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Sample records for biological resistance

  1. Systems biology of diuretic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Knepper, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Diuretics are commonly used to treat hypertension and extracellular fluid volume expansion. However, the development of compensatory responses in the kidney limits the benefit of this class of drugs. In this issue of the JCI, Grimm and colleagues use a systems biology approach in mice lacking the kinase SPAK and unravel a complex mechanism that explains thiazide diuretic resistance. The overall process involves interactions among six different cell types in the kidney. PMID:25893597

  2. The biology of insecticidal activity and resistance.

    PubMed

    Perry, Trent; Batterham, Philip; Daborn, Phillip J

    2011-07-01

    Identifying insecticide resistance mechanisms is paramount for pest insect control, as the understandings that underpin insect control strategies must provide ways of detecting and managing resistance. Insecticide resistance studies rely heavily on detailed biochemical and genetic analyses. Although there have been many successes, there are also many examples of resistance that still challenge us. As a precursor to rational pest insect control, the biology of the insect, within the contexts of insecticide modes of action and insecticide metabolism, must be well understood. It makes sense to initiate this research in the best model insect system, Drosophila melanogaster, and translate these findings and methodologies to other insects. Here we explore the usefulness of the D. melanogaster model in studying metabolic-based insecticide resistances, target-site mediated resistances and identifying novel insecticide targets, whilst highlighting the importance of having a more complete understanding of insect biology for insecticide studies. PMID:21426939

  3. The Biology of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shizuru, Judith A.; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2016-01-01

    At the most basic level, success of an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) procedure relies upon the engraftment of recipients with donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that will generate blood formation for the life of that individual. The formula to achieve durable HSC engraftment involves multiple factors including the recipient conditioning regimen, the nature of the genetic disparity between donor and recipient, and the content of the hematopoietic graft. Animal and clinical studies have shown that the biology of host resistance is complex, involving both immune and nonimmune elements. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to host resistance, describe emerging concepts on the basic biology of resistance, and discuss hematopoietic resistance as it relates specifically to patients with severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID)— disorders that bring unique insights into the dynamics of cell replacement by allogeneic HSCs and progenitor cells. PMID:19913629

  4. Antibiotic resistance shaping multi-level population biology of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Fernando; Tedim, Ana P.; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have natural functions, mostly involving cell-to-cell signaling networks. The anthropogenic production of antibiotics, and its release in the microbiosphere results in a disturbance of these networks, antibiotic resistance tending to preserve its integrity. The cost of such adaptation is the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes, and of all genetic and cellular vehicles in which these genes are located. Selection of the combinations of the different evolutionary units (genes, integrons, transposons, plasmids, cells, communities and microbiomes, hosts) is highly asymmetrical. Each unit of selection is a self-interested entity, exploiting the higher hierarchical unit for its own benefit, but in doing so the higher hierarchical unit might acquire critical traits for its spread because of the exploitation of the lower hierarchical unit. This interactive trade-off shapes the population biology of antibiotic resistance, a composed-complex array of the independent “population biologies.” Antibiotics modify the abundance and the interactive field of each of these units. Antibiotics increase the number and evolvability of “clinical” antibiotic resistance genes, but probably also many other genes with different primary functions but with a resistance phenotype present in the environmental resistome. Antibiotics influence the abundance, modularity, and spread of integrons, transposons, and plasmids, mostly acting on structures present before the antibiotic era. Antibiotics enrich particular bacterial lineages and clones and contribute to local clonalization processes. Antibiotics amplify particular genetic exchange communities sharing antibiotic resistance genes and platforms within microbiomes. In particular human or animal hosts, the microbiomic composition might facilitate the interactions between evolutionary units involved in antibiotic resistance. The understanding of antibiotic resistance implies expanding our knowledge on multi

  5. Adaptive resistance to antibiotics in bacteria: a systems biology perspective.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Motta, Santiago; Aldana, Maximino

    2016-05-01

    Despite all the major breakthroughs in antibiotic development and treatment procedures, there is still no long-term solution to the bacterial antibiotic resistance problem. Among all the known types of resistance, adaptive resistance (AdR) is particularly inconvenient. This phenotype is known to emerge as a consequence of concentration gradients, as well as contact with subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics, both known to occur in human patients and livestock. Moreover, AdR has been repeatedly correlated with the appearance of multidrug resistance, although the biological processes behind its emergence and evolution are not well understood. Epigenetic inheritance, population structure and heterogeneity, high mutation rates, gene amplification, efflux pumps, and biofilm formation have all been reported as possible explanations for its development. Nonetheless, these concepts taken independently have not been sufficient to prevent AdR's fast emergence or to predict its low stability. New strains of resistant pathogens continue to appear, and none of the new approaches used to kill them (mixed antibiotics, sequential treatments, and efflux inhibitors) are completely efficient. With the advent of systems biology and its toolsets, integrative models that combine experimentally known features with computational simulations have significantly improved our understanding of the emergence and evolution of the adaptive-resistant phenotype. Apart from outlining these findings, we propose that one of the main cornerstones of AdR in bacteria, is the conjunction of two types of mechanisms: one rapidly responding to transient environmental challenges but not very efficient, and another much more effective and specific, but developing on longer time scales. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:253-267. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1335 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27103502

  6. Bridging Physics and Biology Using Resistance and Axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Joshua M.

    2014-11-01

    When teaching physics, it is often difficult to get biology-oriented students to see the relevance of physics.1 A complaint often heard is that biology students are required to take physics for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) as part of a "weeding out" process, but that they don't feel like they need physics for biology. Despite this impression held by students, there have been calls for better physics education for future physicians and life scientists.2,3 Research is being performed to improve physics classes and labs by linking topics in biology and physics.4,5 Described here is a laboratory experiment covering the topics of resistance of materials and circuits/Kirchhoff's laws in a biology context with their direct application to neurons, axons, and electrical impulse transmission within animals. This experiment will also demonstrate the mechanism believed to cause multiple sclerosis. The apparatus was designed with low-cost and readily available materials in mind.

  7. Joining the club: Conforming to and resisting biology in practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Cory Alexander

    2000-10-01

    This study explores how science and scientists were produced and reproduced within the setting of a university biology department. It builds upon recent work in anthropology of education and feminist science studies. My purpose was to look at both the contextual and constitutive values of science as they were negotiated and played out in the training of scientists in a setting where: (1) women were well represented in leadership positions; and (2) "mainstream" science was being both taught and practiced. Findings included the organization of a status hierarchy within the department, the meanings of science and scientists that students constructed within the social spaces they occupied, examples of individual resistance to certain norms of biology practice, and examples of institutional opposition to that resistance. There was some evidence that the unusually high representation of women in positions of leadership in the biology department did result in changes in both the contextual and constitutive values of how science was conceptualized, practiced and taught in this setting. Contextually, social spaces controlled by women were likely to emphasize: (1) teamwork bringing together participants with varied backgrounds and perspectives; (2) flexible and collaborative use of physical space; and (3) willingness to do work for which they went unacknowledged or to share rewards equally even when the work distribution was not equitable. Constitutively, these social spaces were prone to: (1) interdisciplinary synthesis and comprehensive approaches; (2) the study of topics that reconsidered beliefs about gender roles in plant and animal reproduction; (3) work that would be slower and take longer to produce (and publish) but might make a large contribution (be a high quality product) eventually; and (4) an awareness by women that their practices were different in some ways than the practices of their male colleagues.

  8. Molecular Biology of Insect Sodium Channels and Pyrethroid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Most of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors. PMID:24704279

  9. Antimicrobial resistance and biological governance: explanations for policy failure.

    PubMed

    Wallinga, D; Rayner, G; Lang, T

    2015-10-01

    The paper reviews the state of policy on antimicrobial use and the growth of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). AMR was anticipated at the time of the first use of antibiotics by their originators. For decades, reports and scientific papers have expressed concern about AMR at global and national policy levels, yet the problem, first exposed a half-century ago, worsened. The paper considers the explanations for this policy failure and the state of arguments about ways forward. These include: a deficit of economic incentivisation; complex interventions in behavioural dynamics; joint and separate shifts in medical and animal health regimes; consumerism; belief in technology; and a narrative that in a 'war on bugs' nature can be beaten by human ingenuity. The paper suggests that these narratives underplay the biological realities of the human-animal-biosphere being in constant flux, an understanding which requires an ecological public health analysis of AMR policy development and failure. The paper suggests that effective policy change requires simultaneous actions across policy levels. No single solution is possible, since AMR is the result of long-term human intervention which has accelerated certain trends in the evolution of a microbial ecosystem shared by humans, animals and other biological organisms inhabiting that ecosystem. Viewing the AMR crisis today through an ecological public health lens has the advantage of reuniting the social-ecological and bio-ecological perspectives which have been separated within public health. PMID:26454427

  10. Systems biology of cisplatin resistance: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Michels, J; Brenner, C; Szabadkai, G; Harel-Bellan, A; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2014-01-01

    The platinum derivative cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), best known as cisplatin, is currently employed for the clinical management of patients affected by testicular, ovarian, head and neck, colorectal, bladder and lung cancers. For a long time, the antineoplastic effects of cisplatin have been fully ascribed to its ability to generate unrepairable DNA lesions, hence inducing either a permanent proliferative arrest known as cellular senescence or the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Accumulating evidence now suggests that the cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of cisplatin involves both a nuclear and a cytoplasmic component. Despite the unresolved issues regarding its mechanism of action, the administration of cisplatin is generally associated with high rates of clinical responses. However, in the vast majority of cases, malignant cells exposed to cisplatin activate a multipronged adaptive response that renders them less susceptible to the antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of the drug, and eventually resume proliferation. Thus, a large fraction of cisplatin-treated patients is destined to experience therapeutic failure and tumor recurrence. Throughout the last four decades great efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the molecular mechanisms whereby neoplastic cells progressively lose their sensitivity to cisplatin. The advent of high-content and high-throughput screening technologies has accelerated the discovery of cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic pathways that may be targeted to prevent or reverse cisplatin resistance in cancer patients. Still, the multifactorial and redundant nature of this phenomenon poses a significant barrier against the identification of effective chemosensitization strategies. Here, we discuss recent systems biology studies aimed at deconvoluting the complex circuitries that underpin cisplatin resistance, and how their findings might drive the development of rational approaches to tackle this clinically relevant

  11. Systems biology of cisplatin resistance: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Michels, J; Brenner, C; Szabadkai, G; Harel-Bellan, A; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2014-01-01

    The platinum derivative cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), best known as cisplatin, is currently employed for the clinical management of patients affected by testicular, ovarian, head and neck, colorectal, bladder and lung cancers. For a long time, the antineoplastic effects of cisplatin have been fully ascribed to its ability to generate unrepairable DNA lesions, hence inducing either a permanent proliferative arrest known as cellular senescence or the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Accumulating evidence now suggests that the cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of cisplatin involves both a nuclear and a cytoplasmic component. Despite the unresolved issues regarding its mechanism of action, the administration of cisplatin is generally associated with high rates of clinical responses. However, in the vast majority of cases, malignant cells exposed to cisplatin activate a multipronged adaptive response that renders them less susceptible to the antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of the drug, and eventually resume proliferation. Thus, a large fraction of cisplatin-treated patients is destined to experience therapeutic failure and tumor recurrence. Throughout the last four decades great efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the molecular mechanisms whereby neoplastic cells progressively lose their sensitivity to cisplatin. The advent of high-content and high-throughput screening technologies has accelerated the discovery of cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic pathways that may be targeted to prevent or reverse cisplatin resistance in cancer patients. Still, the multifactorial and redundant nature of this phenomenon poses a significant barrier against the identification of effective chemosensitization strategies. Here, we discuss recent systems biology studies aimed at deconvoluting the complex circuitries that underpin cisplatin resistance, and how their findings might drive the development of rational approaches to tackle this clinically relevant

  12. Bridging Physics and Biology Using Resistance and Axons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    When teaching physics, it is often difficult to get biology-oriented students to see the relevance of physics. A complaint often heard is that biology students are required to take physics for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) as part of a "weeding out" process, but that they don't feel like they need physics for biology.…

  13. Biological cost of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli implicated in polyclonal infection.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Corvec, S; Guitton, C; Giraudeau, C; Le Gargasson, G; Espaze, E; Drugeon, H

    2007-07-01

    Polyclonal Escherichia coli strains were isolated in a transplanted patient who experienced successive septic shocks. Fluoroquinolone susceptible and resistant strains were corresponding to different PFGE fragment profiles. The gyrA S83L mutation was associated with a reduction in biological fitness. Resistant strain was selected by a long-term single use of ofloxacin. PMID:16884861

  14. Public health evolutionary biology of antimicrobial resistance: priorities for intervention

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Fernando; Lanza, Val F; Cantón, Rafael; Coque, Teresa M

    2015-01-01

    The three main processes shaping the evolutionary ecology of antibiotic resistance (AbR) involve the emergence, invasion and occupation by antibiotic-resistant genes of significant environments for human health. The process of emergence in complex bacterial populations is a high-frequency, continuous swarming of ephemeral combinatory genetic and epigenetic explorations inside cells and among cells, populations and communities, expanding in different environments (migration), creating the stochastic variation required for evolutionary progress. Invasion refers to the process by which AbR significantly increases in frequency in a given (invaded) environment, led by external invaders local multiplication and spread, or by endogenous conversion. Conversion occurs because of the spread of AbR genes from an exogenous resistant clone into an established (endogenous) bacterial clone(s) colonizing the environment; and/or because of dissemination of particular resistant genetic variants that emerged within an endogenous clonal population. Occupation of a given environment by a resistant variant means a permanent establishment of this organism in this environment, even in the absence of antibiotic selection. Specific interventions on emergence influence invasion, those acting on invasion also influence occupation and interventions on occupation determine emergence. Such interventions should be simultaneously applied, as they are not simple solutions to the complex problem of AbR. PMID:25861381

  15. Characterization of the corrosion resistance of biologically active solutions: The effects of anodizing and welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1991-01-01

    An understanding of fabrication processes, metallurgy, electrochemistry, and microbiology is crucial to the resolution of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) problems. The object of this effort was to use AC impedance spectroscopy to characterize the corrosion resistance of Type II anodized aluminum alloy 2219-T87 in sterile and biologically active media and to examine the corrosion resistance of 316L, alloy 2219-T87, and titanium alloy 6-4 in the welded and unwelded conditions. The latter materials were immersed in sterile and biologically active media and corrosion currents were measured using the polarization resistance (DC) technique.

  16. Sporulation, Heat Resistance, and Biological Properties of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, S.; Seo, N.; Nakagawa, M.

    1969-01-01

    A sporulation medium for 134 Clostridium perfringens strains, including types A, B, C, D, E, and F, was devised according to Grelet's observation that sporulation occurred when cultural environment became limited in any nutritional requirement indispensable for the growth of the organism. Sporulation took place most prominently when 10% cooked-meat broth (pH 7.2) containing 3% Proteose Peptone and 1% glucose was used for the preculture and 2% Poli Peptone medium (pH 7.8) was used for the subculture medium. Sometimes, terminal spores could be observed. A correlation between sporulation and heat resistance was examined by use of C. perfringens strains isolated from samples heated at different temperatures. Almost all strains isolated from unheated samples and from those heated at lower temperatures gave rise to spores in our sporulation medium, but the spores were weakly heat-resistant, whereas strains isolated from samples heated at 100 C for 60 min were highly heat-resistant but sporulated poorly. A majority of these heat-resistant strains were non-gelatinolytic and definitely salicin-fermenting. Images PMID:4304763

  17. Antibiotic resistant bacteria associated with biological aerosols within broiler houses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry are known to harbor antibiotic resistant and pathogenic bacteria, and as such poultry litter and poultry house air can be contaminated with these bacteria. Health researchers have typically focused on the presence of aerosolized endotoxin, NH3, and particulate matter within poultry houses; ...

  18. Quantitative phenotyping of powdery mildew resistance in grapevine reveals differences in host resistance biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent demonstration of race-specific resistance to Erysiphe necator has encouraged grapevine breeders to identify and introgress quantitative resistance genes exhibiting complementary mechanisms. In 2012, we established a phenotyping center (VitisGenPM) for detailed evaluation of resistance to...

  19. Wear and abrasion resistance selection maps of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Amini, Shahrouz; Miserez, Ali

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical design of biological materials has generated widespread interest in recent years, providing many insights into their intriguing structure-property relationships. A critical characteristic of load-bearing materials, which is central to the survival of many species, is their wear and abrasion tolerance. In order to be fully functional, protective armors, dentitious structures and dynamic appendages must be able to tolerate repetitive contact loads without significant loss of materials or internal damage. However, very little is known about this tribological performance. Using a contact mechanics framework, we have constructed materials selection charts that provide general predictions about the wear performance of biological materials as a function of their fundamental mechanical properties. One key assumption in constructing these selection charts is that abrasion tolerance is governed by the first irreversible damage at the contact point. The maps were generated using comprehensive data from the literature and encompass a wide range of materials, from heavily mineralized to fully organic materials. Our analysis shows that the tolerance of biological materials against abrasion depends on contact geometry, which is ultimately correlated to environmental and selective pressures. Comparisons with experimental data from nanoindentation experiments are also drawn in order to verify our predictions. With the increasing amount of data available for biological materials also comes the challenge of selecting relevant model systems for bioinspired materials engineering. We suggest that these maps will be able to guide this selection by providing an overview of biological materials that are predicted to exhibit the best abrasion tolerance, which is of fundamental interest for a wide range of applications, for instance in restorative implants and protective devices. PMID:23643608

  20. Cell biological mechanisms of multidrug resistance in tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S M; Schindler, M

    1994-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleiotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs. PMID:7909602

  1. Cell Biological Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a generic term for the variety of strategies tumor cells use to evade the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. MDR is characterized by a decreased sensitivity of tumor cells not only to the drug employed for chemotherapy but also to a broad spectrum of drugs with neither obvious structural homology nor common targets. This pleotropic resistance is one of the major obstacles to the successful treatment of tumors. MDR may result from structural or functional changes at the plasma membrane or within the cytoplasm, cellular compartments, or nucleus. Molecular mechanisms of MDR are discussed in terms of modifications in detoxification and DNA repair pathways, changes in cellular sites of drug sequestration, decreases in drug-target affinity, synthesis of specific drug inhibitors within cells, altered or inappropriate targeting of proteins, and accelerated removal or secretion of drugs.

  2. Radiation resistance of biological reagents for in situ life detection.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Rowedder, Holli; Vafadari, Cyrus; Lui, Clarissa S; Cascio, Ethan; Zuber, Maria T; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Life on Mars, if it exists, may share a common ancestry with life on Earth derived from meteoritic transfer of microbes between the planets. One means to test this hypothesis is to isolate, detect, and sequence nucleic acids in situ on Mars, then search for similarities to known common features of life on Earth. Such an instrument would require biological and chemical components, such as polymerase and fluorescent dye molecules. We show that reagents necessary for detection and sequencing of DNA survive several analogues of the radiation expected during a 2-year mission to Mars, including proton (H-1), heavy ion (Fe-56, O-18), and neutron bombardment. Some reagents have reduced performance or fail at higher doses. Overall, our findings suggest it is feasible to utilize space instruments with biological components, particularly for mission durations of up to several years in environments without large accumulations of charged particles, such as the surface of Mars, and have implications for the meteoritic transfer of microbes between planets. PMID:23330963

  3. [Effect of biologically active compounds on the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Levchenko, A B; Belousova, I I; El'gart, R E; Chistiakova, A M; Tereshin, I M

    1975-11-01

    A number of biologically active substances, i. e. main protamine proteins and histones, EDTA, lysozyme, methacyl and pentoxyl was studied with respect to their effect on the levels of the minimum inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics against E. coli and Staph. aureus and transfer of resistence to chloramphenicol in E. coli on conjugation. It was shown that the above substances lowered the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the antibiotics 2--10 times when added to the culture simultaneously with the latter. The results varied depending on the strain and the resistance nature. Marked inhibition of transfer of resistance to chloramphenicol in the presence of the main proteins and EDTA was found. PMID:817644

  4. Molecular and Biological Diagnostic Tests for Monitoring Benzimidazole Resistance in Human Soil-Transmitted Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Diawara, Aïssatou; Schwenkenbecher, Jan M.; Kaplan, Ray M.; Prichard, Roger K.

    2013-01-01

    In endemic countries with soil-transmitted helminths mass drug administration with albendazole or mebendazole are being implemented as a control strategy. However, it is well known in veterinary helminths that the use of the same benzimidazole drugs can place selection on the β-tubulin gene, leading to resistance. Given the concern that resistance could arise in human soil-transmitted helminths, there is an urgent need to develop accurate diagnostic tools for monitoring resistance. In this study, we developed molecular assays to detect putative resistance genetic changes in Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworms, and we optimized an egg hatch assay for the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum and applied it to Necator americanus. Both assays were tested on field samples. The molecular assays demonstrated their reproducibility and capacity to detect the presence of worms carrying putative resistance-associated genetic changes. However, further investigations are needed to validate our molecular and biological tests on additional field isolates. PMID:23458960

  5. Molecular and biological diagnostic tests for monitoring benzimidazole resistance in human soil-transmitted helminths.

    PubMed

    Diawara, Aïssatou; Schwenkenbecher, Jan M; Kaplan, Ray M; Prichard, Roger K

    2013-06-01

    In endemic countries with soil-transmitted helminths mass drug administration with albendazole or mebendazole are being implemented as a control strategy. However, it is well known in veterinary helminths that the use of the same benzimidazole drugs can place selection on the β-tubulin gene, leading to resistance. Given the concern that resistance could arise in human soil-transmitted helminths, there is an urgent need to develop accurate diagnostic tools for monitoring resistance. In this study, we developed molecular assays to detect putative resistance genetic changes in Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworms, and we optimized an egg hatch assay for the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum and applied it to Necator americanus. Both assays were tested on field samples. The molecular assays demonstrated their reproducibility and capacity to detect the presence of worms carrying putative resistance-associated genetic changes. However, further investigations are needed to validate our molecular and biological tests on additional field isolates. PMID:23458960

  6. Biological characteristics and resistance analysis of the novel fungicide SYP-1620 against Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoke; Wu, Dongxia; Duan, Yabing; Ge, Changyan; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo; Chen, Changjun

    2014-09-01

    SYP-1620, a quinone-outside-inhibitor (QoI), is a novel broad-spectrum fungicide. In this study, 108 isolates of Botrytis cinerea from different geographical regions in Jiangsu Province of China were characterized for baseline sensitivity to SYP-1620. The curves of baseline sensitivity were unimodal with a mean EC50 value of 0.0130±0.0109 μg/mL for mycelial growth, 0.01147±0.0062 μg/mL for spore germination, respectively. The biological characterization of SYP-1620 against B. cinerea was determined in vitro. The results indicated that SYP-1620 has a strong inhibiting effect on spore germination, mycelial growth, and respiration. The protective and curative test of SYP-1620 suggested that protective effect was better than curative either on strawberry leaves or on cucumber leaves in vivo. In addition, the biological characterization of SYP-1620-resistant mutants of B. cinerea was investigated. SYP-1620 has no cross-resistance with other types of fungicide. Compared to the sensitive isolates, the resistant mutants had lower mycelial growth and virulence but not differ in mycelial dry weight. Sequencing indicated that SYP-1620 resistance was associated with a single point mutation (G143A) in the cytochrome b gene. PMID:25175653

  7. Influence of environmental storage relative humidity on biological indicator resistance, viability, and moisture content.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, R R; Morien, L L

    1982-01-01

    The effect of environmental storage relative humidity (RH) on the moisture content, viability, and moist heat and gaseous ethylene oxide (EO) resistance of biological indicators (BIs) was evaluated. No statistically significant difference was observed between the initial Bacillus stearothermophilus spore population and the spore population of BIs stored at 20 degrees C and 0, 20, 44, of 55% RH or under ambient, 4 degrees C, or -20 degrees C conditions after 12 months. A statistically significant decrease in moist heat resistance from initial starting levels was found for BIs stored at 20 degrees C and either 0 or 20% RH. There was a statistically significant decrease in the B. subtilis BI spore population, compared with initial levels, when the BIs were stored at 20 degrees C and 0% RH concomitant with a significant increase in their EO resistance. BI storage at 20 degrees C and 20 or 44% RH, or under ambient, 4 degrees C, or -20 degrees C conditions, had no significant effect on EO resistance. BIs stored at 20 degrees C and 66% RH demonstrated a significantly lower EO resistance compared with starting levels. PMID:7073275

  8. Influence of environmental storage relative humidity on biological indicator resistance, viability, and moisture content.

    PubMed

    Reich, R R; Morien, L L

    1982-03-01

    The effect of environmental storage relative humidity (RH) on the moisture content, viability, and moist heat and gaseous ethylene oxide (EO) resistance of biological indicators (BIs) was evaluated. No statistically significant difference was observed between the initial Bacillus stearothermophilus spore population and the spore population of BIs stored at 20 degrees C and 0, 20, 44, of 55% RH or under ambient, 4 degrees C, or -20 degrees C conditions after 12 months. A statistically significant decrease in moist heat resistance from initial starting levels was found for BIs stored at 20 degrees C and either 0 or 20% RH. There was a statistically significant decrease in the B. subtilis BI spore population, compared with initial levels, when the BIs were stored at 20 degrees C and 0% RH concomitant with a significant increase in their EO resistance. BI storage at 20 degrees C and 20 or 44% RH, or under ambient, 4 degrees C, or -20 degrees C conditions, had no significant effect on EO resistance. BIs stored at 20 degrees C and 66% RH demonstrated a significantly lower EO resistance compared with starting levels. PMID:7073275

  9. Perturbation biology nominates upstream–downstream drug combinations in RAF inhibitor resistant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Korkut, Anil; Wang, Weiqing; Demir, Emek; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Jing, Xiaohong; Molinelli, Evan J; Babur, Özgün; Bemis, Debra L; Onur Sumer, Selcuk; Solit, David B; Pratilas, Christine A; Sander, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to targeted cancer therapies is an important clinical problem. The discovery of anti-resistance drug combinations is challenging as resistance can arise by diverse escape mechanisms. To address this challenge, we improved and applied the experimental-computational perturbation biology method. Using statistical inference, we build network models from high-throughput measurements of molecular and phenotypic responses to combinatorial targeted perturbations. The models are computationally executed to predict the effects of thousands of untested perturbations. In RAF-inhibitor resistant melanoma cells, we measured 143 proteomic/phenotypic entities under 89 perturbation conditions and predicted c-Myc as an effective therapeutic co-target with BRAF or MEK. Experiments using the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 affecting the level of c-Myc protein and protein kinase inhibitors targeting the ERK pathway confirmed the prediction. In conclusion, we propose an anti-cancer strategy of co-targeting a specific upstream alteration and a general downstream point of vulnerability to prevent or overcome resistance to targeted drugs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04640.001 PMID:26284497

  10. Insect growth regulators: I. Biological activity of some IGR's against the susceptible and resistant strains of Culex pipiens larvae. II. Pattern of cross resistance to IGR's in carbaryl-resistant strain.

    PubMed

    Bakr, R F; Abo Gabal, N M; Hussein, M A

    1989-12-01

    The biological activity and cross-resistance of some IGR's, Dimilin, BAY SIR 8514 and Chlorofluzuron against susceptible and carbaryl-resistant strains of Culex pipiens were determined. The results indicated that these compounds are highly effective against the larvae of C. pipiens but more potent larvicides against the susceptible larvae than against the resistant ones. The pattern of cross-resistance to the used IGR's in the carbaryl-resistant strain were obtained. The data revealed no three IGR's as larvicides against the susceptible and resistant Culex pipiens. The pattern of cross resistance to other potent IGR's was also studies. PMID:2504825

  11. Bovine genetic resistance effects on biological traits of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Biegelmeyer, P; Nizoli, L Q; da Silva, S S; dos Santos, T R B; Dionello, N J L; Gulias-Gomes, C C; Cardoso, F F

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to verify the influence of bovine genetic resistance on biological traits of the Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus tick. Genetic resistance or susceptibility was determined according to breeding values for tick counts, predicted using a dataset of 9007 Hereford and Braford (Hereford×Zebu) bovines naturally infested and raised under extensive production systems in southern Brazil. From a total of 974 Braford heifers born in 2008, 20 were classified as genetically tick-resistant and 20 classified as genetically tick-susceptible, and used to obtain the ticks samples used in this study. The 40 heifers were exposed to four subsequent artificial infestations with approximately 20,000 larvae at 14-day intervals. From the 19th to 23rd day of each infestation tick counts were performed on the left body side of the heifers. Engorged ticks were manually collected on the day of highest observed burden after each infestation. Tick counts on susceptible heifers were 5.5, 10.5, 11.1 and 6.9 times larger than on resistant heifers, respectively, after the first, second, third and fourth artificial infestations. In the third infestation, ticks from resistant heifers showed lower egg production index (P<0.0001) than ticks from susceptible heifers. In the fourth infestation, ticks from susceptible group showed higher egg mass weight (P<0.05) and nutrient index (P<0.0001) than ticks from resistant heifers. Tick initial weights showed a positive association with egg production index in susceptible heifers (P<0.05) and a negative association in the resistant group (P<0.05), suggesting a host defense mechanism that reduces the conversion efficiency of ingested blood to eggs in engorged ticks from resistant cattle. This shows that bovine genetic tick resistance, in addition to affecting the number of ticks carried by the animals, also affected the egg mass weight, egg production and nutrient indexes of ticks. The results of the present study imply that the selection of

  12. Resistance exercise biology: manipulation of resistance exercise programme variables determines the responses of cellular and molecular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Spiering, Barry A; Kraemer, William J; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Nindl, Bradley C; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have elucidated some of the mechanisms that regulate skeletal muscle growth. Logically, muscle physiologists have applied these innovations to the study of resistance exercise (RE), as RE represents the most potent natural stimulus for growth in adult skeletal muscle. However, as this molecular-based line of research progresses to investigations in humans, scientists must appreciate the fundamental principles of RE to effectively design such experiments. Therefore, we present herein an updated paradigm of RE biology that integrates fundamental RE principles with the current knowledge of muscle cellular and molecular signalling. RE invokes a sequential cascade consisting of: (i) muscle activation; (ii) signalling events arising from mechanical deformation of muscle fibres, hormones, and immune/inflammatory responses; (iii) protein synthesis due to increased transcription and translation; and (iv) muscle fibre hypertrophy. In this paradigm, RE is considered an 'upstream' signal that determines specific downstream events. Therefore, manipulation of the acute RE programme variables (i.e. exercise choice, load, volume, rest period lengths, and exercise order) alters the unique 'fingerprint' of the RE stimulus and subsequently modifies the downstream cellular and molecular responses. PMID:18557656

  13. Enhancing Stress-Resistance for Efficient Microbial Biotransformations by Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haiyang; Fan, Yanshuang; Feng, Xudong; Li, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Chemical conversions mediated by microorganisms, otherwise known as microbial biotransformations, are playing an increasingly important role within the biotechnology industry. Unfortunately, the growth and production of microorganisms are often hampered by a number of stressful conditions emanating from environment fluctuations and/or metabolic imbalances such as high temperature, high salt condition, strongly acidic solution, and presence of toxic metabolites. Therefore, exploring methods to improve the stress tolerance of host organisms could significantly improve the biotransformation process. With the help of synthetic biology, it is now becoming feasible to implement strategies to improve the stress-resistance of the existing hosts. This review summarizes synthetic biology efforts to enhance the efficiency of biotransformations by improving the robustness of microbes. Particular attention will be given to strategies at the cellular and the microbial community levels. PMID:25368869

  14. Without the Light of Evolution: A Case Study of Resistance and Avoidance in Learning to Teach High School Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Douglas B.; Perry-Ryder, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of Michael, a prospective high school biology teacher, to explore the implications of teacher resistance and avoidance to the topic of evolution. This case is drawn from a year-long qualitative research study that examined Michael's process of learning to teach high school biology and describes how his avoidance of evolution in…

  15. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (BiologTM) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  16. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (Biolog(TM)) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  17. Molecular effects of resistance elicitors from biological origin and their potential for crop protection

    PubMed Central

    Wiesel, Lea; Newton, Adrian C.; Elliott, Ian; Booty, David; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Birch, Paul R. J.; Hein, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Plants contain a sophisticated innate immune network to prevent pathogenic microbes from gaining access to nutrients and from colonizing internal structures. The first layer of inducible response is governed by the plant following the perception of microbe- or modified plant-derived molecules. As the perception of these molecules results in a plant response that can provide efficient resistance toward non-adapted pathogens they can also be described as “defense elicitors.” In compatible plant/microbe interactions, adapted microorganisms have means to avoid or disable this resistance response and promote virulence. However, this requires a detailed spatial and temporal response from the invading pathogens. In agricultural practice, treating plants with isolated defense elicitors in the absence of pathogens can promote plant resistance by uncoupling defense activation from the effects of pathogen virulence determinants. The plant responses to plant, bacterial, oomycete, or fungal-derived elicitors are not, in all cases, universal and need elucidating prior to the application in agriculture. This review provides an overview of currently known elicitors of biological rather than synthetic origin and places their activity into a molecular context. PMID:25484886

  18. Uncovering three-dimensional gradients in fibrillar orientation in an impact-resistant biological armour.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Paris, O; Terrill, N J; Gupta, H S

    2016-01-01

    The complex hierarchical structure in biological and synthetic fibrous nanocomposites entails considerable difficulties in the interpretation of the crystallographic texture from diffraction data. Here, we present a novel reconstruction method to obtain the 3D distribution of fibres in such systems. An analytical expression is derived for the diffraction intensity from fibres, explaining the azimuthal intensity distribution in terms of the angles of the three dimensional fibre orientation distributions. The telson of stomatopod (mantis shrimp) serves as an example of natural biological armour whose high impact resistance property is believed to arise from the hierarchical organization of alpha chitin nanofibrils into fibres and twisted plywood (Bouligand) structures at the sub-micron and micron scale. Synchrotron microfocus scanning X-ray diffraction data on stomatopod telson were used as a test case to map the 3D fibre orientation across the entire tissue section. The method is applicable to a range of biological and biomimetic structures with graded 3D fibre texture at the sub-micron and micron length scales. PMID:27211574

  19. Uncovering three-dimensional gradients in fibrillar orientation in an impact-resistant biological armour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paris, O.; Terrill, N. J.; Gupta, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    The complex hierarchical structure in biological and synthetic fibrous nanocomposites entails considerable difficulties in the interpretation of the crystallographic texture from diffraction data. Here, we present a novel reconstruction method to obtain the 3D distribution of fibres in such systems. An analytical expression is derived for the diffraction intensity from fibres, explaining the azimuthal intensity distribution in terms of the angles of the three dimensional fibre orientation distributions. The telson of stomatopod (mantis shrimp) serves as an example of natural biological armour whose high impact resistance property is believed to arise from the hierarchical organization of alpha chitin nanofibrils into fibres and twisted plywood (Bouligand) structures at the sub-micron and micron scale. Synchrotron microfocus scanning X-ray diffraction data on stomatopod telson were used as a test case to map the 3D fibre orientation across the entire tissue section. The method is applicable to a range of biological and biomimetic structures with graded 3D fibre texture at the sub-micron and micron length scales.

  20. Uncovering three-dimensional gradients in fibrillar orientation in an impact-resistant biological armour

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Paris, O.; Terrill, N. J.; Gupta, H. S.

    2016-01-01

    The complex hierarchical structure in biological and synthetic fibrous nanocomposites entails considerable difficulties in the interpretation of the crystallographic texture from diffraction data. Here, we present a novel reconstruction method to obtain the 3D distribution of fibres in such systems. An analytical expression is derived for the diffraction intensity from fibres, explaining the azimuthal intensity distribution in terms of the angles of the three dimensional fibre orientation distributions. The telson of stomatopod (mantis shrimp) serves as an example of natural biological armour whose high impact resistance property is believed to arise from the hierarchical organization of alpha chitin nanofibrils into fibres and twisted plywood (Bouligand) structures at the sub-micron and micron scale. Synchrotron microfocus scanning X-ray diffraction data on stomatopod telson were used as a test case to map the 3D fibre orientation across the entire tissue section. The method is applicable to a range of biological and biomimetic structures with graded 3D fibre texture at the sub-micron and micron length scales. PMID:27211574

  1. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Wyatt I.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Gaskin, John F.; Norton, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the utilization of highly specific natural enemies to control exotic pests, may be negatively affected by host hybridization because of shifts in plant traits, such as root allocation or chemical constituents. We investigated introgression between two parent species of the invasive shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States, and how differences in plant traits affect interactions with a biological control agent. Introgression varied strongly with latitude of origin and was highly correlated with plant performance. Increased levels of T. ramosissima introgression resulted in both higher investment in roots and tolerance to defoliation and less resistance to insect attack. Because tamarisk hybridization occurs predictably on the western U.S. landscape, managers may be able to exploit this information to maximize control efforts. Genetic differentiation in plant traits in this system underpins the importance of plant hybridization and may explain why some biological control releases are more successful than others.

  2. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Wyatt I; Friedman, Jonathan M; Gaskin, John F; Norton, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the utilization of highly specific natural enemies to control exotic pests, may be negatively affected by host hybridization because of shifts in plant traits, such as root allocation or chemical constituents. We investigated introgression between two parent species of the invasive shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) in the western United States, and how differences in plant traits affect interactions with a biological control agent. Introgression varied strongly with latitude of origin and was highly correlated with plant performance. Increased levels of T. ramosissima introgression resulted in both higher investment in roots and tolerance to defoliation and less resistance to insect attack. Because tamarisk hybridization occurs predictably on the western U.S. landscape, managers may be able to exploit this information to maximize control efforts. Genetic differentiation in plant traits in this system underpins the importance of plant hybridization and may explain why some biological control releases are more successful than others. PMID:24665340

  3. Evolutionary malignant resistance of cells to damaging factors as common biological defence mechanism in neoplastic development. Review of conception.

    PubMed

    Monceviciute-Eringiene, E

    2000-09-01

    Cells have some inborn resistance to harmful factors, which could be called physiological or natural resistance. The mechanisms of multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) and multidrug resistance (MDR) have common features in the formation of acquired resistance in microorganisms, carcinogenesis, tumour metastases and chemotherapy or irradiation. ATP-dependent membrane P-glycoprotein, as an MDR efflux pump, glutathione S-transferases and other products of evolutionary resistance-related genes arised for exportation and detoxification of cytotoxic xenobiotics and drugs are transmitted from bacteria to man. On the one hand, this evolutionary MXR as a common biological defence mechanism is a "driving" power to conserve homeostasis of cells, tissues and organs. On the other hand, mutation, selection and simplification of properties are the causes of functional and morphological changes in tumour cells which regress to a more primitive mode of existence (atavism) for adaptation to survival. In the present work are presented data on the forms of E. coli resistant to antibiotics and of sarcoma 45 resistant to alkylic preparations. They may be helpful in revealing the causes of resistance and acquired accelerated growth of cells. The development of tumours as fibromas 14-15 years following injection of a vital dye trypan blue into human skin supports our conception that neoplastic growth is a particular case of the evolutionary resistance of cells adapted to the damaging factors. So, tumour cells adopting the enhancement mechanisms of general biological persistent resistance, i. e. undergoing repeated cycles of malignancy enhancement, adapt themselves to survive under the changed unfavourable conditions. PMID:11144527

  4. Sublethal effects of antibiosis resistance on the reproductive biology of two spittlebug (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) species affecting Brachiaria spp.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Paola A; Miller, María F; Cardona, Cesar; Miles, John W; Sotelo, Guillermo; Montoya, James

    2008-04-01

    Several greenhouse experiments were used to measure how high levels of antibiosis resistance to nymphs in two interspecific Brachiaria (brachiariagrass) hybrids affect life history parameters of the spittlebugs Aeneolamia varia (F.) and Zulia carbonaria (Lallemand), two of the most important spittlebug (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) species affecting Brachiaria production in Colombia. The A. varia-resistant hybrid CIAT 36062, the Z. carbonaria-resistant hybrid SX01NO/0102, and the susceptible accession CIAT 0654 were used to compare the effect of all possible combinations of food sources for nymphs and adults. Calculation of growth indexes showed a significant impact of antibiosis resistance on the biology of immature stages of both species. Median survival times of adults feeding on resistant genotypes did not differ from those recorded on the susceptible genotype, suggesting that factors responsible for high mortality of nymphs in the resistant hybrids did not affect adult survival. Rearing nymphs of A. varia on CIAT 36062 and of Z. carbonaria on SX01NO/0102 had deleterious sublethal effects on the reproductive biology of resulting adult females. It is concluded that high nymphal mortality and subsequent sublethal effects of nymphal antibiosis on adults should have a major impact on the demography of the two spittlebug species studied. PMID:18459425

  5. Antimalarial drug resistance: a review of the biology and strategies to delay emergence and spread

    PubMed Central

    Klein, E.Y.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to former first-line antimalarial drugs has been an unmitigated disaster. In recent years, artemisinin class drugs have become standard and they are considered an essential tool for helping to eradicate the disease. However, their ability to reduce morbidity and mortality and to slow transmission requires the maintenance of effectiveness. Recently, an artemisinin delayed-clearance phenotype was described. This is believed to be the precursor to resistance and threatens local elimination and global eradication plans. Understanding how resistance emerges and spreads is important for developing strategies to contain its spread. Resistance is the result of two processes: (i) drug selection of resistant parasites; and (ii) the spread of resistance. In this review, we examine the factors that lead to both drug selection and the spread of resistance. We then examine strategies for controlling the spread of resistance, pointing out the complexities and deficiencies in predicting how resistance will spread. PMID:23394809

  6. Impact of the ahas transgene for herbicides resistance on biological nitrogen fixation and yield of soybean.

    PubMed

    Hungria, Mariangela; Nakatani, André Shigueyoshi; Souza, Rosinei Aparecida; Sei, Fernando Bonafé; de Oliveira Chueire, Ligia Maria; Arias, Carlos Arrabal

    2015-02-01

    Studies on the effects of transgenes in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and the associated use of specific herbicides on biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) are still few, although it is important to ensure minimal impacts on benefits provided by the root-nodule symbiosis. Cultivance CV127 transgenic soybean is a cultivar containing the ahas gene, which confers resistance to herbicides of the imidazolinone group. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the ahas transgene and of imidazolinone herbicide on BNF parameters and soybean yield. A large-scale set of field experiments was conducted, for three cropping seasons, at nine sites in Brazil, with a total of 20 trials. The experiment was designed as a completely randomized block with four replicates and the following treatments: (T1) near isogenic transgenic soybean (Cultivance CV127) + herbicide of the imidazolinone group (imazapyr); (T2) near isogenic transgenic soybean + conventional herbicides; and (T3) parental conventional soybean (Conquista) + conventional herbicides; in addition, two commercial cultivars were included, Monsoy 8001 (M-SOY 8001) (T4), and Coodetec 217 (CD 217) (T5). At the R2 growth stage, plants were collected and BNF parameters evaluated. In general, there were no effects on BNF parameters due to the transgenic trait or associated with the specific herbicide. Similarly, at the final harvest, no grain-yield effects were detected related to the ahas gene or to the specific herbicide. However, clear effects on BNF and grain yield were attributed to location and cropping season. PMID:25201300

  7. Combined efficacy of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles and different antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Syed Zeeshan Haider; Kiran, Urooj; Ali, Muhammad Ishtiaq; Jamal, Asif; Hameed, Abdul; Ahmed, Safia; Ali, Naeem

    2013-01-01

    Biological synthesis of nanoparticles is a growing innovative approach that is relatively cheaper and more environmentally friendly than current physicochemical processes. Among various microorganisms, fungi have been found to be comparatively more efficient in the synthesis of nanomaterials. In this research work, extracellular mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was probed by reacting the precursor salt of silver nitrate (AgNO3) with culture filtrate of Aspergillus flavus. Initially, the mycosynthesis was regularly monitored by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, which showed AgNP peaks of around 400–470 nm. X-ray diffraction spectra revealed peaks of different intensities with respect to angle of diffractions (2θ) corresponding to varying configurations of AgNPs. Transmission electron micrographs further confirmed the formation of AgNPs in size ranging from 5–30 nm. Combined and individual antibacterial activities of the five conventional antibiotics and AgNPs were investigated against eight different multidrug-resistant bacterial species using the Kirby–Bauer disk-diffusion method. The decreasing order of antibacterial activity (zone of inhibition in mm) of antibiotics, AgNPs, and their conjugates against bacterial group (average) was; ciprofloxacin + AgNPs (23) . imipenem + AgNPs (21) > gentamycin + AgNPs (19) > vancomycin + AgNPs (16) > AgNPs (15) . imipenem (14) > trimethoprim + AgNPs (14) > ciprofloxacin (13) > gentamycin (11) > vancomycin (4) > trimethoprim (0). Overall, the synergistic effect of antibiotics and nanoparticles resulted in a 0.2–7.0 (average, 2.8) fold-area increase in antibacterial activity, which clearly revealed that nanoparticles can be effectively used in combination with antibiotics in order to improve their efficacy against various pathogenic microbes. PMID:23986635

  8. Limiting the Spread of Resistant Pneumococci: Biological and Epidemiologic Evidence for the Effectiveness of Alternative Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Schrag, Stephanie J.; Beall, Bernard; Dowell, Scott F.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are a leading cause of respiratory illness in young children, the elderly, and persons with chronic medical conditions. The emergence of multidrug-resistant pneumococci has compromised the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy for pneumococcal infections. As antibiotic-resistant strains increase in prevalence, there is a need for interventions that minimize the spread of resistant pneumococci. In this review we provide a framework for understanding the spread of pneumococcal resistance and evaluate proposed interventions to reduce this spread. Pneumococci differ from many drug-resistant pathogens because asymptomatic carriers play a key role in transmission of resistant strains and the genes encoding resistance are spread primarily by transformation and conjugative transposons. Evidence suggests that modifications of treatment regimens that have proved effective at limiting resistance in other pathogens may not prevent the spread of pneumococcal resistance. In contrast, programs encouraging more judicious antibiotic use have been shown to be effective. Additionally, a newly developed conjugate pneumococcal vaccine holds great potential as an “antiresistance vaccine” that simultaneously reduces the burden of invasive disease and the prevalence of resistant strains. Several areas of future epidemiologic and laboratory research hold promise to contribute to the reduced spread of pneumococcal resistance. PMID:11023959

  9. Antibiotic resistance of bacteria in raw and biologically treated sewage and in groundwater below leaking sewers.

    PubMed

    Gallert, C; Fund, K; Winter, J

    2005-11-01

    More than 750 isolates of faecal coliforms (>200 strains), enterococci (>200 strains) and pseudomonads (>340 strains) from three wastewater treatment plants (WTPs) and from four groundwater wells in the vicinity of leaking sewers were tested for resistance against 14 antibiotics. Most, or at least some, strains of the three bacterial groups, isolated from raw or treated sewage of the three WTPs, were resistant against penicillin G, ampicillin, vancomycin, erythromycin, triple sulfa and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SXT). Only a few strains of pseudomonads or faecal coliforms were resistant against some of the other tested antibiotics. The antibiotic resistances of pseudomonads, faecal coliforms and enterococci from groundwater varied to a higher extent. In contrast to the faecal coliforms and enterococci, most pseudomonads from all groundwater samples, including those from non-polluted groundwater, were additionally resistant against chloramphenicol and SXT. Pseudomonads from sewage and groundwater had more multiple antibiotic resistances than the faecal coliforms or the enterococci, and many pseudomonads from groundwater were resistant to more antibiotics than those from sewage. The pseudomonads from non-polluted groundwater were the most resistant isolates of all. The few surviving faecal coliforms in groundwater seemed to gain multiple antibiotic resistances, whereas the enterococci lost antibiotic resistances. Pseudomonads, and presumably, other autochthonous soil or groundwater bacteria, such as antibiotic-producing Actinomyces sp., seem to contribute significantly to the gene pool for acquisition of resistances against antibiotics in these environments. PMID:16001254

  10. Fighting microbial drug resistance: a primer on the role of evolutionary biology in public health

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Gabriel G; Inglis, R Fredrik; Pennings, Pleuni S; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Although microbes have been evolving resistance to antimicrobials for millennia, the spread of resistance in pathogen populations calls for the development of new drugs and treatment strategies. We propose that successful, long-term resistance management requires a better understanding of how resistance evolves in the first place. This is an opportunity for evolutionary biologists to engage in public health, a collaboration that has substantial precedent. Resistance evolution has been an important tool for developing and testing evolutionary theory, especially theory related to the genetic basis of new traits and constraints on adaptation. The present era is no exception. The articles in this issue highlight the breadth of current research on resistance evolution and also its challenges. In this introduction, we review the conceptual advances that have been achieved from studying resistance evolution and describe a path forward. PMID:25861380

  11. Polymyxin Resistance Caused by mgrB Inactivation Is Not Associated with Significant Biological Cost in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Cannatelli, Antonio; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Giani, Tommaso; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The inactivation of the mgrB gene, which encodes a negative-feedback regulator of the PhoPQ signaling system, was recently shown to be a common mutational mechanism responsible for acquired polymyxin resistance among carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains from clinical sources. In this work, we show that mgrB mutants can easily be selected in vitro from different K. pneumoniae lineages, and mgrB inactivation is not associated with a significant biological cost. PMID:25691629

  12. Genome Analysis of the First Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malaysia Provides Insights into the Genetic Basis of Its Biology and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Toh, Yue Fen; Khoo, Jia-Shiun; Chong, Jennifer; Lee, Kok Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has become an increasing problem in many TB-burdened countries. The underlying drug resistance mechanisms, including the genetic variation favored by selective pressure in the resistant population, are partially understood. Recently, the first case of XDR-TB was reported in Malaysia. However, the detailed genotype family and mechanisms of the formation of multiple drugs resistance are unknown. We sequenced the whole genome of the UM 1072388579 strain with a 2-kb insert-size library and combined with that from previously sequenced 500-bp-insert paired-end reads to produce an improved sequence with maximal sequencing coverage across the genome. In silico spoligotyping and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that UM 1072388579 strain belongs to an ancestral-like, non-Beijing clade of East Asia lineage. This is supported by the presence of a number of lineage-specific markers, including fadD28, embA, nuoD and pks7. Polymorphism analysis showed that the drug-susceptibility profile is correlated with the pattern of resistance mutations. Mutations in drug-efflux pumps and the cell wall biogenesis pathway such as mmpL, pks and fadD genes may play an important role in survival and adaptation of this strain to its surrounding environment. In this work, fifty-seven putative promoter SNPs were identified. Among them, we identified a novel SNP located at -4 T allele of TetR/acrR promoter as an informative marker to recognize strains of East Asian lineage. Our work indicates that the UM 1072388579 harbors both classical and uncommon SNPs that allow it to escape from inhibition by many antibiotics. This study provides a strong foundation to dissect the biology and underlying resistance mechanisms of the first reported XDR M. tuberculosis in Malaysia. PMID:26110649

  13. Genome Analysis of the First Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malaysia Provides Insights into the Genetic Basis of Its Biology and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Toh, Yue Fen; Khoo, Jia-Shiun; Chong, Jennifer; Lee, Kok Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has become an increasing problem in many TB-burdened countries. The underlying drug resistance mechanisms, including the genetic variation favored by selective pressure in the resistant population, are partially understood. Recently, the first case of XDR-TB was reported in Malaysia. However, the detailed genotype family and mechanisms of the formation of multiple drugs resistance are unknown. We sequenced the whole genome of the UM 1072388579 strain with a 2-kb insert-size library and combined with that from previously sequenced 500-bp-insert paired-end reads to produce an improved sequence with maximal sequencing coverage across the genome. In silico spoligotyping and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that UM 1072388579 strain belongs to an ancestral-like, non-Beijing clade of East Asia lineage. This is supported by the presence of a number of lineage-specific markers, including fadD28, embA, nuoD and pks7. Polymorphism analysis showed that the drug-susceptibility profile is correlated with the pattern of resistance mutations. Mutations in drug-efflux pumps and the cell wall biogenesis pathway such as mmpL, pks and fadD genes may play an important role in survival and adaptation of this strain to its surrounding environment. In this work, fifty-seven putative promoter SNPs were identified. Among them, we identified a novel SNP located at -4 T allele of TetR/acrR promoter as an informative marker to recognize strains of East Asian lineage. Our work indicates that the UM 1072388579 harbors both classical and uncommon SNPs that allow it to escape from inhibition by many antibiotics. This study provides a strong foundation to dissect the biology and underlying resistance mechanisms of the first reported XDR M. tuberculosis in Malaysia. PMID:26110649

  14. Biological, Biochemical, and Molecular Characterization of a New Clinical Trichophyton rubrum Isolate Resistant to Terbinafine

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Colin S.; Leitner, Ingrid; Hofbauer, Bettina; Fielding, Ceri A.; Favre, Bertrand; Ryder, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    We have characterized a new clinical strain of Trichophyton rubrum highly resistant to terbinafine but exhibiting normal susceptibility to drugs with other mechanisms of action. Resistance to terbinafine in this strain is caused by a missense mutation in the squalene epoxidase gene leading to the amino acid substitution F397L. PMID:16723593

  15. On the multiscale origins of fracture resistance in human bone and its biological degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Barth, Holly D.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2012-03-09

    Akin to other mineralized tissues, human cortical bone can resist deformation and fracture due to the nature of its hierarchical structure, which spans the molecular to macroscopic length-scales. Deformation at the smallest scales, mainly through the composite action of the mineral and collagen, contributes to bone?s strength or intrinsic fracture resistance, while crack-tip shielding mechanisms active on the microstructural scale contribute to the extrinsic fracture resistance once cracking begins. The efficiency with which these structural features can resist fracture at both small and large length-scales becomes severely degraded with such factors as aging, irradiation and disease. Indeed aging and irradiation can cause changes to the cross-link profile at fibrillar length-scales as well as changes at the three orders of magnitude larger scale of the osteonal structures, both of which combine to inhibit the bone's overall resistance to the initiation and growth of cracks.

  16. [Effects of biological regulated measures on active organic carbon and erosion-resistance in the Three Gorges Reservoir region soil].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ru; Huang, Lin; He, Bing-Hui; Zhou, Li-Jiang; Yu, Chuan; Wang, Feng

    2013-07-01

    To gain a better knowledge of characteristics of soils and provide a scientific basis for soil erosion control in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, contents of aggregates and total soil organic carbon (SOC), as well as soil active organic carbon fractions including particulate organic carbon (POC), readily oxidized organic carbon (ROC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in the 0-30 cm soil layer under seven different biological regulated measures were studied by the field investigation combined with the laboratory analysis. Results showed that the content of the SOC and active organic carbon fractions decreased with the increasing soil depth; the content of the SOC and active organic carbon fractions in 0-10 cm was significantly higher than that in 20-30 cm. The stability of soil aggregates were also significantly influenced by biological regulated measures, the content of > 0.25 mm water-stable aggregates in seven types of biological regulated measures was in the order of Koelreuteria bipinnata + Cassia suffruticasa > hedgerows > closed forest > natural restoration > economic forest > traditional planting > control plot, moreover, the content of 0.25 mm water-stable aggregates correlated positively with the content of SOC. Soils under different biological regulated measures all demonstrated fractal features, and soil under the measure of Koelreuteria bipinnata + Cassia suffruticasa was found to have the lowest value of fractal dimension and soil erodiable K, indicating a relatively strong structure stability and erosion-resistant capacity. Negative correlation was observed when compared the content of active organic carbon fractions with the soil erodiable K. It can be concluded that properties of soil can be managed through biological regulated measures; thence had an influence on the soil erosion-resistant capacity. PMID:24028016

  17. Anti-Microbial Dendrimers against Multidrug-Resistant P. aeruginosa Enhance the Angiogenic Effect of Biological Burn-wound Bandages

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Sayed, Philippe; Kaeppli, Ariane; Siriwardena, Thissa; Darbre, Tamis; Perron, Karl; Jafari, Paris; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Pioletti, Dominique P.; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has increased progressively and impedes further regression in mortality in burn patients. Such wound infections serve as bacterial reservoir for nosocomial infections and are associated with significant morbidity and costs. Anti-microbial polycationic dendrimers G3KL and G3RL, able to kill multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa, have been previously developed. The combination of these dendrimers with a class of biological bandages made of progenitor skin cells, which secrete growth factors, could positively impact wound-healing processes. However, polycations are known to be used as anti-angiogenic agents for tumor suppression. Since, neovascularization is pivotal in the healing of deep burn-wounds, the use of anti-microbial dendrimers may thus hinder the healing processes. Surprisingly, we have seen in this study that G3KL and G3RL dendrimers can have angiogenic effects. Moreover, we have shown that a dendrimer concentration ranging between 50 and 100 μg/mL in combination with the biological bandages can suppress bacterial growth without altering cell viability up to 5 days. These results show that antimicrobial dendrimers can be used in combination with biological bandages and could potentially improve the healing process with an enhanced angiogenesis. PMID:26912450

  18. Link between insulin resistance and hypertension: What is the evidence from evolutionary biology?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Aimei; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hypertension are considered as prototypical "diseases of civilization" that are manifested in the modern environment as plentiful food and sedentary life. The human propensity for insulin resistance and hypertension is a product, at least in part, of our evolutionary history. Adaptation to ancient lifestyle characterized by a low sodium, low-calorie food supply and physical stress to injury response has driven our evolution to shape and preserve a thrifty genotype, which is favorite with energy-saving and sodium conservation. As our civilization evolved, a sedentary lifestyle and sodium- and energy-rich diet, the thrifty genotype is no longer advantageous, and may be maladaptive to disease phenotype, such as hypertension, obesity and insulin resistance syndrome. This article reviews human evolution and the impact of the modern environment on hypertension and insulin resistance. PMID:24485020

  19. An update on molecular biology and drug resistance mechanisms of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Pelin; Kiraz, Yağmur; Gündüz, Ufuk; Baran, Yusuf

    2015-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a neoplasm of plasma cells, is the second most common hematological malignancy. Incidance rates increase after age 40. MM is most commonly seen in men and African-American population. There are several factors to this, such as obesity, environmental factors, family history, genetic factors and monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) that have been implicated as potentially etiologic. Development of MM involves a series of complex molecular events, including chromosomal abnormalities, oncogene activation and growth factor dysregulation. Chemotherapy is the most commonly used treatment strategy in MM. However, MM is a difficult disease to treat because of its marked resistance to chemotherapy. MM has been shown to be commonly multidrug resistance (MDR)-negative at diagnosis and associated with a high incidence of MDR expression at relapse. This review deals with the molecular aspects of MM, drug resistance mechanisms during treatment and also possible new applications for overcoming drug resistance. PMID:26235594

  20. Link between insulin resistance and hypertension: What is the evidence from evolutionary biology?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hypertension are considered as prototypical “diseases of civilization” that are manifested in the modern environment as plentiful food and sedentary life. The human propensity for insulin resistance and hypertension is a product, at least in part, of our evolutionary history. Adaptation to ancient lifestyle characterized by a low sodium, low-calorie food supply and physical stress to injury response has driven our evolution to shape and preserve a thrifty genotype, which is favorite with energy-saving and sodium conservation. As our civilization evolved, a sedentary lifestyle and sodium- and energy-rich diet, the thrifty genotype is no longer advantageous, and may be maladaptive to disease phenotype, such as hypertension, obesity and insulin resistance syndrome. This article reviews human evolution and the impact of the modern environment on hypertension and insulin resistance. PMID:24485020

  1. Impact of Plant Resistance on Southwestern Corn Borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Biology and Plant Damage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southwestern corn borer, Diatraea grandiosella Dyar (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is a major insect pest of corn in the southern United States. Germplasm lines with resistance to southwestern corn borer have been developed and released by USDA-ARS. Two single-cross hybrids produced by crossing germplasm...

  2. Synergistic interactions between entomopathogenic nematodes and Bt crops: integrating biological control and resistance management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased use of crops genetically modified to produce insecticidal toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) presents the challenge of designing agricultural systems to manage pests and the evolution of resistance to Bt. We tested whether entomopathogenic nematodes might act synergisti...

  3. Microbial and Antibiotic REsistant Constituents Associated with Biological Aerosols Within A Commercial Poultry House

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry are known to harbor antibiotic resistant and pathogenic bacteria, and as such poultry litter and poultry house air can be contaminated with these bacteria. Health researchers have typically focused on the presence of aerosolized endotoxin, NH3, and particulate matter within poultry houses; ...

  4. Synthetic and Biological Studies of Sesquiterpene Polygodial: Activity of 9-Epipolygodial against Drug-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Ramesh; De Carvalho, Annelise; Medellin, Derek C; Middleton, Kelsey N; Hague, Frédéric; Volmar, Marie N M; Frolova, Liliya V; Rossato, Mateus F; De La Chapa, Jorge J; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Pillai, Akshita; Mathieu, Véronique; Rogelj, Snezna; Gonzales, Cara B; Calixto, João B; Evidente, Antonio; Gautier, Mathieu; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Glass, Rainer; Burth, Patricia; Pelly, Stephen C; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Polygodial, a terpenoid dialdehyde isolated from Polygonum hydropiper L., is a known agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). In this investigation a series of polygodial analogues were prepared and investigated for TRPV1-agonist and anticancer activities. These experiments led to the identification of 9-epipolygodial, which has antiproliferative potency significantly exceeding that of polygodial. 9-Epipolygodial was found to maintain potency against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells as well as those displaying the multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype. In addition, the chemical feasibility for the previously proposed mechanism of action of polygodial, involving the formation of a Paal-Knorr pyrrole with a lysine residue on the target protein, was demonstrated by the synthesis of a stable polygodial pyrrole derivative. These studies reveal rich chemical and biological properties associated with polygodial and its direct derivatives. These compounds should inspire further work in this area aimed at the development of new pharmacological agents, or the exploration of novel mechanisms of covalent modification of biological molecules with natural products. PMID:26434977

  5. Tetracycline Antibiotics: Mode of Action, Applications, Molecular Biology, and Epidemiology of Bacterial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Ian; Roberts, Marilyn

    2001-01-01

    Tetracyclines were discovered in the 1940s and exhibited activity against a wide range of microorganisms including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, chlamydiae, mycoplasmas, rickettsiae, and protozoan parasites. They are inexpensive antibiotics, which have been used extensively in the prophlylaxis and therapy of human and animal infections and also at subtherapeutic levels in animal feed as growth promoters. The first tetracycline-resistant bacterium, Shigella dysenteriae, was isolated in 1953. Tetracycline resistance now occurs in an increasing number of pathogenic, opportunistic, and commensal bacteria. The presence of tetracycline-resistant pathogens limits the use of these agents in treatment of disease. Tetracycline resistance is often due to the acquisition of new genes, which code for energy-dependent efflux of tetracyclines or for a protein that protects bacterial ribosomes from the action of tetracyclines. Many of these genes are associated with mobile plasmids or transposons and can be distinguished from each other using molecular methods including DNA-DNA hybridization with oligonucleotide probes and DNA sequencing. A limited number of bacteria acquire resistance by mutations, which alter the permeability of the outer membrane porins and/or lipopolysaccharides in the outer membrane, change the regulation of innate efflux systems, or alter the 16S rRNA. New tetracycline derivatives are being examined, although their role in treatment is not clear. Changing the use of tetracyclines in human and animal health as well as in food production is needed if we are to continue to use this class of broad-spectrum antimicrobials through the present century. PMID:11381101

  6. Biological responses to glyphosate drift from aerial application in non-glyphosate-resistant corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate drift from aerial application onto susceptible crops is inevitable, yet the biological responses to glyphosate drift in crops are not well characterized. The objectives of this research were to determine the effects of glyphosate drift from a single aerial application (18.3 m swath, 866 ...

  7. Hybridization of an invasive shrub affects tolerance and resistance to defoliation by a biological control agent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evolution has contributed to the successful invasion of exotic plant species in their introduced ranges, but how evolution affects particular control strategies is still under evaluation. For instance, classical biological control, a common strategy involving the importation of highly specific inse...

  8. Nanotextured stainless steel for improved corrosion resistance and biological response in coronary stenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Chandini C.; Prabhath, Anupama; Cherian, Aleena Mary; Vadukumpully, Sajini; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Chennazhi, Krishnaprasad; Menon, Deepthy

    2014-12-01

    Nanosurface engineering of metallic substrates for improved cellular response is a persistent theme in biomaterials research. The need to improve the long term prognosis of commercially available stents has led us to adopt a `polymer-free' approach which is cost effective and industrially scalable. In this study, 316L stainless steel substrates were surface modified by hydrothermal treatment in alkaline pH, with and without the addition of a chromium precursor, to generate a well adherent uniform nanotopography. The modified surfaces showed improved hemocompatibility and augmented endothelialization, while hindering the proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Moreover, they also exhibited superior material properties like corrosion resistance, surface integrity and reduced metal ion leaching. The combination of improved corrosion resistance and selective vascular cell viability provided by nanomodification can be successfully utilized to offer a cell-friendly solution to the inherent limitations pertinent to bare metallic stents.

  9. Environmental and biological factors influencing the UV-C resistance of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Gayán, E; Serrano, M J; Pagán, R; Álvarez, I; Condón, S

    2015-04-01

    In this investigation, the effect of microbiological factors (strain, growth phase, exposition to sublethal stresses, and photorepair ability), treatment medium characteristics (pH, water activity, and absorption coefficient), and processing parameters (dose and temperature) on the UV resistance of Listeria monocytogenes was studied. The dose to inactivate 99.99% of the initial population of the five strains tested ranged from 21.84 J/mL (STCC 5672) to 14.66 J/mL (STCC 4031). The UV inactivation of the most resistant strain did not change in different growth phases and after exposure to sublethal heat, acid, basic, and oxidative shocks. The pH and water activity of the treatment medium did not affect the UV resistance of L. monocytogenes, whereas the inactivation rate decreased exponentially with the absorption coefficient. The lethal effect of UV radiation increased synergistically with temperature between 50 and 60 °C (UV-H treatment). A UV-H treatment of 27.10 J/mL at 55 °C reached 2.99 and 3.69 Log10 inactivation cycles of L. monocytogenes in orange juice and vegetable broth, and more than 5 Log10 cycles in apple juice and chicken broth. This synergistic effect opens the possibility to design UV combined processes for the pasteurization of liquid foods with high absorptivity. PMID:25475293

  10. Characterization of the corrosion resistance of several alloys to dilute biologically active solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria/fungi detected in hygiene waters increased the corrosion rate in aluminum alloy. Biologically active media enhanced the formation of pits on metal coupons. Direct observation of gas evolved at the corrosion sample, coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of the corrosion products indicates that the corrosion rate is increased because the presence of bacteria favor the reduction of hydrogen as the cathodic reaction through the reaction of oxygen and water. SEM verifies the presence of microbes in a biofilm on the surface of corroding samples. The bacterial consortia are associated with anodic sites on the metal surface, aggressive pitting occurs adjacent to biofilms. Many pits are associated with triple points and inclusions in the aluminum alloy microstructure. Similar bacterial colonization was found on the stainless steel samples. Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carbonyl groups in pitted areas of samples exposed to biologically active waters.

  11. Synergistic and Additive Effect of Oregano Essential Oil and Biological Silver Nanoparticles against Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strains.

    PubMed

    Scandorieiro, Sara; de Camargo, Larissa C; Lancheros, Cesar A C; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F; Nakamura, Celso V; de Oliveira, Admilton G; Andrade, Célia G T J; Duran, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K T

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a clinical and public health problem, making therapeutic decisions more challenging. Plant compounds and nanodrugs have been proposed as potential antimicrobial alternatives. Studies have shown that oregano (Origanum vulgare) essential oil (OEO) and silver nanoparticles have potent antibacterial activity, also against multidrug-resistant strains; however, the strong organoleptic characteristics of OEO and the development of resistance to these metal nanoparticles can limit their use. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of a two-drug combination of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (bio-AgNP), produced by Fusarium oxysporum, and OEO against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains. OEO and bio-AgNP showed bactericidal effects against all 17 strains tested, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 0.298 to 1.193 mg/mL and 62.5 to 250 μM, respectively. Time-kill curves indicated that OEO acted rapidly (within 10 min), while the metallic nanoparticles took 4 h to kill Gram-negative bacteria and 24 h to kill Gram-positive bacteria. The combination of the two compounds resulted in a synergistic or additive effect, reducing their MIC values and reducing the time of action compared to bio-AgNP used alone, i.e., 20 min for Gram-negative bacteria and 7 h for Gram-positive bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed similar morphological alterations in Staphylococcus aureus (non-methicillin-resistant S. aureus, non-MRSA) cells exposed to three different treatments (OEO, bio-AgNP and combination of the two), which appeared cell surface blebbing. Individual and combined treatments showed reduction in cell density and decrease in exopolysaccharide matrix compared to untreated bacterial cells. It indicated that this composition have an antimicrobial activity against S. aureus by disrupting cells. Both compounds showed very low

  12. Synergistic and Additive Effect of Oregano Essential Oil and Biological Silver Nanoparticles against Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Scandorieiro, Sara; de Camargo, Larissa C.; Lancheros, Cesar A. C.; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F.; Nakamura, Celso V.; de Oliveira, Admilton G.; Andrade, Célia G. T. J.; Duran, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K. T.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a clinical and public health problem, making therapeutic decisions more challenging. Plant compounds and nanodrugs have been proposed as potential antimicrobial alternatives. Studies have shown that oregano (Origanum vulgare) essential oil (OEO) and silver nanoparticles have potent antibacterial activity, also against multidrug-resistant strains; however, the strong organoleptic characteristics of OEO and the development of resistance to these metal nanoparticles can limit their use. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of a two-drug combination of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (bio-AgNP), produced by Fusarium oxysporum, and OEO against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains. OEO and bio-AgNP showed bactericidal effects against all 17 strains tested, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 0.298 to 1.193 mg/mL and 62.5 to 250 μM, respectively. Time-kill curves indicated that OEO acted rapidly (within 10 min), while the metallic nanoparticles took 4 h to kill Gram-negative bacteria and 24 h to kill Gram-positive bacteria. The combination of the two compounds resulted in a synergistic or additive effect, reducing their MIC values and reducing the time of action compared to bio-AgNP used alone, i.e., 20 min for Gram-negative bacteria and 7 h for Gram-positive bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed similar morphological alterations in Staphylococcus aureus (non-methicillin-resistant S. aureus, non-MRSA) cells exposed to three different treatments (OEO, bio-AgNP and combination of the two), which appeared cell surface blebbing. Individual and combined treatments showed reduction in cell density and decrease in exopolysaccharide matrix compared to untreated bacterial cells. It indicated that this composition have an antimicrobial activity against S. aureus by disrupting cells. Both compounds showed very low

  13. Partial synthesis and biological evaluation of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids derivatives: potential modulators of multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Sun, Hua; Jian, Xi-Xian; Chen, Qiao-Hong; Chen, Dong-Lin; Liu, Geng-Tao; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2012-01-01

    A series of new bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids was partially synthesized from tetrandrine and fangchinoline and evaluated for their ability to reverse P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. All the test compounds increased the intracellular accumulation rate of rhodamine 123 in MDR cells (Bel7402 and HCT8), and most exhibited more potent MDR-reversing activity relative to the reference compound verapamil. Compounds 8, 10, 13, and 14 enhanced intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin in Bel7402 and HCT8 cells. PMID:22587798

  14. Study of the influence of sporulation conditions on heat resistance of Geobacillus stearothermophilus used in the development of biological indicators for steam sterilization.

    PubMed

    Guizelini, Belquis P; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Sella, Sandra Regina B R; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    Biological indicators are important tools in infection control via sterilization process monitoring. The use of a standardized spore crop with a well-defined heat resistance will guarantee the quality of a biological indicator. Ambient factors during sporulation can affect spore characteristics and properties, including heat resistance. The aim of this study is to evaluate the main sporulation factors responsible for heat resistance in Geobacillus stearothermophilus, a useful biological indicator for steam sterilization. A sequence of a three-step optimization of variables (initial pH, nutrient concentration, tryptone, peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, manganese sulfate, magnesium sulfate, calcium chloride and potassium phosphate) was carried out to screen those that have a significant influence on heat resistance of produced spores. The variable exerting greatest influence on G. stearothermophilus heat resistance during sporulation was found to be the initial pH. Lower nutrient concentration and alkaline pH around 8.5 tended to enhance decimal reduction time at 121 °C (D(121°C)). A central composite design enabled a fourfold enhancement in heat resistance, and the model obtained accurately describes positive pH and negative manganese sulfate concentration influence on spore heat resistance. PMID:22872104

  15. Effect of substrate characteristics on microbial community structure, function, resistance, and resilience; application to coupled photocatalytic-biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Marsolek, Michael D; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-03-01

    Advanced oxidation (AO) coupled with biodegradation is an emerging treatment technology for wastewaters containing biologically recalcitrant and inhibitory organics, including those containing chlorinated aromatic compounds. The composition of the AO effluent organics can vary significantly with reaction conditions, and this composition can affect the performance of subsequent biodegradation. Three synthetic effluents were used to mimic varying degrees of AO of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol: 4-chlorocatechol to mimic light transformation, 2-chloromuconic acid to mimic moderate transformation, and acetate to mimic extensive transformation. The substrates were fed to identical chemostats and analyzed at steady state for removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biomass concentration, and bacterial diversity. The chemostat fed acetate performed best at steady state. The 2-chloromuconic acid chemostat was next in terms of steady-state performance, and the 4-chlorocatechol reactor performed worst, correlating with degree of AO transformation. A spike of 100 μM 2,4,5-trichlorophenol was then applied to each chemostat. The chemostat fed 4-chlorocatechol exhibited the best resistance to the perturbation in terms of maintaining consistent community structure and biomass concentration, whereas the performance of the acetate-fed chemostat was severely impaired in these categories, although it quickly regained capacity to remove organics near pre-perturbation levels demonstrating good resilience. The opposing trends for steady-state versus perturbed performance highlight tradeoffs inherent in coupled chemical-biological systems. PMID:26722990

  16. Biological indicators for low temperature steam formaldehyde sterilization: effect of defined media on sporulation, germination index and moist heat resistance at 110 degrees C of Bacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Hoxey, E V; Soper, C J; Davies, D J

    1985-02-01

    Choice of a biological indicator depends upon selecting a strain with the optimum balance of desirable properties. Screening 20 strains of Bacillus spp. for sporulation on three defined media has shown the wide variation that occurs in requirements for sporulation and properties of the resultant spores. Comparison of germination index and moist heat resistance of resultant spores suggest that a combination of high germination index, high heat resistance and linear inactivation may not be possible. PMID:3980302

  17. Applying electrical resistivity tomography and biological methods to assess the surface-groundwater interaction in two Mediterranean rivers (central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iepure, Sanda; Gómez Ortiz, David; Lillo Ramos, Javier; Rasines Ladero, Ruben; Persoiu, Aurel

    2014-05-01

    Delineation of the extent of hyporheic zone (HZ) in river ecosystems is problematic due to the scarcity of spatial information about the structure of riverbed sediments and the magnitude and extent of stream interactions with the parafluvial and riparian zones. The several existing methods vary in both quality and quantity of information and imply the use of hydrogeological and biological methods. In the last decades, various non-invasive geophysical techniques were developed to characterise the streambed architecture and also to provide detailed spatial information on its vertical and horizontal continuity. All classes of techniques have their strengths and limitations; therefore, in order to assess their potential in delineating the lateral and vertical spatial extents of alluvial sediments, we have combined the near-surface images obtained by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) with biological assessment of invertebrates in two Mediterranean lowland rivers from central Spain. We performed in situ imaging of the thickness and continuity of alluvial sediments under the riverbed and parafluvial zone during base-flow conditions (summer 2013 and winter 2014) at two different sites with distinct lithology along the Tajuña and Henares Rivers. ERT was performed by installing the electrodes (1 m spacing) on a 47 m long transect normal to the river channel using a Wener-Schlumberger array, across both the riparian zones and the river bed. Invertebrates were collected in the streambed from a depth of 20-40 cm, using the Bou-Rouch method, and from boreholes drilled to a depth of 1.5 m in the riparian zone. The ERT images obtained at site 1 (medium and coarse sand dominated lithology) shows resistivity values ranging from ~20 to 80 ohm•m for the in-stream sediments, indicating a permeable zone up to ~ 0.5 m thick and extending laterally for ca. 5 m from the channel. These sediments contribute to active surface/hyporheic water exchanges and to low water retention in

  18. Do Offspring of Insects Feeding on Defoliation-Resistant Trees Have Better Biological Performance When Exposed to Nutritionally-Imbalanced Food?

    PubMed

    Quezada-Garcia, Roberto; Fuentealba, Alvaro; Nguyen, Ngoc; Bauce, Éric

    2015-01-01

    White spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) trees that are resistant or susceptible to spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.)) attack were identified in a southern Quebec plantation. Due to high mortality-induced selective pressures imposed by resistant trees on spruce budworm larvae, insects that survive on resistant trees exhibited greater biological performance than those on susceptible trees. We tested the hypothesis that this better biological performance is maintained across generations when progeny were subjected to nutritional stress. We collected pupae from resistant and susceptible trees (phenotype). Adults were reared under controlled laboratory conditions. Progeny were subsequently reared on two types of artificial diet (high vs. low quality). Low quality diet simulated food quality deterioration during outbreak conditions. Results confirmed that surviving insects collected from resistant trees have better performance than those from susceptible trees. Offspring performance (pupal mass, developmental time) was affected only by diet quality. These results suggest that adaptive advantages that would be acquired from parents fed on resistant trees are lost when progeny are exposed to nutritionally-imbalanced food, but the effects persist when larvae are fed a balanced diet. Offspring mortality, fecundity and fertility were positively influenced by parental origin (tree phenotype). PMID:26463069

  19. Study of the surface wear resistance and biological properties of the Ti-Zr-Nb-Sn alloy for dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Chang-Yi; Deng, Jia-Yin; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Lian-Yun

    2010-10-01

    A new titanium alloy (Ti-12.5Zr-3Nb-2.5Sn) was developed to meet the needs of clinical requirements for medical titanium alloys and improve the properties of existing titanium alloys. The as-prepared alloy was solution treated at 500 °C for 3 h in vacuum followed by water quenching. Tensile, wear and hardness tests were carried out to examine the mechanical properties of the Ti-Zr-Nb-Sn alloy. Oral mucous membrane irritation test was performed to evaluate the surface biological properties of the Ti-Zr-Nb-Sn alloy. The results suggested that the surface hardness and wear-resistant properties of the Ti-12.5Zr-3Nb-2.5Sn alloy were superior to commercially pure Ti. The oral mucous irritation test showed that all samples had no mucous membrane irritation. It indicates that Ti-12.5Zr-3Nb-2.5Sn has large potential to be used as dental restoration material. PMID:20876964

  20. Biological Characteristics of Experimental Genotype Mixtures of Cydia Pomonella Granulovirus (CpGV): Ability to Control Susceptible and Resistant Pest Populations

    PubMed Central

    Graillot, Benoit; Bayle, Sandrine; Blachere-Lopez, Christine; Besse, Samantha; Siegwart, Myriam; Lopez-Ferber, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The detection of resistance in codling moth (Cydia pomonella) populations against the Mexican isolate of its granulovirus (CpGV-M), raised questions on the sustainability of the use of this biological insecticide. In resistant host cells, CpGV-M is not able to complete its replication cycle because replication is blocked at an early step. Virus isolates able to overcome this resistance have been characterized—among them, the CpGV-R5 isolate. In mixed infections on resistant insects, both CpGV-M and CpGV-R5 viruses replicate, while CpGV-M alone does not induce mortality. Genetically heterogeneous virus populations, containing 50% of each CpGV-M and CpGV-R5 appear to control resistant host populations as well as CpGV-R5 alone at the same final concentration, even if the concentration of CpGV-R5 is only half in the former. The use of mixed genotype virus preparations instead of genotypically homogeneous populations may constitute a better approach than traditional methods for the development of baculovirus-based biological insecticides. PMID:27213431

  1. Biological Characteristics of Experimental Genotype Mixtures of Cydia Pomonella Granulovirus (CpGV): Ability to Control Susceptible and Resistant Pest Populations.

    PubMed

    Graillot, Benoit; Bayle, Sandrine; Blachere-Lopez, Christine; Besse, Samantha; Siegwart, Myriam; Lopez-Ferber, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The detection of resistance in codling moth (Cydia pomonella) populations against the Mexican isolate of its granulovirus (CpGV-M), raised questions on the sustainability of the use of this biological insecticide. In resistant host cells, CpGV-M is not able to complete its replication cycle because replication is blocked at an early step. Virus isolates able to overcome this resistance have been characterized-among them, the CpGV-R5 isolate. In mixed infections on resistant insects, both CpGV-M and CpGV-R5 viruses replicate, while CpGV-M alone does not induce mortality. Genetically heterogeneous virus populations, containing 50% of each CpGV-M and CpGV-R5 appear to control resistant host populations as well as CpGV-R5 alone at the same final concentration, even if the concentration of CpGV-R5 is only half in the former. The use of mixed genotype virus preparations instead of genotypically homogeneous populations may constitute a better approach than traditional methods for the development of baculovirus-based biological insecticides. PMID:27213431

  2. Wildfire-resistant biological soil crusts and fire-induced loss of soil stability in Palouse prairies, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Belnap, J.; Rosentreter, R.; Graham, B.

    2004-01-01

    Frequent low-intensity fires are a natural component of the ecology of the Palouse prairies of northwestern North America. To study the effects of fire upon biological soil crusts (BSCs) occurring in these grasslands, we sampled three burned (in 2000) sites and three unburned sites in the Hell's Canyon area (OR, USA) ???1 year post-fire. We measured vascular plant and BSC cover, soil microbe pigmentation, texture and chemistry, and soil surface physical properties (stability and rugosity). Festuca idahoensis was two times more abundant in unburned plots (P=0.0006), and vascular plant and litter cover were generally higher in unburned plots. At the community scale, there was no difference in the lichen and moss species composition, suggesting much less drastic effects of fire on BSCs than reported in other systems. Soil surface stability (measured using slake value) was significantly lower in burned sites than unburned sites (median value=5 versus 6, P=0.008), a result which is likely due to the greater density of lichens and mosses encountered in the unburned plots. Soil microbe pigmentation was lower in burned plots (P=0.03), suggesting that the biomass of photosynthetic microbes had decreased; however, the presence of intra- and extracellular pigments in burned soils indicates that microorganisms were not eradicated. Pigments most strongly associated with cyanobacteria were more abundant in unburned sites, suggesting that cyanobacteria may have been more strongly impacted by the fire than other BSC components. Composition of nutrients and surface rugosity did not differ significantly between treatments. We hypothesize that Palouse prairie soil crusts are relatively resistant to wildfire because of low fire intensity and their occupation of space away from the vascular plant fuel load.

  3. A functional biological network centered on XRCC3: a new possible marker of chemoradiotherapy resistance in rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Marco; Zangrando, Andrea; Pastrello, Chiara; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Romano, Gabriele; Giovannoni, Roberto; Giordan, Marco; Maretto, Isacco; Bedin, Chiara; Zanon, Carlo; Digito, Maura; Esposito, Giovanni; Mescoli, Claudia; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Rizzolio, Flavio; Jurisica, Igor; Giordano, Antonio; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Nitti, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is widely used to improve local control of disease, sphincter preservation and to improve survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients enrolled in the present study underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy, followed by surgical excision. Response to chemoradiotherapy was evaluated according to Mandard's Tumor Regression Grade (TRG). TRG 3, 4 and 5 were considered as partial or no response while TRG 1 and 2 as complete response. From pretherapeutic biopsies of 84 locally advanced rectal carcinomas available for the analysis, only 42 of them showed 70% cancer cellularity at least. By determining gene expression profiles, responders and non-responders showed significantly different expression levels for 19 genes (P < 0.001). We fitted a logistic model selected with a stepwise procedure optimizing the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and then validated by means of leave one out cross validation (LOOCV, accuracy = 95%). Four genes were retained in the achieved model: ZNF160, XRCC3, HFM1 and ASXL2. Real time PCR confirmed that XRCC3 is overexpressed in responders group and HFM1 and ASXL2 showed a positive trend. In vitro test on colon cancer resistant/susceptible to chemoradioterapy cells, finally prove that XRCC3 deregulation is extensively involved in the chemoresistance mechanisms. Protein-protein interactions (PPI) analysis involving the predictive classifier revealed a network of 45 interacting nodes (proteins) with TRAF6 gene playing a keystone role in the network. The present study confirmed the possibility that gene expression profiling combined with integrative computational biology is useful to predict complete responses to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer. PMID:26023803

  4. Br-rich tips of calcified crab claws are less hard but more fracture resistant: a comparison of mineralized and heavy-element biological materials.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Robert M S; Niedbala, Jack C; Nesson, Michael H; Tao, Ye; Shokes, Jacob E; Scott, Robert A; Latimer, Matthew J

    2009-06-01

    We find that the spoon-like tips of the chelipeds (large claws) of the crab Pachygrapsus crassipes differ from the rest of the claw in that they are not calcified, but instead contain about 1% bromine--thus they represent a new example of a class of structural biological materials that contain heavy elements such as Zn, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Br bound in an organic matrix. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data suggest that the bromine is bound to phenyl rings, possibly in tyrosine. We measure a broad array of mechanical properties of a heavy-element biological material for the first time (abrasion resistance, coefficient of kinetic friction, energy of fracture, hardness, modulus of elasticity and dynamic mechanical properties), and we make a direct comparison with a mineralized tissue. Our results suggest that the greatest advantage of bromine-rich cuticle over calcified cuticle is resistance to fracture (the energy of fracture is about an order of magnitude greater than for calcified cuticle). The greatest advantage relative to unenriched cuticle, represented by ant mandible cuticle, is a factor of about 1.5 greater hardness and modulus of elasticity.The spoon-like tips gain additional fracture resistance from the orientation of the constituent laminae and from the viscoelasticity of the material. We suggest that fracture resistance is of greater importance in smaller organisms, and we speculate that one function of heavy elements in structural biological materials is to reduce molecular resonant frequencies and thereby increase absorption of energy from impacts. PMID:19422071

  5. Biological trait analysis and stability of lambda-cyhalothrin resistance in the house fly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae).

    PubMed

    Abbas, Naeem; Shah, Rizwan Mustafa; Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Iqbal, Naeem; Razaq, Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    House flies, Musca domestica L., (Diptera: Muscidae), are pests of poultry and have the ability to develop resistance to insecticides. To design a strategy for resistance management, life history traits based on laboratory observations were established for lambda-cyhalothrin-resistant, susceptible and reciprocal crosses of M. domestica strains. Bioassay results showed that the lambda-cyhalothrin-selected strain developed a resistance ratio of 98.34 compared to its susceptible strain. The lambda-cyhalothrin-selected strain had a relative fitness of 0.26 and lower fecundity, hatchability, lower number of next generation larvae, and net reproductive rate compared with its susceptible strain. Mean population growth rates, such as intrinsic rate of population increase, and biotic potential were lower for the lambda-cyhalothrin-selected strain compared to its susceptible strain. Resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin, indoxacarb, and abamectin was unstable while resistance to bifenthrin and methomyl was stable in the lambda-cyhalothrin-selected strain of M. domestica. Development of resistance can cost considerable fitness for the lambda-cyhalothrin-selected strain. The present study provided useful information for making potential management strategies to delay resistance development in M. domestica. PMID:26874957

  6. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of thiosemicarbazones, hydrazinobenzothiazoles and arylhydrazones as anticancer agents with a potential to overcome multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Pape, Veronika F S; Tóth, Szilárd; Füredi, András; Szebényi, Kornélia; Lovrics, Anna; Szabó, Pál; Wiese, Michael; Szakács, Gergely

    2016-07-19

    There is a constant need for new therapies against multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer. An attractive strategy is to develop chelators that display significant antitumor activity in multidrug resistant cancer cell lines overexpressing the drug efflux pump P-glycoprotein. In this study we used a panel of sensitive and MDR cancer cell lines to evaluate the toxicity of picolinylidene and salicylidene thiosemicarbazone, arylhydrazone, as well as picolinylidene and salicylidene hydrazino-benzothiazole derivatives. Our results confirm the collateral sensitivity of MDR cells to isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones, and identify several chelator scaffolds with a potential to overcome multidrug resistance. Analysis of structure-activity-relationships within the investigated compound library indicates that NNS and NNN donor chelators show superior toxicity as compared to ONS derivatives regardless of the resistance status of the cells. PMID:27161177

  7. Effects of siRNA-mediated silencing of myeloid cell leukelia-1 on the biological behaviors and drug resistance of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo-Pei; Liu, Jin-Lu; Chen, Jun-Qiang; Wang, Zhen; Mao, Yuan-Tian; Chen, Ye-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was to investigate the effects of siRNA mediated silencing of myeloid cell leukelia-1 (Mcl-1) on the biological behaviors and drug resistance of human drug-resistant gastric cancer (GC) cell lines, and to explore the potential mechanisms. Methods: siRNA targeting Mcl-1 mRNA were designed and independently transfected into SGC-7901/VCR and SGC-7901/DDP. Cell proliferation and drug sensitivity were examined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. Cell Invasion and migration abilities were detected by transwell chamber assays. The expressions of drug-resistance-related genes and apoptosis-related proteins were detected by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot assay, respectively. Results: siRNA effectively inhibited the Mcl-1 expression, lowered the proliferation rate (P<0.05), raised the apoptosis rate (P<0.05), and arrested cells in S-phase (P<0.05). After inhibiting Mcl-1, the cell migration and invasion decreased (P<0.05), the resistance to VCR, DDP and 5-Fu was reversed to different extents (P<0.05), TS mRNA expression increased significantly (P<0.05), MDR1 remained unchanged (P>0.05), but DPD and TOP2A decreased significantly (P<0.05). Following Mcl-1 silencing, Bcl-2 was over-expressed in VCR-siRNA group, but the expressions of Fas and survivin reduced markedly (P<0.05); Bcl-2 and Fas expressions decreased significantly in DDP-siRNA group (P<0.05), but survivin expression remained unchanged. Conclusion: Mcl-1 is implicated in the proliferation, invasion, apoptosis and drug resistance of GC cells, and may be a promising target for the therapy of GC. PMID:26807186

  8. Biological indicators for low temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilization: the effect of defined media on sporulation, growth index and formaldehyde resistance of spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus strains.

    PubMed

    Wright, A M; Hoxey, E V; Soper, C J; Davies, D J

    1995-10-01

    Preliminary screening was carried out on spores of 29 strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus to determine their potential as biological indicator organisms for low temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilization. Each strain was sporulated on four chemically defined media. Fourteen strains produced satisfactory sporulation on one or more of the media but there was considerable variation in the extent of sporulation. The growth index of the spores, which was dependent on both the strain of organism and the sporulation medium, ranged from 1% to 90%. The spores were appraised on the basis of their resistance to inactivation by 0.5% w/v formaldehyde in aqueous solution at 70 degrees C. The survivor curves obtained could be characterized into five types on the basis of the shape of the curve. Only five strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus produced spores with the characteristics of high resistance, linear semi-logarithmic survivor curve and high growth index that would be required of a potential biological indicator organism. PMID:7592136

  9. Using biological and physico-chemical test methods to assess the role of concrete mixture design in resistance to microbially induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Mitchell Wayne

    Concrete is the most widely used material for construction of wastewater collection, storage, and treatment infrastructure. The chemical and physical characteristics of hydrated portland cement make it susceptible to degradation under highly acidic conditions. As a result, some concrete wastewater infrastructure may be susceptible to a multi-stage degradation process known as microbially induced corrosion, or MIC. MIC begins with the production of aqueous hydrogen sulfide (H2S(aq)) by anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria present below the waterline. H2S(aq) partitions to the gas phase where it is oxidized to sulfuric acid by the aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus that resides on concrete surfaces above the waterline. Sulfuric acid then attacks the cement paste portion of the concrete matrix through decalcification of calcium hydroxide and calcium silica hydrate coupled with the formation of expansive corrosion products. The attack proceeds inward resulting in reduced service life and potential failure of the concrete structure. There are several challenges associated with assessing a concrete's susceptibility to MIC. First, no standard laboratory tests exist to assess concrete resistance to MIC. Straightforward reproduction of MIC in the laboratory is complicated by the use of microorganisms and hydrogen sulfide gas. Physico-chemical tests simulating MIC by immersing concrete specimens in sulfuric acid offer a convenient alternative, but do not accurately capture the damage mechanisms associated with biological corrosion. Comparison of results between research studies is difficult due to discrepancies that can arise in experimental methods even if current ASTM standards are followed. This thesis presents two experimental methods to evaluate concrete resistance to MIC: one biological and one physico-chemical. Efforts are made to address the critical aspects of each testing method currently absent in the literature. The first method presented is a new test

  10. Comparison of Chemical Sensitivity of Fresh and Long-Stored Heat Resistant Neosartorya fischeri Environmental Isolates Using BIOLOG Phenotype MicroArray System.

    PubMed

    Panek, Jacek; Frąc, Magdalena; Bilińska-Wielgus, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Spoilage of heat processed food and beverage by heat resistant fungi (HRF) is a major problem for food industry in many countries. Neosartorya fischeri is the leading source of spoilage in thermally processed products. Its resistance to heat processing and toxigenicity makes studies about Neosartorya fischeri metabolism and chemical sensitivity essential. In this study chemical sensitivity of two environmental Neosartorya fischeri isolates were compared. One was isolated from canned apples in 1923 (DSM3700), the other from thermal processed strawberry product in 2012 (KC179765), used as long-stored and fresh isolate, respectively. The study was conducted using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray platforms of chemical sensitivity panel and traditional hole-plate method. The study allowed for obtaining data about Neosartorya fischeri growth inhibitors. The fresh isolate appeared to be much more resistant to chemical agents than the long-stored isolate. Based on phenotype microarray assay nitrogen compounds, toxic cations and membrane function compounds were the most effective in growth inhibition of N. fischeri isolates. According to the study zaragozic acid A, thallium(I) acetate and sodium selenate were potent and promising N. fischeri oriented fungicides which was confirmed by both chemical sensitivity microplates panel and traditional hole-plate methods. PMID:26815302

  11. Comparison of Chemical Sensitivity of Fresh and Long-Stored Heat Resistant Neosartorya fischeri Environmental Isolates Using BIOLOG Phenotype MicroArray System

    PubMed Central

    Panek, Jacek; Frąc, Magdalena; Bilińska-Wielgus, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Spoilage of heat processed food and beverage by heat resistant fungi (HRF) is a major problem for food industry in many countries. Neosartorya fischeri is the leading source of spoilage in thermally processed products. Its resistance to heat processing and toxigenicity makes studies about Neosartorya fischeri metabolism and chemical sensitivity essential. In this study chemical sensitivity of two environmental Neosartorya fischeri isolates were compared. One was isolated from canned apples in 1923 (DSM3700), the other from thermal processed strawberry product in 2012 (KC179765), used as long-stored and fresh isolate, respectively. The study was conducted using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray platforms of chemical sensitivity panel and traditional hole-plate method. The study allowed for obtaining data about Neosartorya fischeri growth inhibitors. The fresh isolate appeared to be much more resistant to chemical agents than the long-stored isolate. Based on phenotype microarray assay nitrogen compounds, toxic cations and membrane function compounds were the most effective in growth inhibition of N. fischeri isolates. According to the study zaragozic acid A, thallium(I) acetate and sodium selenate were potent and promising N. fischeri oriented fungicides which was confirmed by both chemical sensitivity microplates panel and traditional hole-plate methods. PMID:26815302

  12. Biological rational for sequential targeting of Bruton tyrosine kinase and Bcl-2 to overcome CD40-induced ABT-199 resistance in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiron, David; Touzeau, Cyrille; Maïga, Sophie; Moreau, Philippe; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Le Gouill, Steven; Amiot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    The aggressive biological behavior of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and its short response to current treatment highlight a great need for better rational therapy. Herein, we investigate the ability of ABT-199, the Bcl-2-selective BH3 mimetic, to kill MCL cells. Among MCL cell lines tested (n = 8), only three were sensitive (LD50 < 200 nM). In contrast, all primary MCL samples tested (n = 11) were highly sensitive to ABT-199 (LD50 < 10 nM). Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL both confer resistance to ABT-199-specific killing and BCL2/(BCLXL + MCL1) mRNA ratio is a strong predictor of sensitivity. By mimicking the microenvironment through CD40 stimulation, we show that ABT-199 sensitivity is impaired through activation of NF-kB pathway and Bcl-xL up-regulation. We further demonstrate that resistance is rapidly lost when MCL cells detach from CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. It has been reported that ibrutinib induces lymphocytosis in vivo holding off malignant cells from their protective microenvironment. We show here for two patients undergoing ibrutinib therapy that mobilized MCL cells are highly sensitive to ABT-199. These results provide evidence that in situ ABT-199 resistance can be overcome when MCL cells escape from the lymph nodes. Altogether, our data support the clinical application of ABT-199 therapy both as a single agent and in sequential combination with BTK inhibitors. PMID:25797245

  13. Biological activity of carbazole alkaloids and essential oil of Murraya koenigii against antibiotic resistant microbes and cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nagappan, Thilahgavani; Ramasamy, Perumal; Wahid, Mohd Effendy Abdul; Segaran, Thirukanthan Chandra; Vairappan, Charles S

    2011-01-01

    A total of three carbazole alkaloids and essential oil from the leaves of Murraya koenigii (Rutaceae) were obtained and examined for their effects on the growth of five antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria and three tumor cell lines (MCF-7, P 388 and Hela). The structures of these carbazoles were elucidated based on spectroscopy data and compared with literature data, hence, were identified as mahanine (1), mahanimbicine (2) and mahanimbine (3). The chemical constituents of the essential oil were identified using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GCMS). These compounds exhibited potent inhibition against antibiotic resistant bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus (210P JTU), Psedomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 25619), Klebsiella pneumonia (SR1-TU), Escherchia coli (NI23 JTU) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (SR16677-PRSP) with significant minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values (25.0-175.0 mg/mL) and minimum bacteriacidal concentrations (MBC) (100.0-500.0 mg/mL). The isolated compounds showed significant antitumor activity against MCF-7, Hela and P388 cell lines. Mahanimbine (3) and essential oil in particular showed potent antibacteria and cytotoxic effect with dose dependent trends (≤5.0 μg/mL). The findings from this investigation are the first report of carbazole alkaloids' potential against antibiotic resistant clinical bacteria, MCF-7 and P388 cell lines. PMID:22105714

  14. Polyether ionophores: broad-spectrum and promising biologically active molecules for the control of drug-resistant bacteria and parasites

    PubMed Central

    Kevin, Dion A; Meujo, Damaris AF; Hamann, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Background As multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens continue to emerge, there is a substantial amount of pressure to identify new drug candidates. Carboxyl polyethers, also referred to as polyether antibiotics, are a unique class of compounds with outstanding potency against a variety of critical infectious disease targets including protozoa, bacteria and viruses. The characteristics of these molecules that are of key interest are their selectivity and high potency against several MDR etiological agents. Objective Although many studies have been published about carboxyl polyether antibiotics, there are no recent reviews of this class of drugs. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with an overview of the spectrum of activity of polyether antibiotics, their mechanism of action, toxicity and potential as drug candidates to combat drug-resistant infectious diseases. Conclusion Polyether ionophores show a high degree of promise for the potential control of drug-resistant bacterial and parasitic infections. Despite the long history of use of this class of drugs, very limited medicinal chemistry and drug optimization studies have been reported, thus leaving the door open to these opportunities in the future. Scifinder and PubMed were the main search engines used to locate articles relevant to the topic presented in the present review. Keywords used in our search were specific names of each of the 88 compounds presented in the review as well as more general terms such as polyethers, ionophores, carboxylic polyethers and polyether antibiotics. PMID:23480512

  15. Host plant resistance in romaine lettuce affects feeding behavior and biology of Trichoplusia ni and Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Sethi, Amit; McAuslane, Heather J; Nagata, Russell T; Nuessly, Gregg S

    2006-12-01

    Lettuce quality and yield can be reduced by feeding of several lepidopterous pests, particularly cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hübner), and beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Host plant resistance to these insects is an environmentally sound adjunct to conventional chemical control. In this study we compared the survival, development, and feeding behavior of cabbage looper and beet armyworm on two romaine lettuce cultivars, resistant 'Valmaine' and susceptible 'Tall Guzmaine'. Larval mortality of both species was significantly higher on resistant Valmaine than on susceptible Tall Guzmaine. The average weight per larva after feeding for 1 wk on Tall Guzmaine plants was 6 times (beet armyworm) and 2 times (cabbage looper) greater than that of larvae feeding on Valmaine plants. Significant reduction in larval growth on Valmaine compared with that on Tall Guzmaine resulted in a 5.9- (beet armyworm) and 2.6-d (cabbage looper) increase in larval duration and almost a 1-d increase in pupal duration. Average pupal and adult weights and successful pupation of cabbage looper and beet armyworm were reduced on Valmaine compared with Tall Guzmaine. The sex ratio of progeny did not deviate from 1:1 when larvae were reared on either Valmaine or Tall Guzmaine. The fecundity of cabbage looper and beet armyworm adults that developed from larvae reared on Valmaine was about one-third that of adults from Tall Guzmaine, but adult longevity did not significantly differ on the two lettuce cultivars. The two insect species showed different feeding preferences for leaves of different age groups on Valmaine and Tall Guzmaine. Cabbage loopers cut narrow trenches on the leaf before actual feeding to block the flow of latex to the intended site of feeding. In contrast, beet armyworms did not trench. The different feeding behavior of the two species on Valmaine may explain the superior performance of cabbage looper compared with beet armyworm. PMID:17195688

  16. Impacts of off-road vehicles on nitrogen cycles in biological soil crusts: Resistance in different U.S. deserts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.

    2002-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are an important component of desert ecosystems, as they influence soil stability and fertility. This study examined and compared the short-term vehicular impacts on lichen cover and nitrogenase activity (NA) of biological soil crusts. Experimental disturbance was applied to different types of soil in regions throughout the western U.S. (Great Basin, Colorado Plateau, Sonoran, Chihuahuan, and Mojave deserts). Results show that pre-disturbance cover of soil lichens is significantly correlated with the silt content of soils, and negatively correlated with sand and clay. While disturbance appeared to reduce NA at all sites, differences were statistically significant at only 12 of the 26 sites. Cool desert sites showed a greater decline than hot desert sites, which may indicate non-heterocystic cyanobacterial species are more susceptible to disturbance than non-heterocystic species. Sandy soils showed greater reduction of NA as sand content increased, while fine-textured soils showed a greater decline as sand content increased. At all sites, higher NA before the disturbance resulted in less impact to NA post-disturbance. These results may be useful in predicting the impacts of off-road vehicles in different regions and different soils. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  17. Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H S.

    2006-06-01

    The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most biologists because it took us into increasingly familiar territory. It took mysterious processes, such as the replication of genetic material and assigned them parts that could be readily understood by the human mind. When we think of ''molecular machines'' as being the underlying basis of life, we are using a paradigm derived from everyday experience. However, the price that we paid was a relentless drive towards reductionism and the attendant balkanization of biology. Now along comes ''systems biology'' that promises us a solution to the problem of ''knowing more and more about less and less''. Unlike molecular biology, systems biology appears to be taking us into unfamiliar intellectual territory, such as statistics, mathematics and computer modeling. Not surprisingly, systems biology has met with widespread skepticism and resistance. Why do we need systems biology anyway and how does this new area of research promise to change the face of biology in the next couple of decades?

  18. Novel benzofuroxan derivatives against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains: design using Topliss' decision tree, synthesis and biological assay.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Salomão Dória; Palace-Berl, Fanny; Masunari, Andrea; Cechinel, Cléber André; Ishii, Marina; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; Tavares, Leoberto Costa

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was the design of a set of benzofuroxan derivatives as antimicrobial agents exploring the physicochemical properties of the related substituents. Topliss' decision tree approach was applied to select the substituent groups. Hierarchical cluster analysis was also performed to emphasize natural clusters and patterns. The compounds were obtained using two synthetic approaches for reducing the synthetic steps as well as improving the yield. The minimal inhibitory concentration method was employed to evaluate the activity against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. The most active compound was 4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)[N'-(benzofuroxan-5-yl)methylene]benzhydrazide (MIC range 12.7-11.4 μg/mL), pointing out that the antimicrobial activity was indeed influenced by the hydrophobic and electron-withdrawing property of the substituent groups 3-CF(3) and 4-NO(2), respectively. PMID:21757359

  19. Multifunctional commercially pure titanium for the improvement of bone integration: Multiscale topography, wettability, corrosion resistance and biological functionalization.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Sara; Vitale, Alessandra; Bertone, Elisa; Guastella, Salvatore; Cassinelli, Clara; Pan, Jinshan; Spriano, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    The objects of this research are commercially pure titanium surfaces, with multifunctional behavior, obtained through a chemical treatment and biological functionalization. The explored surfaces are of interest for dental implants, in contact with bone, where several simultaneous and synergistic actions are needed, in order to get a fast and effective osseointegration. The here described modified surfaces present a layer of titanium oxide, thicker than the native one, with a multi-scale surface topography (a surface roughness on the nano scale, which can be overlapped to a micro or macro roughness of the substrate) and a high density of OH groups, that increase surface wettability, induce a bioactive behavior (hydroxyapatite precipitation in simulated body fluid) and make possible the grafting of biomolecules (alkaline phosphatase, ALP, in the present research). The surface oxide is an efficient barrier against corrosion, with passive behavior both with and without application of an external voltage. PMID:26706544

  20. The Evolving Biology of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Review of Recommendations From the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group 3.

    PubMed

    Geethakumari, Praveen Ramakrishnan; Cookson, Michael S; Kelly, William Kevin

    2016-02-01

    In 2008, the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group 2 (PCWG2) developed consensus guidelines for clinical trial design and conduct that redefined trial endpoints, with a dual-objective paradigm: to (1) controlling, relieving, or eliminating disease manifestations at the start of treatment; and (2) preventing or delaying further disease manifestations. Clinical and translational research in prostate cancer has expanded our current-day understanding of the mechanisms of its pathogenesis, as well as the different clinicopathologic and molecular subtypes of the disease, and has improved the therapeutic armamentarium for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). These new advances led to the development of the updated PCWG3 guidelines in 2015. In this review, we analyze our evolving understanding of the biology of CRPC, acquired resistance mechanisms, and emerging therapeutic targets in light of the updated PCWG3 guidelines. We present a joint perspective from the medical oncology and urologic disciplines on the ongoing efforts to advance clinical trial performance in order to discover new therapies for this fatal disease. PMID:26888794

  1. MgF2-coated porous magnesium/alumina scaffolds with improved strength, corrosion resistance, and biological performance for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Ho; Jang, Tae-Sik; Kim, Sung Won; Park, Hui-Sun; Song, Juha; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Jung, Kyung-Hwan; Jung, Hyun-Do

    2016-05-01

    Porous magnesium (Mg) has recently emerged as a promising biodegradable alternative to biometal for bone ingrowth; however, its low mechanical properties and high corrosion rate in biological environments remain problematic. In this study, porous magnesium was implemented in a scaffold that closely mimics the mechanical properties of human bones with a controlled degradation rate and shows good biocompatibility to match the regeneration rate of bone tissue at the affected site. The alumina-reinforced Mg scaffold was produced by spark plasma sintering and coated with magnesium fluoride (MgF2) using a hydrofluoric acid solution to regulate the corrosion rate under physiological conditions. Sodium chloride granules (NaCl), acting as space holders, were leached out to achieve porous samples (60%) presenting an average pore size of 240 μm with complete pore interconnectivity. When the alumina content increased from 0 to 5 vol%, compressive strength and stiffness rose considerably from 9.5 to 13.8 MPa and from 0.24 to 0.40 GPa, respectively. Moreover, the biological response evaluated by in vitro cell test and blood test of the MgF2-coated porous Mg composite was enhanced with better corrosion resistance compared with that of uncoated counterparts. Consequently, MgF2-coated porous Mg/alumina composites may be applied in load-bearing biodegradable implants. PMID:26952467

  2. Design, Synthesis, and Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors To Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.

    2012-09-11

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants. In particular, inhibitors containing the 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies.

  3. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 4-Anilino-quinazolines and -quinolines as Inhibitors of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Krapf, Michael K; Wiese, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer often fails due to overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins, like ABCG2, triggering active efflux of various structurally unrelated drugs. This so-called multidrug resistance (MDR) may be reversed by selective, potent, and nontoxic inhibitors of ABCG2. As only a few potent inhibitors are known, new compounds based on a 4-substituted-2-phenylquinazoline scaffold were investigated. Substitution with hydroxy, cyano, nitro, acetamido, and fluoro led to high inhibitory activities toward ABCG2. The ability to reverse MDR of the most active compounds was confirmed in a MTT efficacy assay. Moreover, a negligibly low intrinsic cytotoxicity was found resulting in a high therapeutic ratio. Investigations of the inhibitory activity toward ABCB1 and ABCC1 yielded a high selectivity toward ABCG2 for the quinazoline compounds. Quinoline-based analogues showed lower inhibitory activity and selectivity. The study yielded a variety of promising compounds, some with superior properties compared to those of the standard inhibitor Ko143. PMID:27148793

  4. Skeletal muscle fiber type: using insights from muscle developmental biology to dissect targets for susceptibility and resistance to muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Jared; Maves, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are classified into fiber types, in particular, slow twitch versus fast twitch. Muscle fiber types are generally defined by the particular myosin heavy chain isoforms that they express, but many other components contribute to a fiber's physiological characteristics. Skeletal muscle fiber type can have a profound impact on muscle diseases, including certain muscular dystrophies and sarcopenia, the aging-induced loss of muscle mass and strength. These findings suggest that some muscle diseases may be treated by shifting fiber type characteristics either from slow to fast, or fast to slow phenotypes, depending on the disease. Recent studies have begun to address which components of muscle fiber types mediate their susceptibility or resistance to muscle disease. However, for many diseases it remains largely unclear why certain fiber types are affected. A substantial body of work has revealed molecular pathways that regulate muscle fiber type plasticity and early developmental muscle fiber identity. For instance, recent studies have revealed many factors that regulate muscle fiber type through modulating the activity of the muscle regulatory transcription factor MYOD1. Future studies of muscle fiber type development in animal models will continue to enhance our understanding of factors and pathways that may provide therapeutic targets to treat muscle diseases. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:518-534. doi: 10.1002/wdev.230 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27199166

  5. Biological and structural characterization of the Mycobacterium smegmatis nitroreductase NfnB, and its role in benzothiazinone resistance.

    PubMed

    Manina, Giulia; Bellinzoni, Marco; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Neres, João; Milano, Anna; Ribeiro, Ana Luisa De Jesus Lopes; Buroni, Silvia; Skovierová, Henrieta; Dianišková, Petronela; Mikušová, Katarína; Marák, Jozef; Makarov, Vadim; Giganti, David; Haouz, Ahmed; Lucarelli, Anna Paola; Degiacomi, Giulia; Piazza, Aurora; Chiarelli, Laurent R; De Rossi, Edda; Salina, Elena; Cole, Stewart T; Alzari, Pedro M; Riccardi, Giovanna

    2010-09-01

    Tuberculosis is still a leading cause of death in developing countries, for which there is an urgent need for new pharmacological agents. The synthesis of the novel antimycobacterial drug class of benzothiazinones (BTZs) and the identification of their cellular target as DprE1 (Rv3790), a component of the decaprenylphosphoryl-β-d-ribose 2'-epimerase complex, have been reported recently. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of a novel resistance mechanism to BTZ in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The overexpression of the nitroreductase NfnB leads to the inactivation of the drug by reduction of a critical nitro-group to an amino-group. The direct involvement of NfnB in the inactivation of the lead compound BTZ043 was demonstrated by enzymology, microbiological assays and gene knockout experiments. We also report the crystal structure of NfnB in complex with the essential cofactor flavin mononucleotide, and show that a common amino acid stretch between NfnB and DprE1 is likely to be essential for the interaction with BTZ. We performed docking analysis of NfnB-BTZ in order to understand their interaction and the mechanism of nitroreduction. Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis seems to lack nitroreductases able to inactivate these drugs, our findings are valuable for the design of new BTZ molecules, which may be more effective in vivo. PMID:20624223

  6. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of LBM-A5 derivatives as potent P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuxiang; Pan, Miaobo; Dai, Yuxuan; Liu, Baomin; Cui, Jian; Shi, Wei; Qiu, Qianqian; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2016-05-15

    A novel series of P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) inhibitors with triazol-N-phenethyl-tetrahydroisoquinoline or triazol-N-ethyl-tetrahydroisoquinoline scaffold were designed and synthesized via click chemistry. Most of the synthesized compounds showed higher reversal activity than verapamil (VRP). Among them, the most potent compound 4 showed a comparable activity with the known potent P-gp inhibitor WK-X-34 with lower cytotoxicity toward K562 cells (IC50>100μM). Compared with VRP, compound 4 exhibited more potency in increasing drug accumulation in K562/A02 MDR cells. Moreover, compound 4 could significantly reverse MDR in a dose-dependent manner and also persist longer chemo-sensitizing effect than VRP with reversibility. Further mechanism studies revealed that compound 4 could remarkably increase the intracellular accumulation of Adriamycin (ADM) in K562/A02 cells as well as inhibit rhodamine-123 (Rh123) efflux from the cells. These results suggested that compound 4 may represent a promising candidate for developing P-gp-mediated MDR inhibitors. PMID:27073052

  7. Design, Synthesis, Protein−Ligand X-ray Structure, and Biological Evaluation of a Series of Novel Macrocyclic Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Protease Inhibitors to Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Kulkarni, Sarang; Anderson, David D.; Hong, Lin; Baldridge, Abigail; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Chumanevich, Alexander A.; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Tojo, Yasushi; Amano, Masayuki; Koh, Yasuhiro; Tang, Jordan; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2010-04-05

    The structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of nonpeptidic macrocyclic HIV protease inhibitors are described. The inhibitors are designed to effectively fill in the hydrophobic pocket in the S1'-S2' subsites and retain all major hydrogen bonding interactions with the protein backbone similar to darunavir (1) or inhibitor 2. The ring size, the effect of methyl substitution, and unsaturation within the macrocyclic ring structure were assessed. In general, cyclic inhibitors were significantly more potent than their acyclic homologues, saturated rings were less active than their unsaturated analogues and a preference for 10- and 13-membered macrocylic rings was revealed. The addition of methyl substituents resulted in a reduction of potency. Both inhibitors 14b and 14c exhibited marked enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity, and they exerted potent activity against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. Protein-ligand X-ray structures of inhibitors 2 and 14c provided critical molecular insights into the ligand-binding site interactions.

  8. Biological preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  9. Kinetic study of atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: evidence for resistance to biologic effects of the hormone even in patients with mild myocardial involvement.

    PubMed

    Iervasi, G; Clerico, A; Pilo, A; Berti, S; Vitek, F; Biagini, A; Bianchi, R; Donato, L

    1994-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) kinetics was studied in 12 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy at different sodium excretion (30-175 mmol/day) and variable degrees of hemodynamic dysfunction [New York Heart Association (NYHA) class range I-III] to investigate whether differences in renewal and distribution of this hormone (as compared with those of a control group) play a role in pathogenesis and evolution of heart failure. [125I]Labeled ANP was injected as a bolus, and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure was used to purify the labeled hormone in venous plasma samples collected for < or = 50 min after injection; the main ANP kinetic parameters were then derived from the disappearance curve of the labeled hormone. As in controls, a positive linear regression between ANP metabolic clearance rate (MCR, ml/min/m2) values and daily urinary excretion of sodium (NaUE, mmol/day) was noted in patients. The different linear regression coefficients between normal subjects (MCR = 365 +/- 8.08 NaUE, r = 0.986, p < 0.0001) and patients (MCR = 497 + 18.5 NaUE, r = 0.867, p = 0.001) indicate that in patients a higher peptide clearance rate is needed to obtain the same biologic effect (sodium excretion) and suggest that resistance to biologic effects of the hormone exists in patients at an early stage of disease (NYHA class I). When the efficiency of the ANP system in excreting sodium was expressed as the ratio of NaUE to ANP production rate (PR = MCR x ANP plasma concentration, microgram/day/m2) patients showed significantly lower values (p = 0.0126) than normal volunteers, thus confirming resistance to the hormone effects. Significantly lower values for ANP total distribution volume (16.5 +/- 8.4 L/m2), mean residence time in the sampling space (4.04 +/- 1.14 min), mean residence time in the body (7.25 +/- 2.13 min), and fewer recycles through the initial (sampling) space (0.27 +/- 0.16) were noted in patients, indicating an altered mechanism

  10. Biological and Epidemiological Features of Antibiotic-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Pre- and Post-Conjugate Vaccine Eras: a United States Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lindsay; McGee, Lesley; Tomczyk, Sara; Beall, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae inflicts a huge disease burden as the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and meningitis. Soon after mainstream antibiotic usage, multiresistant pneumococcal clones emerged and disseminated worldwide. Resistant clones are generated through adaptation to antibiotic pressures imposed while naturally residing within the human upper respiratory tract. Here, a huge array of related commensal streptococcal strains transfers core genomic and accessory resistance determinants to the highly transformable pneumococcus. β-Lactam resistance is the hallmark of pneumococcal adaptability, requiring multiple independent recombination events that are traceable to nonpneumococcal origins and stably perpetuated in multiresistant clonal complexes. Pneumococcal strains with elevated MICs of β-lactams are most often resistant to additional antibiotics. Basic underlying mechanisms of most pneumococcal resistances have been identified, although new insights that increase our understanding are continually provided. Although all pneumococcal infections can be successfully treated with antibiotics, the available choices are limited for some strains. Invasive pneumococcal disease data compiled during 1998 to 2013 through the population-based Active Bacterial Core surveillance program (U.S. population base of 30,600,000) demonstrate that targeting prevalent capsular serotypes with conjugate vaccines (7-valent and 13-valent vaccines implemented in 2000 and 2010, respectively) is extremely effective in reducing resistant infections. Nonetheless, resistant non-vaccine-serotype clones continue to emerge and expand. PMID:27076637

  11. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID invests in basic research to understand the biology of microbes, their behavior, and how drug resistance ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  12. Avoiding the Perfect Storm: The Biologic and Clinical Case for Reevaluating the 7-Day Expectation for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Before Switching Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Kullar, Ravina; McKinnell, James A.; Sakoulas, George

    2014-01-01

    Persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (MRSAB) is associated with poor outcomes and serious complications. The MRSA guidelines define treatment failure and persistent bacteremia as lasting ≥7 days; however, this definition requires reevaluation. Aggressively reducing the bacterial inoculum promptly is critical because factors already in place before clinical presentation are driving resistance to the few antibiotics that are available to treat MRSAB. Alternative approaches to treat MRSAB should be considered within 3–4 days of persistent MRSAB. With rapid molecular diagnostics emerging in clinical microbiology laboratories and biomarkers as a potential for early patient risk stratification, a future shorter threshold may become possible. PMID:25048852

  13. Biological Threats

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thunderstorms & Lightning Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may ...

  14. Aladapcin, a new microbial metabolite that enhances host resistance against bacterial infection. Production, isolation, physico-chemical properties and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, A; Nakajima, M; Katayama, T; Matsuda, T; Niwa, T; Okazaki, T; Takamatsu, Y; Nagaki, H; Kinoshita, T; Takatsu, T

    1990-06-01

    We have constructed a new screening system for detecting microbial products that enhance host resistance against bacterial infection. It was found that a new compound with such activity is produced by a soil isolate classified as Nocardia sp. SANK 60484. The compound was isolated from the culture filtrate of the organism and named aladapcin after its amino acid composition. Aladapcin was obtained as an amphoteric white amorphous powder with the molecular formula, C13H25N5O5. It consists of 2 mol of D-alanine and 1 mol of meso-diaminopimelic acid. From the analysis of IR, 1H NMR and FAB-MS spectra, the structure was assigned to be a tripeptide. Aladapcin enhanced host resistance against an experimental Escherichia coli infection in mice at doses ranging between 1 and 100 micrograms/kg. PMID:2199420

  15. Hidden Treasures in “Ancient” Microarrays: Gene-Expression Portrays Biology and Potential Resistance Pathways of Major Lung Cancer Subtypes and Normal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kerkentzes, Konstantinos; Lagani, Vincenzo; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Vyberg, Mogens; Røe, Oluf Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Novel statistical methods and increasingly more accurate gene annotations can transform “old” biological data into a renewed source of knowledge with potential clinical relevance. Here, we provide an in silico proof-of-concept by extracting novel information from a high-quality mRNA expression dataset, originally published in 2001, using state-of-the-art bioinformatics approaches. Methods: The dataset consists of histologically defined cases of lung adenocarcinoma (AD), squamous (SQ) cell carcinoma, small-cell lung cancer, carcinoid, metastasis (breast and colon AD), and normal lung specimens (203 samples in total). A battery of statistical tests was used for identifying differential gene expressions, diagnostic and prognostic genes, enriched gene ontologies, and signaling pathways. Results: Our results showed that gene expressions faithfully recapitulate immunohistochemical subtype markers, as chromogranin A in carcinoids, cytokeratin 5, p63 in SQ, and TTF1 in non-squamous types. Moreover, biological information with putative clinical relevance was revealed as potentially novel diagnostic genes for each subtype with specificity 93–100% (AUC = 0.93–1.00). Cancer subtypes were characterized by (a) differential expression of treatment target genes as TYMS, HER2, and HER3 and (b) overrepresentation of treatment-related pathways like cell cycle, DNA repair, and ERBB pathways. The vascular smooth muscle contraction, leukocyte trans-endothelial migration, and actin cytoskeleton pathways were overexpressed in normal tissue. Conclusion: Reanalysis of this public dataset displayed the known biological features of lung cancer subtypes and revealed novel pathways of potentially clinical importance. The findings also support our hypothesis that even old omics data of high quality can be a source of significant biological information when appropriate bioinformatics methods are used. PMID:25325012

  16. Variations in grain lipophilic phytochemicals, proteins and resistance to Fusarium spp. growth during grain storage as affected by biological plant protection with Aureobasidium pullulans (de Bary).

    PubMed

    Wachowska, Urszula; Tańska, Małgorzata; Konopka, Iwona

    2016-06-16

    Modern agriculture relies on an integrated approach, where chemical treatment is reduced to a minimum and replaced by biological control that involves the use of active microorganisms. The effect of the antagonistic yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans on proteins and bioactive compounds (alkylresorcinols, sterols, tocols and carotenoids) in winter wheat grain and on the colonization of wheat kernels by fungal microbiota, mainly Fusarium spp. pathogens, was investigated. Biological treatment contributed to a slight increase contents of tocols, alkylresorcinols and sterols in grain. At the same time, the variation of wheat grain proteins was low and not significant. Application of A. pullulans enhanced the natural yeast colonization after six months of grain storage and inhibited growth of F. culmorum pathogens penetrating wheat kernel. This study demonstrated that an integrated approach of wheat grain protection with the use of the yeast-like fungus A. pullulans reduced kernel colonization by Fusarium spp. pathogens and increased the content of nutritionally beneficial phytochemicals in wheat grain without a loss of gluten proteins responsible for baking value. PMID:27055191

  17. Study of plasma modified-PTFE for biological applications: relationship between protein resistant properties, plasma treatment, surface composition and surface roughness

    PubMed Central

    Vandencasteele, Nicolas; Nisol, Bernard; Viville, Pascal; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Castner, David G.; Reniers, François

    2013-01-01

    PTFE samples were treated by low-pressure, O2 RF plasmas. The adsorption of BSA was used as a probe for the protein resistant properties. The exposure of PTFE to an O2 plasma leads to an increase in the chamber pressure. OES reveals the presence of CO, CO2 and F in the gas phase, indicating a strong etching of the PTFE surface by the O2 plasma. Furthermore, the high resolution C1s spectrum shows the appearance of CF3, CF and C-CF components in addition to the CF2 component, which is consistent with etching of the PTFE surface. WCA as high as 160° were observed, indicating a superhydrophobic behaviour. AFM Images of surfaces treated at high plasma power showed a increase in roughness. Lower amounts of BSA adsorption were detected on high power, O2 plasma-modified PTFE samples compared to low power, oxygen plasma-modified ones. PMID:24795545

  18. Synthesis of new steroidal inhibitors of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance and biological evaluation on K562/R7 erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    de Ravel, Marc Rolland; Alameh, Ghina; Melikian, Maxime; Mahiout, Zahia; Emptoz-Bonneton, Agnès; Matera, Eva-Laure; Lomberget, Thierry; Barret, Roland; Rocheblave, Luc; Walchshofer, Nadia; Beltran, Sonia; El Jawad, Lucienne; Mappus, Elisabeth; Grenot, Catherine; Pugeat, Michel; Dumontet, Charles; Le Borgne, Marc; Cuilleron, Claude Yves

    2015-02-26

    A simple route for improving the potency of progesterone as a modulator of P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance was established by esterification or etherification of hydroxylated 5α/β-pregnane-3,20-dione or 5β-cholan-3-one precursors. X-ray crystallography of representative 7α-, 11α-, and 17α-(2'R/S)-O-tetrahydropyranyl ether diastereoisomers revealed different combinations of axial-equatorial configurations of the anomeric oxygen. Substantial stimulation of accumulation and chemosensitization was observed on K562/R7 erythroleukemia cells resistant to doxorubicin, especially using 7α,11α-O-disubstituted derivatives of 5α/β-pregnane-3,20-dione, among which the 5β-H-7α-benzoyloxy-11α-(2'R)-O-tetrahydropyranyl ether 22a revealed promising properties (accumulation index 2.9, IC50 0.5 μM versus 1.2 and 10.6 μM for progesterone), slightly overcoming those of verapamil and cyclosporin A. Several 7α,12α-O-disubstituted derivatives of 5β-cholan-3-one proved even more active, especially the 7α-O-methoxymethyl-12α-benzoate 56 (accumulation index 3.8, IC50 0.2 μM). The panel of modulating effects from different O-substitutions at a same position suggests a structural influence of the substituent completing a simple protection against stimulating effects of hydroxyl groups on P-gp-mediated transport. PMID:25634041

  19. Cross-Institute Evaluations of Inhibitor-Resistant PCR Reagents for Direct Testing of Aerosol and Blood Samples Containing Biological Warfare Agent DNA

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Timothy D.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples—which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR. PMID:24334660

  20. Biological Technicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important ... Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important ...

  1. Enhancing growth, phytochemical constituents and aphid resistance capacity in cabbage with foliar application of eckol--a biologically active phenolic molecule from brown seaweed.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Kulkarni, Manoj G; Pendota, Srinivasa C; Van Staden, Johannes

    2016-03-25

    Although foliar application of seaweed extracts on plant growth and development has and is extensively studied, reliable knowledge and understanding of the mode of action of particular compound(s) responsible for enhancing plant growth is lacking. A brown seaweed Ecklonia maxima is widely used commercially as a biostimulant to improve plant growth and crop protection. Eckol, a phenolic compound isolated from E. maxima has recently shown stimulatory effects in maize, indicating its potential use as a plant biostimulant. Cabbage is a widely cultivated vegetable crop throughout the world, which requires high input of fertilizers and is susceptible to several aphid borne diseases. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of foliar application of eckol on the growth, phytochemical constituents and myrosinase activity (aphid resistance capacity) of commercially cultivated cabbage. Foliar application of eckol (10(-6) M) significantly enhanced shoot and root length, shoot and root fresh and dry weight, leaf area and leaf number. This treatment also showed a significant increase in photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll 'a', chlorophyll 'b', total chlorophyll and carotenoid) compared to the untreated plants. The levels of protein, proline and iridoid glycosides were significantly higher in cabbage leaves with eckol treatment. All the control plants were severely infested with cabbage aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae) but no infestation was observed on the eckol-sprayed plants, which can be attributed to an increase in myrosinase activity. This study reveals dual effects (plant growth promoting and insect repelling) of eckol on cabbage plants that need further investigations both under field conditions and in other brassicaceous species. PMID:26585339

  2. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  4. [Biological weapons].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, K; Becker, S; Wulf, H; Densow, D

    2010-08-01

    Biological weapons are weapons of mass destruction that use pathogens (bacteria, viruses) or the toxins produced by them to target living organisms or to contaminate non-living substances. In the past, biological warfare has been repeatedly used. Anthrax, plague and smallpox are regarded as the most dangerous biological weapons by various institutions. Nowadays it seems quite unlikely that biological warfare will be employed in any military campaigns. However, the possibility remains that biological weapons may be used in acts of bioterrorism. In addition all diseases caused by biological weapons may also occur naturally or as a result of a laboratory accident. Risk assessment with regard to biological danger often proves to be difficult. In this context, an early identification of a potentially dangerous situation through experts is essential to limit the degree of damage. PMID:20717866

  5. [Reduction of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) in the exhaust air of two piggeries by a bio-trickling filter and a biological three-step air cleaning system].

    PubMed

    Clauss, Marcus; Schulz, Jochen; Stratmann-Selke, Janin; Decius, Maja; Hartung, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    "Livestock-associated" Methicillin-resistent Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) are frequently found in the air of piggeries, are emitted into the ambient air of the piggeries and may also drift into residential areas or surrounding animal husbandries.. In order to reduce emissions from animal houses such as odour, gases and dust different biological air cleaning systems are commercially available. In this study the retention efficiencies for the culturable LA-MRSA of a bio-trickling filter and a combined three step system, both installed at two different piggeries, were investigated. Raw gas concentrations for LA-MRSA of 2.1 x 10(2) cfu/m3 (biotrickling filter) and 3.9 x 10(2) cfu/m3 (three step system) were found. The clean gas concentrations were in each case approximately one power of ten lower. Both systems were able to reduce the number of investigated bacteria in the air of piggeries on average about 90%. The investigated systems can contribute to protect nearby residents. However, considerable fluctuations of the emissions can occur. PMID:23540196

  6. Synthetic Biology for Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a relatively new field with the key aim of designing and constructing biological systems with novel functionalities. Today, synthetic biology devices are making their first steps in contributing new solutions to a number of biomedical challenges, such as emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance and cancer therapy. This review discusses some synthetic biology approaches and applications that were recently used in disease mechanism investigation and disease modeling, drug discovery and production, as well as vaccine development and treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and metabolic disorders. PMID:25098838

  7. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  8. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  9. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  10. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    PubMed

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms. PMID:26205204

  11. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of biology to be used in biology courses in secondary schools. Among those experiments presented are demonstrating the early stages of ferns and mosses and simple culture methods for fern prothalli. (HM)

  12. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including chi-square tests on a microcomputer, an integrated biology game, microscope slides of leaf stomata, culturing soil nematodes, technique for watering locust egg-laying tubes, hazards of biological chemicals (such as benzene, benzidene, calchicine,…

  13. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including use of dwarf cichlids (fishes) in secondary school biology, teaching edge effects on stomatal diffusion, computer program on effects of selection on gene frequencies, biological oxidation/reduction reactions, short cuts with Drosophila, computer program…

  14. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  15. Biological warfare agents

    PubMed Central

    Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2010-01-01

    The recent bioterrorist attacks using anthrax spores have emphasized the need to detect and decontaminate critical facilities in the shortest possible time. There has been a remarkable progress in the detection, protection and decontamination of biological warfare agents as many instrumentation platforms and detection methodologies are developed and commissioned. Even then the threat of biological warfare agents and their use in bioterrorist attacks still remain a leading cause of global concern. Furthermore in the past decade there have been threats due to the emerging new diseases and also the re-emergence of old diseases and development of antimicrobial resistance and spread to new geographical regions. The preparedness against these agents need complete knowledge about the disease, better research and training facilities, diagnostic facilities and improved public health system. This review on the biological warfare agents will provide information on the biological warfare agents, their mode of transmission and spread and also the detection systems available to detect them. In addition the current information on the availability of commercially available and developing technologies against biological warfare agents has also been discussed. The risk that arise due to the use of these agents in warfare or bioterrorism related scenario can be mitigated with the availability of improved detection technologies. PMID:21829313

  16. Biological post

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, B. Suresh; Kumar, Senthil; Mohan Kumar, N. S.; Karunakaran, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior tooth fracture as a result of traumatic injuries, is frequently encountered in endodontic practice. Proper reconstruction of extensively damaged teeth can be achieved through the fragment reattachment procedure known as “biological restoration.” This case report refers to the esthetics and functional recovery of extensively damaged maxillary central incisor through the preparation and adhesive cementation of “biological post” in a young patient. Biological post obtained through extracted teeth from another individual–represent a low-cost option and alternative technique for the morphofunctional recovery of extensively damaged anterior teeth. PMID:26538952

  17. BIOLOGICAL WARFARE

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, John

    1953-01-01

    The use of biological agents as controlled weapons of war is practical although uncertain. Three types of agents are feasible, including pathogenic organisms and biological pests, toxins, and synthetic hormones regulating plant growth. These agents may be chosen for selective effects varying from prolonged incipient illness to death of plants, man and domestic animals. For specific preventive and control measures required to combat these situations, there must be careful and detailed planning. The nucleus of such a program is available within the existing framework of public health activities. Additional research and expansion of established activities in time of attack are necessary parts of biological warfare defense. PMID:13059641

  18. Ecological Compatibility of GM Crops and Biological Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant genetically modified (GM) crops pervade many modern cropping systems, and present challenges and opportunities for developing biologically-based pest management programs. Interactions between biological control agents (insect predators, parasitoids, and pathog...

  19. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Ten ideas that have been tried out by the authors in schools are presented for biology teachers. The areas covered include genetics, dispersal of seeds, habituation in earthworms, respiration, sensory neurons, fats and oils. A reading list is provided. (PS)

  20. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Some helpful ideas are proposed for use by biology teachers. Topics included are Food Webs,'' Key to Identification of Families,'' Viruses,'' Sieve Tube,'' Woodlice,'' Ecology of Oak Leaf Roller Moth,'' and Model Making.'' (PS)

  1. Bottle Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSTA Journal, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Provides hands-on biology activities using plastic bottles that allow students to become engaged in asking questions, creating experiments, testing hypotheses, and generating answers. Activities explore terrestrial and aquatic systems. (MKR)

  2. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new experiments in biology are described by teachers for use in classrooms. Broad areas covered include enzyme action, growth regulation, microscopy, respiration, germination, plant succession, leaf structure and blood structure. Explanations are detailed. (PS)

  3. Biological Oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of global biogeochemical cycles and ocean productivity, there are two areas that will be of particular interest to biological oceanography in the 1990s. The first is the mapping in space time of the biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the world ocean. The second area is the coupling of biological and physical processes as it affects the distribution and growth rate of phytoplankton biomass. Certainly other areas will be of interest to biological oceanographers, but these two areas are amenable to observations from satellites. Temporal and spatial variability is a regular feature of marine ecosystems. The temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton biomass and productivity which is ubiquitous at all time and space scales in the ocean must be characterized. Remote sensing from satellites addresses these problems with global observations of mesocale (2 to 20 days, 10 to 200 km) features over a long period of time.

  4. Biological rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberg, F.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of basic features of biological rhythms. The classification of periodic behavior of physical and psychological characteristics as circadian, circannual, diurnal, and ultradian is discussed, and the notion of relativistic time as it applies in biology is examined. Special attention is given to circadian rhythms which are dependent on the adrenocortical cycle. The need for adequate understanding of circadian variations in the basic physiological indicators of an individual (heart rate, body temperature, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, etc.) to ensure the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic measures is stressed.

  5. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets and ...

  6. Host Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concepts covered in this chapter (for an undergraduate text book) • Disease resistance is a crucial trait for any crop plant. • The degree of disease resistance varies within plant populations. Much of this variation has a genetic basis. • Plant disease resistance can be broadly categorized into s...

  7. RESISTIVITY METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistivity methods were among the first geophysical techniques developed. The basic concept originated with Conrad Schlumberger, who conducted the initial resistivity field tests in Normandy, France during 1912. The resistivity method, employed in its earliest and most conventional form, uses an ex...

  8. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics are medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, they can save lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able to resist the effects of an antibiotic. Using antibiotics can lead to resistance. ...

  9. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in biology and environmental education instruction, including, among others, sampling in ecology using an overhead projector, the slide finder as an aid to microscopy, teaching kidney function, and teaching wildlife conservation-sand dune systems. (SK)

  10. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on the teaching of nutrition (including new information relating to many current O-level syllabi) and part 16 of a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Also includes a note on using earthworms as a source of material for teaching meiosis. (JN)

  11. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presents content information and/or laboratory procedures and experiments on different biology topics including small-scale cultivation of watercress and its use in water-culture experiments, microbiology of the phylloplane, use of mouthbrooders in science class, and the gene. (DC)

  12. Scaffolded biology.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Descriptions and interpretations of the natural world are dominated by dichotomies such as organism vs. environment, nature vs. nurture, genetic vs. epigenetic, but in the last couple of decades strong dissatisfaction with those partitions has been repeatedly voiced and a number of alternative perspectives have been suggested, from perspectives such as Dawkins' extended phenotype, Turner's extended organism, Oyama's Developmental Systems Theory and Odling-Smee's niche construction theory. Last in time is the description of biological phenomena in terms of hybrids between an organism (scaffolded system) and a living or non-living scaffold, forming unit systems to study processes such as reproduction and development. As scaffold, eventually, we can define any resource used by the biological system, especially in development and reproduction, without incorporating it as happens in the case of resources fueling metabolism. Addressing biological systems as functionally scaffolded systems may help pointing to functional relationships that can impart temporal marking to the developmental process and thus explain its irreversibility; revisiting the boundary between development and metabolism and also regeneration phenomena, by suggesting a conceptual framework within which to investigate phenomena of regular hypermorphic regeneration such as characteristic of deer antlers; fixing a periodization of development in terms of the times at which a scaffolding relationship begins or is terminated; and promoting plant galls to legitimate study objects of developmental biology. PMID:27287514

  13. Cancer Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominiecki, Mary E.

    2004-01-01

    University of Colorado's Virtual Student Fellowship available at and developed by Bakemeier, Richard F. This website is designed to give students applying for a fellowship an overview of basic topics in biology and how they are used by cancer researchers to develop new treatments.

  14. Biology Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes nine biology experiments, including osmosis, genetics; oxygen content of blood, enzymes in bean seedlings, preparation of bird skins, vascularization in bean seedlings, a game called "sequences" (applied to review situations), crossword puzzle for human respiration, and physiology of the woodlouse. (CS)

  15. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Organized by topic is a reading list for A- and S-level biology. Described are experiments for measuring rate of water uptake in a shoot; questions to aid students in designing experiments; rise of overhead projection to demonstrate osmosis and blood cell counting; and microbial manufacture of vinegar. (CS)

  16. Marine Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  17. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  18. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a variety of laboratory procedures, techniques, and materials including construction of a survey frame for field biology, a simple tidal system, isolation and applications of plant protoplasts, tropisms, teaching lung structure, and a key to statistical methods for biologists. (DS)

  19. Bottle Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jager, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Describes activities which utilize plastic drink bottles and are designed to foster the development of a wide range of biological and ecological concepts. Includes instructions for making a model compost column and presents a model that illustrates open versus closed ecosystems. (DDR)

  20. Sverdrup's Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, J.

    2002-12-01

    Sverdrup's contribution to Biological Oceanography were more than merely substantial, they were of fundamental importance. His plan for the training of graduate students at Scripps did not recognize the traditional division of the basic disciplines into separate categories of physics, chemistry, biology and geology. He insisted that Oceanography was a multi-disciplinary subject and that all entering students should study all four subjects. Today this is not very unusual but it was in the early 50s when I took those courses. We biologists carried away from those courses an appreciation of the importance of both spatial and temporal scale. It was of clear relevance to problems of oceanic population and community biology. But there was still more to his biology. He is responsible for a very simple, but very elegant model of the regulation of oceanic primary productivity. The elements of this model are found today in the ten or so highly derivative models. He also published a map predicting global ocean productivity based on the ideas in the model plus some wonderfully intuitive thinking. This map does not differ strongly from those glorious false color ones being published today.

  1. Biology Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including water relation exercise on auxin-treated artichoke tuber tissue; aerobic respiration in yeast; an improved potometer; use of mobiles in biological classification, and experiments on powdery mildews and banana polyphenol oxidase. Includes reading lists…

  2. Mating success, longevity, and fertility of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Chrysomelidae: Coleoptera) in relation to body size and Cry3Bb1 resistant and susceptible genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect resistance to population control methodologies is a widespread problem, with the development of effective resistance management programs often dependent on detailed knowledge regarding the biology of individual species and changes in that biology associated with resistance evolution. This stu...

  3. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antibiotic-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria ...

  4. Marine biology

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  5. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Ibáñez de Cáceres, Immaculada; Barriuso, Jorge; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; González Barón, Manuel; Feliú, Jaime

    2008-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer death. This devastating disease has the horrible honour of close to equal incidence and mortality rates. Late diagnosis and a constitutive resistance to every chemotherapy approach are responsible for this scenario. However, molecular biology tools in cooperation with translational efforts have dissected several secrets that underlie pancreatic cancer. Progressive acquisition of malignant, invasive phenotypes from pre-malignant lesions, recent revelations on core signalling pathways and new targeted designed trials offer a better future for pancreatic cancer patients. This review will summarise recent advances in the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer. PMID:18796369

  6. Land Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.

    1984-01-01

    The advancing technology of our civilization on Earth affects our environment on a local, regional and global scale. Local effects can feed into larger scale effects because of positive feedbacks in our system. The ability to understand, quantify and predict the large scale and long-term effects of technology is truly mind boggling. The understanding of these effects, which is paramount to the quality of life on Earth, will depend upon the ability to interact with scientists from the biological, atmospheric, oceanographic and geological sciences and develop a common communication system and unified objectives.

  7. Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Janus, Agnieszka; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a severe medical condition which is estimated to appear in 9-18% of hypertensive patients. Due to higher cardiovascular risk, this disorder requires special diagnosis and treatment. The heterogeneous etiology, risk factors and comorbidities of resistant hypertension stand in need of sophisticated evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and select the best therapeutic options, which should consider lifestyle modifications as well as pharmacological and interventional treatment. After having excluded pseudohypertension, inappropriate blood pressure measurement and control as well as the white coat effect, suspicion of resistant hypertension requires an analysis of drugs which the hypertensive patient is treated with. According to one definition - ineffective treatment with 3 or more antihypertensive drugs including diuretics makes it possible to diagnose resistant hypertension. A multidrug therapy including angiotensin - converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, diuretics, long-acting calcium channel blockers and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists has been demonstrated to be effective in resistant hypertension treatment. Nevertheless, optional, innovative therapies, e.g. a renal denervation or baroreflex activation, may create a novel pathway of blood pressure lowering procedures. The right diagnosis of this disease needs to eliminate the secondary causes of resistant hypertension e.g. obstructive sleep apnea, atherosclerosis and renal or hormonal disorders. This paper briefly summarizes the identification of the causes of resistant hypertension and therapeutic strategies, which may contribute to the proper diagnosis and an improvement of the long term management of resistant hypertension. PMID:26935512

  8. Aphid resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Testing and selecting for Russian wheat aphid (RWA) and greenbug resistance in WIT breeding lines continued this year. Several excellent lines with high levels of resistance advanced through the cultivar development process. Single plant selections from six experimental lines were retested to conf...

  9. Biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes allow life as we know it to exist. They form cells and enable separation between the inside and outside of an organism, controlling by means of their selective permeability which substances enter and leave. By allowing gradients of ions to be created across them, membranes also enable living organisms to generate energy. In addition, they control the flow of messages between cells by sending, receiving and processing information in the form of chemical and electrical signals. This essay summarizes the structure and function of membranes and the proteins within them, and describes their role in trafficking and transport, and their involvement in health and disease. Techniques for studying membranes are also discussed. PMID:26504250

  10. Active Biological Materials

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2011-01-01

    Cells make use of dynamic internal structures to control shape and create movement. By consuming energy to assemble into highly organized systems of interacting parts, these structures can generate force and resist compression, as well as adaptively change in response to their environment. Recent progress in reconstituting cytoskeletal structures in vitro has provided an opportunity to characterize the mechanics and dynamics of filament networks formed from purified proteins. Results indicate that a complex interplay between length scales and timescales underlies the mechanical responses of these systems and that energy consumption, as manifested in molecular motor activity and cytoskeletal filament growth, can drive transitions between distinct material states. This review discusses the basic characteristics of these active biological materials that set them apart from conventional materials and that create a rich array of unique behaviors. PMID:18999991

  11. Update on zinc biology.

    PubMed

    Solomons, Noel W

    2013-01-01

    Zinc has become a prominent nutrient of clinical and public health interest in the new millennium. Functions and actions for zinc emerge as increasingly ubiquitous in mammalian anatomy, physiology and metabolism. There is undoubtedly an underpinning in fundamental biology for all of the aspects of zinc in human health (clinical and epidemiological) in pediatric and public health practice. Unfortunately, basic science research may not have achieved a full understanding as yet. As a complement to the applied themes in the companion articles, a selection of recent advances in the domains homeostatic regulation and transport of zinc is presented; they are integrated, in turn, with findings on genetic expression, intracellular signaling, immunity and host defense, and bone growth. The elements include ionic zinc, zinc transporters, metallothioneins, zinc metalloenzymes and zinc finger proteins. In emerging basic research, we find some plausible mechanistic explanations for delayed linear growth with zinc deficiency and increased infectious disease resistance with zinc supplementation. PMID:23689109

  12. Resisting HRD's Resistance to Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierema, Laura L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically illustrate how human resource development (HRD) resists and omits issues of diversity in academic programs, textbooks, and research; analyze the research on HRD and diversity over a ten-year period; discuss HRD's resistance to diversity; and offer some recommendations for a more authentic…

  13. Resistivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, Michael R.; Bruce, Victoria J.; Ring, Rosalinda M.; Cole, Edward Jr. I.; Hawkins, Charles F.; Tangyungong, Paiboon

    2006-06-13

    According to an example embodiment of the present invention a semiconductor die having a resistive electrical connection is analyzed. Heat is directed to the die as the die is undergoing a state-changing operation to cause a failure due to suspect circuitry. The die is monitored, and a circuit path that electrically changes in response to the heat is detected and used to detect that a particular portion therein of the circuit is resistive. In this manner, the detection and localization of a semiconductor die defect that includes a resistive portion of a circuit path is enhanced.

  14. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  15. Simulating Biological and Non-Biological Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruzzo, Angela; Gesierich, Benno; Wohlschlager, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the brain processes biological and non-biological movements in distinct neural circuits. Biological motion, in contrast to non-biological motion, refers to active movements of living beings. Aim of our experiment was to investigate the mechanisms underlying mental simulation of these two movement types. Subjects had to…

  16. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... and health professionals can play their part; rewarding innovation and development of new treatment options and other ... and industry can help tackle resistance by: fostering innovation and research and development of new vaccines, diagnostics, ...

  17. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotic are known as methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA. Antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs first became widely ... factors for infection are known as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Recently, several cases overseas and in ...

  18. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  19. Lantibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Draper, Lorraine A; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2015-06-01

    The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry. PMID:25787977

  20. Lantibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Lorraine A.; Ross, R. Paul

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry. PMID:25787977

  1. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fairlamb, Alan H; Gow, Neil A R; Matthews, Keith R; Waters, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies. PMID:27572976

  2. (Mechanisms of tolerance and resistance)

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.C.

    1990-08-28

    The traveler participated in the Seventh International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry by presenting a poster entitled Studies on the Expression of Insecticide Resistance-Associated Cytochrome P450 in Drosophila Using Cloned DNA'' and as an invited speaker in the Workshop Session on Insecticide Resistance. The Congress covered a wide range of topics, including studies of new syntheic compounds and natural products with crop protecting properties, modes of action of pesticides, mechanisms of pesticide resistance, environmental fate of pesticides and estimates of risk to pesticide exposure. Several presentations on the potential role of cytochrome P450 in resistance to insecticides and herbicides were relevant to our work at ORNL's Biology Division on molecular mechanisms of P450 expression.

  3. Drug resistance in Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Brendan R E; McConville, Malcolm J; Ma'ayeh, Showgy Y; Dagley, Michael J; Gasser, Robin B; Svärd, Staffan G; Jex, Aaron R

    2015-11-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a microaerophilic parasite of the human gastrointestinal tract and a major contributor to diarrheal and post-infectious chronic gastrointestinal disease world-wide. Treatment of G. duodenalis infection currently relies on a small number of drug classes. Nitroheterocyclics, in particular metronidazole, have represented the front line treatment for the last 40 years. Nitroheterocyclic-resistant G. duodenalis have been isolated from patients and created in vitro, prompting considerable research into the biomolecular mechanisms of resistance. These compounds are redox-active and are believed to damage proteins and DNA after being activated by oxidoreductase enzymes in metabolically active cells. In this review, we explore the molecular phenotypes of nitroheterocyclic-resistant G. duodenalis described to date in the context of the protist's unusual glycolytic and antioxidant systems. We propose that resistance mechanisms are likely to extend well beyond currently described resistance-associated enzymes (i.e., pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases and nitroreductases), to include NAD(P)H- and flavin-generating pathways, and possibly redox-sensitive epigenetic regulation. Mechanisms that allow G. duodenalis to tolerate oxidative stress may lead to resistance against both oxygen and nitroheterocyclics, with implications for clinical control. The present review highlights the potential for systems biology tools and advanced bioinformatics to further investigate the multifaceted mechanisms of nitroheterocyclic resistance in this important pathogen. PMID:25922317

  4. Drug Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drug resistance refers to both intrinsic and acquired abilities of cells or organisms to become insensitive or refractory to chemotherapeutic intervention. The advent of antibiotics is considered one of the most important medicinal developments in human history, which has led to significantly reduce...

  5. Antibacterial drug discovery in the resistance era.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-01-21

    The looming antibiotic-resistance crisis has penetrated the consciousness of clinicians, researchers, policymakers, politicians and the public at large. The evolution and widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistance elements in bacterial pathogens has made diseases that were once easily treatable deadly again. Unfortunately, accompanying the rise in global resistance is a failure in antibacterial drug discovery. Lessons from the history of antibiotic discovery and fresh understanding of antibiotic action and the cell biology of microorganisms have the potential to deliver twenty-first century medicines that are able to control infection in the resistance era. PMID:26791724

  6. Computing motion using resistive networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Christof; Luo, Jin; Mead, Carver; Hutchinson, James

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of early vision are described which lead from the formulation of the motion problem as an ill-posed one to its solution by minimizing certain 'cost' functions. These cost or energy functions can be mapped onto simple analog and digital resistive networks. It is shown how the optical flow can be computed by injecting currents into resistive networks and recording the resulting stationary voltage distribution at each node. These networks can be implemented in cMOS VLSI circuits and represent plausible candidates for biological vision systems.

  7. [Biology of size and gravity].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Baba, Shoji A

    2004-03-01

    Gravity is a force that acts on mass. Biological effects of gravity and their magnitude depend on scale of mass and difference in density. One significant contribution of space biology is confirmation of direct action of gravity even at the cellular level. Since cell is the elementary unit of life, existence of primary effects of gravity on cells leads to establish the firm basis of gravitational biology. However, gravity is not limited to produce its biological effects on molecules and their reaction networks that compose living cells. Biological system has hierarchical structure with layers of organism, group, and ecological system, which emerge from the system one layer down. Influence of gravity is higher at larger mass. In addition to this, actions of gravity in each layer are caused by process and mechanism that is subjected and different in each layer of the hierarchy. Because of this feature, summing up gravitational action on cells does not explain gravity for biological system at upper layers. Gravity at ecological system or organismal level can not reduced to cellular mechanism. Size of cells and organisms is one of fundamental characters of them and a determinant in their design of form and function. Size closely relates to other physical quantities, such as mass, volume, and surface area. Gravity produces weight of mass. Organisms are required to equip components to support weight and to resist against force that arise at movement of body or a part of it. Volume and surface area associate with mass and heat transport process at body. Gravity dominates those processes by inducing natural convection around organisms. This review covers various elements and process, with which gravity make influence on living systems, chosen on the basis of biology of size. Cells and biochemical networks are under the control of organism to integrate a consolidated form. How cells adjust metabolic rate to meet to the size of the composed organism, whether is gravity

  8. Storage stability of Bacillus subtilis ethylene oxide biological indicators.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, R R

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis biological indicators, stored at ambient and freezer conditions for 24 months, demonstrated no statistical difference in ethylene oxide resistance and spore viability from initial production levels. PMID:6766701

  9. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals. PMID:21694883

  10. Resistant hypertension and chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-04-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient's history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of "non-dipper" hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  11. Resistant Hypertension and Chronotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing’s syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient’s history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of “non-dipper” hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  12. Student Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Biological Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Klein, Vanessa A.; Ghosh, Rajlakshmi; Eibel, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is fundamental to biology and scientific literacy, but teaching high school evolution is often difficult. Evolution teachers face several challenges including limited content knowledge, personal conflicts with evolution, expectations of resistance, concerns about students' conflicts with religion, and curricular constraints. Evolution…

  13. Evolutionary Biology: Its Value to Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Hampton L.

    1972-01-01

    Cites examples of the contribution of basic research in evolutionary biology to the solution of problems facing society (1) by dispelling myths about human origins, the nature of the individual, and the nature of race (2) by providing basic data concerning the effects of overpopulation, the production of improved sources of food, resistance of…

  14. Synthetic biology of antimicrobial discovery.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K

    2013-07-19

    Antibiotic discovery has a storied history. From the discovery of penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming to the relentless quest for antibiotics by Selman Waksman, the stories have become like folklore used to inspire future generations of scientists. However, recent discovery pipelines have run dry at a time when multidrug-resistant pathogens are on the rise. Nature has proven to be a valuable reservoir of antimicrobial agents, which are primarily produced by modularized biochemical pathways. Such modularization is well suited to remodeling by an interdisciplinary approach that spans science and engineering. Herein, we discuss the biological engineering of small molecules, peptides, and non-traditional antimicrobials and provide an overview of the growing applicability of synthetic biology to antimicrobials discovery. PMID:23654251

  15. Synthetic biology of antimicrobial discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K.

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic discovery has a storied history. From the discovery of penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming to the relentless quest for antibiotics by Selman Waksman, the stories have become like folklore, used to inspire future generations of scientists. However, recent discovery pipelines have run dry at a time when multidrug resistant pathogens are on the rise. Nature has proven to be a valuable reservoir of antimicrobial agents, which are primarily produced by modularized biochemical pathways. Such modularization is well suited to remodeling by an interdisciplinary approach that spans science and engineering. Herein, we discuss the biological engineering of small molecules, peptides, and non-traditional antimicrobials and provide an overview of the growing applicability of synthetic biology to antimicrobials discovery. PMID:23654251

  16. [Resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2008-04-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as a persistent blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic, is unusual. The diagnosis requires ruling out initially pseudoresistance and a lack of compliance with treatment. Ambulatory blood pressure recording allow the recognition of white coat hypertension. When there is a clinical or laboratory suspicion, secondary causes of hypertension should be discarded. Excessive salt intake, the presence of concomitant diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, obesity, and psychiatric conditions such as panic attacks, anxiety and depression, should also be sought. The presence of target organ damage requires a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. Recent clinical studies indicate that the administration of aldosterone antagonists as a fourth therapeutic line provides significant additional blood pressure reduction, when added to previous antihypertensive regimens in subjects with resistant hypertension. The possible blood pressure lowering effects of prolonged electrical activation of carotid baroreceptors is under investigation. PMID:18769797

  17. Re-evolution of the 2-phenylquinolines: ligand-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a potent new class of Staphylococcus aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors to combat antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Gosetto, Francesca; Iraci, Nunzio; Barreca, Maria Letizia; Massari, Serena; Sancineto, Luca; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Dimovska, Mirjana; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2013-06-27

    Overexpression of efflux pumps is an important mechanism by which bacteria evade the effects of antimicrobial agents that are substrates. NorA is a Staphylococcus aureus efflux pump that confers reduced susceptibility to many structurally unrelated agents, including fluoroquinolones, biocides, and dyes, resulting in a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype. In this work, a series of 2-phenylquinoline derivatives was designed by means of ligand-based pharmacophore modeling in an attempt to identify improved S. aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Most of the 2-phenylquinoline derivatives displayed potent EPI activity against the norA overexpressing strain SA-1199B. The antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin, when used in combination with some of the synthesized compounds, was completely restored in SA-1199B and SA-K2378, a strain overexpressing norA from a multicopy plasmid. Compounds 3m and 3q also showed potent synergistic activity with the ethidium bromide dye in a strain overexpressing the MepA MDR efflux pump. PMID:23710549

  18. [A population-genetics approach to the problem of nonspecific biological resistance of the human body. III. The ABO and rhesus blood group systems of healthy and sick children and their mothers].

    PubMed

    Kurbatova, O L; Botvin'ev, O K; Altukhov, Iu P

    1984-04-01

    ABO and Rhesus blood types have been specified in 2047 diseased newborns, diseased infants and children who died before the age of one, as well as in their mothers. 527 healthy children and their mothers were investigated as a control group. A significant difference in the ABO phenotype frequencies has been revealed between: i) healthy and dead children, ii) mothers of diseased newborns and mothers of healthy children, iii) dead children and their mothers. The significant increase in the incidence of maternal Rhesus-negative phenotype, as compared with the control group, was shown in the groups of diseased newborns, diseased infants and dead children. In the same groups, mothers differ significantly from their children with respect to the frequency of Rhesus phenotypes. The incidence of Rhesus-incompatible mother-child pairs in the groups of diseased newborns, diseased infants and dead children was shown to be two times higher than the respective frequency in the control group and the expected frequency. A certain increase in the frequency of ABO-incompatible pairs was revealed in the groups of diseased newborns and dead children, but the difference, as compared to the control group, did not prove to be statistically significant. A hypothesis was advanced to the effect that the mother-child incompatibility for Rhesus and ABO antigens may result not only in fetal wastage and haemolytic disease of newborns, but also in the decrease of child's resistance to diseases of different origin. PMID:6427064

  19. Transglutaminases: nature's biological glues.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Martin; Casadio, Rita; Bergamini, Carlo M

    2002-01-01

    Transglutaminases (Tgases) are a widely distributed group of enzymes that catalyse the post-translational modification of proteins by the formation of isopeptide bonds. This occurs either through protein cross-linking via epsilon-(gamma-glutamyl)lysine bonds or through incorporation of primary amines at selected peptide-bound glutamine residues. The cross-linked products, often of high molecular mass, are highly resistant to mechanical challenge and proteolytic degradation, and their accumulation is found in a number of tissues and processes where such properties are important, including skin, hair, blood clotting and wound healing. However, deregulation of enzyme activity generally associated with major disruptions in cellular homoeostatic mechanisms has resulted in these enzymes contributing to a number of human diseases, including chronic neurodegeneration, neoplastic diseases, autoimmune diseases, diseases involving progressive tissue fibrosis and diseases related to the epidermis of the skin. In the present review we detail the structural and regulatory features important in mammalian Tgases, with particular focus on the ubiquitous type 2 tissue enzyme. Physiological roles and substrates are discussed with a view to increasing and understanding the pathogenesis of the diseases associated with transglutaminases. Moreover the ability of these enzymes to modify proteins and act as biological glues has not gone unnoticed by the commercial sector. As a consequence, we have included some of the present and future biotechnological applications of this increasingly important group of enzymes. PMID:12366374

  20. Pre-resistance-welding resistance check

    DOEpatents

    Destefan, Dennis E.; Stompro, David A.

    1991-01-01

    A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

  1. [Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Carlos Andrés; Vesga, Omar

    2005-12-01

    The evolution and molecular mechanisms of vancomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus were reviewed. Case reports and research studies on biochemestry, electron microscopy and molecular biology of Staphylococcus aureus were selected from Medline database and summarized in the following review. After almost 40 years of successful treatment of S. aureus with vancomycin, several cases of clinical failures have been reported (since 1997). S. aureus strains have appeared with intermediate susceptibility (MIC 8-16 microg/ml), as well as strains with heterogeneous resistance (global MIC < or =4 microg/ml), but with subpopulations of intermediate susceptibility. In these cases, resistance is mediated by cell wall thickening with reduced cross linking. This traps the antibiotic before it reaches its major target, the murein monomers in the cell membrane. In 2002, a total vancomycin resistant strain (MIC > or =32 microg/ml) was reported with vanA genes from Enterococcus spp. These genes induce the change of D-Ala-D-Ala terminus for D-Ala-D-lactate in the cell wall precursors, leading to loss of affinity for glycopeptides. Vancomycin resistance in S. aureus has appeared; it is mediated by cell wall modifications that trap the antibiotic before it reaches its action site. In strains with total resistance, Enterococcus spp. genes have been acquired that lead to modification of the glycopeptide target. PMID:16433184

  2. Biological conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.

    A system for bioconversion of organic material comprises a primary bioreactor column wherein a biological active agent (zymomonas mobilis) converts the organic material (sugar) to a product (alcohol), a rejuvenator column wherein the biological activity of said biological active agent is enhanced, and means for circulating said biological active agent between said primary bioreactor column and said rejuvenator column.

  3. Learning Biology by Designing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Fred; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2010-01-01

    According to a century-old tradition in biological thinking, organisms can be considered as being optimally designed. In modern biology this idea still has great heuristic value. In evolutionary biology a so-called design heuristic has been formulated which provides guidance to researchers in the generation of knowledge about biological systems.…

  4. Systems Chemical Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Tropsha, Alexander; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Rintoul, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing availability of data related to genes, proteins and their modulation by small molecules, paralleled by the emergence of simulation tools in systems biology, has provided a vast amount of biological information. However, there is a critical need to develop cheminformatics tools that can integrate chemical knowledge with these biological databases, with the goal of creating systems chemical biology. PMID:17637771

  5. Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies Trial Edition. Set I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairwell, Kay, Ed.; And Others

    The Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies (OBIS) Trial Edition Set I contains 24 varied activities which make use of crafts, simulations, and basic investigative techniques to provide introductory learning experiences in outdoor biology for children aged 10 to 15. The individual water-resistant folio for each activity includes biological…

  6. Translational environmental biology: cell biology informing conservation.

    PubMed

    Traylor-Knowles, Nikki; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2014-05-01

    Typically, findings from cell biology have been beneficial for preventing human disease. However, translational applications from cell biology can also be applied to conservation efforts, such as protecting coral reefs. Recent efforts to understand the cell biological mechanisms maintaining coral health such as innate immunity and acclimatization have prompted new developments in conservation. Similar to biomedicine, we urge that future efforts should focus on better frameworks for biomarker development to protect coral reefs. PMID:24766840

  7. Synthetic biology: insights into biological computation.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, Romilde; Urrios, Arturo; Velazquez-Garcia, Silvia; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc

    2016-04-18

    Organisms have evolved a broad array of complex signaling mechanisms that allow them to survive in a wide range of environmental conditions. They are able to sense external inputs and produce an output response by computing the information. Synthetic biology attempts to rationally engineer biological systems in order to perform desired functions. Our increasing understanding of biological systems guides this rational design, while the huge background in electronics for building circuits defines the methodology. In this context, biocomputation is the branch of synthetic biology aimed at implementing artificial computational devices using engineered biological motifs as building blocks. Biocomputational devices are defined as biological systems that are able to integrate inputs and return outputs following pre-determined rules. Over the last decade the number of available synthetic engineered devices has increased exponentially; simple and complex circuits have been built in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. These devices can manage and store information, take decisions based on past and present inputs, and even convert a transient signal into a sustained response. The field is experiencing a fast growth and every day it is easier to implement more complex biological functions. This is mainly due to advances in in vitro DNA synthesis, new genome editing tools, novel molecular cloning techniques, continuously growing part libraries as well as other technological advances. This allows that digital computation can now be engineered and implemented in biological systems. Simple logic gates can be implemented and connected to perform novel desired functions or to better understand and redesign biological processes. Synthetic biological digital circuits could lead to new therapeutic approaches, as well as new and efficient ways to produce complex molecules such as antibiotics, bioplastics or biofuels. Biological computation not only provides possible biomedical and

  8. Is Biology Boring? Student Attitudes toward Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Pavol; Prokop, Matel; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2007-01-01

    The study examines the interests and attitudes of school students toward biology: through their interest in out-of-school activities and their attitude towards lessons as measured by interest, importance and difficulty. Biology lessons were relatively popular with the greatest preference found among students learning zoology. Girls showed…

  9. Models for synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic biological engineering is emerging from biology as a distinct discipline based on quantification. The technologies propelling synthetic biology are not new, nor is the concept of designing novel biological molecules. What is new is the emphasis on system behavior. The objective is the design and construction of new biological devices and systems to deliver useful applications. Numerous synthetic gene circuits have been created in the past decade, including bistable switches, oscillators, and logic gates, and possible applications abound, including biofuels, detectors for biochemical and chemical weapons, disease diagnosis, and gene therapies. More than fifty years after the discovery of the molecular structure of DNA, molecular biology is mature enough for real quantification that is useful for biological engineering applications, similar to the revolution in modeling in chemistry in the 1950s. With the excitement that synthetic biology is generating, the engineering and biological science communities appear remarkably willing to cross disciplinary boundaries toward a common goal. PMID:17986347

  10. Biological information specialists for biological informatics

    PubMed Central

    Heidorn, P Bryan; Palmer, Carole L; Wright, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Data management and integration are complicated and ongoing problems that will require commitment of resources and expertise from the various biological science communities. Primary components of successful cross-scale integration are smooth information management and migration from one context to another. We call for a broadening of the definition of bioinformatics and bioinformatics training to span biological disciplines and biological scales. Training programs are needed that educate a new kind of informatics professional, Biological Information Specialists, to work in collaboration with various discipline-specific research personnel. Biological Information Specialists are an extension of the informationist movement that began within library and information science (LIS) over 30 years ago as a professional position to fill a gap in clinical medicine. These professionals will help advance science by improving access to scientific information and by freeing scientists who are not interested in data management to concentrate on their science. PMID:17295920

  11. Superinfection and the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eili Y.; Smith, David L.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Simon

    2012-01-01

    A major issue in the control of malaria is the evolution of drug resistance. Ecological theory has demonstrated that pathogen superinfection and the resulting within-host competition influences the evolution of specific traits. Individuals infected with Plasmodium falciparum are consistently infected by multiple parasites; however, while this probably alters the dynamics of resistance evolution, there are few robust mathematical models examining this issue. We developed a general theory for modelling the evolution of resistance with host superinfection and examine: (i) the effect of transmission intensity on the rate of resistance evolution; (ii) the importance of different biological costs of resistance; and (iii) the best measure of the frequency of resistance. We find that within-host competition retards the ability and slows the rate at which drug-resistant parasites invade, particularly as the transmission rate increases. We also find that biological costs of resistance that reduce transmission are less important than reductions in the duration of drug-resistant infections. Lastly, we find that random sampling of the population for resistant parasites is likely to significantly underestimate the frequency of resistance. Considering superinfection in mathematical models of antimalarial drug resistance may thus be important for generating accurate predictions of interventions to contain resistance. PMID:22787024

  12. Tamoxifen Resistance: Emerging Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Villegas, Victoria E.; Rangel, Nelson; Sánchez, Magda Carolina; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of breast cancer. As a result, blockade of the E2 signal through either tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors is an important therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, resistance to TAM is the major obstacle in endocrine therapy. This resistance occurs either de novo or is acquired after an initial beneficial response. The underlying mechanisms for TAM resistance are probably multifactorial and remain largely unknown. Considering that breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and patients respond differently to treatment, the molecular analysis of TAM’s biological activity could provide the necessary framework to understand the complex effects of this drug in target cells. Moreover, this could explain, at least in part, the development of resistance and indicate an optimal therapeutic option. This review highlights the implications of TAM in breast cancer as well as the role of receptors/signal pathways recently suggested to be involved in the development of TAM resistance. G protein—coupled estrogen receptor, Androgen Receptor and Hedgehog signaling pathways are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic indicators for breast cancer, based on their ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in ERα-positive or -negative breast cancer. PMID:27548161

  13. Tamoxifen Resistance: Emerging Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Villegas, Victoria E; Rangel, Nelson; Sánchez, Magda Carolina; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of breast cancer. As a result, blockade of the E2 signal through either tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors is an important therapeutic strategy to treat or prevent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. However, resistance to TAM is the major obstacle in endocrine therapy. This resistance occurs either de novo or is acquired after an initial beneficial response. The underlying mechanisms for TAM resistance are probably multifactorial and remain largely unknown. Considering that breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and patients respond differently to treatment, the molecular analysis of TAM's biological activity could provide the necessary framework to understand the complex effects of this drug in target cells. Moreover, this could explain, at least in part, the development of resistance and indicate an optimal therapeutic option. This review highlights the implications of TAM in breast cancer as well as the role of receptors/signal pathways recently suggested to be involved in the development of TAM resistance. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, Androgen Receptor and Hedgehog signaling pathways are emerging as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic indicators for breast cancer, based on their ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in ERα-positive or -negative breast cancer. PMID:27548161

  14. Advances in Biological Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Steven B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews major developments in areas that are at the cutting edge of biological research. Areas include: human anti-cancer gene, recombinant DNA techniques for the detection of Huntington disease carriers, and marine biology. (CW)

  15. Biological Therapies for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  16. Biology of Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mail Facebook TwitterTitle Google+ LinkedIn Home Blood Disorders Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Resources In This ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Components of Blood ...

  17. Resetting Biological Clocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winfree, Arthur T.

    1975-01-01

    Reports on experiments conducted on two biological clocks, in organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms, which indicate that biological oscillation can be arrested by a single stimulus of a definite strength delivered at the proper time. (GS)

  18. Biology Today: Questions & Variations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the importance of student questions as tools of instruction and as indicators of student misconceptions. Suggests different ways in which students may gain an understanding of biological concepts through discussion of popular movies and biological problems. (CW)

  19. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    DOEpatents

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2002-01-01

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  20. Biology Myth-Killers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Evan

    2014-01-01

    "Biology Myth-Killers" is an activity designed to identify and correct common misconceptions for high school and college introductory biology courses. Students identify common myths, which double as biology misconceptions, and use appropriate sources to share the "truth" about the myths. This learner-centered activity is a fun…

  1. Mythology in Introductory Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Steve

    1987-01-01

    Argues that introductory courses in college biology do a poor job of encouraging students to enter a career in biology. Cites examples of poorly written textbooks and treatments of various aspects of biology including basic definitions, cells and their operations, the mechanics of life, the nervous system, evolution and sex. (TW)

  2. BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF LANGUAGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LENNEBERG, ERIC H.

    THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BIOLOGY AND LANGUAGE IS EXPLORED IN THIS VOLUME. THE AUTHOR BELIEVES THAT "LANGUAGE IS THE MANIFESTATION OF SPECIES-SPECIFIC COGNITIVE PROPENSITIES. IT IS THE CONSEQUENCE OF THE BIOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES THAT MAKE A HUMAN TYPE OF COGNITION POSSIBLE." IN ATTEMPTING TO "REINSTATE THE CONCEPT OF THE BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF…

  3. Designing synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2014-03-21

    Synthetic biology is frequently defined as the application of engineering design principles to biology. Such principles are intended to streamline the practice of biological engineering, to shorten the time required to design, build, and test synthetic gene networks. This streamlining of iterative design cycles can facilitate the future construction of biological systems for a range of applications in the production of fuels, foods, materials, and medicines. The promise of these potential applications as well as the emphasis on design has prompted critical reflection on synthetic biology from design theorists and practicing designers from many fields, who can bring valuable perspectives to the discipline. While interdisciplinary connections between biologists and engineers have built synthetic biology via the science and the technology of biology, interdisciplinary collaboration with artists, designers, and social theorists can provide insight on the connections between technology and society. Such collaborations can open up new avenues and new principles for research and design, as well as shed new light on the challenging context-dependence-both biological and social-that face living technologies at many scales. This review is inspired by the session titled "Design and Synthetic Biology: Connecting People and Technology" at Synthetic Biology 6.0 and covers a range of literature on design practice in synthetic biology and beyond. Critical engagement with how design is used to shape the discipline opens up new possibilities for how we might design the future of synthetic biology. PMID:24156739

  4. Biology and the Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Roger D.

    1969-01-01

    Emphasizes the social implications of biological knowledge and discusses two main government roles in biology: (1) a creative and supportive role, including support of education and research, (2) control, regulation and protection related to the applications of biological knowledge. Public control is considered necessary in areas such as food and…

  5. General Biology Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Scott; Watthews, Thomas

    This syllabus has been developed as an alternative to Regents biology and is intended for the average student who could benefit from an introductory biology course. It is divided into seven major units dealing with, respectively: (1) similarities among living things; (2) human biology (focusing on nutrition, transport, respiration, excretion, and…

  6. Upgrading Undergraduate Biology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musante, Susan

    2011-01-01

    On many campuses throughout the country, undergraduate biology education is in serious need of an upgrade. During the past few decades, the body of biological knowledge has grown exponentially, and as a research endeavor, the practice of biology has evolved. Education research has also made great strides, revealing many new insights into how…

  7. Chemistry and Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigston, David L.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between chemisty and biology in the science curriculum. Points out the differences in perception of the disciplines, which the physical scientists favoring reductionism. Suggests that biology departments offer a special course for chemistry students, just as the chemistry departments have done for biology students.…

  8. History of Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maienschein, Jane

    1985-01-01

    Examines the history of biology in the United States by considering: (1) general trends about the nature of American biology; (2) sources of information; (3) biographies; (4) biological institutions; and (5) disciplinary studies. Indicates that the field is dominated by internalists who focus on particular persons and topics. (JN)

  9. Controversial Issues within Biology: Enriching Biology Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rooy, Wilhelmina

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development and implementation of a senior high school biology lesson concerned with organ transplantation. Discusses the teacher's rationale and techniques for using controversial issues in science teaching. (Contains 18 references.) (Author/WRM)

  10. Larvicide resistance in Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) populations in Denmark and establishment of resistant laboratory strains.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Michael; Jespersen, Jørgen B

    2003-08-01

    We determined the toxicity of the two IGRs, diflubenzuron and cyromazine, in this survey of resistance in Danish field populations of Musca domestica (L.). We observed resistance toward diflubenzuron and for the first time in Denmark and we found field populations with some resistance to cyromazine. Eleven of the twenty-one field populations had larvae surviving a diagnostic dose of 1.6 times of susceptible LC95 of diflubenzuron and two of these populations had larvae surviving 6.1 times of LC95. Eight of the twenty-one field populations had larvae surviving 2.2 times of susceptible LC95 of cyromazine and one population had larvae surviving 4.4 times of LC95. A fivefold cyromazine resistant strain was established after selection with cyromazine. It was 3-, 5-, and 90-fold resistant to diflubenzuron, triflumuron, and methoprene, respectively. Two diflubenzuron resistant strains (120- and 86-fold, respectively) were established. They showed a high level of resistance to triflumuron (1000- and 200-fold, respectively), and moderate resistance to methoprene (73- and 50-fold, respectively). Both were susceptible to cyromazine. This study shows that by applying the recommendations of previous resistance risk assessments, severe control failures and detrimental development of a high level of resistance have been avoided. The development of resistance has not been completely avoided, but has not developed to a level of biological or economic importance. PMID:14503604

  11. Synthetic Biology: Putting Synthesis into Biology

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Luo, Yunzi; Zhao, Huimin

    2010-01-01

    The ability to manipulate living organisms is at the heart of a range of emerging technologies that serve to address important and current problems in environment, energy, and health. However, with all its complexity and interconnectivity, biology has for many years been recalcitrant to engineering manipulations. The recent advances in synthesis, analysis, and modeling methods have finally provided the tools necessary to manipulate living systems in meaningful ways, and have led to the coining of a field named synthetic biology. The scope of synthetic biology is as complicated as life itself – encompassing many branches of science, and across many scales of application. New DNA synthesis and assembly techniques have made routine the customization of very large DNA molecules. This in turn has allowed the incorporation of multiple genes and pathways. By coupling these with techniques that allow for the modeling and design of protein functions, scientists have now gained the tools to create completely novel biological machineries. Even the ultimate biological machinery – a self-replicating organism – is being pursued at this moment. It is the purpose of this review to dissect and organize these various components of synthetic biology into a coherent picture. PMID:21064036

  12. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  13. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  14. Computational Systems Chemical Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; May, Elebeoba E.; Leitão, Andrei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    There is a critical need for improving the level of chemistry awareness in systems biology. The data and information related to modulation of genes and proteins by small molecules continue to accumulate at the same time as simulation tools in systems biology and whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) continue to evolve. We called this emerging area at the interface between chemical biology and systems biology systems chemical biology, SCB (Oprea et al., 2007). The overarching goal of computational SCB is to develop tools for integrated chemical-biological data acquisition, filtering and processing, by taking into account relevant information related to interactions between proteins and small molecules, possible metabolic transformations of small molecules, as well as associated information related to genes, networks, small molecules and, where applicable, mutants and variants of those proteins. There is yet an unmet need to develop an integrated in silico pharmacology / systems biology continuum that embeds drug-target-clinical outcome (DTCO) triplets, a capability that is vital to the future of chemical biology, pharmacology and systems biology. Through the development of the SCB approach, scientists will be able to start addressing, in an integrated simulation environment, questions that make the best use of our ever-growing chemical and biological data repositories at the system-wide level. This chapter reviews some of the major research concepts and describes key components that constitute the emerging area of computational systems chemical biology. PMID:20838980

  15. The biological control of the malaria vector.

    PubMed

    Kamareddine, Layla

    2012-09-01

    The call for malaria control, over the last century, marked a new epoch in the history of this disease. Many control strategies targeting either the Plasmodium parasite or the Anopheles vector were shown to be effective. Yet, the emergence of drug resistant parasites and insecticide resistant mosquito strains, along with numerous health, environmental, and ecological side effects of many chemical agents, highlighted the need to develop alternative tools that either complement or substitute conventional malaria control approaches. The use of biological means is considered a fundamental part of the recently launched malaria eradication program and has so far shown promising results, although this approach is still in its infancy. This review presents an overview of the most promising biological control tools for malaria eradication, namely fungi, bacteria, larvivorous fish, parasites, viruses and nematodes. PMID:23105979

  16. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Anti-retroviral Drug Resistance Testing; ARV Resistance Testing Formal name: ...

  17. Investigating rust resistance with the model grass Brachypodium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has provided unique opportunities to explore and unravel many key biological features of plant biology including disease resistance. However, the inability of rust fungi of the genus Puccinia to infect Arabidopsis has prevented its use in exploring grass-rust int...

  18. Environmental implications of herbicide resistance: soil biology and ecology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil microbial community structure and activity are clearly linked to plant communities established in natural and agricultural ecosystems. A limited number of studies confirm that weeds alter their soil environment and select for specific microbial communities in the rhizosphere. Such rhizosphere m...

  19. Leaf rust of wheat: Pathogen biology, variation and host resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rusts are important pathogens of angiosperms and gymnosperms. Rust fungi are among the most important pathogens of cereals. Cereal rusts are heteroecious and macrocyclic requiring two taxonomically unrelated hosts to complete a five spore stage life cycle. Cereal rust fungi are highly variable for v...

  20. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  1. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  2. Engineering scalable biological systems

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic biology is focused on engineering biological organisms to study natural systems and to provide new solutions for pressing medical, industrial and environmental problems. At the core of engineered organisms are synthetic biological circuits that execute the tasks of sensing inputs, processing logic and performing output functions. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in developing basic designs for a wide range of biological circuits in bacteria, yeast and mammalian systems. However, significant challenges in the construction, probing, modulation and debugging of synthetic biological systems must be addressed in order to achieve scalable higher-complexity biological circuits. Furthermore, concomitant efforts to evaluate the safety and biocontainment of engineered organisms and address public and regulatory concerns will be necessary to ensure that technological advances are translated into real-world solutions. PMID:21468204

  3. Physical and biological properties of Bazna waters

    PubMed Central

    TRÂMBIŢAŞ, DAN

    2013-01-01

    The healing properties of Bazna waters and their therapeutic indications have been well known since the 18th century. The objective of the present study was to characterize these waters from physical and biological points of view, and to further analyze the nitrogen compounds, especially NH4+. The following physical parameters of the water were analyzed: density (g/cm3), electric resistivity (Ω·m), electric conductivity (cm−1o−1), salinity, The pH analysis of the biological component was performed on samples from 4 basins. Nitrogen compounds were dosed in the form of ammonium ion (NH4+). The physical and chemical proprieties are similar across the basins. Flora and fauna biological components were identified. Ammonium ions were identified in large quantities, but this did not lead to hygienicaly unclean waters. PMID:26527972

  4. Biological Warfare: Implications for Antimicrobial Use.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Ethan; Levi, Itzhak

    2002-02-01

    Biological warfare is intended to incapacitate a large number of individuals at a single exposure, creating epidemic-type disease, death, and social chaos. The organisms with potential for immediate use as bacteriologic weapons are Bacillus anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Yersinia pestis, and Vibrio cholera, all necessitating antibiotic therapy for a cure. It is reasonable, therefore, to assume that a biological attack, or even a hoax, would requiure thousands of individuals over a large area to begin antibiotic therapy. Issues such as antibiotic availability, logistical problems in antibiotic distribution, development of drug resistance, side effects influencing the individual, and adverse effects on the community due to the impact of mass therapy on the ecology, make biological warfare the most apocalyptic scenario for the creation of a "postantibiotic era." PMID:11853654

  5. Quinolone Resistance: Much More than Predicted

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Alvaro; Sánchez, María B.; Martínez, José L.

    2011-01-01

    Since quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, it was predicted that mutations in target genes would be the only mechanism through which resistance could be acquired, because there will not be quinolone-resistance genes in nature. Contrary to this prediction, a variety of elements ranging from efflux pumps, target-protecting proteins, and even quinolone-modifying enzymes have been shown to contribute to quinolone resistance. The finding of some of these elements in plasmids indicates that quinolone resistance can be transferable. As a result, there has been a developing interest on the reservoirs for quinolone-resistance genes and on the potential risks associated with the use of these antibiotics in non-clinical environments. As a matter of fact, plasmid-encoded, quinolone-resistance qnr genes originated in the chromosome of aquatic bacteria. Thus the use of quinolones in fish-farming might constitute a risk for the emergence of resistance. Failure to predict the development of quinolone resistance reinforces the need of taking into consideration the wide plasticity of biological systems for future predictions. This plasticity allows pathogens to deal with toxic compounds, including those with a synthetic origin as quinolones. PMID:21687414

  6. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2014-04-15

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  7. Biological detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M; McDowell, Andrew F

    2013-02-26

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  8. Biological detector and method

    SciTech Connect

    Sillerud, Laurel; Alam, Todd M.; McDowell, Andrew F.

    2015-11-24

    A biological detector includes a conduit for receiving a fluid containing one or more magnetic nanoparticle-labeled, biological objects to be detected and one or more permanent magnets or electromagnet for establishing a low magnetic field in which the conduit is disposed. A microcoil is disposed proximate the conduit for energization at a frequency that permits detection by NMR spectroscopy of whether the one or more magnetically-labeled biological objects is/are present in the fluid.

  9. Metadata Activities in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Inigo, Gil San; HUTCHISON, VIVIAN; Frame, Mike; Palanisamy, Giri

    2010-01-01

    The National Biological Information Infrastructure program has advanced the biological sciences ability to standardize, share, integrate and synthesize data by making the metadata program a core of its activities. Through strategic partnerships, a series of crosswalks for the main biological metadata specifications have enabled data providers and international clearinghouses to aggregate and disseminate tens of thousands of metadata sets describing petabytes of data records. New efforts at the National Biological Information Infrastructure are focusing on better metadata creation and curation tools, semantic mediation for data discovery and other curious initiatives.

  10. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  11. Macrothermodynamics of Biological Evolution:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, Georgi P.

    The author sets forth general considerations pertaining to the thermodynamic theory of biological evolution and the aging of living organisms. It becomes much easier to comprehend the phenomenon of life scrutinizing the formation of structural hierarchies of biological matter applying different temporal scales. These scales are 'identified' by nature itself, and this is reflected in the law of temporal hierarchies. The author discusses some misunderstandings in thermodynamics and evolutionary biology. A simple physicochemical model of biological evolution and the development of living beings is proposed. The considered theory makes it possible to use physicochemical evaluations to develop effective anti-aging diets.

  12. Opportunities for synthetic biology in antibiotics: expanding glycopeptide chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-03-20

    Synthetic biology offers a new path for the exploitation and improvement of natural products to address the growing crisis in antibiotic resistance. All antibiotics in clinical use are facing eventual obsolesce as a result of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms, yet there are few new drug leads forthcoming from the pharmaceutical sector. Natural products of microbial origin have proven over the past 70 years to be the wellspring of antimicrobial drugs. Harnessing synthetic biology thinking and strategies can provide new molecules and expand chemical diversity of known antibiotic scaffolds to provide much needed new drug leads. The glycopeptide antibiotics offer paradigmatic scaffolds suitable for such an approach. We review these strategies here using the glycopeptides as an example and demonstrate how synthetic biology can expand antibiotic chemical diversity to help address the growing resistance crisis. PMID:23654249

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides: Versatile Biological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are diverse group of biologically active molecules with multidimensional properties. In recent past, a wide variety of AMPs with diverse structures have been reported from different sources such as plants, animals, mammals, and microorganisms. The presence of unusual amino acids and structural motifs in AMPs confers unique structural properties to the peptide that attribute for their specific mode of action. The ability of these active AMPs to act as multifunctional effector molecules such as signalling molecule, immune modulators, mitogen, antitumor, and contraceptive agent makes it an interesting candidate to study every aspect of their structural and biological properties for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, easy cloning and recombinant expression of AMPs in heterologous plant host systems provided a pipeline for production of disease resistant transgenic plants. Besides these properties, AMPs were also used as drug delivery vectors to deliver cell impermeable drugs to cell interior. The present review focuses on the diversity and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of AMPs along with its multidimensional properties that could be exploited for the application of these bioactive peptides as a potential and promising drug candidate in pharmaceutical industries. PMID:23935642

  14. Workshop Introduction: Systems Biology and Biological Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    As we consider the future of toxicity testing, the importance of applying biological models to this problem is clear. Modeling efforts exist along a continuum with respect to the level of organization (e.g. cell, tissue, organism) linked to the resolution of the model. Generally,...

  15. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Cost Español: Datos breves Facts about Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotic resistance has been called one of the world’s most ... antibiotic use is a key strategy to control antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance in children is of particular concern ...

  16. Conserving and Enhancing Biological Control of Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Timper, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Conservation biological control is the modification of the environment or existing practices to protect and enhance antagonistic organisms to reduce damage from pests. This approach to biological control has received insufficient attention compared with inundative applications of microbial antagonists to control nematodes. This review provides examples of how production practices can enhance or diminish biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes and other soilborne pests. Antagonists of nematodes can be enhanced by providing supplementary food sources such as occurs when organic amendments are applied to soil. However, some organic amendments (e.g., manures and plants containing allelopathic compounds) can also be detrimental to nematode antagonists. Plant species and genotype can strongly influence the outcome of biological control. For instance, the susceptibility of the plant to the nematode can determine the effectiveness of control; good hosts will require greater levels of suppression than poor hosts. Plant genotype can also influence the degree of rhizosphere colonization and antibiotic production by antagonists, as well the expression of induced resistance by plants. Production practices such as crop rotation, fallow periods, tillage, and pesticide applications can directly disrupt populations of antagonistic organisms. These practices can also indirectly affect antagonists by reducing their primary nematode host. One of the challenges of conservation biological control is that practices intended to protect or enhance suppression of nematodes may not be effective in all field sites because they are dependent on indigenous antagonists. Ultimately, indicators will need to be identified, such as the presence of particular antagonists, which can guide decisions on where it is practical to use conservation biological control. Antagonists can also be applied to field sites in conjunction with conservation practices to improve the consistency, efficacy, and

  17. Recognizing the real threat of biological terror.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Richard P.

    2002-01-01

    Weapons of mass destruction can be used to harm and terrorize populations. Such weapons include those with chemical, nuclear or biological properties. Obviously computer viruses can add additional barriers to a quick response. The most effective, least costly and greatest threats are biologicals. Biological terror is not new, and biological weapons have been used for centuries. However, as a result of modern technology, the risks are greater now and the outcomes more terrible. Today they include live pathogens, various toxins, and theoretically "bioregulators"--biochemicals affecting cell signaling. Altered cell signaling could be used to induce apoptosis-cell death, or a heightened outpouring of cytokines mimicking overwhelming sepsis, or even an intracellular, biochemical "strike" causing cellular paralysis. Biological weaponeers now have the frightening ability to alter the genetic makeup of pathogens, rendering them resistant not only to available antibiotic therapy but also to currently effective vaccines. In dark corners of some fringe groups, bioweaponeers are searching for the capability of designing pathogens that target specific races, by virtue of discriminating ligands (1). The resulting morbidity and mortality from use of any biological weapons will be accompanied by chaos, governmental and social instability, panic, an extraordinary utilization of available resources, and an ongoing epidemic of sleepless nights (2,3). Herein I will review some of the issues and some of the currently available biological weapons. The major goal is to highlight the clinical presentations of patients with infections that could be used as biological weapons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:12053717

  18. Experimenting with Mathematical Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanft, Rebecca; Walter, Anne

    2016-01-01

    St. Olaf College recently added a Mathematical Biology concentration to its curriculum. The core course, Mathematics of Biology, was redesigned to include a wet laboratory. The lab classes required students to collect data and implement the essential modeling techniques of formulation, implementation, validation, and analysis. The four labs…

  19. MARYLAND BIOLOGICAL STREAM SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Maryland Biological Stream Survey (MBSS) is a multi-year probability-based sampling program designed to assess the status of biological resources in non-tidal streams of Maryland. The MBSS is quantifying the extent to which acidic deposition and other human activities have af...

  20. Bioinformatics and School Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalpech, Roger

    2006-01-01

    The rapidly changing field of bioinformatics is fuelling the need for suitably trained personnel with skills in relevant biological "sub-disciplines" such as proteomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics, etc. But because of the complexity--and sheer weight of data--associated with these new areas of biology, many school teachers feel…

  1. Biology Bulletins "Revisited"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audet, Richard H.

    2006-01-01

    In October 1981, an article appeared in "The American Biology Teacher" with the catchy title, "Bio-Bull." In it, author, Dale Carlson, described a powerful form of communication that he employed successfully in his community college classes. Each week students received what he called a "Bio-Bull" that included current biological topics,…

  2. Towards a Liberal Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, P. M. C.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the purpose of a university biology department and the organization of its curriculum in terms of perceived crises in British biology. Concludes that reform becomes a project of crucial importance, not only to the social and technological development of civilized societies, but to the survival of the human species. (Author/AL)

  3. Biological monitors of pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Root, M.

    1990-02-01

    This article discusses the use of biological monitors to assess the biological consequences of toxicants in the environment, such as bioavailability, synergism, and bioaccumulation through the food web. Among the organisms discussed are fly larvae, worms, bees, shellfish, fishes, birds (starlings, owls, hawks, songbirds) and mammals (rabbits, field mice, shrews).

  4. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  5. Biology 100-A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pensacola Junior Coll., FL.

    This publication is the course guide book for a one-semester, non-laboratory junior college course in biology. Included for each topic are lesson objectives, learning materials, and discussion ideas for seminar groups. Topics include the organization of life, heredity, reproduction, the meaning of biology to modern man, and homeostasis and…

  6. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  7. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  8. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2002-09-01

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects; and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (apriori) or in response to existing contamination spread (aposteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and apriori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, aposteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  9. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  10. EXPANDED BED BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-year pilot-scale research investigation at the EPA Lebanon Pilot Plant was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a unique biological secondary treatment process, designated the Expanded Bed Biological Treatment Process (EBBT). The EBBT process is a three-phase (oxygen/...

  11. Biologic Patterns of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Carl V.; Linn, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of Rasch analysis to elucidate biological patterns of disability present in the functional ability of persons undergoing medical rehabilitation. Uses two measures, one for inpatients and one for outpatients, to illustrate the approach and provides examples of some biological patterns of disability associated with specific types…

  12. Human Biology: Experimental.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    Education is a process of adapting to change, and the rate of change is especially rapid in science today. This curriculum in human biology is an alternative to the New York State courses in general and Regents biology, and it has been designed to focus on change from the standpoint of the urban student. It is designed to provide students with…

  13. Space biology research development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonting, Sjoerd L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Institute is to conduct and promote research related activities regarding the search for extraterrestrial life, particularly intelligent life. Such research encompasses the broad discipline of 'Life in the Universe', including all scientific and technological aspects of astronomy and the planetary sciences, chemical evolution, the origin of life, biological evolution, and cultural evolution. The primary purpose was to provide funding for the Principal Investigator to collaborate with the personnel of the SETI Institute and the NASA-Ames Research center in order to plan and develop space biology research on and in connection with Space Station Freedom; to promote cooperation with the international partners in the space station; to conduct a study on the use of biosensors in space biology research and life support system operation; and to promote space biology research through the initiation of an annual publication 'Advances in Space Biology and Medicine'.

  14. Biological sample collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  15. Tumour resistance to cisplatin: a modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, L.; Bezak, E.; Olver, I.; van Doorn, T.

    2005-01-01

    Although chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of haematological tumours, in many common solid tumours the success has been limited. Some of the reasons for the limitations are: the timing of drug delivery, resistance to the drug, repopulation between cycles of chemotherapy and the lack of complete understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a specific agent. Cisplatin is among the most effective cytotoxic agents used in head and neck cancer treatments. When modelling cisplatin as a single agent, the properties of cisplatin only have to be taken into account, reducing the number of assumptions that are considered in the generalized chemotherapy models. The aim of the present paper is to model the biological effect of cisplatin and to simulate the consequence of cisplatin resistance on tumour control. The 'treated' tumour is a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, previously grown by computer-based Monte Carlo techniques. The model maintained the biological constitution of a tumour through the generation of stem cells, proliferating cells and non-proliferating cells. Cell kinetic parameters (mean cell cycle time, cell loss factor, thymidine labelling index) were also consistent with the literature. A sensitivity study on the contribution of various mechanisms leading to drug resistance is undertaken. To quantify the extent of drug resistance, the cisplatin resistance factor (CRF) is defined as the ratio between the number of surviving cells of the resistant population and the number of surviving cells of the sensitive population, determined after the same treatment time. It is shown that there is a supra-linear dependence of CRF on the percentage of cisplatin-DNA adducts formed, and a sigmoid-like dependence between CRF and the percentage of cells killed in resistant tumours. Drug resistance is shown to be a cumulative process which eventually can overcome tumour regression leading to treatment failure.

  16. Status of insecticide resistance and selection for imidacloprid resistance in the ladybird beetle Propylaea japonica (Thunberg).

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang-De; Qiu, Bao-Li; Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Ren, Shun-Xiang

    2015-09-01

    Field populations or strains of Propylaea japonica collected from four places in southern China (Guangzhou, Nanning, Guilin, and Yuxi) were tested for susceptibility to four insecticides (abamectin, imidacloprid, beta-cypermethrin, and chlorpyrifos) by the Petri-dish Potter tower method and compared with an insecticide-susceptible strain. Concentrations that proved lethal for 50% of the tested individuals (LC50) were estimated by probit analysis, and resistance factors (RF) were calculated at the LC50 level, which ranged from 1.6 to 10.1, depending on the insecticide. In addition, the Guangzhou strain formed the original population for imidacloprid resistance selection. After selection for 20 generations, the resistance had increased 39.3-fold. Fitness analysis in terms of such traits as fecundity, days to maturity, and survival showed that although both resistant and susceptible populations developed at comparable rates, the resistant strain was less fecund (it laid fewer eggs and a smaller proportion of those eggs hatched and resulted in adults), attaining a fitness score of only 0.56 relative to the susceptible strain. These observations suggest that it is possible to detect strains of P. japonica highly resistant to insecticides under laboratory conditions, and that resistance to imidacloprid carries considerable fitness costs to P. japonica. The study served to expand our understanding of the impact of imidacloprid resistance on biological parameters of P. japonica in more detail and to facilitate the deployment of natural enemies resistant to insecticides in integrated pest management. PMID:26267056

  17. Antibiotic resistance: from Darwin to Lederberg to Keynes.

    PubMed

    Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F

    2013-04-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria reflects both, a gradual, completely Darwinian evolution, which mostly yields slight decreases in antibiotic susceptibility, along with phenotypes that are not precisely characterized as "resistance"; and sudden changes, from full susceptibility to full resistance, which are driven by a vast array of horizontal gene transfer mechanisms. Antibiotics select for more than just antibiotic resistance (i.e., increased virulence and enhanced gene exchange abilities); and many non-antibiotic agents or conditions select for or maintain antibiotic resistance traits as a result of a complex network of underlying and often overlapping mechanisms. Thus, the development of new antibiotics and thoughtful, integrated anti-infective strategies is needed to address the immediate and long-term threat of antibiotic resistance. Since the biology of resistance is complex, these new drugs and strategies will not come from free-market forces, or from "incentives" for pharmaceutical companies. PMID:23046150

  18. Anthelmintic resistance: markers for resistance, or susceptibility?

    PubMed Central

    BEECH, R. N.; SKUCE, P.; BARTLEY, D. J.; MARTIN, R. J.; PRICHARD, R. K.; GILLEARD, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Consortium for Anthelmintic Resistance and Susceptibility (CARS) brings together researchers worldwide, with a focus of advancing knowledge of resistance and providing information on detection methods and treatment strategies. Advances in this field suggest mechanisms and features of resistance that are shared among different classes of anthelmintic. Benzimidazole resistance is characterized by specific amino acid substitutions in beta-tubulin. If present, these substitutions increase in frequency upon drug treatment and lead to treatment failure. In the laboratory, sequence substitutions in ion-channels can contribute to macrocyclic lactone resistance, but there is little evidence that they are significant in the field. Changes in gene expression are associated with resistance to several different classes of anthelmintic. Increased P-glycoprotein expression may prevent drug access to its site of action. Decreased expression of ion-channel subunits and the loss of specific receptors may remove the drug target. Tools for the identification and genetic analysis of parasitic nematodes and a new online database will help to coordinate research efforts in this area. Resistance may result from a loss of sensitivity as well as the appearance of resistance. A focus on the presence of anthelmintic susceptibility may be as important as the detection of resistance. PMID:20825689

  19. Resistance Factor-Mediated Spectinomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David H.; Janjigian, J. A.; Prescott, Naomi; Anderson, Porter W.

    1970-01-01

    Of 100 natural isolates of drug-resistant enteric bacteria, 51 were resistant to spectinomycin (Spc) and 46 contained transferable R factors mediating Spc resistance. All SpcR R factors mediated streptomycin and bluensomycin resistance and were fi+ type. Extracts of R-SpcR strains adenylated Spc, dihydrospectinomycin, actinamine, streptomycin, and bluensomycin in vitro in the presence of adenosine triphosphate and Mg++. Results of genetic and biochemical studies support the hypothesis that these reactions are mediated by a single enzyme. PMID:16557684

  20. Essential Oils, A New Horizon in Combating Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Yiap, Beow Chin; Ping, Hu Cai; Lim, Swee Hua Erin

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the battle between humans and the multitudes of infection and disease causing pathogens continues. Emerging at the battlefield as some of the most significant challenges to human health are bacterial resistance and its rapid rise. These have become a major concern in global public health invigorating the need for new antimicrobial compounds. A rational approach to deal with antibiotic resistance problems requires detailed knowledge of the different biological and non-biological factors that affect the rate and extent of resistance development. Combination therapy combining conventional antibiotics and essential oils is currently blooming and represents a potential area for future investigations. This new generation of phytopharmaceuticals may shed light on the development of new pharmacological regimes in combating antibiotic resistance. This review consolidated and described the observed synergistic outcome between essential oils and antibiotics, and highlighted the possibilities of essential oils as the potential resistance modifying agent. PMID:24627729

  1. Biological Resource Centers and Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufeng

    2009-01-01

    There are hundreds of Biological Resource Centers (BRCs) around the world, holding many little-studied microorganism. The proportion of bacterial strains that is well represented in the sequence and literature databases may be as low as 1%. This body of unexplored diversity represents an untapped source of useful strains and derived products. However, a modicum of phenotypic data is available for almost all the bacterial strains held by BRCs around the world. It is at the phenotypic level that our knowledge of the well-studied strains of bacteria and the many yet-to-be studied strains intersects. This suggests we might leverage the phenotypic data from the data-poor bacteria with the omics data from the data-rich bacteria, using our knowledge of their evolutionary relationships, to map the metabolic networks of the little-known bacteria. This systems biology-based approach is a new way to explore the diversity harbored in BRCs. PMID:20157346

  2. Biologic agents in the treatment of glomerulonephritides.

    PubMed

    Yeo, See Cheng; Liew, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    Current immunosuppression strategies in the treatment of glomerulonephritides remain unsatisfactory, especially in glomerular diseases that are frequently relapsing or are resistant to treatment. Toxicities associated with the use of drugs with non-specific targets for the immune response result in treatment non-compliance, and increase morbidity and mortality in these patients. Advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritis and the availability of biologics have led to their successful use in the treatment of immune-mediated glomerular diseases. Biologics are usually very large complex molecules, often produced using recombinant DNA technology and manufactured in a living system such as a microorganism, or plant or animal cells. They are novel agents that can target specific immune cell types, cytokines or immune pathways involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. It is attractive to consider that, given their specific mode of action, these agents can potentially offer a more directed and effective immunosuppression, with side-effect profiles that are much more desirable. However, there have been few randomized controlled trials comparing biologic agents to conventional immunosuppression, and in many of these studies the side-effect profiles have been disappointingly similar. In this review, we will examine the rationale, efficacy and safety of some commonly used biologics in the treatment of primary and secondary glomerulonephritides. We will also discuss some of the key challenges that may be encountered with the use of biologics in treating glomerulonephritis in the future. PMID:26040770

  3. Issues in chemical and biological terrorism.

    PubMed

    Salem, Harry

    2003-01-01

    This manuscript describes the overview presented at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American College of Toxicology in 2002. Although it is recognized that weapons of mass destruction that can be used against our military and civilian populations include chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) agents, this overview is limited primarily to chemical and biological (CB) agents. The issues of CB terrorism are discussed in terms of When, What, How, and Who. The US Army has been providing chemical and biological solutions since 1917, and has since 1996 applied these solutions to homeland defense and domestic preparedness. The use of chemical and biological agents as terrorist weapons both in the United States and elsewhere in the world is reviewed. The CB threat spectrum is presented, as is the further categorization of biological threat agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In addition, the CB agents considered to be a potential threat to our water supply are also presented. These are agents that are water soluble, stable, and resistant to water treatment and/or disinfection. The overview concludes with the chronological accomplishments of ECBC since 1917. PMID:14680993

  4. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it. PMID:27097837

  5. Tumor microenvironment and cancer therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu

    2016-09-28

    Innate resistance to various therapeutic interventions is a hallmark of cancer. In recent years, however, acquired resistance has emerged as a daunting challenge to anticancer treatments including chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapy, which abolishes the efficacy of otherwise successful regimens. Cancer cells gain resistance through a variety of mechanisms in both primary and metastatic sites, involving cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors, but the latter often remains overlooked. Mounting evidence suggests critical roles played by the tumor microenvironment (TME) in multiple aspects of cancer progression particularly therapeutic resistance. The TME decreases drug penetration, confers proliferative and antiapoptotic advantages to surviving cells, facilitates resistance without causing genetic mutations and epigenetic changes, collectively modifying disease modality and distorting clinical indices. Recent studies have set the baseline for future investigation on the intricate relationship between cancer resistance and the TME in pathological backgrounds. This review provides an updated outline of research advances in TME biology and highlights the prospect of targeting the TME as an essential strategy to overcome cancer resistance and improve therapeutic outcomes through precise intervention. In the long run, continued inputs into translational medicine remain highly desired to achieve durable responses in the current era of personalized clinical oncology. PMID:26272180

  6. Managing biological diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samson, Fred B.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1993-01-01

    Biological diversity is the variety of life and accompanying ecological processes (Off. Technol. Assess. 1987, Wilcove and Samson 1987, Keystone 1991). Conservation of biological diversity is a major environmental issue (Wilson 1988, Counc. Environ. Quality 1991). The health and future of the earth's ecological systems (Lubchenco et al. 1991), global climate change (Botkin 1990), and an ever-increasing rate in loss of species, communities, and ecological systems (Myers 1990) are among issues drawing biological diversity to the mainstream of conservation worldwide (Int. Union Conserv. Nat. and Nat. Resour. [IUCN] et al. 1991). The legal mandate for conserving biological diversity is now in place (Carlson 1988, Doremus 1991). More than 19 federal laws govern the use of biological resources in the United States (Rein 1991). The proposed National Biological Diversity Conservation and Environmental Research Act (H.R. 585 and S.58) notes the need for a national biological diversity policy, would create a national center for biological diversity research, and recommends a federal interagency strategy for ecosystem conservation. There are, however, hard choices ahead for the conservation of biological diversity, and biologists are grappling with how to set priorities in research and management (Roberts 1988). We sense disillusion among field biologists and managers relative to how to operationally approach the seemingly overwhelming charge of conserving biological diversity. Biologists also need to respond to critics like Hunt (1991) who suggest a tree farm has more biological diversity than an equal area of old-growth forest. At present, science has played only a minor role in the conservation of biological diversity (Weston 1992) with no unified approach available to evaluate strategies and programs that address the quality and quantity of biological diversity (Murphy 1990, Erwin 1992). Although actions to conserve biological diversity need to be clearly defined by

  7. Noise in biological circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Michael L; Allen, Michael S.; Cox, Chris D.; Dar, Roy D.; Karig, David K; McCollum, James M.; Cooke, John F

    2009-01-01

    Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and reviewmany of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology.

  8. Biological and Chemical Security

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, P J

    2002-12-19

    The LLNL Chemical & Biological National Security Program (CBNP) provides science, technology and integrated systems for chemical and biological security. Our approach is to develop and field advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical or biological weapons. Recent events show the importance of civilian defense against terrorism. The 1995 nerve gas attack in Tokyo's subway served to catalyze and focus the early LLNL program on civilian counter terrorism. In the same year, LLNL began CBNP using Laboratory-Directed R&D investments and a focus on biodetection. The Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction Act, passed in 1996, initiated a number of U.S. nonproliferation and counter-terrorism programs including the DOE (now NNSA) Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (also known as CBNP). In 2002, the Department of Homeland Security was formed. The NNSA CBNP and many of the LLNL CBNP activities are being transferred as the new Department becomes operational. LLNL has a long history in national security including nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction. In biology, LLNL had a key role in starting and implementing the Human Genome Project and, more recently, the Microbial Genome Program. LLNL has over 1,000 scientists and engineers with relevant expertise in biology, chemistry, decontamination, instrumentation, microtechnologies, atmospheric modeling, and field experimentation. Over 150 LLNL scientists and engineers work full time on chemical and biological national security projects.

  9. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases. PMID:26204087

  10. A Hypothesis on Biological Protection from Space Radiation Through the Use of Therapeutic Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation proposes a hypothesis to use therapeutic gases in space to enhance the biological protection for astronauts from space radiation. The fundamental role in how radiation causes biological damage appears to be radiolysis, the dissociation of water by radiation. A chain of events appears to cause molecular and biological transformations that ultimately manifest into medical diseases. The hypothesis of this work is that applying medical gases may increase resistance to radiation, by possessing the chemical properties that effectively improve the radical scavenging and enhance bond repair and to induce biological processes which enhance and support natural resistance and repair mechanisms.

  11. [Viruses as biological weapons].

    PubMed

    Akçali, Alper

    2005-07-01

    The destruction made by nuclear, biological and chemical weapons used by governments and terrorist groups in the near history is posing anxiety and fear for human being. Rumour about the possible use of these agents leads to the development of serious negative effects on populations. Since there are no vaccine and therapy for most viral agents and cost of production as biological weapons is low, interest rate is rising for viruses. In this review, general characteristics, diagnosis, therapy and protective measures for viral agents such as variola virus, hemorrhagic fever viruses, encephalitis viruses, Hantaviruses and Nipah viruses, those can be used as biological weapon, have been summarized. PMID:16358499

  12. Powdery Mildew Disease Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, Shauna C.

    2010-08-31

    The overall goal of this project was to characterize the PMR5 protein, a member of the DUF231/TBR family, and to determine its role in plant cell wall biogenesis. Since the pmr5 mutants are also resistant to the fungal powdery mildew pathogen, we wished to determine what specific cell wall changes are associated with disease resistance and why. The graduate student working on this project made mutations in the putative active site of PMR5, assuming it is a member of the SGNH/GDSL esterase superfamily (Anantharaman and Aravind, 2010, Biology Direct 5, 1). These mutants were inactive in planta suggesting that PMR5 is a functional enzyme and not a binding protein or chaperone. In addition, she determined that cell wall preparations from the pmr5 mutant exhibited a modest reduction (13%) in total acetyl groups. To pursue characterization further, the graduate student expressed the PMR5 protein in a heterologous E. coli system. She could purify PMR5 using a two step protocol based on tags added to the N and C terminus of the protein. She was able to show the PMR5 protein bound to pectins, including homogalacturonan, but not to other cell wall components (e.g., xyloglucans, arabinans). Based on these observations, a postdoctoral fellow is currently developing an enzyme assay for PMR5 based on the idea that it may be acetylating the homogalacturonic acid pectin fraction. Our initial experiments to localize PMR5 subcellularly suggested that it occurred in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, since the various pectins are believed to be synthesized in the Golgi apparatus, we felt it necessary to repeat our results using a native promoter expression system. Within the past year, we have demonstrated conclusively that PMR5 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, a location that sets it apart from most cell wall biogenesis and modification enzymes. The graduate student contributed to the characterization of two suppressor mutants, which were selected as restoring powdery

  13. Resistant multiple sparse canonical correlation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jacob; Replogle, Joseph; Chandler, Gabriel; Hardin, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a multivariate technique that takes two datasets and forms the most highly correlated possible pairs of linear combinations between them. Each subsequent pair of linear combinations is orthogonal to the preceding pair, meaning that new information is gleaned from each pair. By looking at the magnitude of coefficient values, we can find out which variables can be grouped together, thus better understanding multiple interactions that are otherwise difficult to compute or grasp intuitively. CCA appears to have quite powerful applications to high-throughput data, as we can use it to discover, for example, relationships between gene expression and gene copy number variation. One of the biggest problems of CCA is that the number of variables (often upwards of 10,000) makes biological interpretation of linear combinations nearly impossible. To limit variable output, we have employed a method known as sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA), while adding estimation which is resistant to extreme observations or other types of deviant data. In this paper, we have demonstrated the success of resistant estimation in variable selection using SCCA. Additionally, we have used SCCA to find multiple canonical pairs for extended knowledge about the datasets at hand. Again, using resistant estimators provided more accurate estimates than standard estimators in the multiple canonical correlation setting. R code is available and documented at https://github.com/hardin47/rmscca. PMID:26963062

  14. [Proteins in cancer multidrug resistance].

    PubMed

    Popęda, Marta; Płuciennik, Elżbieta; Bednarek, Andrzej K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug Resistance (MDR) is defined as insensitivity to administered medicines that are structurally unrelated and have different molecular targets. Cancers possess numerous mechanisms of drug resistance, involving various aspects of cell biology. A pivotal role in this phenomenon is played by proteins--enzymatic or structural parts of the cell. Membrane transporters, including the main members of ABC protein family--P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP, as well as LRP, which builds structure of vaults, determine the multidrug-resistant phenotype by decreasing drug concentration within the cell or modifying its distribution to intracellular compartments. The π isoform of protein enzyme--glutathione S-transferase (GSTP-1), is responsible for excessive intensity of detoxification of cytostatics. A common example of altered drug target site that does not respond to chemotherapy is topoisomerase II α (TopoIIa). Alterations of programmed cell death result from expression of metallothionein (MT)--inhibitor of the process, and cytokeratin 18 (CK18), which, if in high concentration, also prevents apoptosis of cells. Several methods of decreasing activity of these proteins have been developed, aiming to overcome MDR in cancer cells. However, for a variety of reasons, their clinical suitability is still very low, leading to continuous increase in death rate among patients. This paper presents current state of knowledge on the most important examples of proteins responsible for MDR of cancer cells and molecular mechanisms of their action. PMID:24864112

  15. Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Large amounts of antibiotics used for human therapy, as well as for farm animals and even for fish in aquaculture, resulted in the selection of pathogenic bacteria resistant to multiple drugs. Multidrug resistance in bacteria may be generated by one of two mechanisms. First, these bacteria may accumulate multiple genes, each coding for resistance to a single drug, within a single cell. This accumulation occurs typically on resistance (R) plasmids. Second, multidrug resistance may also occur by the increased expression of genes that code for multidrug efflux pumps, extruding a wide range of drugs. This review discusses our current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in both types of resistance. PMID:19231985

  16. Thermodynamics of Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Hernan G.; Kondev, Jane; Orme, Nigel; Theriot, Julie A.; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    There is a long and rich tradition of using ideas from both equilibrium thermodynamics and its microscopic partner theory of equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this chapter, we provide some background on the origins of the seemingly unreasonable effectiveness of ideas from both thermodynamics and statistical mechanics in biology. After making a description of these foundational issues, we turn to a series of case studies primarily focused on binding that are intended to illustrate the broad biological reach of equilibrium thinking in biology. These case studies include ligand-gated ion channels, thermodynamic models of transcription, and recent applications to the problem of bacterial chemotaxis. As part of the description of these case studies, we explore a number of different uses of the famed Monod–Wyman–Changeux (MWC) model as a generic tool for providing a mathematical characterization of two-state systems. These case studies should provide a template for tailoring equilibrium ideas to other problems of biological interest. PMID:21333788

  17. SOIL BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term "Soil Biology", the study of organism groups living in soil, (plants, lichens, algae, moss, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, and arthropods), predates "Soil Ecology", the study of interactions between soil organisms as mediated by the soil physical environment. oil ...

  18. Biological satellite Kosmos-936

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedeshin, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of physiological experiments performed on the biological satellite Kosmos-936. Other experiments to determine the electrostatic and dielectric responses to the effects of cosmic radiation are discussed.

  19. Recapturing Quantitative Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pernezny, Ken; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity on estimating animal populations. Uses shoe boxes and candies to emphasize the importance of mathematics in biology while introducing the methods of quantitative ecology. (JRH)

  20. The Biology of Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broom, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses topics to aid in understanding animal behavior, including the value of the biological approach to psychology, functional systems, optimality and fitness, universality of environmental effects on behavior, and evolution of social behavior. (DS)

  1. Microbiology in Introductory Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callery, Michael L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a microbiology unit developed for an introductory college biology course in which the identity of an unknown bacterium is determined. Also described is an interactive taxonomy computer program which aids in the identity of the unknown organism. (CS)

  2. Insecticides and Biological Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furness, G. O.

    1972-01-01

    Use of insecticides has been questioned due to their harmful effects on edible items. Biological control of insects along with other effective practices for checking spread of parasites on crops are discussed. (PS)

  3. The Biology of Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprott, Richard L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen articles in this special issue discuss aging theories, biomarkers of aging, aging research, disease, cancer biology, Alzheimer's disease, stress, oxidation of proteins, gene therapy, service delivery, biogerontology, and ethics and aging research. (SK)

  4. Biological selectivity of extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchell, Jennifer A.

    Selective survival across major extinction event horizons is both a bothersome puzzle and an opportunity to delimit the biologically interesting question of causality. Heritable differences in characters may have predictable consequences in terms of differential species survival. Differences in magnitude and intensity of extinction are insufficient to distinguish background from mass extinction regimes. Biological adaptations may establish links of causality between abnormal times of mass extinction and normal times of background extinction. A current hypothesis, developed from a comparison of extinction patterns among Late Cretaceous molluscs, is that biological adaptations of organisms, effective during normal times of Earth history, are ineffectual during times of crises. A counter example is provided by data from high-latitude laminated marine strata that preserve evidence of an actively exploited life-history strategy among Late Cretaceous phytoplankton. These data illustrate a causal dependency between a biological character selected for during times of background extinction and macroevolutionary survivorship during an unusual time of crisis.

  5. BIOLOGICAL PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three proprietary biological phosphorus removal processes are reviewed. The paper presents the description and development status of these technologies. The paper is a summary of the emerging technology assessment report published by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1984. ...

  6. Ontologies for molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Kremer, S

    1998-01-01

    Molecular biology has a communication problem. There are many databases using their own labels and categories for storing data objects and some using identical labels and categories but with a different meaning. A prominent example is the concept "gene" which is used with different semantics by major international genomic databases. Ontologies are one means to provide a semantic repository to systematically order relevant concepts in molecular biology and to bridge the different notions in various databases by explicitly specifying the meaning of and relation between the fundamental concepts in an application domain. Here, the upper level and a database branch of a prospective ontology for molecular biology (OMB) is presented and compared to other ontologies with respect to suitability for molecular biology (http:/(/)igd.rz-berlin.mpg.de/approximately www/oe/mbo.html). PMID:9697223

  7. Vibrations, quanta and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B.

    2013-07-01

    Quantum biology is an emerging field of research that concerns itself with the experimental and theoretical exploration of non-trivial quantum phenomena in biological systems. In this tutorial overview we aim to bring out fundamental assumptions and questions in the field, identify basic design principles and develop a key underlying theme - the dynamics of quantum dynamical networks in the presence of an environment and the fruitful interplay that the two may enter. At the hand of three biological phenomena whose understanding is held to require quantum mechanical processes, namely excitation and charge transfer in photosynthetic complexes, magneto-reception in birds and the olfactory sense, we demonstrate that this underlying theme encompasses them all, thus suggesting its wider relevance as an archetypical framework for quantum biology.

  8. EDITORIAL: Physical Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscoe, Jane

    2004-06-01

    Physical Biology is a new peer-reviewed publication from Institute of Physics Publishing. Launched in 2004, the journal will foster the integration of biology with the traditionally more quantitative fields of physics, chemistry, computer science and other math-based disciplines. Its primary aim is to further the understanding of biological systems at all levels of complexity, ranging from the role of structure and dynamics of a single molecule to cellular networks and organisms. The journal encourages the development of a new biology-driven physics based on the extraordinary and increasingly rich data arising in biology, and provides research directions for those involved in the creation of novel bio-engineered systems. Physical Biology will publish a stimulating combination of full length research articles, communications, perspectives, reviews and tutorials from a wide range of disciplines covering topics such as: Single-molecule studies and nanobiotechnology Molecular interactions and protein folding Charge transfer and photobiology Ion channels; structure, function and ion regulation Molecular motors and force generation Subcellular processes Biological networks and neural systems Modeling aspects of molecular and cell biology Cell-cell signaling and interaction Biological patterns and development Evolutionary processes Novel tools and methods in physical biology Experts in the areas encompassed by the journal's scope have been appointed to the Editorial Scientific Committee and the composition of the Committee will be updated regularly to reflect the developments in this new and exciting field. Physical Biology is free online to everyone in 2004; you are invited to take advantage of this offer by visiting the journal homepage at http://physbio.iop.org This special print edition of Physical Biology is a combination of issues 1 and 2 of this electronic-only journal and it brings together an impressive range of articles in the fields covered, including a popular

  9. The Biology Olympics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medve, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the first Biology Olympics for high school teams which took place at Slippery Rock State College, Pennsylvania. Individual events are described as well as the visitation day program for nonparticipants. (SA)

  10. Synthetic biology and biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Robienski, Jürgen; Simon, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the conflict fields and legal questions of synthetic biology, esp. concerning biosecurity. A respective jurisprudential discussion has not taken place yet in Germany apart from few statements and recommendations. But in Germany, Europe and the USA, it is generally accepted that a broad discussion is necessary. This is esp. true for the question of biosecurity and the possible dangers arising from Synthetic Biology. PMID:25845204

  11. Systems cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Fred D.; Ratushny, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Systems cell biology melds high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modeling to understand many critical processes that contribute to cellular organization and dynamics. Recently, there have been several advances in technology and in the application of modeling approaches that enable the exploration of the dynamic properties of cells. Merging technology and computation offers an opportunity to objectively address unsolved cellular mechanisms, and has revealed emergent properties and helped to gain a more comprehensive and fundamental understanding of cell biology. PMID:25225336

  12. Graphs in molecular biology

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Carey, Vincent J; Long, Li; Falcon, Seth; Gentleman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Graph theoretical concepts are useful for the description and analysis of interactions and relationships in biological systems. We give a brief introduction into some of the concepts and their areas of application in molecular biology. We discuss software that is available through the Bioconductor project and present a simple example application to the integration of a protein-protein interaction and a co-expression network. PMID:17903289

  13. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27383577

  14. Flame-resistant textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogg, L. C.; Stringham, R. S.; Toy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Flame resistance treatment for acid resistant polyamide fibers involving photoaddition of fluorocarbons to surface has been scaled up to treat 10 yards of commercial width (41 in.) fabric. Process may be applicable to other low cost polyamides, polyesters, and textiles.

  15. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced by natural or human activity on the ecology and living organisms. Ecology The study of the relationships and interactions between ... antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial Agents Glossary References Web ...

  16. Power to Resist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, Janice

    1975-01-01

    Transferrable drug resistance has been observed in bacteria for over ten years. Concern now is that livestock that have been fed with grain supplemented with antibiotics for growth stimulation will infect humans with potentially dangerous resistant bacteria. (MA)

  17. Oxidation-resistant cermet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    Chromium metal alloys and chromium oxide ceramic are combined to produce cermets with oxidation-resistant properties. Application of cermets includes use in hot corrosive environments requiring strong resistive materials.

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... major obstacles to understanding the issue of antimicrobial resistance is that the subject material appears abstract and is complex. This video was designed to make the concept of antimicrobial resistance more real and understandable to veterinarians, livestock producers, ...

  19. The Changing Image of Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurd, Paul DeHart

    2001-01-01

    Defines the changes in the nature of biology during the past 50 years and relates biology to science education. Argues that biology curriculum should focus on human beings and the realities of life and living. (YDS)

  20. Biology Olympics: A New Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Alan J., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a new department in this journal titled "Biology Olympics." Presents justification for this department and discusses the first three "challenges" focusing on: (1) model-building, (2) plant biology, and (3) human biology. (DS)

  1. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  2. [Biologics and mycobacterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Tomoshige

    2013-03-01

    Various biologics such as TNF-alpha inhibitor or IL-6 inhibitor are now widely used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Many reports suggested that one of the major issues is high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) associated with using these agents, which is especially important in Japan where tuberculosis still remains endemic. Another concern is the risk of development of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) diseases and we have only scanty information about it. The purpose of this symposium is to elucidate the role of biologics in the development of mycobacterial diseases and to establish the strategy to control them. First, Dr. Tohma showed the epidemiologic data of TB risks associated with using biologics calculated from the clinical database on National Database of Rheumatic Diseases by iR-net in Japan. He estimated TB risks in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to be about four times higher compared with general populations and to become even higher by using biologics. He also pointed out a low rate of implementation of QuantiFERON test (QFT) as screening test for TB infection. Next, Dr. Tokuda discussed the issue of NTM disease associated with using biologics. He suggested the airway disease in RA patients might play some role in the development of NTM disease, which may conversely lead to overdiagnosis of NTM disease in RA patients. He suggested that NTM disease should not be uniformly considered a contraindication to treatment with biologics, considering from the results of recent multicenter study showing relatively favorable outcome of NTM patients receiving biologics. Patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) should receive LTBI treatment before starting biologics. Dr. Kato, a chairperson of the Prevention Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis, proposed a new LTBI guideline including active implementation of LTBI treatment, introducing interferon gamma release assay, and appropriate selection of persons at high risk for

  3. Understanding Resistance to Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Justin R.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Hemann, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The current clinical application of combination chemotherapy is guided by a historically successful set of practices that were developed by basic and clinical researchers 50-60 years ago. Thus, in order to understand how emerging approaches to drug development might aid the creation of new therapeutic combinations, it is critical to understand the defining principles underlying classic combination therapy and the original experimental rationales behind them. One such principle is that the use of combination therapies with independent mechanisms of action can minimize the evolution of drug resistance. Another is that in order to kill sufficient cancer cells to cure a patient, multiple drugs must be delivered at their maximum tolerated dose – a condition that allows for enhanced cancer cell killing with manageable toxicity. In light of these models, we aim to explore recent genomic evidence underlying the mechanisms of resistance to the combination regimens constructed on these principles. Interestingly, we find that emerging genomic evidence contradicts some of the rationales of early practitioners in developing commonly used drug regimens. However, we also find that the addition of recent targeted therapies has yet to change the current principles underlying the construction of anti-cancer combinatorial regimens, nor have they made substantial inroads into the treatment of most cancers. We suggest that emerging systems/network biology approaches have an immense opportunity to impact the rational development of successful drug regimens. Specifically, by examining drug combinations in multivariate ways, next generation combination therapies can be constructed with a clear understanding of how mechanisms of resistance to multi-drug regimens differ from single agent resistance. PMID:23164555

  4. Resisting Mind Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Susan M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    1980-01-01

    Provides conceptual analyses of mind control techniques along with practical advice on how to resist these techniques. The authors stress that effective mind control stems more from everyday social relations than from exotic technological gimmicks. Suggestions are given for resisting persuasion, resisting systems, and challenging the system.…

  5. Grafting for disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary purpose of grafting vegetables worldwide has been to provide resistance to soil-borne diseases. The potential loss of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant combined with pathogen resistance to commonly used pesticides will make resistance to soil-borne pathogens even more important in the fu...

  6. Effectiveness of Eriophyid Mites for Biological Control of Weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eriophyid mites are thought to have a high potential for use as classical biological control agents of weeds. However, in the past 20 years few species have been authorized for introduction, and few have significantly reduced the target plant's population. Natural enemies, resistant plant genotype...

  7. BIOLOGY OF PLANT-MICROBE INTERACTIONS, VOL. 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 10th International Congress on Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions was hosted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in July 2001 by Sally Leong. Over one thousand scientists from 41 countries were in attendance. Major progress was reported on the biology of disease resistance in plants and, ...

  8. BOOK REVIEW: TETRACYCLINES IN BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, AND MEDICINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book Tetracyclines in Biology, Chemistry, and Medicine edited by M. Nelson, W. Hillen, and R. A. Greenwald was reviewed at the request of the American Society for Microbiology. This book is not so much concerned with tetracycline antibiotic properties or bacterial resistance mechanisms. Instea...

  9. Relations between Intuitive Biological Thinking and Biological Misconceptions in Biology Majors and Nonmajors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, John D.; Tanner, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Research and theory development in cognitive psychology and science education research remain largely isolated. Biology education researchers have documented persistent scientifically inaccurate ideas, often termed "misconceptions," among biology students across biological domains. In parallel, cognitive and developmental psychologists…

  10. Genomics and the biology of parasites.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D A; Blaxter, M L; Degrave, W M; Foster, J; Ivens, A C; Melville, S E

    1999-02-01

    Despite the advances of modern medicine, the threat of chronic illness, disfigurement, or death that can result from parasitic infection still affects the majority of the world population, retarding economic development. For most parasitic diseases, current therapeutics often leave much to be desired in terms of administration regime, toxicity, or effectiveness and potential vaccines are a long way from market. Our best prospects for identifying new targets for drug, vaccine, and diagnostics development and for dissecting the biological basis of drug resistance, antigenic diversity, infectivity and pathology lie in parasite genome analysis, and international mapping and gene discovery initiatives are under way for a variety of protozoan and helminth parasites. These are far from ideal experimental organisms, and the influence of biological and genomic characteristics on experimental approaches is discussed, progress is reviewed and future prospects are examined. PMID:10193187

  11. Biologically Inspired Mushroom-Shaped Adhesive Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heepe, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon with great importance in technology, in our everyday life, and in nature. In this article, we review physical interactions that resist the separation of two solids in contact. By using examples of biological attachment systems, we summarize and categorize various principles that contribute to the so-called gecko effect. Emphasis is placed on the contact geometry and in particular on the mushroom-shaped geometry, which is observed in long-term biological adhesive systems. Furthermore, we report on artificial model systems with this bio-inspired geometry and demonstrate that surface microstructures with this geometry are promising candidates for technical applications, in which repeatable, reversible, and residue-free adhesion under different environmental conditions—such as air, fluid, and vacuum—is required. Various applications in robotic systems and in industrial pick-and-place processes are discussed.

  12. Biological Races in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  13. Biological races in humans.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  14. Information Complexity and Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco; Bignone, Franco A.; Cecconi, Fabio; Politi, Antonio

    Kolmogorov contributed directly to Biology in essentially three problems: the analysis of population dynamics (Lotka-Volterra equations), the reaction-diffusion formulation of gene spreading (FKPP equation), and some discussions about Mendel's laws. However, the widely recognized importance of his contribution arises from his work on algorithmic complexity. In fact, the limited direct intervention in Biology reflects the generally slow growth of interest of mathematicians towards biological issues. From the early work of Vito Volterra on species competition, to the slow growth of dynamical systems theory, contributions to the study of matter and the physiology of the nervous system, the first 50-60 years have witnessed important contributions, but as scattered pieces apparently uncorrelated, and in branches often far away from Biology. Up to the 40' it is hard to see the initial loose build up of a convergence, for those theories that will become mainstream research by the end of the century, and connected by the study of biological systems per-se.

  15. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A

    2016-07-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  16. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  17. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  18. Onchocerciasis control: biological research is still needed.

    PubMed

    Boussinesq, M

    2008-09-01

    Achievements obtained by the onchocerciasis control programmes should not lead to a relaxation in the biological research on Onchocerco volvulus. Issues such as the Loa loa-related post-ivermectin serious adverse events, the uncertainties as to whether onchocerciasis can be eliminated by ivermectin treatments, and the possible emergence of ivermectin-resistant O. volvulus populations should be addressed proactively. Doxycycline, moxidectin and emodepside appear to be promising as alternative drugs against onchocerciasis but support to researches in immunology and genomics should also be increased to develop new control tools, including both vaccines and macrofilaricidal drugs. PMID:18814732

  19. Identification of Bacteria and Determination of Biological Indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; La Duc, Myron T.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2009-01-01

    The ultimate goal of planetary protection research is to develop superior strategies for inactivating resistance bearing micro-organisms like Rummeli - bacillus stabekisii. By first identifying the particular physiologic pathway and/or structural component of the cell/spore that affords it such elevated tolerance, eradication regimes can then be designed to target these resistance-conferring moieties without jeopardizing the structural integrity of spacecraft hardware. Furthermore, hospitals and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of sterilization processes. The spores of Rummelibacillus stabekisii, which are far more resistant to many of such perturbations, could likely serve as a more significant biological indicator for potential survival than those being used currently.

  20. Selection of biological indicator for validating microwave heating sterilization.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Mori, Y; Honda, W; Miyake, Y

    1998-01-01

    For the purpose of selecting an appropriate biological indicator for evaluation of the effects of microwave heating sterilization, we examined aerobic bacterial spores to determine whether microwaves have non-thermal sterilization effects. After microwave irradiation on dry bacterial spores (three species), none of the bacterial spores were killed. The survival rate of the spores after microwave irradiation of spore suspensions (twelve species) was compared with that after heating by a conventional method. The order of heat resistance in the bacterial species was similar between the two heating methods. Bacillus stearothermophilus spores were the most heat-resistant. These results suggest that microwaves have no non-thermal sterilization effects on bacterial spores, the specific resistant spores to microwave heating, and microwave heating sterilization can be evaluated in the same way as for conventional heating sterilization. As a biological indicator for evaluation of overkill sterilization, B. stearothermophilus spores may be appropriate for microwave heating sterilization as well as steam sterilization. PMID:9610169

  1. Synthetic biology: Novel approaches for microbiology.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Vaca, Felipe; Anaya-Velázquez, Fernando; Franco, Bernardo

    2015-06-01

    In the past twenty years, molecular genetics has created powerful tools for genetic manipulation of living organisms. Whole genome sequencing has provided necessary information to assess knowledge on gene function and protein networks. In addition, new tools permit to modify organisms to perform desired tasks. Gene function analysis is speed up by novel approaches that couple both high throughput data generation and mining. Synthetic biology is an emerging field that uses tools for generating novel gene networks, whole genome synthesis and engineering. New applications in biotechnological, pharmaceutical and biomedical research are envisioned for synthetic biology. In recent years these new strategies have opened up the possibilities to study gene and genome editing, creation of novel tools for functional studies in virus, parasites and pathogenic bacteria. There is also the possibility to re-design organisms to generate vaccine subunits or produce new pharmaceuticals to combat multi-drug resistant pathogens. In this review we provide our opinion on the applicability of synthetic biology strategies for functional studies of pathogenic organisms and some applications such as genome editing and gene network studies to further comprehend virulence factors and determinants in pathogenic organisms. We also discuss what we consider important ethical issues for this field of molecular biology, especially for potential misuse of the new technologies. PMID:26496614

  2. [RANKL Biology ~Beyond the bone biology~].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tomoki

    2016-08-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand(RANKL),a transmembrane protein of the tumor necrosis factor(TNF) superfamily cytokine, currently provides a paradigm that enables the molecular understanding of the linkage among bone metabolism, organization of lymphoid tissues, establishment of the thymic microenviroment, thermoregulation, metabolic regulation, mammary gland development and tumorigenesis. Here we summarize the recent progress in the understanding of RANKL biology by focusing on the investigation of RANKL expressing cells/organs, signaling and related diseases in the context of the newly established interdisciplinary field of osteonetwork. The elucidation of both physiological and pathological RANKL function will provide a scientific basis for future therapeutic approaches to several RANKL-related diseases. PMID:27461496

  3. [Rodenticide resistance and consequences].

    PubMed

    Esther, A; Endepols, S; Freise, J; Klemann, N; Runge, M; Pelz, H-J

    2014-05-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides, such as warfarin was first described in 1958. Polymorphisms in the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) gene and respective substitutions of amino acids in the VKOR enzyme are the major cause for rodenticide resistance. Resistant Norway rats in Germany are characterized by the Tyr139Cys genotype, which is spread throughout the northwest of the country. Resistant house mice with the VKOR variants Tyr139Cys, Leu128Ser and Arg12Trp/Ala26Ser/Ala48Thr/Arg61Leu (spretus type) are distributed over a number of locations in Germany. Resistance can reduce management attempts with consequences for stored product protection, hygiene and animal health. Anticoagulants of the first generation (warfarin, chlorophacinone, coumatetralyl) as well as bromadiolone and difenacoum are not an option for the control of resistant Norway rats. The same applies for house mice whereby the tolerance to compounds can be different between local incidences. Due to the higher toxicity and tendency to persist, the most potent anticoagulant rodenticides brodifacoum, flocoumafen and difethialone should be applied but only where resistance is known. In other cases less toxic anticoagulants should be preferred for rodent management in order to mitigate environmental risks. Resistance effects of further VKOR polymorphisms and their combinations, the spread of resistant rats and conditions supporting and reducing resistance should be investigated in order to improve resistance management strategies. PMID:24781908

  4. Biology & control of Anopheles culicifacies Giles 1901

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, V.P.; Dev, V.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria epidemiology is complex due to multiplicity of disease vectors, sibling species complex and variations in bionomical characteristics, vast varied terrain, various ecological determinants. There are six major mosquito vector taxa in India, viz. Anopheles culicifacies, An. fluviatilis, An. stephensi, An. minimus, An. dirus and An. sundaicus. Among these, An. culicifacies is widely distributed and considered the most important vector throughout the plains and forests of India for generating bulk of malaria cases (>60% annually). Major malaria epidemics are caused by An. culicifaices. It is also the vector of tribal malaria except parts of Odisha and Northeastern States of India. An. culicifacies has been the cause of perennial malaria transmission in forests, and over the years penetrated the deforested areas of Northeast. An. culicifacies participates in malaria transmission either alone or along with An. stephensi or An. fluviatilis. The National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) spends about 80 per cent malaria control budget annually in the control of An. culicifacies, yet it remains one of the most formidable challenges in India. With recent advances in molecular biology there has been a significant added knowledge in understanding the biology, ecology, genetics and response to interventions, requiring stratification for cost-effective and sustainable malaria control. Research leading to newer interventions that are evidence-based, community oriented and sustainable would be useful in tackling the emerging challenges in malaria control. Current priority areas of research should include in-depth vector biology and control in problem pockets, preparation of malaria-risk maps for focused and selective interventions, monitoring insecticide resistance, cross-border initiative and data sharing, and coordinated control efforts for achieving transmission reduction, and control of drug-resistant malaria. The present review on An. culicifacies

  5. Biology & control of Anopheles culicifacies Giles 1901.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V P; Dev, V

    2015-05-01

    Malaria epidemiology is complex due to multiplicity of disease vectors, sibling species complex and variations in bionomical characteristics, vast varied terrain, various ecological determinants. There are six major mosquito vector taxa in India, viz. Anopheles culicifacies, An. fluviatilis, An. stephensi, An. minimus, An. dirus and An. sundaicus. Among these, An. culicifacies is widely distributed and considered the most important vector throughout the plains and forests of India for generating bulk of malaria cases (>60% annually). Major malaria epidemics are caused by An. culicifaices. It is also the vector of tribal malaria except parts of Odisha and Northeastern States of India. An. culicifacies has been the cause of perennial malaria transmission in forests, and over the years penetrated the deforested areas of Northeast. An. culicifacies participates in malaria transmission either alone or along with An. stephensi or An. fluviatilis. The National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) spends about 80 per cent malaria control budget annually in the control of An. culicifacies, yet it remains one of the most formidable challenges in India. With recent advances in molecular biology there has been a significant added knowledge in understanding the biology, ecology, genetics and response to interventions, requiring stratification for cost-effective and sustainable malaria control. Research leading to newer interventions that are evidence-based, community oriented and sustainable would be useful in tackling the emerging challenges in malaria control. Current priority areas of research should include in-depth vector biology and control in problem pockets, preparation of malaria-risk maps for focused and selective interventions, monitoring insecticide resistance, cross-border initiative and data sharing, and coordinated control efforts for achieving transmission reduction, and control of drug-resistant malaria. The present review on An. culicifacies

  6. Genetics of metabolic resistance.

    PubMed

    Richter, Otto; Langemann, Dirk; Beffa, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Herbicide resistance has become a major issue for many weeds. Metabolic resistance refers to the biochemical processes within organisms that degrade herbicides to less toxic compounds, resulting in a shift of the dose response curve. This type of resistance involves polygenic inheritance. A model is presented linking the biochemical pathway of amino acid synthesis and the detoxifying pathway of an inhibitor of the key enzyme ALS. From this model, resistance factors for each biotype are derived, which are then applied to a polygenic population genetic model for an annual weed plant. Polygenic inheritance is described by a new approach based on tensor products of heredity matrices. Important results from the model are that low dose regimes favour fast emergence of resistant biotypes and that the emergence of resistant biotypes occurs as abrupt outbreaks. The model is used to evaluate strategies for the management of metabolic resistance. PMID:27424952

  7. Epigenetics: Biology's Quantum Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    The perspective presented here is that modern genetics is at a similar stage of development as were early formulations of quantum mechanics theory in the 1920s and that in 2010 we are at the dawn of a new revolution in genetics that promises to enrich and deepen our understanding of the gene and the genome. The interrelationships and interdependence of two views of the gene - the molecular biological view and the epigenetic view - are explored, and it is argued that the classical molecular biological view is incomplete without incorporation of the epigenetic perspective and that in a sense the molecular biological view has been evolving to include the epigenetic view. Intriguingly, this evolution of the molecular view toward the broader and more inclusive epigenetic view of the gene has an intriguing, if not precise, parallel in the evolution of concepts of atomic physics from Newtonian mechanics to quantum mechanics that are interesting to consider. PMID:22639577

  8. Computational Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Samudrala, Ram; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Montogomery, Kristina; Ireton, Renee

    2009-05-01

    Computational systems biology is the term that we use to describe computational methods to identify, infer, model, and store relationships between the molecules, pathways, and cells (“systems”) involved in a living organism. Based on this definition, the field of computational systems biology has been in existence for some time. However, the recent confluence of high throughput methodology for biological data gathering, genome-scale sequencing and computational processing power has driven a reinvention and expansion of this field. The expansions include not only modeling of small metabolic{Ishii, 2004 #1129; Ekins, 2006 #1601; Lafaye, 2005 #1744} and signaling systems{Stevenson-Paulik, 2006 #1742; Lafaye, 2005 #1744} but also modeling of the relationships between biological components in very large systems, incluyding whole cells and organisms {Ideker, 2001 #1124; Pe'er, 2001 #1172; Pilpel, 2001 #393; Ideker, 2002 #327; Kelley, 2003 #1117; Shannon, 2003 #1116; Ideker, 2004 #1111}{Schadt, 2003 #475; Schadt, 2006 #1661}{McDermott, 2002 #878; McDermott, 2005 #1271}. Generally these models provide a general overview of one or more aspects of these systems and leave the determination of details to experimentalists focused on smaller subsystems. The promise of such approaches is that they will elucidate patterns, relationships and general features that are not evident from examining specific components or subsystems. These predictions are either interesting in and of themselves (for example, the identification of an evolutionary pattern), or are interesting and valuable to researchers working on a particular problem (for example highlight a previously unknown functional pathway). Two events have occurred to bring about the field computational systems biology to the forefront. One is the advent of high throughput methods that have generated large amounts of information about particular systems in the form of genetic studies, gene expression analyses (both protein and

  9. Noise in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Tsimring, Lev S.

    2014-01-01

    Noise permeates biology on all levels, from the most basic molecular, sub-cellular processes to the dynamics of tissues, organs, organisms, and populations. The functional roles of noise in biological processes can vary greatly. Along with standard, entropy-increasing effects of producing random mutations, diversifying phenotypes in isogenic populations, limiting information capacity of signaling relays, it occasionally plays more surprising constructive roles by accelerating the pace of evolution, providing selective advantage in dynamic environments, enhancing intracellular transport of biomolecules and increasing information capacity of signaling pathways. This short review covers the recent progress in understanding mechanisms and effects of fluctuations in biological systems of different scales and the basic approaches to their mathematical modeling. PMID:24444693

  10. Biological Soft Robotics.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    In nature, nanometer-scale molecular motors are used to generate force within cells for diverse processes from transcription and transport to muscle contraction. This adaptability and scalability across wide temporal, spatial, and force regimes have spurred the development of biological soft robotic systems that seek to mimic and extend these capabilities. This review describes how molecular motors are hierarchically organized into larger-scale structures in order to provide a basic understanding of how these systems work in nature and the complexity and functionality we hope to replicate in biological soft robotics. These span the subcellular scale to macroscale, and this article focuses on the integration of biological components with synthetic materials, coupled with bioinspired robotic design. Key examples include nanoscale molecular motor-powered actuators, microscale bacteria-controlled devices, and macroscale muscle-powered robots that grasp, walk, and swim. Finally, the current challenges and future opportunities in the field are addressed. PMID:26643022

  11. Modeling complexity in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louzoun, Yoram; Solomon, Sorin; Atlan, Henri; Cohen, Irun. R.

    2001-08-01

    Biological systems, unlike physical or chemical systems, are characterized by the very inhomogeneous distribution of their components. The immune system, in particular, is notable for self-organizing its structure. Classically, the dynamics of natural systems have been described using differential equations. But, differential equation models fail to account for the emergence of large-scale inhomogeneities and for the influence of inhomogeneity on the overall dynamics of biological systems. Here, we show that a microscopic simulation methodology enables us to model the emergence of large-scale objects and to extend the scope of mathematical modeling in biology. We take a simple example from immunology and illustrate that the methods of classical differential equations and microscopic simulation generate contradictory results. Microscopic simulations generate a more faithful approximation of the reality of the immune system.

  12. 7th Annual Systems Biology Symposium: Systems Biology and Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Galitski, Timothy P.

    2008-04-01

    Systems biology recognizes the complex multi-scale organization of biological systems, from molecules to ecosystems. The International Symposium on Systems Biology has been hosted by the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, Washington, since 2002. The annual two-day event gathers the most influential researchers transforming biology into an integrative discipline investingating complex systems. Engineering and application of new technology is a central element of systems biology. Genome-scale, or very small-scale, biological questions drive the enigneering of new technologies, which enable new modes of experimentation and computational analysis, leading to new biological insights and questions. Concepts and analytical methods in engineering are now finding direct applications in biology. Therefore, the 2008 Symposium, funded in partnership with the Department of Energy, featured global leaders in "Systems Biology and Engineering."

  13. Digital biology and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Witters, Daan; Sun, Bing; Begolo, Stefano; Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Robles, Whitney; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2014-09-01

    This account examines developments in "digital" biology and chemistry within the context of microfluidics, from a personal perspective. Using microfluidics as a frame of reference, we identify two areas of research within digital biology and chemistry that are of special interest: (i) the study of systems that switch between discrete states in response to changes in chemical concentration of signals, and (ii) the study of single biological entities such as molecules or cells. In particular, microfluidics accelerates analysis of switching systems (i.e., those that exhibit a sharp change in output over a narrow range of input) by enabling monitoring of multiple reactions in parallel over a range of concentrations of signals. Conversely, such switching systems can be used to create new kinds of microfluidic detection systems that provide "analog-to-digital" signal conversion and logic. Microfluidic compartmentalization technologies for studying and isolating single entities can be used to reconstruct and understand cellular processes, study interactions between single biological entities, and examine the intrinsic heterogeneity of populations of molecules, cells, or organisms. Furthermore, compartmentalization of single cells or molecules in "digital" microfluidic experiments can induce switching in a range of reaction systems to enable sensitive detection of cells or biomolecules, such as with digital ELISA or digital PCR. This "digitizing" offers advantages in terms of robustness, assay design, and simplicity because quantitative information can be obtained with qualitative measurements. While digital formats have been shown to improve the robustness of existing chemistries, we anticipate that in the future they will enable new chemistries to be used for quantitative measurements, and that digital biology and chemistry will continue to provide further opportunities for measuring biomolecules, understanding natural systems more deeply, and advancing molecular and

  14. EPA RESISTANCE MONITORING RESEARCH (NCR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2006 resistance management research program was organized around three components: development of resistance monitoring program for Bt corn using remote sensing, standardization of resistance assays, and testing of resistance management models. Each area of research has shown...

  15. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2000-03-01

    Introduction; 1. From the physical world to the biological universe: Democritus to Lowell; 2. Plurality of worlds and the decline of anthropocentrism; 3. The solar system: the limits of observation; 4. Solar systems beyond: the limits of theory; 5. Extraterrestrials in literature and the arts: the role of imagination; 6. The UFO controversy: on perception and deception; 7. The origin and evolution of life in the extraterrestrial context; 8. SETI: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; 9. The convergence of disciplines: birth of a new science; 10. The meaning of life; Summary and conclusion: the biological universe and the limits of science.

  16. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    1996-09-01

    Introduction; 1. From the physical world to the biological universe: Democritus to Lowell; 2. Plurality of worlds and the decline of anthropocentrism; 3. The solar system: the limits of observation; 4. Solar systems beyond: the limits of theory; 5. Extraterrestrials in literature and the arts: the role of imagination; 6. The UFO controversy: on perception and deception; 7. The origin and evolution of life in the extraterrestrial context; 8. SETI: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; 9. The convergence of disciplines: birth of a new science; 10. The meaning of life; Summary and conclusion: the biological universe and the limits of science.

  17. Biologic Safety in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    The development of targeted biologic agents has revolutionized the treatment of psoriasis. In this review, the authors focus on the published long-term (≥ one year) safety data for the use of tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab, as well as the IL-12/IL-23 antagonist ustekinumab, in adult patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. The efficacy of these currently available biologic therapies has been demonstrated in several studies, and their safety profiles are also reassuring. PMID:25741401

  18. Biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

  19. Biological and Pharmaceutical Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This first comprehensive yet concise overview of all important classes of biological and pharmaceutical nanomaterials presents in one volume the different kinds of natural biological compounds that form nanomaterials or that may be used to purposefully create them. This unique single source of information brings together the many articles published in specialized journals, which often remain unseen by members of other, related disciplines. Covering pharmaceutical, nucleic acid, peptide and DNA-Chitosan nanoparticles, the book focuses on those innovative materials and technologies needed for the continued growth of medicine, healthcare, pharmaceuticals and human wellness. For chemists, biochemists, cell biologists, materials scientists, biologists, and those working in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  20. Biological switches and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Albert, Reka; Goldbeter, Albert; Ruoff, Peter; Sible, Jill

    2008-01-01

    To introduce this special issue on biological switches and clocks, we review the historical development of mathematical models of bistability and oscillations in chemical reaction networks. In the 1960s and 1970s, these models were limited to well-studied biochemical examples, such as glycolytic oscillations and cyclic AMP signalling. After the molecular genetics revolution of the 1980s, the field of molecular cell biology was thrown wide open to mathematical modellers. We review recent advances in modelling the gene–protein interaction networks that control circadian rhythms, cell cycle progression, signal processing and the design of synthetic gene networks. PMID:18522926

  1. Current Trends in Biology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wivagg, Daniel E.; Moore, Randy

    1987-01-01

    This newsletter reports on the status of biology education in the United States. It states that biology has entered its "golden age" because of the emergence of biotechnology, ecology, agricultural productivity, and human biology as major societal issues. This report discusses the status of the informal national curriculum of biology, involving…

  2. Indirect ecological effects in invaded landscapes: Spillover and spillback from biological control agents to native analogues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological control remains an effective option for managing large-scale weed problems in natural areas. The predation or parasitism of biological control agents by other species present in the introduced range (biotic resistance) is well studied and is often cited as the cause for a lack of establis...

  3. Microbial Survey of a Full-Scale, Biologically Active Filter for Treatment of Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological nitrification has been used as a reliable technology in wastewater treatment for decades. Implementing biological approaches to drinking water treatment has faced resistance in the United States due in part to the lack of understanding of microbial processes and conce...

  4. Genetic resistance to flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Margo A; Perelygin, Andrey A

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to flavivirus-induced disease in mice was first discovered in the 1920s and was subsequently shown to be controlled by the resistant allele of a single dominant autosomal gene. While the majority of current laboratory mouse stains have a homozygous-susceptible phenotype, the resistant allele has been found to segregate in wild mouse populations in many different parts of the world. Resistance is flavivirus specific and extends to both mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses. Resistant animals are infected productively by flaviviruses but produce lower virus titers, especially in their brains, as compared to susceptible mice. Decreased virus production is observed in resistant animals even during a lethal infection and the times of disease onset and death are also delayed as compared to susceptible mice. An intact immune response is required to clear flaviviruses from resistant mice. The resistant phenotype is expressed constitutively and does not require interferon induction. The Flv gene was discovered using a positional cloning approach and identified as Oas1b. Susceptible mice produce a truncated Oas1b protein. A C820T transition in the fourth exon of the gene introduced a premature stop codon and was found in all susceptible mouse strains tested. Possible mechanisms by which the product of the resistant allele could confer the resistant phenotype are discussed. PMID:14689691

  5. Biology of Toxoplasma gondii, its survival in body tissues and liquids, risks for the pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Zardi, O; Soubotian, B

    1979-01-01

    After briefly outlining the biology of Toxoplasma gondii the authors discuss the resistance of the parasite in body liquids and tissues under certain environmental conditions. Parasite resistance and its consequent risk of human infection, particularly for the pregnant woman, is emphasized. Toxoplasma oocysts, the sexual expression of the parasite, and the cyst facilitate the diffusion of Toxoplasma, as they are much more resistant than the trophozoite. PMID:552276

  6. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects. Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response by increasing the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction, increasing the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response, augmenting the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response, decreasing the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells, or increasing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  7. Models in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Addresses the most popular models currently being chosen for biological research and the reasons behind those choices. Among the current favorites are zebra fish, fruit flies, mice, monkeys, and yeast. Concludes with a brief examination of the ethical issues involved, and why some animals may need to be replaced in research with model systems.…

  8. Biologically inspired intelligent robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Breazeal, Cynthia

    2003-07-01

    Humans throughout history have always sought to mimic the appearance, mobility, functionality, intelligent operation, and thinking process of biological creatures. This field of biologically inspired technology, having the moniker biomimetics, has evolved from making static copies of human and animals in the form of statues to the emergence of robots that operate with realistic behavior. Imagine a person walking towards you where suddenly you notice something weird about him--he is not real but rather he is a robot. Your reaction would probably be "I can't believe it but this robot looks very real" just as you would react to an artificial flower that is a good imitation. You may even proceed and touch the robot to check if your assessment is correct but, as oppose to the flower case, the robot may be programmed to respond physical and verbally. This science fiction scenario could become a reality as the current trend continues in developing biologically inspired technologies. Technology evolution led to such fields as artificial muscles, artificial intelligence, and artificial vision as well as biomimetic capabilities in materials science, mechanics, electronics, computing science, information technology and many others. This paper will review the state of the art and challenges to biologically-inspired technologies and the role that EAP is expected to play as the technology evolves.

  9. Who's Who in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Colin

    1983-01-01

    Provides top-rated programs (by university) in biochemistry, botany, cellular/molecular biology, microbiology, physiology, and zoology. Overall scores included with each program were obtained from 1,848 biologists who were asked to rate programs in terms of faculty quality and their effectiveness in educating graduate students. (Author/JN)

  10. Biological Isolation Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A spinoff of astronaut's biological garment will allow hospital patients who are highly vulnerable to infection to leave their sterile habitats for several hours, carrying their germ free environment with them. Garments can be used in any of some 200 hospitals where isolation rooms are installed to treat leukemia.

  11. The Viking biology results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Harold P.

    1989-01-01

    A brief review of the purposes and the results from the Viking Biology experiments is presented, in the expectation that the lessons learned from this mission will be useful in planning future approaches to the biological exploration of Mars. Since so little was then known about potential micro-environments on Mars, three different experiments were included in the Viking mission, each one based on different assumptions about what Martian organisms might be like. In addition to the Viking Biology Instrument (VBI), important corollary information was obtained from the Viking lander imaging system and from the molecular analysis experiments that were conducted using the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GCMS) instrument. No biological objects were noted by the lander imaging instrument. The GCMS did not detect any organic compounds. A description of the tests conducted by the Gas Exchange Experiment, the Labeled Release experiment, and the Pyrolytic Release experiment is given. Results are discussed. Taken as a whole, the Viking data yielded no unequivocal evidence for a Martian biota at either landing site. The results also revealed the presence of one or more reactive oxidants in the surface material and these need to be further characterized, as does the range of micro-environments, before embarking upon future searches for extant life on Mars.

  12. ECOREGIONAL BIOLOGICAL CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the purposes of this paper, biocriteria are defined as numerical values that describe the biological health of aquatic communities for a designated aquatic life use. egardless of whether they are implemented regionally or site specifically, biocriteria (ambient, community-bas...

  13. Inventive Thinking in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Alan J., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    To encourage students to become involved in the inventive and imaginative dimensions of biology, students are asked to invent: a useful product, way to use old newspapers, insect repellent, organism attracter, organelle separater, way to measure rate of hyphal growth, and method to measure strength of spider web. (DC)

  14. Biological Vulnerability to Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuckit, Marc A.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the role of biological factors in the risk for alcoholism. Notes the importance of the definition of primary alcoholism and highlights data indicating that this disorder is genetically influenced. In studies of men at high risk for the future development of alcoholism, vulnerability shows up in reactions to ethanol brain wave amplitude and…

  15. Regents Biology Resource Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Nancy A., Comp.

    This publication provides supplemental information which can be used by the teacher to accompany each unit in the Regents Biology Syllabus. Each unit of the supplement addresses topics and understandings in the corresponding unit of the syllabus. These units are: (1) unity and diversity among living things; (2) maintenance in living things; (3)…

  16. Junior Biology, Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    Twenty-one studies related to populations are included in this student manual for a junior high school biology course. Each activity or study provides questions, diagrams, experiments, and/or descriptive material to which the student must respond. Population studies pertain to individual plants and animals, their physical environments, reactions…

  17. Biological response modifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  18. The Biology of Food

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, J. Jose

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses "The Biology of Food" course. This course--a large lecture course with no laboratory section--is a mixture of kitchen chemistry, post-eating food metabolism, origins of different foods (from crop breeding to evolution), and ecological and environmental impacts of farming and harvesting practices. Nearly every…

  19. Biology Teachers and Peace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, L. Jack

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that biology teachers can serve an important role in turning humankind from nuclear warfare to peaceful cooperation. Argues that the school should lead the world in teaching about the universal will to live exhibited by all organisms and about the insanity of nuclear armament. (DC)

  20. Biology=Sinh Vat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Nguyen Manh, Ed.

    This volume contains 32 biology self-study learning packets designed primarily for Indochinese students in grades 9 to 12. The materials could be used by "English as a Second Language" teachers who may/may not speak one of the Indochinese languages, or by mainstream teachers who have a number of low-English-proficiency Indochinese students in…

  1. Plant Systems Biology (editorial)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In June 2003, Plant Physiology published an Arabidopsis special issue devoted to plant systems biology. The intention of Natasha Raikhel and Gloria Coruzzi, the two editors of this first-of-its-kind issue, was ‘‘to help nucleate this new effort within the plant community’’ as they considered that ‘‘...

  2. Molecular biology of development

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, E.H.; Firtel, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This book is a compilation of papers presented at a symposium on the molecular biology of development. Topics discussed include: cytoplasmic localizations and pattern formations, gene expression during oogenesis and early development, developmental expression of gene families molecular aspects of plant development and transformation in whole organisms and cells.

  3. Biology Curriculum Support Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This biology curriculum supplement includes the North Carolina Standard Course of Study Goals, helpful resources, and suggested activities supported by inquiry-based laboratory activities. Contents include a detailed description of content which provides the goals and standards being sough), a materials list for inquiry support labs and…

  4. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  5. Commercializing Biological Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeLeu, K. L.; Young, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the only commercial establishment involved in biological control in Australia. The wasp Aphitis melinus, which parasitizes the insect Red Scale, is bred in large numbers and released in the citrus groves where Red Scale is causing damage to the fruit. (JR)

  6. Openers for Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, C. Robert R.

    This teaching guide contains 200 activities that are suitable for openers and demonstrations in biology classes. Details are provided regarding the use of these activities. Some of the broad topics under which the activities are organized include algae, amphibians, bacteria, biologists, crustaceans, dinosaurs, ecology, evolution, flowering plants,…

  7. Evolution, Entropy, & Biological Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    A logical question to be expected from students: "How could life develop, that is, change, evolve from simple, primitive organisms into the complex forms existing today, while at the same time there is a generally observed decline and disorganization--the second law of thermodynamics?" The explanations in biology textbooks relied upon by…

  8. Another New Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokal, Robert R.

    1970-01-01

    Describes scope, methods, and history of evolutionary biology. Illustrates the application of new mathematical treatments to problems of speciation, homology and ecology. Urges biologists to become familiar with these methods and to adopt a mathematical approach in teaching, arguing that much ecology taught today is irrelevant to theories now…

  9. Biophysics and systems biology.

    PubMed

    Noble, Denis

    2010-03-13

    Biophysics at the systems level, as distinct from molecular biophysics, acquired its most famous paradigm in the work of Hodgkin and Huxley, who integrated their equations for the nerve impulse in 1952. Their approach has since been extended to other organs of the body, notably including the heart. The modern field of computational biology has expanded rapidly during the first decade of the twenty-first century and, through its contribution to what is now called systems biology, it is set to revise many of the fundamental principles of biology, including the relations between genotypes and phenotypes. Evolutionary theory, in particular, will require re-assessment. To succeed in this, computational and systems biology will need to develop the theoretical framework required to deal with multilevel interactions. While computational power is necessary, and is forthcoming, it is not sufficient. We will also require mathematical insight, perhaps of a nature we have not yet identified. This article is therefore also a challenge to mathematicians to develop such insights. PMID:20123750

  10. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MANGANESE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biological effects of manganese were studied in a town on the coast of Dalmatia in which a ferromanganese plant has been operating since before World War II. The study focused on the question of whether the exposure to manganese can cause a higher incidence of respiratory dis...

  11. Molecular Models in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes types of molecular models (ball-and-stick, framework, and space-filling) and evaluates commercially available kits. Gives instructions for constructive models from polystyrene balls and pipe-cleaners. Models are useful for class demonstrations although not sufficiently accurate for research use. Illustrations show biologically important…

  12. Encouraging Student Biological Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frame, Kathy, Ed.; Hays, Rachel, Ed.; Mack, Alison, Ed.

    This publication encourages student involvement in biological research through student research with the cooperation of teachers and scientists. The contents of the book are divided into two sections. The first section introduces students to research investigations and includes: (1) "How the Investigations Are Set Up and the Rationale Behind Their…

  13. Biophysics and systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Biophysics at the systems level, as distinct from molecular biophysics, acquired its most famous paradigm in the work of Hodgkin and Huxley, who integrated their equations for the nerve impulse in 1952. Their approach has since been extended to other organs of the body, notably including the heart. The modern field of computational biology has expanded rapidly during the first decade of the twenty-first century and, through its contribution to what is now called systems biology, it is set to revise many of the fundamental principles of biology, including the relations between genotypes and phenotypes. Evolutionary theory, in particular, will require re-assessment. To succeed in this, computational and systems biology will need to develop the theoretical framework required to deal with multilevel interactions. While computational power is necessary, and is forthcoming, it is not sufficient. We will also require mathematical insight, perhaps of a nature we have not yet identified. This article is therefore also a challenge to mathematicians to develop such insights. PMID:20123750

  14. Biological isolation garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spross, F. R.

    1968-01-01

    Biological Isolation Garment /BIG/ is a one-piece loose fitting garment fabricated from a tightly woven, permeable, 100 percent-cotton fabric. Its headpiece, incorporates an integral oronsal respirator with 0.3-micron-particle filters, and a full width visor. All fabrication seams are sealed on the inside of the garment.

  15. Electrophoresis of biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The selection of biological products was studied for electrophoresis in space. Free flow electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and isotachophoresis are described. The candidates discussed include: immunoglobulins and gamma globulins; isolated islet of langerhans from pancreas; bone marrow; tumor cells; kidney cells, cryoprecipitate; and column separated cultures.

  16. Biology Regents Syllabus. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahret, Mary Jean; And Others

    Objectives, topics/understandings to be taught, and teachers notes are provided for the seven units in this Regents biology syllabus. Units and major topic areas include: (1) unity and diversity among living things (concept of life, diversity/unity of life); (2) maintenance in living things (nutrition, transport, respiration, excretion,…

  17. Biological system interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Adomian, G; Adomian, G E; Bellman, R E

    1984-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of cellular population growth, interconnected subsystems of the body, blood flow, and numerous other complex biological systems problems involves nonlinearities and generally randomness as well. Such problems have been dealt with by mathematical methods often changing the actual model to make it tractable. The method presented in this paper (and referenced works) allows much more physically realistic solutions. PMID:6585837

  18. Gloucester Marine Biology Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearer, Sonja; And Others

    Objectives and activities for a field trip study of the seacoast environment of Gloucester, Massachusetts, are outlined in this guide. One phase of a six-week tenth grade biology unit, the field trip features study of tidal pool and salt marsh ecosystems. Specific objectives of the trip relate to observation and identification of various forms of…

  19. Drug interactions and the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Pamela J.; Hegreness, Matthew J.; Aiden, Aviva Presser; Kishony, Roy

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale, systems biology approaches now allow us to systematically map synergistic and antagonistic interactions between drugs. Consequently, drug antagonism is emerging as a powerful tool to study biological function and relatedness between cellular components as well as to uncover mechanisms of drug action. Furthermore, theoretical models and new experiments suggest that antagonistic interactions between antibiotics can counteract the evolution of drug resistance. PMID:19444248

  20. Biological life-support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepelev, Y. Y.

    1975-01-01

    The establishment of human living environments by biologic methods, utilizing the appropriate functions of autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms is examined. Natural biologic systems discussed in terms of modeling biologic life support systems (BLSS), the structure of biologic life support systems, and the development of individual functional links in biologic life support systems are among the factors considered. Experimental modeling of BLSS in order to determine functional characteristics, mechanisms by which stability is maintained, and principles underlying control and regulation is also discussed.

  1. Biological trade and markets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation between organisms can often be understood, like trade between merchants, as a mutually beneficial exchange of services, resources or other ‘commodities’. Mutual benefits alone, however, are not sufficient to explain the evolution of trade-based cooperation. First, organisms may reject a particular trade if another partner offers a better deal. Second, while human trade often entails binding contracts, non-human trade requires unwritten ‘terms of contract’ that ‘self-stabilize’ trade and prevent cheating even if all traders strive to maximize fitness. Whenever trading partners can be chosen, market-like situations arise in nature that biologists studying cooperation need to account for. The mere possibility of exerting partner choice stabilizes many forms of otherwise cheatable trade, induces competition, facilitates the evolution of specialization and often leads to intricate forms of cooperation. We discuss selected examples to illustrate these general points and review basic conceptual approaches that are important in the theory of biological trade and markets. Comparing these approaches with theory in economics, it turns out that conventional models—often called ‘Walrasian’ markets—are of limited relevance to biology. In contrast, early approaches to trade and markets, as found in the works of Ricardo and Cournot, contain elements of thought that have inspired useful models in biology. For example, the concept of comparative advantage has biological applications in trade, signalling and ecological competition. We also see convergence between post-Walrasian economics and biological markets. For example, both economists and biologists are studying ‘principal–agent’ problems with principals offering jobs to agents without being sure that the agents will do a proper job. Finally, we show that mating markets have many peculiarities not shared with conventional economic markets. Ideas from economics are useful for biologists

  2. Biological trade and markets.

    PubMed

    Hammerstein, Peter; Noë, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    Cooperation between organisms can often be understood, like trade between merchants, as a mutually beneficial exchange of services, resources or other 'commodities'. Mutual benefits alone, however, are not sufficient to explain the evolution of trade-based cooperation. First, organisms may reject a particular trade if another partner offers a better deal. Second, while human trade often entails binding contracts, non-human trade requires unwritten 'terms of contract' that 'self-stabilize' trade and prevent cheating even if all traders strive to maximize fitness. Whenever trading partners can be chosen, market-like situations arise in nature that biologists studying cooperation need to account for. The mere possibility of exerting partner choice stabilizes many forms of otherwise cheatable trade, induces competition, facilitates the evolution of specialization and often leads to intricate forms of cooperation. We discuss selected examples to illustrate these general points and review basic conceptual approaches that are important in the theory of biological trade and markets. Comparing these approaches with theory in economics, it turns out that conventional models-often called 'Walrasian' markets-are of limited relevance to biology. In contrast, early approaches to trade and markets, as found in the works of Ricardo and Cournot, contain elements of thought that have inspired useful models in biology. For example, the concept of comparative advantage has biological applications in trade, signalling and ecological competition. We also see convergence between post-Walrasian economics and biological markets. For example, both economists and biologists are studying 'principal-agent' problems with principals offering jobs to agents without being sure that the agents will do a proper job. Finally, we show that mating markets have many peculiarities not shared with conventional economic markets. Ideas from economics are useful for biologists studying cooperation but need

  3. Systems biology, emergence and antireductionism.

    PubMed

    Kesić, Srdjan

    2016-09-01

    This study explores the conceptual history of systems biology and its impact on philosophical and scientific conceptions of reductionism, antireductionism and emergence. Development of systems biology at the beginning of 21st century transformed biological science. Systems biology is a new holistic approach or strategy how to research biological organisms, developed through three phases. The first phase was completed when molecular biology transformed into systems molecular biology. Prior to the second phase, convergence between applied general systems theory and nonlinear dynamics took place, hence allowing the formation of systems mathematical biology. The second phase happened when systems molecular biology and systems mathematical biology, together, were applied for analysis of biological data. Finally, after successful application in science, medicine and biotechnology, the process of the formation of modern systems biology was completed. Systems and molecular reductionist views on organisms were completely opposed to each other. Implications of systems and molecular biology on reductionist-antireductionist debate were quite different. The analysis of reductionism, antireductionism and emergence issues, in the era of systems biology, revealed the hierarchy between methodological, epistemological and ontological antireductionism. Primarily, methodological antireductionism followed from the systems biology. Only after, epistemological and ontological antireductionism could be supported. PMID:27579007

  4. CURRICULUM GUIDES IN BIOLOGY--LIFE SCIENCE, BIOLOGY--GENERAL, AND BIOLOGY--ADVANCED PLACEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WESNER, GORDON E.; AND OTHERS

    "BIOLOGY--LIFE SCIENCE" IS GEARED TO STUDENTS OF AVERAGE ABILITY, "BIOLOGY--GENERAL" IS OFFERED FOR THOSE WHO HAVE COMPLETED "BIOLOGY--GENERAL" IN GRADES 10 OR 11 AND WHO WISH TO PURSUE COLLEGE LEVEL STUDY WHILE IN GRADE 12. THE NONTECHNICAL "BIOLOGY--LIFE SCIENCE" HAS OUTLINED UNITS IN ORGANIZING FOOD, ORGAN SYSTEMS, HEALTH, CONTINUANCE OF LIFE,…

  5. Drug Resistance in Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Sundar, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    The treatment options of leishmaniasis are limited and far from satisfactory. For more than 60 years, treatment of leishmaniasis has centered around pentavalent antimonials (Sbv). Widespread misuse has led to the emergence of Sbv resistance in the hyperendemic areas of North Bihar. Other antileishmanials could also face the same fate, especially in the anthroponotic cycle. The HIV/ visceral leishmaniasis (VL) coinfected patients are another potential source for the emergence of drug resistance. At present no molecular markers of resistance are available and the only reliable method for monitoring resistance of isolates is the technically demanding in vitro amastigote-macrophage model. As the armametrium of drugs for leishmaniasis is limited, it is important that effective monitoring of drug use and response should be done to prevent the spread of resistance. Regimens of simultaneous or sequential combinations should be seriously considered to limit the emergence of resistance. PMID:20606973

  6. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    de Luca, Carl; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2008-01-01

    Obesity-induced chronic inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the Metabolic syndrome. In this review, we focus on the interconnection between obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause insulin resistance in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver by inhibiting insulin signal transduction. The sources of cytokines in insulin resistant states are the insulin target tissue themselves, primarily fat and liver, but to a larger extent the activated tissue resident macrophages. While the initiating factors of this inflammatory response remain to be fully determined, chronic inflammation in these tissues could cause localized insulin resistance via autocrine/paracrine cytokine signaling and systemic insulin resistance via endocrine cytokine signaling all of which contribute to the abnormal metabolic state. PMID:18053812

  7. Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Yesim; Falk, Pamela; Mayhall, C. Glen

    2000-01-01

    After they were first identified in the mid-1980s, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) spread rapidly and became a major problem in many institutions both in Europe and the United States. Since VRE have intrinsic resistance to most of the commonly used antibiotics and the ability to acquire resistance to most of the current available antibiotics, either by mutation or by receipt of foreign genetic material, they have a selective advantage over other microorganisms in the intestinal flora and pose a major therapeutic challenge. The possibility of transfer of vancomycin resistance genes to other gram-positive organisms raises significant concerns about the emergence of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We review VRE, including their history, mechanisms of resistance, epidemiology, control measures, and treatment. PMID:11023964

  8. Cancer Metabolism and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahbuba; Hasan, Mohammad Rubayet

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alterations, driven by genetic and epigenetic factors, have long been known to be associated with the etiology of cancer. Furthermore, accumulating evidence suggest that cancer metabolism is intimately linked to drug resistance, which is currently one of the most important challenges in cancer treatment. Altered metabolic pathways help cancer cells to proliferate at a rate higher than normal, adapt to nutrient limited conditions, and develop drug resistance phenotypes. Application of systems biology, boosted by recent advancement of novel high-throughput technologies to obtain cancer-associated, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data, is expected to make a significant contribution to our understanding of metabolic properties related to malignancy. Indeed, despite being at a very early stage, quantitative data obtained from the omics platforms and through applications of 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) in in vitro studies, researchers have already began to gain insight into the complex metabolic mechanisms of cancer, paving the way for selection of molecular targets for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we discuss some of the major findings associated with the metabolic pathways in cancer cells and also discuss new evidences and achievements on specific metabolic enzyme targets and target-directed small molecules that can potentially be used as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26437434

  9. Bacterial resistance to uncouplers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K; Naroditskaya, V; Ferrante, A; Fokina, I

    1994-12-01

    Uncoupler resistance presents a potential challenge to the conventional chemiosmotic coupling mechanism. In E. coli, an adaptive response to uncouplers was found in cell growing under conditions requiring oxidative phosphorylation. It is suggested that uncoupler-resistant mutants described in the earlier literature might represent a constitutive state of expression of this "low energy shock" adaptive response. In the environment, bacteria are confronted by nonclassical uncoupling factors such as organic solvents, heat, and extremes of pH. It is suggested that the low energy shock response will aid the cell in coping with the effects of natural uncoupling factors. The genetic analysis of uncoupler resistance has only recently began, and is yielding interesting and largely unexpected results. In Bacillus subtilis, a mutation in fatty acid desaturase causes an increased content of saturated fatty acids in the membrane and increased uncoupler resistance. The protonophoric efficiency of uncouplers remains unchanged in the mutants, inviting nonorthodox interpretations of the mechanism of resistance. In E. coli, two loci conferring resistance to CCCP and TSA were cloned and were found to encode multidrug resistance pumps. Resistance to one of the uncouplers, TTFB, remained unchanged in strains mutated for the MDRs, suggesting a resistance mechanism different from uncoupler extrusion. PMID:7721726

  10. Airflow resistance in soybean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenghe, R. N.; Nimkar, P. M.; Shirkole, S. S.; Shinde, K. J.

    2012-04-01

    Resistance of material to airflow is an important factor to consider in the design of a dryer or an aeration system. The airflow resistance of soybean was determined with the modified airflow resistance apparatus. It was found that pressure drop increased with increase in airflow rate, bulk density, bed depth and decreased with moisture content. Modified Shedd equation, Hukill and Ives equation and modified Ergun equation were examined for pressure drop prediction. Airflow resistance was accurately described by modified Shedd equation followed by Hukill and Ives equation and modified Ergun equation. The developed statistical model comprised of airflow rate, moisture content and bulk density could fit pressure drop data reasonably well.

  11. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Vikas; Sanchaita, Sinha; Singh, NP

    2010-01-01

    Emergence and spread of Acinetobacter species, resistant to most of the available antimicrobial agents, is an area of great concern. It is now being frequently associated with healthcare associated infections. Literature was searched at PUBMED, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library, using the terms ‘Acinetobacter Resistance, multidrug resistant (MDR), Antimicrobial Therapy, Outbreak, Colistin, Tigecycline, AmpC enzymes, and carbapenemases in various combinations. The terms such as MDR, Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR), and Pan Drug Resistant (PDR) have been used in published literature with varied definitions, leading to confusion in the correlation of data from various studies. In this review various mechanisms of resistance in the Acinetobacter species have been discussed. The review also probes upon the current therapeutic options, including combination therapies available to treat infections due to resistant Acinetobacter species in adults as well as children. There is an urgent need to enforce infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs to prevent the further spread of these resistant Acinetobacter species and to delay the emergence of increased resistance in the bacteria. PMID:20927292

  12. TSH resistance revisited.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic defects of hormone receptors are the most common form of end-organ hormone resistance. One example of such defects is TSH resistance, which is caused by biallelic inactivating mutations in the TSH receptor gene (TSHR). TSH, a master regulator of thyroid functions, affects virtually all cellular processes involving thyroid hormone production, including thyroidal iodine uptake, thyroglobulin iodination, reuptake of iodinated thyroglobulin and thyroid cell growth. Resistance to TSH results in defective thyroid hormone production from the neonatal period, namely congenital hypothyroidism. Classically, clinical phenotypes of TSH resistance due to inactivating TSHR mutations were thought to vary depending on the residual mutant receptor activity. Nonfunctional mutations in the two alleles produce severe thyroid hypoplasia with overt hypothyroidism (uncompensated TSH resistance), while hypomorphic mutations in at least one allele produce normal-sized thyroid gland with preserved hormone-producing capacity (compensated TSH resistance). More recently, a new subgroup of TSH resistance (nonclassic TSH resistance) that is characterized by paradoxically high thyroidal iodine uptake has been reported. In this article, the pathophysiology and clinical features of TSH resistance due to inactivating TSHR mutations are reviewed, with particular attention to the nonclassic form. PMID:25797365

  13. Expression of cytokeratin confers multiple drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, P.A.; Dalton, W.S.; Anderson, J.M.; Cress, A.E. )

    1994-06-07

    The cytokeratin network is an extensive filamentous structure in the cytoplasm whose biological function(s) is unknown. Based upon previous data showing the modification of cytokeratin by mitoxantrone, the authors investigated the ability of cytokeratin networks to influence the survival response of cells to chemotherapeutic agents. They have compared the survival of mouse L fibroblasts lacking cytokeratins with that of L cells transfected with cytokeratins 8 and 18 in the presence of chemotherapeutic drugs. The expression of cytokeratins 8 and 18 conferred a multiple drug resistance phenotype on cells exposed to mitoxantrone, doxorubicin, methotrexate, melphalan, Colcemid, and vincristine. The degree of drug resistance was 5-454 times that of parental cells, depending upon the agent used. Drug resistance could not be attributed to altered growth characteristics, altered drug accumulation, or an altered drug efflux in the transfected cells. Cytokeratin does not confer resistance to ionizing radiation, which damages DNA independently on intracellular transport mechanisms. These data suggest a role for cytokeratin networks in conferring a drug resistance phenotype.

  14. Insecticide Resistance: Challenge to Pest Management and Basic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brattsten, L. B.; Holyoke, C. W.; Leeper, J. R.; Raffa, K. F.

    1986-03-01

    The agricultural use of synthetic insecticides usually protects crops but imposes strong selection pressures that can result in the development of resistance. The most important resistance mechanisms are enhancement of the capacity to metabolically detoxify insecticides and alterations in target sites that prevent insecticides from binding to them. Insect control methods must incorporate strategies to minimize resistance development and preserve the utility of the insecticides. The most promising approach, integrated pest management, includes the use of chemical insecticides in combination with improved cultural and biologically based techniques.

  15. Reassessing Biological Threats: Implications for Cooperative Mitigation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Summer Elise; Petzing, Stephanie Rachel; Young, Catharine Grace

    2015-01-01

    Multiple factors ranging from globalization to ecosystem disruption are presenting the global community with evolving biological threats to local, national, and global security that reach beyond the realm of traditional bioweapon threats. As a result, mitigation strategies have adapted necessarily to the increased diversity of biological threats. In general, response and preparedness strategies have largely shifted from being primarily reactive to traditional biological weapons to more proactive in nature. In this review, we briefly explore biological threats through a wider aperture, to embrace a greater appreciation of viral pathogens, antimicrobial resistance, and agricultural pathogens, and their potential to cause civil, economic, and political devastation. In addition, we discuss current mitigation strategies codified by the Global Health Security Agenda and the One Health paradigm as well as some of the available tools to assist with their sustainable implementation. PMID:26649289

  16. Biological Cluster Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the new physics and new applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry using cluster ion probes. These probes, particularly C60, exhibit enhanced molecular desorption with improved sensitivity owing to the unique nature of the energy-deposition process. In addition, these projectiles are capable of eroding molecular solids while retaining the molecular specificity of mass spectrometry. When the beams are microfocused to a spot on the sample, bioimaging experiments in two and three dimensions are feasible. We describe emerging theoretical models that allow the energy-deposition process to be understood on an atomic and molecular basis. Moreover, experiments on model systems are described that allow protocols for imaging on biological materials to be implemented. Finally, we present recent applications of imaging to biological tissue and single cells to illustrate the future directions of this methodology. PMID:20055679

  17. Power and Biological Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehler, T. M.; Som, S. M.; Kempes, C.; Jørgensen, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Habitability, biomass abundance, growth rates, and rates of evolution are constrained by the availability of biologically accessible energy through time -- power. It is well understood that life requires energy not only to grow, but also to support standing biomass without new growth. Quantifying this "maintenance energy" requirement is critical for understanding the biological potential of low energy systems, including many systems of astrobiological interest, but field- and culture-based estimates differ by as much as three orders of magnitude. Here, we evaluate and compare these estimates to environmental energy supply in two examples: methanogenic metabolism in serpentinizing systems and a hypothetical "thermotrophic" metabolism. In both cases, evaluation of the power budget introduces constraint and resolution beyond that provided by evaluation of Gibbs energy change for metabolic reactions.

  18. Biological materials by design.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhao; Dimas, Leon; Adler, David; Bratzel, Graham; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-02-19

    In this topical review we discuss recent advances in the use of physical insight into the way biological materials function, to design novel engineered materials 'from scratch', or from the level of fundamental building blocks upwards and by using computational multiscale methods that link chemistry to material function. We present studies that connect advances in multiscale hierarchical material structuring with material synthesis and testing, review case studies of wood and other biological materials, and illustrate how engineered fiber composites and bulk materials are designed, modeled, and then synthesized and tested experimentally. The integration of experiment and simulation in multiscale design opens new avenues to explore the physics of materials from a fundamental perspective, and using complementary strengths from models and empirical techniques. Recent developments in this field illustrate a new paradigm by which complex material functionality is achieved through hierarchical structuring in spite of simple material constituents. PMID:24451343

  19. Biological particle identification apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Gary C.; Gregg, Charles T.; Grace, W. Kevin; Hiebert, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

  20. The Biological Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    1999-12-01

    Throughout the twentieth century, from the furor over Percival Lowell's claim of canals on Mars to the sophisticated Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, otherworldly life has often intrigued and occasionally consumed science and the public. The Biological Universe provides a rich and colorful history of the attempts during the twentieth century to answer questions such as whether "biological law" reigns throughout the universe and whether there are other histories, religions, and philosophies outside those on Earth. Covering a broad range of topics, including the search for life in the solar system, the origins of life, UFOs, and aliens in science fiction, Steven J. Dick shows how the concept of extraterrestrial intelligence is a world view of its own, a "biophysical cosmology" that seeks confirmation no less than physical views of the universe. This book will fascinate astronomers, historians of science, biochemists, and science fiction readers.

  1. Integrative radiation systems biology.

    PubMed

    Unger, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Maximisation of the ratio of normal tissue preservation and tumour cell reduction is the main concept of radiotherapy alone or combined with chemo-, immuno- or biologically targeted therapy. The foremost parameter influencing this ratio is radiation sensitivity and its modulation towards a more efficient killing of tumour cells and a better preservation of normal tissue at the same time is the overall aim of modern therapy schemas. Nevertheless, this requires a deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms of radiation sensitivity in order to identify its key players as potential therapeutic targets. Moreover, the success of conventional approaches that tried to statistically associate altered radiation sensitivity with any molecular phenotype such as gene expression proofed to be somewhat limited since the number of clinically used targets is rather sparse. However, currently a paradigm shift is taking place from pure frequentistic association analysis to the rather holistic systems biology approach that seeks to mathematically model the system to be investigated and to allow the prediction of an altered phenotype as the function of one single or a signature of biomarkers. Integrative systems biology also considers the data from different molecular levels such as the genome, transcriptome or proteome in order to partially or fully comprehend the causal chain of molecular mechanisms. An example for the application of this concept currently carried out at the Clinical Cooperation Group "Personalized Radiotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer" of the Helmholtz-Zentrum München and the LMU Munich is described. This review article strives for providing a compact overview on the state of the art of systems biology, its actual challenges, potential applications, chances and limitations in radiation oncology research working towards improved personalised therapy concepts using this relatively new methodology. PMID:24411063

  2. [Biological markers of alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Marcos Martín, M; Pastor Encinas, I; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2005-09-01

    Diagnosis of alcoholism is very important, given its high prevalence and possibility of influencing the disease course. For this reason, the so-called biological markers of alcoholism are useful. These are analytic parameters that alter in the presence of excessive alcohol consumption. The two most relevant markers are the gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and carbohydrate deficient transferrin. With this clinical comment, we aim to contribute to the knowledge of these tests and promote its use in the clinical practice. PMID:16194480

  3. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  4. Quantum Effects in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  5. Biology of Infantile Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Itinteang, Tinte; Withers, Aaron H. J.; Davis, Paul F.; Tan, Swee T.

    2014-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma (IH), the most common tumor of infancy, is characterized by an initial proliferation during infancy followed by spontaneous involution over the next 5–10 years, often leaving a fibro-fatty residuum. IH is traditionally considered a tumor of the microvasculature. However, recent data show the critical role of stem cells in the biology of IH with emerging evidence suggesting an embryonic developmental anomaly due to aberrant proliferation and differentiation of a hemogenic endothelium with a neural crest phenotype that possesses the capacity for endothelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neuronal differentiation. Current evidence suggests a putative placental chorionic mesenchymal core cell embolic origin of IH during the first trimester. This review outlines the emerging role of stem cells and their interplay with the cytokine niche that promotes a post-natal environment conducive for vasculogenesis involving VEGFR-2 and its ligand VEGF-A and the IGF-2 ligand in promoting cellular proliferation, and the TRAIL-OPG anti-apoptotic pathway in preventing cellular apoptosis in IH. The discovery of the role of the renin–angiotensin system in the biology of IH provides a plausible explanation for the programed biologic behavior and the β-blocker-induced accelerated involution of this enigmatic condition. This crucially involves the vasoactive peptide, angiotensin II, that promotes cellular proliferation in IH predominantly via its action on the ATIIR2 isoform. The role of the RAS in the biology of IH is further supported by the effect of captopril, an ACE inhibitor, in inducing accelerated involution of IH. The discovery of the critical role of RAS in IH represents a novel and fascinating paradigm shift in the understanding of human development, IH, and other tumors in general. PMID:25593962

  6. Biology of infantile hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Itinteang, Tinte; Withers, Aaron H J; Davis, Paul F; Tan, Swee T

    2014-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma (IH), the most common tumor of infancy, is characterized by an initial proliferation during infancy followed by spontaneous involution over the next 5-10 years, often leaving a fibro-fatty residuum. IH is traditionally considered a tumor of the microvasculature. However, recent data show the critical role of stem cells in the biology of IH with emerging evidence suggesting an embryonic developmental anomaly due to aberrant proliferation and differentiation of a hemogenic endothelium with a neural crest phenotype that possesses the capacity for endothelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neuronal differentiation. Current evidence suggests a putative placental chorionic mesenchymal core cell embolic origin of IH during the first trimester. This review outlines the emerging role of stem cells and their interplay with the cytokine niche that promotes a post-natal environment conducive for vasculogenesis involving VEGFR-2 and its ligand VEGF-A and the IGF-2 ligand in promoting cellular proliferation, and the TRAIL-OPG anti-apoptotic pathway in preventing cellular apoptosis in IH. The discovery of the role of the renin-angiotensin system in the biology of IH provides a plausible explanation for the programed biologic behavior and the β-blocker-induced accelerated involution of this enigmatic condition. This crucially involves the vasoactive peptide, angiotensin II, that promotes cellular proliferation in IH predominantly via its action on the ATIIR2 isoform. The role of the RAS in the biology of IH is further supported by the effect of captopril, an ACE inhibitor, in inducing accelerated involution of IH. The discovery of the critical role of RAS in IH represents a novel and fascinating paradigm shift in the understanding of human development, IH, and other tumors in general. PMID:25593962

  7. [Biological etiologies of transsexualism].

    PubMed

    Butty, Anne-Virginie; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2016-03-16

    Transsexualism or gender dysphoria is a disorder of sexual identity of unknown etiology. At the biological level, one assumes atypical brain development during certain periods of its formation (genesis) notably during embryogenesis, as a result of altered hormonal influence and a particular genetic polymorphism. This article summarizes the research conducted to date in these three areas only, excluding psycho-social and environmental factors. PMID:27149713

  8. Biological Imaging Software Tools

    PubMed Central

    Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Berthold, Michael R.; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Ibáñez, Luis; Manjunath, B.S.; Martone, Maryann E.; Murphy, Robert F.; Peng, Hanchuan; Plant, Anne L.; Roysam, Badrinath; Stuurman, Nico; Swedlow, Jason R.; Tomancak, Pavel; Carpenter, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    Few technologies are more widespread in modern biological laboratories than imaging. Recent advances in optical technologies and instrumentation are providing hitherto unimagined capabilities. Almost all these advances have required the development of software to enable the acquisition, management, analysis, and visualization of the imaging data. We review each computational step that biologists encounter when dealing with digital images, the challenges in that domain, and the overall status of available software for bioimage informatics, focusing on open source options. PMID:22743775

  9. The biology of growth.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Noël

    2008-01-01

    Variability in human growth is not only in the timing of critical periods within the whole pattern of growth but also in the magnitude and rate of change coincident with the period. In addition, for a radical change in, e.g., height to occur there must also be changes in the anatomical parts that make up total height and these changes are themselves variable. Acceleration, for instance in height velocity, may be the result of different changes in the length of the spine, femur, and/or tibia, each of which may contribute differently to the total process. In addition, not only may the process be variable within a single child, it may also be variable between different children of the same or opposite sexes. The mathematical and statistical problems arising from the seemingly simple process of an increase in height are thus complex. In order to review the biology of human growth this contribution will discuss the principles of growth that are fundamental to our ability to interpret the response of the child to factors that might modify the genetically programmed pattern of growth from conception to maturity. In this way the biology of human growth will be described by a set of phenomena that reflect the actions of biological control mechanisms. These mechanisms are subject to genetic and environmental influences and their expression is characterised by variation in timing, magnitude, and duration. PMID:18196941

  10. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  11. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  12. Gravity and Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.

    1996-01-01

    Gravity has been the most constant environmental factor throughout the evolution of biological species on Earth. Organisms are rarely exposed to other gravity levels, either increased or decreased, for prolonged periods. Thus, evolution in a constant 1G field has historically prevented us from appreciating the potential biological consequences of a multi-G universe. To answer the question 'Can terrestrial life be sustained and thrive beyond our planet?' we need to understand the importance of gravity on living systems, and we need to develop a multi-G, rather than a 1G, mentality. The science of gravitational biology took a giant step with the advent of the space program, which provided the first opportunity to examine living organisms in gravity environments lower than could be sustained on Earth. Previously, virtually nothing was known about the effects of extremely low gravity on living organisms, and most of the initial expectations were proven wrong. All species that have flown in space survive in microgravity, although no higher organism has ever completed a life cycle in space. It has been found, however, that many systems change, transiently or permanently, as a result of prolonged exposure to microgravity.

  13. A gene expression signature for insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Nicky; Foletta, Victoria C; Segal, David H; Shields, Katherine A; Sanigorski, Andrew; Windmill, Kelly; Swinton, Courtney; Connor, Tim; Wanyonyi, Stephen; Dyer, Thomas D; Fahey, Richard P; Watt, Rose A; Curran, Joanne E; Molero, Juan-Carlos; Krippner, Guy; Collier, Greg R; James, David E; Blangero, John; Jowett, Jeremy B; Walder, Ken R

    2011-02-11

    Insulin resistance is a heterogeneous disorder caused by a range of genetic and environmental factors, and we hypothesize that its etiology varies considerably between individuals. This heterogeneity provides significant challenges to the development of effective therapeutic regimes for long-term management of type 2 diabetes. We describe a novel strategy, using large-scale gene expression profiling, to develop a gene expression signature (GES) that reflects the overall state of insulin resistance in cells and patients. The GES was developed from 3T3-L1 adipocytes that were made "insulin resistant" by treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and then reversed with aspirin and troglitazone ("resensitized"). The GES consisted of five genes whose expression levels best discriminated between the insulin-resistant and insulin-resensitized states. We then used this GES to screen a compound library for agents that affected the GES genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a way that most closely resembled the changes seen when insulin resistance was successfully reversed with aspirin and troglitazone. This screen identified both known and new insulin-sensitizing compounds including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, β-adrenergic antagonists, β-lactams, and sodium channel blockers. We tested the biological relevance of this GES in participants in the San Antonio Family Heart Study (n = 1,240) and showed that patients with the lowest GES scores were more insulin resistant (according to HOMA_IR and fasting plasma insulin levels; P < 0.001). These findings show that GES technology can be used for both the discovery of insulin-sensitizing compounds and the characterization of patients into subtypes of insulin resistance according to GES scores, opening the possibility of developing a personalized medicine approach to type 2 diabetes. PMID:21081660

  14. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance: Daptomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Truc T.; Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction in clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key front-line antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP-resistance (R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP resistance are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have offered novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria. PMID:26495887

  15. An overview of antimicrobial resistance and its public health significance.

    PubMed

    Balsalobre, Livia Carminato; Dropa, Milena; Matté, Maria Helena

    2014-01-01

    Multiple papers have been published regarding the bacterial resistance theme over the last years. A variety of information has reached general and scientific public, daily bringing up data on new resistant microorganisms, new drugs, outbreaks, epidemiological news, resistance gene dissemination, and the lack of information in a particular field has caught our attention: the public health department. Most of researchers, physicians and government employees interpret the public health field as a separate department, not linked to this antibiotic resistance era that we are living nowadays. In this paper we carefully tried to fill in the blanks between public health and the bacteria resistance issue, also considering historical, social, economical and biological problematic that come with this possible pre-antibiotic era. PMID:24948906

  16. Mechanisms of tumor resistance to EGFR-targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hopper-Borge, Elizabeth A; Nasto, Rochelle E; Ratushny, Vladimir; Weiner, Louis M; Golemis, Erica A

    2009-01-01

    Background Much effort has been devoted to development of cancer therapies targeting EGFR, based on its role in regulating cell growth. Small-molecule and antibody EGFR inhibitors have clinical roles based on their efficacy in a subset of cancers, generally as components of combination therapies. Many cancers are either initially resistant to EGFR inhibitors or become resistant during treatment, limiting the efficacy of these reagents. Objective/Methods To review cellular resistance mechanisms to EGFR-targeted therapies. Results/Conclusions The best validated of these mechanisms include activation of classic ATP-binding casette (ABC) multidrug transporters; activation or mutation of EGFR; and overexpression or activation of signaling proteins operating in relation to EGFR. We discuss current efforts and potential strategies to override these sources of resistance. We describe emerging systems-biology-based concepts of alternative resistance to EGFR-targeted therapies, and discuss their implications for use of EGFR-targeted and other targeted therapies. PMID:19236156

  17. Resistance gene capture.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Magnus, D A; Mazel, D

    1999-10-01

    Integrons are the primary mechanism for antibiotic-resistance gene capture and dissemination among Gram-negative bacteria. The recent finding of super-integron structures in the genomes of several bacterial species has expanded their role in genome evolution and suggests that they are the source of mobile multi-resistant integrons. PMID:10508722

  18. Mold-Resistant Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that one of the surest ways to prevent indoor air quality and mold issues is to use preventive construction materials, discussing typical resistance to dealing with mold problems (usually budget-related) and describing mold-resistant construction, which uses concrete masonry, brick, and stone and is intended to withstand inevitable…

  19. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2016-04-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have not only emerged in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic "attack" is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. "Survival of the fittest" is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material, or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and to devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice, providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  20. Resistance, Reactance, and Consultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Jan N.; Falk, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a review of techniques for dealing with consultee resistance. Suggests the social psychological theory of reactance is a useful conceptual framework for considering resistance in consultation. Discusses examples of its application, variables that predict the likely effectiveness of a reactance utilization intervention, and ethical issues.…

  1. Biological event composition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years, biological event extraction has emerged as a key natural language processing task, aiming to address the information overload problem in accessing the molecular biology literature. The BioNLP shared task competitions have contributed to this recent interest considerably. The first competition (BioNLP'09) focused on extracting biological events from Medline abstracts from a narrow domain, while the theme of the latest competition (BioNLP-ST'11) was generalization and a wider range of text types, event types, and subject domains were considered. We view event extraction as a building block in larger discourse interpretation and propose a two-phase, linguistically-grounded, rule-based methodology. In the first phase, a general, underspecified semantic interpretation is composed from syntactic dependency relations in a bottom-up manner. The notion of embedding underpins this phase and it is informed by a trigger dictionary and argument identification rules. Coreference resolution is also performed at this step, allowing extraction of inter-sentential relations. The second phase is concerned with constraining the resulting semantic interpretation by shared task specifications. We evaluated our general methodology on core biological event extraction and speculation/negation tasks in three main tracks of BioNLP-ST'11 (GENIA, EPI, and ID). Results We achieved competitive results in GENIA and ID tracks, while our results in the EPI track leave room for improvement. One notable feature of our system is that its performance across abstracts and articles bodies is stable. Coreference resolution results in minor improvement in system performance. Due to our interest in discourse-level elements, such as speculation/negation and coreference, we provide a more detailed analysis of our system performance in these subtasks. Conclusions The results demonstrate the viability of a robust, linguistically-oriented methodology, which clearly distinguishes

  2. The US Biology Education Standards, New Biology Curricula and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a brief history of the events leading up to the current US biology education standards, a brief examination of the National Science Education Standards for biology, and a description of the three recently developed biology curricula that were designed to address the new standards. Several evaluative studies of these curricula…

  3. Neglect of Biological Rhythms in High School Biology Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlgren, Andrew; Nelson, Julie Ann

    1979-01-01

    This article developed from a survey of the five most popular biology texts which promote the theory of invariant homeostasis rather than biological rhythms. The popular fad of "birthdate biorhythms" is discussed in relation to providing education on biological rhythms and its legitimacy to the public. (SA)

  4. Biology Intensive Orientation for Students (BIOS): A Biology "Boot Camp"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wischusen, Sheri Maples; Wischusen, E. William

    2007-01-01

    The Biology Intensive Orientation for Students (BIOS) Program was designed to assess the impact of a 5-d intensive prefreshman program on success and retention of biological science majors at Louisiana State University. The 2005 pilot program combined content lectures and examinations for BIOL 1201, Introductory Biology for Science Majors, as well…

  5. Luminescent Quantum Dots as Ultrasensitive Biological Labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming

    2000-03-01

    Highly luminescent semiconductor quantum dots have been covalently coupled to biological molecules for use in ultrasensitive biological detection. This new class of luminescent labels is considerably brighter and more resistant againt photobleaching in comparison with organic dyes. Quantum dots labeled with the protein transferrin undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) in cultured HeLa cells, and those dots that were conjugated to immunomolecules recognize specific antibodies or antigens. In addition, we show that DNA functionalized quantum dots can be used to target specific genes by hybridization. We expect that quantum dot bioconjugates will have a broad range of biological applications, such as ligand-receptor interactions, real-time monitoring of molecular trafficking inside living cells, multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), high-sensitivity detection in miniaturized devices (e.g., DNA chips), and fluorescent tagging of combinatorial chemical libraries. A potential clinical application is the use of quantum dots for ultrasensitive viral RNA detection, in which as low as 100 copies of hepatitis C and HIV viruses per ml blood should be detected.

  6. Pancreatic cancer stromal biology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dacheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. Significant progresses have been made in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including appreciation of precursor lesions or premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), description of sequential transformation from normal pancreatic tissue to invasive pancreatic cancer and identification of major genetic and epigenetic events and the biological impact of those events on malignant behavior. However, the currently used therapeutic strategies targeting tumor epithelial cells, which are potent in cell culture and animal models, have not been successful in the clinic. Presumably, therapeutic resistance of pancreatic cancer is at least in part due to its drastic desmoplasis, which is a defining hallmark for and circumstantially contributes to pancreatic cancer development and progression. Improved understanding of the dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the stroma is important to better understanding pancreatic cancer biology and to designing effective intervention strategies. This review focuses on the origination, evolution and disruption of stromal molecular and cellular components in pancreatic cancer, and their biological effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26114155

  7. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chellat, Mathieu F; Raguž, Luka; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human-pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last-resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled "Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow" triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  8. Stability and fitness costs associated with etoxazole resistance in Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Stocco, Rafael Sorrentino Minazzi; Sato, Mário Eidi; Santos, Taiana Lumi

    2016-08-01

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, is one of the most important pests on a wide range of crops worldwide. Studies on stability of resistance and possible fitness costs associated with etoxazole resistance were carried out in T. urticae to provide basic information necessary to define effective acaricide resistance management strategies for this pest. Selection for resistance to etoxazole was performed in a population of T. urticae collected from a commercial rose field, in Holambra County, in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. After five rounds of selection for resistance, the resistance ratio (R/S) at the LC50 reached 8739 fold value in comparison with a susceptible strain (Brazabrantes S Strain). The stability of etoxazole resistance was studied under laboratory conditions, using a population with initial frequency of 75 % of resistant mites. The frequencies of etoxazole resistance were evaluated monthly for a period of 13 months. The frequency of etoxazole resistance decreased from 75 to 37 % in this period. Comparison of biological traits between resistant and susceptible strains indicated the presence of fitness costs associated with etoxazole resistance. The resistant strain showed lower fecundity and a higher proportion of males in the population. The figures for net reproductive rate (R 0), intrinsic rate of natural increase (r m) and finite rate of increase (λ) were higher in the susceptible strain. The instability of etoxazole resistance is a favorable aspect for the acaricide resistance management in the spider mite. PMID:27222145

  9. Paraquat resistance in conyza.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, E P; Nakatani, H Y; Dodge, A D; Penner, D; Arntzen, C J

    1985-04-01

    A biotype of Conyza bonariensis (L.) Cronq. (identical to Conyza linefolia in other publications) originating in Egypt is resistant to the herbicide 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium ion (paraquat). Penetration of the cuticle by [(14)C]paraquat was greater in the resistant biotype than the susceptible (wild) biotype; therefore, resistance was not due to differences in uptake. The resistant and susceptible biotypes were indistinguishable by measuring in vitro photosystem I partial reactions using paraquat, 6,7-dihydrodipyrido [1,2-alpha:2',1'-c] pyrazinediium ion (diquat), or 7,8-dihydro-6H-dipyrido [1,2-alpha:2',1'-c] [1,4] diazepinediium ion (triquat) as electron acceptors. Therefore, alteration at the electron acceptor level of photosystem I is not the basis for resistance. Chlorophyll fluorescence measured in vivo was quenched in the susceptible biotype by leaf treatment with the bipyridinium herbicides. Resistance to quenching of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence was observed in the resistant biotype, indicating that the herbicide was excluded from the chloroplasts. Movement of [(14)C] paraquat was restricted in the resistant biotype when excised leaves were supplied [(14)C]paraquat through the petiole. We propose that the mechanism of resistance to paraquat is exclusion of paraquat from its site of action in the chloroplast by a rapid sequestration mechanism. No differential binding of paraquat to cell walls isolated from susceptible and resistant biotypes could be detected. The exact site and mechanism of paraquat binding to sequester the herbicide remains to be determined. PMID:16664176

  10. The biology of hair diversity.

    PubMed

    Westgate, Gillian E; Botchkareva, Natalia V; Tobin, Desmond J

    2013-08-01

    Hair diversity, its style, colour, shape and growth pattern is one of our most defining characteristics. The natural versus temporary style is influenced by what happens to our hair during our lifetime, such as genetic hair loss, sudden hair shedding, greying and pathological hair loss in the various forms of alopecia because of genetics, illness or medication. Despite the size and global value of the hair care market, our knowledge of what controls the innate and within-lifetime characteristics of hair diversity remains poorly understood. In the last decade, drivers of knowledge have moved into the arena of genetics where hair traits are obvious and measurable and genetic polymorphisms are being found that raise valuable questions about the biology of hair growth. The recent discovery that the gene for trichohyalin contributes to hair shape comes as no surprise to the hair biologists who have believed for 100 years that hair shape is linked to the structure and function of the inner root sheath. Further conundrums awaiting elucidation include the polymorphisms in the androgen receptor (AR) described in male pattern alopecia whose location on the X chromosome places this genetic contributor into the female line. The genetics of female hair loss is less clear with polymorphisms in the AR not associated with female pattern hair loss. Lifestyle choices are also implicated in hair diversity. Greying, which also has a strong genetic component, is often suggested to have a lifestyle (stress) influence and hair follicle melanocytes show declining antioxidant protection with age and lowered resistance to stress. It is likely that hair research will undergo a renaissance on the back of the rising information from genetic studies as well as the latest contributions from the field of epigenetics. PMID:23363384

  11. Update on antifungal drug resistance mechanisms of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Chamilos, G; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2005-12-01

    Although the arsenal of agents with anti-Aspergillus activity has expanded over the last decade, mortality due to invasive aspergillosis (IA) remains unacceptably high. Aspergillus fumigatus still accounts for the majority of cases of IA; however less susceptible to antifungals non-fumigatus aspergilli began to emerge. Antifungal drug resistance of Aspergillus might partially account for treatment failures. Recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms of antifungal drug action in Aspergillus, along with the standardization of in vitro susceptibility testing methods, has brought resistance testing to the forefront of clinical mycology. In addition, molecular biology has started to shed light on the mechanisms of resistance of A. fumigatus to azoles and the echinocandins, while genome-based assays show promise for high-throughput screening for genotypic antifungal resistance. Several problems remain, however, in the study of this complex area. Large multicenter clinical studies--point prevalence or longitudinal--to capture the incidence and prevalence of antifungal resistance in A. fumigatus isolates are lacking. Correlation of in vitro susceptibility with clinical outcome and susceptibility breakpoints has not been established. In addition, the issue of cross-resistance between the newer triazoles is of concern. Furthermore, in vitro resistance testing for polyenes and echinocandins is difficult, and their mechanisms of resistance are largely unknown. This review examines challenges in the diagnosis, epidemiology, and mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in A. fumigatus. PMID:16488654

  12. FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... animal, and microorganism—and may be produced by biotechnology methods. Gene-based and cellular biologics, at the ... other categories of biological products mostly produced by biotechnology methods, including: monoclonal antibodies designed as targeted therapies ...

  13. American Institute of Biological Sciences

    MedlinePlus

    ... About | Newsroom | Contact Us The American Institute of Biological Sciences is the national scientific organization that promotes ... of science to inform decision-making that advances biology for the benefit of science and society. We ...

  14. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  15. Philosophical Foundations of Biological Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Arthur T.; Phillips, Winfred M.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a philosophy from which biological engineering curriculums can emerge. Discusses competencies, basic engineering and biological concepts, common courses, interfacing between engineers and biologists, and employment. Contains 28 references. (JRH)

  16. Is Our Biology to Blame?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Scott

    1977-01-01

    Brief analyses of three recent examples of biological determinism: sex roles, overpopulation, and sociobiology, are presented in this article. Also a brief discussion of biological determinism and education is presented. (MR)

  17. [BIOLOGICAL IMPLANTS IN ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA REPAIR (REVIEW)].

    PubMed

    Abatov, N; Badyrov, R; Abatova, A; Assamidanov, E; Kaukenov, B

    2016-02-01

    The use of synthetic meshes as a material for abdominal wall hernia repair does not always ensure a recurrence-free treatment outcome and full recovery of the abdominal wall functional activity. There are well-known disadvantages such as poor resistance to infection, the infiltrate formation in the place of implantation, expressed adhesive process in cases of introperitoneal fixation, to create certain restrictions on the using of these implants for abdominal wall reconstruction. The search for alternative materials that could minimize the risk of complications, has led to the study of biological grafts. It is known that various methods for the manufacturing biological implants determine endogenous properties for each material separately, and may be cause a variety of biological responses in vivo after implantation. The question has not been resolved, what the fresh raw material is better to use for derive biological implants. In this review we investigated the interaction of different types of biological implants between the abdominal wall and the organs of abdominal cavity of the recipient, their ability to resist infection and the development of relapses, as a leading indicator of the effectiveness of hernioplasty. PMID:27001778

  18. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention related to the preservation of a liquid biological sample. The biological sample is exposed to a preservative containing at least about 0.15 g of sodium benzoate and at least about 0.025 g of citric acid per 100 ml of sample. The biological sample may be collected in a vessel or an absorbent mass. The biological sample may also be exposed to a substrate and/or a vehicle.

  19. Opportunities in Biological Sciences Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Charles A.

    This book offers a panoramic view of the diversity of careers which the future may offer to those trained in the biological sciences. It discusses the scope and organization of the biological sciences, focusing on the various specialties such as microbiology, genetics, entomology, ecology, wildlife biology, and the biomedical sciences such as…

  20. Learning Biology with Plant Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Juliet E.

    This monograph contains 10 plant pathology experiments that were written to correspond to portions of a biology curriculum. Each experiment is suitable to a biology topic and designed to encourage exploration of those biological concepts being taught. Experiments include: (1) The Symptoms and Signs of Disease; (2) Koch's Postulates; (3)…

  1. Functions in Biological Kind Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombrozo, Tania; Rehder, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Biological traits that serve functions, such as a zebra's coloration (for camouflage) or a kangaroo's tail (for balance), seem to have a special role in conceptual representations for biological kinds. In five experiments, we investigate whether and why functional features are privileged in biological kind classification. Experiment 1…

  2. Marine molecular biology: an emerging field of biological sciences.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Narsinh L; Jain, Roopesh; Natalio, Filipe; Hamer, Bojan; Thakur, Archana N; Müller, Werner E G

    2008-01-01

    An appreciation of the potential applications of molecular biology is of growing importance in many areas of life sciences, including marine biology. During the past two decades, the development of sophisticated molecular technologies and instruments for biomedical research has resulted in significant advances in the biological sciences. However, the value of molecular techniques for addressing problems in marine biology has only recently begun to be cherished. It has been proven that the exploitation of molecular biological techniques will allow difficult research questions about marine organisms and ocean processes to be addressed. Marine molecular biology is a discipline, which strives to define and solve the problems regarding the sustainable exploration of marine life for human health and welfare, through the cooperation between scientists working in marine biology, molecular biology, microbiology and chemistry disciplines. Several success stories of the applications of molecular techniques in the field of marine biology are guiding further research in this area. In this review different molecular techniques are discussed, which have application in marine microbiology, marine invertebrate biology, marine ecology, marine natural products, material sciences, fisheries, conservation and bio-invasion etc. In summary, if marine biologists and molecular biologists continue to work towards strong partnership during the next decade and recognize intellectual and technological advantages and benefits of such partnership, an exciting new frontier of marine molecular biology will emerge in the future. PMID:18299181

  3. Multipronged Design of Light-Triggered Nanoparticles To Overcome Cisplatin Resistance for Efficient Ablation of Resistant Tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanli; Deng, Yibin; Tian, Xin; Ke, Hengte; Guo, Miao; Zhu, Aijun; Yang, Tao; Guo, Zhengqing; Ge, Zhishen; Yang, Xiangliang; Chen, Huabing

    2015-10-27

    Chemotherapeutic drugs frequently encounter multiple drug resistance in the field of cancer therapy. The strategy has been explored with limited success for the ablation of drug-resistant tumor via intravenous administration. In this work, the rationally designed light-triggered nanoparticles with multipronged physicochemical and biological features are developed to overcome cisplatin resistance via the assembly of Pt(IV) prodrug and cyanine dye (Cypate) within the copolymer for efficient ablation of cisplatin-resistant tumor. The micelles exhibit good photostability, sustained release, preferable tumor accumulation, and enhanced cellular uptake with reduced efflux on both A549 cells and resistant A549R cells. Moreover, near-infrared light not only triggers the photothermal effect of the micelles for remarkable photothermal cytotoxicity, but also leads to the intracellular translocation of the micelles and reduction-activable Pt(IV) prodrug into cytoplasm through the lysosomal disruption, as well as the remarkable inhibition on the expression of a drug-efflux transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) for further reversal of drug resistance of A549R cells. Consequently, the multipronged effects of light-triggered micelles cause synergistic cytotoxicity against both A549 cells and A549R cells, and thus efficient ablation of cisplatin-resistant tumor without regrowth. The multipronged features of light-triggered micelles represent a versatile synergistic approach for the ablation of resistant tumor in the field of cancer therapy. PMID:26365698

  4. Allometric Scaling in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavar, Jayanth

    2009-03-01

    The unity of life is expressed not only in the universal basis of inheritance and energetics at the molecular level, but also in the pervasive scaling of traits with body size at the whole-organism level. More than 75 years ago, Kleiber and Brody and Proctor independently showed that the metabolic rates, B, of mammals and birds scale as the three-quarter power of their mass, M. Subsequent studies showed that most biological rates and times scale as M-1/4 and M^1/4 respectively, and that these so called quarter-power scaling relations hold for a variety of organisms, from unicellular prokaryotes and eukaryotes to trees and mammals. The wide applicability of Kleiber's law, across the 22 orders of magnitude of body mass from minute bacteria to giant whales and sequoias, raises the hope that there is some simple general explanation that underlies the incredible diversity of form and function. We will present a general theoretical framework for understanding the relationship between metabolic rate, B, and body mass, M. We show how the pervasive quarter-power biological scaling relations arise naturally from optimal directed resource supply systems. This framework robustly predicts that: 1) whole organism power and resource supply rate, B, scale as M^3/4; 2) most other rates, such as heart rate and maximal population growth rate scale as M-1/4; 3) most biological times, such as blood circulation time and lifespan, scale as M^1/4; and 4) the average velocity of flow through the network, v, such as the speed of blood and oxygen delivery, scales as M^1/12. Our framework is valid even when there is no underlying network. Our theory is applicable to unicellular organisms as well as to large animals and plants. This work was carried out in collaboration with Amos Maritan along with Jim Brown, John Damuth, Melanie Moses, Andrea Rinaldo, and Geoff West.

  5. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    Often students and educators view assessments as an obligation and finality for a unit. In the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, the balance of time, resources and emphasis on students' scores related to assessment have been slanted considerably toward the summative side. This tension between assessment for accountability and assessment to inform teaching strains instruction and educators' ability to use that information to design learning opportunities that help students develop deeper conceptual understanding. A substantive body of research indicates that formative and reflective assessment can significantly improve student learning. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum (BRAC) examines support provided for high school science students through assessment practices. This investigation incorporates the usage of reflective assessments as a guiding practice for differentiated instruction and student choice. Reflective assessment is a metacognitive strategy that promotes self-monitoring and evaluation. The goals of the curriculum are to promote self-efficacy and conceptual understanding in students learning biology through developing their metacognitive awareness. BRAC was implemented in a high school biology classroom. Data from assessments, metacognitive surveys, self-efficacy surveys, reflective journals, student work, a culminating task and field notes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The results suggest that students who develop their metacognitive skills developed a deeper conceptual understanding and improved feelings of self-efficacy when they were engaged in a reflective assessment unit embedded with student choice. BRAC is a tool for teachers to use assessments to assist students in becoming metacognitive and to guide student choice in learning opportunities.

  6. Biological safety cabinetry.

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, R H; Puckett, W H; Richardson, J H

    1991-01-01

    The biological safety cabinet is the one piece of laboratory and pharmacy equipment that provides protection for personnel, the product, and the environment. Through the history of laboratory-acquired infections from the earliest published case to the emergence of hepatitis B and AIDS, the need for health care worker protection is described. A brief description with design, construction, function, and production capabilities is provided for class I and class III safety cabinets. The development of the high-efficiency particulate air filter provided the impetus for clean room technology, from which evolved the class II laminar flow biological safety cabinet. The clean room concept was advanced when the horizontal airflow clean bench was manufactured; it became popular in pharmacies for preparing intravenous solutions because the product was protected. However, as with infectious microorganisms and laboratory workers, individual sensitization to antibiotics and the advent of hazardous antineoplastic agents changed the thinking of pharmacists and nurses, and they began to use the class II safety cabinet to prevent adverse personnel reactions to the drugs. How the class II safety cabinet became the mainstay in laboratories and pharmacies is described, and insight is provided into the formulation of National Sanitation Foundation standard number 49 and its revisions. The working operations of a class II cabinet are described, as are the variations of the four types with regard to design, function, air velocity profiles, and the use of toxins. The main certification procedures are explained, with examples of improper or incorrect certifications. The required levels of containment for microorganisms are given. Instructions for decontaminating the class II biological safety cabinet of infectious agents are provided; unfortunately, there is no method for decontaminating the cabinet of antineoplastic agents. Images PMID:2070345

  7. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  8. Toward verified biological models.

    PubMed

    Sadot, Avital; Fisher, Jasmin; Barak, Dan; Admanit, Yishai; Stern, Michael J; Hubbard, E Jane Albert; Harel, David

    2008-01-01

    The last several decades have witnessed a vast accumulation of biological data and data analysis. Many of these data sets represent only a small fraction of the system's behavior, making the visualization of full system behavior difficult. A more complete understanding of a biological system is gained when different types of data (and/or conclusions drawn from the data) are integrated into a larger-scale representation or model of the system. Ideally, this type of model is consistent with all available data about the system, and it is then used to generate additional hypotheses to be tested. Computer-based methods intended to formulate models that integrate various events and to test the consistency of these models with respect to the laboratory-based observations on which they are based are potentially very useful. In addition, in contrast to informal models, the consistency of such formal computer-based models with laboratory data can be tested rigorously by methods of formal verification. We combined two formal modeling approaches in computer science that were originally developed for non-biological system design. One is the inter-object approach using the language of live sequence charts (LSCs) with the Play-Engine tool, and the other is the intra-object approach using the language of statecharts and Rhapsody as the tool. Integration is carried out using InterPlay, a simulation engine coordinator. Using these tools, we constructed a combined model comprising three modules. One module represents the early lineage of the somatic gonad of C. elegans in LSCs, while a second more detailed module in statecharts represents an interaction between two cells within this lineage that determine their developmental outcome. Using the advantages of the tools, we created a third module representing a set of key experimental data using LSCs. We tested the combined statechart-LSC model by showing that the simulations were consistent with the set of experimental LSCs. This small

  9. Evolutionary biology of language.

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, M A

    2000-01-01

    Language is the most important evolutionary invention of the last few million years. It was an adaptation that helped our species to exchange information, make plans, express new ideas and totally change the appearance of the planet. How human language evolved from animal communication is one of the most challenging questions for evolutionary biology The aim of this paper is to outline the major principles that guided language evolution in terms of mathematical models of evolutionary dynamics and game theory. I will discuss how natural selection can lead to the emergence of arbitrary signs, the formation of words and syntactic communication. PMID:11127907

  10. Elements in biological AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. {sup 14}C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth`s biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed.

  11. Illuminating Cell Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Ames Research Center awarded Ciencia, Inc., a Small Business Innovation Research contract to develop the Cell Fluorescence Analysis System (CFAS) to address the size, mass, and power constraints of using fluorescence spectroscopy in the International Space Station's Life Science Research Facility. The system will play an important role in studying biological specimen's long-term adaptation to microgravity. Commercial applications for the technology include diverse markets such as food safety, in situ environmental monitoring, online process analysis, genomics and DNA chips, and non-invasive diagnostics. Ciencia has already sold the system to the private sector for biosensor applications.

  12. Biology of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Berlot, Giorgio; Rossini, Perla; Turchet, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous Immunoglobulins (IvIg) are often administered to critically ill patients more as an act of faith than on the basis of relevant clinical studies. This particularly applies to the treatment of sepsis in adult patients, in whom the current guidelines even recommend against their use, despite that many studies demonstrated either their beneficial effects in different subsets of patients and that some preparations of IvIg are more effective than other. The biology of Ig are reviewed, aiming to a more in-depth understanding of their properties in order to clarify their possible indications in different clinical settings. PMID:25674545

  13. [Woman and race biology].

    PubMed

    Hanson, H

    1993-01-01

    Early 20th century race biology takes a special interest in woman as part of the "intra-racial" project of bringing forth healthy and competitive individuals. But there are other motives as well for the race biologist to take an interest in woman. She is believed to develop fewer individual characteristics and is therefore a more typical representative of her race than man. The development level of the race is also presupposed to be discernible by the degree of "gender diformism": a race of higher standing would exhibit a greater difference between the sexes. The anthropologist, anatomist, gynaecologist--or whatever guise the race biologist may adopt-- will, in principle, stress that the relation between the sexes is not a matter of "more or less", but one of differences in kind. In reality, the "more-or-less of comparison is the very cornerstone of the issue. Quantitative differences, directly observed or obtained from statistics, are construed as signs of difference in kind. 18th century medical philosophy and sex-linked anthropology laid the theoretical foundation of the 19th century essentialist conception of woman, which is also that adopted by race biology. Eugenics of social Darwinist inspiration regarded prophylactic health care and social welfare programs with scepticism. A race biology founded on the man-woman dualism could sustain altogether different conclusions. An advanced culture calls for extensive division of labour. An extended childhood renders possible higher development but will also impose higher demands on woman. The protection of the female organism is thus an exigency for any people or race striving to survive and evolve. From society's care for the female organism health care for women and preventive maternity care will emerge. Race biology has been a preeminently German concern, as indicated by the selection of works taken to represent this perspective on woman: Bartels-Ploss' Das Weib, C.H. Stratz' Die Rassenschönheit des Weibes and

  14. [The biologization of ethics].

    PubMed

    Moreno Lax, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Three ethics exist as a condition of possibility of any possible ethics, following a material and biological foundation. This content argument (not logical-formal) supposes a refutation of the naturalistic fallacy that the analytical philosophy attributes to Hume, in three areas of the ethical human experience: body, society and nature. These are: the ethics of the species [J. Habermas], the ethics of liberation [E. Dussel] and the ethics of the responsibility [H. Jonas]. This material argument is a philosophical foundation to considering for three types of applied ethics: medical bioethics, development ethics and environmental ethics. PMID:20405971

  15. Bustling argon: biological effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option. PMID:24088583

  16. Biological hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  17. Telomere Biology in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Nuno M.V.; Shay, Jerry W.; Wright, Woodring E.

    2010-01-01

    In this review we present critical overview of some of the available literature on the fundamental biology of telomeres and telomerase in Metazoan. With the exception of Nematodes and Arthropods, the (TTAGGG)n sequence is conserved in most Metazoa. Available data shows that telomerase-based end maintenance is a very ancient mechanism in unicellular and multicellular organisms. In invertebrates, fish, amphibian, and reptiles persistent telomerase activity in somatic tissues might allow the maintenance of the extensive regenerative potentials of these species. Telomerase repression among birds and many mammals suggests that, as humans, they may use replicative aging as a tumor protection mechanism. PMID:20655915

  18. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, Robert; McMonigal, K. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) has been established to collect, process, annotate, store, and distribute specimens under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The NBSR is a secure controlled storage facility that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time, under well-controlled conditions, for future use in approved human spaceflight-related research protocols. The repository supports the Human Research Program, which is charged with identifying and investigating physiological changes that occur during human spaceflight, and developing and implementing effective countermeasures when necessary. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can validate clinical hypotheses, study space-flight related changes, and investigate physiological markers All samples collected require written informed consent from each long duration crewmember. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating long duration ISS crewmembers. These biological samples are collected pre-flight at approximately 45 days prior to launch, during flight on flight days 15, 30, 60 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days following landing. The number of inflight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Operations began in 2007 and as of October 2009, 23 USOS crewmembers have completed or agreed to participate in this project. As currently planned, these human biological samples will be collected from crewmembers covering multiple ISS missions until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS or 2017. The NBSR will establish guidelines for sample distribution that are consistent with ethical principles

  19. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    couple of billion years of evolutionary history; 'you cannot expect to explain so wise an old bird in a few simple words'. It is indisputably so, but it is followed by two other competing sub-dogmas: Dogma N6a: Physics wants to simplify and unify things, as much as possible, biology resists the reductionist approach and is happy about diversification and complexity. In my opinion all these dogmas have been beaten by this icon, the understanding of which gave rise to the idea of DNA replication and all the following principles of molecular biology. Not only 'this will happen again' but on a smaller scale this happens all the time. Generally, through centuries, physics and mathematics have changed our lives completely. In a short article one cannot give a full list of such achievements from Aristotle's time, but I name just a few of the summits of the last two centuries. A great physicist Rutherford (who was, by the way, a Nobel Laureate in Chemistry for 'his investigations into the disintegration of the elements, and the chemistry of radioactive substances') was also famous for an extreme (and definitely outdated) statement: 'All science is either stamp collecting or physics'. Let us paraphrase him and collect some stamps. I have no space to stop on the Faraday-Ampere laws of stationary electricity (who cares, electric current comes from a plug would be the answer of most of people unfamiliar with physics, and forget about electricity that is supplied to biological laboratories). So, let us go straight away to James Clerk Maxwell. He derived four equations that related electricity and magnetism and, as the legend tells us, it took him seven years to write the fourth equation to complete the set with four unknown variables. The story of the fourth Maxwell equation is one of the most dramatic stories in the history of science [4]. As a solution of that set he obtained relativistically-invariant electromagnetic waves, which no one saw and the consequences of which no one had

  20. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  1. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  2. Linezolid Resistance in Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Stefania; Bongiorno, Dafne; Mongelli, Gino; Campanile, Floriana

    2010-01-01

    Linezolid, the first oxazolidinone to be used clinically, is effective in the treatment of infections caused by various Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus. It has been used successfully for the treatment of patients with endocarditis and bacteraemia, osteomyelitis, joint infections and tuberculosis and it is often used for treatment of complicated infections when other therapies have failed. Linezolid resistance in Gram-positive cocci has been encountered clinically as well as in vitro, but it is still a rare phenomenon. The resistance to this antibiotic has been, until now, entirely associated with distinct nucleotide substitutions in domain V of the 23S rRNA genes. The number of mutated rRNA genes depends on the dose and duration of linezolid exposure and has been shown to influence the level of linezolid resistance. Mutations in associated ribosomal proteins also affect linezolid activity. A new phenicol and clindamycin resistance phenotype has recently been found to be caused by an RNA methyltransferase designated Cfr. This gene confers resistance to lincosamides, oxazolidinones, streptogramin A, phenicols and pleuromutilins, decrease the susceptibility of S. aureus to tylosin, to josamycin and spiramycin and thus differs from erm rRNA methylase genes. Research into new oxazolidinones with improved characteristics is ongoing. Data reported in patent applications demonstrated that some oxazolidinone derivatives, also with improved characteristics with respect to linezolid, are presently under study: at least three of them are in an advanced phase of development.

  3. Biological capacitance studies of anodes in microbial fuel cells using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhihao; Girguis, Peter; Liang, Peng; Shi, Haifeng; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

    2015-07-01

    It is known that cell potential increases while anode resistance decreases during the start-up of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Biological capacitance, defined as the apparent capacitance attributed to biological activity including biofilm production, plays a role in this phenomenon. In this research, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to study anode capacitance and resistance during the start-up period of MFCs so that the role of biological capacitance was revealed in electricity generation by MFCs. It was observed that the anode capacitance ranged from 3.29 to 120 mF which increased by 16.8% to 18-20 times over 10-12 days. Notably, lowering the temperature and arresting biological activity via fixation by 4% para formaldehyde resulted in the decrease of biological capacitance by 16.9 and 62.6%, indicating a negative correlation between anode capacitance and anode resistance of MFCs. Thus, biological capacitance of anode should play an important role in power generation by MFCs. We suggest that MFCs are not only biological reactors and/or electrochemical cells, but also biological capacitors, extending the vision on mechanism exploration of electron transfer, reactor structure design and electrode materials development of MFCs. PMID:25656699

  4. [The corrosion resistance of aluminum and aluminum-based alloys studied in artificial model media].

    PubMed

    Zhakhangirov, A Zh; Doĭnikov, A I; Aboev, V G; Iankovskaia, T A; Karamnova, V S; Sharipov, S M

    1991-01-01

    Samples of aluminum and its alloys, designed for orthodontic employment, were exposed to 4 media simulating the properties of biologic media. The corrosion resistance of the tested alloys was assessed from the degree of aluminum migration to simulation media solutions, which was measured by the neutron activation technique. Aluminum alloy with magnesium and titanium has shown the best corrosion resistance. PMID:1799002

  5. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... Many ear infections Top of Page Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Click for ...

  6. Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An exercise device 10 is particularly well suited for use in low gravity environments, and includes a frame 12 with plurality of resistance elements 30,82 supported in parallel on the frame. A load transfer member 20 is moveable relative to the frame for transferring the applied force to the free end of each captured resistance element. Load selection template 14 is removably secured both to the load transfer member, and a plurality of capture mechanisms engage the free end of corresponding resistance elements. The force applying mechanism 53 may be a handle, harness or other user interface for applying a force to move the load transfer member.

  7. Resistance to bio-insecticides or how to enhance their sustainability: a review.

    PubMed

    Siegwart, Myriam; Graillot, Benoit; Blachere Lopez, Christine; Besse, Samantha; Bardin, Marc; Nicot, Philippe C; Lopez-Ferber, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    After more than 70 years of chemical pesticide use, modern agriculture is increasingly using biological control products. Resistances to conventional insecticides are wide spread, while those to bio-insecticides have raised less attention, and resistance management is frequently neglected. However, a good knowledge of the limitations of a new technique often provides greater sustainability. In this review, we compile cases of resistance to widely used bio-insecticides and describe the associated resistance mechanisms. This overview shows that all widely used bio-insecticides ultimately select resistant individuals. For example, at least 27 species of insects have been described as resistant to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins. The resistance mechanisms are at least as diverse as those that are involved in resistance to chemical insecticides, some of them being common to bio-insecticides and chemical insecticides. This analysis highlights the specific properties of bio-insecticides that the scientific community should use to provide a better sustainability of these products. PMID:26150820

  8. Resistance to bio-insecticides or how to enhance their sustainability: a review

    PubMed Central

    Siegwart, Myriam; Graillot, Benoit; Blachere Lopez, Christine; Besse, Samantha; Bardin, Marc; Nicot, Philippe C.; Lopez-Ferber, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    After more than 70 years of chemical pesticide use, modern agriculture is increasingly using biological control products. Resistances to conventional insecticides are wide spread, while those to bio-insecticides have raised less attention, and resistance management is frequently neglected. However, a good knowledge of the limitations of a new technique often provides greater sustainability. In this review, we compile cases of resistance to widely used bio-insecticides and describe the associated resistance mechanisms. This overview shows that all widely used bio-insecticides ultimately select resistant individuals. For example, at least 27 species of insects have been described as resistant to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins. The resistance mechanisms are at least as diverse as those that are involved in resistance to chemical insecticides, some of them being common to bio-insecticides and chemical insecticides. This analysis highlights the specific properties of bio-insecticides that the scientific community should use to provide a better sustainability of these products. PMID:26150820

  9. Effect of Glyphosate on Symbiotic N2 Fixation and Nickel Concentration in Glyphosate-Resistant Soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of widespread cultivation of glyphosate-resistant (GR) soybean and the use of one herbicide class on biological processes has received considerable attention. Decreased biological nitrogen fixation in GR soybean has been attributed directly to toxicity of glyphosate or its metabolites to ...

  10. Neutron instrumentation for biology

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the October 1994 round of proposals at the ILL, the external biology review sub- committee was asked to allocate neutron beam time to a wide range of experiments, on almost half the total number of scheduled neutron instruments: on 3 diffractometers, on 3 small angle scattering instruments, and on some 6 inelastic scattering spectrometers. In the 3.5 years since the temporary reactor shutdown, the ILL`s management structure has been optimized, budgets and staff have been trimmed, the ILL reactor has been re-built, and many of the instruments up-graded, many powerful (mainly Unix) workstations have been introduced, and the neighboring European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has established itself as the leading synchrotron radiation source and has started its official user program. The ILL reactor remains the world`s most intense dedicated neutron source. In this challenging context, it is of interest to review briefly the park of ILL instruments used to study the structure and energetics of small and large biological systems. A brief summary will be made of each class of experiments actually proposed in the latest ILL proposal round.

  11. Quantum physics meets biology

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Markus; Juffmann, Thomas; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-01-01

    Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the past decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world-view of quantum coherences, entanglement, and other nonclassical effects, has been heading toward systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a “pedestrian guide” to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future “quantum biology,” its current status, recent experimental progress, and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolations of quantum theory to macroscopic phenomena. PMID:20234806

  12. Insights into prion biology

    PubMed Central

    DiSalvo, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Protein misfolding and assembly into ordered, self-templating aggregates (amyloid) has emerged as a novel mechanism for regulating protein function. For a subclass of amyloidogenic proteins known as prions, this process induces transmissible changes in normal cellular physiology, ranging from neurodegenerative disease in animals and humans to new traits in fungi. The severity and stability of these altered phenotypic states can be attenuated by the conformation or amino-acid sequence of the prion, but in most of these cases, the protein retains the ability to form amyloid in vitro. Thus, our ability to link amyloid formation in vitro with its biological consequences in vivo remains a challenge. In two recent studies, we have begun to address this disconnect by assessing the effects of the cellular environment on traits associated with the misfolding of the yeast prion Sup35. Remarkably, the effects of quality control pathways and of limitations on protein transfer in vivo amplify the effects of even slight differences in the efficiency of Sup35 misfolding, leading to dramatic changes in the associated phenotype. Together, our studies suggest that the interplay between protein misfolding pathways and their cellular context is a crucial contributor to prion biology. PMID:21654204

  13. Industrial systems biology.

    PubMed

    Otero, José Manuel; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-02-15

    The chemical industry is currently undergoing a dramatic change driven by demand for developing more sustainable processes for the production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. In biotechnological processes different microorganisms can be exploited, and the large diversity of metabolic reactions represents a rich repository for the design of chemical conversion processes that lead to efficient production of desirable products. However, often microorganisms that produce a desirable product, either naturally or because they have been engineered through insertion of heterologous pathways, have low yields and productivities, and in order to establish an economically viable process it is necessary to improve the performance of the microorganism. Here metabolic engineering is the enabling technology. Through metabolic engineering the metabolic landscape of the microorganism is engineered such that there is an efficient conversion of the raw material, typically glucose, to the product of interest. This process may involve both insertion of new enzymes activities, deletion of existing enzyme activities, but often also deregulation of existing regulatory structures operating in the cell. In order to rapidly identify the optimal metabolic engineering strategy the industry is to an increasing extent looking into the use of tools from systems biology. This involves both x-ome technologies such as transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome analysis, and advanced mathematical modeling tools such as genome-scale metabolic modeling. Here we look into the history of these different techniques and review how they find application in industrial biotechnology, which will lead to what we here define as industrial systems biology. PMID:19891008

  14. Male mating biology

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Paul I; Knols, Bart GJ

    2009-01-01

    Before sterile mass-reared mosquitoes are released in an attempt to control local populations, many facets of male mating biology need to be elucidated. Large knowledge gaps exist in how both sexes meet in space and time, the correlation of male size and mating success and in which arenas matings are successful. Previous failures in mosquito sterile insect technique (SIT) projects have been linked to poor knowledge of local mating behaviours or the selection of deleterious phenotypes during colonisation and long-term mass rearing. Careful selection of mating characteristics must be combined with intensive field trials to ensure phenotypic characters are not antagonistic to longevity, dispersal, or mating behaviours in released males. Success has been achieved, even when colonised vectors were less competitive, due in part to extensive field trials to ensure mating compatibility and effective dispersal. The study of male mating biology in other dipterans has improved the success of operational SIT programmes. Contributing factors include inter-sexual selection, pheromone based attraction, the ability to detect alterations in local mating behaviours, and the effects of long-term colonisation on mating competitiveness. Although great strides have been made in other SIT programmes, this knowledge may not be germane to anophelines, and this has led to a recent increase in research in this area. PMID:19917078

  15. [The Biology of Learning].

    PubMed

    Campo-Cabal, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    The effort to relate mental and biological functioning has fluctuated between two doctrines: 1) an attempt to explain mental functioning as a collective property of the brain and 2) as one relatied to other mental processes associated with specific regions of the brain. The article reviews the main theories developed over the last 200 years: phrenology, the psuedo study of the brain, mass action, cellular connectionism and distributed processing among others. In addition, approaches have emerged in recent years that allows for an understanding of the biological determinants and individual differences in complex mental processes through what is called cognitive neuroscience. Knowing the definition of neuroscience, the learning of memory, the ways in which learning occurs, the principles of the neural basis of memory and learning and its effects on brain function, among other things, allows us the basic understanding of the processes of memory and learning and is an important requirement to address the best manner to commit to the of training future specialists in Psychiatry. PMID:26572571

  16. Slipping and Sliding: frameshift mutations in herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and drug-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most successful antiviral agents currently available are effective against herpes simplex virus. However, resistance to these drugs is frequently associated with significant morbidity, particularly in immunocompromised patients. In addition to the clinical implications of drug resistance, the range of biological processes exploited by the virus to attain resistance while maintaining pathogenicity is proving to be surprising. These mechanisms, which include ribosomal frameshifting, induced infidelity of the DNA polymerase, and internal ribosome entry, are discussed. PMID:21940196

  17. Academic Preparation in Biology and Advocacy for Teaching Evolution: Biology versus Non-Biology Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehm, Ross H.; Kim, Sun Young; Sheppard, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Despite considerable focus on evolution knowledge-belief relationships, little research has targeted populations with strong content backgrounds, such as undergraduate degrees in biology. This study (1) measured precertified biology and non-biology teachers' (n = 167) knowledge of evolution and the nature of science; (2) quantified teacher…

  18. Improved methods for analysis and biological characterization of fiber.

    PubMed

    Jeraci, J L; Van Soest, P J

    1990-01-01

    Dietary fibers are not uniform, chemically or in their nutritive and biological properties, the only common ground being their resistance to mammalian digestive enzymes. The AOAC method for total fiber is subject to inferences from ash, protein, tannins and resistant starches. These interferences can be reduced by urea enzymatic dialysis. The measurement of soluble and insoluble fiber is nutritionally relevant, since physical properties greatly modify dietary effects of fiber. Insoluble fiber is conveniently measured as neutral-detergent fiber. This procedure has been improved by reducing the starch interference and the time of analysis. Physical and biological properties of dietary fiber can be measured by using relevant procedures for hydration capacity, metal ion exchange capacity and rate of fermentation. The lignin and tannin content modify the characteristics of dietary fiber. PMID:1706559

  19. Microgravity Fluids for Biology, Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon; Kohl, Fred; Massa, Gioia D.; Motil, Brian; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Quincy, Charles; Sato, Kevin; Singh, Bhim; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity Fluids for Biology represents an intersection of biology and fluid physics that present exciting research challenges to the Space Life and Physical Sciences Division. Solving and managing the transport processes and fluid mechanics in physiological and biological systems and processes are essential for future space exploration and colonization of space by humans. Adequate understanding of the underlying fluid physics and transport mechanisms will provide new, necessary insights and technologies for analyzing and designing biological systems critical to NASAs mission. To enable this mission, the fluid physics discipline needs to work to enhance the understanding of the influence of gravity on the scales and types of fluids (i.e., non-Newtonian) important to biology and life sciences. In turn, biomimetic, bio-inspired and synthetic biology applications based on physiology and biology can enrich the fluid mechanics and transport phenomena capabilities of the microgravity fluid physics community.

  20. Bridging the gap between systems biology and synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Di; Hoynes-O’Connor, Allison; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2013-01-01

    Systems biology is an inter-disciplinary science that studies the complex interactions and the collective behavior of a cell or an organism. Synthetic biology, as a technological subject, combines biological science and engineering, allowing the design and manipulation of a system for certain applications. Both systems and synthetic biology have played important roles in the recent development of microbial platforms for energy, materials, and environmental applications. More importantly, systems biology provides the knowledge necessary for the development of synthetic biology tools, which in turn facilitates the manipulation and understanding of complex biological systems. Thus, the combination of systems and synthetic biology has huge potential for studying and engineering microbes, especially to perform advanced tasks, such as producing biofuels. Although there have been very few studies in integrating systems and synthetic biology, existing examples have demonstrated great power in extending microbiological capabilities. This review focuses on recent efforts in microbiological genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, aiming to fill the gap between systems and synthetic biology. PMID:23898328