing between a high ɛNd, low Sm/Nd hydrothermal endmember and a low ɛNd, low δ56Fe, but high Sm/Nd continental endmember occurred prior to deposition of the BIF, is required. The low-δ56Fe, high-Sm/Nd endmember is best explained by microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in the coastal sediments, which fractionated Fe isotopes and REEs and released these components back to water column that were ultimately precipitated in BIFs. The range and distribution of ɛNdvalues in the BIF samples suggest that the amount

  1. Pattern formation in stromatolites: insights from mathematical modelling

    PubMed Central

    Cuerno, R.; Escudero, C.; García-Ruiz, J. M.; Herrero, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    To this day, computer models for stromatolite formation have made substantial use of the Kardar–Parisi–Zhang (KPZ) equation. Oddly enough, these studies yielded mutually exclusive conclusions about the biotic or abiotic origin of such structures. We show in this paper that, at our current state of knowledge, a purely biotic origin for stromatolites can neither be proved nor disproved by means of a KPZ-based model. What can be shown, however, is that whatever their (biotic or abiotic) origin might be, some morphologies found in actual stromatolite structures (e.g. overhangs) cannot be formed as a consequence of a process modelled exclusively in terms of the KPZ equation and acting over sufficiently large times. This suggests the need to search for alternative mathematical approaches to model these structures, some of which are discussed in this paper. PMID:21993008

  2. Two-dimensional colloidal fluids exhibiting pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Blesson; Chalmers, Christopher; Archer, Andrew J.

    2015-12-01

    Fluids with competing short range attraction and long range repulsive interactions between the particles can exhibit a variety of microphase separated structures. We develop a lattice-gas (generalised Ising) model and analyse the phase diagram using Monte Carlo computer simulations and also with density functional theory (DFT). The DFT predictions for the structures formed are in good agreement with the results from the simulations, which occur in the portion of the phase diagram where the theory predicts the uniform fluid to be linearly unstable. However, the mean-field DFT does not correctly describe the transitions between the different morphologies, which the simulations show to be analogous to micelle formation. We determine how the heat capacity varies as the model parameters are changed. There are peaks in the heat capacity at state points where the morphology changes occur. We also map the lattice model onto a continuum DFT that facilitates a simplification of the stability analysis of the uniform fluid.

  3. Genetic oscillations. A Doppler effect in embryonic pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Soroldoni, Daniele; Jörg, David J; Morelli, Luis G; Richmond, David L; Schindelin, Johannes; Jülicher, Frank; Oates, Andrew C

    2014-07-11

    During embryonic development, temporal and spatial cues are coordinated to generate a segmented body axis. In sequentially segmenting animals, the rhythm of segmentation is reported to be controlled by the time scale of genetic oscillations that periodically trigger new segment formation. However, we present real-time measurements of genetic oscillations in zebrafish embryos showing that their time scale is not sufficient to explain the temporal period of segmentation. A second time scale, the rate of tissue shortening, contributes to the period of segmentation through a Doppler effect. This contribution is modulated by a gradual change in the oscillation profile across the tissue. We conclude that the rhythm of segmentation is an emergent property controlled by the time scale of genetic oscillations, the change of oscillation profile, and tissue shortening. PMID:25013078

  4. Formation of periodic and localized patterns in an oscillating granular layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I.; Tsimring, L. S.; Materials Science Division; Bar Ilan Univ.; Univ. of California at San Diego

    1998-02-01

    A simple phenomenological model for pattern formation in a vertically vibrated layer of granular particles is proposed. This model exhibits a variety of stable cellular patterns including standing rolls and squares as well as localized excitations (oscillons and worms), similar to recent experimental observations (Umbanhowar et al., 1996). The model is an order parameter equation for the parametrically excited waves coupled to the mass conservation law. The structure and dynamics of the solutions resemble closely the properties of patterns observed in the experiments.

  5. Counterion-mediated pattern formation in membranes containing anionic lipids

    PubMed Central

    Slochower, David R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Tourdot, Richard W.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Most lipid components of cell membranes are either neutral, like cholesterol, or zwitterionic, like phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Very few lipids, such as sphingosine, are cationic at physiological pH. These generally interact only transiently with the lipid bilayer, and their synthetic analogs are often designed to destabilize the membrane for drug or DNA delivery. However, anionic lipids are common in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. The net charge per anionic phospholipid ranges from −1 for the most abundant anionic lipids such has phosphatidylserine, to near −7 for phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate, although the effective charge depends on many environmental factors. Anionic phospholipids and other negatively charged lipids such as lipopolysaccharides are not randomly distributed in the lipid bilayer, but are highly restricted to specific leaflets of the bilayer and to regions near transmembrane proteins or other organized structures within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights some recent evidence that counterions, in the form of monovalent or divalent metal ions, polyamines, or cationic protein domains, have a large influence of the lateral distribution of anionic lipids within the membrane, and that lateral demixing of anionic lipids has effects on membrane curvature and protein function that are important for biological control. PMID:24556233

  6. Exploring Formative E-Assessment: Using Case Stories and Design Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Caroline; Pachler, Norbert; Mor, Yishay; Mellar, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    This article presents key findings from a Joint Information Systems Committee-funded project, which aimed to identify existing practices where technologies contribute to formative assessment and identify processes that take place around formative assessment where technologies play a significant role. Using a design pattern methodology, the project…

  7. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Hans-Georg; Meyer, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO), molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness < 10 nm) result from an interplay between dewetting patterns and diffusion limited growth pattern of ordered lamella growing within the dewetting areas. Besides structure formation of hydrophilic PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic) PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups. PMID:23385233

  8. Pattern cladistics and the 'realism-antirealism debate' in the philosophy of biology.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Silva, Francisco

    2009-06-01

    Despite the amount of work that has been produced on the subject over the years, the 'transformation of cladistics' is still a misunderstood episode in the history of comparative biology. Here, I analyze two outstanding, highly contrasting historiographic accounts on the matter, under the perspective of an influential dichotomy in the philosophy of science: the opposition between Scientific Realism and Empiricism. Placing special emphasis on the notion of 'causal grounding' of morphological characters (sensu Olivier Rieppel) in modern developmental biology's (mechanistic) theories, I arrive at the conclusion that a 'new transformation of cladistics' is philosophically plausible. This 'reformed' understanding of 'pattern cladistics' entails retaining the interpretation of cladograms as 'schemes of synapomorphies', but in association to construing cladogram nodes as 'developmental-genetic taxic homologies', instead of 'standard Darwinian ancestors'. The reinterpretation of pattern cladistics presented here additionally proposes to take Bas Van Fraassen's 'constructive empiricism' as a philosophical stance that could properly support such analysis of developmental-genetic data for systematic purposes. The latter suggestion is justified through a reappraisal of previous ideas developed by prominent pattern cladists (mainly, Colin Patterson), which concerned a scientifically efficient 'observable/non-observable distinction' linked to the conceptual pair 'ontogeny and phylogeny'. Finally, I argue that a robust articulation of Antirealist alternatives in systematics may provide a rational basis for its disciplinary separation from evolutionary biology, as well as for a critical reconsideration of the proper role of certain Scientific Realist positions, currently popular in comparative biology. PMID:19507040

  9. Microcodium: An extensive review and a proposed non-rhizogenic biologically induced origin for its formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabanov, Pavel; Anadón, Pere; Krumbein, Wolfgang E.

    2008-04-01

    Microcodium has been previously described as a mainly Cenozoic calcification pattern ascribed to various organisms. A review of the available literature and our data reveal two peaks in Microcodium abundance; the Moscovian-early Permian and the latest Cretaceous-Paleogene. A detailed analysis of late Paleozoic and Cenozoic examples leads to the following new conclusions. Typical Microcodium-forming unilayered 'corn-cob' aggregates of elongated grains and thick multilayered (palisade) replacing structures cannot be linked to smaller-grained intracellular root calcifications, as became widely accepted after the work of Klappa [Klappa, C.F., 1979. Calcified filaments in Quaternary calcretes: organo-mineral interactions in the subaerial vadose environment. J. Sediment. Petrol. 49, 955-968.] Typical Microcodium is recognized from the early Carboniferous (with doubtful Devonian reports) to Quaternary as a biologically induced mineralization formed via dissolution/precipitation processes in various aerobic Ca-rich soil and subsoil terrestrial environments. Morphology and δ13C signatures of Microcodium suggest that neither plants, algae, or roots and root-associated mycorrhiza regulate the formation of these fossil structures. Non-recrystallized Microcodium grains basically consist of slender (1.5-4 μm) curved radiating monocrystalline prisms with occasionally preserved hyphae-like morphology. Thin (0.5-3 μm) hypha-like canals can also be observed. These supposed hyphae may belong to actinobacteria. However, thin fungal mycelia cannot be excluded. We propose a model of Microcodium formation involving a mycelial saprotrophic organism responsible for substrate corrosion and associated bacteria capable of consuming acidic metabolites and CaCO 3 reprecipitation into the Microcodium structures.

  10. Instability and pattern formation in electrifield liquid layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    2015-11-01

    The stability and axisymmetric deformation of two immiscible, viscous, perfect or leaky dielectric fluids confined in the annulus between two concentric cylinders are studied in the presence of radial electric fields. The fields are set up by imposing a constant voltage potential difference between the inner and outer cylinders. We derive a set of equations for the interface in the long-wavelength approximation which retains the essential physics of the system and allows for interfacial deformations to be as large as the annular gap hence accounting for possible touchdown at the inner or outer electrode. As the layer thickness is asymptotically small, the system recovers the standard (modified) Hammond equation in the absence (presence) of electric fields. For both perfect and leaky dielectric liquids, the full nonlinear system is investigated numerically. It is shown that a two-side touching solution is possible for both the non-electrified and perfect dielectric cases, while only one-side touching is found in the case of leaky dielectric liquids, where the flattened interface shape resembles the pattern solutions found in literature. Meanwhile the finite-time singular solution agrees qualitatively with the experiments.

  11. Things fall apart: Topics in biophysics and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, Meredith Diane

    2000-11-01

    This thesis is made up of three distinct projects. Chapter 2 considers the effect of electrostatics on the stability of a charged membrane. We show that at low ionic strength and high surface charge density, repulsion between membrane charges renders it unstable to the formation of holes. An edge is unstable to modulations with wavelength longer than the Debye screening length. Hence at low ionic strength, membranes will disintegrate into vesicles. We use these results-to interpret experiments on stable holes in red blood cell ghosts. Chapter 3 discusses cylindrical chemotactic collapse. Under special conditions bacteria excrete an attractant and aggregate. The high density regions initially collapse into cylindrical structures, which subsequently destabilize into spherical aggregates. We present a theoretical description of this process. We show that cylindrical collapse involves a balance in which bacterial attraction and diffusion nearly cancel, leading to corrections to the collapse laws expected from dimensional analysis. The cylinder instability is composed of two stages: Initially, slow modulations to the cylinder develop, which correspond to a variation of the collapse time along the cylinder axis. Ultimately, one point on the cylinder pinches off. At this final stage, a front propagates from the pinch into the remainder of the cylinder. The spacing of the resulting spherical aggregates is determined by the front propagation. Chapter 4 describes penitentes, columns of snow several meters tall which form on glaciers at high altitudes. They form by reflection of sunlight: depressions in the snow receive more reflected sunlight than the top edges, and therefore melt more quickly. Although this explanation is accepted in the literature, no one has previously formulated a mathematical model of penitente formation. This work models the process, aiming to quantify the ideas in the literature. We describe what size and shape penitentes appear, and how this depends

  12. Spontaneous pattern formation in a thin film of bacteriorhodopsin with mixed absorptive-dispersive nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, J.; Saffman, M.

    1995-03-01

    We have observed the spontaneous formation of transverse spatial patterns in a thin film of bacteriorhodopsin with a feedback mirror. Bacteriorhodopsin has a mixed absorptive-dispersive nonlinearity at the wavelength used in the experiments (633 nm). Threshold values of the incident intensity for observation of pattern formation are found from a linear stability analysis of a model that describes bacteriorhodopsin as a sluggish saturable nonlinear medium with a complex Kerr coefficient. The calculated threshold intensity is in good agreement with the experimental observations, and the patterns are predicted to be frequency offset from the pump radiation.

  13. Towards understanding speckle pattern formation in optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Valentin; Meglinski, Igor; Doronin, Alexander; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2016-03-01

    We consider the mechanism of speckle patterns formation in time-domain and swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT), and introduce a Monte Carlo based model for simulating OCT signals and images. The model takes into account polarization and coherent properties of light, mutual interference of the back-scattering light, and its interference with the reference beam. The developed model is employed to generate OCT images, and to analyze the resultant OCT speckle pattern properties. The model simulation results are compared with experimental measurements, and an interpretation of the speckle patterns formation in terms of its underlying physics is provided.

  14. One-dimensional pattern of Au nanodots by ion-beam sputtering: formation and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-H; Ha, N-B; Kim, J-S; Joe, M; Lee, K-R; Cuerno, R

    2011-07-15

    Highly ordered one-dimensional arrays of nanodots, or nanobeads, are fabricated by forming nanoripples and nanodots in sequence, entirely by ion-beam sputtering (IBS) of Au(001). This demonstrates the capability of IBS for the fabrication of sophisticated nanostructures via hierarchical self-assembly. The intricate nanobead pattern ideally serves to identify the governing mechanisms for the pattern formation: nonlinear effects, especially local redeposition and surface-confined transport, are essential both for the formation and the preservation of the one-dimensional order of the nanobead pattern. PMID:21625038

  15. Formation of spatially patterned colloidal photonic crystals through the control of capillary forces and template recognition.

    PubMed

    Brozell, Adrian M; Muha, Michelle A; Parikh, Atul N

    2005-12-01

    We report the formation of microscopic patterns of substrate-supported, 3D planar colloidal crystals using physical confinement in conjunction with surfaces displaying predetermined binary patterns of hydropholicity. The formation process involves a primary self-assembly wherein nano- and microscale colloids order into a photonic fcc lattice via capillary interactions followed by a secondary template-induced crystal cleavage step. Following this method, arbitrary arrays of pattern elements, which preserve structural and orientational properties of the parent crystal, can be easily obtained. PMID:16316085

  16. The dynamics of spatio-temporal Rho GTPase signaling: formation of signaling patterns

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Rafael Dominik; Pertz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPases are crucial signaling molecules that regulate a plethora of biological functions. Traditional biochemical, cell biological, and genetic approaches have founded the basis of Rho GTPase biology. The development of biosensors then allowed measuring Rho GTPase activity with unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution. This revealed that Rho GTPase activity fluctuates on time and length scales of tens of seconds and micrometers, respectively. In this review, we describe Rho GTPase activity patterns observed in different cell systems. We then discuss the growing body of evidence that upstream regulators such as guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins shape these patterns by precisely controlling the spatio-temporal flux of Rho GTPase activity. Finally, we comment on additional mechanisms that might feed into the regulation of these signaling patterns and on novel technologies required to dissect this spatio-temporal complexity. PMID:27158467

  17. Polar pattern formation in driven filament systems requires non-binary particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Weber, Christoph A.; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2015-10-01

    From the self-organization of the cytoskeleton to the synchronous motion of bird flocks, living matter has the extraordinary ability to behave in a concerted manner. The Boltzmann equation for self-propelled particles is frequently used in silico to link a system’s meso- or macroscopic behaviour to the microscopic dynamics of its constituents. But so far such studies have relied on an assumption of simplified binary collisions owing to a lack of experimental data suggesting otherwise. We report here experimentally determined binary-collision statistics by studying a recently introduced molecular system, the high-density actomyosin motility assay. We demonstrate that the alignment induced by binary collisions is too weak to account for the observed ordering transition. The transition density for polar pattern formation decreases quadratically with filament length, indicating that multi-filament collisions drive the observed ordering phenomenon and that a gas-like picture cannot explain the transition of the system to polar order. Our findings demonstrate that the unique properties of biological active-matter systems require a description that goes well beyond that developed in the framework of kinetic theories.

  18. Pattern Formation and Reaction Textures during Dunite Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of olivine-bearing rocks by fluids is one of the most pervasive geochemical processes on the surface of the Earth. Serpentinized and/or carbonated ultramafic rocks often exhibit characteristic textures on many scales, from polygonal mesh textures on the grain-scale to onion-skin or kernel patterns on the outcrop scale. Strong disequilibrium between pristine ultramafic rocks and common geological fluids such as water and carbon dioxide leads to rapid reactions and coupled mechanical and chemical feedbacks that manifest as characteristic textures. Textural evolution during metasomatic reactions can control effective reaction rates by modulating dynamic porosity and therefore reactant supply and reactive surface area. We run hydrostatic experiments on thermally cracked dunites saturated with carbon dioxide bearing brine at 15 MPa confining pressure and 150°C to explore the evolution of physical properties and reaction textures as carbon mineralization takes place in the sample. Compaction and permeability reduction are observed throughout experiments. Rates of porosity and permeability changes are sensitive to pore fluid chemistry. After reaction, samples are imaged in 3-dimension (3D) using a dual-beam FIB-SEM. Analysis of the high resolution 3D microstructure shows that permeable, highly porous domains are created by olivine dissolution at a characteristic distance from pre-existing crack surfaces while precipitation of secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnesite is limited largely to the primary void space. The porous dissolution channels provide an avenue for fluid ingress, allow reactions to continue and could lead to progressive hierarchical fracturing. Initial modeling of the system indicates that this texture is the result of coupling between dissolution-precipitation reactions and the local stress state of the sample.

  19. Dependence of Initial Value on Pattern Formation for a Logistic Coupled Map Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Guang; Cui, Haoyue

    2016-01-01

    The logistic coupled map lattices (LCML) have been widely investigated as well as their pattern dynamics. The patterns formation may depend on not only fluctuations of system parameters, but variation of the initial conditions. However, the mathematical discussion is quite few for the effect of initial values so far. The present paper is concerned with the pattern formation for a two-dimensional Logistic coupled map lattice, where any initial value can be linear expressed by corresponding eigenvectors, and patterns formation can be determined by selecting the corresponding eigenvectors. A set of simulations are conducted whose results demonstrate the fact. The method utilized in the present paper could be applied to other discrete systems as well. PMID:27382964

  20. Pattern formation in vibrated beds of dry and wet granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan Lim, Eldin Wee

    2014-01-01

    The Discrete Element Method was coupled with a capillary liquid bridge force model for computational studies of pattern formation in vibrated granular beds containing dry or wet granular materials. Depending on the vibration conditions applied, hexagonal, stripes, or cellular pattern was observed in the dry vibrated granular bed. In each of these cases, the same hexagonal, stripes, or cellular pattern was also observed in the spatial distribution of the magnitudes of particle-particle collision forces prior to the formation of the corresponding actual pattern in physical distributions of the particles. This seemed to suggest that the pattern formation phenomenon of vibrated granular bed systems might be the result of a two-dimensional Newton's cradle effect. In the presence of a small amount of wetness, these patterns were no longer formed in the vibrated granular beds under the same corresponding set of vibration conditions. Despite the relatively much weaker capillary forces arising from the simulated liquid bridges between particles compared with particle-particle collision forces, the spatial distributions of these collision forces, physical distributions of particles, as well as time profiles of average collision forces were altered significantly in comparison with the corresponding distributions and profiles observed for the dry vibrated granular beds. This seemed to suggest the presence of a two-dimensional Stokes' cradle effect in these wet vibrated granular bed systems which disrupted the formation of patterns in the wet granular materials that would have been observed in their dry counterparts.

  1. Pattern formation during gastrulation in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    McClay, D R; Armstrong, N A; Hardin, J

    1992-01-01

    The sea urchin embryo follows a relatively simple cell behavioral sequence in its gastrulation movements. To form the mesoderm, primary mesenchyme cells ingress from the vegetal plate and then migrate along the basal lamina lining the blastocoel. The presumptive secondary mesenchyme and endoderm then invaginate from the vegetal pole of the embryo. The archenteron elongates and extends across the blastocoel until the tip of the archenteron touches and attaches to the opposite side of the blastocoel. Secondary mesenchyme cells, originally at the tip of the archenteron, differentiate to form a variety of structures including coelomic pouches, esophageal muscles, pigment cells and other cell types. After migration of the secondary mesenchyme cells from their original position at the tip of the archenteron, the endoderm fuses with an invagination of the ventral ectoderm (the stomodaem), to form the mouth and complete the process of gastrulation. A larval skeleton is made by primary mesenchyme cells during the time of archenteron and mouth formation. A number of experiments have established that these morphogenetic movements involve a number of cell autonomous behaviors plus a series of cell interactions that provide spatial, temporal and scalar information to cells of the mesoderm and endoderm. The cell autonomous behaviors can be demonstrated by the ability of micromeres or endoderm to perform their morphogenetic functions if either is isolated and grown in culture. The requirement for cell interactions has been demonstrated by manipulative experiments where it has been shown that axial information, temporal information, spatial information and scalar information is obtained by mesoderm and endoderm from other embryonic cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1299366

  2. Predicting the Distribution of Spiral Waves from Cell Properties in a Developmental-Path Model of Dictyostelium Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Geberth, Daniel; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2009-01-01

    The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is one of the model systems of biological pattern formation. One of the most successful answers to the challenge of establishing a spiral wave pattern in a colony of homogeneously distributed D. discoideum cells has been the suggestion of a developmental path the cells follow (Lauzeral and coworkers). This is a well-defined change in properties each cell undergoes on a longer time scale than the typical dynamics of the cell. Here we show that this concept leads to an inhomogeneous and systematic spatial distribution of spiral waves, which can be predicted from the distribution of cells on the developmental path. We propose specific experiments for checking whether such systematics are also found in data and thus, indirectly, provide evidence of a developmental path. PMID:19593362

  3. [The pattern of relationships between nanosciences, health, and biology: a historical survey using Citespace].

    PubMed

    Novo, Magda Suzana; Geracitano, Laura Alicia; Henning, Paula

    2013-10-01

    The article traces a pattern of relationships between nanosciences, health, and biology to provide a historical overview of the nanoscience field. Input data came from the Web of Science databank, through a search first based on the keywords 'nanoscience' and 'nanotechnology' and also the selection of words related to biology and health. Application of the Citespace program made it possible to visualize the pattern of relationships between topics in the research base, allowing identification of burst and centrality points on the subject. Data findings show that the relationship between these areas emerged in 2006, most of them related to nanomedicine. There are also a significant number of works on nanotoxicology, since these two areas necessarily come hand in hand. PMID:23827968

  4. Pattern formation through spatial interactions in a modified Daisyworld model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Tommaso; Primavera, Leonardo; Lepreti, Fabio; Vecchio, Antonio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    The Daisyworld model is based on a hypothetical planet, like the Earth, which receives the radiant energy coming from a Sun-like star, and populated by two kinds of identical plants differing by their colour: white daisies reflecting light and black daisies absorbing light. The interactions and feedbacks between the collective biota of the planet and the incoming radiation form a self-regulating system where the conditions for life are maintained. We investigate a modified version of the Daisyworld model where a spatial dependency on latitude is introduced, and both a variable heat diffusivity along latitude and a simple greenhouse model are included. We show that the spatial interactions between the variables of the system can generate some equilibrium patterns which can locally stabilize the coexistence of the two vegetation types. The feedback on albedo is able to generate new equilibrium solutions which can efficiently self-regulate the planet climate, even for values of the solar luminosity relatively far from the current Earth conditions. The extension to spatial Daisyworld gives room to the possibility of inhomogeneous solar forcing in a curved planet, with explicit differences between poles and equator and the direct use of the heat diffusion equation. As a first approach, to describe a spherical planet, we consider the temperature T(θ,t) and the surface coverage as depending only on time and on latitude θ (-90° ≤ θ ≤ 90°). A second step is the introduction of the greenhouse effect in the model, the process by which outgoing infrared radiation is partly screened by greenhouse gases. This effect can be described by relaxing the black-body radiation hypothesis and by introducing a grayness function g(T) in the heat equation. As a third step, we consider a latitude dependence of the Earth's conductivity, χ = χ(θ). Considering these terms, using spherical coordinates and symmetry with respect to θ, the modified Daisyworld equations reduce to the

  5. “Pop-slide” patterning: Rapid fabrication of microstructured PDMS gasket slides for biological applications

    PubMed Central

    Ramji, Ramesh; Khan, Nafeesa T; Muñoz-Rojas, Andrés; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    We describe a “pop-slide” patterning approach to easily produce thin film microstructures on the surface of glass with varying feature sizes (3 μm – 250 μm) and aspect ratios (0.066 – 3) within 45 minutes. This low cost method does not require specialized equipment while allowing us to produce micro structured gasket layers for sandwich assays and could be readily applied to many biological applications. PMID:26949529

  6. BIOCAT: a pattern recognition platform for customizable biological image classification and annotation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pattern recognition algorithms are useful in bioimage informatics applications such as quantifying cellular and subcellular objects, annotating gene expressions, and classifying phenotypes. To provide effective and efficient image classification and annotation for the ever-increasing microscopic images, it is desirable to have tools that can combine and compare various algorithms, and build customizable solution for different biological problems. However, current tools often offer a limited solution in generating user-friendly and extensible tools for annotating higher dimensional images that correspond to multiple complicated categories. Results We develop the BIOimage Classification and Annotation Tool (BIOCAT). It is able to apply pattern recognition algorithms to two- and three-dimensional biological image sets as well as regions of interest (ROIs) in individual images for automatic classification and annotation. We also propose a 3D anisotropic wavelet feature extractor for extracting textural features from 3D images with xy-z resolution disparity. The extractor is one of the about 20 built-in algorithms of feature extractors, selectors and classifiers in BIOCAT. The algorithms are modularized so that they can be “chained” in a customizable way to form adaptive solution for various problems, and the plugin-based extensibility gives the tool an open architecture to incorporate future algorithms. We have applied BIOCAT to classification and annotation of images and ROIs of different properties with applications in cell biology and neuroscience. Conclusions BIOCAT provides a user-friendly, portable platform for pattern recognition based biological image classification of two- and three- dimensional images and ROIs. We show, via diverse case studies, that different algorithms and their combinations have different suitability for various problems. The customizability of BIOCAT is thus expected to be useful for providing effective and efficient

  7. How can macromolecular crowding inhibit biological reactions? The enhanced formation of DNA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sen; Trochimczyk, Piotr; Sun, Lili; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Zhang, Xuzhu; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the already known effect that macromolecular crowding usually promotes biological reactions, solutions of PEG 6k at high concentrations stop the cleavage of DNA by HindIII enzyme, due to the formation of DNA nanoparticles. We characterized the DNA nanoparticles and probed the prerequisites for their formation using multiple techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence analytical ultracentrifugation etc. In >25% PEG 6k solution, macromolecular crowding promotes the formation of DNA nanoparticles with dimensions of several hundreds of nanometers. The formation of DNA nanoparticles is a fast and reversible process. Both plasmid DNA (2686 bp) and double-stranded/single-stranded DNA fragment (66bp/nt) can form nanoparticles. We attribute the enhanced nanoparticle formation to the depletion effect of macromolecular crowding. This study presents our idea to enhance the formation of DNA nanoparticles by macromolecular crowding, providing the first step towards a final solution to efficient gene therapy. PMID:26903405

  8. How can macromolecular crowding inhibit biological reactions? The enhanced formation of DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sen; Trochimczyk, Piotr; Sun, Lili; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Zhang, Xuzhu; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the already known effect that macromolecular crowding usually promotes biological reactions, solutions of PEG 6k at high concentrations stop the cleavage of DNA by HindIII enzyme, due to the formation of DNA nanoparticles. We characterized the DNA nanoparticles and probed the prerequisites for their formation using multiple techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence analytical ultracentrifugation etc. In >25% PEG 6k solution, macromolecular crowding promotes the formation of DNA nanoparticles with dimensions of several hundreds of nanometers. The formation of DNA nanoparticles is a fast and reversible process. Both plasmid DNA (2686 bp) and double-stranded/single-stranded DNA fragment (66bp/nt) can form nanoparticles. We attribute the enhanced nanoparticle formation to the depletion effect of macromolecular crowding. This study presents our idea to enhance the formation of DNA nanoparticles by macromolecular crowding, providing the first step towards a final solution to efficient gene therapy. PMID:26903405

  9. Retinoic acid, local cell-cell interactions, and pattern formation in vertebrate limbs.

    PubMed

    Bryant, S V; Gardiner, D M

    1992-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a derivative of vitamin A, has remarkable effects on developing and regenerating limbs. These effects include teratogenesis, arising from RA's ability to inhibit growth and pattern formation. They also include pattern duplication, arising as a result of the stimulation of additional growth and pattern formation. In this review we present evidence that the diverse effects of RA are consistent with a singular, underlying explanation. We propose that in all cases exogenously applied RA causes the positional information of pattern formation-competent cells to be reset to a value that is posterior-ventral-proximal with respect to the limb. The diversity of outcomes can be seen as a product of the mode of application of exogenous RA (global versus local) coupled with the unifying concept that growth and pattern formation in both limb development and limb regeneration are controlled by local cell-cell interactions, as formulated in the polar coordinate model. We explore the possibility that the major role of endogenous RA in limb development is in the establishment of the limb field rather than as a diffusible morphogen that specifies graded positional information across the limb as previously proposed. Finally, we interpret the results of the recent finding that RA can turn tail regenerates into limbs, as evidence that intercalary interactions may also be involved in the formation of the primary body axis. PMID:1628749

  10. Effect of substrate temperature on pattern formation of nanoparticles from volatile drops.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Maryam; Harmand, Souad; Sefiane, Khellil; Bigerelle, Maxence; Deltombe, Raphaël

    2015-03-24

    This study investigates pattern formation during evaporation of water-based nanofluid sessile droplets placed on a smooth silicon surface at various temperatures. An infrared thermography technique was employed to observe the temperature distribution along the air-liquid interface of evaporating droplets. In addition, an optical interferometry technique is used to quantify and characterize the deposited patterns. Depending on the substrate temperature, three distinctive deposition patterns are observed: a nearly uniform coverage pattern, a "dual-ring" pattern, and multiple rings corresponding to "stick-slip" pattern. At all substrate temperatures, the internal flow within the drop builds a ringlike cluster of the solute on the top region of drying droplets, which is found essential for the formation of the secondary ring deposition onto the substrate for the deposits with the "dual-ring" pattern. The size of the secondary ring is found to be dependent on the substrate temperature. For the deposits with the rather uniform coverage pattern, the ringlike cluster of the solute does not deposit as a distinct secondary ring; instead, it is deformed by the contact line depinning. In the case of the "stick-slip" pattern, the internal flow behavior is complex and found to be vigorous with rapid circulating flow which appears near the edge of the drop. PMID:25742508

  11. Discovering and validating biological hypotheses from coherent patterns in functional genomics data

    SciTech Connect

    Joachimiak, Marcin Pawel

    2008-08-12

    The area of transcriptomics analysis is among the more established in computational biology, having evolved in both technology and experimental design. Transcriptomics has a strong impetus to develop sophisticated computational methods due to the large amounts of available whole-genome datasets for many species and because of powerful applications in regulatory network reconstruction as well as elucidation and modeling of cellular transcriptional responses. While gene expression microarray data can be noisy and comparisons across experiments challenging, there are a number of sophisticated methods that aid in arriving at statistically and biologically significant conclusions. As such, computational transcriptomics analysis can provide guidance for analysis of results from newer experimental technologies. More recently, search methods have been developed to identify modules of genes, which exhibit coherent expression patterns in only a subset of experimental conditions. The latest advances in these methods allow to integrate multiple data types anddatasets, both experimental and computational, within a single statistical framework accounting for data confidence and relevance to specific biological questions. Such frameworks provide a unified environment for the exploration of specific biological hypothesis and for the discovery of coherent data patterns along with the evidence supporting them.

  12. Pattern formation in the iodate-sulfite-thiosulfate reaction-diffusion system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haimiao; Pojman, John A; Zhao, Yuemin; Pan, Changwei; Zheng, Juhua; Yuan, Ling; Horváth, Attila K; Gao, Qingyu

    2012-01-01

    Sodium polyacrylate-induced pH pattern formation and starch-induced iodine pattern formation were investigated in the iodate-sulfite-thiosulfate (IST) reaction in a one-side fed disc gel reactor (OSFR). As binding agents of the autocatalyst of hydrogen ions or iodide ions, different content of sodium polyacrylate or starch has induced various types of pattern formation. We observed pH pulses, striped patterns, mixed spots and stripes, and hexagonal spots upon increasing the content of sodium polyacrylate and observed iodine pulses, branched patterns, and labyrinthine patterns upon increasing the starch content in the system. Coexistence of a pH front and an iodine front was also studied in a batch IST reaction-diffusion system. Both pH and iodine front instabilities were observed in the presence of sodium polyacrylate, i.e., cellular fronts and transient Turing structures resulting from the decrease in diffusion coefficients of activators. The mechanism of multiple feedback may explain the different patterns in the IST reaction-diffusion system. PMID:22068976

  13. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions ( de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically colocalize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  14. On the role of vegetation in the formation of river anabranching patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzy, B.; D'Odorico, P.; Wütrich, D.; Perona, P.

    2012-04-01

    Part of studies on the couplings between the evolution of riparian vegetation and the river morphodynamics, we investigate the effect of spatial interactions between vegetation located at different positions within the channel. This work generalizes the experimental and theoretical results by Perona et al. and by Crouzy and Perona (both Advances in Water Resources, in Press) on colonization of riverbars by seedlings or large woody debris by relaxing the hypothesis made in those two works of the biomass growth and uprooting being independent on the presence of neighboring plants. While the hypothesis of independent vegetation growth and uprooting is justified for sparse vegetation cover or young seedlings, it fails as soon as the canopy significantly disturbs the flow or changes the sediment stability. Then, flow-mediated interactions between riparian vegetation located at different positions within the channel can be observed. Those interactions are either constructive or destructive. For example, a region favorable to the development of biomass appears on the lee side of a vegetated obstacle (with bleed flow) due to increased deposition of seeds and sediment (Schnauder and Moggridge, 2008) while conversely scouring can be increased laterally due to obstacle-induced flow diversion (Roulund et al., 2005; Melville and Sutherland, 1988; Zong and Nepf, 2008). We focus on the role of vegetation in the formation of the regular vegetated ridge patterns found in ephemeral rivers (see for example the work by Tooth and Nanson, 2004 on anabranching patterns) or as a succession of swales and ridges on the inside of meander bends (scroll bars). From the analysis of aerial images, we obtain the characteristic length scale of the patterns. We show how in the limit where the hydrological (interarrival time of floods) and the biological (germination and growth rates) timescales are comparable the combination between both positive and negative feedbacks between vegetation located at

  15. A stochastic multicellular model identifies biological watermarks from disorders in self-organized patterns of phyllotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Refahi, Yassin; Brunoud, Géraldine; Farcot, Etienne; Jean-Marie, Alain; Pulkkinen, Minna; Vernoux, Teva; Godin, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of developmental mechanisms classically relies on analysis of pattern regularities. Whether disorders induced by biological noise may carry information on building principles of developmental systems is an important debated question. Here, we addressed theoretically this question using phyllotaxis, the geometric arrangement of plant aerial organs, as a model system. Phyllotaxis arises from reiterative organogenesis driven by lateral inhibitions at the shoot apex. Motivated by recurrent observations of disorders in phyllotaxis patterns, we revisited in depth the classical deterministic view of phyllotaxis. We developed a stochastic model of primordia initiation at the shoot apex, integrating locality and stochasticity in the patterning system. This stochastic model recapitulates phyllotactic patterns, both regular and irregular, and makes quantitative predictions on the nature of disorders arising from noise. We further show that disorders in phyllotaxis instruct us on the parameters governing phyllotaxis dynamics, thus that disorders can reveal biological watermarks of developmental systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14093.001 PMID:27380805

  16. Nanoporous silicon-based surface patterns fabricated by UV laser interference techniques for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio-Sánchez, G.; Peláez, R. J.; Vega, F.; Martín-Palma, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of selectively functionalized micropatterns based on nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) by phase mask ultraviolet laser interference is presented here. This single-step process constitutes a flexible method for the fabrication of surface patterns with tailored properties. These surface patterns consist of alternate regions of almost untransformed nanoPS and areas where nanoPS is transformed into Si nanoparticles (Si NPs) as a result of the laser irradiation process. The size of the transformed areas as well as the diameter of the Si NPs can be straightforwardly tailored by controlling the main fabrications parameters including the porosity of the nanoPS layers, the laser interference period areas, and laser fluence. The surface patterns have been found to be appropriate candidates for the development of selectively-functionalized surfaces for biological applications mainly due to the biocompatibility of the untransformed nanoPS regions.

  17. The influence of biological soil crusts on successional vegetation patterns in a revegetated desert area in the Tengger Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huang; Zhi-shan, Zhang; Xin-rong, Li

    2014-05-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are an important cover in arid desert landscapes, and have a profound effect on the soil water redistribution, plant growth and vegetation succession. Although a large number of studies have focused on the single-process of BSCs experimentally, relatively few studies have examined the eco-hydrological mechanisms of BSCs influence on successional vegetation patterns in revegetated desert areas. In this study, based on the long term monitoring and focused research on sand-binding vegetation in the Shapotou region (southeastern edge of the Tengger Desert, China) since the 1950s, the characteristics of plant community and BSCs at different successional stages, and the soil water dynamics were investigated. Then a simplified mathematical model describing the coupled dynamics of soil moisture and vegetation in drylands was developed. And finally the role of BSCs on soil water dynamics and vegetation patterns were discussed. Results have showed that BSCs was closely associated with the vegetation succession, such as in the Caragana korshinskii community, moss crusts were the dominate species and in the Artemisia ordosica community, algae crusts were the dominate species. BSCs had a significant effect on soil water infiltration and it was one of the main driving forces to vegetation pattern formations, as algae crusts would induced the tiger bush stripes and moss crusts would lead to the leopard bush spots in arid ecosystems.

  18. On the dynamics of Liesegang-type pattern formation in a gaseous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Álvarez, Elizeth; Montoya, Fernando; Buhse, Thomas; Rios-Herrera, Wady; Torres-Guzmán, José; Rivera, Marco; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-03-01

    Liesegang pattern formations are widely spread in nature. In spite of a comparably simple experimental setup under laboratory conditions, a variety of spatio-temporal structures may arise. Presumably because of easier control of the experimental conditions, Liesegang pattern formation was mainly studied in gel systems during more than a century. Here we consider pattern formation in a gas phase, where beautiful but highly complex reaction-diffusion-convection dynamics are uncovered by means of a specific laser technique. A quantitative analysis reveals that two different, apparently independent processes, both highly correlated and synchronized across the extension of the reaction cloud, act on different time scales. Each of them imprints a different structure of salt precipitation at the tube walls.

  19. A Theoretical Model of Jigsaw-Puzzle Pattern Formation by Plant Leaf Epidermal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Yoshimura, Kenji; Miura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Plant leaf epidermal cells exhibit a jigsaw puzzle–like pattern that is generated by interdigitation of the cell wall during leaf development. The contribution of two ROP GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, to the cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate epidermal cell wall interdigitation has already been examined; however, how interactions between these molecules result in pattern formation remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a simple interface equation model that incorporates both the cell wall remodeling activity of ROP GTPases and the diffusible signaling molecules by which they are regulated. This model successfully reproduces pattern formation observed in vivo, and explains the counterintuitive experimental results of decreased cellulose production and increased thickness. Our model also reproduces the dynamics of three-way cell wall junctions. Therefore, this model provides a possible mechanism for cell wall interdigitation formation in vivo. PMID:27054467

  20. Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Henri; Redinger, Alex; Messlinger, Sebastian; Stoian, Georgiana; Michely, Thomas; Rosandi, Yudi; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Linke, Udo

    2006-06-15

    Ripple patterns forming on Pt(111) due to 5 keV Ar{sup +} grazing-incidence ion bombardment were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy in a broad temperature range from 100 to 720 K and for ion fluences up to 3x10{sup 20} ions/m{sup 2}. A detailed morphological analysis together with molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts allow us to develop atomic scale models for the formation of these patterns. The large difference in step edge versus terrace damage is shown to be crucial for ripple formation under grazing incidence. The importance of distinct diffusion processes--step adatom generation at kinks and adatom lattice gas formation--for temperature dependent transitions in the surface morphology is highlighted. Surprisingly, ion bombardment effects like thermal spike induced adatom production and planar subsurface channeling are important for pattern ordering.

  1. A Theoretical Model of Jigsaw-Puzzle Pattern Formation by Plant Leaf Epidermal Cells.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Yoshimura, Kenji; Miura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Plant leaf epidermal cells exhibit a jigsaw puzzle-like pattern that is generated by interdigitation of the cell wall during leaf development. The contribution of two ROP GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, to the cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate epidermal cell wall interdigitation has already been examined; however, how interactions between these molecules result in pattern formation remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a simple interface equation model that incorporates both the cell wall remodeling activity of ROP GTPases and the diffusible signaling molecules by which they are regulated. This model successfully reproduces pattern formation observed in vivo, and explains the counterintuitive experimental results of decreased cellulose production and increased thickness. Our model also reproduces the dynamics of three-way cell wall junctions. Therefore, this model provides a possible mechanism for cell wall interdigitation formation in vivo. PMID:27054467

  2. On the dynamics of Liesegang-type pattern formation in a gaseous system.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Álvarez, Elizeth; Montoya, Fernando; Buhse, Thomas; Rios-Herrera, Wady; Torres-Guzmán, José; Rivera, Marco; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Müller, Markus F

    2016-01-01

    Liesegang pattern formations are widely spread in nature. In spite of a comparably simple experimental setup under laboratory conditions, a variety of spatio-temporal structures may arise. Presumably because of easier control of the experimental conditions, Liesegang pattern formation was mainly studied in gel systems during more than a century. Here we consider pattern formation in a gas phase, where beautiful but highly complex reaction-diffusion-convection dynamics are uncovered by means of a specific laser technique. A quantitative analysis reveals that two different, apparently independent processes, both highly correlated and synchronized across the extension of the reaction cloud, act on different time scales. Each of them imprints a different structure of salt precipitation at the tube walls. PMID:27025405

  3. On the dynamics of Liesegang-type pattern formation in a gaseous system

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Álvarez, Elizeth; Montoya, Fernando; Buhse, Thomas; Rios-Herrera, Wady; Torres-Guzmán, José; Rivera, Marco; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Liesegang pattern formations are widely spread in nature. In spite of a comparably simple experimental setup under laboratory conditions, a variety of spatio-temporal structures may arise. Presumably because of easier control of the experimental conditions, Liesegang pattern formation was mainly studied in gel systems during more than a century. Here we consider pattern formation in a gas phase, where beautiful but highly complex reaction-diffusion-convection dynamics are uncovered by means of a specific laser technique. A quantitative analysis reveals that two different, apparently independent processes, both highly correlated and synchronized across the extension of the reaction cloud, act on different time scales. Each of them imprints a different structure of salt precipitation at the tube walls. PMID:27025405

  4. Do Hybrid Lecture Formats Influence Laboratory Performance in Large, Pre-Professional Biology Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffell, Samuel; Merrill, John

    2005-01-01

    Introductory biology courses for pre-professional majors at large universities are usually high-enrollment lectures with associated labs that complement the lecture, but are independently taught and administered. Although web-based instructional formats have become popular alternatives to traditional lectures, it is unknown how these formats…

  5. Formative Assessment and Increased Student Involvement Increase Grades in an Upper Secondary School Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granbom, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that formative methods and increased student participation has a positive influence on learning measured as grades. The study was conducted during the course Biology A in a Swedish Upper Secondary School. The students constructed grade criteria and defined working methods and type of examination within a given topic, Gene…

  6. Interfacial force-driven pattern formation during drying of Aβ (25-35) fibrils.

    PubMed

    Sett, Ayantika; Bag, Sudipta; Dasgupta, Swagata; DasGupta, Sunando

    2015-08-01

    Pattern formation during evaporation of biofluids finds significant applications in the biomedical field for disease identification. Aβ (25-35) is the smallest peptide in the amyloid peptide family that retains the toxicity of a full length peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease and is chosen here as the model solute. Drying experiments on substrates of varying wettability exhibit unique drying patterns of Aβ (25-35) fibrils visualized through fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The unique pattern formations can be interpreted as manifestations of the changes in the self-pinning mechanism with changes in wettability, which in some cases resembles the well-known coffee ring effect. Additionally, the delicate balance between the drag and capillary forces has been perturbed by initiating controlled rates of evaporation and probing their effects on the fibril patterning. PMID:25964177

  7. Hormone-Mediated Pattern Formation in Seedling of Plants: a Competitive Growth Dynamics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Mimura, Masayasu; Ohya, Tomoyuki; Oikawa, Noriko; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kai, Shoichi

    2001-10-01

    An ecologically relevant pattern formation process mediated by hormonal interactions among growing seedlings is modeled based on the experimental observations on the effects of indole acetic acid, which can act as an inhibitor and activator of root growth depending on its concentration. In the absence of any lateral root with constant hormone-sensitivity, the edge effect phenomenon is obtained depending on the secretion rate of hormone from the main root. Introduction of growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity drastically amplifies the initial randomness, resulting in spatially irregular macroscopic patterns. When the lateral root growth is introduced, periodic patterns are obtained whose periodicity depends on the length of lateral roots. The growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity and the lateral root growth are crucial for macroscopic periodic-pattern formation.

  8. Perception and discrimination of movement and biological motion patterns in fish.

    PubMed

    Schluessel, V; Kortekamp, N; Cortes, J A Ortiz; Klein, A; Bleckmann, H

    2015-09-01

    Vision is of primary importance for many fish species, as is the recognition of movement. With the exception of one study, assessing the influence of conspecific movement on shoaling behaviour, the perception of biological motion in fish had not been studied in a cognitive context. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess the discrimination abilities of two teleost species in regard to simple and complex movement patterns of dots and objects, including biological motion patterns using point and point-light displays (PDs and PLDs). In two-alternative forced-choice experiments, in which choosing the designated positive stimulus was food-reinforced, fish were first tested in their ability to distinguish the video of a stationary black dot on a light background from the video of a moving black dot presented at different frequencies and amplitudes. While all fish succeeded in learning the task, performance declined with decreases in either or both parameters. In subsequent tests, cichlids and damselfish distinguished successfully between the videos of two dots moving at different speeds and amplitudes, between two moving dot patterns (sinus vs. expiring sinus) and between animated videos of two moving organisms (trout vs. eel). Transfer tests following the training of the latter showed that fish were unable to identify the positive stimulus (trout) by means of its PD alone, thereby indicating that the ability of humans to spontaneously recognize an organism based on its biological motion may not be present in fish. All participating individuals successfully discriminated between two PDs and two PLDs after a short period of training, indicating that biological motions presented in form of PLDs are perceived and can be distinguished. Results were the same for the presentation of dark dots on a light background and light dots on a dark background. PMID:25981056

  9. Pattern Formation in Self-Propelled Particles with Density-Dependent Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, F. D. C.; Marchetti, M. C.; Marenduzzo, D.; Tailleur, J.

    2012-06-01

    We study the behavior of interacting self-propelled particles, whose self-propulsion speed decreases with their local density. By combining direct simulations of the microscopic model with an analysis of the hydrodynamic equations obtained by explicitly coarse graining the model, we show that interactions lead generically to the formation of a host of patterns, including moving clumps, active lanes, and asters. This general mechanism could explain many of the patterns seen in recent experiments and simulations.

  10. Inhibited pattern formation by asymmetrical high-voltage excitation in nematic fluids.

    PubMed

    Salamon, Péter; Éber, Nándor; Fekete, Balázs; Buka, Ágnes

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to the predictions of the standard theory of electroconvection (EC), our experiments showed that the action of superposed ac and dc voltages rather inhibits pattern formation than favors the emergence of instabilities; the patternless region may extend to much higher voltages than the individual ac or dc thresholds. The pattern formation induced by such asymmetrical voltage was explored in a nematic liquid crystal in a wide frequency range. The findings could be qualitatively explained for the conductive EC, but represent a challenging problem for the dielectric EC. PMID:25215747

  11. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the biological characteristics of human skin fibroblasts and hypertrophic scar tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongming; Hu, Chao; Li, Fengyu; Liang, Liming; Liu, Lingying

    2013-06-01

    Burn injury-mediated destruction of the skin barrier normally induces microbial invasion, in turn leading to the development of systemic infection and occasional septic shock by the release of endotoxins. The objective of this work was to study the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the biological characteristics of normal skin fibroblasts and to elucidate the influence of LPS in the initial stage of skin wound healing. Twenty patients with hypertrophic scar in proliferative stage were selected randomly and primary cultures were established from fibroblasts derived from their hypertrophic scar tissue and normal skin. Normal skin fibroblasts of passage 3 were stimulated with different concentrations of LPS. LPS stimulated the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts within a certain extent of concentrations (0.005-0.5 μg/mL) (P < 0.05), whereas at a concentration of 1 μg/mL inhibited the proliferation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts (P < 0.05). Collagen synthesis by normal skin fibroblasts after LPS stimulation mimicked those derived from hypertrophic scar tissue. LPS of 0.1 μg/mL had significant effect on normal skin fibroblasts-continuous passage of these fibroblasts resulted in ultrastructural pattern similar to fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar tissue, and the findings was substantiated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry detection of proliferation cell nuclear antigen, type I procollagen and α-smooth muscle actin. Our results suggest that LPS might convert normal skin fibroblasts to hypertrophic scar tissue fibroblasts and participate in the formation of hypertrophic scar; hence, appropriate concentration of LPS may have no effect or be beneficial to skin wound healing, whereas excessive concentration of LPS may delay the time of wound healing. PMID:23653386

  12. Using sign patterns to detect the possibility of periodicity in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Culos, G J; Olesky, D D; van den Driessche, P

    2016-04-01

    Many models in the physical and life sciences, formulated as dynamical systems, exhibit a positive steady state, with its local qualitative behavior determined by the eigenvalues of its Jacobian matrix. Our interest lies in detecting if this steady state is linearly stable or if the system has periodic solutions arising from a Hopf bifurcation. We address this by considering the sign pattern of the Jacobian matrix and its set of allowed refined inertias. The refined inertia of a matrix, which is an extension of the classical matrix inertia, is a property of its eigenvalues. A Hopf bifurcation, leading to periodic solutions, may be possible if the sign pattern of the Jacobian matrix allows a specific set of refined inertias. For most systems, we also need to consider magnitude restrictions on the entries of the Jacobian matrix that are a consequence of the particular biological model. The usefulness of sign pattern analysis to detect linear stability or the possibility of periodicity is illustrated with several biological examples, including metabolic-genetic circuits, biochemical reaction networks, predator-prey and competition systems. PMID:26092517

  13. Trickle-down boundary conditions in aeolian dune-field pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2015-12-01

    One the one hand, wind-blown dune-field patterns emerge within the overarching boundary conditions of climate, tectonics and eustasy implying the presence of these signals in the aeolian geomorphic and stratigraphic record. On the other hand, dune-field patterns are a poster-child of self-organization, in which autogenic processes give rise to patterned landscapes despite remarkable differences in the geologic setting (i.e., Earth, Mars and Titan). How important are climate, tectonics and eustasy in aeolian dune field pattern formation? Here we develop the hypothesis that, in terms of pattern development, dune fields evolve largely independent of the direct influence of 'system-scale' boundary conditions, such as climate, tectonics and eustasy. Rather, these boundary conditions set the stage for smaller-scale, faster-evolving 'event-scale' boundary conditions. This 'trickle-down' effect, in which system-scale boundary conditions indirectly influence the event scale boundary conditions provides the uniqueness and richness of dune-field patterned landscapes. The trickle-down effect means that the architecture of the stratigraphic record of dune-field pattern formation archives boundary conditions, which are spatially and temporally removed from the overarching geologic setting. In contrast, the presence of an aeolian stratigraphic record itself, reflects changes in system-scale boundary conditions that drive accumulation and preservation of aeolian strata.

  14. Evaluating the formation mechanisms of the equatorial Pacific SST warming pattern in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Jun; Huang, Ping; Huang, Ronghui

    2016-04-01

    Based on the historical and RCP8.5 runs of the multi-model ensemble of 32 models participating in CMIP5, the present study evaluates the formation mechanisms for the patterns of changes in equatorial Pacific SST under global warming. Two features with complex formation processes, the zonal El Ni˜no-like pattern and the meridional equatorial peak warming (EPW), are investigated. The climatological evaporation is the main contributor to the El Ni˜no-like pattern, while the ocean dynamical thermostat effect plays a comparable negative role. The cloud-shortwave-radiation-SST feedback and the weakened Walker circulation play a small positive role in the El Ni˜no-like pattern. The processes associated with ocean dynamics are confined to the equator. The climatological evaporation is also the dominant contributor to the EPW pattern, as suggested in previous studies. However, the effects of some processes are inconsistent with previous studies. For example, changes in the zonal heat advection due to the weakened Walker circulation have a remarkable positive contribution to the EPW pattern, and changes in the shortwave radiation play a negative role in the EPW pattern.

  15. Preparation of highly water-repellent surface by spontaneous formation of double scale roughness pattern.

    PubMed

    Joly, Pascal; Kuroda, Akihiro; Asakura, Kouichi

    2010-01-01

    Hydrophobic organic-inorganic hybrid composite suspensions were prepared by mixing hydrophobic octylsilyl titanium dioxide particles having average diameter of 35 nm with drying oil or moisture cure room temperature vulcanization silicone gum in volatile silicone. They were spread on a glass plate by using a linear motor coater and an applicator. Spatially periodic stripe patterns parallel to the direction of dragging the applicator were usually generated. The phenomenon is called directional viscous fingering, i.e. spontaneous pattern formation by the growth of fluctuation in morphology of mobile interface during the dragging coat. The pattern spontaneously formed on the surface became double scale when stored samples were coated. In this case, the large scale spatially periodic pattern was formed by the directional viscous fingering and the small ragged random pattern may be due to the giant molecules formed by cross-linking of silicone gum. Double scale roughness patterns were also generated by double dragging coat. The large and small scale pattern was formed by the first and second dragging coat, respectively. The formation of double scale roughness enhanced the water-repellent property of the hydrophobic surface. In some cases, water contact angle increased by 20 degrees to realize super water-repellent surface with a value exceeding 150 degrees. PMID:20103981

  16. Towards the planning and design of disturbance patterns across scales to counter biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Zurlini, Giovanni; Petrosillo, Irene; Jones, Kenneth Bruce; Li, Bai-Lian; Riitters, Kurt Hans; Medagli, Pietro; Marchiori, Silvano; Zaccarelli, Nicola

    2013-10-15

    The way in which disturbances from human land use are patterned in space across scales can have important consequences for efforts to govern human/environment with regard to, but not only, invasive spread-dispersal processes. In this context, we explore the potential of disturbance patterns along a continuum of scales as proxies for identifying the geographical regions prone to spread of invasive plant species. To this end, we build on a previous framework of cross-scale disturbance patterns, exercising the approach for the Apulia region (South Italy). We first review procedures and results introducing disturbance maps and sliding windows to measure composition (amount) and configuration (contagion) of disturbance patterns both for real and simulated landscapes from random, multifractal and hierarchical neutral models. We introduce cross-scale disturbance profiles obtained by clustering locations from real and simulated landscapes, which are used as foils for comparison to the real landscapes on the same pattern transition space. Critical percolation thresholds derived from landscape observations and theoretical works are discussed in order to identify critical scale domains. With reference to the actual land use and invasive alien flora correlates of disturbance patterns, a cross-scale "invasibility" map of the Apulia region is derived, which shows sub-regions and scale domains with different potentials for the invasive spread of undesirable species. We discuss the potential effect of contagious and non-contagious disturbances like climate change and why multifractal-like disturbance patterns might be more desirable than others to counter biological invasions in a multi-scale and multi-level context of adaptive planning, design and management of disturbance. PMID:23747370

  17. Drying bacterial biosaline patterns capable of vital reanimation upon rehydration: novel hibernating biomineralogical life formations.

    PubMed

    Gómez Gómez, José María; Medina, Jesús; Hochberg, David; Mateo-Martí, Eva; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Rull, Fernando

    2014-07-01

    Water is the fundamental molecule for life on Earth. Thus, the search for hibernating life-forms in waterless environments is an important research topic for astrobiology. To date, however, the organizational patterns containing microbial life in extremely dry places, such as the deserts of Earth, the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, or Mars analog regolith, have been poorly characterized. Here, we report on the formation of bacterial biosaline self-organized drying patterns formed over plastic surfaces. These emerge during the evaporation of sessile droplets of aqueous NaCl salt 0.15 M solutions containing Escherichia coli cells. In the present study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) analyses indicated that the bacterial cells and the NaCl in these biosaline formations are organized in a two-layered characteristic 3-D architectural morphology. A thin filmlike top layer formed by NaCl conjugated to, and intermingled with, "mineralized" bacterial cells covers a bottom layer constructed by the bulk of the nonmineralized bacterial cells; both layers have the same morphological pattern. In addition, optical microscopic time-lapsed movies show that the formation of these patterns is a kinetically fast process that requires the coupled interaction between the salt and the bacterial cells. Apparently, this mutual interaction drives the generative process of self-assembly that underlies the drying pattern formation. Most notably, the bacterial cells inside these drying self-assembled patterns enter into a quiescent suspended anhydrobiotic state resistant to complete desiccation and capable of vital reanimation upon rehydration. We propose that these E. coli biosaline drying patterns represent an excellent experimental model for understanding different aspects of anhydrobiosis phenomena in bacteria as well as for revealing the mechanisms of bacterially induced biomineralization, both highly relevant topics for the search of life in

  18. Biological and physico-chemical formation of Birnessite during the ripening of manganese removal filters.

    PubMed

    Bruins, Jantinus H; Petrusevski, Branislav; Slokar, Yness M; Huysman, Koen; Joris, Koen; Kruithof, Joop C; Kennedy, Maria D

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of manganese removal in conventional groundwater treatment consisting of aeration followed by rapid sand filtration, strongly depends on the ability of filter media to promote auto-catalytic adsorption of dissolved manganese and its subsequent oxidation. Earlier studies have shown that the compound responsible for the auto-catalytic activity in ripened filters is a manganese oxide called Birnessite. The aim of this study was to determine if the ripening of manganese removal filters and the formation of Birnessite on virgin sand is initiated biologically or physico-chemically. The ripening of virgin filter media in a pilot filter column fed by pre-treated manganese containing groundwater was studied for approximately 600 days. Samples of filter media were taken at regular time intervals, and the manganese oxides formed in the coating were analysed by Raman spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the EPR analyses, it was established that the formation of Birnessite was most likely initiated via biological activity. With the progress of filter ripening and development of the coating, Birnessite formation became predominantly physico-chemical, although biological manganese oxidation continued to contribute to the overall manganese removal. The knowledge that manganese removal in conventional groundwater treatment is initiated biologically could be of help in reducing typically long ripening times by creating conditions that are favourable for the growth of manganese oxidizing bacteria. PMID:25463936

  19. A model for the biological precipitation of Precambrian iron-formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laberge, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    A biological model for the precipitation of Precambrian iron formations is presented. Assuming an oxygen deficient atmosphere and water column to allow sufficient Fe solubility, it is proposed that local oxidizing environments, produced biologically, led to precipitation of iron formations. It is further suggested that spheroidal structures about 30 mm in diameter, which are widespread in low grade cherty rion formations, are relict forms of the organic walled microfossil Eosphaera tylerii. The presence of these structures suggests that the organism may have had a siliceous test, which allowed sufficient rigidity for accumulation and preservation. The model involves precipitation of ferric hydrates by oxidation of iron in the photic zone by a variety of photosynthetic organisms. Silica may have formed in the frustules of silica secreting organisms, including Eosphaera tylerii. Iron formates formed, therefore, by a sediment rain of biologically produced ferric hydrates and silica and other organic material. Siderite and hematite formed diagenetically on basin floors, and subsequent metamorphism produced magnetite and iron silicates.

  20. Transverse Mode Structure and Pattern Formation in Oxide Confined Vertical Cavity Semiconductor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Hegarty, S.P.; Hou, H.Q.; Huyet, G.; McInerney, J.G.; Porta, P.

    1999-07-06

    We analyze the transverse profiles of oxide-confined vertical cavity laser diodes as a function of aperture size. For small apertures we demonstrate that thermal lensing can be the dominant effect in determining the transverse resonator properties. We also analyze pattern formation in lasers with large apertures where we observe the appearance of tilted waves.

  1. Pattern formation on networks with reactions: A continuous-time random-walk approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angstmann, C. N.; Donnelly, I. C.; Henry, B. I.

    2013-03-01

    We derive the generalized master equation for reaction-diffusion on networks from an underlying stochastic process, the continuous time random walk (CTRW). The nontrivial incorporation of the reaction process into the CTRW is achieved by splitting the derivation into two stages. The reactions are treated as birth-death processes and the first stage of the derivation is at the single particle level, taking into account the death process, while the second stage considers an ensemble of these particles including the birth process. Using this model we have investigated different types of pattern formation across the vertices on a range of networks. Importantly, the CTRW defines the Laplacian operator on the network in a non-ad hoc manner and the pattern formation depends on the structure of this Laplacian. Here we focus attention on CTRWs with exponential waiting times for two cases: one in which the rate parameter is constant for all vertices and the other where the rate parameter is proportional to the vertex degree. This results in nonsymmetric and symmetric CTRW Laplacians, respectively. In the case of symmetric Laplacians, pattern formation follows from the Turing instability. However in nonsymmetric Laplacians, pattern formation may be possible with or without a Turing instability.

  2. Spatial Heterogeneity and Imperfect Mixing in Chemical Reactions: Visualization of Density-Driven Pattern Formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sobel, Sabrina G.; Hastings, Harold M.; Testa, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Imore » mperfect mixing is a concern in industrial processes, everyday processes (mixing paint, bread machines), and in understanding salt water-fresh water mixing in ecosystems. The effects of imperfect mixing become evident in the unstirred ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, the prototype for chemical pattern formation. Over time, waves of oxidation (high ferriin concentration, blue) propagate into a background of low ferriin concentration (red); their structure reflects in part the history of mixing in the reaction vessel. However, it may be difficult to separate mixing effects from reaction effects. We describe a simpler model system for visualizing density-driven pattern formation in an essentially unmixed chemical system: the reaction of pale yellow Fe 3 + with colorless SCN − to form the blood-red Fe ( SCN ) 2 + complex ion in aqueous solution. Careful addition of one drop of Fe ( NO 3 ) 3 to KSCN yields striped patterns after several minutes. The patterns appear reminiscent of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and convection rolls, arguing that pattern formation is caused by density-driven mixing.« less

  3. Collective Motion of Cells Mediates Segregation and Pattern Formation in Co-Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Méhes, Előd; Mones, Enys; Németh, Valéria; Vicsek, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    Pattern formation by segregation of cell types is an important process during embryonic development. We show that an experimentally yet unexplored mechanism based on collective motility of segregating cells enhances the effects of known pattern formation mechanisms such as differential adhesion, mechanochemical interactions or cell migration directed by morphogens. To study in vitro cell segregation we use time-lapse videomicroscopy and quantitative analysis of the main features of the motion of individual cells or groups. Our observations have been extensive, typically involving the investigation of the development of patterns containing up to 200,000 cells. By either comparing keratocyte types with different collective motility characteristics or increasing cells' directional persistence by the inhibition of Rac1 GTP-ase we demonstrate that enhanced collective cell motility results in faster cell segregation leading to the formation of more extensive patterns. The growth of the characteristic scale of patterns generally follows an algebraic scaling law with exponent values up to 0.74 in the presence of collective motion, compared to significantly smaller exponents in case of diffusive motion. PMID:22359617

  4. The effect of the signalling scheme on the robustness of pattern formation in development

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye-Won; Zheng, Likun; Othmer, Hans G.

    2012-01-01

    Pattern formation in development is a complex process which involves spatially distributed signals called morphogens that influence gene expression and thus the phenotypic identity of cells. Usually different cell types are spatially segregated, and the boundary between them may be determined by a threshold value of some state variable. The question arises as to how sensitive the location of such a boundary is to variations in properties, such as parameter values, that characterize the system. Here, we analyse both deterministic and stochastic reaction-diffusion models of pattern formation with a view towards understanding how the signalling scheme used for patterning affects the variability of boundary determination between cell types in a developing tissue. PMID:22649582

  5. Two-Dimensionality of Yeast Colony Expansion Accompanied by Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Noorbakhsh, Javad; Adams, Rhys M.; Samaniego-Evans, Joseph; Agollah, Germaine; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Kuzdzal-Fick, Jennie; Mehta, Pankaj; Balázsi, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can form multicellular patterns as they expand on agar plates, a phenotype that requires a functional copy of the FLO11 gene. Although the biochemical and molecular requirements for such patterns have been examined, the mechanisms underlying their formation are not entirely clear. Here we develop quantitative methods to accurately characterize the size, shape, and surface patterns of yeast colonies for various combinations of agar and sugar concentrations. We combine these measurements with mathematical and physical models and find that FLO11 gene constrains cells to grow near the agar surface, causing the formation of larger and more irregular colonies that undergo hierarchical wrinkling. Head-to-head competition assays on agar plates indicate that two-dimensional constraint on the expansion of FLO11 wild type (FLO11) cells confers a fitness advantage over FLO11 knockout (flo11Δ) cells on the agar surface. PMID:25504059

  6. Nanostructured diffusion-limited-aggregation crystal pattern formation in a reactive microemulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rohit; Srivastava, P. K.

    2014-03-01

    Nanostructured diffusion-limited-aggregation (DLA) crystal pattern formation in microemulsion consisting of water, styrene, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTACl), potassium persulphate and an oscillating Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactant is reported. A variety of spatiotemporal patterns like concentric wave, spatial (stripe) and chaotic patterns appear. A colloidal phase composed of numerous nano-sized particles has been observed. The solid phase nucleation has been found to occur in the colloidal phase and has been found to grow in a symmetric crystal pattern with the progress of the reaction finally exhibiting DLA structures. We show that the formation of a nanostructured DLA crystal pattern is governed by spatial structures emerging in the BZ microemulsion system. Without any spatial structure in the microemulsion system only hydrogel of high viscosity is formed. A nano-sized branched crystal pattern was formed with a particle diameter in the range of 60-100 nm, as evident by transmission electron microscope, powder x-ray diffraction and particle size analyser studies.

  7. Techniques for analysing pattern formation in populations of stem cells and their progeny

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate how patterns of cell differentiation are related to underlying intra- and inter-cellular signalling pathways, we use a stochastic individual-based model to simulate pattern formation when stem cells and their progeny are cultured as a monolayer. We assume that the fate of an individual cell is regulated by the signals it receives from neighbouring cells via either diffusive or juxtacrine signalling. We analyse simulated patterns using two different spatial statistical measures that are suited to planar multicellular systems: pair correlation functions (PCFs) and quadrat histograms (QHs). Results With a diffusive signalling mechanism, pattern size (revealed by PCFs) is determined by both morphogen decay rate and a sensitivity parameter that determines the degree to which morphogen biases differentiation; high sensitivity and slow decay give rise to large-scale patterns. In contrast, with juxtacrine signalling, high sensitivity produces well-defined patterns over shorter lengthscales. QHs are simpler to compute than PCFs and allow us to distinguish between random differentiation at low sensitivities and patterned states generated at higher sensitivities. Conclusions PCFs and QHs together provide an effective means of characterising emergent patterns of differentiation in planar multicellular aggregates. PMID:21991994

  8. Post-spike hyperpolarization participates in the formation of auditory behavior-related response patterns of inferior collicular neurons in Hipposideros pratti.

    PubMed

    Li, Y-L; Fu, Z-Y; Yang, M-J; Wang, J; Peng, K; Yang, L-J; Tang, J; Chen, Q-C

    2015-03-19

    To probe the mechanism underlying the auditory behavior-related response patterns of inferior collicular neurons to constant frequency-frequency modulation (CF-FM) stimulus in Hipposideros pratti, we studied the role of post-spike hyperpolarization (PSH) in the formation of response patterns. Neurons obtained by in vivo extracellular (N=145) and intracellular (N=171) recordings could be consistently classified into single-on (SO) and double-on (DO) neurons. Using intracellular recording, we found that both SO and DO neurons have a PSH with different durations. Statistical analysis showed that most SO neurons had a longer PSH duration than DO neurons (p<0.01). These data suggested that the PSH directly participated in the formation of SO and DO neurons, and the PSH elicited by the CF component was the main synaptic mechanism underlying the SO and DO response patterns. The possible biological significance of these findings relevant to bat echolocation is discussed. PMID:25617651

  9. Simultaneous formation of fine and large-area electrode patterns using screen-offset printing and its application to the patterning on adhesive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Sato, Junya; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro; Arai, Masahiro; Kurata, Yuji; Iwata, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    Additive-type printing techniques such as gravure-offset printing and screen printing are effective for low-cost and ecofriendly electrode pattern formation. Gravure-offset printing is effective for fine pattern formation with widths on the order of 10-20 µm, whereas screen printing is effective for the formation of large-area patterns. However, it is difficult to simultaneously form fine and large-area patterns using these printing techniques. In this study, we demonstrate that fine (minimum width of 15 µm) and medium- as well as large-area patterns can be formed simultaneously using our developed screen-offset printing technique, which is a combination of screen printing on a silicone blanket and transfer printing from the blanket to a substrate. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of our method to printing on adhesive materials, which allows electrode formation without applying heat to the film substrate.

  10. A Turing-Hopf Bifurcation Scenario for Pattern Formation on Growing Domains.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jorge A; Sánchez-Garduño, Faustino; Padilla, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study the emergence of different patterns that are formed on both static and growing domains and their bifurcation structure. One of these is the so-called Turing-Hopf morphogenetic mechanism. The reactive part we consider is of FitzHugh-Nagumo type. The analysis was carried out on a flat square by considering both fixed and growing domain. In both scenarios, sufficient conditions on the parameter values are given for the formation of specific space-time structures or patterns. A series of numerical solutions of the corresponding initial and boundary value problems are obtained, and a comparison between the resulting patterns on the fixed domain and those arising when the domain grows is established. We emphasize the role of growth of the domain in the selection of patterns. The paper ends by listing some open problems in this area. PMID:27412157

  11. Pattern Formation in Diffusion Flames Embedded in von Karman Swirling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha

    2006-01-01

    Pattern formation is observed in nature in many so-called excitable systems that can support wave propagation. It is well-known in the field of combustion that premixed flames can exhibit patterns through differential diffusion mechanism between heat and mass. However, in the case of diffusion flames where fuel and oxidizer are separated initially there have been only a few observations of pattern formation. It is generally perceived that since diffusion flames do not possess an inherent propagation speed they are static and do not form patterns. But in diffusion flames close to their extinction local quenching can occur and produce flame edges which can propagate along stoichiometric surfaces. Recently, we reported experimental observations of rotating spiral flame edges during near-limit combustion of a downward-facing polymethylmethacrylate disk spinning in quiescent air. These spiral flames, though short-lived, exhibited many similarities to patterns commonly found in quiescent excitable media including compound tip meandering motion. Flame disks that grow or shrink with time depending on the rotational speed and in-depth heat loss history of the fuel disk have also been reported. One of the limitations of studying flame patterns with solid fuels is that steady-state conditions cannot be achieved in air at normal atmospheric pressure for experimentally reasonable fuel thickness. As a means to reproduce the flame patterns observed earlier with solid fuels, but under steady-state conditions, we have designed and built a rotating, porous-disk burner through which gaseous fuels can be injected and burned as diffusion flames. The rotating porous disk generates a flow of air toward the disk by a viscous pumping action, generating what is called the von K rm n boundary layer which is of constant thickness over the entire burner disk. In this note we present a map of the various dynamic flame patterns observed during the combustion of methane in air as a function of

  12. Shifting Arctic Sea-ice Formation and Melt Patterns in a Warming World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, R.; Fowler, C.; Tremblay, B.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    As the Arctic warms, sea-ice formation and melt regions are shifting. Ice retreats earlier, open water extends farther north, and fall freeze-up comes later. The changes are already having an impact on important features of the aquatic Arctic system such as surface productivity, water-column stratification, sea-ice velocities, and the export of freshwater (and buoyancy) to the Nordic Seas. These changes are likely to amplify as the trend toward warmer conditions continues. In this contribution we present ice formation and melt patterns over the duration of the polar satellite observation period, from 1979 to the current. The changes are complex, reflecting latitudinal and temporal shifts with warming of the Northern Hemisphere as well as dynamical trends, such as changes in the prevailing surface wind stress patterns and reduction of internal ice stress. We analyze the satellite-derived sea-ice formation and melt dataset with an eye on: the potential impacts on melt/deposition regions (nutrient delivery, water column stratification, contaminant release); the timing of ice formation anddeposition; changes in bathymetric regimes of the formatino and deposition (which imply changes in sea-ice rafted material transport); shifting freshwater transport patterns; and the underlying dynamical mechanisms driving the observed changes.

  13. Formation of spacing pattern and morphogenesis of chick feather buds is regulated by cytoskeletal structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Young; Cho, Sung-Won; Song, Wu-Chul; Lee, Min-Jung; Cai, Jinglei; Ohk, Seung-Ho; Song, Hee-Kyung; Degan, Alexander; Jung, Han-Sung

    2005-06-01

    Chick feather buds develop sequentially in a hexagonal array. Each feather bud develops with anterior posterior polarity, which is thought to develop in response to signals derived from specialized regions of mesenchymal condensation and epithelial thickening. These developmental processes are performed by cellular mechanisms, such as cell proliferation and migration, which occur during chick feather bud development. In order to understand the mechanisms regulating the formation of mesenchymal condensation and their role in feather bud development, we explanted chick dorsal skin at stage HH29+ with cytochalasin D, which inhibits cytoskeletal formation. We show that the aggregation of mesenchymal cells can be prevented by cytochalasin D treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. Subsequently, cytochalasin D disrupts the spacing pattern and inhibits feather bud axis formation as well. In addition, expression patterns of Bmp-4 and Msx-2, key molecules for early feather bud development, were disturbed by cytochalasin D treatment. Our results fully indicate that both the cytoskeletal structure and cell activity via gene regulation are of fundamental importance in mesenchymal condensation leading to proper morphogenesis of feather bud and spacing pattern formation. PMID:16026546

  14. Tuning the Biological Activity Profile of Antibacterial Polymers via Subunit Substitution Pattern

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Binary nylon-3 copolymers containing cationic and hydrophobic subunits can mimic the biological properties of host-defense peptides, but relationships between composition and activity are not yet well understood for these materials. Hydrophobic subunits in previously studied examples have been limited mostly to cycloalkane-derived structures, with cyclohexyl proving to be particularly promising. The present study evaluates alternative hydrophobic subunits that are isomeric or nearly isomeric with the cyclohexyl example; each has four sp3 carbons in the side chains. The results show that varying the substitution pattern of the hydrophobic subunit leads to relatively small changes in antibacterial activity but causes significant changes in hemolytic activity. We hypothesize that these differences in biological activity profile arise, at least in part, from variations among the conformational propensities of the hydrophobic subunits. The α,α,β,β-tetramethyl unit is optimal among the subunits we have examined, providing copolymers with potent antibacterial activity and excellent prokaryote vs eukaryote selectivity. Bacteria do not readily develop resistance to the new antibacterial nylon-3 copolymers. These findings suggest that variation in subunit conformational properties could be generally valuable in the development of synthetic polymers for biological applications. PMID:24601599

  15. Spatiotemporal pattern formation in two-dimensional neural circuits: roles of refractoriness and noise.

    PubMed

    Gong, Pulin; Loi, S T C; Robinson, P A; Yang, C Y J

    2013-02-01

    Refractoriness is one of the most fundamental states of neural firing activity, in which neurons that have just fired are unable to produce another spike, regardless of the strength of afferent stimuli. Another essential and unavoidable feature of neural systems is the existence of noise. To study the role of these essential factors in spatiotemporal pattern formation in neural systems, a spatially expended neural network model is constructed, with the dynamics of its individual neurons capturing the three most essential states of the neural firing behavior: firing, refractory and resting, and the network topology consistent with the widely observed center-surround coupling manner in the real brain. By changing the refractory period with and without noise in a systematic way in the network, it is shown numerically and analytically that without refractoriness, or when the refractory period is smaller than a certain value, the collective activity pattern of the system consists of localized, oscillating patterns. However, when the refractory period is greater than a certain value, crescent-shaped, localized propagating patterns emerge in the presence of noise. It is further illustrated that the formation of the dynamical spiking patterns is due to a symmetry breaking mechanism, refractoriness-induced symmetry breaking; that is generated by the interplay of noise and refractoriness in the network model. This refractoriness-induced symmetry breaking provides a novel perspective on the emergence of localized, spiking wave patterns or spike timing sequences as ubiquitously observed in real neural systems; it therefore suggests that refractoriness may benefit neural systems in their temporal information processing, rather than limiting the performance of neurons, as has been conventionally thought. Our results also highlight the importance of considering noise in studying spatially extended neural systems, where it may facilitate the formation of spatiotemporal order. PMID

  16. Formation and all-optical control of optical patterns in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, R.; Tsang, C. Y.; Tse, Y. C.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Leung, P. T.; Lewandowski, P.; Schumacher, Stefan; Lafont, O.; Baudin, E.; Tignon, J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor microcavities offer a unique way to combine transient all-optical manipulation of GaAs quantum wells with the benefits of structural advantages of microcavities. In these systems, exciton-polaritons have dispersion relations with very small effective masses. This has enabled prominent effects, for example polaritonic Bose condensation, but it can also be exploited for the design of all-optical communication devices. The latter involves non-equilibrium phase transitions in the spatial arrangement of exciton-polaritons. We consider the case of optical pumping with normal incidence, yielding a spatially homogeneous distribution of exciton-polaritons in optical cavities containing the quantum wells. Exciton-exciton interactions can trigger instabilities if certain threshold behavior requirements are met. Such instabilities can lead, for example, to the spontaneous formation of hexagonal polariton lattices (corresponding to six-spot patterns in the far field), or to rolls (corresponding to two-spot far field patterns). The competition among these patterns can be controlled to a certain degree by applying control beams. In this paper, we summarize the theory of pattern formation and election in microcavities and illustrate the switching between patterns via simulation results.

  17. Flow-driven pattern formation in the calcium-oxalate system.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Bíborka; Endrődi, Balázs; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2016-04-28

    The precipitation reaction of calcium oxalate is studied experimentally in the presence of spatial gradients by controlled flow of calcium into oxalate solution. The density difference between the reactants leads to strong convection in the form of a gravity current that drives the spatiotemporal pattern formation. The phase diagram of the system is constructed, the evolving precipitate patterns are analyzed and quantitatively characterized by their diameters and the average height of the gravity flow. The compact structures of calcium oxalate monohydrate produced at low flow rates are replaced by the thermodynamically unstable calcium oxalate dihydrate favored in the presence of a strong gravity current. PMID:27131554

  18. Flow-driven pattern formation in the calcium-oxalate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohner, Bíborka; Endrődi, Balázs; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2016-04-01

    The precipitation reaction of calcium oxalate is studied experimentally in the presence of spatial gradients by controlled flow of calcium into oxalate solution. The density difference between the reactants leads to strong convection in the form of a gravity current that drives the spatiotemporal pattern formation. The phase diagram of the system is constructed, the evolving precipitate patterns are analyzed and quantitatively characterized by their diameters and the average height of the gravity flow. The compact structures of calcium oxalate monohydrate produced at low flow rates are replaced by the thermodynamically unstable calcium oxalate dihydrate favored in the presence of a strong gravity current.

  19. Spike Train Dynamics Underlying Pattern Formation in Integrate-and-Fire Oscillator Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, P. C.; Coombes, S.

    1998-09-01

    A dynamical mechanism underlying pattern formation in a spatially extended network of integrate-and-fire oscillators with synaptic interactions is identified. It is shown how in the strong coupling regime the network undergoes a discrete Turing-Hopf bifurcation of the firing times from a synchronous state to a state with periodic or quasiperiodic variations of the interspike intervals on closed orbits. The separation of these orbits in phase space results in a spatially periodic pattern of mean firing rate across the network that is modulated by deterministic fluctuations of the instantaneous firing rate.

  20. Multiplicative Noise-Induced Electrohydrodynamic Pattern Formations by Controlling Electric Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    We report multiplicative noise impacts on electroconvections (ECs) in a nematic liquid crystal. By controlling the intensity and cutoff frequency of a superposed electric noise (on a sinusoidal field for ECs), we investigate the variation in the characteristics of ECs such as thresholds and pattern diagrams in high-conductivity cells (σ ˜ 10-6 Ω-1 m-1), in comparison with that in usual conventional cells (σ ˜ 10-8 - 10-7 Ω-1 m-1). Unpredictable threshold behaviors, unknown pattern formations such as isotropic liquid bubbles and EC-sustained phases, and undesirable dielectric breakdown induced by thermal focusing are found in high-conductivity cells.

  1. Formation of Somitogenesis-like Pattern in a Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Fumitaka; Miyakawa, Kenji

    2008-08-01

    The Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction system showing stationary patterns is realized on the basis of water-in-oil microemulsions with the surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate. We experimentally demonstrate the formation of somitogenesis-like pattern in which chemical waves arising from spontaneous bulk oscillations are successively arrested and then stacked. The experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by numerical simulations using the two-variable oregonator model. These show that a somitogenesis can be accounted for by the genuine reaction-diffusion model.

  2. Patterned Formation of Highly Coherent Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers Using a Focused Electron Irradiation Technique.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Claire A; Myers, Bryan A; Kraemer, Stephan; Ohno, Kenichi; Awschalom, David D; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C

    2016-04-13

    We demonstrate fully three-dimensional and patterned localization of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond with coherence times in excess of 1 ms. Nitrogen δ-doping during chemical vapor deposition diamond growth vertically confines nitrogen to 4 nm while electron irradiation with a transmission electron microscope laterally confines vacancies to less than 450 nm. We characterize the effects of electron energy and dose on NV formation. Importantly, our technique enables the formation of reliably high-quality NV centers inside diamond nanostructures with applications in quantum information and sensing. PMID:27010642

  3. Patterned Formation of Highly Coherent Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers Using a Focused Electron Irradiation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLellan, Claire A.; Myers, Bryan A.; Kraemer, Stephan; Ohno, Kenichi; Awschalom, David D.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate fully three-dimensional and patterned localization of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond with coherence times in excess of 1 ms. Nitrogen {\\delta}-doping during CVD diamond growth vertically confines nitrogen to 4 nm while electron irradiation with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) laterally confines vacancies to less than 1 {\\mu}m. We characterize the effects of electron energy and dose on NV formation. Importantly, our technique enables the formation of reliably high-quality NV centers inside diamond nanostructures, with applications in quantum information and sensing.

  4. Patterns of biofilm formation in intermittent and permanent streams: analysis of biofilm structure and metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artigas, J.; Schwartz, T.; Kirchen, S.; Romaní, A. M.; Fund, K.; Obst, U.; Sabater, S.

    2009-04-01

    The development and functioning of benthic microbial communities in streams is largely dependent on the hydrological conditions. Climate change projections predict that the hydrological characteristics will probably be affected because of the rainfall regime. Hence, rivers from the Mediterranean region will become more similar to those draining arid or desert regions, while temperate streams will suffer of higher water flow fluctuations. In this study, we compared the process of biofilm formation between an intermittent (the Fuirosos, Mediterranean) and a permanent (the Walzbach, Central European) stream. Specifically, we analyzed the succession of bacterial and algal populations in the biofilm through bacterial rDNA sequences analysis (16S rDNA and 16S-23S intergenic sequence) and diatom taxa identification over a 60-days colonization experiment. Moreover, changes in biofilm structural (microbial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide content) and metabolic (extracellular enzyme activities) parameters were also analyzed. The successional patterns of microbial populations in the Fuirosos showed clear discontinutities coinciding with flood episodes while at the Walzbach the time sequence was more gradual. Although both study sites were forested, greater microbial biomass standing stock (algal and bacterial) and greater species biodiversity was detected during biofilm development at the Mediterranean site. The higher bacterial biodiversity may be related to the potential effect of flooding episodes in reducing biological interactions in complex microbial communities, such as the competitive exclusion of species. Moreover, the presence of rapid colonizing diatom species might be an adaptation to hydrological changes. In contrast, species competition could define the more stable environments, such as that observed in the Central European stream. Overall, the hystorical evolutionary pressure from the different bioclimatic regions could be also affecting the microbial

  5. On the mechanism of pattern formation in glow dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yajun; Li, Ben; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-01-01

    The formation mechanism of pattern in glow dielectric barrier discharge is investigated by two-dimensional fluid modeling. Experimental results are shown for comparison. The simulation results show that the non-uniform distribution of space charges makes the discharge be enhanced in the high-density region but weakened in its neighborhood, which is considered as an activation-inhibition effect. This effect shows through during a current pulse (one discharge event) but also in a certain period of time after discharge that determines a driving frequency range for the non-uniformity of space charges to be enhanced. The effects of applied voltage, surface charge, electrode boundary, and external field are also discussed. All these factors affect the formation of dielectric-barrier-discharge pattern by changing the distribution or the dynamics of space charges and hence the activation-inhibition effect of non-uniform space charges.

  6. Topology regulates pattern formation capacity of binary cellular automata on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, Carsten; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2005-08-01

    We study the effect of topology variation on the dynamic behavior of a system with local update rules. We implement one-dimensional binary cellular automata on graphs with various topologies by formulating two sets of degree-dependent rules, each containing a single parameter. We observe that changes in graph topology induce transitions between different dynamic domains (Wolfram classes) without a formal change in the update rule. Along with topological variations, we study the pattern formation capacities of regular, random, small-world and scale-free graphs. Pattern formation capacity is quantified in terms of two entropy measures, which for standard cellular automata allow a qualitative distinction between the four Wolfram classes. A mean-field model explains the dynamic behavior of random graphs. Implications for our understanding of information transport through complex, network-based systems are discussed.

  7. A Mechanochemical Model for Embryonic Pattern Formation: Coupling Tissue Mechanics and Morphogen Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mercker, Moritz; Hartmann, Dirk; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental findings, we propose a novel mechanism of embryonic pattern formation based on coupling of tissue curvature with diffusive signaling by a chemical factor. We derive a new mathematical model using energy minimization approach and show that the model generates a variety of morphogen and curvature patterns agreeing with experimentally observed structures. The mechanism proposed transcends the classical Turing concept which requires interactions between two morphogens with a significantly different diffusivity. Our studies show how biomechanical forces may replace the elusive long-range inhibitor and lead to formation of stable spatially heterogeneous structures without existence of chemical prepatterns. We propose new experimental approaches to decisively test our central hypothesis that tissue curvature and morphogen expression are coupled in a positive feedback loop. PMID:24376555

  8. Lung adenocarcinoma with giant cyst formation showing a variety of histologic patterns: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer with large cyst formation is relatively rare. This is a case report of a patient with lung cystic adenocarcinoma with multiple histologic patterns. This type of lung adenocarcinoma is believed to be the first reported case in English language medical literature. Case presentation A 60-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to hospital complaining of dyspnea and died of respiratory failure. She had been suffering from lung cancer with pleural effusion for five years. Autopsy analysis revealed lung adenocarcinoma with large cyst formation showing a variety of histologic patterns. Conclusions Autopsy analysis of this atypical case of lung cancer may provide insight and lead to a better understanding of the heterogeneity and clonal expansion of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:21108775

  9. Pattern formation and dynamics of plasma filaments in dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegari, T.; Bernecker, B.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2014-10-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) operating in a transient glow discharge regime offer a large variety of self-organized filamentary static or dynamical structures and constitute an excellent physical system for the study of nonlinear dynamics and pattern formation. The plasma filaments of DBDs can exhibit particle-like behavior, with motion, generation, annihilation, and scattering as well as collective effects leading to self-organized structures (hexagons, stripes, concentric rings, spirals, etc) that are typical of reaction-diffusion systems. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the detailed physics of pattern formation in DBDs on the basis of numerical fluid simulations and experiments in order to provide a deeper understanding of the nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the self-organization and dynamics of filaments.

  10. Phase Separation and Pattern Formation in a Binary Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, Jacopo; Zurek, Wojciech H.; Davis, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    The miscibility-immiscibility phase transition in binary Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) can be controlled by a coupling between the two components. Here we propose a new scheme that uses coupling-induced pattern formation to test the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) of topological-defect formation in a quantum phase transition. For a binary BEC in a ring trap we find that the number of domains forming the pattern scales as a function of the coupling quench rate with an exponent as predicted by the KZM. For a binary BEC in an elongated harmonic trap we find a different scaling law due to the transition being spatially inhomogeneous. We perform a “quantum simulation” of the harmonically trapped system in a ring trap to verify the scaling exponent.

  11. Phase Separation and Pattern Formation in a Binary Bose-Einstein Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbatini, Jacopo; Davis, Matthew J.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2011-12-02

    The miscibility-immiscibility phase transition in binary Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) can be controlled by a coupling between the two components. Here we propose a new scheme that uses coupling-induced pattern formation to test the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) of topological-defect formation in a quantum phase transition. For a binary BEC in a ring trap we find that the number of domains forming the pattern scales as a function of the coupling quench rate with an exponent as predicted by the KZM. For a binary BEC in an elongated harmonic trap we find a different scaling law due to the transition being spatially inhomogeneous. We perform a ''quantum simulation'' of the harmonically trapped system in a ring trap to verify the scaling exponent.

  12. Paths and patterns: the biology and physics of swimming bacterial populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, J. O.; Strittmatter, R. P.; Swartz, D. L.; Wiseley, D. A.; Wojciechowski, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    The velocity distribution of swimming micro-organisms depends on directional cues supplied by the environment. Directional swimming within a bounded space results in the accumulation of organisms near one or more surfaces. Gravity, gradients of chemical concentration and illumination affect the motile behaviour of individual swimmers. Concentrated populations of organisms scatter and absorb light or consume molecules, such as oxygen. When supply is one-sided, consumption creates gradients; the presence of the population alters the intensity and the symmetry of the environmental cues. Patterns of cues interact dynamically with patterns of the consumer population. In suspensions, spatial variations in the concentration of organisms are equivalent to variations of mean mass density of the fluid. When organisms accumulate in one region whilst moving away from another region, the force of gravity causes convection that translocates both organisms and dissolved substances. The geometry of the resulting concentration-convection patterns has features that are remarkably reproducible. Of interest for biology are (1) the long-range organisation achieved by organisms that do not communicate, and (2) that the entire system, consisting of fluid, cells, directional supply of consumables, boundaries and gravity, generates a dynamic that improves the organisms' habitat by enhancing transport and mixing. Velocity distributions of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis have been measured within the milieu of the spatially and temporally varying oxygen concentration which they themselves create. These distributions of swimming speed and direction are the fundamental ingredients required for a quantitative mathematical treatment of the patterns. The quantitative measurement of swimming behaviour also contributes to our understanding of aerotaxis of individual cells.

  13. Patterned electrospun nanofiber matrices via localized dissolution: potential for guided tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chao; Yu, Dou; Lamarre, Marven; Leopold, Philip L; Teng, Yang D; Wang, Hongjun

    2014-12-23

    With the assistance of an ink-jet printer, solvent (the "ink") can be controllably and reproducibly printed onto electrospun nanofiber meshes (the "paper") to generate various micropatterns and subsequently guide distinct cellular organization and phenotype expression. In combination with the nanofiber-assisted layer-by-layer cell assembly, the patterned electrospun meshes will define an instructive microenvironment for guided tissue formation. PMID:25352221

  14. Mosaic-pattern vegetation formation and dynamics driven by the water-wind crisscross erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gao-Lin; Wang, Dong; Liu, Yu; Hao, Hong-Min; Fang, Nu-Fang; Shi, Zhi-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical explanations for vegetation pattern dynamic emphasized on banded pattern-forming systems on the dynamics of the spot pattern. In this context, we explore the patch pattern forming and development in the desertification land. We hypothesized that spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes would determine vegetation pattern dynamics theory. The spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes were studied. Differences between the inside and outside of the canopy of soil carbon content and soil total nitrogen content were significantly increasing with patches sizes. Sampling location across vegetation patch was the main factor controlling soil properties. Soil nutrient content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were the largest, while bulk density and the coarse sand content were the lowest at the sampling location of half-way between taproot and downslope edge of the canopy. The height of the mound relative to the adjacent soil interspace between shrubs increased as patches diameter increased at the upslope of the taproot. Hydrological and aeolian processes resulted in spatial distributions of soil moisture, nutrition properties, which lead to patch migrated to downslope rather than upslope. A conceptual model was integrated hydrological and nutrient facilitation and competition effects among the plant-soil in mosaic-pattern patch formation and succession process.

  15. Stability of synchronized dynamics and pattern formation in coupled systems: Review of some recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yonghong; Rangarajan, Govindan; Ding, Mingzhou

    2006-12-01

    In arbitrarily coupled dynamical systems (maps or ordinary differential equations), the stability of synchronized states (including equilibrium point, periodic orbit or chaotic attractor) and the formation of patterns from loss of stability of the synchronized states are two problems of current research interest. These two problems are often treated separately in the literature. Here, we present a unified framework in which we show that the eigenvalues of the coupling matrix determine the stability of the synchronized state, while the eigenvectors correspond to patterns emerging from desynchronization. Based on this simple framework three results are derived: First, general approaches are developed that yield constraints directly on the coupling strengths which ensure the stability of synchronized dynamics. Second, when the synchronized state becomes unstable spatial patterns can be selectively realized by varying the coupling strengths. Distinct temporal evolution of the spatial pattern can be obtained depending on the bifurcating synchronized state. Third, given a desired spatiotemporal pattern, one is able to design coupling schemes which give rise to that pattern as the coupled system evolves. Systems with specific coupling schemes are used as examples to illustrate the general methods.

  16. How memory of direct animal interactions can lead to territorial pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jonathan R; Lewis, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic home range analysis (MHRA) is a highly effective tool for understanding spacing patterns of animal populations. It has hitherto focused on populations where animals defend their territories by communicating indirectly, e.g. via scent marks. However, many animal populations defend their territories using direct interactions, such as ritualized aggression. To enable application of MHRA to such populations, we construct a model of direct territorial interactions, using linear stability analysis and energy methods to understand when territorial patterns may form. We show that spatial memory of past interactions is vital for pattern formation, as is memory of 'safe' places, where the animal has visited but not suffered recent territorial encounters. Additionally, the spatial range over which animals make decisions to move is key to understanding the size and shape of their resulting territories. Analysis using energy methods, on a simplified version of our system, shows that stability in the nonlinear system corresponds well to predictions of linear analysis. We also uncover a hysteresis in the process of territory formation, so that formation may depend crucially on initial space-use. Our analysis, in one dimension and two dimensions, provides mathematical groundwork required for extending MHRA to situations where territories are defended by direct encounters. PMID:27146687

  17. Formation of ordered polymer patterns from benzene vapors in a barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, S.; Ryabov, A.; Shchyogoleva, G.; Tsyro, L.

    2014-10-01

    The experimental conditions are found under which the impact of the barrier discharge (BD) on a gas-vapor mixture of benzene, argon and helium results in a spontaneous formation of ordered polymer structures similar to the luminous BD patterns on the electrodes of the reactor. It is shown that the impact of a BD on a Ar-C6H6 mixture leads to the formation of two types of materials: black color column-structure materials (CSMs), measuring ˜100 µm in diameter and 2 mm in height and ˜4-6 mm honeycomb polymer patterns with a well-defined bead-like interface ˜50-100 µm in height. In a He-C6H6 mixture, the CSMs form dendrite-like structures on the dielectric barrier surface of the high-voltage electrode. The patterns formed on the grounded electrode have no clear boundaries. In this paper, the properties of the materials are investigated and the mechanism of their formation is discussed.

  18. Formation mechanism of dot-line square superlattice pattern in dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weibo; Dong, Lifang E-mail: pyy1616@163.com; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Xinpu; Pan, Yuyang E-mail: pyy1616@163.com

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the formation mechanism of the dot-line square superlattice pattern (DLSSP) in dielectric barrier discharge. The spatio-temporal structure studied by using the intensified-charge coupled device camera shows that the DLSSP is an interleaving of three different subpatterns in one half voltage cycle. The dot square lattice discharges first and, then, the two kinds of line square lattices, which form square grid structures discharge twice. When the gas pressure is varied, DLSSP can transform from square superlattice pattern (SSP). The spectral line profile method is used to compare the electron densities, which represent the amounts of surface charges qualitatively. It is found that the amount of surface charges accumulated by the first discharge of DLSSP is less than that of SSP, leading to a bigger discharge area of the following discharge (lines of DLSSP instead of halos of SSP). The spatial distribution of the electric field of the surface charges is simulated to explain the formation of DLSSP. This paper may provide a deeper understanding for the formation mechanism of complex superlattice patterns in DBD.

  19. Optical Pattern Formation in Spatially Bunched Atoms: A Self-Consistent Model and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    The nonlinear optics and optomechanical physics communities use different theoretical models to describe how optical fields interact with a sample of atoms. There does not yet exist a model that is valid for finite atomic temperatures but that also produces the zero temperature results that are generally assumed in optomechanical systems. We present a self-consistent model that is valid for all atomic temperatures and accounts for the back-action of the atoms on the optical fields. Our model provides new insights into the competing effects of the bunching-induced nonlinearity and the saturable nonlinearity. We show that it is crucial to keep the fifth and seventh-order nonlinearities that arise when there exists atomic bunching, even at very low optical field intensities. We go on to apply this model to the results of our experimental system where we observe spontaneous, multimode, transverse optical pattern formation at ultra-low light levels. We show that our model accurately predicts our experimentally observed threshold for optical pattern formation, which is the lowest threshold ever reported for pattern formation. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  20. Formation mechanism of dot-line square superlattice pattern in dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weibo; Dong, Lifang; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Xinpu; Pan, Yuyang

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the formation mechanism of the dot-line square superlattice pattern (DLSSP) in dielectric barrier discharge. The spatio-temporal structure studied by using the intensified-charge coupled device camera shows that the DLSSP is an interleaving of three different subpatterns in one half voltage cycle. The dot square lattice discharges first and, then, the two kinds of line square lattices, which form square grid structures discharge twice. When the gas pressure is varied, DLSSP can transform from square superlattice pattern (SSP). The spectral line profile method is used to compare the electron densities, which represent the amounts of surface charges qualitatively. It is found that the amount of surface charges accumulated by the first discharge of DLSSP is less than that of SSP, leading to a bigger discharge area of the following discharge (lines of DLSSP instead of halos of SSP). The spatial distribution of the electric field of the surface charges is simulated to explain the formation of DLSSP. This paper may provide a deeper understanding for the formation mechanism of complex superlattice patterns in DBD.

  1. Plant development. Integration of growth and patterning during vascular tissue formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    De Rybel, Bert; Adibi, Milad; Breda, Alice S; Wendrich, Jos R; Smit, Margot E; Novák, Ondřej; Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Yoshida, Saiko; Van Isterdael, Gert; Palovaara, Joakim; Nijsse, Bart; Boekschoten, Mark V; Hooiveld, Guido; Beeckman, Tom; Wagner, Doris; Ljung, Karin; Fleck, Christian; Weijers, Dolf

    2014-08-01

    Coordination of cell division and pattern formation is central to tissue and organ development, particularly in plants where walls prevent cell migration. Auxin and cytokinin are both critical for division and patterning, but it is unknown how these hormones converge upon tissue development. We identify a genetic network that reinforces an early embryonic bias in auxin distribution to create a local, nonresponding cytokinin source within the root vascular tissue. Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that these cells act as a tissue organizer by positioning the domain of oriented cell divisions. We further demonstrate that the auxin-cytokinin interaction acts as a spatial incoherent feed-forward loop, which is essential to generate distinct hormonal response zones, thus establishing a stable pattern within a growing vascular tissue. PMID:25104393

  2. Pattern formation in liquid-vapor systems under periodic potential and shear.

    PubMed

    Coclite, A; Gonnella, G; Lamura, A

    2014-06-01

    In this paper the phase behavior and pattern formation in a sheared nonideal fluid under a periodic potential is studied. An isothermal two-dimensional formulation of a lattice Boltzmann scheme for a liquid-vapor system with the van der Waals equation of state is presented and validated. Shear is applied by moving walls and the periodic potential varies along the flow direction. A region of the parameter space, where in the absence of flow a striped phase with oscillating density is stable, will be considered. At low shear rates the periodic patterns are preserved and slightly distorted by the flow. At high shear rates the striped phase loses its stability and traveling waves on the interface between the liquid and vapor regions are observed. These waves spread over the whole system with wavelength only depending on the length of the system. Velocity field patterns, characterized by a single vortex, will also be shown. PMID:25019908

  3. Swarming Patterns in a Two-Dimensional Kinematic Model for Biological Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, Chad

    2004-03-01

    We construct a continuum model for the motion of biological organisms experiencing social interactions and study its pattern-forming behavior. The model takes the form of a conservation law in two spatial dimensions. Social interactions are modeled in the velocity term, which is nonlocal in the population density. The dynamics of the model may be uniquely decomposed into incompressible motion and potential motion. For the purely incompressible case, the model resembles that for fluid dynamical vortex patches. There exist solutions that have constant population density and compact support for all time. Numerical simulations produce rotating structures with circular cores and spiral arms, reminiscent of naturally observed swarms such as ant mills. For the purely potential case, the model resembles a nonlocal (forwards or backwards) porous media equation, describing aggregation or dispersion of the population. For the aggregative case, the population clumps into regions of high and low density with a predictable characteristic length scale that is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  4. Formation and maintenance of nitrogen-fixing cell patterns in filamentous cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Javier; Ares, Saúl

    2016-05-31

    Cyanobacteria forming one-dimensional filaments are paradigmatic model organisms of the transition between unicellular and multicellular living forms. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, in filaments of the genus Anabaena, some cells differentiate into heterocysts, which lose the possibility to divide but are able to fix environmental nitrogen for the colony. These heterocysts form a quasiregular pattern in the filament, representing a prototype of patterning and morphogenesis in prokaryotes. Recent years have seen advances in the identification of the molecular mechanism regulating this pattern. We use these data to build a theory on heterocyst pattern formation, for which both genetic regulation and the effects of cell division and filament growth are key components. The theory is based on the interplay of three generic mechanisms: local autoactivation, early long-range inhibition, and late long-range inhibition. These mechanisms can be identified with the dynamics of hetR, patS, and hetN expression. Our theory reproduces quantitatively the experimental dynamics of pattern formation and maintenance for wild type and mutants. We find that hetN alone is not enough to play the role as the late inhibitory mechanism: a second mechanism, hypothetically the products of nitrogen fixation supplied by heterocysts, must also play a role in late long-range inhibition. The preponderance of even intervals between heterocysts arises naturally as a result of the interplay between the timescales of genetic regulation and cell division. We also find that a purely stochastic initiation of the pattern, without a two-stage process, is enough to reproduce experimental observations. PMID:27162328

  5. Potential nitrosamine formation and its prevention during biological denitrification of red beet juice.

    PubMed

    Kolb, E; Haug, M; Janzowski, C; Vetter, A; Eisenbrand, G

    1997-02-01

    High nitrate intake has been shown to result in an increased risk of endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds. Certain vegetables and vegetable juices contain high concentrations of nitrate. Biological denitrification using strains of Paracoccus denitrificans (P.d.) has been proposed as effective means to reduce nitrate contents in such vegetable juices. During this bacterial denitrification process, substantial nitrite concentrations are transiently formed. This study investigated whether N-nitrosation reactions might occur. The easily nitrosatable amine morpholine was added to red beet juice at high concentration (100 ppm) during denitrification 10 different batches of red beet juice served as raw material. Each batch was submitted to denitrification in the presence and absence of ascorbic acid. In the absence of ascorbic acid, formation of N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) was observed in the low ppb range (0.5-8 ppb). Addition of ascorbic acid (500 mg/litre) inhibited the formation of NMOR, except for those instances where the pH was less than 6 and/or nitrate turnover was low (< 200 mg NO3-/litre/hr). Under conditions leading to high rates of nitrate turnover (> 200 mg NO3-/litre/hr), nitrosamine formation can reliably be prevented by ascorbic acid. The results show that bacterial denitrification of red beet juice high in nitrate can be accomplished without the risk of nitrosamine formation. PMID:9146735

  6. Learning anchor verbs for biological interaction patterns from published text articles.

    PubMed

    Hatzivassiloglou, Vasileios; Weng, Wubin

    2002-12-01

    Much of knowledge modeling in the molecular biology domain involves interactions between proteins, genes, various forms of RNA, small molecules, etc. Interactions between these substances are typically extracted and codified manually, increasing the cost and time for modeling and substantially limiting the coverage of the resulting knowledge base. In this paper, we describe an automatic system that learns from text interaction verbs; these verbs can then form the core of automatically retrieved patterns which model classes of biological interactions. We investigate text features relating verbs with genes and proteins, and apply statistical tests and a logistic regression statistical model to determine whether a given verb belongs to the class of interaction verbs. Our system, AVAD, achieves over 87% precision and 82% recall when tested on an 11 million word corpus of journal articles. In addition, we compare the automatically obtained results with a manually constructed database of interaction verbs and show that the automatic approach can significantly enrich the manual list by detecting rarer interaction verbs that were omitted from the database. PMID:12460629

  7. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: I. Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates frequently precipitate out of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C equilibrium with ambient waters. Two patterns of isotopic disequilibrium are particularly common. Kinetic disequilibria, so designated because they apparently result from kinetic isotope effects during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation, involve simultaneous depletions of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C as large as 4{per thousand} and 10 to 15{per thousand}, respectively. Rapid skeletogenesis favors strong kinetic effects, and approximately linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C are common in carbonates showing mainly the kinetic pattern. Metabolic effects involve additional positive or negative modulation of skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C, reflecting changes in the {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon, caused mainly by photosynthesis and respiration. Kinetic isotope disequilibria tend to be fairly consistent in rapidly growing parts of photosynthetic corals, and time dependent isotopic variations therefore reflect changes in environmental conditions. {delta}{sup 18}O variations from Galapagos corals yields meaningful clues regarding seawater temperature, while {delta}{sup 13}C variations reflect changes in photosynthesis, modulated by cloudiness.

  8. The expansion of neighborhood and pattern formation on spatial prisoner's dilemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xiaolan; Xu, Fangqian; Yang, Junzhong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    The prisoner's dilemma (PD), in which players can either cooperate or defect, is considered a paradigm for studying the evolution of cooperation in spatially structured populations. There the compact cooperator cluster is identified as a characteristic pattern and the probability of forming such pattern in turn depends on the features of the networks. In this paper, we investigate the influence of expansion of neighborhood on pattern formation by taking a weak PD game with one free parameter T, the temptation to defect. Two different expansion methods of neighborhood are considered. One is based on a square lattice and expanses along four directions generating networks with degree increasing with K = 4 m . The other is based on a lattice with Moore neighborhood and expanses along eight directions, generating networks with degree of K = 8 m . Individuals are placed on the nodes of the networks, interact with their neighbors and learn from the better one. We find that cooperator can survive for a broad degree 4 ≤ K ≤ 70 by taking a loose type of cooperator clusters. The former simple corresponding relationship between macroscopic patterns and the microscopic PD interactions is broken. Under a condition that is unfavorable for cooperators such as large T and K, systems prefer to evolve to a loose type of cooperator clusters to support cooperation. However, compared to the well-known compact pattern, it is a suboptimal strategy because it cannot help cooperators dominating the population and always corresponding to a low cooperation level.

  9. Is keV ion-induced pattern formation on Si(001) caused by metal impurities?

    PubMed

    Macko, Sven; Frost, Frank; Ziberi, Bashkim; Förster, Daniel F; Michely, Thomas

    2010-02-26

    We present ion beam erosion experiments performed in ultrahigh vacuum using a differentially pumped ion source and taking care that the ion beam hits the Si(001) sample only. Under these conditions no ion beam patterns form on Si for angles theta < or = 45 degrees with respect to the global surface normal using 2 keV Kr+ and fluences of approximately 2 x 10(22) ions m(-2). In fact, the ion beam induces a smoothening of preformed patterns. Simultaneous sputter deposition of stainless steel in this angular range creates a variety of patterns, similar to those previously ascribed to clean ion-beam-induced destabilization of the surface profile. Only for grazing incidence with 60 degrees < or = theta < or = 83 degrees do pronounced ion beam patterns form. It appears that the angular-dependent stability of Si(001) against pattern formation under clean ion beam erosion conditions is related to the angular dependence of the sputtering yield, and not primarily to a curvature-dependent yield as invoked frequently in continuum theory models. PMID:20097973

  10. Is keV ion-induced pattern formation on Si(001) caused by metal impurities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macko, Sven; Frost, Frank; Ziberi, Bashkim; Förster, Daniel F.; Michely, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    We present ion beam erosion experiments performed in ultrahigh vacuum using a differentially pumped ion source and taking care that the ion beam hits the Si(001) sample only. Under these conditions no ion beam patterns form on Si for angles thetav<=45° with respect to the global surface normal using 2 keV Kr+ and fluences of ≈ 2 × 1022 ions m-2. In fact, the ion beam induces a smoothening of preformed patterns. Simultaneous sputter deposition of stainless steel in this angular range creates a variety of patterns, similar to those previously ascribed to clean ion-beam-induced destabilization of the surface profile. Only for grazing incidence with 60°<=thetav<=83° do pronounced ion beam patterns form. It appears that the angular-dependent stability of Si(001) against pattern formation under clean ion beam erosion conditions is related to the angular dependence of the sputtering yield, and not primarily to a curvature-dependent yield as invoked frequently in continuum theory models.

  11. Pattern formation--A missing link in the study of ecosystem response to environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Meron, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    Environmental changes can affect the functioning of an ecosystem directly, through the response of individual life forms, or indirectly, through interspecific interactions and community dynamics. The feasibility of a community-level response has motivated numerous studies aimed at understanding the mutual relationships between three elements of ecosystem dynamics: the abiotic environment, biodiversity and ecosystem function. Since ecosystems are inherently nonlinear and spatially extended, environmental changes can also induce pattern-forming instabilities that result in spatial self-organization of life forms and resources. This, in turn, can affect the relationships between these three elements, and make the response of ecosystems to environmental changes far more complex. Responses of this kind can be expected in dryland ecosystems, which show a variety of self-organizing vegetation patterns along the rainfall gradient. This paper describes the progress that has been made in understanding vegetation patterning in dryland ecosystems, and the roles it plays in ecosystem response to environmental variability. The progress has been achieved by modeling pattern-forming feedbacks at small spatial scales and up-scaling their effects to large scales through model studies. This approach sets the basis for integrating pattern formation theory into the study of ecosystem dynamics and addressing ecologically significant questions such as the dynamics of desertification, restoration of degraded landscapes, biodiversity changes along environmental gradients, and shrubland-grassland transitions. PMID:26529391

  12. Concerning mechanisms for the zebra pattern formation in the solar radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Laptukhov, A. I.; Chernov, G. P.

    2009-02-15

    The nature of the zebra patterns in continuous type-IV solar radio bursts is discussed. The most comprehensively developed models of such patterns involve mechanisms based on the double plasma resonance and plasma wave-whistler interaction. Over the last five years, there have appeared a dozen papers concerning the refinement of the mechanism based on the double plasma resonance, because, in its initial formulation, this mechanism failed to describe many features of the zebra pattern. It is shown that the improved model of this mechanism with a power-law distribution function of hot electrons within the loss cone is inapplicable to the coronal plasma. In recent papers, the formation of the zebra pattern in the course of electromagnetic wave propagation through the solar corona was considered. In the present paper, all these models are estimated comparatively. An analysis of recent theories shows that any types of zebra patterns can form in the course of radio wave propagation in the corona, provided that there are plasma inhomogeneities of different scales on the wave path. The superfine structure of zebra stripes in the form of millisecond spikes with a strict period of {approx}30 ms can be attributed to the generation of continuous radio emission in the radio source itself, assuming that plasma inhomogeneities are formed by a finite-amplitude wave with the same period.

  13. Dynamics of fast pattern formation in porous silicon by laser interference

    SciTech Connect

    Peláez, Ramón J.; Kuhn, Timo; Afonso, Carmen N.; Vega, Fidel

    2014-10-20

    Patterns are fabricated on 290 nm thick nanostructured porous silicon layers by phase-mask laser interference using single pulses of an excimer laser (193 nm, 20 ns pulse duration). The dynamics of pattern formation is studied by measuring in real time the intensity of the diffraction orders 0 and 1 at 633 nm. The results show that a transient pattern is formed upon melting at intensity maxima sites within a time <30 ns leading to a permanent pattern in a time <100 ns upon solidification at these sites. This fast process is compared to the longer one (>1 μs) upon melting induced by homogeneous beam exposure and related to the different scenario for releasing the heat from hot regions. The diffraction efficiency of the pattern is finally controlled by a combination of laser fluence and initial thickness of the nanostructured porous silicon layer and the present results open perspectives on heat release management upon laser exposure as well as have potential for alternative routes for switching applications.

  14. Temporal patterns and behavioral characteristics of aggregation formation and spawning in the Bermuda chub ( Kyphosus sectatrix)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemeth, Richard S.; Kadison, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    Reef fish spawning aggregations are important life history events that occur at specific times and locations and represent the primary mode of reproduction for many species. This paper provides detailed descriptions of aggregation formation and mass spawning of the Bermuda chub ( Kyphosus sectatrix). Spawning coloration and gamete release of K. sectatrix were observed and filmed at the Grammanik Bank, a deep spawning aggregation site used by many different species located on the southern edge of the Puerto Rican shelf 10 km south of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Underwater visual surveys using technical Nitrox and closed circuit re-breathers were conducted from December 2002 to March 2013 and documented spatial and temporal patterns of movement and aggregation formation along 1.5 km of mesophotic reef. The largest aggregations of K. sectatrix (>200 fish) were observed on the Grammanik Bank January to March from 0 to 11 d after the full moon with peak abundance from 60 to 80 d after the winter solstice across all survey years. Aggregation formation of K. sectatrix coincided with the spawning season of Nassau ( Epinephelus striatus) and yellowfin ( Mycteroperca venenosa) groupers. These spatial and temporal patterns of aggregation formation and spawning suggest that K. sectatrix, an herbivore, may also be a transient aggregating species. On several occasions, chubs were observed both pair spawning and mass spawning. Color patterns and behaviors associated with aggregation and spawning are described and compared to spawning characteristics observed in other species, many of which are similar but others that appear unique to K. sectatrix. This represents the first report of a kyphosid species aggregating to spawn and illuminates a portion of the poorly understood life history of the Bermuda chub.

  15. Endogenous voltage gradients as mediators of cell-cell communication: strategies for investigating bioelectrical signals during pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Dany S.; Levin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Alongside the well-known chemical modes of cell-cell communication, we find an important and powerful system of bioelectrical signaling: changes in the resting voltage potential (Vmem) of the plasma membrane driven by ion channels, pumps and gap junctions. Slow Vmem changes in all cells serve as a highly conserved, information-bearing pathway that regulates cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. In embryonic and regenerative pattern formation and in the disorganization of neoplasia, bioelectrical cues serve as mediators of large-scale anatomical polarity, organ identity and positional information. Recent developments have resulted in tools that enable a high-resolution analysis of these biophysical signals and their linkage with upstream and downstream canonical genetic pathways. Here, we provide an overview for the study of bioelectric signaling, focusing on state-of-the-art approaches that use molecular physiology and developmental genetics to probe the roles of bioelectric events functionally. We highlight the logic, strategies and well-developed technologies that any group of researchers can employ to identify and dissect ionic signaling components in their own work and thus to help crack the bioelectric code. The dissection of bioelectric events as instructive signals enabling the orchestration of cell behaviors into large-scale coherent patterning programs will enrich on-going work in diverse areas of biology, as biophysical factors become incorporated into our systems-level understanding of cell interactions. PMID:22350846

  16. Quasi-iso-focal hole pattern formation by Checker-Board PSM (CB-PSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Maejima, S.; Minamide, A.; Saitoh, H.; Hanawa, T.; Suko, K.

    2008-03-01

    A novel RET, which enables on-grid sub-50 nm hole pattern formation with ArF immersion lithography, has been developed. One of the authors has found quasi-iso-focal point image generation at the center of square area of high transmission embedded attenuating phase shift mask (EA-PSM), where four small openings are laid out at the corners of the area, utilizing an optimized quadrupole illumination. As an extension of continuous configuration, checker-board like mask pattern arrangement is created. In the mask, small openings and opaque pads are arranged like as checkerboard, whose base pitch is around resolution limit of targeted optical system. The mask pattern arrangement is named as "Checker-Board PSM (CB-PSM)". By eliminating any one opening from "checker-board", very fine point image is generated at the place. Because four openings around the eliminated one are necessary for the fine imaging characteristic, minimum distance between the point images is about the double of that for resolution limit. After simulation study of imaging, experiments are carried out to prove the fine imaging performance utilizing ArF immersion optics with NA=1.07 and a tri-level resist system. As a result, sub-50nm isolated hole is successfully formed with DOF larger than 200 nm. Simultaneously, ~ 60 nm semi-dense hole with pitch of 240 nm is printed with over 200 nm DOF. Moreover, application of conventional mask pattern arrangement, ultimately dense hole of 140nm pitch is well formed. As a conclusion, we believe that CB-PSM is a promising candidate for hole pattern formation at 32 nm node and beyond.

  17. Pattern formation by a cell surface-associated morphogen in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Jelsbak, Lars; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2002-01-01

    In response to starvation, an unstructured population of identical Myxococcus xanthus cells rearranges into an asymmetric, stable pattern of multicellular fruiting bodies. Central to this pattern formation process are changes in organized cell movements from swarming to aggregation. Aggregation is induced by the cell surface-associated C-signal. To understand how aggregation is accomplished, we have analyzed how C-signal modulates cell behavior. We show that C-signal induces a motility response that includes increases in transient gliding speeds and in the duration of gliding intervals and decreases in stop and reversal frequencies. This response results in a switch in cell behavior from an oscillatory to a unidirectional type of behavior in which the net-distance traveled by a cell per minute is increased. We propose that the C-signal-dependent regulation of the reversal frequency is essential for aggregation and that the remaining C-signal-dependent changes in motility parameters contribute to aggregation by increasing the net-distance traveled by starving cells per minute. In our model for symmetry-breaking and aggregation, C-signal transmission is a local event involving direct contacts between cells that results in a global organization of cells. This pattern formation mechanism does not require a diffusible substance or other actions at a distance. Rather it depends on contact-induced changes in motility behavior to direct cells appropriately PMID:11842199

  18. Structure and formation of the twisted plywood pattern of collagen fibrils in rat lamellar bone.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Sasaki, Muneteru; Hongo, Hiromi; Tabata, Chihiro; Liu, Zhusheng; Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to elucidate details of the structure and formation process of the alternate lamellar pattern known to exist in lamellar bone. For this purpose, we examined basic internal lamellae in femurs of young rats by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the latter employing two different macerations with NaOH at concentrations of 10 and 24%. Observations after the maceration with 10% NaOH showed that the regular and periodic rotation of collagen fibrils caused an alternation between two types of lamellae: one consisting of transversely and nearly transversely cut fibrils, and the other consisting of longitudinally and nearly longitudinally cut fibrils. This finding confirms the consistency of the twisted plywood model. The maceration method with 24% NaOH removed bone components other than cells, thus allowing for three-dimensional observations of osteoblast morphology. Osteoblasts extended finger-like processes paralleling the inner bone surface, and grouped in such a way that, within a group, the processes arranged in a similar direction. Transmission electron microscopy showed that newly deposited fibrils were arranged alongside these processes. For the formation of the alternating pattern, our findings suggest that: (1) osteoblasts control the collagen fibril arrangement through their finger-like process position; (2) osteoblasts behave similarly within a group; (3) osteoblasts move their processes synchronously and periodically to promote alternating different fibril orientation; and (4) this dynamic sequential deposition of fibrils results in the alternate lamellar (or twisted plywood) pattern. PMID:22362877

  19. Pattern Formation in the Arabidopsis Embryo Revealed by Position-Specific Lipid Transfer Protein Gene Expression.

    PubMed Central

    Vroemen, C. W.; Langeveld, S.; Mayer, U.; Ripper, G.; Jurgens, G.; Van Kammen, A.; De Vries, S. C.

    1996-01-01

    During Arabidopsis embryogenesis, the zygote divides asymmetrically in the future apical-basal axis; however, a radial axis is initiated only within the eight-celled embryo. Mutations in the GNOM, KNOLLE, and KEULE genes affect these processes: gnom zygotes tend to divide symmetrically; knolle embryos lack oriented cell divisions that initiate protoderm formation; and in keule embryos, an outer cell layer is present that consists of abnormally enlarged cells from early development. Pattern formation along the two axes is reflected by the position-specific expression of the Arabidopsis lipid transfer protein (AtLTP1) gene. In wild-type embryos, the AtLTP1 gene is expressed in the protoderm and initially in all protodermal cells; later, AtLTP1 expression is confined to the cotyledons and the upper end of the hypocotyl. Analysis of AtLTP1 expression in gnom, knolle, and keule embryos showed that gnom embryos also can have no or reversed apical-basal polarity, whereas radial polarity is unaffected. knolle embryos initially lack but eventually form a radial pattern, and keule embryos are affected in protoderm cell morphology rather than in the establishment of the radial pattern. PMID:12239400

  20. The Relationship of Independent Study, Object Visualization, and Anxiety to Hypothesis Formation by College Freshmen in the Biological Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dorothy McKenna

    Reported is a study of the relationship of independent study, object visualization, and anxiety to hypothesis formation by college freshmen in the biological sciences. The participants of the study were 108 undergraduate females who had no previous science instruction and who were enrolled in introductory biology classes. The subjects, randomly…

  1. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug...

  2. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug...

  3. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug...

  4. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug...

  5. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug...

  6. Molecular dynamics of single-particle impacts predicts phase diagrams for large scale pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Norris, Scott A; Samela, Juha; Bukonte, Laura; Backman, Marie; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Madi, Charbel S; Brenner, Michael P; Aziz, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Energetic particle irradiation can cause surface ultra-smoothening, self-organized nanoscale pattern formation or degradation of the structural integrity of nuclear reactor components. A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms governing the selection among these outcomes has been elusive. Here we predict the mechanism governing the transition from pattern formation to flatness using only parameter-free molecular dynamics simulations of single-ion impacts as input into a multiscale analysis, obtaining good agreement with experiment. Our results overturn the paradigm attributing these phenomena to the removal of target atoms via sputter erosion: the mechanism dominating both stability and instability is the impact-induced redistribution of target atoms that are not sputtered away, with erosive effects being essentially irrelevant. We discuss the potential implications for the formation of a mysterious nanoscale topography, leading to surface degradation, of tungsten plasma-facing fusion reactor walls. Consideration of impact-induced redistribution processes may lead to a new design criterion for stability under irradiation. PMID:21505432

  7. NFI-C2 temporal-spatial expression and cellular localization pattern during tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Lamani, Ejvis; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; MacDougall, Mary

    2015-12-01

    Currently, little is known regarding critical signaling pathways during later stages of tooth development, especially those associated with root formation. Nfi-c null mice, lacking molar roots, have implicated the transcription factor NFI-C as having an essential role in root development. Previously, we identified three NFI-C isoforms expressed in dental tissues with NFI-C2 being the major transcript. However, the expression pattern of the NFI-C2 protein is not characterized. In this study we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry using isoform specific probes. We show the production of a NFI-C2 peptide antibody, its characterization, the temporal-spatial expression pattern of the NFI-C2 protein during odontogenesis and sub-cellular localization in dental cells. Moderate NFI-C2 staining, as early as bud stage, was detected mostly in the condensing dental ectomesenchyme. This staining intensified within the dental pulp at later stages culminating in high expression in the dentin producing odontoblasts. The dental epithelium showed slight staining until cytodifferentiation of enamel organ into ameloblasts and stratum intermedium. During root formation NFI-C2 expression was high in the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath and later was found in the fully developed root and its supporting tissues. NFI-C2 cellular staining was cytosolic, associated with the Golgi, and nuclear. These data suggest a broader role for NFI-C during tooth formation than limited to root and periodontal ligament development. PMID:26687982

  8. Multistability, local pattern formation, and global collective firing in a small-world network of nonleaky integrate-and-fire neurons.

    PubMed

    Rothkegel, Alexander; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2009-03-01

    We investigate numerically the collective dynamical behavior of pulse-coupled nonleaky integrate-and-fire neurons that are arranged on a two-dimensional small-world network. To ensure ongoing activity, we impose a probability for spontaneous firing for each neuron. We study network dynamics evolving from different sets of initial conditions in dependence on coupling strength and rewiring probability. Besides a homogeneous equilibrium state for low coupling strength, we observe different local patterns including cyclic waves, spiral waves, and turbulentlike patterns, which-depending on network parameters-interfere with the global collective firing of the neurons. We attribute the various network dynamics to distinct regimes in the parameter space. For the same network parameters different network dynamics can be observed depending on the set of initial conditions only. Such a multistable behavior and the interplay between local pattern formation and global collective firing may be attributable to the spatiotemporal dynamics of biological networks. PMID:19335013

  9. Multistability, local pattern formation, and global collective firing in a small-world network of nonleaky integrate-and-fire neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothkegel, Alexander; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2009-03-01

    We investigate numerically the collective dynamical behavior of pulse-coupled nonleaky integrate-and-fire neurons that are arranged on a two-dimensional small-world network. To ensure ongoing activity, we impose a probability for spontaneous firing for each neuron. We study network dynamics evolving from different sets of initial conditions in dependence on coupling strength and rewiring probability. Besides a homogeneous equilibrium state for low coupling strength, we observe different local patterns including cyclic waves, spiral waves, and turbulentlike patterns, which—depending on network parameters—interfere with the global collective firing of the neurons. We attribute the various network dynamics to distinct regimes in the parameter space. For the same network parameters different network dynamics can be observed depending on the set of initial conditions only. Such a multistable behavior and the interplay between local pattern formation and global collective firing may be attributable to the spatiotemporal dynamics of biological networks.

  10. Pattern formation for active particles on optically created ordered and disordered substrates (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Charles M.; Ray, Dipanjan; Reichhardt, Cynthia J.

    2015-08-01

    There has been tremendous growth in the field of active matter, where the individual particles that comprise the system are self-driven. Examples of this class of system include biological systems such as swimming bacteria and crawling cells. More recently, non-biological swimmers have been created using colloidal Janus particles that undergo chemical reactions on one side to produce self-propulsion. These active matter systems exhibit a wide variety of behaviors that are absent in systems undergoing purely thermal fluctuations, such as transitions from uniform liquids to clusters or living crystals, pushing objects around, ratchet effects, and phase separation in mixtures of active and passive particles. Here we examine the collective effects of active matter disks in the presence of static or dynamic substrates. For colloids, such substrates could be created optically in the form of periodic, random, or quasiperiodic patterns. For thermal particles, increasing the temperature generally increases the diffusion or mobility of the particles when they move over a random or periodic substrates. We find that when the particles are active, increasing the activity can increase the mobility for smaller run lengths but decrease the mobility at large run lengths. Additionally we find that at large run lengths on a structured substrate, a variety of novel active crystalline states can form such as stripes, squares and triangular patterns.

  11. SBtab: a flexible table format for data exchange in systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, Timo; Hahn, Jens; Bergmann, Frank T.; Noor, Elad; Klipp, Edda; Liebermeister, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Summary: SBtab is a table-based data format for Systems Biology, designed to support automated data integration and model building. It uses the structure of spreadsheets and defines conventions for table structure, controlled vocabularies and semantic annotations. The format comes with predefined table types for experimental data and SBML-compliant model structures and can easily be customized to cover new types of data. Availability and Implementation: SBtab documents can be created and edited with any text editor or spreadsheet tool. The website www.sbtab.net provides online tools for syntax validation and conversion to SBML and HTML, as well as software for using SBtab in MS Excel, MATLAB and R. The stand-alone Python code contains functions for file parsing, validation, conversion to SBML and HTML and an interface to SQLite databases, to be integrated into Systems Biology workflows. A detailed specification of SBtab, including examples and descriptions of table types and available tools, can be found at www.sbtab.net. Contact: wolfram.liebermeister@gmail.com PMID:27153616

  12. A biological approach to assembling tissue modules through endothelial capillary network formation.

    PubMed

    Riesberg, Jeremiah J; Shen, Wei

    2015-09-01

    To create functional tissues having complex structures, bottom-up approaches to assembling small tissue modules into larger constructs have been emerging. Most of these approaches are based on chemical reactions or physical interactions at the interface between tissue modules. Here we report a biological assembly approach to integrate small tissue modules through endothelial capillary network formation. When adjacent tissue modules contain appropriate extracellular matrix materials and cell types that support robust endothelial capillary network formation, capillary tubules form and grow across the interface, resulting in assembly of the modules into a single, larger construct. It was shown that capillary networks formed in modules of dense fibrin gels seeded with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); adjacent modules were firmly assembled into an integrated construct having a strain to failure of 117 ± 26%, a tensile strength of 2208 ± 83 Pa and a Young's modulus of 2548 ± 574 Pa. Under the same culture conditions, capillary networks were absent in modules of dense fibrin gels seeded with either HUVECs or MSCs alone; adjacent modules disconnected even when handled gently. This biological assembly approach eliminates the need for chemical reactions or physical interactions and their associated limitations. In addition, the integrated constructs are prevascularized, and therefore this bottom-up assembly approach may also help address the issue of vascularization, another key challenge in tissue engineering. PMID:25694020

  13. Vegetation pattern formation in semiarid systems induced by long-range competition in the absence of facilitation mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Garcia, Ricardo; Calabrese, Justin M.; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Lopez, Cristobal

    2014-05-01

    and its range. When the finite range of the competitive interaction is considered used kernel functions with a finite range, whose Fourier transform may have negative values, patterns emerge in the system. This is a rather general condition if we consider the finite length of the roots responsible of long-range competition for water in plant ecosystems.Therefore, our findings support the notion that, under fairly broad conditions, only competition is required for patterns to occur and suggest that the role of short-range facilitation mechanisms may not be as fundamental to pattern formation as has previously been thought. REFERENCES: C.A. Klausmeier, Science, 284, 1826-1828 (1999). F. Borgogno, P. D'Odorico, F. Laio and L. Ridolfi, Reviews of Geophysics, 4, RG1005 (2009). R. Martinez-Garcia, J.M. Calabrese, and C. Lopez, Journal of Theoretical Biology, 333, 156-165 (2013). R. Martinez-Garcia, J. M. Calabrese, E. Hernandez-Garcia, and C. Lopez, Geophysical Research Letters, 40, 6143-6147,(2013).

  14. Pattern formation and control in polymeric systems: From Minkowski measures to in situ AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Thin liquid polymer films are not only of great technical importance, they also exhibit a variety of dynamical instabilities. Some of them may be desired, some rather not. To analyze and finally control pattern formation, modern thin film theories are as vital as techniques to characterize the morphologies and structures in and on the films. Examples for the latter are atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as scattering techniques. The talk will introduce into the practical applications of Minkowski measures to characterize patterns and explain what thin film properties (e.g. capillary number, solid/liquid boundary condition, glass transition temperature, chain mobility) can further be extracted including new technical possibilities by AFM and scattering techniques.

  15. Pattern formation in multiphase flow through porous media: continuum models and phase diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon capture and geologic storage, dissociation of methane hydrates in permafrost, infiltration of water in soil, and enhanced oil recovery, are some relevant examples of multiphase flow in porous media. While flow instabilities and pattern formation play a central role in these processes, our ability to describe them using mathematical models has been hampered by the lack of a macroscopic theory that explains the patterns observed in experimental and field conditions. We propose a new approach —phase-field modeling— to advance our fundamental understanding of multiphase porous media flow. The basic tenet, with origins in the mathematical description of solidification processes, is that the energy of the system is a function of the inhomogeneous distribution of fluid phases in the pore space, and should account for the presence of macroscopic interfaces. We present numerical simulations and compare our predictions with experimental observations. Numerical simulation of viscous fingering in a Hele-Shaw cell using the proposed phase-field modeling approach

  16. Pattern formation from consistent dynamical closures of uniaxial nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Híjar, Humberto; de Hoyos, Diego Marquina; Santamaría-Holek, Iván

    2012-03-21

    Pattern formation in uniaxial polymeric liquid crystals is studied for different dynamic closure approximations. Using the principles of mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics in a mean-field approach, we derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the single-particle non-homogeneous distribution function of particle orientations and the evolution equations for the second and fourth order orientational tensor parameters. Afterwards, two dynamic closure approximations are discussed, one of them considering the relaxation of the fourth order orientational parameter and leading to a novel expression for the free-energy like function in terms of the scalar order parameter. Considering the evolution equation of the density of the system and values of the interaction parameter for which isotropic and nematic phases coexist, our analysis predicts that patterns and traveling waves can be produced in lyotropic uniaxial nematics even in the absence of external driving. PMID:22443750

  17. Continuous fine pattern formation by screen-offset printing using a silicone blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Seiya; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro; Iwata, Shiro

    2014-09-01

    Screen-offset printing combines screen-printing on a silicone blanket with transference of the print from the blanket to a substrate. The blanket absorbs organic solvents in the ink, and therefore, the ink does not disperse through the material. This prevents blurring and allows fine patterns with widths of a few tens of micrometres to be produced. However, continuous printing deteriorates the pattern’s shape, which may be a result of decay in the absorption abilities of the blanket. Thus, we have developed a new technique for refreshing the blanket by substituting high-boiling-point solvents present on the blanket surface with low-boiling-point solvents. We analyse the efficacy of this technique, and demonstrate continuous fine pattern formation for 100 screen-offset printing processes.

  18. Spatiotemporal Pattern Formation and Chaos in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction in a Reverse Microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Irving R.; Vanag, Vladimir K.

    2003-08-01

    We study the spatiotemporal behavior of the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction in a reverse microemulsion consisting of water, octane and the surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT). By varying the microemulsion composition, we can "tune" its structure, specifically the size and spacing between the nanometer-sized water droplets in which the polar BZ reactants reside. We find a remarkable array of pattern formation as the microemulsion structure and BZ chemistry are varied. Behaviors observed include stationary Turing patterns, traveling and standing waves, spirals, targets, antispirals and antitargets (which travel into rather than out from their center), and spatiotemporal chaos. A simple reaction-diffusion model, which accounts for the BZ chemistry and the differential diffusion of species within water droplets and in the bulk oil phase, is able to reproduce nearly all of the observed behavior.

  19. Three dimensional simulations of pattern formation during high-pressure, freely localized microwave breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtzanidis, K. Boeuf, J. P.; Rogier, F.

    2014-12-15

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that a freely localized 100 GHz microwave discharge can propagate towards the microwave source with high speed, forming a complex pattern of self-organized filaments. We present three-dimensional simulations of the formation and propagation of such patterns that reveal more information on their nature and interaction with the electromagnetic waves. The developed three-dimensional Maxwell-plasma solver permits the study of different forms of incident field polarization. Results for linear and circular polarization of the wave are presented and comparisons with recent experiments show a good overall agreement. The three dimensional simulations provide a quantitative analysis of the parameters controlling the time and length scales of the strongly non-linear plasma dynamics and could be useful for potential microwave plasma applications such as aerodynamic flow and combustion control.

  20. Primary mesenchyme cell-ring pattern formation in 2D-embryos of the sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Katow, H; Nakajima, Y; Uemura, I

    2000-02-01

    Primary mesenchyme cell (PMC) migration during PMC-ring pattern formation was analyzed using computer-assisted time-lapse video microscopy in spread embryos (2D-embryo) of the sea urchin, Mespilia globulus, and a computer simulation. The PMC formed a near normal ring pattern in the 2D-embryos, which were shown to be an excellent model for the examination of cell behavior in vivo by time-lapse computer analysis. The average migration distance of the ventro-lateral PMC aggregate-forming cells (AFC) and that of the dorso-ventral PMC cable-forming cells (CFC) showed no significant difference. All PMC took a rather straightforward migration path to their destinations with little lag time after ingression. This in vivo cell behavior fitted well to a computer simulation with a non-diffusable chemotaxis factor in the cyber-cell migration field. This simulation suggests that PMC recognize their destination from a very early moment of cell migration from the vegetal plate, and implicates that a chemoattractive region is necessary for making the PMC migration pattern. The left- and right-lateral AFC and dorso and ventral CFC were each derived from an unequally divided one-quarter segment of the vegetal plate. This suggests that AFC and CFC have a distinctive ancestor in the vegetal plate, and the PMC are a heterogeneous population at least in terms of their destination in the PMC-ring pattern. PMID:10831039

  1. Disappearing scales in carps: re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Casas, Laura; Szűcs, Réka; Vij, Shubha; Goh, Chin Heng; Kathiresan, Purushothaman; Németh, Sándor; Jeney, Zsigmond; Bercsényi, Miklós; Orbán, László

    2013-01-01

    The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n) regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the 'S' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called 'N' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude × nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s) showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype), those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov's work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern) to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here). We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dose-dependent effect) probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation. PMID:24386179

  2. Disappearing Scales in Carps: Re-Visiting Kirpichnikov's Model on the Genetics of Scale Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Chin Heng; Kathiresan, Purushothaman; Németh, Sándor; Jeney, Zsigmond; Bercsényi, Miklós; Orbán, László

    2013-01-01

    The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n) regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the ‘S’ gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called ‘N’ has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude × nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s) showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype), those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov's work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern) to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here). We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dose-dependent effect) probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation. PMID:24386179

  3. Patterns in nutrient concentrations and biological quality indices across the upper Thames river basin, UK.

    PubMed

    Jarvi, Helen P; Lycett, Esther; Neal, Colin; Love, Alison

    2002-01-23

    This paper examines the nutrient chemistry and biological quality indices [Mean Trophic Rank (MTR) and Trophic Diatom Index (TDI)] for rivers within the upper Thames basin. The predominant sources of nitrogen within the rivers monitored were diffuse and agricultural in nature. However, phosphorus showed both diffuse and point source signals. MTR surveys undertaken both upstream and downstream of major STWs indicate that these rivers are 'at risk' of eutrophication or 'badly damaged'. MTR surveys also indicate increased trophic status downstream of STWs, whereas TDI does not indicate such a consistent pattern. Phosphorus treatment at selected major sewage treatment works in the upper Thames basin resulted in significant reductions in in-stream P concentrations and reductions in fluxes by a half to two thirds. However, the effects of P-reduction on in-stream ecology (measured as MTR and TDI) were more difficult to ascribe, owing to: (1) the high variability in river flow rates experienced since P-reduction was introduced; (2) lag effects related to P stores in river bed sediments; and (3) diffuse and smaller point source inputs upstream. The results of this study indicate that control of upstream sources of phosphorus may prove critical in improving the biological quality status of UK lowland rivers, including ecological responses to P-source controls on the major sewage treatment works downstream. Upstream sources include both diffuse (agricultural) sources and small point source inputs which, at present, are not classified as 'qualifying discharges' under the Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive (UWWTD) and are thus not subject to phosphorus control measures. These results are of relevance for integrated, sustainable management and protection of European freshwater resources, particularly in terms of new ecological targets for water quality management under the new Water Framework Directive. PMID:11846074

  4. The formation and distribution of hippocampal synapses on patterned neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell-Mesfin, Natalie M.

    Communication within the central nervous system is highly orchestrated with neurons forming trillions of specialized junctions called synapses. In vivo, biochemical and topographical cues can regulate neuronal growth. Biochemical cues also influence synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. The effects of topography on the development of synapses have been less studied. In vitro, neuronal growth is unorganized and complex making it difficult to study the development of networks. Patterned topographical cues guide and control the growth of neuronal processes (axons and dendrites) into organized networks. The aim of this dissertation was to determine if patterned topographical cues can influence synapse formation and distribution. Standard fabrication and compression molding procedures were used to produce silicon masters and polystyrene replicas with topographical cues presented as 1 mum high pillars with diameters of 0.5 and 2.0 mum and gaps of 1.0 to 5.0 mum. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons grown unto patterned surfaces. A developmental analysis with immunocytochemistry was used to assess the distribution of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. Activity-dependent pre-synaptic vesicle uptake using functional imaging dyes was also performed. Adaptive filtering computer algorithms identified synapses by segmenting juxtaposed pairs of pre- and post-synaptic labels. Synapse number and area were automatically extracted from each deconvolved data set. In addition, neuronal processes were traced automatically to assess changes in synapse distribution. The results of these experiments demonstrated that patterned topographic cues can induce organized and functional neuronal networks that can serve as models for the study of synapse formation and plasticity as well as for the development of neuroprosthetic devices.

  5. Zonal Flow as Pattern Formation: Merging Jets and the Ultimate Jet Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey B. Parker and John A. Krommes

    2013-01-30

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. It is shown that for statisti- cally averaged equations of quasigeostrophic turbulence on a beta plane, zonal flows and inhomoge- neous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the zonal flow wavelength is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  6. The pattern of secondary root formation in curving roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, M. C.; Pierce, F. J.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    A gravitational stimulus was used to induce the curvature of the main root of Arabidopsis thaliana. The number of secondary roots increased on the convex side and decreased on the concave side of any curved main root axes in comparison with straight roots used as the control. The same phenomenon was observed with the curved main roots of plants grown on a clinostat and of mutant plants exhibiting random root orientation. The data suggest that the pattern of lateral root formation is associated with curvature but is independent of the environmental stimuli used to induce curvature.

  7. The physics of pattern formation at liquid interfaces. Progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, J.V.

    1992-06-01

    During the past year we have submitted six papers for publication, three related to the dynamics of macroscopic interfaces, and ultimately all related to solidification, and three related to the internal structure of disorderly materials, with possible applications to the processing of composite materials. In addition to completing all these projects during the past year, we have begun two new projects, one on pattern formation and one on aggregation within a composite system. A brief description is given of this research in this paper.

  8. DSA patterning options for FinFET formation at 7nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chi-Chun C.; Franke, Elliott; Lie, Fee Li; Sieg, Stuart; Tsai, Hsinyu; Lai, Kafai; Truong, Hoa; Farrell, Richard; Somervell, Mark; Sanders, Daniel; Felix, Nelson; Guillorn, Michael; Burns, Sean; Hetzer, David; Ko, Akiteru; Arnold, John; Colburn, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Several 27nm-pitch directed self-assembly (DSA) processes targeting fin formation for FinFET device fabrication are studied in a 300mm pilot line environment, including chemoepitaxy for a conventional Fin arrays, graphoepitaxy for a customization approach and a hybrid approach for self-aligned Fin cut. The trade-off between each DSA flow is discussed in terms of placement error, Fin CD/profile uniformity, and restricted design. Challenges in pattern transfer are observed and process optimization are discussed. Finally, silicon Fins with 100nm depth and on-target CD using different DSA options with either lithographic or self-aligned customization approach are demonstrated.

  9. Laser Patterning of Diamond. Part II. Surface Nondiamond Carbon Formation and its Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, J.; Jaye, C; Bohon, J; Rao, T; Fischer, D

    2009-01-01

    As diamond becomes more prevalent for electronic and research applications, methods of patterning diamond will be required. One such method, laser ablation, has been investigated in a related work. We report on the formation of surface nondiamond carbon during laser ablation of both polycrystalline and single-crystal synthetic diamonds. Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used to confirm that the nondiamond carbon layer formed during the ablation was amorphous, and Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to estimate the thickness of this layer to be {approx} 60 nm. Ozone cleaning was used to remove the nondiamond carbon layer.

  10. E × B shear pattern formation by radial propagation of heat flux waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kosuga, Y.; Diamond, P. H.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Gürcan, Ö. D.

    2014-05-15

    A novel theory to describe the formation of E×B flow patterns by radially propagating heat flux waves is presented. A model for heat avalanche dynamics is extended to include a finite delay time between the instantaneous heat flux and the mean flux, based on an analogy between heat avalanche dynamics and traffic flow dynamics. The response time introduced here is an analogue of the drivers' response time in traffic dynamics. The microscopic foundation for the time delay is the time for mixing of the phase space density. The inclusion of the finite response time changes the model equation for avalanche dynamics from Burgers equation to a nonlinear telegraph equation. Based on the telegraph equation, the formation of heat flux jams is predicted. The growth rate and typical interval of jams are calculated. The connection of the jam interval to the typical step size of the E×B staircase is discussed.

  11. Pattern formation in chemically interacting active rotors with self-propulsion.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Cates, Michael E; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate that active rotations in chemically signalling particles, such as autochemotactic E. coli close to walls, create a route for pattern formation based on a nonlinear yet deterministic instability mechanism. For slow rotations, we find a transient persistence of the uniform state, followed by a sudden formation of clusters contingent on locking of the average propulsion direction by chemotaxis. These clusters coarsen, which results in phase separation into a dense and a dilute region. Faster rotations arrest phase separation leading to a global travelling wave of rotors with synchronized roto-translational motion. Our results elucidate the physics resulting from the competition of two generic paradigms in active matter, chemotaxis and active rotations, and show that the latter provides a tool to design programmable self-assembly of active matter, for example to control coarsening. PMID:27526180

  12. Mixing regime as a key factor to determine DON formation in drinking water biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Lu, Changqing; Li, Shuai; Gong, Song; Yuan, Shoujun; Yu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can act as precursor of nitrogenous disinfection by-products formed during chlorination disinfection. The performances of biological fluidized bed (continuous stirred tank reactor, CSTR) and bio-ceramic filters (plug flow reactor, PFR) were compared in this study to investigate the influence of mixing regime on DON formation in drinking water treatment. In the shared influent, DON ranged from 0.71mgL(-1) to 1.20mgL(-1). The two biological fluidized bed reactors, named BFB1 (mechanical stirring) and BFB2 (air agitation), contained 0.12 and 0.19mgL(-1) DON in their effluents, respectively. Meanwhile, the bio-ceramic reactors, labeled as BCF1 (no aeration) and BCF2 (with aeration), had 1.02 and 0.81mgL(-1) DON in their effluents, respectively. Comparative results showed that the CSTR mixing regime significantly reduced DON formation. This particular reduction was further investigated in this study. The viable/total microbial biomass was determined with propidium monoazide quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PMA-qPCR) and qPCR, respectively. The results of the investigation demonstrated that the microbes in BFB2 had higher viability than those in BCF2. The viable bacteria decreased more sharply than the total bacteria along the media depth in BCF2, and DON in BCF2 accumulated in the deeper media. These phenomena suggested that mixing regime determined DON formation by influencing the distribution of viable, total biomass, and ratio of viable biomass to total biomass. PMID:25585870

  13. Bone morphogenetic proteins, eye patterning, and retinocollicular map formation in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Plas, Daniel T.; Dhande, Onkar; Lopez, Joshua E.; Murali, Deepa; Thaller, Christina; Henkemeyer, Mark; Furuta, Yasuhide; Overbeek, Paul; Crair, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Patterning events during early eye formation determine retinal cell fate and can dictate the behavior of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons as they navigate toward central brain targets. The temporally and spatially regulated expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their receptors in the retina are thought to play a key role in this process, initiating gene expression cascades that distinguish different regions of the retina, particularly along the dorsoventral axis. Here, we examine the role of BMP and a potential downstream effector, EphB, in retinotopic map formation in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and superior colliculus (SC). RGC axon behaviors during retinotopic map formation in wild type mice are compared with those in several strains of mice with engineered defects of BMP and EphB signaling. Normal RGC axon sorting produces axon order in the optic tract that reflects the dorsoventral position of the parent RGCs in the eye. A dramatic consequence of disrupting BMP signaling is a missorting of RGC axons as they exit the optic chiasm. This sorting is not dependent on EphB. When BMP signaling in the developing eye is genetically modified, RGC order in the optic tract and targeting in the LGN and SC are correspondingly disrupted. These experiments show that BMP signaling regulates dorsoventral RGC cell fate, RGC axon behavior in the ascending optic tract and retinotopic map formation in the LGN and SC through mechanisms that are in part distinct from EphB signaling in the LGN and SC. PMID:18614674

  14. Forging patterns and making waves from biology to geology: a commentary on Turing (1952) ‘The chemical basis of morphogenesis’

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Alan Turing was neither a biologist nor a chemist, and yet the paper he published in 1952, ‘The chemical basis of morphogenesis’, on the spontaneous formation of patterns in systems undergoing reaction and diffusion of their ingredients has had a substantial impact on both fields, as well as in other areas as disparate as geomorphology and criminology. Motivated by the question of how a spherical embryo becomes a decidedly non-spherical organism such as a human being, Turing devised a mathematical model that explained how random fluctuations can drive the emergence of pattern and structure from initial uniformity. The spontaneous appearance of pattern and form in a system far away from its equilibrium state occurs in many types of natural process, and in some artificial ones too. It is often driven by very general mechanisms, of which Turing's model supplies one of the most versatile. For that reason, these patterns show striking similarities in systems that seem superficially to share nothing in common, such as the stripes of sand ripples and of pigmentation on a zebra skin. New examples of ‘Turing patterns' in biology and beyond are still being discovered today. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750229

  15. The formation, function and regulation of amyloids: insights from structural biology.

    PubMed

    Landreh, M; Sawaya, M R; Hipp, M S; Eisenberg, D S; Wüthrich, K; Hartl, F U

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the accumulation of insoluble, β-strand-rich aggregates. The underlying structural conversions are closely associated with cellular toxicity, but can also drive the formation of functional protein assemblies. In recent years, studies in the field of structural studies have revealed astonishing insights into the origins, mechanisms and implications of amyloid formation. Notably, high-resolution crystal structures of peptides in amyloid-like fibrils and prefibrillar oligomers have become available despite their challenging chemical nature. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has revealed that dynamic local polymorphisms in the benign form of the prion protein affect the transformation into amyloid fibrils and the transmissibility of prion diseases. Studies of the structures and interactions of chaperone proteins help us to understand how the cellular proteostasis network is able to recognize different stages of aberrant protein folding and prevent aggregation. In this review, we will focus on recent developments that connect the different aspects of amyloid biology and discuss how understanding the process of amyloid formation and the associated defence mechanisms can reveal targets for pharmacological intervention that may become the first steps towards clinically viable treatment strategies. PMID:27237473

  16. Biological clues on neuronal degeneration based on theoretical fits of decay patterns: towards a mathematical neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2010-01-01

    The application of the best mathematical fit to quantitative data on cell death over time in models of nervous abiotrophies can yield useful clues as to the cellular properties of degenerative processes. We review data obtained in two neurogenetic models of movement disorders in the laboratory mouse, the 'Purkinje cell degeneration' (pcd) mutant, a model of cerebellar ataxia, and the 'weaver' (wv) mutant, a combined degeneration of multiple systems including the mesostriatal dopaminergic pathway. In the cerebellum of pcd mice, analyses of transsynaptic granule cell death subsequent to the genetically-determined degeneration of Purkinje cells show that granule neuron fallout follows a typical pattern of exponential decay. In the midbrain of weaver mice, regression fits show that dopaminergic neuron fallout combines two independent components, an initial exponential decay, superceded by a linear regression, with a threshold around 100 days. The biological connotations of such analyses are discussed in light of the empirical observations and the theoretical simulation models. The theoretical connotations may link neuron loss to specific cellular idiosyncracies in elucidating the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease. PMID:20383806

  17. Mechanical Regulation of Three-Dimensional Epithelial Fold Pattern Formation in the Mouse Oviduct.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Hiroshi; Shi, Dongbo; Suzuki, Makoto; Ueno, Naoto; Uemura, Tadashi; Fujimori, Toshihiko

    2016-08-01

    Epithelia exhibit various three-dimensional morphologies linked to organ function in animals. However, the mechanisms of three-dimensional morphogenesis remain elusive. The luminal epithelium of the mouse oviduct forms well-aligned straight folds along the longitudinal direction of the tubes. Disruption of the Celsr1 gene, a planar cell polarity-related gene, causes ectopically branched folds. Here, we evaluated the mechanical contributions of the epithelium to the fold pattern formation. In the mutant oviduct, the epithelium was more intricate along the longitudinal direction than in the wild-type, suggesting a higher ratio of the longitudinal length of the epithelial layer to that of the surrounding smooth muscle (SM) layer (L-Epi/SM ratio). Our mathematical modeling and computational simulations suggested that the L-Epi/SM ratio could explain the differences in fold branching between the two genotypes. Longitudinal epithelial tensions were increased in well-aligned folds compared with those in disorganized folds both in the simulations and in experimental estimations. Artificially increasing the epithelial tensions suppressed the branching in simulations, suggesting that the epithelial tensions can regulate fold patterning. The epithelial tensions could be explained by the combination of line tensions along the epithelial cell-cell boundaries with the polarized cell arrays observed in vivo. These results suggest that the fold pattern is associated with the polarized cell array through the longitudinal epithelial tension. Further simulations indicated that the L-Epi/SM ratio could contribute to fold pattern diversity, suggesting that the L-Epi/SM ratio is a critical parameter in the fold patterning in tubular organs. PMID:27508448

  18. Turing instability and pattern formation in a two-population neuronal network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyller, John; Blomquist, Patrick; Einevoll, Gaute T.

    2007-01-01

    A two-population firing-rate model describing the dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory neural activity in one spatial dimension is investigated with respect to formation of patterns, in particular stationary periodic patterns and spatiotemporal oscillations. Conditions for existence of spatially homogeneous equilibrium states are first determined, and the stability properties of these equilibria are investigated. It is shown that the nonlocal synaptic interactions may promote a finite bandwidth instability in a way analogous to diffusion effects in the classical Turing instability for reaction-diffusion equations and modulational instability in the theory of nonlinear waves in nonlocal defocusing Kerr media. Our analysis relies on the wave-number dependent invariants of the 2×2-matrix representing the spatially Fourier-transformed linearized evolution equations. The generic picture which emerges is an instability consisting of a finite set of well-separated unstable bands in wave-number space (gain bands). The case with symmetrical, exponentially decaying connectivity functions is investigated in detail, allowing for a more comprehensive analysis of the gain-band structure, and, in particular, conditions for the excitation of a single gain band through a Turing-Hopf bifurcation with the relative inhibition time constant as control parameter. Two typical situations emerge depending on the thresholds and inclinations of the sigmoidal firing-rate functions: (i) A single gain-band is excited through a Turing-Hopf bifurcation, and the resulting state is a spatiotemporally oscillating pattern, or (ii) the instability develops into a stationary periodic pattern, i.e. a set of equidistant bumps. The dependence of instability-type on the inclinations of the firing-rate function and the time constant are comprehensively investigated, demonstrating, for example, that only stationary patterns can be generated for sufficiently small inhibitory time constants. The nonlinear

  19. Dynamic Pattern Formation for Wings of Pterygota in an Eclosion ---Pattern Analysis for Wings with the Imago---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, M.; Kakazu, Y.

    The vein and cell patterns for the fore and hind wing of Lepidoptera, Hemiptera, Orthoptera and Odonata are analyzed and discussed. For vein patterns of them, the fractal properties are shown and the inequality between four orders is obtained. The nature of wings observed by mass distributions for fractal dimensions of the vein pattern is presented.

  20. Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged colloids: Stability and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christdoss Pushpam, Sam David; Basavaraj, Madivala G.; Mani, Ethayaraja

    2015-11-01

    A binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids can be used to stabilize water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsions. A Monte Carlo simulation study to address the effect of charge ratio of colloids on the stability of Pickering emulsions is presented. The colloidal particles at the interface are modeled as aligned dipolar hard spheres, with attractive interaction between unlike-charged and repulsive interaction between like-charged particles. The optimum composition (fraction of positively charged particles) required for the stabilization corresponds to a minimum in the interaction energy per particle. In addition, for each charge ratio, there is a range of compositions where emulsions can be stabilized. The structural arrangement of particles or the pattern formation at the emulsion interface is strongly influenced by the charge ratio. We find well-mixed isotropic, square, and hexagonal arrangements of particles on the emulsion surface for different compositions at a given charge ratio. The distribution of coordination numbers is calculated to characterize structural features. The simulation study is useful for the rational design of Pickering emulsifications wherein oppositely charged colloids are used, and for the control of pattern formation that can be useful for the synthesis of colloidosomes and porous shells derived thereof.

  1. Energy approach to rivalry dynamics, soliton stability, and pattern formation in neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loxley, P. N.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-10-01

    Hopfield’s Lyapunov function is used to view the stability and topology of equilibria in neuronal networks for visual rivalry and pattern formation. For two neural populations with reciprocal inhibition and slow adaptation, the dynamics of neural activity is found to include a pair of limit cycles: one for oscillations between states where one population has high activity and the other has low activity, as in rivalry, and one for oscillations between states where both populations have the same activity. Hopfield’s Lyapunov function is used to find the dynamical mechanism for oscillations and the basin of attraction of each limit cycle. For a spatially continuous population with lateral inhibition, stable equilibria are found for local regions of high activity (solitons) and for bound states of two or more solitons. Bound states become stable when moving two solitons together minimizes the Lyapunov function, a result of decreasing activity in regions between peaks of high activity when the firing rate is described by a sigmoid function. Lowering the barrier to soliton formation leads to a pattern-forming instability, and a nonlinear solution to the dynamical equations is found to be given by a soliton lattice, which is completely characterized by the soliton width and the spacing between neighboring solitons. Fluctuations due to noise create lattice vacancies analogous to point defects in crystals, leading to activity which is spatially inhomogeneous.

  2. The dependence of contrail formation on the weather pattern and altitude in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, E. A.; Hoskins, B. J.; Shine, K. P.

    2012-06-01

    Aircraft flying through cold ice-supersaturated air produce persistent contrails which contribute to the climate impact of aviation. Here, we demonstrate the importance of the weather situation, together with the route and altitude of the aircraft through this, on estimating contrail coverage. The results have implications for determining the climate impact of contrails as well as potential mitigation strategies. Twenty-one years of re-analysis data are used to produce a climatological assessment of conditions favorable for persistent contrail formation between 200 and 300 hPa over the north Atlantic in winter. The seasonal-mean frequency of cold ice-supersaturated regions is highest near 300 hPa, and decreases with altitude. The frequency of occurrence of ice-supersaturated regions varies with large-scale weather pattern; the most common locations are over Greenland, on the southern side of the jet stream and around the northern edge of high pressure ridges. Assuming aircraft take a great circle route, as opposed to a more realistic time-optimal route, is likely to lead to an error in the estimated contrail coverage, which can exceed 50% for westbound north Atlantic flights. The probability of contrail formation can increase or decrease with height, depending on the weather pattern, indicating that the generic suggestion that flying higher leads to fewer contrails is not robust.

  3. Regulatory logic and pattern formation in the early sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengyang; Cheng, Xianrui; Socolar, Joshua E S

    2014-12-21

    We model the endomesoderm tissue specification process in the vegetal half of the early sea urchin embryo using Boolean models with continuous-time updating to represent the regulatory network that controls gene expression. Our models assume that the network interaction rules remain constant over time and the dynamics plays out on a predetermined program of cell divisions. An exhaustive search of two-node models, in which each node may represent a module of several genes in the real regulatory network, yields a unique network architecture that can accomplish the pattern formation task at hand--the formation of three latitudinal tissue bands from an initial state with only two distinct cell types. Analysis of an eight-gene model constructed from available experimental data reveals that it has a modular structure equivalent to the successful two-node case. Our results support the hypothesis that the gene regulatory network provides sufficient instructions for producing the correct pattern of tissue specification at this stage of development (between the fourth and tenth cleavages in the urchin embryo). PMID:25093827

  4. Hybrid approach for structural modeling of biological systems from X-ray free electron laser diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Jonic, Slavica; Tama, Florence; Miyashita, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    We present a new hybrid approach for structural modeling using X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) diffraction patterns from non-crystalline biological samples. Reconstruction of a 3D structure requires a large number of diffraction patterns; however, in the current XFEL experiments with biological systems, the analysis often relies on a small number of 2D diffraction patterns. In this study, we explore the strategies to identify plausible 3D structural models by combining the 2D analysis of such diffraction patterns with computational modeling (normal mode analysis or molecular dynamics simulations). As the first step toward such hybrid modeling, we established a protocol to assess the agreement between the model structure and the target XFEL diffraction pattern and showed that XFEL data can be used to study the conformational transitions of biological molecules. We tested the proposed algorithms using data of three biomolecular complexes of different sizes (elongation factor 2, CCM virus, and ribosome) and examined the experimental conditions that are required to perform such studies, in particular the XFEL beam intensity requirements. The results indicate that the current beam intensity is close to a strength that enables us to study conformational transitions of macromolecules, such as ribosomes. The proposed algorithm can be combined with molecular mechanics approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis, to generate a large number of candidate structures to perform hybrid structural modeling. PMID:26972893

  5. An in vitro-in silico interface platform for spatiotemporal analysis of pattern formation in collective epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, M

    2016-08-01

    A multicellular organization is a complex resulting from the coordinated migration of cells to form a specific pattern. The directionality of migration is governed by the mechanical and molecular dynamics of factors secreted from the cells. The mechanism underlying pattern formation is too complex to unveil by culture experiments alone. A mathematical model could provide a powerful tool for elucidating the mechanism of pattern formation by computing the molecular dynamics, which are difficult to visualize by culture experiments. However, there tends to be a gap between mathematical models and experimental research due to incongruity between the idealized conditions of the model and the experimental results. This paper presents an in vitro-in silico interface platform for elucidating the logic of multicellular pattern formation. Two-dimensional collective cell pattern formation was developed using normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Then, geometrical control of collective cells followed by feedback iteration was used to bridge the gap between the mathematical model and in vitro experiments. The mechanisms underlying the pattern formation of bronchial epithelial cells were evaluated using a reaction-diffusion model. The results indicated that differences in the diffusion rates of the activator and inhibitor determine the direction of collective cell migration to form a specific pattern. PMID:27452205

  6. Dynamic coupling of pattern formation and morphogenesis in the developing vertebrate retina.

    PubMed

    Picker, Alexander; Cavodeassi, Florencia; Machate, Anja; Bernauer, Sabine; Hans, Stefan; Abe, Gembu; Kawakami, Koichi; Wilson, Stephen W; Brand, Michael

    2009-10-01

    During embryonic development, pattern formation must be tightly synchronized with tissue morphogenesis to coordinate the establishment of the spatial identities of cells with their movements. In the vertebrate retina, patterning along the dorsal-ventral and nasal-temporal (anterior-posterior) axes is required for correct spatial representation in the retinotectal map. However, it is unknown how specification of axial cell positions in the retina occurs during the complex process of early eye morphogenesis. Studying zebrafish embryos, we show that morphogenetic tissue rearrangements during eye evagination result in progenitor cells in the nasal half of the retina primordium being brought into proximity to the sources of three fibroblast growth factors, Fgf8/3/24, outside the eye. Triple-mutant analysis shows that this combined Fgf signal fully controls nasal retina identity by regulating the nasal transcription factor Foxg1. Surprisingly, nasal-temporal axis specification occurs very early along the dorsal-ventral axis of the evaginating eye. By in vivo imaging GFP-tagged retinal progenitor cells, we find that subsequent eye morphogenesis requires gradual tissue compaction in the nasal half and directed cell movements into the temporal half of the retina. Balancing these processes drives the progressive alignment of the nasal-temporal retina axis with the anterior-posterior body axis and is controlled by a feed-forward effect of Fgf signaling on Foxg1-mediated cell cohesion. Thus, the mechanistic coupling and dynamic synchronization of tissue patterning with morphogenetic cell behavior through Fgf signaling leads to the graded allocation of cell positional identity in the eye, underlying retinotectal map formation. PMID:19823566

  7. Dynamic Coupling of Pattern Formation and Morphogenesis in the Developing Vertebrate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Picker, Alexander; Cavodeassi, Florencia; Machate, Anja; Bernauer, Sabine; Hans, Stefan; Abe, Gembu; Kawakami, Koichi; Wilson, Stephen W.; Brand, Michael

    2009-01-01

    During embryonic development, pattern formation must be tightly synchronized with tissue morphogenesis to coordinate the establishment of the spatial identities of cells with their movements. In the vertebrate retina, patterning along the dorsal-ventral and nasal-temporal (anterior-posterior) axes is required for correct spatial representation in the retinotectal map. However, it is unknown how specification of axial cell positions in the retina occurs during the complex process of early eye morphogenesis. Studying zebrafish embryos, we show that morphogenetic tissue rearrangements during eye evagination result in progenitor cells in the nasal half of the retina primordium being brought into proximity to the sources of three fibroblast growth factors, Fgf8/3/24, outside the eye. Triple-mutant analysis shows that this combined Fgf signal fully controls nasal retina identity by regulating the nasal transcription factor Foxg1. Surprisingly, nasal-temporal axis specification occurs very early along the dorsal-ventral axis of the evaginating eye. By in vivo imaging GFP-tagged retinal progenitor cells, we find that subsequent eye morphogenesis requires gradual tissue compaction in the nasal half and directed cell movements into the temporal half of the retina. Balancing these processes drives the progressive alignment of the nasal-temporal retina axis with the anterior-posterior body axis and is controlled by a feed-forward effect of Fgf signaling on Foxg1-mediated cell cohesion. Thus, the mechanistic coupling and dynamic synchronization of tissue patterning with morphogenetic cell behavior through Fgf signaling leads to the graded allocation of cell positional identity in the eye, underlying retinotectal map formation. PMID:19823566

  8. A possible formation mechanism of rampart-like ejecta pattern in a laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Kadono, T.; Nakamura, A. M.; Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Yamamoto, S.

    2011-12-01

    The ejecta morphologies around impact craters represent highly diverse appearance on the surface of solid bodies in our Solar System. It is considered that the varied ejecta morphologies result from the environments such as the atmospheric pressure, the volatile content in the subsurface, because they affect the emplacement process of the ejecta. Clarifying the relationships between the ejecta morphologies and the formation processes and environments could constrain the ancient surface environment and the evolution of the planets. We have investigated the ejecta patterns around the impact craters which formed on a glass beads layer in a laboratory, and found that the patterns depend on impact velocity, atmospheric pressure, and initial state of packing of the target [Suzuki et al., 2010, JpGU abstract]. Now, we focus on one of the ejecta patterns which has a petal-like (or sometimes concentric) ridges on the distal edge of the continuous ejecta. This ejecta pattern looks very similar to the rampart ejecta morphology observed around Martian impact craters [e.g. Barlow et al., 2000]. The experiments are conducted with the small light gas gun placed in Kobe University, Japan. The projectile is a cylinder with a diameter of 10 mm and a height of 10 mm, and is made of aluminum, nylon, or stainless. The target is a layer of glass beads (nearly uniform diameter) in a tub with ~28 cm in diameter. The bulk density is about 1.7 g/cm^3. The following three parameters are varied: 1) the diameter of the target glass beads (50, 100, 420 microns), 2) the ambient atmospheric pressure in the chamber (from ~500 Pa to atmospheric pressure), 3) the impact velocity of the projectile (from a few to ~120 m/s). In our experiments, the rampart-like ridged patterns are observed within the following conditions: 1) the diameter of the target glass beads is 50 and 100 microns, 2) the ambient pressure in the chamber is higher than ~10^4 Pa, and 3) the impact velocity is higher than 16 m

  9. Dynamic model based on voltage transfer curve for pattern formation in dielectric barrier glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ben; He, Feng; Ouyang, Jiting; Duan, Xiaoxi

    2015-12-15

    Simulation work is very important for understanding the formation of self-organized discharge patterns. Previous works have witnessed different models derived from other systems for simulation of discharge pattern, but most of these models are complicated and time-consuming. In this paper, we introduce a convenient phenomenological dynamic model based on the basic dynamic process of glow discharge and the voltage transfer curve (VTC) to study the dielectric barrier glow discharge (DBGD) pattern. VTC is an important characteristic of DBGD, which plots the change of wall voltage after a discharge as a function of the initial total gap voltage. In the modeling, the combined effect of the discharge conditions is included in VTC, and the activation-inhibition effect is expressed by a spatial interaction term. Besides, the model reduces the dimensionality of the system by just considering the integration effect of current flow. All these greatly facilitate the construction of this model. Numerical simulations turn out to be in good accordance with our previous fluid modeling and experimental result.

  10. Spermidine, but not spermine, is essential for pigment pattern formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Frohnhöfer, Hans Georg; Geiger-Rudolph, Silke; Pattky, Martin; Meixner, Martin; Huhn, Carolin; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Geisler, Robert; Gehring, Ines; Maderspacher, Florian; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Irion, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines are small poly-cations essential for all cellular life. The main polyamines present in metazoans are putrescine, spermidine and spermine. Their exact functions are still largely unclear; however, they are involved in a wide variety of processes affecting cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis and aging. Here we identify idefix, a mutation in the zebrafish gene encoding the enzyme spermidine synthase, leading to a severe reduction in spermidine levels as shown by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. We show that spermidine, but not spermine, is essential for early development, organogenesis and colour pattern formation. Whereas in other vertebrates spermidine deficiency leads to very early embryonic lethality, maternally provided spermidine synthase in zebrafish is sufficient to rescue the early developmental defects. This allows us to uncouple them from events occurring later during colour patterning. Factors involved in the cellular interactions essential for colour patterning, likely targets for spermidine, are the gap junction components Cx41.8, Cx39.4, and Kir7.1, an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, all known to be regulated by polyamines. Thus, zebrafish provide a vertebrate model to study the in vivo effects of polyamines. PMID:27215328

  11. Mechanism Underlying the Spatial Pattern Formation of Dominant Tree Species in a Natural Secondary Forest

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guodong; Yu, Xinxiao; Fan, Dengxing; Jia, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Studying the spatial pattern of plant species may provide significant insights into processes and mechanisms that maintain stand stability. To better understand the dynamics of naturally regenerated secondary forests, univariate and bivariate Ripley’s L(r) functions were employed to evaluate intra-/interspecific relationships of four dominant tree species (Populus davidiana, Betula platyphylla, Larix gmelinii and Acer mono) and to distinguish the underlying mechanism of spatial distribution. The results showed that the distribution of soil, water and nutrients was not fragmented but presented clear gradients. An overall aggregated distribution existed at most distances. No correlation was found between the spatial pattern of soil conditions and that of trees. Both positive and negative intra- and interspecific relationships were found between different DBH classes at various distances. Large trees did not show systematic inhibition of the saplings. By contrast, the inhibition intensified as the height differences increased between the compared pairs. Except for Larix, universal inhibition of saplings by upper layer trees occurred among other species, and this reflected the vertical competition for light. Therefore, we believe that competition for light rather than soil nutrients underlies the mechanism driving the formation of stand spatial pattern in the rocky mountainous areas examined. PMID:27028757

  12. Dynamic model based on voltage transfer curve for pattern formation in dielectric barrier glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ben; He, Feng; Duan, Xiaoxi; Ouyang, Jiting

    2015-12-01

    Simulation work is very important for understanding the formation of self-organized discharge patterns. Previous works have witnessed different models derived from other systems for simulation of discharge pattern, but most of these models are complicated and time-consuming. In this paper, we introduce a convenient phenomenological dynamic model based on the basic dynamic process of glow discharge and the voltage transfer curve (VTC) to study the dielectric barrier glow discharge (DBGD) pattern. VTC is an important characteristic of DBGD, which plots the change of wall voltage after a discharge as a function of the initial total gap voltage. In the modeling, the combined effect of the discharge conditions is included in VTC, and the activation-inhibition effect is expressed by a spatial interaction term. Besides, the model reduces the dimensionality of the system by just considering the integration effect of current flow. All these greatly facilitate the construction of this model. Numerical simulations turn out to be in good accordance with our previous fluid modeling and experimental result.

  13. Spermidine, but not spermine, is essential for pigment pattern formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Frohnhöfer, Hans Georg; Geiger-Rudolph, Silke; Pattky, Martin; Meixner, Martin; Huhn, Carolin; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Geisler, Robert; Gehring, Ines; Maderspacher, Florian; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyamines are small poly-cations essential for all cellular life. The main polyamines present in metazoans are putrescine, spermidine and spermine. Their exact functions are still largely unclear; however, they are involved in a wide variety of processes affecting cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis and aging. Here we identify idefix, a mutation in the zebrafish gene encoding the enzyme spermidine synthase, leading to a severe reduction in spermidine levels as shown by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. We show that spermidine, but not spermine, is essential for early development, organogenesis and colour pattern formation. Whereas in other vertebrates spermidine deficiency leads to very early embryonic lethality, maternally provided spermidine synthase in zebrafish is sufficient to rescue the early developmental defects. This allows us to uncouple them from events occurring later during colour patterning. Factors involved in the cellular interactions essential for colour patterning, likely targets for spermidine, are the gap junction components Cx41.8, Cx39.4, and Kir7.1, an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, all known to be regulated by polyamines. Thus, zebrafish provide a vertebrate model to study the in vivo effects of polyamines. PMID:27215328

  14. Mechanism Underlying the Spatial Pattern Formation of Dominant Tree Species in a Natural Secondary Forest.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guodong; Yu, Xinxiao; Fan, Dengxing; Jia, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Studying the spatial pattern of plant species may provide significant insights into processes and mechanisms that maintain stand stability. To better understand the dynamics of naturally regenerated secondary forests, univariate and bivariate Ripley's L(r) functions were employed to evaluate intra-/interspecific relationships of four dominant tree species (Populus davidiana, Betula platyphylla, Larix gmelinii and Acer mono) and to distinguish the underlying mechanism of spatial distribution. The results showed that the distribution of soil, water and nutrients was not fragmented but presented clear gradients. An overall aggregated distribution existed at most distances. No correlation was found between the spatial pattern of soil conditions and that of trees. Both positive and negative intra- and interspecific relationships were found between different DBH classes at various distances. Large trees did not show systematic inhibition of the saplings. By contrast, the inhibition intensified as the height differences increased between the compared pairs. Except for Larix, universal inhibition of saplings by upper layer trees occurred among other species, and this reflected the vertical competition for light. Therefore, we believe that competition for light rather than soil nutrients underlies the mechanism driving the formation of stand spatial pattern in the rocky mountainous areas examined. PMID:27028757

  15. Nanoscale topographic pattern formation on Kr{sup +}-bombarded germanium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perkinson, Joy C.; Madi, Charbel S.; Aziz, Michael J.

    2013-03-15

    The nanoscale pattern formation of Ge surfaces uniformly irradiated by Kr{sup +} ions was studied in a low-contamination environment at ion energies of 250 and 500 eV and at angles of 0 Degree-Sign through 80 Degree-Sign . The authors present a phase diagram of domains of pattern formation occurring as these two control parameters are varied. The results are insensitive to ion energy over the range covered by the experiments. Flat surfaces are stable from normal incidence up to an incidence angle of {theta} = 55 Degree-Sign from normal. At higher angles, the surface is linearly unstable to the formation of parallel-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is parallel to the projection of the ion beam on the surface. For {theta} {>=} 75 Degree-Sign the authors observe perpendicular-mode ripples, in which the wave vector is perpendicular to the ion beam. This behavior is qualitatively similar to those of Madi et al. for Ar{sup +}-irradiated Si but is inconsistent with those of Ziberi et al. for Kr{sup +}-irradiated Ge. The existence of a window of stability is qualitatively inconsistent with a theory based on sputter erosion [R. M. Bradley and J. M. Harper, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 6, 2390 (1988)] and qualitatively consistent with a model of ion impact-induced mass redistribution [G. Carter and V. Vishnyakov, Phys. Rev. B 54, 17647 (1996)] as well as a crater function theory incorporating both effects [S. A. Norris et al., Nat. Commun. 2, 276 (2011)]. The critical transition angle between stable and rippled surfaces occurs 10 Degree-Sign -15 Degree-Sign above the value of 45 Degree-Sign predicted by the mass redistribution model.

  16. Atmospheric chemistry of nitrogenous aerosols in northeastern Asia: biological sources and secondary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Fu, P. Q.

    2015-09-01

    To better understand the sources of nitrogenous aerosols, particularly water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) and water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION), in northeastern Asia, we measured total nitrogen (TN) and water-soluble total nitrogen (WSTN) as well as nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) of TN (δ15NTN) and WSTN (δ15NWSTN) in the total suspended particulate (TSP) samples collected from Sapporo, northern Japan, for a 1-year period. In general, WION was more abundant (126 ± 117 ng m-3), whereas WSON was 89.7 ± 80.6 ng m-3, accounting for 14 ± 11 % and 9.2 ± 7.3 % of TN, respectively. WSON peaked in late autumn to winter (maximum 288 ng m-3) and WION peaked in mid-spring to early summer (454 ng m-3). δ15NTN (21.9 ± 4.1 ‰) and δ15NWSTN (25.8 ± 8.2 ‰) showed peaks in summer with relatively high ratios in late autumn. Based on the seasonal variations in WSON and WION together with organic tracers, fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning are found to be two major sources of WSON, whereas emissions of biological particles and secondary formation by reactions of biogenic secondary organic species (carbonyls) with NH3 are suggested as an important source of WION. The seasonality of δ15NTN and δ15NWSTN, together with the comparisons to literature values, implies that chemical aging (including gas-particle partitioning) and biomass burning are the causes of the enhanced values in summer and autumn, respectively. This study demonstrates that contributions of aerosol N from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning dominate in autumn and/or winter, whereas emission of terrestrial biological particles and secondary formation from biogenic hydrocarbons and subsequent chemical aging in the atmosphere are important in spring and/or summer in northeastern Asia.

  17. Atmospheric chemistry of nitrogenous aerosols in Northeast Asia: biological sources and secondary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Fu, P. Q.

    2015-04-01

    To better understand the sources of nitrogenous aerosols, particularly water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) and water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION), in Northeast Asia, we measured total nitrogen (TN) and water-soluble total nitrogen (WSTN) as well as nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) of TN (δ15NTN) and WSTN (δ15NWSTN) in the total suspended particles (TSP) collected from Sapporo, northern Japan for one-year period. In general, WION was more abundant (126 ± 117 ng m-3) whereas WSON (89.7 ± 80.6 ng m-3), accounting for 14 ± 11% and 9.2 ± 7.3% of TN, respectively. WSON peaked in late autumn to winter (maximum 288 ng m-3) and WION peaked in mid spring to early summer (454 ng m-3). δ15NTN (21.9 ± 4.1‰) and δ15NWSTN (25.8 ± 8.2‰) showed peaks in summer with relatively high ratios in late autumn. Based on the seasonal variations of WSON and WION together with organic tracers, fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning are found to be two major sources of WSON whereas emissions of biological particles and secondary formation by reactions of biogenic secondary organic species (carbonyls) with NH3 are suggested as important source of WION. The seasonality of δ15NTN and δ15NWSTN, together with the comparisons to literature values, implies that chemical aging (including gas/particle partitioning) and biomass burning are the causes of the enhanced values in summer and autumn, respectively. This study demonstrates that contributions of aerosol N from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning dominate in autumn/winter whereas emission of terrestrial biological particles and secondary formation from biogenic hydrocarbons and subsequent chemical aging in the atmosphere are important in spring/summer in Northeast Asia.

  18. The effect of phosphorus on the formation of the Widmanstaetten pattern in iron meteorites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Doan, A. S., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Use of a combination of a revised Fe-Ni-P phase diagram and laboratory cooling experiments on Fe-Ni-P alloys to determine the effect of P on the formation of the Widmanstaetten pattern. From the phase diagram results, two reaction paths were found for the formation of kamacite (1) gamma (taenite) yields alpha (kamacite) + gamma (taenite) and (2) gamma yields gamma + Ph /phosphide, (FeNi)3P/ yields alpha + gamma + Ph. The reaction path gamma yields alpha + gamma is preferred at low P contents, while at higher P contents and at Ni contents greater than 7.0 wt.%, the reaction path gamma yields gamma + Ph yields alpha + gamma + Ph controls the formation of kamacite. Above 7 wt.% Ni, the effect of P on the equilibrium nucleation temperature of kamacite is quite small, less than about plus or minus 30 C with respect to the Fe-Ni binary diagram. The addition of P (greater than 0.1 wt.%) to meteorites promotes nucleation of kamacite at higher temperatures and effectively lowers the amount of undercooling necessary to nucleate kamacite homogeneously. Ni has just the opposite effect, decreasing the temperature of nucleation and increasing the amount of undercooling. It is concluded that significant amounts of undercooling, 50 to 100 C, are necessary for the nucleation of the Widmanstaetten structure in meteorites, and that chemical equilibrium is maintained in the various phases of slowly cooled iron meteorites to 650 C and probably to 600 C.

  19. A formative evaluation of a high school blended learning biology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellman, Stephen William

    As growing student populations continue to tax the resources of public high schools, administrators are constantly looking for ways to address the needs of all students. One option for increasing the number of students in a classroom without sacrificing quality of instruction is to use "blended learning". Blended learning is defined by Marsh et al. (2003, p.2) as a situation where "face-to-face and distance education delivery methods and resources are merged". In such a course, students receive the benefits of classroom-based instruction, while also benefiting from several aspects of distance learning. This is especially true for science courses that rely heavily on both hands-on labs and various multimedia. The purpose of this study was a formative evaluation of a high school blended learning biology course, focusing on a genetics unit. The research question addressed by the study was "Will participants increase their domain knowledge and problem-solving skills after instruction in a high school level blended distance learning biology course? Also investigated was if higher levels of self-regulation skills were correlated to higher levels of content-understanding and problem-solving. The study was composed of a pilot study and a main study. Participants were students in an urban Southern California public high school biology course. Classroom instruction was from a single instructor, and online content was managed using the "Moodle" course management system. Participants were assessed for their gains in genetics content-understanding, genetics problem-solving skills (Punnett squares), and self-regulation. Additionally, participant reactions to the blended instruction model were surveyed. Results indicated that significant increases (p<.05) in content-understanding and problem-solving occurred, though self-regulation skills were not shown to be significantly correlated to increased content-understanding, or problem-solving skills. Participants reacted positively to

  20. Pattern formation of down-built salt structures: insights from 3D numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris

    2015-04-01

    Many salt diapirs are thought to have formed as a result of down-building, which implies that the top of the diapir remained close to the surface during sediment deposition. This process is largely three-dimensional and in order to better understand what controls the patterns that form as a result of this down-building process, we here perform three-dimensional numerical models and compare the results with analytical models. In our models, we vary several parameters such as initial salt thickness, sedimentation rate, salt viscosity, salt-sediment viscosity contrast as well as the density of sediments. Down-building of three-dimensional diapirs only occurs for a certain range of parameters and is favored by lower sediment/salt viscosity contrasts and sedimentation rates in agreement with analytical predictions and findings from previous 2D models. However, the models show that the sedimentation rate has an additional effect on the formation and evolution of three-dimensional diapir patterns. At low sedimentation rates, salt ridges that form during early model stages remain preserved at later stages as well. For higher sedimentation rates, the initial salt ridges break up and form finger-like diapirs at the junction of salt ridges, which results in different salt exposure patterns at the surface. Once the initial pattern of diapirs is formed, higher sedimentation rate can also result in covered diapirs if the diapir extrusion velocity is insufficiently large. We quantify the effect of sedimentation rate on the number of diapirs exposed at the surface as well as on their spacing. In some cases, this final pattern is distinctly different from the initial polygonal pattern. We also study the extrusion of salt through time in the simulations, and show that it can be related to the geometries of the sedimentary layers surrounding the diapirs. Acknowledgements. Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Program

  1. Solid-Phase Formation Of Isovaline, A Non-Biological, Meteoritic Amino Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Lewis, A. S.; Moore, M. H.; Dworkin, J. P.; Glavin, D. P.

    2007-10-01

    Among the Murchison (CM) meteoritic amino acids, isovaline stands out as being non-biological (nonprotein) and having a high abundance. Approximately equal amounts of D- and L-isovaline have been reported in CM meteorites, but the molecule's structure appears to prohibit racemization in aqueous solutions. While it is possible that isovaline could be made by the oft-studied Strecker reaction, laboratory experiments have seldom been able to produce this molecule from realistic molecular precursors. Recently we have investigated the low-temperature solid-phase chemistry of isovaline with an eye toward the molecule's formation, its stability, and the interconversion of its D- and L-enantiomers. Ion-irradiated isovaline-containing ices were examined by IR spectroscopy and highly-sensitive LC/ToF-MS methods to assess both amino acid destruction and racemization. Samples were studied both in the presence and absence of water-ice, and the destruction of isovaline was measured as a function of radiation dose. In addition, we have continued our earlier work on solid-phase amino acid formation, extending it to cover isovaline. In this presentation we will report the results of these newer investigations. This work was supported by a grant to the Goddard Center for Astrobiology through the NASA Astrobiology Institute. AL was supported by an award from the Summer Undergraduate Internship in Astrobiology program.

  2. Biological marker distribution in coexisting kerogen, bitumen and asphaltenes in Monterey Formation diatomite, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Ruth, E.; Huizinga, B. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1986-01-01

    Organic-rich (18.2%) Monterey Formation diatomite from California was studied. The organic matter consist of 94% bitumen and 6% kerogen. Biological markers from the bitumen and from pyrolysates of the coexisting asphaltenes and kerogen were analyzed in order to elucidate the relationship between the various fractions of the organic matter. While 17 alpha(H), 18 alpha(H), 21 alpha(H)-28,30-bisnorhopane was present in the bitumen and in the pryolysate of the asphaltenes, it was not detected in the pyrolysates of the kerogen. A C40-isoprenoid with "head to head" linkage, however, was present in pyrolysates of both kerogen and asphaltenes, but not in the bitumen from the diatomite. The maturation level of the bitumen, based on the extent of isomerization of steranes and hopanes, was that of a mature oil, whereas the pyrolysate from the kerogen showed a considerably lower maturation level. These relationships indicate that the bitumen may not be indigenous to the diatomite and that it is a mature oil that migrated into the rock. We consider the possibility, however, that some of the 28,30-bisnorhopane-rich Monterey Formation oils have not been generated through thermal degradation of kerogen, but have been expelled from the source rock at an early stage of diagenesis.

  3. Using biological markets principles to examine patterns of grooming exchange in Macaca thibetana.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, K N; Berman, C M; Ogawa, H; Li, J

    2011-12-01

    Biological markets principles offer testable hypotheses to explain variation in grooming exchange patterns among nonhuman primates. They predict that when within-group contest competition (WGC) is high and dominance hierarchies steep, grooming interchange with other "commodity" behaviors (such as agonistic support) should prevail. In contrast, when WGC is low and gradients shallow, market theory predicts that grooming reciprocity should prevail. We tested these predictions in a wild, provisioned Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) group across six time periods during which the group had been subjected to varying degrees of range restriction. Data on female-female aggression, grooming, and support were collected using all-occurrences and focal animal sampling techniques, and analyzed using ANCOVA methods and correlation analyses. We found that hierarchical steepness varied significantly across periods, but did not correlate with two indirect indicators of WGC (group size and range restriction) in predicted directions. Contrary to expectations, we found a negative correlation between steepness and group size, perhaps because the responses of group members to external risks (i.e. prolonged and unavoidable exposure to humans) may have overshadowed the effects of WGC. As predicted, grooming reciprocity was significant in each period and negatively correlated with steepness, even after we controlled group size, kinship, rank differences, and proximity. In contrast, there was no evidence for grooming interchange with agonistic support or for a positive relationship between interchange and steepness. We hypothesize that stressful conditions and/or the presence of stable hierarchies during each period may have led to a greater market demand for grooming than support. We suggest that future studies testing these predictions consider more direct measures of WGC and commodities in addition to support, such as feeding tolerance and access to infants. PMID:21922505

  4. Dogs Evaluate Threatening Facial Expressions by Their Biological Validity--Evidence from Gazing Patterns.

    PubMed

    Somppi, Sanni; Törnqvist, Heini; Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Hänninen, Laura; Krause, Christina M; Vainio, Outi

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate response to companions' emotional signals is important for all social creatures. The emotional expressions of humans and non-human animals have analogies in their form and function, suggesting shared evolutionary roots, but very little is known about how animals other than primates view and process facial expressions. In primates, threat-related facial expressions evoke exceptional viewing patterns compared with neutral or positive stimuli. Here, we explore if domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have such an attentional bias toward threatening social stimuli and whether observed emotional expressions affect dogs' gaze fixation distribution among the facial features (eyes, midface and mouth). We recorded the voluntary eye gaze of 31 domestic dogs during viewing of facial photographs of humans and dogs with three emotional expressions (threatening, pleasant and neutral). We found that dogs' gaze fixations spread systematically among facial features. The distribution of fixations was altered by the seen expression, but eyes were the most probable targets of the first fixations and gathered longer looking durations than mouth regardless of the viewed expression. The examination of the inner facial features as a whole revealed more pronounced scanning differences among expressions. This suggests that dogs do not base their perception of facial expressions on the viewing of single structures, but the interpretation of the composition formed by eyes, midface and mouth. Dogs evaluated social threat rapidly and this evaluation led to attentional bias, which was dependent on the depicted species: threatening conspecifics' faces evoked heightened attention but threatening human faces instead an avoidance response. We propose that threatening signals carrying differential biological validity are processed via distinctive neurocognitive pathways. Both of these mechanisms may have an adaptive significance for domestic dogs. The findings provide a novel perspective on

  5. Dogs Evaluate Threatening Facial Expressions by Their Biological Validity – Evidence from Gazing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Somppi, Sanni; Törnqvist, Heini; Kujala, Miiamaaria V.; Hänninen, Laura; Krause, Christina M.; Vainio, Outi

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate response to companions’ emotional signals is important for all social creatures. The emotional expressions of humans and non-human animals have analogies in their form and function, suggesting shared evolutionary roots, but very little is known about how animals other than primates view and process facial expressions. In primates, threat-related facial expressions evoke exceptional viewing patterns compared with neutral or positive stimuli. Here, we explore if domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have such an attentional bias toward threatening social stimuli and whether observed emotional expressions affect dogs’ gaze fixation distribution among the facial features (eyes, midface and mouth). We recorded the voluntary eye gaze of 31 domestic dogs during viewing of facial photographs of humans and dogs with three emotional expressions (threatening, pleasant and neutral). We found that dogs’ gaze fixations spread systematically among facial features. The distribution of fixations was altered by the seen expression, but eyes were the most probable targets of the first fixations and gathered longer looking durations than mouth regardless of the viewed expression. The examination of the inner facial features as a whole revealed more pronounced scanning differences among expressions. This suggests that dogs do not base their perception of facial expressions on the viewing of single structures, but the interpretation of the composition formed by eyes, midface and mouth. Dogs evaluated social threat rapidly and this evaluation led to attentional bias, which was dependent on the depicted species: threatening conspecifics’ faces evoked heightened attention but threatening human faces instead an avoidance response. We propose that threatening signals carrying differential biological validity are processed via distinctive neurocognitive pathways. Both of these mechanisms may have an adaptive significance for domestic dogs. The findings provide a novel

  6. New patterns of family formation in Italy. Which tools for which interpretations?

    PubMed

    Micheli, G A

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed discussion of the impact of World War II on subsequent fertility behavior a generation later in Italy. The changes in fertility were delayed and induced by a transgenerational process precipitated by war. War anomie and anomie in the rules of family formation are "symptoms" and not effects of the broad structural changes and historical upheavals during the 30 years of war. Fertility behavior is not construed to be an inevitable outcome of causal processes, but as alternative responses to life situations. The author bases this explanatory model of macrodemographic processes on a variant of Brown and Harris' etiological model that explains the occurrence of depression. It is argued that demographic models of European fertility are needed that acknowledge "a radical form of war that acts on reciprocity systems susceptible to change" and "intervenes to modify the subsequent transgenerational (family) relations." A research design is not now available that relies on the tools of history and anthropology. Thus, the demography of fertility may be reduced to a "mere bookkeeping of vital statistical data or simple economics of resources." The author's new pattern of family formation in Italy considers the "regional family culture and structure to be symptom-formation factors relating to the war and transformations in systems of family relations and exchange." These family changes are linked to war anomie and "changes in the logic of transition strategies from suppression to disconfirmation." War anomie is linked with a generational impact that intervenes in the relationship between changes in the logic of transition strategies and the decline in births. The decline in births is the response to background factors, precipitating events, and symptom-formation or structural factors. The author states that the second demographic transition does not represent a break with prior urban lifestyles and does not modify general trends continuing from the

  7. Evaluating the Biological Influences on Ooid Formation in the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, J. T.; Stefurak, E. J.; Anderson, R. P.; Meneske, M.; Berelson, W.; Sessions, A. L.; Osburn, M. R.; Spear, J. R.; Stamps, B. W.; Stevenson, B.; Shapiro, R. S.; Torres, M. A.; Corsetti, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies from the Bahamas and Shark Bay imply microbial influence on ooid formation based on both 16S-rRNA and lipid biomarkers [1,2]. The Great Salt Lake, Utah, provides an opportunity to assess the possible role of microbes in ooid formation because of its unique environmental setting: the lake is divided into the more saline North Arm (NA) and the less saline South Arm (SA). The microbial community of the NA ooids was dominated by members of the Halobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteriodetes. The diversity of the surrounding water was identical to that of the NA ooids. The community from the SA ooids, dominated by Bacteriodetes, Alphaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria, was distinct from that of the surrounding water, which was dominated by Halobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteriodetes. OTUs related to Bacteriodetes and Gammaproteobacteria in SA ooids differed from the surrounding water and NA ooids. While ooid fabrics from the NA and SA were identical, their microbial communities differed which indicates the variance in diversity exerts no obvious control on ooid morphology. In addition, the microbial communities of the Great Salt Lake shared few similarities with those of recently examined ooids in the Bahamas and Shark Bay. The Great Salt Lake is supersaturated with respect to calcite, aragonite, and dolomite, suggesting that carbonate precipitation need not require biological mediation. However, we did identify taxa that can alter the local saturation state of calcium carbonate (e.g., Desulfohalobiaceae and Ectothiorhodospiraceae), although they were different between the two sites. Intriguingly, the ooids contain a significant amount of sulfur (up to 0.15 wt. %). The microbial communities observed, which include sulfate reducers and sulfide oxidizers, could facilitate this sulfur formation and in doing so provide a significant boost to the local alkalinity. We hypothesize that this observed microbial community could influence ooid

  8. Chemical pattern formation driven by a neutralization reaction. I. Mechanism and basic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Kerstin; Acker, Margret; Shi, Ying

    2004-02-01

    We study the chemohydrodynamic pattern formation during interfacial mass transfer accompanied by a neutralization reaction. The system, which is placed in a Hele-Shaw cell, is a configuration of two immiscible liquid phases in contact along a plane interface. In the upper, organic layer a carboxylic acid is dissolved, the concentration of which is far beyond the equilibrium partition ratio. Interfacial acid transfer initiates the neutralization with an organic base dissolved in the lower, aqueous layer. Focus is on the exploration of a novel instability consisting of a regular cellular structure penetrating into the aqueous bulk solution. By several complementary experimental methods, including shadowgraph visualization with different magnifications, particle image velocimetry, differential interferometry, and detailed measurements of relevant material properties, the driving mechanism of the instability is identified. Synthesis of the experimental results suggests that lateral differences in buoyancy are responsible for the convection.

  9. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  10. Pattern Formation and Force Generation by Cell Ensembles in a Filamentous Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, R.; Schwarz, U. S.

    Adhesion-dependent soft tissue cells both create and sense tension in the extracellular matrix. Therefore cells can actively interact through the mechanics of the surrounding matrix. An intracellular positive feedback loop upregulates cellular contractility in stiff or tensed environments. Here we theoretically address the resulting pattern formation and force generation for the case of a filamentous matrix, which we model as a two-dimensional cable network. Cells are modeled as anisotropic contraction dipoles which move in favor of tensed directions in the matrix. Our Monte Carlo simulations suggest that at small densities, cells align in strings, while at high densities, they form interconnected meshworks. Cellular activation both by biochemical factors and by tension leads to a hyperbolic increase in tissue tension. We also discuss the effect of cell density on tissue tension and shape.

  11. The non-equilibrium charge screening effects in diffusion-driven systems with pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovkov, V. N.; Kotomin, E. A.; de la Cruz, M. Olvera

    2011-07-01

    The effects of non-equilibrium charge screening in mixtures of oppositely charged interacting molecules on surfaces are analyzed in a closed system. The dynamics of charge screening and the strong deviation from the standard Debye-Hückel theory are demonstrated via a new formalism based on computing radial distribution functions suited for analyzing both short-range and long-range spacial ordering effects. At long distances the inhomogeneous molecular distribution is limited by diffusion, whereas at short distances (of the order of several coordination spheres) by a balance of short-range (Lennard-Jones) and long-range (Coulomb) interactions. The non-equilibrium charge screening effects in transient pattern formation are further quantified. It is demonstrated that the use of screened potentials, in the spirit of the Debye-Hückel theory, leads to qualitatively incorrect results.

  12. The Fokker-Planck law of diffusion and pattern formation in heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    Bengfort, Michael; Malchow, Horst; Hilker, Frank M

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the influence of spatially inhomogeneous diffusion on several common ecological problems. Diffusion is modeled with Fick's law and the Fokker-Planck law of diffusion. We discuss the differences between the two formalisms and when to use either the one or the other. In doing so, we start with a pure diffusion equation, then turn to a reaction-diffusion system with one logistically growing component which invades the spatial domain. We also look at systems of two reacting components, namely a trimolecular oscillating chemical model system and an excitable predator-prey model. Contrary to Fickian diffusion, spatial inhomogeneities promote spatial and spatiotemporal pattern formation in case of Fokker-Planck diffusion. PMID:26803768

  13. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  14. Developmental transcriptomics in Atlantic haddock: Illuminating pattern formation and organogenesis in non-model vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sørhus, Elin; Incardona, John P; Furmanek, Tomasz; Jentoft, Sissel; Meier, Sonnich; Edvardsen, Rolf B

    2016-03-15

    Gadiforms such as Atlantic haddock comprise some of the world's most economically important fisheries. Understanding the early life history of these fish is a prerequisite for predicting effects of a changing environment and increased human activities. Robust assessment of the effects of environmental impacts on the embryos of non-model vertebrates is hampered by a lack of molecular resources and detailed knowledge regarding the regulation of genes and pathways in early development. Here we used mRNA sequencing to link transcriptional changes to developmental processes in haddock, specifically, pattern formation and organogenesis. Temporal expression of key developmental genes was tightly anchored to either the appearance of visible structures or cellular processes characterised in model organisms. These findings demonstrate the high potential of developmental transcriptomics as an analytical tool for improved understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms leading to abnormal development in any vertebrate. PMID:26875497

  15. Identification of genes from pattern formation, tyrosine kinase, and potassium channel families by DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Kamb, A.; Weir, M.; Rudy, B.; Varmus, H.; Kenyon, C. )

    1989-06-01

    The study of gene family members has been aided by the isolation of related genes on the basis of DNA homology. The authors have adapted the polymerase chain reaction to screen animal genomes very rapidly and reliably for likely gene family members. Using conserved amino acid sequences to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers, they have shown that the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains sequences homologous to many Drosophila genes involved in pattern formation, including the segment polarity gene wingless (vertebrate int-1), and homeobox sequences characteristic of the Antennapedia, engrailed, and paired families. In addition, they have used this method to show that C. elegans contains at least five different sequences homologous to genes in the tyrosine kinase family. Lastly, they have isolated six potassium channel sequences from humans, a result that validates the utility of the method with large genomes and suggests that human potassium channel gene diversity may be extensive.

  16. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajnak, Michal; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-08-01

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  17. Trends in ice formation at Lake Neusiedl since 1931 and large-scale oscillation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Anna-Maria; Maracek, Karl; Soja, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Ice formation at Lake Neusiedl (Neusiedler See, Fertitó), a shallow steppe lake (area 320 km2, mean depth 1.2 m) at the border of Austria/Hungary, is of ecological and economic importance. Ice sailing and skating help to keep a touristic off-season alive. Reed harvest to maintain the ecological function of the reed belt (178 km2) is facilitated when lake surface is frozen. Changes in ice formation were analysed in the frame of the EULAKES-project (European Lakes under Environmental Stressors, www.eulakes.eu), financed by the Central Europe Programme of the EU. Data records of ice-on, ice duration and ice-off at Lake Neusiedl starting with the year 1931, and air temperature (nearby monitoring station Eisenstadt - Sopron (HISTALP database and ZAMG)) were used to investigate nearly 80 winters. Additionally, influences of 8 teleconnection patterns, i.e. the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), the East Atlantic pattern (EAP), the East Atlantic/West Russia pattern (EA/WR), the Eastern Mediterranean Pattern (EMP), the Mediterranean Oscillation (MO) for Algiers and Cairo, and for Israel and Gibraltar, resp., the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the Scandinavia pattern (SCA) were assessed. Ice cover of Lake Neusiedl showed a high variability between the years (mean duration 71±27 days). Significant trends for later ice-on (p=0.02), shorter ice duration (p=0.07) and earlier ice-off (p=0.02) for the period 1931-2011 were found by regression analysis and trend analysis tests. On an average, freezing of Lake Neusiedl started 2 days later per decade and ice melting began 2 days earlier per decade. Close relationships between mean air temperature and ice formation could be found: ice-on showed a dependency on summer (R=+0.28) and autumn air temperatures (R=+0.51), ice duration and ice off was related to autumn (R=-0.36 and -0.24), winter (R=-0.73 and -0.61) and concurrent spring air temperatures (R=-0.44). Increases of air temperature by 1° C caused an 8.4 days later

  18. Delay-driven pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion predator-prey model incorporating a prey refuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Xinze; Wang, Hailing; Wang, Weiming

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we consider a diffusive predation model with a delay effect, which is based on a modified version of the Leslie-Gower scheme incorporating a prey refuge. We mainly investigate the effects of time delay on the stability of the homogeneous state point and the formation of spatial patterns. We give the conditions for diffusion-driven and delay-diffusion-driven instability in detail. Furthermore, we illustrate the spatial patterns via numerical simulations, which show that the model dynamics exhibits a delay and diffusion controlled formation growth not only of spots, stripes and holes, but also of self-replicating spiral patterns. The results indicate that the delay plays an important role in the pattern selection. This may enrich the pattern dynamics for a delay diffusive model.

  19. Instability and Pattern Formation in Three-Species Food Chain Model via Holling Type II Functional Response on a Circular Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abid, Walid; Yafia, R.; Aziz Alaoui, M. A.; Bouhafa, H.; Abichou, A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of food chain predator-prey model. This model is given by a reaction-diffusion system defined on a circular spatial domain, which includes three-state variables namely, prey and intermediate predator and top predator and incorporates the Holling type II and a modified Leslie-Gower functional response. The aim of this paper is to investigate theoretically and numerically the asymptotic behavior of the interior equilibrium of the model. The local and global stabilities of the positive steady-state solution and the conditions that enable the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation and Turing instability in the circular spatial domain are proved. In the end, we carry out numerical simulations to illustrate how biological processes can affect spatiotemporal pattern formation in a disc spatial domain and different types of spatial patterns with respect to different time steps and diffusion coefficients are obtained.

  20. Legume Diversity Patterns in West Central Africa: Influence of Species Biology on Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    de la Estrella, Manuel; Mateo, Rubén G.; Wieringa, Jan J.; Mackinder, Barbara; Muñoz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are used to produce predictions of potential Leguminosae diversity in West Central Africa. Those predictions are evaluated subsequently using expert opinion. The established methodology of combining all SDMs is refined to assess species diversity within five defined vegetation types. Potential species diversity is thus predicted for each vegetation type respectively. The primary aim of the new methodology is to define, in more detail, areas of species richness for conservation planning. Methodology Using Maxent, SDMs based on a suite of 14 environmental predictors were generated for 185 West Central African Leguminosae species, each categorised according to one of five vegetation types: Afromontane, coastal, non-flooded forest, open formations, or riverine forest. The relative contribution of each environmental variable was compared between different vegetation types using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis followed by a post-hoc Kruskal-Wallis Paired Comparison contrast. Legume species diversity patterns were explored initially using the typical method of stacking all SDMs. Subsequently, five different ensemble models were generated by partitioning SDMs according to vegetation category. Ecological modelers worked with legume specialists to improve data integrity and integrate expert opinion in the interpretation of individual species models and potential species richness predictions for different vegetation types. Results/Conclusions Of the 14 environmental predictors used, five showed no difference in their relative contribution to the different vegetation models. Of the nine discriminating variables, the majority were related to temperature variation. The set of variables that played a major role in the Afromontane species diversity model differed significantly from the sets of variables of greatest relative important in other vegetation categories. The traditional approach of stacking all SDMs indicated overall

  1. Statistical analysis of granular gases, pattern formation, and crumpling through real space imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Daniel L.

    The statistical properties of driven dissipative systems is investigated experimentally with the use of high speed, and high resolution imaging. A variety of experiments that range from idealized granular gases to systems with anisotropic interactions and pattern formation is explored. These experiments can be divided into three classes: granular gases, granular fluids with anisotropic interactions, and pattern formation. The statistical properties of spherical particles that are excited into a dilute gas state are investigated. The particles are constrained to roll on an inclined plane, which reduces the effects of gravity, allowing real space particle tracking with high precision. Energy is given to the particles through a single vibrating boundary. If the driving is at a high frequency and amplitude, the particles resemble molecules of equilibrium liquids or gases. I will demonstrate that a number of fundamental statistical measures of equilibrium fluids, such as distribution of velocities and path lengths are not consistent with those of inelastic gases. However, the particle motion remains diffusive and the velocity autocorrelation functions decays exponentially. Recent theoretical approaches to granular hydrodynamics also are discussed. In the case where the driving frequency and amplitude are sufficiently low, the particles undergo a spontaneous transition from a quiescent to patterned state. The patterns formed are similar to those found in three-dimensional granular fluids. By introducing a temporally dependent measure of the spatial correlation of the velocities, an accurate determination of the wavelength and onset of patterns is determined. The phase averaged temperature is measured to show that patterns arise when the temperature of the layer is at minimum. These results could be used to develop a linear stability analysis of granular fluids. A quasi-two-dimensional granular system of particles with embedded dipole moments is investigated, and it is

  2. Northern-Hemisphere snow cover patterns and formation conditions in winter 2007 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hongyan; Qiao, Fangli; Shu, Qi; Yu, Long

    2016-06-01

    The Arctic sea ice minimum records appeared in the Septembers of 2007 and 2012, followed by high snow cover areas in the Northern Hemisphere winters. The snow cover distributions show different spatial patterns in these two years: increased snow cover in Central Asia and Central North America in 2007, while increased snow cover in East Asia and northwestern Europe in 2012. The high snow cover anomaly shifted to higher latitudes in winter of 2012 compared to 2007. It is noticed that the snow cover had positive anomaly in 2007 and 2012 with the following conditions: the negative geopotential height and the related cyclonic wind anomaly were favorable for upwelling, and, with the above conditions, the low troposphere and surface air temperature anomaly and water vapor anomaly were favorable for the formation and maintenance of snowfalls. The negative geopotential height, cyclonic wind and low air temperature conditions were satisfied in different locations in 2007 and 2012, resulting in different spatial snow cover patterns. The cross section of lower air temperature move to higher latitudes in winter of 2012 compared to 2007.

  3. Multi-scale modeling of complex neuronal networks: a view towards striatal cholinergic pattern formations.

    PubMed

    Noori, Hamid Reza

    2012-09-01

    The phenomena related to brain function occur as the interplay of various modules at different spatial and temporal scales. Particularly, the integration of the dynamical behavior of cells within the complex brain topology reveals a heterogeneous multi-scale problem, which has, to date, mainly been addressed by methods of statistical physics such as mean-field approximations. In contrast, the present study introduces an abstract mathematical model of a deterministic nature that provides a robust integral transformation of the microscopic activities into macroscopic spatiotemporal patterns. The existence of the transformation operator is guaranteed by the convergence of a repetitive patching of the network domain with its fundamental domains that express the local topologies of the tissue. Depending on the choice of the local connectivity function, this framework represents a computationally efficient generalization of the classical Kirchhoff's, Hebbian, and Hopfield's approaches. The capabilities of this multi-scale method have been evaluated within the structure of the dorsal striatum of rats, a brain region with major involvement in motor and cognitive information processing. Numerical simulations suggest the formation of characteristic spatiotemporal patterns due to the activation of cholinergic interneurons. PMID:24615222

  4. Pattern formation and molecular transport of histidine-tagged GFPs using supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Kazuaki; Kashimura, Yoshiaki; Sumitomo, Koji; Shinozaki, Youichi; Torimitsu, Keiichi

    2010-08-01

    We fabricated a heterogeneous supported lipid bilayer (SLB) by employing binary lipid mixtures comprising a saturated acyl chain DSPC and an unsaturated acyl chain nickel-chelating lipid. By using the specific adsorption properties of histidine-tagged proteins (His-tagged GFPs) in relation to nickel-chelating lipids, we demonstrated protein pattern formation on the SLB corresponding to the phase separation pattern of the SLB. In addition, by using a lipid mixture consisting of an unsaturated acyl chain DOPC and a nickel-chelating lipid, and His-tagged GFPs, we succeeded in transporting the proteins along a hydrophilic micropattern on a SiO(2) substrate. The protein transport is induced by the self-spreading behavior of a fluid SLB with a kinetic spreading coefficient beta = 10.4 microm(2) s(-1). This method provides a guide for strategically carrying various biomolecules to specific positions by using a soft biointerface on a solid surface. In addition, the results demonstrate the importance of using techniques that allow the controlled manipulation of biomolecules based on the static or dynamic properties of the SLB platform. PMID:20666418

  5. Nanoscale pattern formation at surfaces under ion-beam sputtering: A perspective from continuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuerno, Rodolfo; Castro, Mario; Muñoz-García, Javier; Gago, Raúl; Vázquez, Luis

    2011-05-01

    Although reports on surface nanostructuring of solid targets by low to medium energy ion irradiation date back to the 1960s, only with the advent of high resolution tools for surface/interface characterization has the high potential of this procedure been recognized as a method for efficient production of surface patterns. Such morphologies are made up of periodic arrangements of nanometric sized features, like ripples and dots, with interest for technological applications due to their electronic, magnetic, and optical properties. Thus, roughly for the last ten years large efforts have been directed towards harnessing this nanofabrication technique. However, and particularly in view of recent experimental developments, we can say that the basic mechanisms controlling these pattern formation processes remain poorly understood. The lack of nanostructuring at low angles of incidence on some pure monoelemental targets, the role of impurities in the surface dynamics and other recent observations are challenging the classic view on the phenomenon as the mere interplay between the curvature dependence of the sputtering yield and surface diffusion. We review the main attempts at a theoretical (continuum) description of these systems, with emphasis on recent developments. Strong hints already exist that the nature of the morphological instability has to be rethought as originating in the material flow that is induced by the ion beam.

  6. Pattern Formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis via Droplet Evaporation on Micropillars Arrays at a Surface.

    PubMed

    Susarrey-Arce, A; Marin, A; Massey, A; Oknianska, A; Díaz-Fernandez, Y; Hernández-Sánchez, J F; Griffiths, E; Gardeniers, J G E; Snoeijer, J H; Lohse, Detlef; Raval, R

    2016-07-19

    We evaluate the effect of epoxy surface structuring on the evaporation of water droplets containing Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis). During evaporation, droplets with S. epidermidis cells yield to complex wetting patterns such as the zipping-wetting1-3 and the coffee-stain effects. Depending on the height of the microstructure, the wetting fronts propagate circularly or in a stepwise manner, leading to the formation of octagonal or square-shaped deposition patterns.4,5 We observed that the shape of the dried droplets has considerable influence on the local spatial distribution of S. epidermidis deposited between micropillars. These changes are attributed to an unexplored interplay between the zipping-wetting1 and the coffee-stain6 effects in polygonally shaped droplets containing S. epidermidis. Induced capillary flows during evaporation of S. epidermidis are modeled with polystyrene particles. Bacterial viability measurements for S. epidermidis show high viability of planktonic cells, but low biomass deposition on the microstructured surfaces. Our findings provide insights into design criteria for the development of microstructured surfaces on which bacterial propagation could be controlled, limiting the use of biocides. PMID:27341165

  7. Pattern formation, synchronization, and outbreak of biodiversity in cyclically competing games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Ni, Xuan; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2011-01-01

    Species in nature are typically mobile over diverse distance scales, examples of which range from bacteria run to long-distance animal migrations. These behaviors can have a significant impact on biodiversity. Addressing the role of migration in biodiversity microscopically is fundamental but remains a challenging problem in interdisciplinary science. We incorporate both intra- and inter-patch migrations in stochastic games of cyclic competitions and find that the interplay between the migrations at the local and global scales can lead to robust species coexistence characterized dynamically by the occurrence of remarkable target-wave patterns in the absence of any external control. The waves can emerge from either mixed populations or isolated species in different patches, regardless of the size and the location of the migration target. We also find that, even in a single-species system, target waves can arise from rare mutations, leading to an outbreak of biodiversity. A surprising phenomenon is that target waves in different patches can exhibit synchronization and time-delayed synchronization, where the latter potentially enables the prediction of future evolutionary dynamics. We provide a physical theory based on the spatiotemporal organization of the target waves to explain the synchronization phenomena. We also investigate the basins of coexistence and extinction to establish the robustness of biodiversity through migrations. Our results are relevant to issues of general and broader interest such as pattern formation, control in excitable systems, and the origin of order arising from self-organization in social and natural systems.

  8. Instantaneous Formation of Block Copolymer Patterns via Solvo-Thermal Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyun Jung; Woo, Sanghoon; Huh, June; Bang, Joona

    2015-03-01

    A self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) exhibits one of the most promising alternative methods for the next-generation lithography. Many semiconductor companies have explored the possibility of implementing this process in actual chip process, whereas the critical challenges such as feature size control, defect density, and long processing time need to be overcome. Regarding the BCP process, the formation of BCP patterns usually requires long processing time via thermal or solvent annealing. Herein we developed a simple processing method to promote a microphase separation of BCPs using solvo-thermal spin casting process. Spin casting has a very similar mechanism to solvent vapor annealing but its short process time prevents BCP chains from reaching equilibrium morphology. To maximize the chain mobility, we employed a high boiling point solvent and also applied the heat during spin casting. As a result, a well ordered BCP patterns were obtained within less than 5 min via solvo-thermal casting process without further additional annealing step.

  9. Seasonal and temporal patterns of NDMA formation potentials in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Habibullah; Kim, Daekyun; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-02-01

    The seasonal and temporal patterns of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potentials (FPs) were examined with water samples collected monthly for 21 month period in 12 surface waters. This long term study allowed monitoring the patterns of NDMA FPs under dynamic weather conditions (e.g., rainy and dry periods) covering several seasons. Anthropogenically impacted waters which were determined by high sucralose levels (>100 ng/L) had higher NDMA FPs than limited impacted sources (<100 ng/L). In most sources, NDMA FP showed more variability in spring months, while seasonal mean values remained relatively consistent. The study also showed that watershed characteristics played an important role in the seasonal and temporal patterns. In the two dam-controlled river systems (SW A and G), the NDMA FP levels at the downstream sampling locations were controlled by the NDMA levels in the dams independent of either the increases in discharge rates due to water releases from the dams prior to or during the heavy rain events or intermittent high NDMA FP levels observed at the upstream of dams. The large reservoirs and impoundments on rivers examined in this study appeared serving as an equalization basin for NDMA precursors. On the other hand, in a river without an upstream reservoir (SW E), the NDMA levels were influenced by the ratio of an upstream wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent discharge to the river discharge rate. The impact of WWTP effluent decreased during the high river flow periods due to rain events. Linear regression with independent variables DOC, DON, and sucralose yielded poor correlations with NDMA FP (R(2) < 0.27). Multiple linear regression analysis using DOC and log [sucralose] yielded a better correlation with NDMA FP (R(2) = 0.53). PMID:25481075

  10. A simulation and time series analysis of reaction- diffusion equations in biological pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Crystal Diane

    A computer program was modified to model the dynamics of morphogen concentrations in a developing eye of a Xenopus laevis frog. The dynamics were modelled because it is believed that the behavior of the morphogen concentrations determine how the developing eye maps to the brain. The eye in the xenophus grows as a series of rings, and thus this is the model used. The basis for the simulation are experiments done by Sullivan et al. Following the experiment, aIl eye ring is 'split' in half, inverted, and then 'pasted' onto a donor half. The purpose of the program is to replicate and analyze the results that were found experimentally: a graft made on a north to south axis (dorsal to ventral) produces a change in vision along the east to west axis (anterior to posterior). Four modified Gierer-Meinhardt reaction- diffusion equations are used to simulate the operation. In the second part of the research, the program was further modified and a time series analysis was done on the results. It was found that the modified Gierer- Meinhardt equations demonstrated chaotic behavior under certain conditions. The dynamics included fixed points, limit cycles, transient chaos, intermittent chaos, and strange attractors. The creation and destruction of fractal torii was found.

  11. Modeling the PbI2 formation in perovskite solar cells using XRD/XPS patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabpoor, Hamed; Elyasi, Majid; Aldosari, Marouf; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of prolonged irradiation and air humidity on the stability of perovskite solar cells is modeled using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy patterns reported in the literature. Light or air-moisture causes the formation of a thin PbI2 or oxide defective layers (in nanoscale) at the interface of perovskite/hole-transport-layer or at the junction with metallic back contact. This thin layer blocks the carrier transport/passivation at the interfaces and cause degradation of device parameters. Variation in thickness of defective layers, changes the XRD and XPS peaks. This allows detection and estimation of the type, crystallinity and thickness of the defective layer. A simple model is developed here to extract the thickness of such thin defective layers formed in nanometer scale at the back region of several perovskite devices. Based on this information, corrected energy band diagram of every device before and after degradation/aging is drawn and discussed in order to obtain insight into the carrier transport and charge collection at the barrier region. In addition, graphene contacted perovskite devices are investigated showing that honey-comb network of graphene contact reduces the effect of aging leading to formation of a thinner defective layer at the perovskite surface compared to perovskite devices with conventional inorganic contacts i.e. Au, Al.

  12. Frequency of Teriparatide Administration Affects the Histological Pattern of Bone Formation in Young Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomomaya; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Sasaki, Muneteru; Hongo, Hiromi; Tsuboi, Kanako; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Ota, Masahiro; Haraguchi, Mai; Takahata, Masahiko; Oda, Kimimitsu; Luiz de Freitas, Paulo Henrique; Takakura, Aya; Takao-Kawabata, Ryoko; Isogai, Yukihiro; Amizuka, Norio

    2016-07-01

    Evidence supports that daily and once-weekly administration of teriparatide, human (h)PTH(1-34), enhance bone mass in osteoporotic patients. However, it is uncertain whether different frequencies of hPTH(1-34) administration would induce bone formation similarly in terms of quantity and quality. To investigate that issue, mice were subjected to different frequencies of PTH administration, and their bones were histologically examined. Frequencies of administration were 1 time/2 days, 1 time a day, and 2 and 4 times a day. Mice were allocated to either to control or to 3 different dosing regimens: 80 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per injection (80 μg/kg per dose), 80 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per day (80 μg/kg · d), or 20 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per day (20 μg/kg · d). With the regimens of 80 μg/kg per dose and 80 μg/kg · d, high-frequency hPTH(1-34) administration increased metaphyseal trabecular number. However, 4 doses per day induced the formation of thin trabeculae, whereas the daily PTH regimen resulted in thicker trabeculae. A similar pattern was observed with the lower daily hPTH(1-34) dose (20 μg/kg · d): more frequent PTH administration led to the formation of thin trabeculae, showing a thick preosteoblastic cell layer, several osteoclasts, and scalloped cement lines that indicated accelerated bone remodeling. On the other hand, low-frequency PTH administration induced new bone with mature osteoblasts lying on mildly convex surfaces representative of arrest lines, which suggests minimodeling-based bone formation. Thus, high-frequency PTH administration seems to increase bone mass rapidly by forming thin trabeculae through accelerated bone remodeling. Alternatively, low-frequency PTH administration leads to the formation of thicker trabeculae through bone remodeling and minimodeling. PMID:27227535

  13. X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F.

    1997-04-01

    Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi{sub 2} exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 {mu}{Omega}-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 {mu}{Omega}-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick {open_quotes}as is{close_quotes} industrial samples.

  14. Geologically Controlled Isotope-Time Patterns Reveal Early Differentiation and Crust Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, V. C.; Nutman, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms of continental crust production and evolution in the early Earth remain controversial, as are questions of the relative roles of early differentiation versus subsequent tectonic procssing in creating Earth's chemical signatures. Here we present geologic observations integrated with whole rock major, trace element and Sm-Nd isotopic signatures and combined with U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic compositions of zircon populations from the same rocks, from the most extensive early rock record comprising the 3.9 Ga to 3.6 Ga terranes of southwest Greenland. These data reveal repeated patterns of formation of juvenile TTG crust and associated mafic and ultramafic rocks in convergent margin settings followed by formation of more evolved granites [1]. Our new zircon Lu-Hf data from rare 3.6-3.7 Ga tonalites within the Itsaq Gneiss Complex, obtained from single component, non-migmatitic gneisses with simple zircon populations, limited within sample Hf isotopic variability and accurate U-Pb ages, now document extraction of juvenile tonalites from a near chondritic mantle source between 3.9 Ga and 3.6 Ga. The more evolved, granitic rocks in each area show slightly negative initial ɛHf in accord with crustal reworking of the older (3.8-3.9 Ga) gniesses. There is no evidence for Hadean material in the sources of the granitoids. The Hf isotope-time patterns are consistent with juvenile crust production from a mantle source that experienced only modest amounts of prior crustal extraction. They are distinct from those predicted by reprocessing of an enriched Hadean mafic crust, as has been proposed for this region [2] and for the source of the Hadean Jack Hills zircons [3]. The well-documented, time decreasing, positive 142Nd anomalies [e.g., 4] from these rocks are further evidence of crustal derivation from a convecting mantle source, rather than reworking of an enriched mafic lithosphere. The 143Nd isotopic -time patterns are more complex, reflecting the interplay

  15. A generic model of pattern formation in Mississippi Valley-Type deposits based on analytical findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Veveakis, Manolis; Beaudoin, Nicolas; Poulet, Thomas; Koehn, Daniel; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Chung, Peter; Berndt, Jasper

    2016-04-01

    Rhythmically banded dolomites (zebra dolomite) are found worldwide, and are frequently associated with mineralization of the Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT). These rocks consist of dark fine grained and impurity-rich layers alternating with light coarse grained and virtually impurity-free layers. The texture of the light layers is similar to the one of tectonic syntaxial veins where crystals grow towards a median line. We present petrographic and chemical analysis of zebra dolomite samples from the San Vicente mine, Central Peru. The applied methods are petrographic microscopy, SEM, EBSD, EMP and LA-ICP-MS. The findings influence the development of a generic model of pattern formation. We found the density and the distribution of second-phase material to be one striking feature. The impurities are accumulated in the dark layers, which show an even higher density of second-phase material than the surrounding impurity-rich dolomite. With CL, it was possible to detect a luminescent structure in the center of the light bands which seems to be present independent of the thickness and spacing of the respective layers. This structure was analysed in more detail with EMP. We further found that the dolomite crystals in the dark and light layers are chemically similar but show a variation in some trace elements. Based on the analytical findings, we put forward a mathematical model of zebra dolomite formation based on Cnoidal waves. We believe that the light coarse grained layers represent hydromechanical instabilities arising during the diagenetic compaction of a fluid saturated, impurity-rich dolomite. Our approach is based on the extension of the classical compaction bands theory to a viscose, non-linear rheology. In the model, the spacing between two light coarse grained layers is linked to the compaction length during the pattern formation. With the formulation of a 1D steady-state solution we can relate the genesis of the structure to physical parameter, such as

  16. Importance of Biological Loess Crusts for Loess Formation in Semi-Arid Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirčev, Z.; Marković, S. B.; Stevens, T.; Smalley, I. J.; Hambach, U.; Obreht, I.; Lukić, T.; Vasiljević, Dj. A.

    2012-04-01

    The essential components for loess deposition are: material, atmospheric circulation and appropriate surface conditions for the trapping of aeolian material as well as the subsequent development of typical loess sedimentary structures. In spite of the world-wide distribution of loess deposits, knowledge of the processes of transformation from accumulated dust to mature loess sediment is still inadequate. Some recent studies highlight the potential importance of biologically crusted surfaces (BCS) in loess formation. BCS are highly specialized extremophile communities and generally play an important role in atmospheric dust trapping and erosion prevention. Our initial results indicate that cyanobacterial strains isolated from loess exhibit some specific morphological and ecophysiological characteristics that play a key role in loess formation, warranting adoption of the new term biological loess crusts (BLC). We suggest that loessification is heavily influenced by the metabolic activity of BLC microorganisms mainly through polysaccharides. The sticky polysaccharide glue on the topographic surface, exuded mostly by cyanobacteria, can trap silty particles suspended in a dusty atmosphere. This collection of airborne loess forming particles is part of the life strategy of crust organisms in so far as they provide the necessary minerals for further growth of the BLC, which in turn provides protection from desiccation during dry periods. Simultaneously, polysaccharides secreted by crust organisms bind particles inside the BLC zone, forming a cohesive crust that resists both wind and water erosion during dry periods. Metabolized particles, exuded metabolites and unused airborne particles become the uppermost loess sediment covered with BLC. During moist periods, accumulation of dust and loess forming particles is very active. During the dry phases, the BLC becomes very stable and develops a resistant surface preventing wind and water erosion. The drying period induces

  17. Effect of pattern formation on C and N turnover heterogeneity in initial soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    The formation of vegetation patterns and hydrological processes, among others, result in soil heterogeneity in newly exposed land surfaces. We studied the effect of these developling structures on carbon and nitrogen trunover in soils of the artificial catchment Chicken Creek (Schaaf et al. 2011, 2012). Substrates with different physical and geochemical properties in combination with different labelled plant litter materials were studied in a microcosm experiment over a period of 80 weeks. Main objectives of the microcosm experiment were to determine the transformation processes of C and N from litter decomposition within the gaseous, liquid and solid phase, the interaction with mineral surfaces and its role for the establishment of biogeochemical cycles. The microcosm experiments were established in a climate chamber at constant 10 °C. In total, 48 soil columns (diameter: 14.4 cm; height: 30 cm) were filled with two different quaternary substrates (sand and loamy sand) representing the textural variation within the catchment at a bulk density of 1.4-1.5 g cm-3. The columns were automatically irrigated with artificial rainwater four times a day with 6.6 ml each (corresponding to 600 mm yr-1). The gaseous phase in the headspace of the microcosms was analyzed continuously for CO2 and N2O concentrations. C and N transformation processes were studied using 13C and 15N labelled litter of two different plant species occurring at the catchment (Lotus corniculatus, Calamagrostis epigejos) that was incorporated into the microcosm surface. By including litter from species with wide distribution within the catchment and soil substrates representing the main variation types of the sediments used for catchment construction we were able to characterize the general function of these sub-patches within the catchment with respect to litter decomposition, soil solution composition, DOC and nutrient leaching, and impact on the mineral soil phase. The results suggest that initial

  18. Unsaturated glycerophospholipids mediate heme crystallization: biological implications for hemozoin formation in the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Stiebler, Renata; Majerowicz, David; Knudsen, Jens; Gondim, Katia C; Wright, David W; Egan, Timothy J; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2014-01-01

    Hemozoin (Hz) is a heme crystal produced by some blood-feeding organisms, as an efficient way to detoxify heme derived from hemoglobin digestion. In the triatomine insect Rhodnius prolixus, Hz is essentially produced by midgut extracellular phospholipid membranes known as perimicrovillar membranes (PMVM). Here, we investigated the role of commercial glycerophospholipids containing serine, choline and ethanolamine as headgroups and R. prolixus midgut lipids (RML) in heme crystallization. All commercial unsaturated forms of phospholipids, as well as RML, mediated fast and efficient β-hematin formation by means of two kinetically distinct mechanisms: an early and fast component, followed by a late and slow one. The fastest reactions observed were induced by unsaturated forms of phosphatidylethanolamine (uPE) and phosphatidylcholine (uPC), with half-lives of 0.04 and 0.7 minutes, respectively. β-hematin crystal morphologies were strikingly distinct among groups, with uPE producing homogeneous regular brick-shaped crystals. Interestingly, uPC-mediated reactions resulted in two morphologically distinct crystal populations: one less representative group of regular crystals, resembling those induced by uPE, and the other largely represented by crystals with numerous sharp edges and tapered ends. Heme crystallization reactions induced by RML were efficient, with a heme to β-hematin conversion rate higher than 70%, but clearly slower (t1/2 of 9.9-17.7 minutes) than those induced by uPC and uPE. Interestingly, crystals produced by RML were homogeneous in shape and quite similar to those mediated by uPE. Thus, β-hematin formation can be rapidly and efficiently induced by unsaturated glycerophospholipids, particularly uPE and uPC, and may play a role on biological heme crystallization in R. prolixus midgut. PMID:24586467

  19. Unsaturated Glycerophospholipids Mediate Heme Crystallization: Biological Implications for Hemozoin Formation in the Kissing Bug Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Stiebler, Renata; Majerowicz, David; Knudsen, Jens; Gondim, Katia C.; Wright, David W.; Egan, Timothy J.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2014-01-01

    Hemozoin (Hz) is a heme crystal produced by some blood-feeding organisms, as an efficient way to detoxify heme derived from hemoglobin digestion. In the triatomine insect Rhodnius prolixus, Hz is essentially produced by midgut extracellular phospholipid membranes known as perimicrovillar membranes (PMVM). Here, we investigated the role of commercial glycerophospholipids containing serine, choline and ethanolamine as headgroups and R. prolixus midgut lipids (RML) in heme crystallization. All commercial unsaturated forms of phospholipids, as well as RML, mediated fast and efficient β-hematin formation by means of two kinetically distinct mechanisms: an early and fast component, followed by a late and slow one. The fastest reactions observed were induced by unsaturated forms of phosphatidylethanolamine (uPE) and phosphatidylcholine (uPC), with half-lives of 0.04 and 0.7 minutes, respectively. β-hematin crystal morphologies were strikingly distinct among groups, with uPE producing homogeneous regular brick-shaped crystals. Interestingly, uPC-mediated reactions resulted in two morphologically distinct crystal populations: one less representative group of regular crystals, resembling those induced by uPE, and the other largely represented by crystals with numerous sharp edges and tapered ends. Heme crystallization reactions induced by RML were efficient, with a heme to β-hematin conversion rate higher than 70%, but clearly slower (t1/2 of 9.9–17.7 minutes) than those induced by uPC and uPE. Interestingly, crystals produced by RML were homogeneous in shape and quite similar to those mediated by uPE. Thus, β-hematin formation can be rapidly and efficiently induced by unsaturated glycerophospholipids, particularly uPE and uPC, and may play a role on biological heme crystallization in R. prolixus midgut. PMID:24586467

  20. Expression Patterns and Subcellular Localization of Carbonic Anhydrases Are Developmentally Regulated during Tooth Formation

    PubMed Central

    Reibring, Claes-Göran; El Shahawy, Maha; Hallberg, Kristina; Kannius-Janson, Marie; Nilsson, Jeanette; Parkkila, Seppo; Sly, William S.; Waheed, Abdul; Linde, Anders; Gritli-Linde, Amel

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) play fundamental roles in several physiological events, and emerging evidence points at their involvement in an array of disorders, including cancer. The expression of CAs in the different cells of teeth is unknown, let alone their expression patterns during odontogenesis. As a first step towards understanding the role of CAs during odontogenesis, we used immunohistochemistry, histochemistry and in situ hybridization to reveal hitherto unknown dynamic distribution patterns of eight CAs in mice. The most salient findings include expression of CAII/Car2 not only in maturation-stage ameloblasts (MA) but also in the papillary layer, dental papilla mesenchyme, odontoblasts and the epithelial rests of Malassez. We uncovered that the latter form lace-like networks around incisors; hitherto these have been known to occur only in molars. All CAs studied were produced by MA, however CAIV, CAIX and CARPXI proteins were distinctly enriched in the ruffled membrane of the ruffled MA but exhibited a homogeneous distribution in smooth-ended MA. While CAIV, CAVI/Car6, CAIX, CARPXI and CAXIV were produced by all odontoblasts, CAIII distribution displayed a striking asymmetry, in that it was virtually confined to odontoblasts in the root of molars and root analog of incisors. Remarkably, from initiation until near completion of odontogenesis and in several other tissues, CAXIII localized mainly in intracellular punctae/vesicles that we show to overlap with LAMP-1- and LAMP-2-positive vesicles, suggesting that CAXIII localizes within lysosomes. We showed that expression of CAs in developing teeth is not confined to cells involved in biomineralization, pointing at their participation in other biological events. Finally, we uncovered novel sites of CA expression, including the developing brain and eye, the olfactory epithelium, melanoblasts, tongue, notochord, nucleus pulposus and sebaceous glands. Our study provides important information for future single or