Science.gov

Sample records for biological samples ii

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of copper(II) in pharmaceutical, biological and water samples by 4-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashem, E. Y.; Seleim, M. M.; El-Zohry, A. M.

    2011-09-01

    A highly sensitive method is proposed to determine copper(II) ions by forming a stable complex through their interaction with 4-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-salicylic acid (BTAS) at room temperature and pH of about 5.0. The complex gave a maximum absorption at λ = 485 nm with a molar absorptivity coefficient of 2.35·104 l/(mol·cm). The linear range for the copper determination is 0.63-5.04 mg/l. The method can be applied to determine copper ions in different biological specimens like some drugs and water samples.

  2. Biological sample collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  3. Tripodal chelating ligand-based sensor for selective determination of Zn(II) in biological and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Mehtab, Sameena; Singh, Udai P; Aggarwal, Vaibhave

    2007-08-01

    Potassium hydrotris(N-tert-butyl-2-thioimidazolyl)borate [KTtt-Bu] and potassium hydrotris(3-tert-butyl-5-isopropyl-l-pyrazolyl)borate [KTpt-Bu,i-Pr] have been synthesized and evaluated as ionophores for preparation of a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane sensor for Zn(II) ions. The effect of different plasticizers, viz. benzyl acetate (BA), dioctyl phthalate (DOP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), tributyl phosphate (TBP), and o-nitrophenyl octyl ether (o-NPOE), and the anion excluders sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB), potassium tetrakis(p-chlorophenyl)borate (KTpClPB), and oleic acid (OA) were studied to improve the performance of the membrane sensor. The best performance was obtained from a sensor with a of [KTtt-Bu] membrane of composition (mg): [KTtt-Bu] (15), PVC (150), DBP (275), and NaTPB (4). This sensor had a Nernstian response (slope, 29.4+/-0.2 mV decade of activity) for Zn2+ ions over a wide concentration range (1.4x10(-7) to 1.0x10(-1) mol L(-1)) with a limit of detection of 9.5x10(-8) mol L(-1). It had a relatively fast response time (12 s) and could be used for 3 months without substantial change of the potential. The membrane sensor had very good selectivity for Zn2+ ions over a wide variety of other cations and could be used in a working pH range of 3.5-7.8. The sensor was also found to work satisfactorily in partially non-aqueous media and could be successfully used for estimation of zinc at trace levels in biological and environmental samples. PMID:17622519

  4. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention related to the preservation of a liquid biological sample. The biological sample is exposed to a preservative containing at least about 0.15 g of sodium benzoate and at least about 0.025 g of citric acid per 100 ml of sample. The biological sample may be collected in a vessel or an absorbent mass. The biological sample may also be exposed to a substrate and/or a vehicle.

  5. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of preserving a liquid biological sample, comprising the step of: contacting said liquid biological sample with a preservative comprising, sodium benzoate in an amount of at least about 0.15% of the sample (weight/volume) and citric acid in an amount of at least about 0.025% of the sample (weight/volume).

  6. Biology II Curriculum Guide. Bulletin 1820.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Academic Programs.

    In 1986, the Louisiana State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education requested that an advanced course in Biology II be developed. The resulting curriculum guide contains grade appropriate goals, skills, and competencies; suggested activities; suggested materials of instruction; and minimum time allotments for instruction. Biology II is a…

  7. Fluorescence-detected X-ray magnetic circular dichroism of well-defined Mn(II) and Ni(II) doped in MgO crystals: credential evaluation for measurements on biological samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxin; Bryant, Craig; LeGros, M; Wang, Xin; Cramer, S P

    2012-10-18

    L(2,3)-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra have been measured for the well-defined dilute Ni(II) and Mn(II) ions doped into a MgO crystal, with sub-Kelvin dilution refrigerator cooling and 2 T magnetic field magnetization. A 30-element Ge array X-ray detector has been used to measure the XMCD for these dilute ions, whose concentrations are 1400 ppm for Ni(II) and 10,000 ppm for Mn(II). Large XMCD effects have been observed for both Ni(II) and Mn(II), and multiplet simulation described the observed spectra. The fluorescence-detected L-edge absorption spectrum and XMCD of Ni(II) in MgO are comparable with both theoretical calculations and the total electron yield measured ions in similar chemical environments, at least qualitatively validating the use of the sensitive fluorescence detection technique for studying XMCD for dilute 3d metal ions, such as various metalloproteins. Sum rule analyses on the XMCD spectra are also performed. In addition, these XMCD measurements have also been used to obtain the sample's magnetization curve and the beamline's X-ray helicity curve. This study also illustrated that bend magnet beamlines are still useful in examining XMCD on dilute and paramagnetic metal sites. PMID:22650370

  8. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  9. Students prepare biological space samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    High school students screen crystals of various proteins that are part of the ground-based work that supports Alexander McPherson's protein crystal growth experiment. The students also prepared and stored samples in the Enhanced Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar, which was launched on the STS-98 mission for delivery to the ISS. The crystals grown on the ground will be compared with crystals grown in orbit. Participants include Joseph Negron (shown), of Terry Parker High School, Jacksonville, Florida; Megan Miskowski, of Ridgeview High School, Orange Park, Florida; and Sam Swank, of Fletcher High School, Neptune Beach, Florida. The proteins are placed in plastic tubing that is heat-sealed at the ends, then flash-frozen and preserved in a liquid nitrogen Dewar. Aboard the ISS, the nitrogen will be allowed to evaporated so the samples thaw and then slowly crystallize. They will be analyzed after return to Earth. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. Students prepare biological space samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    High school students screen crystals of various proteins that are part of the ground-based work that supports Alexander McPherson's protein crystal growth experiment. The students also prepared and stored samples in the Enhanced Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar, which was launched on the STS-98 mission for delivery to the ISS. The crystals grown on the ground will be compared with crystals grown in orbit. Participants include Joseph Negron, of Terry Parker High School, Jacksonville, Florida; Megan Miskowski (shown), of Ridgeview High School, Orange Park, Florida; and Sam Swank, of Fletcher High School, Neptune Beach, Florida. The proteins are placed in plastic tubing that is heat-sealed at the ends, then flash-frozen and preserved in a liquid nitrogen Dewar. Aboard the ISS, the nitrogen will be allowed to evaporated so the samples thaw and then slowly crystallize. They will be analyzed after return to Earth. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. Students prepare biological space samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    High school students screen crystals of various proteins that are part of the ground-based work that supports Alexander McPherson's protein crystal growth experiment. The students also prepared and stored samples in the Enhanced Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar, which was launched on the STS-98 mission for delivery to the ISS. The crystals grown on the ground will be compared with crystals grown in orbit. Participants include Joseph Negron, of Terry Parker High School, Jacksonville, Florida; Megan Miskowski, of Ridgeview High School, Orange Park, Florida; and Sam Swank (shown), of Fletcher High School, Neptune Beach, Florida. The proteins are placed in plastic tubing that is heat-sealed at the ends, then flash-frozen and preserved in a liquid nitrogen Dewar. Aboard the ISS, the nitrogen will be allowed to evaporated so the samples thaw and then slowly crystallize. They will be analyzed after return to Earth. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

  12. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  13. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    DOEpatents

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2002-01-01

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  14. Trace Element Analysis of Biological Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veillon, Claude

    1986-01-01

    Reviews background of atomic absorption spectrometry techniques. Discusses problems encountered and precautions to be taken in determining trace elements in the parts-per-billion concentration range and below. Concentrates on determining chromium in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption. Considers other elements, matrices, and…

  15. Biological Sterilization of Returned Mars Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Albert, F. G.; Combie, J.; Bodnar, R. J.; Hamilton, V. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Kuebler, K.; Wang, A.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Morris, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Martian rock and soil, collected by robotic spacecraft, will be returned to terrestrial laboratories early in the next century. Current plans call for the samples to be immediately placed into biological containment and tested for signs of present or past life and biological hazards. It is recommended that "Controlled distribution of unsterilized materials from Mars should occur only if rigorous analyses determine that the materials do not constitute a biological hazard. If any portion of the sample is removed from containment prior to completion of these analyses it should first be sterilized." While sterilization of Mars samples may not be required, an acceptable method must be available before the samples are returned to Earth. The sterilization method should be capable of destroying a wide range of organisms with minimal effects on the geologic samples. A variety of biological sterilization techniques and materials are currently in use, including dry heat, high pressure steam, gases, plasmas and ionizing radiation. Gamma radiation is routinely used to inactivate viruses and destroy bacteria in medical research. Many commercial sterilizers use Co-60 , which emits gamma photons of 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Absorbed doses of approximately 1 Mrad (10(exp 8) ergs/g) destroy most bacteria. This study investigates the effects of lethal doses of Co-60 gamma radiation on materials similar to those anticipated to be returned from Mars. The goals are to determine the gamma dose required to kill microorganisms in rock and soil samples and to determine the effects of gamma sterilization on the samples' isotopic, chemical and physical properties. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Comet coma sample return via Giotto II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A comet coma sample return is possible with a low-cost flyby mission. Collecting coma materials and returning them to earth can be accomplished in a free-return trajectory. Intact capture of coma dust, preserving the cometary dust mineralogy, is possible at low encounter speeds. Samples from a known cometary source can then be compared with the wealth of information on meteorites and interplanetary dust. Sample return via Giotto II is a unique, low-cost NASA/ESA cooperative opportunity. With ESA providing the Giotto spacecraft and payload and NASA the sample return capability, first-class science can be accomplished at a very low cost for both NASA and ESA. This paper focuses on the sample return aspects, including sample return objectives, sample collection techniques, experimental work to verify collection concepts, and some of the characteristics of the cometary targets for sample return.

  17. Guide for Carotenoid Identification in Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Rivera Vélez, Sol Maiam

    2016-05-27

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in carotenoids with respect to their biological roles in animals, microorganisms, and plants, in addition to their use in the chemical, cosmetics, food, pharmaceutical, poultry, and other industries. However, the structural diversity, the different range of concentration, and the presence of cis/trans-isomers complicate the identification of carotenoids. This review provides updated information on their physical and chemical properties as well as spectroscopic and chromatographic data for the unambiguous determination of carotenoids in biological samples. PMID:27158746

  18. Microfluidic Tools for Biological Sample Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S R; Ness, K; Dzenitis, J; Benett, B; Bettencourt, K; Hamilton, J; Fisher, K; Krulevitch, P

    2002-04-10

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. To support detection instruments, we are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. We are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Sample preparation functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure, dielectrophoresis, and solid phase extraction. We are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow and investigating small-scale detection methods.

  19. Ultra high performance supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry for screening of doping agents. II: Analysis of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Lucie; Rentsch, Marco; Grand-Guillaume Perrenoud, Alexandre; Nicoli, Raul; Saugy, Martial; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-01-01

    The potential and applicability of UHPSFC-MS/MS for anti-doping screening in urine samples were tested for the first time. For this purpose, a group of 110 doping agents with diverse physicochemical properties was analyzed using two separation techniques, namely UHPLC-MS/MS and UHPSFC-MS/MS in both ESI+ and ESI- modes. The two approaches were compared in terms of selectivity, sensitivity, linearity and matrix effects. As expected, very diverse retentions and selectivities were obtained in UHPLC and UHPSFC, proving a good complementarity of these analytical strategies. In both conditions, acceptable peak shapes and MS detection capabilities were obtained within 7 min analysis time, enabling the application of these two methods for screening purposes. Method sensitivity was found comparable for 46% of tested compounds, while higher sensitivity was observed for 21% of tested compounds in UHPLC-MS/MS and for 32% in UHPSFC-MS/MS. The latter demonstrated a lower susceptibility to matrix effects, which were mostly observed as signal suppression. In the case of UHPLC-MS/MS, more serious matrix effects were observed, leading typically to signal enhancement and the matrix effect was also concentration dependent, i.e., more significant matrix effects occurred at the lowest concentrations. PMID:25467514

  20. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH).

  1. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Allison, David P; Mortensen, Ninell P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH). PMID:20672388

  2. [Biology of primary hyperparathyroidism: selective venous sampling].

    PubMed

    Fulla, Y; Bonnichon, P; Tissier, F; Delbot, T; Richard, B; Bertagna, X; Legmann, P

    2009-03-01

    The diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) is chemical: high level of Parathormone (PTH) in conjunction with hypercalcaemia. In borderline cases with sub-normal plasma PTH and calcium, an oral calcium load test could allow a differential diagnosis from other causes of high PTH. Imaging is required only for PHP. Selective venous sampling can help in localizing a parathyroid adenoma in difficult cases by PTH cartography in the following situations: imaging in favour of an ectopic mediastinal gland or a deep cervical adenoma, persistent or recurrent PHP after first failed surgery with negative neck exploration or unsatisfactory in case of another hypersecreting gland, PHP well diagnosed with indeterminate imaging, symptomatic PHP with normal PTH and negative imaging. Venous blood sampling performed in a vascular radiological department with a quick PTH assay can reveal an area of maximum secretion potentially linked to a nodule localized by previous ultrasound coupled to scintigraphy, giving thus a "biological imaging" study. The association of imaging and biology is an efficient procedure enabling localization of an area of abnormal PTH secretion and characterization of the level of PTH secretion. The area with the highest gradient of PTH concentration can help to protocol CT and MR examination. PMID:19421132

  3. Measurement of NO in biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Csonka, C; Páli, T; Bencsik, P; Görbe, A; Ferdinandy, P; Csont, T

    2015-01-01

    Although the physiological regulatory function of the gasotransmitter NO (a diatomic free radical) was discovered decades ago, NO is still in the frontline research in biomedicine. NO has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes; therefore, pharmacological modulation of NO levels in various tissues may have significant therapeutic value. NO is generated by NOS in most of cell types and by non-enzymatic reactions. Measurement of NO is technically difficult due to its rapid chemical reactions with a wide range of molecules, such as, for example, free radicals, metals, thiols, etc. Therefore, there are still several contradictory findings on the role of NO in different biological processes. In this review, we briefly discuss the major techniques suitable for measurement of NO (electron paramagnetic resonance, electrochemistry, fluorometry) and its derivatives in biological samples (nitrite/nitrate, NOS, cGMP, nitrosothiols) and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. We conclude that to obtain a meaningful insight into the role of NO and NO modulator compounds in physiological or pathological processes, concomitant assessment of NO synthesis, NO content, as well as molecular targets and reaction products of NO is recommended. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-6 PMID:24990201

  4. Millimeter wave absorption spectra of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, O.P.; Hagmann, M.J.; Hill, D.W.; Partlow, L.M.; Bush, L.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-state computer-controlled system has been used to make swept-frequency measurements of absorption of biological specimens from 26.5 to 90.0 GHz. A wide range of samples was used, including solutions of DNA and RNA, and suspensions of BHK-21/C13 cells, Candida albicans, C krusei, and Escherichia coli. Sharp spectra reported by other workers were not observed. The strong absorbance of water (10--30 dB/mm) caused the absorbance of all aqueous preparations that we examined to have a water-like dependence on frequency. Reduction of incident power (to below 1.0 microW), elimination of modulation, and control of temperature to assure cell viability were not found to significantly alter the water-dominated absorbance. Frozen samples of BHK-21/C13 cells tested at dry ice and liquid nitrogen temperatures were found to have average insertion loss reduced to 0.2 dB/cm but still showed no reproducible peaks that could be attributed to absorption spectra. It is concluded that the special resonances reported by others are likely to be in error.

  5. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  6. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  7. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  8. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  9. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3... Applicability § 113.3 Sampling of biological products. Each licensee and permittee shall furnish representative samples of each serial or subserial of a biological product manufactured in the United States or...

  10. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed. PMID:24320063

  11. COMPARISON OF BIOLOGICAL COMMUNITIES: THE PROBLEM OF SAMPLE REPRESENTATIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining an adequate, representative sample of biological communities or assemblages to make richness or compositional comparisons among sites is a continuing challenge. Traditionally, sample size is based on numbers of replicates or area collected or numbers of individuals enum...

  12. Biology of alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the many metabolic properties of alveolar type II cells, their production of surfactant, their role in innate immunity, and their importance in the repair process after lung injury. The review is based on the medical literature and results from our laboratory. Type II cells produce and secrete pulmonary surfactant and for that purpose they need to synthesize the lipids of surfactant. One of the regulators of lipogenesis is the transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). This is a key transcription factor regulating fatty acid synthesis. Type II cells also proliferate to restore the epithelium after lung injury, clear alveolar fluid by transporting sodium from the apical to the basolateral surface, and participate in the innate immune response to inhaled materials and organisms. The type II cell is, in many ways, the defender of the alveolus. However, the type II cells work in concert with the other cells in the gas exchange regions of the lung to keep the alveoli open and reduce inflammation due to irritants in the air we breathe. PMID:16423262

  13. 40 CFR Appendix II to Subpart E - Sampling Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sampling Tables II Appendix II to Subpart E Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems Pt. 205, Subpt. E, App. II...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Subpart E - Sampling Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Sampling Tables II Appendix II to Subpart E Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems Pt. 205, Subpt. E, App. II...

  15. Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies Trial Edition. Set II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairwell, Kay, Ed.; And Others

    The 24 activities in the Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies (OBIS) Trial Edition Set II use living organisms such as crabs, birds, crayfish, lichens, and insects to investigate biological interrelationships, organism behavior, and species density to promote greater environmental and sensory awareness. The activities, designed primarily for…

  16. How to analyze those messy biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, S.A. . Dept. of Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology)

    1993-03-01

    Extracting drugs, pollutants, or naturally occurring components from tissues is always an analytical challenge. However, there is an increasing need to perform such extractions for the regulation of food safety, the determination of the degree or nature of pollution in various environments, or to isolate a particular class of structural components from cells. The samples may range from blood to whole oysters, milk to fish, calf's liver to crayfish, or beef to bacteria. The author has developed a generic process that greatly simplifies and speeds the isolation of drugs, pollutants, and biomolecules from tissues, bacteria, and processed foods. This process, called matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD; patent pending), allows the analyst to perform sample homogenization, cellular disruption, and sample purification in a single step. The methods that they have developed have shown to reduce solvent usage by 90% and analyst time by 95% when compared with classical procedures for drug isolations from tissue.

  17. Rapid Automated Sample Preparation for Biological Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Shusteff, M

    2011-03-04

    Our technology utilizes acoustic, thermal, and electric fields to separate out contaminants such as debris or pollen from environmental samples, lyse open cells, and extract the DNA from the lysate. The objective of the project is to optimize the system described for a forensic sample, and demonstrate its performance for integration with downstream assay platforms (e.g. MIT-LL's ANDE). We intend to increase the quantity of DNA recovered from the sample beyond the current {approx}80% achieved using solid phase extraction methods. Task 1: Develop and test an acoustic filter for cell extraction. Task 2: Develop and test lysis chip. Task 3: Develop and test DNA extraction chip. All chips have been fabricated based on the designs laid out in last month's report.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix II to Subpart E of... - Sampling Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sampling Tables II Appendix II to Subpart E of Part 205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems Pt....

  19. 40 CFR Appendix II to Subpart E of... - Sampling Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sampling Tables II Appendix II to Subpart E of Part 205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems Pt....

  20. A sample of Type II-L supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faran, T.; Poznanski, D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Leonard, D. C.; Li, W.; Modjaz, M.; Serduke, F. J. D.; Silverman, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    What are Type II-Linear supernovae (SNe II-L)? This class, which has been ill defined for decades, now receives significant attention - both theoretically, in order to understand what happens to stars in the ˜15-25 M⊙ range, and observationally, with two independent studies suggesting that they cannot be cleanly separated photometrically from the regular hydrogen-rich SNe II-P characterized by a marked plateau in their light curve. Here, we analyse the multiband light curves and extensive spectroscopic coverage of a sample of 35 SNe II and find that 11 of them could be SNe II-L. The spectra of these SNe are hydrogen deficient, typically have shallow Hα absorption, may show indirect signs of helium via strong O I λ7774 absorption, and have faster line velocities consistent with a thin hydrogen shell. The light curves can be mostly differentiated from those of the regular, hydrogen-rich SNe II-P by their steeper decline rates and higher luminosity, and we propose to define them based on their decline in the V band: SNe II-L decline by more than 0.5 mag from peak brightness by day 50 after explosion. Using our sample we provide template light curves for SNe II-L and II-P in four photometric bands.

  1. Asteroid Sample Return Mission II: Eltanin Recovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, J. A.; Kyte, F. T.; Gersonde, R.

    1995-09-01

    -fraction (>590 micrometers) of impact debris has been separated from several samples. More than 3 grams of coarse material has been recovered from these two cores. The largest vesicular impact melt particle is ~6.5 mm. We have also recovered ~30 unmelted meteorite fragments, a few as large as 4 mm. Within the debris horizons in PS2708 and PS2709, concentrations of coarse debris are typically ~3 to 10 % and can be as high as 20%. Low-precision Ir concentrations, measured in an early INAA count, indicate that Ir concentrations in these sediments are as high as 30 ng/g. With these preliminary results we can evaluate the model used to estimate the size of the impacting projectile [4]. This model assumed that the highest concentrations of impact debris should be in the vicinity of E13-4 where the estimated net fluence of Ir was 190 ng cm-2 and that was assumed to be equivalent to a fluence of projectile material of ~790 mg cm-2. Based on an assumption that the sediment dry density is 1.0, we obtain esimates of net fluences for Ir of 190 and 140 ng cm-2 and for coarse debris of 1100 and 600 mg cm-2 for PS2708 and PS2709, respectively. These results are consistent with a hypothesized minimum projectile diameter of ~500 m. References: [1] Kyte F. T. et al. (1981) Nature, 292, 417. [2] Kyte F. T. and Brownlee D. E. (1985) GCA, 49, 105. [3] Margolis S. V. et al. (1991) Science, 251, 1594. [4] Kyte F. T. et al. (1988) Science, 241, 63.

  2. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  3. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  4. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Sehat, Ali Akbari; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L(-1) for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31-355 μg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.34-380 μg L(-1) for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. PMID:24411390

  5. Extraction of DNA from Forensic Biological Samples for Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Stray, J E; Liu, J Y; Brevnov, M G; Shewale, J G

    2010-07-01

    Biological forensic samples constitute evidence with probative organic matter. Evidence believed to contain DNA is typically processed for extraction and purification of its nucleic acid content. Forensic DNA samples are composed of two things, a tissue and the substrate it resides on. Compositionally, a sample may contain almost anything and for each, the type, integrity, and content of both tissue and substrate will vary, as will the contaminant levels. This fact makes the success of extraction one of the most unpredictable steps in genotypic analysis. The development of robust genotyping systems and analysis platforms for short tandem repeat (STR) and mitochondrial DNA sequencing and the acceptance of results generated by these methods in the court system, resulted in a high demand for DNA testing. The increasing variety of sample submissions created a need to isolate DNA from forensic samples that may be compromised or contain low levels of biological material. In the past decade, several robust chemistries and isolation methods have been developed to safely and reliably recover DNA from a wide array of sample types in high yield and free of PCR inhibitors. In addition, high-throughput automated workflows have been developed to meet the demand for processing increasing numbers of samples. This review summarizes a number of the most widely adopted methods and the best practices for DNA isolation from forensic biological samples, including manual, semiautomated, and fully automated platforms. PMID:26242594

  6. Structural aspects in semicrystalline samples of the mannan II family.

    PubMed

    Heux, L; Hägglund, P; Putaux, J-L; Chanzy, H

    2005-01-01

    A series of samples having the mannan II character were prepared by either (i) desincrusting stems of Acetabularia crenulata, or (ii) acetylating these stems, followed by dissolution and recrystallization under deacetylation conditions, or (iii) recrystallizing at low temperature the alkali soluble fraction of ivory nut mannan. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray and electron diffraction analysis together with (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. Whereas the A. crenulata stems consisted of a mixture of mannan I and mannan II, the recrystallized samples were all of the hydrated mannan II family and occurred in a ribbonlike morphology where the mannan chains were organized with their molecular axis perpendicular to the ribbon long axis. The recrystallized ivory nut mannan samples presented X-ray and electron diffraction diagrams, together with (13)C solid-state NMR spectra recorded at 95% RH, different from those of recrystallized A. crenulata recorded under the same RH conditions. They corresponded therefore to a new allomorph of the mannan II family. Despite this difference, when the recrystallized samples were in an aqueous environment, they revealed an additional well-defined perhydrated phase, which showed the same (13)C solid-state NMR spectrum for both samples. As this phase, which gave 6-band NMR spectra with narrow line-width and low T1, had no counterpart in X-ray diffraction, it was attributed to specific amorphous segments of mannan chains, gaining some mobility when swollen in water. When the samples were totally dried, their NMR spectra lost their resolution, thus indicating the role played by water for the structural organization of the crystalline and amorphous components of mannan II. PMID:15638536

  7. Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-01

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological and

  8. An Assay for Thiaminase I in Complex Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Jeremiah W.; Kraft, Clifford E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2007-01-01

    An alternative method for measuring thiaminase I activity in complex samples is described. This assay is based on the selective consumption of the highly chromophoric 4-nitrothiophenolate by thiaminase I resulting in a large decrease in absorbance at 411 nm. This new assay is simple and sensitive and requires only readily available chemicals and a visible region spectrophotometer. In addition, the assay is optimized for high throughput analysis in 96-well format with complex biological samples. PMID:17603991

  9. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  10. Fast X-Ray Fluorescence Microtomography of Hydrated Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lombi, Enzo; de Jonge, Martin D.; Donner, Erica; Kopittke, Peter M.; Howard, Daryl L.; Kirkham, Robin; Ryan, Chris G.; Paterson, David

    2011-01-01

    Metals and metalloids play a key role in plant and other biological systems as some of them are essential to living organisms and all can be toxic at high concentrations. It is therefore important to understand how they are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. In situ imaging of metal distribution at physiological relevant concentrations in highly hydrated biological systems is technically challenging. In the case of roots, this is mainly due to the possibility of artifacts arising during sample preparation such as cross sectioning. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography has been used to obtain virtual cross sections of elemental distributions. However, traditionally this technique requires long data acquisition times. This has prohibited its application to highly hydrated biological samples which suffer both radiation damage and dehydration during extended analysis. However, recent advances in fast detectors coupled with powerful data acquisition approaches and suitable sample preparation methods can circumvent this problem. We demonstrate the heightened potential of this technique by imaging the distribution of nickel and zinc in hydrated plant roots. Although 3D tomography was still impeded by radiation damage, we successfully collected 2D tomograms of hydrated plant roots exposed to environmentally relevant metal concentrations for short periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first published example of the possibilities offered by a new generation of fast fluorescence detectors to investigate metal and metalloid distribution in radiation-sensitive, biological samples. PMID:21674049

  11. [Critical aspects in determining total radioactivity of biological samples].

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, M P; Paolini, M; Corsi, C; Bauer, C

    1989-03-01

    During measurements of radioactivity in some milk samples with liquid scintillation counter (about one year after the nuclear accident of Chernobyl) we have observed an increase of the values of scintillation fluid with the passing of time. Although this enhancement is absolutely small (about 2 c.p.m. in 500 min), it is very important for an exact measurement of samples at low counting, as those tested. Our protocol of measure provides for insertion of alternate blanks and samples in the automatic sample-holders of liquid scintillation counter. The values of measurement of samples are taken during the increase phase subtracting the value of blank interpolated on the increasing straight line from c.p.m. of sample. Finally, we report the collected values of the whole radioactivity in some milk samples: at least 5-6 nCi/L contrary to about 1 nCi/L of 137Cs reported by USL. In our opinion it is important to consider the whole radioactivity as measure of the overall biological danger of radioactive samples. In fact, this measurement takes into account also biologically very dangerous radionuclides as 3H, 14C, 90Sr. PMID:2765252

  12. Efficient Sample Preparation from Complex Biological Samples Using a Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sample preparation is a major bottleneck in many biological processes. Paramagnetic particles (PMPs) are a ubiquitous method for isolating analytes of interest from biological samples and are used for their ability to thoroughly sample a solution and be easily collected with a magnet. There are three main methods by which PMPs are used for sample preparation: (1) removal of fluid from the analyte-bound PMPs, (2) removal of analyte-bound PMPs from the solution, and (3) removal of the substrate (with immobilized analyte-bound PMPs). In this paper, we explore the third and least studied method for PMP-based sample preparation using a platform termed Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions (SLIDE). SLIDE leverages principles of surface tension and patterned hydrophobicity to create a simple-to-operate platform for sample isolation (cells, DNA, RNA, protein) and preparation (cell staining) without the need for time-intensive wash steps, use of immiscible fluids, or precise pinning geometries. Compared to other standard isolation protocols using PMPs, SLIDE is able to perform rapid sample preparation with low (0.6%) carryover of contaminants from the original sample. The natural recirculation occurring within the pinned droplets of SLIDE make possible the performance of multistep cell staining protocols within the SLIDE by simply resting the lid over the various sample droplets. SLIDE demonstrates a simple easy to use platform for sample preparation on a range of complex biological samples. PMID:24927449

  13. Contrasting of biological samples for X-ray synchrotron microtomography.

    PubMed

    Efimova, O I; Khlebnikov, A S; Senin, R A; Voronin, P A; Anokhin, K V

    2013-08-01

    The method of contrasting with iodine ions was developed to obtain high-resolution 3D images of large biological specimens using a synchrotron X-ray microtomography unit. It was shown that the samples (late mouse embryos) treated with 50% Lugol solution with addition of 25% ethanol for 48 h followed by a 48-h washout in phosphate buffered saline had maximum contrast and lowest compression artifacts. Processing of samples by this protocol allowed detecting zones of active proliferation. Incubation of brain samples for 120 h in 7.6% meglumine/sodium diatrizoate without washout ensured the best contrast during myelin identification. PMID:24143358

  14. Home Economics. Sample Test Items. Levels I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Educational Testing.

    A sample of behavioral objectives and related test items that could be developed for content modules in Home Economics levels I and II, this book is intended to enable teachers to construct more valid and reliable test materials. Forty-eight one-page modules are presented, and opposite each module are listed two to seven specific behavioral…

  15. A large-scale cryoelectronic system for biological sample banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Stephen G.; Durst, Christopher H. P.; Fuchs, Christian C.; Zimmermann, Heiko; Ihmig, Frank R.

    2009-11-01

    We describe a polymorphic electronic infrastructure for managing biological samples stored over liquid nitrogen. As part of this system we have developed new cryocontainers and carrier plates attached to Flash memory chips to have a redundant and portable set of data at each sample. Our experimental investigations show that basic Flash operation and endurance is adequate for the application down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. This identification technology can provide the best sample identification, documentation and tracking that brings added value to each sample. The first application of the system is in a worldwide collaborative research towards the production of an AIDS vaccine. The functionality and versatility of the system can lead to an essential optimization of sample and data exchange for global clinical studies.

  16. Cryogenic X-ray Diffraction Microscopy for Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    E Lima; L Wiegart; P Pernot; M Howells; J Timmins; F Zontone; A Madsen

    2011-12-31

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is well suited for nondestructive, high-resolution biological imaging, especially for thick samples, with the high penetration power of x rays and without limitations imposed by a lens. We developed nonvacuum, cryogenic (cryo-) XDM with hard x rays at 8 keV and report the first frozen-hydrated imaging by XDM. By preserving samples in amorphous ice, the risk of artifacts associated with dehydration or chemical fixation is avoided, ensuring the imaging condition closest to their natural state. The reconstruction shows internal structures of intact D. radiodurans bacteria in their natural contrast.

  17. Measurement of n-alkanals and hydroxyalkenals in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Holley, A E; Walker, M K; Cheeseman, K H; Slater, T F

    1993-09-01

    A modified method was developed to measure nM levels of a range of n-alkanals and hydroxyalkenals in biological samples such as blood plasma and tissue homogenates and also in Folch lipid extracts of these samples. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and desferrioxamine (Desferal) were added to samples to prevent artifactual peroxidation. Aldehydes were reacted with 1,3-cyclohexanedione (CHD), cleaned up by solid-phase extraction on a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge and the fluorescent decahydroacridine derivatives resolved by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with gradient elution. A wider range of aldehydes was detected in lipid extracts of plasma and liver homogenate compared to whole (unextracted) samples. Human plasma contained nM levels of acetaldehyde, propanal, butanal, pentanal, hexanal, and heptanal. 4-Hydroxynonenal (0.93 nmol/g) and alkanals with two to six carbons (up to 7.36 nmol/g) were detected in rat liver. Recovery of aldehydes added to whole plasma or to lipid extracts of plasma was dependent on carbon chain length, varying from 95% for acetaldehyde to 8% for decanal. Recovery from biological samples was significantly less than that of standards taken through the Sep-Pak clean-up procedure, suggesting that aldehydes can bind to plasma protein and lipid components. PMID:8406128

  18. Fluorimetric screening assay for protein carbonyl evaluation in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Stocker, P; Ricquebourg, E; Vidal, N; Villard, C; Lafitte, D; Sellami, L; Pietri, S

    2015-08-01

    Many assays are available for the detection of protein carbonyls (PCs). Currently, the measurement of PC groups after their derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenol hydrazine (DNPH) is widely used for measuring protein oxidation in biological samples. However, this method includes several washing steps. In this context, we have developed a rapid, sensitive, and accurate fluorimetric method adapted to 96-well microplates for the convenient assessment of protein carbonyl level in biological samples. The method reported here is based on the reaction of carbonyl content in proteins with 7-hydrazino-4-nitrobenzo-2,1,3-oxadiazole (NBDH) to form highly fluorescent derivatives via hydrazone formation. PCs were determined using the DNPH and NBDH assays in fully reduced bovine serum albumin (BSA) and plasma and liver homogenates obtained from healthy control rats up the addition of various amounts of HOCl-oxidized BSA (OxBSA). Using the NBDH assay, PC concentrations as low as 0.2 nmol/mg were detected with precision as low as 5%. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy was used to successfully identify the formation of the NBDH adducts after derivatization with standard oxidized peptides. Finally, the two methods were further used for PC determination in plasma and liver samples from diabetic and normal rats, showing that the NBDH assay can be reliably used in biological experiments. PMID:25933703

  19. Combination of Modern Visualization Techniques for Imaging of Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyda, Frantisek; Dammer, Jiri

    2012-08-01

    We have used several visualization techniques to characterize biological objects. A micro-radiography with the hybrid single photon counting silicon pixel detector Medipix2 (matrix 256 x 256 sq. pixels of 55 μm pitch) is an imaging technique using X-rays in the studies of internal structures of objects. The detector Medipix2 is used as an imager of an ionizing radiation, emitted by X-ray tubes (micro or nano-focus FeinFocus). An unlimited dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and a high spatial resolution below 1μm is particularly suitable for a non-destructive and non-invasive radiographic imaging of small biological samples in a living state, including in vivo observations and a micro-tomography. Contrast agents (based on iodine or lanthanum) could be used for dynamic studies inside of organisms. Infrared digital photography has ability to shot still photographs or movies in complete dark. Is it also possible to use it for studies of internal organs and structures inside of living biological objects. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) in low temperature mode is sophisticated recent technique successfully used in biological laboratories. The main advantage is ability to study details of tissues and cells close to living state at very high magnification. Special cryotransfer system connected to FESEM allows deeply frozen samples to be prepared in way like freeze-fracturing followed by freeze-etching for observation directly inside of electron microscope. Combination of information from all above mentioned techniques could give us very powerful visualization tool for complex studies of biological specimen.

  20. Quantitative microanalysis of bile acids in biological samples. Collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, F

    1988-10-28

    The analysis of bile acids in biological samples has always presented a problem because of their complex nature and low concentration. Recently, newer analytical procedures for bile acids have become available, including enzymatic analysis, radioimmunoassay, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with selected ion monitoring (SIM). However, they differ greatly with respect to specificity, sensitivity, accuracy and simplicity. On the other hand, the choice of analytical procedure differs according to the specific aims and the nature of biological samples to be analysed. These newer procedures have been compared in a double-blind fashion by distributing bile, plasma and urine samples to seven participating laboratories. GC-MS-SIM was found to be the most sensitive and reliable, but it requires other procedures for preliminary clean-up and fractionation steps. Enzymatic analysis is simple and gives small analytical errors but tends to over-estimate plasma bile acids. Radioimmunoassay gives variable results but is useful as a screening procedure for large numbers of plasma samples. TLC gives reliable results for biliary bile acids in experienced hands, except for differentiation between conjugated dihydroxycholanoic acids. HPLC, whether using derivatization or with fixed 3 alpha-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase detection, is suitable for the analysis of major bile acids in normal human serum but not for the identification of unknown minor peaks. PMID:3243854

  1. A Sample of Clusters of Extragalactic Ultracompact H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey E.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Massey, Philip; Conti, Peter S.

    2001-10-01

    We report on the detection of optically thick free-free radio sources in the galaxies M33, NGC 253, and NGC 6946 using data in the literature. We interpret these sources as being young embedded star birth regions that are likely to be clusters of ultracompact H II regions. All 35 of the sources presented in this article have positive radio spectral indices (α>0 for Sν~να), suggesting an optically thick thermal bremsstrahlung origin from the H II region surrounding the hot stars. The estimated emission measures for these sources are EM6 cm>~108 cm-6 pc, and energy requirements indicate that the sources in our sample have a range of a few to ~560 O7 V star equivalents powering their H II regions. Assuming a Salpeter initial mass function with lower and upper mass cutoffs of 1 and 100 Msolar, respectively, this range in NLyc corresponds to integrated stellar masses of 0.1-60×103 Msolar. For roughly half of the sources in our sample there is no obvious optical counterpart, which gives further support for their deeply embedded nature; for most of the remaining sources, the correspondence to an optical source is insecure owing to relative astrometric uncertainty. Their luminosities and radio spectral energy distributions are consistent with H II regions modeled as spheres of plasma with electron densities from ne~1.5×103 to ~1.5×104 cm-3 and radii of ~1-7 pc. Because of the high densities required to fit the data, we suggest that the less luminous of these sources are extragalactic ultracompact H II region complexes, those of intermediate luminosity are similar to W49 in the Galaxy, and the brightest will be counterparts to 30 Doradus when they emerge from their birth material. These objects constitute the lower mass range of extragalactic ``ultradense H II regions,'' which we argue are the youngest stages of massive star cluster formation yet observed. The sample presented in this paper is beginning to fill in the continuum of objects between small associations

  2. Specific fluorogenic probes for ozone in biological and atmospheric samples

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Amanda L.; St Croix, Claudette M.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Leikauf, George D.; Ando, Shin; Koide, Kazunori

    2010-01-01

    Ozone exposure is a growing global health problem, especially in urban areas. While ozone in the stratosphere protects the earth from harmful ultraviolet light, tropospheric or ground-level ozone is toxic and can damage the respiratory tract. It has recently been shown that ozone may be produced endogenously in inflammation and antibacterial responses of the immune system; however, these results have sparked controversy owing to the use of a non-specific colorimetric probe. Here we report the synthesis of fluorescent molecular probes able to unambiguously detect ozone in both biological and atmospheric samples. Unlike other ozone-detection methods, in which interference from different reactive oxygen species is often a problem, these probes are ozone specific. Such probes will prove useful for the study of ozone in environmental science and biology, and so possibly provide some insight into the role of ozone in cells. PMID:20634904

  3. Ethanol analysis from biological samples by dual rail robotic autosampler.

    PubMed

    Morris-Kukoski, Cynthia L; Jagerdeo, Eshwar; Schaff, Jason E; LeBeau, Marc A

    2007-05-01

    Detection, identification, and quantitation of ethanol and other low molecular weight volatile compounds in liquid matrices by headspace gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) and headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) are becoming commonly used practices in forensic laboratories. Although it is one of the most frequently utilized procedures, sample preparation is usually done manually. Implementing the use of a dual-rail, programmable autosampler can minimize many of the manual steps in sample preparation. The autosampler is configured so that one rail is used for sample preparation and the other rail is used as a traditional autosampler for sample introduction into the gas chromatograph inlet. The sample preparation rail draws up and sequentially adds a saturated sodium chloride solution and internal standard (0.08%, w/v acetonitrile) to a headspace vial containing a biological sample, a calibrator, or a control. Then, the analytical rail moves the sample to the agitator for incubation, followed by sampling of the headspace for analysis. Using DB-624 capillary columns, the method was validated on a GC-FID and confirmed with a GC-MS. The analytes (ethanol, acetonitrile) and possible interferences (acetaldehyde, methanol, pentane, diethyl ether, acetone, isopropanol, methylene chloride, n-propanol, and isovaleraldehyde) were baseline resolved for both the GC-FID and GC-MS methods. This method demonstrated acceptable linearity from 0 to 1500 mg/dL. The lower limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 17 mg/dL and the limit of detection was 5 mg/dL. PMID:17223393

  4. A low temperature scanning force microscope for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, M. G.L.

    1993-05-01

    An SFM has been constructed capable of operating at 143 K. Two contributions to SFM technology are described: a new method of fabricating tips, and new designs of SFM springs that significantly lower the noise level. The SFM has been used to image several biological samples (including collagen, ferritin, RNA, purple membrane) at 143 K and room temperature. No improvement in resolution resulted from 143 K operation; several possible reasons for this are discussed. Possibly sharper tips may help. The 143 K SFM will allow the study of new categories of samples, such as those prepared by freeze-frame, single molecules (temperature dependence of mechanical properties), etc. The SFM was used to cut single collagen molecules into segments with a precision of {le} 10 nm.

  5. Microsystem strategies for sample preparation in biological detection.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Bennett, Dawn Jonita; Manginell, Monica; Okandan, Murat; Acrivos, Andreas; Brozik, Susan Marie; Khusid, Boris

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this LDRD was to develop microdevice strategies for dealing with samples to be examined in biological detection systems. This includes three sub-components: namely, microdevice fabrication, sample delivery to the microdevice, and sample processing within the microdevice. The first component of this work focused on utilizing Sandia's surface micromachining technology to fabricate small volume (nanoliter) fluidic systems for processing small quantities of biological samples. The next component was to develop interfaces for the surface-micromachined silicon devices. We partnered with Micronics, a commercial company, to produce fluidic manifolds for sample delivery to our silicon devices. Pressure testing was completed to examine the strength of the bond between the pressure-sensitive adhesive layer and the silicon chip. We are also pursuing several other methods, both in house and external, to develop polymer-based fluidic manifolds for packaging silicon-based microfluidic devices. The second component, sample processing, is divided into two sub-tasks: cell collection and cell lysis. Cell collection was achieved using dielectrophoresis, which employs AC fields to collect cells at energized microelectrodes, while rejecting non-cellular particles. Both live and dead Staph. aureus bacteria have been collected using RF frequency dielectrophoresis. Bacteria have been separated from polystyrene microspheres using frequency-shifting dielectrophoresis. Computational modeling was performed to optimize device separation performance, and to predict particle response to the dielectrophoretic traps. Cell lysis is continuing to be pursued using microactuators to mechanically disrupt cell membranes. Novel thermal actuators, which can generate larger forces than previously tested electrostatic actuators, have been incorporated with and tested with cell lysis devices. Significant cell membrane distortion has been observed, but more experiments need to be conducted to

  6. Combined liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer for involatile biological samples.

    PubMed

    Blakley, C R; Carmody, J C; Vestal, M L

    1980-09-01

    A new liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer has been developed in our laboratory for application to analysis of biological molecules of extremely low volatility. Oxyhydrogen flames rapidly vaporize the total liquid-chromatographic effluent, and molecular and particle beam techniques are used to efficiently transfer the sample to the ionization source of the mass spectrometer. This new instrument is comparable in cost and complexity to a combined gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, but extends the capabilities of combined chromatography/mass spectrometry to a broad range of compounds not previously accessible. We are currently testing biologically significant samples with this instrument, using reversed-phase liquid-chromatographic separation and both positive and negative ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry. Results have been obtained from mixtures of nucleic acid components--bases, nucleosides, and nucleotides--and from amino acids, peptides, saccharides, fatty acids, vitamins, and antibiotics. In all cases investigated to date, ions indicative of molecular mass are obtained in at least one of the operating modes available. Detection limits are typically in the 1-10 ng range for full mass scans (about 80-600 amu); sub-nanogram quantities are usually detectable with single-ion monitoring. PMID:7408175

  7. Dynamical models of a sample of Population II stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levison, H. F.; Richstone, D. O.

    1986-09-01

    Dynamical models are constructed in order to investigate the implications of recent kinematic data of distant Population II stars on the emissivity distribution of those stars. Models are constructed using a modified Schwarzschild method in two extreme scale-free potentials, spherical and E6 elliptical. Both potentials produce flat rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles. In all models, the distribution of stars in this sample is flat. Moreover, it is not possible to construct a model with a strictly spheroidal emissivity distribution. Most models have dimples at the poles. The dynamics of the models indicate that the system is supported by both the third integral and z angular momentum.

  8. Proteomic Challenges: Sample Preparation Techniques for Microgram-Quantity Protein Analysis from Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Feist, Peter; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins regulate many cellular functions and analyzing the presence and abundance of proteins in biological samples are central focuses in proteomics. The discovery and validation of biomarkers, pathways, and drug targets for various diseases can be accomplished using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. However, with mass-limited samples like tumor biopsies, it can be challenging to obtain sufficient amounts of proteins to generate high-quality mass spectrometric data. Techniques developed for macroscale quantities recover sufficient amounts of protein from milligram quantities of starting material, but sample losses become crippling with these techniques when only microgram amounts of material are available. To combat this challenge, proteomicists have developed micro-scale techniques that are compatible with decreased sample size (100 μg or lower) and still enable excellent proteome coverage. Extraction, contaminant removal, protein quantitation, and sample handling techniques for the microgram protein range are reviewed here, with an emphasis on liquid chromatography and bottom-up mass spectrometry-compatible techniques. Also, a range of biological specimens, including mammalian tissues and model cell culture systems, are discussed. PMID:25664860

  9. Comparative analysis of toxin detection in biological and enviromental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogert, Robert A.; Burans, James; O'Brien, Tom; Ligler, Frances S.

    1994-03-01

    The basic recognition schemes underlying the principles of standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay (RIA) protocols are increasingly being adapted for use with new detection devices. A direct comparison was made using a fiber optic biosensor that employs evanescent wave detection and an ELISA using avidin-biotin. The assays were developed for the detection of Ricinus communis agglutinin II, also known as ricin or RCA60. Detection limits between the two methods were comparable for ricin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), however results in complex samples differed slightly. In PBS, sensitivity for ricin was 1 ng/ml using the fiber optic device and 500 pg/ml using the ELISA. The fiber optic sensor could not detect ricin directly in urine or serum spiked with 5 ng/ml ricin, however, the ELISA showed detection but at reduced levels to the PBS control.

  10. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  11. Consistency of ARESE II Cloud Absorption Estimates and Sampling Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Marshak, A.; Cahalan, R. F.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Data from three cloudy days (March 3, 21, 29, 2000) of the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment II (ARESE II) were analyzed. Grand averages of broadband absorptance among three sets of instruments were compared. Fractional solar absorptances were approx. 0.21-0.22 with the exception of March 3 when two sets of instruments gave values smaller by approx. 0.03-0.04. The robustness of these values was investigated by looking into possible sampling problems with the aid of 500 nm spectral fluxes. Grand averages of 500 nm apparent absorptance cover a wide range of values for these three days, namely from a large positive (approx. 0.011) average for March 3, to a small negative (approximately -0.03) for March 21, to near zero (approx. 0.01) for March 29. We present evidence suggesting that a large part of the discrepancies among the three days is due to the different nature of clouds and their non-uniform sampling. Hence, corrections to the grand average broadband absorptance values may be necessary. However, application of the known correction techniques may be precarious due to the sparsity of collocated flux measurements above and below the clouds. Our analysis leads to the conclusion that only March 29 fulfills all requirements for reliable estimates of cloud absorption, that is, the presence of thick, overcast, homogeneous clouds.

  12. Application of Acoustic Techniques for Characterization of Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Ebert, Anne

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is emerging as a powerful tool in cell biology. Originally developed for high-resolution imaging purposes, the AFM also has unique capabilities as a nano-indenter to probe the dynamic viscoelastic material properties of living cells in culture. In particular, AFM elastography combines imaging and indentation modalities to map the spatial distribution of cell mechanical properties, which in turn reflect the structure and function of the underlying cytoskeleton. Such measurements have contributed to our understanding of cell mechanics and cell biology and appear to be sensitive to the presence of disease in individual cells. Examples of applications and considerations on the effective capability of ultrasonic AFM techniques on biological samples (both mammalian and plant) are reported in this chapter. Included in the discussion is scanning near-field ultrasound holography an acoustic technique which has been used to image structure and in particular nanoparticles inside cells. For illustration an example that is discussed in some detail is a technique for rapid in vitro single-cell elastography. The technique is based on atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) but (1) requires only a few minutes of scan time, (2) can be used on live cells briefly removed from most of the nutrient fluid, (3) does negligible harm or damage to the cell, (4) provides semi-quantitative information on the distribution of modulus across the cell, and (5) yields data with 1-10 nm resolution. The technique is shown to enable rapid assessment of physical/biochemical signals on the cell modulus and contributes to current understanding of cell mechanics.

  13. Proteomics: Challenges, Techniques and Possibilities to Overcome Biological Sample Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics is the large-scale study of the structure and function of proteins in complex biological sample. Such an approach has the potential value to understand the complex nature of the organism. Current proteomic tools allow large-scale, high-throughput analyses for the detection, identification, and functional investigation of proteome. Advances in protein fractionation and labeling techniques have improved protein identification to include the least abundant proteins. In addition, proteomics has been complemented by the analysis of posttranslational modifications and techniques for the quantitative comparison of different proteomes. However, the major limitation of proteomic investigations remains the complexity of biological structures and physiological processes, rendering the path of exploration paved with various difficulties and pitfalls. The quantity of data that is acquired with new techniques places new challenges on data processing and analysis. This article provides a brief overview of currently available proteomic techniques and their applications, followed by detailed description of advantages and technical challenges. Some solutions to circumvent technical difficulties are proposed. PMID:20948568

  14. Micro-radiography of biological samples with medical contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Benes, J.; Sopko, V.; Gelbic, I.

    2013-12-01

    Micro-radiography is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to study the internal structures of objects. This fast and easy imaging tool is based on differential X-ray attenuation by various tissues and structures within biological samples. The experimental setup described is based on the semiconductor pixel X-ray detector Medipix2 and X-ray micro-focus tube. Our micro-radiographic system has been recently used not only for the examination of internal structures of various arthropods and other biological objects but also for tracing some processes in selected model species (we used living larvae of mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus). Low concentrations of iodine, lanthanum or gold particles were used as a tracer (contrast agent). Such contrast agents increase the absorption of X-rays and allow a better visibility of internal structures of model organisms (especially the various cavities, pores, etc.). In addition, the movement of tracers in selected timing experiments demonstrates some physiological functions of digestive and excretory system.

  15. New sensitive assay for cadmium in biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Peterson, D.P.; Sacco-Gibson, N.

    1992-08-01

    OSHA is giving serious consideration to substantially lowering permissible exposure limits (PELs) for air cadmium concentrations in the workplace. Consequently, the issue has been raised that improved methods may be needed to effectively monitor worker populations for cadmium exposure if one of the proposed PELs of 1 or 5 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (down from the current 100 {mu}/gm{sup 3}) is adopted. In this brief report, an assay method is described for accurately and precisely determining cadmium concentrations in blood, urine, or other biological samples that has a detection limit of 0.02 {mu}g/L, considerably lower than methods currently in use. It is straight-forward to carry out and uses commercially available chemicals.

  16. New sensitive assay for cadmium in biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Peterson, D.P.; Sacco-Gibson, N.

    1992-01-01

    OSHA is giving serious consideration to substantially lowering permissible exposure limits (PELs) for air cadmium concentrations in the workplace. Consequently, the issue has been raised that improved methods may be needed to effectively monitor worker populations for cadmium exposure if one of the proposed PELs of 1 or 5 {mu}g/m{sup 3} (down from the current 100 {mu}/gm{sup 3}) is adopted. In this brief report, an assay method is described for accurately and precisely determining cadmium concentrations in blood, urine, or other biological samples that has a detection limit of 0.02 {mu}g/L, considerably lower than methods currently in use. It is straight-forward to carry out and uses commercially available chemicals.

  17. The determination of homocysteine-thiolactone in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2002-09-01

    Homocysteine-thiolactone, a cyclic thioester of homocysteine, is synthesized by methionyl-tRNA synthetase in all cell types. A new assay for the determination of homocysteine-thiolactone in biological samples is described. The assay involves separation of homocysteine-thiolactone from macromolecules by ultrafiltration. Homocysteine-thiolactone is further purified and quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography either on a reverse phase or a cation exchange micro-bore column. The detection and quantitation are obtained by monitoring the absorbance at 240 nm, a maximum in a UV spectrum of homocysteine-thiolactone. The sensitivity of detection is 5 pmol. This assay has been applied to bacteria (Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis), the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cultured human vascular endothelial cells, and human plasma. The data support the conclusion that homocysteine-thiolactone is a ubiquitous metabolite whose levels are directly related to homocysteine levels. PMID:12234471

  18. Pressure pulse induced-damage in live biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, C.; Balzer, J.; Godfrey, S.; Francois, M.; Saffell, J. L.; Rankin, S. M.; Proud, W. G.; Brown, K. A.

    2012-08-01

    Developing a cellular and molecular understanding of the nature of traumatic and post-traumatic effects of blast on live biological samples is critical for improving clinical outcomes. To analyze the effects of blast waves upon the cellular structures and the underlying physiological and biochemical changes, we have constructed an experimental platform capable of delivering compression waves, of amplitudes relevant to blast, to cell suspensions in a contained environment. Initial characterization of the system shows that cell cultures can be subjected to high-intensity compression waves up to 15 MPa in pressure and duration of 80 ± 10μs. Studies of mouse mesenchymal stem cells subjected to two different pressure impulses were analysed by cell counting, cell viability assays and microscopic evaluation: the experiments present evidence suggestive of increased levels of damage and loss of cellular integrity compared to uncompressed cell cultures.

  19. Monitoring prion protein expression in complex biological samples by SERS for diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manno, D.; Filippo, E.; Fiore, R.; Serra, A.; Urso, E.; Rizzello, A.; Maffia, M.

    2010-04-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) allows a new insight into the analysis of cell physiology. In this work, the difficulty of producing suitable substrates that, besides permitting the amplification of the Raman signal, do not interact with the biological material causing alteration, has been overcome by a combined method of hydrothermal green synthesis and thermal annealing. The SERS analysis of the cell membrane has been performed with special attention to the cellular prion protein PrPC. In addition, SERS has also been used to reveal the prion protein-Cu(II) interaction in four different cell models (B104, SH-SY5Y, GN11, HeLa), expressing PrPC at different levels. A significant implication of the current work consists of the intriguing possibility of revealing and quantifying prion protein expression in complex biological samples by a cheap SERS-based method, replacing the expensive and time-consuming immuno-assay systems commonly employed.

  20. Environmental estrogens in an urban aquatic ecosystem: II. Biological effects.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Melissa M; Minarik, Thomas A; Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Curran, Erin M; Bartell, Stephen E; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2013-11-01

    Urban aquatic ecosystems are often overlooked in toxicological studies even though they serve many ecosystem functions and sustain fish populations despite large-scale habitat alterations. However, urban fish populations are likely exposed to a broad range of stressors, including environmental estrogens (EEs) that may affect anatomy, physiology and reproduction of exposed fish. Although significant progress has been made in establishing ecological consequences of EE exposure, these studies have focused largely on hydrologically simple systems that lack the complexity of urban aquatic environments. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the occurrence and biological effects of EEs across a large urbanized aquatic ecosystem. A multi-pronged study design was employed relying on quantitative determination of select EEs by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and repeated biological monitoring of wild-caught and caged fish for indications of endocrine disruption. Over three years, EEs were measured in aqueous samples (n=42 samples) and biological effects assessed in >1200 male fish across the 2000km(2) aquatic ecosystems of the Greater Metropolitan Area of Chicago, IL. Our study demonstrated that in addition to water reclamation plant (WRP) effluents, non-WRP sources contribute significant EE loads to the aquatic ecosystem. While resident and caged male fish responded with the induction of the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin, an indicator of EE exposure, neither resident nor caged sunfish exhibited prevalent histopathological changes to their reproductive organs (i.e., intersex) that have been reported in other studies. Vitellogenin induction was greater in spring than the fall and was not correlated with body condition factor, gonadosomatic index or hepatosomatic index. Exposure effects were not correlated with sites downstream of treated effluent discharge further affirming the complexity of sources and effects of EEs in urban aquatic ecosystems

  1. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for Studying Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Patrick; Thatenhorst, Denis; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2012-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a scanning probe technique that utilizes the increase in access resistance that occurs if an electrolyte filled glass micro-pipette is approached towards a poorly conducting surface. Since an increase in resistance can be monitored before the physical contact between scanning probe tip and sample, this technique is particularly useful to investigate the topography of delicate samples such as living cells. SICM has shown its potential in various applications such as high resolution and long-time imaging of living cells or the determination of local changes in cellular volume. Furthermore, SICM has been combined with various techniques such as fluorescence microscopy or patch clamping to reveal localized information about proteins or protein functions. This review details the various advantages and pitfalls of SICM and provides an overview of the recent developments and applications of SICM in biological imaging. Furthermore, we show that in principle, a combination of SICM and ion selective micro-electrodes enables one to monitor the local ion activity surrounding a living cell. PMID:23202197

  2. Constructing mock catalogues for the REFLEX II galaxy cluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the construction of a suite of galaxy cluster mock catalogues from N-body simulations, based on the properties of the new ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. Our procedure is based on the measurements of the cluster abundance, and involves the calibration of the underlying scaling relation linking the mass of dark matter haloes to the cluster X-ray luminosity determined in the ROSAT energy band 0.1-2.4 keV. In order to reproduce the observed abundance in the luminosity range probed by the REFLEX II X-ray luminosity function [0.01 < LX/(1044 erg s-1 h-2) < 10], a mass-X-ray luminosity relation deviating from a simple power law is required. We discuss the dependence of the calibration of this scaling relation on the X-ray luminosity and the definition of halo masses and analyse the one- and two-point statistical properties of the mock catalogues. Our set of mock catalogues provides samples with self-calibrated scaling relations of galaxy clusters together with inherent properties of flux-limited surveys. This makes them a useful tool to explore different systematic effects and statistical methods involved in constraining both astrophysical and cosmological information from present and future galaxy cluster surveys.

  3. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  6. EPR Methods for Biological Cu(II): L-Band CW and NARS

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian; Kowalski, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Copper has many roles in biology that involve the change of coordination sphere and/or oxidation state of the copper ion. Consequently, the study of copper in heterogeneous environments is an important area in biophysics. EPR is a primary technique for the investigation of paramagnetic copper, which is usually the isolated Cu(II) ion, but sometimes as Cu(II) in different oxidation states of multi-transition ion clusters. The gross geometry of the coordination environment of Cu(II) can often be determined from a simple inspection of the EPR spectrum, recorded in the traditional X-band frequency range (9 – 10 GHz). Identification and quantitation of the coordinating ligand atoms, however, is not so straightforward. In particular, analysis of the superhyperfine structure on the EPR spectrum, to determine the number of coordinated nitrogen atoms, is fraught with difficulty at X-band, despite the observation that the overwhelming number of EPR studies of Cu(II) in the literature have been carried out at X-band. Greater reliability has been demonstrated at S-band (3 – 4 GHz), using the low-field parallel (gz) features. However, analysis relies on clear identification of the outermost superhyperfine line, which has the lowest intensity of all the spectral features. Computer simulations have subsequently indicated that the much more intense perpendicular region of the spectrum can be reliably interpreted at L-band (2 GHz). The present work describes the development of L-band EPR of Cu(II) into a routine method, that is applicable to biological samples. PMID:26478491

  7. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 390 - Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement II Appendix... PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. II Appendix II to Part 390—Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement capital construction fund agreement with This Capital Construction Fund...

  8. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 390 - Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. II Appendix II to Part 390—Sample Capital... Francisco, Calif. SS Brown, official No. 325111 ......do 265,000 dwt Owned 1974, Southern Shipyards,...

  9. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 390 - Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. II Appendix II to Part 390—Sample Capital... Francisco, Calif. SS Brown, official No. 325111 ......do 265,000 dwt Owned 1974, Southern Shipyards,...

  10. Human Ecology: A Perspective for Biology Education. Monograph Series II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    This monograph provides a framework for biology teachers who are rethinking and redesigning their programs. The major focus is on the human ecology perspective in biology programs. The first chapter attempts to define and clarify human ecology through historical review. The second chapter provides support, based on a survey of citizens…

  11. Modular Automated Processing System (MAPS) for analysis of biological samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Chirica, Gabriela S.; Fruetel, Julia A.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Branda, Steven S.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Brennan, James S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a novel modular automated processing system (MAPS) that enables reliable, high-throughput analysis as well as sample-customized processing. This system is comprised of a set of independent modules that carry out individual sample processing functions: cell lysis, protein concentration (based on hydrophobic, ion-exchange and affinity interactions), interferent depletion, buffer exchange, and enzymatic digestion of proteins of interest. Taking advantage of its unique capacity for enclosed processing of intact bioparticulates (viruses, spores) and complex serum samples, we have used MAPS for analysis of BSL1 and BSL2 samples to identify specific protein markers through integration with the portable microChemLab{trademark} and MALDI.

  12. Invasion Ecology and School Biology--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that invasion biology can supply subject matter for teaching evolution, genetics, ecological relationships, and conservation. Describes flowering and non-flowering plant invaders, vertebrates and invertebrates, and two ecological invasions on the southern coast of England. (JN)

  13. Strontium: Part II. Chemistry, Biological Aspects and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, G. C.; Johnson, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews basic information on the Chemistry of strontium and its compounds. Explains biological aspects of strontium and its pharmaceutical applications. Highlights industrial application of strontium and its components. (ML)

  14. Basics of particle therapy II: relative biological effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyun

    2012-01-01

    In the previous review, the physical aspect of heavy particles, with a focus on the carbon beam was introduced. Particle beam therapy has many potential advantages for cancer treatment without increasing severe side effects in normal tissue, these kinds of radiation have different biologic characteristics and have advantages over using conventional photon beam radiation during treatment. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used for many biological, clinical endpoints among different radiation types and is the only convenient way to transfer the clinical experience in radiotherapy with photons to another type of radiation therapy. However, the RBE varies dependent on the energy of the beam, the fractionation, cell types, oxygenation status, and the biological endpoint studied. Thus this review describes the concerns about RBE related to particle beam to increase interests of the Korean radiation oncologists' society. PMID:23120738

  15. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  16. Single photon radioluminescence. II. Signal detection and biological applications.

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokh, Z.; Bicknese, S.; Shohet, S. B.; Verkman, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    A quantitative theory for excitation of fluorescent molecules by beta decay electrons is reported in the accompanying manuscript; experimental detection methods and biological applications are reported here. The single photon signals produced by an excited fluorophore (single photon radioluminescence, SPR) provide quantitative information about the distance between radioisotope and fluorophore. Instrumentation was constructed for SPR signal detection. Photons produced in a 0.5-ml sample volume were detected by a cooled photomultiplier and photon counting electronics. To minimize electronic noise and drift for detection of very small SPR signals, a mechanical light chopper was used for gated-signal detection, and a pulse height analyzer for noise rejection. SPR signals of approximately 1 cps were reproducibly measurable. The influence of inner filter effect, sample turbidity, and fluorophore environment (lipid, protein, and carbohydrate) on SPR signals were evaluated experimentally. SPR was then applied to measure lipid exchange kinetics, ligand binding, and membrane transport, and to determine an intermolecular distance in an intact membrane. (a. Lipid exchange kinetics.) Transfer of 12-anthroyloxystearic acid (12-AS) from sonicated lipid vesicles and micelles to vesicles containing 3H-cholesterol was measured from the time course of increasing SPR signal. At 22 degrees C, the half-times for 12-AS transfer from vesicles and micelles were 3.3 and 1.1 min, respectively. (b. Ligand binding.) Binding of 3H-oleic acid to albumin in solution, and 3H-2,2'-dihydro-4,4'-diisothiocyanodisulfonic stilbene (3H-H2DIDS) to band 3 on the erythrocyte membranes were detected by the radioluminescence of the intrinsic tryptophans. The SPR signal from 5 microCi 3H-oleic acid bound to 0.3 mM albumin decreased from 13 +/- 2 cps to 3 +/- 2 cps upon addition of nonradioactive oleic acid, giving 2.7 high affinity oleic acid binding sites per albumin. The SPR signal from 1 microCi 3H-H2DIDS

  17. Single photon radioluminescence. II. Signal detection and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Shahrokh, Z; Bicknese, S; Shohet, S B; Verkman, A S

    1992-11-01

    A quantitative theory for excitation of fluorescent molecules by beta decay electrons is reported in the accompanying manuscript; experimental detection methods and biological applications are reported here. The single photon signals produced by an excited fluorophore (single photon radioluminescence, SPR) provide quantitative information about the distance between radioisotope and fluorophore. Instrumentation was constructed for SPR signal detection. Photons produced in a 0.5-ml sample volume were detected by a cooled photomultiplier and photon counting electronics. To minimize electronic noise and drift for detection of very small SPR signals, a mechanical light chopper was used for gated-signal detection, and a pulse height analyzer for noise rejection. SPR signals of approximately 1 cps were reproducibly measurable. The influence of inner filter effect, sample turbidity, and fluorophore environment (lipid, protein, and carbohydrate) on SPR signals were evaluated experimentally. SPR was then applied to measure lipid exchange kinetics, ligand binding, and membrane transport, and to determine an intermolecular distance in an intact membrane. (a. Lipid exchange kinetics.) Transfer of 12-anthroyloxystearic acid (12-AS) from sonicated lipid vesicles and micelles to vesicles containing 3H-cholesterol was measured from the time course of increasing SPR signal. At 22 degrees C, the half-times for 12-AS transfer from vesicles and micelles were 3.3 and 1.1 min, respectively. (b. Ligand binding.) Binding of 3H-oleic acid to albumin in solution, and 3H-2,2'-dihydro-4,4'-diisothiocyanodisulfonic stilbene (3H-H2DIDS) to band 3 on the erythrocyte membranes were detected by the radioluminescence of the intrinsic tryptophans. The SPR signal from 5 microCi 3H-oleic acid bound to 0.3 mM albumin decreased from 13 +/- 2 cps to 3 +/- 2 cps upon addition of nonradioactive oleic acid, giving 2.7 high affinity oleic acid binding sites per albumin. The SPR signal from 1 microCi 3H-H2DIDS

  18. Elemental mapping of biological samples using a scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.

    1988-03-01

    Elemental mapping using a scanning proton microprobe (SPM) can be a powerful technique for probing trace elements in biology, allowing complex interfaces to be studied in detail, identifying contamination and artefacts present in the specimen, and in certain circumstances obtaining indirect chemical information. Examples used to illustrate the advantages of the technique include the elemental mapping of growing pollen tubes, honey bee brain section, a mouse macrophage cell, human liver section exhibiting primary biliary cirrhosis, and the attack by a mildew fungus on a pea leaf.

  19. Topical Conference on Oportunities in Biology for Physicists II

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, Judy R.

    2004-02-01

    In 2002, the American Physical Society (APS) organized and held the first topical conference in Boston, MA, as a way of informing physicists, particularly those just entering the field, of opportunities emerging at the interface of physics and biology. Because of the tremendous success of the first conference, it was decided to organize a second conference, similar in nature and focus, but with different presentation topic areas. Again the intended audience would be graduate students and postdocs considering applying methods of physics to biological research, and those who advise others on such opportunities.

  20. Energy loss and straggling of MeV ions through biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lei; Wang Yugang; Xue Jianming; Chen Qizhong; Zhang Weiming; Zhang Yanwen

    2007-10-15

    Energy loss and energy straggling of energetic ions through natural dehydrated biological samples were investigated using transmission technique. Biological samples (onion membrane, egg coat, and tomato coat) with different mass thickness were studied, together with Mylar for comparison. The energy loss and energy straggling of MeV H and He ions after penetrating the biological and Mylar samples were measured. The experimental results show that the average energy losses of MeV ions through the biological samples are consistent with SRIM predictions; however, large deviation in energy straggling is observed between the measured results and the SRIM predictions. Taking into account inhomogeneity in mass density and structure of the biological sample, an energy straggling formula is suggested, and the experimental energy straggling values are well predicted by the proposed formula.

  1. Energy loss and straggling of MeV ions through biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lie; Wang, Yugang; Xue, Jianming; Chen, Qizhong; Zhang, Weiming; Zhang, Yanwen

    2007-10-15

    Energy loss and energy straggling of energetic ions through natural dehydrated biological samples were investigated using transmission technique. Biological samples (onion membrane, egg coat and tomato coat) with different mass thickness were studied, together with mylar for comparison, in this work. The energy loss and energy straggling of MeV H and He ions after penetrating from the biological and mylar samples were measured. The experimental results show that the average energy losses of MeV ions through the biological samples are consistent with SRIM predictions, however, large deviation in energy straggling is observed between the measured result and the SRIM predictions. Taking into account inhomogeneity in mass density and structure of the biological sample, an energy straggling formula is suggested, and the experimental energy straggling values are well predicated by the proposed formula.

  2. River Pollution: Part II. Biological Methods for Assessing Water Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods used in the biological assessment of river quality and such indicators of clean and polluted waters as the Trent Biotic Index, Chandler Score System, and species diversity indexes. Includes a summary of a river classification scheme based on quality criteria related to water use. (JN)

  3. Sampling of vehicle emissions for chemical analysis and biological testing.

    PubMed Central

    Schuetzle, D

    1983-01-01

    Representative dilution tube sampling techniques for particulate and gas phase vehicle emissions are described using Teflon filter media and XAD-2 resin. More than 90% of the total gas (C8-C18) and particulate direct acting Ames assay mutagenicity (TA 98) was found in the particulate phase. The gas and particulate phase material was fractionated by HPLC into nonpolar, moderately polar and highly polar chemical fractions. The moderately polar chemical fraction of the particulates contained more than 50% of the direct acting Ames assay mutagenicity for the total extract. The concentration of oxygenated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAH) and nitrated PAH (nitro-PAH) identified in the moderately polar particulate fractions are given. Nitro-PAH account for most of the direct-acting (TA 98) Ames assay mutagenicity in these moderately polar fractions. Reactions and kinetic expressions for chemical conversion of PAH are presented. Chemical conversion of PAH to nitro-PAH during dilution tube sampling of particulates on Teflon filters and gases on XAD-2 resin is a minor problem (representing 10-20%, on the average, of the 1-nitropyrene found in extracts) at short (46 min) sampling times, at low sampling temperatures (42 degrees C), and in diluted exhaust containing 3 ppm NO2. Particulate emissions collected from dilution tubes on filter media appear to be representative of what is emitted in the environment as based upon a comparison of highway and laboratory studies. PMID:6186484

  4. Application of scanning electrochemical microscopy to biological samples.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Kwak, J; Bard, A J

    1990-03-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope can be used in the feedback mode in two-dimensional scans over biological substrates to obtain topographic information at the micrometer level. In this mode, the effect of distance between a substrate (either conductive or insulating) and a scanning ultramicroelectrode tip on the electrolytic current flowing at the tip is recorded as a function of the tip x-y position. Scans of the upper surface of a grass leaf and the lower surface of a Ligustrum sinensis leaf (which show open stomata structures) immersed in aqueous solution are shown. Scans of the upper surface of an elodea leaf in the dark and under irradiation, where the tip reaction is the reduction of oxygen produced by photosynthesis, demonstrate the possibility of obtaining information about the distribution of reaction sites on the substrate surface. PMID:2308933

  5. Application of scanning electrochemical microscopy to biological samples.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C; Kwak, J; Bard, A J

    1990-01-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope can be used in the feedback mode in two-dimensional scans over biological substrates to obtain topographic information at the micrometer level. In this mode, the effect of distance between a substrate (either conductive or insulating) and a scanning ultramicroelectrode tip on the electrolytic current flowing at the tip is recorded as a function of the tip x-y position. Scans of the upper surface of a grass leaf and the lower surface of a Ligustrum sinensis leaf (which show open stomata structures) immersed in aqueous solution are shown. Scans of the upper surface of an elodea leaf in the dark and under irradiation, where the tip reaction is the reduction of oxygen produced by photosynthesis, demonstrate the possibility of obtaining information about the distribution of reaction sites on the substrate surface. Images PMID:2308933

  6. Application of Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy to Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chongmok; Kwak, Juhyoun; Bard, Allen J.

    1990-03-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope can be used in the feedback mode in two-dimensional scans over biological substrates to obtain topographic information at the micrometer level. In this mode, the effect of distance between a substrate (either conductive or insulating) and a scanning ultramicroelectrode tip on the electrolytic current flowing at the tip is recorded as a function of the tip x-y position. Scans of the upper surface of a grass leaf and the lower surface of a Ligustrum sinensis leaf (which show open stomata structures) immersed in aqueous solution are shown. Scans of the upper surface of an elodea leaf in the dark and under irradiation, where the tip reaction is the reduction of oxygen produced by photosynthesis, demonstrate the possibility of obtaining information about the distribution of reaction sites on the substrate surface.

  7. Soft Robotic Grippers for Biological Sampling on Deep Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Kevin C.; Becker, Kaitlyn P.; Phillips, Brennan; Kirby, Jordan; Licht, Stephen; Tchernov, Dan; Gruber, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article presents the development of an underwater gripper that utilizes soft robotics technology to delicately manipulate and sample fragile species on the deep reef. Existing solutions for deep sea robotic manipulation have historically been driven by the oil industry, resulting in destructive interactions with undersea life. Soft material robotics relies on compliant materials that are inherently impedance matched to natural environments and to soft or fragile organisms. We demonstrate design principles for soft robot end effectors, bench-top characterization of their grasping performance, and conclude by describing in situ testing at mesophotic depths. The result is the first use of soft robotics in the deep sea for the nondestructive sampling of benthic fauna. PMID:27625917

  8. Use of STM for analysis of surfaces of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permjakov, N. K.; Ananyan, M. A.; Luskinovich, P. N.; Sorokovoi, V. I.; Saveliev, S. V.

    1999-04-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) was used to image the cell surfaces of the olfactory organ of the shark Carcharhinus longimanus and ectoderm of the frog Xenopus laevis blastulae of 1024 stages, as well as human low-density lipoproteins surface. The samples from two of these objects were prepared by using traditional techniques for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The lipoprotein samples were prepared by drying in the air. A comparison of the STM images with the earlier obtained SEM images indicates that there are some earlier unknown details of the surface structures of receptor microvilli and support cell membranes of the olfactory organ of the shark. There was found a fold of membrane on the surface of the ectodermal frog embryo cells, which covered yolk granules. STM images of the lipoprotein surface were obtained without increasing conductivity treatment.

  9. Adaptive optics for deeper imaging of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Girkin, John M; Poland, Simon; Wright, Amanda J

    2009-02-01

    Optical microscopy has been a cornerstone of life science investigations since its first practical application around 400 years ago with the goal being subcellular resolution, three-dimensional images, at depth, in living samples. Nonlinear microscopy brought this dream a step closer, but as one images more deeply the material through which you image can greatly distort the view. By using optical devices, originally developed for astronomy, whose optical properties can be changed in real time, active compensation for sample-induced aberrations is possible. Submicron resolution images are now routinely recorded from depths over 1mm into tissue. Such active optical elements can also be used to keep conventional microscopes, both confocal and widefield, in optimal alignment. PMID:19272766

  10. Experiment kits for processing biological samples inflight on SLS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, P. D.; Hinds, W. E.; Jaquez, R.; Evans, J.; Dubrovin, L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes development of an innovative, modular approach to packaging the instruments used to obtain and preserve the inflight rodent tissue and blood samples associated with hematology experiments on the Spacelab Life Sciences-2 (SLS-2) mission. The design approach organized the multitude of instruments into twelve 5- x 6- x l-in. kits which were each used for a particular experiment. Each kit contained the syringes, vials, microscope slides, etc., necessary for processing and storing blood and tissue samples for one rat on a particular day. A total of 1245 components, packaged into 128 kits and stowed in 17 Zero(registered trademark) boxes, were required. Crewmembers found the design easy to use and laid out in a logical, simple configuration which minimized chances for error during the complex procedures in flight. This paper also summarizes inflight performance of the kits on SLS-2.

  11. Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes of benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: Synthesis, characterization and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathima, B.; Subba Rao, Y.; Adinarayana Reddy, S.; Reddy, Y. P.; Varada Reddy, A.

    2010-09-01

    Benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligand (L) has been synthesized from benzyloxybenzaldehyde and 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazide. Complexes of this ligand with chlorides of Cu(II) and Ni(II) have been prepared. The structure of the ligand (L) is proposed based on elemental analysis, IR and 1H NMR spectra. Its complexes with Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions are characterized from the studies of electronic as well as EPR spectra. On the basis of electronic and EPR studies, rhombically distorted octahedral structure has been proposed for Cu(II) complex while the Ni(II) complex has been found to acquire an octahedral structure. The ligand and their metal complexes have been tested in vitro for their biological effects. Their antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Gram-positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) have been investigated. The prepared metal complexes exhibit higher antibacterial activities than the parent ligand. The in vitro antioxidant activity of free ligand and its metal(II) complexes have also been investigated and the results however reveal that the ligand exhibits greater antioxidant activity than its complexes.

  12. Evaluation of biological sample preparation for immunosignature-based diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Chase, Brian Andrew; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Legutki, Joseph Barten

    2012-03-01

    To address the need for a universal system to assess health status, we previously described a method termed "immunosignaturing" which splays the entire humoral antibody repertoire across a peptide microarray. Two important issues relative to the potential broad use of immunosignatures are sample preparation and stability. In the present study, we compared the immunosignatures developed from serum, plasma, saliva, and antibodies eluted from blood dried onto filter paper. We found that serum and plasma provide identical immunosignatures. Immunosignatures derived from dried blood also correlated well with those from nondried serum from the same individual. Immunosignatures derived from dried blood were capable of distinguishing naïve mice from those infected with influenza virus. Saliva was applied to the arrays, and the IgA immunosignature correlated strongly with that from dried blood. Finally, we demonstrate that dried blood retains immunosignature information even when exposed to high temperature. This work expands the potential diagnostic uses for immunosignatures. These features suggest that different forms of archival samples can be used for diagnosis development and that in prospective studies samples can be easily procured. PMID:22237890

  13. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  14. Determination of Alkali Ions in Biological and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the common methods for the determination of the alkali metals is given. These are drawn from all of the three principle branches of quantitative analysis and consist mainly of optical atomic spectrometric methods, ion-selective electrodes, and the separation methods of ion-chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Their main characteristics and performance parameters are discussed. Important specific applications are also examined, namely clinical analysis, single cell analysis, the analysis of soil samples and hydroponic nutrient solutions, as well as the detection of the radioactive (137)Cs isotope. PMID:26860298

  15. Broad Consent For Research With Biological Samples: Workshop Conclusions

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Christine; Eckstein, Lisa; Berkman, Ben; Brock, Dan; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Greely, Hank; Hansson, Mats G.; Hull, Sara; Kim, Scott; Lo, Bernie; Pentz, Rebecca; Rodriguez, Laura; Weil, Carol; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; Wendler, David

    2016-01-01

    Different types of consent are used to obtain human biospecimens for future research. This variation has resulted in confusion regarding what research is permitted, inadvertent constraints on future research, and research proceeding without consent. The NIH Clinical Center’s Department of Bioethics held a workshop to consider the ethical acceptability of addressing these concerns by using broad consent for future research on stored biospecimens. Multiple bioethics scholars, who have written on these issues, discussed the reasons for consent, the range of consent strategies, gaps in our understanding, and concluded with a proposal for broad initial consent coupled with oversight and, when feasible, ongoing provision of information to donors. The manuscript describes areas of agreement as well as areas that need more research and dialogue. Given recent proposed changes to the Common Rule, and new guidance regarding storing and sharing data and samples, this is an important and timely topic. PMID:26305750

  16. Multiphoton imaging of biological samples during freezing and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-02-01

    We applied multiphoton microscopic imaging to observe freezing and heating effects in plant- and animal cell samples. The experimental setups consisted of a multiphoton imaging system and a heating and cooling stage which allows for precise temperature control from liquid nitrogen temperature (-196°C 77 K) up to +600°C (873 K) with heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K/min and 150 K/min. Two multiphoton imaging systems were used: a system based on a modified optical microscope and a flexible mobile system. To illustrate the imaging capabilities, plant leafs as well as animal cells were microscopically imaged in vivo during freezing based on autofluorescence lifetime and intensity of intrinsic molecules. The measurements illustrate the usefulness of multiphoton imaging to investigate freezing effects on animal and plant cells.

  17. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions. PMID:25756068

  18. Reaction mechanism of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes: umbrella sampling QM/MM MD study.

    PubMed

    Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2014-07-15

    Biologically relevant interactions of piano-stool ruthenium(II) complexes with ds-DNA are studied in this article by hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computational technique. The whole reaction mechanism is divided into three phases: (i) hydration of the [Ru(II) (η(6) -benzene)(en)Cl](+) complex, (ii) monoadduct formation between the resulting aqua-Ru(II) complex and N7 position of one of the guanines in the ds-DNA oligomer, and (iii) formation of the intrastrand Ru(II) bridge (cross-link) between two adjacent guanines. Free energy profiles of all the reactions are explored by QM/MM MD umbrella sampling approach where the Ru(II) complex and two guanines represent a quantum core, which is described by density functional theory methods. The combined QM/MM scheme is realized by our own software, which was developed to couple several quantum chemical programs (in this study Gaussian 09) and Amber 11 package. Calculated free energy barriers of the both ruthenium hydration and Ru(II)-N7(G) DNA binding process are in good agreement with experimentally measured rate constants. Then, this method was used to study the possibility of cross-link formation. One feasible pathway leading to Ru(II) guanine-guanine cross-link with synchronous releasing of the benzene ligand is predicted. The cross-linking is an exergonic process with the energy barrier lower than for the monoadduct reaction of Ru(II) complex with ds-DNA. PMID:24865949

  19. Physicochemical and biological properties of oxovanadium(IV), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes with oxydiacetate anions.

    PubMed

    Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Kloska, Anna; Pranczk, Joanna; Szczepańska, Aneta; Tesmar, Aleksandra; Jacewicz, Dagmara; Pilarski, Bogusław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2015-03-01

    The potentiometric and conductometric titration methods have been used to characterize the stability of series of VO(IV)-, Co(II)- and Ni(II)-oxydiacetato complexes in DMSO-water solutions containing 0-50 % (v/v) DMSO. The influence of DMSO as a co-solvent on the stability of the complexes as well as the oxydiacetic acid was evaluated. Furthermore, the reactivity of the complexes towards superoxide free radicals was assessed by employing the nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. The biological properties of the complexes were investigated in relation to their cytoprotective activity against the oxidative damage generated exogenously by using hydrogen peroxide in the Human Dermal Fibroblasts adult (HDFa) cell line as well as to their antimicrobial activity against the bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis). The relationship between physicochemical and biological properties of the complexes was discussed. PMID:25488702

  20. Biological Screening of a Novel Nickel (II) Tyrosine Complex

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Rafiqul; Islam, S. M. Rafiqul; Noman, Abu Shadat Mohammod; Khanam, Jahan Ara; Ali, Shaikh Mohammad Mohsin; Alam, Shahidul

    2007-01-01

    A newly synthesized Nickel (II) tyrosine complex was screened as potential antimicrobial agent against a number of medically important bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus β-haemolytica, Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenterae) and fungi (Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium sp.) strains. were used for antifungal activity. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated using the Agar Disc method. Moreover, the minimum inhibitory concentration of the complexes was determined against the same pathogenic bacteria and the values were found between 4~64 µg ml-1. Brine shrimp bioassay was carried out for cytotoxicity measurements of the complexes. The LC50 values were calculated after probit transformation of the resulting mortality data and found to be 6 µg ml-1. PMID:24015064

  1. Spectral, thermal and biological studies of Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes with two thiosemicarbazide derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Metwaly, Nashwa M.

    Two derivatives of thiosemicarbazide were prepared. Their complexes were prepared using Mn(II) and Cu(II) salts. All the isolated complexes are characterized using the following spectra: IR, UV-Vis, Mass, 1H NMR and X-ray diffraction. Magnetic measurements and thermal analysis are the other additive tools for complete investigation. Mononuclear and binuclear complexes are proposed based on elemental analysis mainly. The IR spectra offer the mode of coordination of each ligand with each metal ion. The electronic spectra and magnetic measurements are proposing the structural geometry of the investigated complexes. The octahedral geometry proposed for Mn(II) complexes but the square-planar for Cu(II) complexes. The 1H NMR spectra were done for all organic compounds used in this study and displaying the most suitable tautomer of them. X-ray diffraction of H2L1 and its complexes show their amorphous nature but H2L2 ligand and its complexes show their nanocrystalline nature. The TG analysis was used to prove the presence of solvent molecules attached with the complexes as covalently or physically. Finally, the biological investigation was carried out for H2L2 ligand and its complexes and displaying the inhibition activity of Cu(II) complex than the Mn(II) one.

  2. FURTHER CHARACTERIZATION OF SORBENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING--II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is the fourth in a series providing characterization data related to the use of sorbents for emissions sampling. It provides retention and recovery data for several sorbates on XAD-2, XAD-7, Tenax-GC, Ambersorb XE-340, and Florisil. Retention properties of two organome...

  3. Family Violence: A Curriculum Sample. Women's Issues Series, Vol. II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Refugee Women's Alliance, Seattle, WA.

    The materials in this curriculum sample are written as an English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) lesson for immigrants and refugees, designed to begin discussion of family violence. An introductory section outlines issues related to discussion of family violence in the classroom setting, including the importance of opening lines of communication and…

  4. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable to... Highway Fuel Economy Test Procedure and calculation similar to that shown in paragraph (a) by...

  5. The effect of sterilization on biological, organic geochemical and morphological information in natural samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Philpott, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of biological, organic geochemical, and morphological science information that may occur should a Mars surface sample be sterilized prior to return to earth is examined. Results of experimental studies are summarized.

  6. High sensitivity analysis of nitrite and nitrate in biological samples by capillary zone electrophoresis with transient isotachophoretic sample stacking.

    PubMed

    Szöko, Eva; Tábi, Tamás; Halász, Attila S; Pálfi, Melinda; Magyar, Kálmán

    2004-10-01

    Tissue level of nitrate and nitrite are established indicators of altered nitric oxide metabolism under various pathological conditions. Determination of these anions in biological samples, in the presence of high chloride concentration, using capillary zone electrophoresis suffers from poor detection sensitivity. Separation conditions providing excellent resolution and submicromolar detection sensitivity of nitrate and nitrite have been developed and validated. Simple sample preparation was applied that maintains nitrite stability in tissue extracts and at the same time allows transient isotachophoresis stacking of the analytes. Nitrate and nitrite concentrations in rat brain and liver tissue samples were determined in control and lipopolysaccharide treated animals. PMID:15532571

  7. Biological reduction of nitric oxide in aqueous Fe(II)EDTA solutions.

    PubMed

    van der Maas, Peter; van de Sandt, Thomas; Klapwijk, Bram; Lens, Piet

    2003-01-01

    The reduction of nitric oxide (NO) in aqueous solutions of Fe(II)EDTA is one of the core processes in BioDeNOx, an integrated physicochemical and biological technique for NO(x)() removal from industrial flue gases. NO reduction in aqueous solutions of Fe(II)EDTA (20-25 mM, pH 7.2 +/- 0.2) was investigated in batch experiments at 55 degrees C. Reduction of NO to N(2) was found to be biologically catalyzed with nitrous oxide (N(2)O) as an intermediate. Various sludges from full-scale denitrifying and anaerobic reactors were capable to catalyze NO reduction under thermophilic conditions. The NO reduction rate was not affected by the presence of ethanol or acetate. EDTA-chelated Fe(II) was found to be a suitable electron donor for the biological reduction of nitric oxide to N(2), with the concomitant formation of Fe(III)EDTA. In the presence of ethanol, EDTA-chelated Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II)EDTA. This study strongly indicates that redox cycling of FeEDTA plays an important role in the biological denitrification process within the BioDeNOx concept. PMID:12892497

  8. Uniform Sampling Table Method and its Applications II--Evaluating the Uniform Sampling by Experiment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yibin; Chen, Jiaxi; Chen, Xuan; Wang, Min; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A new method of uniform sampling is evaluated in this paper. The items and indexes were adopted to evaluate the rationality of the uniform sampling. The evaluation items included convenience of operation, uniformity of sampling site distribution, and accuracy and precision of measured results. The evaluation indexes included operational complexity, occupation rate of sampling site in a row and column, relative accuracy of pill weight, and relative deviation of pill weight. They were obtained from three kinds of drugs with different shape and size by four kinds of sampling methods. Gray correlation analysis was adopted to make the comprehensive evaluation by comparing it with the standard method. The experimental results showed that the convenience of uniform sampling method was 1 (100%), odds ratio of occupation rate in a row and column was infinity, relative accuracy was 99.50-99.89%, reproducibility RSD was 0.45-0.89%, and weighted incidence degree exceeded the standard method. Hence, the uniform sampling method was easy to operate, and the selected samples were distributed uniformly. The experimental results demonstrated that the uniform sampling method has good accuracy and reproducibility, which can be put into use in drugs analysis. PMID:26525264

  9. Observations of the Ca ii IR Triplet in High Luminosity Quasars: Exploring the Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Aldama, Mary Loli; Marziani, Paola; Dultzin, Deborah; Sulentic, Jack W.; Bressan, Alessandro; Chen, Yang; Stirpe, Giovanna M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new spectroscopic sample of 11 quasars at intermediate redshift observed with the Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera (ISAAC) on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), covering O i λ8446 and the Ca ii triplet 8498, 8542, 8662. The new observations - that supplement the sample presented by Martínez-Aldama et al. (2015) - allow us to confirm the constraints on physical conditions and location of the region emitting the low ionization lines, as well as the relation between Ca ii and Fe ii.

  10. Biology of the tribe Ambelanieae (apocynaceae). Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Zarucchi, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The tribe Ambelanieae consists of seventeen species of latex-bearing shrubs and trees in six genera found in the tropical lowlands of norther South America. The center of distribution as well as diversification for the Ambelanieae is the Rio Negro basin of Brazilian Amazonia. This study is based on field observations of representative species from five of the genera, supplemented by the examination of exsiccatae from the major herbaria of the world. The analysis includes a review of the taxonomic history, a presentation of a systematic treatment for the genera and species, and detailed discussions of morphology, anatomy, ecology, pollination, fruit dispersal, phenology, palynology, cytology, and biogeography. The first chromosome numbers for the tribe are reported, indicating that polyploidy occurs within the group. Pollen variability is demonstrated, not only among species of different genera but also within individual pollen samples. In reference to economic uses, some members of the tribe are suggested to hold promise for exploitation of usable latex, lightweight wood, and edible fruits. The presence of potentially important toxic and medicinal principles from several species is indicated by ethnopharmacological observations made in the northwest Amazon basin.

  11. A method for three-dimensional quantitative observation of the microstructure of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengfei; Chen, Dieyan; Ma, Wanyun; Wu, Hongxin; Ji, Liang; Sun, Jialin; Lv, Danyu; Zhang, Lu; Li, Ying; Tian, Ning; Zheng, Jinggao; Zhao, Fengying

    2009-07-01

    Contemporary biology has developed into the era of cell biology and molecular biology, and people try to study the mechanism of all kinds of biological phenomena at the microcosmic level now. Accurate description of the microstructure of biological samples is exigent need from many biomedical experiments. This paper introduces a method for 3-dimensional quantitative observation on the microstructure of vital biological samples based on two photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM). TPLSM is a novel kind of fluorescence microscopy, which has excellence in its low optical damage, high resolution, deep penetration depth and suitability for 3-dimensional (3D) imaging. Fluorescent stained samples were observed by TPLSM, and afterward the original shapes of them were obtained through 3D image reconstruction. The spatial distribution of all objects in samples as well as their volumes could be derived by image segmentation and mathematic calculation. Thus the 3-dimensionally and quantitatively depicted microstructure of the samples was finally derived. We applied this method to quantitative analysis of the spatial distribution of chromosomes in meiotic mouse oocytes at metaphase, and wonderful results came out last.

  12. Multielement analysis of micro-volume biological samples by ICP-MS with highly efficient sample introduction system.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Yuka; Inagaki, Kazumi; Sabarudin, Akhmad; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Iwahata, Daigo; Takatsu, Akiko; Chiba, Koichi; Umemura, Tomonari

    2011-12-15

    A method for multielement analysis of micro-volume biological sample by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with a highly efficient sample introduction system was presented. The sample introduction system was the combination of (1) an inert loop injection unit and (2) a high performance concentric nebulizer (HPCN) coupled with a temperature controllable cyclone chamber. The loop injection unit could introduce 20 μL samples into the carrier liquid flow of 10 μL min(-1) producing a stable signal for 100s without any dilution. The injection loop is continuously washed with 0.1M HNO(3) carrier solution during the measurement, thereby much improving sample throughput. The HPCN is a triple tube concentric nebulizer, which can generate fine aerosols and provide a stable and highly measurement sensitivity in ICP-MS at a liquid flow rate less than 10 μL min(-1). With the combination of the chamber heating at 60°C, the sensitivity obtained with the proposed sample introduction system at the liquid flow rate of 10 μL min(-1) was almost the same as that with a common concentric nebulizer and cyclone chamber system at the liquid flow rate of 1 mL min(-1), though the sample consumption rate of the HPCN was two orders of the magnitude lower than that of the common nebulizer. The validation of the proposed system was performed by analyzing the NIST SRM 1577b Bovine Liver. The observed values for 12 elements such as Na, P, S, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, Cd were in good agreement with their certified values and information value. Satisfactory analytical results for 14 elements such as Na, Mg, P, S, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Ba in Escherichia coli sample were also obtained. The proposed sample introduction system was quite effective in the cases when only micro-volume of biological sample is available. PMID:22099643

  13. Near infrared fluorescence quenching properties of copper (II) ions for potential applications in biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Dolonchampa; Zhou, Mingzhou; Sarder, Pinaki; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence quenching properties of copper(II) ions have been used for designing Cu(II) sensitive fluorescent molecular probes. In this paper, we demonstrate that static quenching plays a key role in free Cu(II)-mediated fluorescence quenching of a near infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye cypate. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant was calculated to be KSV = 970,000 M-1 in 25 mM MES buffer, pH 6.5 at room temperature. We synthesized LS835, a compound containing cypate attached covalently to chelated Cu(II) to study fluorescence quenching by chelated Cu(II). The fluorescence quenching mechanism of chelated Cu(II) is predominantly dynamic or collisional quenching. The quenching efficiency of chelated Cu(II) was calculated to be 58% ± 6% in dimethylsulfoxide at room temperature. Future work will involve further characterization of the mechanism of NIR fluorescence quenching by Cu(II) and testing its reversibility for potential applications in designing fluorophore-quencher based molecular probes for biological imaging.

  14. Penicillamine-modified sensor for the voltammetric determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in natural samples.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ràfols, Clara; Serrano, Núria; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Ariño, Cristina; Esteban, Miquel

    2015-11-01

    A new penicillamine-GCE was developed based on the immobilization of d-penicillamine on aryl diazonium salt monolayers anchored to the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface and it was applied for the first time to the simultaneous determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions by stripping voltammetric techniques. The detection and quantification limits at levels of µg L(-1) suggest that the penicillamine-GCE could be fully suitable for the determination of the considered ions in natural samples. PMID:26452863

  15. Analysis of low-angle x-ray scattering peaks from lyophilized biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Elshemey, Wael M.; Selim, Nabila S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.

    2001-08-01

    Low-angle x-ray scattering (LAXS) from lyophilized blood and its constituents is characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are found to be sensitive to the variations in the molecular structure of a given sample. The present work aims to explore the nature of LAXS from a variety of lyophilized biological samples. It also aims to investigate the possibility that a certain biological macromolecule is responsible of the production of LAXS peaks. This is carried out through measurements of LAXS from complex biological samples and their basic constituents. Among the measured samples are haemoglobin (Hb), globin, haem, packed red blood cells, bovine albumin, egg albumin, milk, casein, glutamine, alanine, fat, muscle and DNA. A table containing some characteristic parameters of the LAXS profiles of these samples is also presented. Analysis of measured profiles shows that all lyophilized samples produce at least one relatively broad peak at a scattering angle around 10.35°. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak varies considerably among the measured samples. Except for milk and casein, one additional peak at a scattering angle around 4.65° is observed only in the LAXS profiles of proteins or protein-rich samples. This fact strongly suggests protein to be the biological macromolecule from which this characteristic peak originates. The same idea is further strengthened through discussion of some previous observations.

  16. Gross boron determination in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.F.; Johnson, D.A.; Steele, S.M.; Messick, K.; Miller, D.L.; Propp, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the analysis of boron in biological samples including urine, blood plasma, and tissues with subsequent boron determinations by ICP-AES. A comparison will be made between results obtained by this method and by the prompt-gamma technique on the same samples. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Epigenetic Segregation of Microbial Genomes from Complex Samples Using Restriction Endonucleases HpaII and McrB

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q.; Pham, Long K.; Waltz, Shannon; Barnes, Helen; King, Paula; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Forsyth, R. Allyn

    2016-01-01

    We describe continuing work to develop restriction endonucleases as tools to enrich targeted genomes of interest from diverse populations. Two approaches were developed in parallel to segregate genomic DNA based on cytosine methylation. First, the methyl-sensitive endonuclease HpaII was used to bind non-CG methylated DNA. Second, a truncated fragment of McrB was used to bind CpG methylated DNA. Enrichment levels of microbial genomes can exceed 100-fold with HpaII allowing improved genomic detection and coverage of otherwise trace microbial genomes from sputum. Additionally, we observe interesting enrichment results that correlate with the methylation states not only of bacteria, but of fungi, viruses, a protist and plants. The methods presented here offer promise for testing biological samples for pathogens and global analysis of population methylomes. PMID:26727463

  18. Epigenetic Segregation of Microbial Genomes from Complex Samples Using Restriction Endonucleases HpaII and McrB.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohong; Weston, Christopher Q; Pham, Long K; Waltz, Shannon; Barnes, Helen; King, Paula; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T; Forsyth, R Allyn

    2016-01-01

    We describe continuing work to develop restriction endonucleases as tools to enrich targeted genomes of interest from diverse populations. Two approaches were developed in parallel to segregate genomic DNA based on cytosine methylation. First, the methyl-sensitive endonuclease HpaII was used to bind non-CG methylated DNA. Second, a truncated fragment of McrB was used to bind CpG methylated DNA. Enrichment levels of microbial genomes can exceed 100-fold with HpaII allowing improved genomic detection and coverage of otherwise trace microbial genomes from sputum. Additionally, we observe interesting enrichment results that correlate with the methylation states not only of bacteria, but of fungi, viruses, a protist and plants. The methods presented here offer promise for testing biological samples for pathogens and global analysis of population methylomes. PMID:26727463

  19. Analysis of biological samples by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Szöko, Eva; Tábi, Tamás

    2010-12-15

    In this paper an overview is provided on practical difficulties as well as applications of capillary electrophoresis coupled to laser induced fluorescence detection methods in the field of analysis of biological samples. Various methodological approaches elaborated for determination of small molecules, peptides and proteins are outlined. Besides giving an overview on detection based on native fluorescence, immune and enzyme assays, the main focus is the problematics of sample derivatization and achievable detection sensitivities in the analysis of real biological samples. The characteristics and applicability of the most commonly used labeling reagents are discussed in details. PMID:20719451

  20. Chemical abundances in LMC stellar populations. II. The bar sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Swaelmen, M.; Hill, V.; Primas, F.; Cole, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    favour of an episode of enhanced star formation a few Gyr ago, occurring in the central parts of the LMC and leading to the formation of the bar. This is in agreement with recently derived star formation histories. Proposals 072.B-0293(B) and 078.B-0323(A), P.I. Vanessa Hill.Full Tables 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and abundances tables for the LMC bar and disc samples are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/560/A44Table 11 is also available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Improved Butanol-Methanol (BUME) Method by Replacing Acetic Acid for Lipid Extraction of Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Mutya; Wang, Miao; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica; Han, Xianlin

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of lipids from biological samples is a critical step in lipidomics, especially for shotgun lipidomics where lipid extracts are directly infused into a mass spectrometer. The butanol-methanol (BUME) extraction method was originally developed to extract lipids from plasma samples with 1 % acetic acid. Considering some lipids are sensitive to acidic environments, we modified this protocol by replacing acetic acid with lithium chloride solution and extended the modified extraction to tissue samples. Although no significant reduction of plasmalogen levels in the acidic BUME extracts of rat heart samples was found, the modified method was established to extract various tissue samples, including rat liver, heart, and plasma. Essentially identical profiles of the majority of lipid classes were obtained from the extracts of the modified BUME and traditional Bligh-Dyer methods. However, it was found that neither the original, nor the modified BUME method was suitable for 4-hydroxyalkenal species measurement in biological samples. PMID:27245345

  2. Synthesis, fluorescence study and biological evaluation of three Zn(II) complexes with Paeonol Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Qin, Dong-dong; Yang, Zheng-yin; Qi, Gao-fei

    2009-10-01

    The synthesis of three Paeonol Schiff base ligand and their Zn(II) complexes are reported. The complexes were fully characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, elemental analysis and molar conductivity. The experiment results show the three Zn(II) complexes can emit bright fluorescence at room temperature in DMF solution and solid state. The fluorescence quantum yields (Phi) of three Schiff base ligands and their Zn(II) complexes were calculated using quinine sulfate as the reference with a known Phi(R) of 0.546 in 1.0N sulfuric acid. Furthermore, in order to develop these Zn(II) complexes' biological value, the antioxidant activities against hydroxyl radicals (OH*) were evaluated. The results show the three complexes possess excellent ability to scavenge hydroxyl radicals. PMID:19632146

  3. Synthesis, fluorescence study and biological evaluation of three Zn(II) complexes with Paeonol Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dong-dong; Yang, Zheng-yin; Qi, Gao-fei

    2009-10-01

    The synthesis of three Paeonol Schiff base ligand and their Zn(II) complexes are reported. The complexes were fully characterized by IR, 1H NMR, elemental analysis and molar conductivity. The experiment results show the three Zn(II) complexes can emit bright fluorescence at room temperature in DMF solution and solid state. The fluorescence quantum yields ( Φ) of three Schiff base ligands and their Zn(II) complexes were calculated using quinine sulfate as the reference with a known ΦR of 0.546 in 1.0N sulfuric acid. Furthermore, in order to develop these Zn(II) complexes' biological value, the antioxidant activities against hydroxyl radicals (OH rad ) were evaluated. The results show the three complexes possess excellent ability to scavenge hydroxyl radicals.

  4. Membrane materials for storing biological samples intended for comparative nanotoxicological testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelkin, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The study is aimed at identifying the samples of most promising membrane materials for storing dry specimens of biological fluids (Dried Blood Spots, DBS technology). Existing sampling systems using cellulose fiber filter paper have a number of drawbacks such as uneven distribution of the sample spot, dependence of the spot spreading area on the individual biosample properties, incomplete washing-off of the sample due to partially inconvertible sorption of blood components on cellulose fibers, etc. Samples of membrane materials based on cellulose, polymers and glass fiber with applied biosamples were studied using methods of scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and surface-wetting measurement. It was discovered that cellulose-based membrane materials sorb components of biological fluids inside their structure, while membranes based on glass fiber display almost no interaction with the samples and biological fluid components dry to films in the membrane pores between the structural fibers. This characteristic, together with the fact that membrane materials based on glass fiber possess sufficient strength, high wetting properties and good storage capacity, attests them as promising material for dry samples of biological fluids storage systems.

  5. Determination of selenium in biological samples with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhaoshui

    2016-05-01

    Selenium is both a nutrient and a toxin. Selenium-especially organic selenium-is a core component of human nutrition. Thus, it is very important to measure selenium in biological samples. The limited sensitivity of conventional XRF hampers its widespread use in biological samples. Here, we describe the use of high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) in tandem with a three-dimensional optics design to determine 0.1-5.1μgg(-1) levels of selenium in biological samples. The effects of various experimental parameters such as applied voltage, acquisition time, secondary target and various filters were thoroughly investigated. The detection limit of selenium in biological samples via high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was decreased by one order of magnitude versus conventional XRF (Paltridge et al., 2012) and found to be 0.1μg/g. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe EDXRF measurements of Se in biological samples with important implications for the nutrition and analytical chemistry communities. PMID:26922394

  6. Minutes of the 28th Annual Plutonium Sample Exchange Meeting. Part II: metal sample exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Contents of this publication include the following list of participating laboratories; agenda; attendees; minutes of October 25 and 26 meeting; and handout materials supplied by speakers. The handout materials cover the following: statistics and reporting; plutonium - chemical assay 100% minus impurities; americium neptunium, uranium, carbon and iron data; emission spectroscopy data; plutonium metal sample exchange; the calorimetry sample exchange; chlorine determination in plutonium metal using phyrohydrolysis; spectrophotometric determination of 238-plutonium in oxide; plutonium measurement capabilities at the Savannah River Plant; and robotics in radiochemical laboratory.

  7. Chemometric and Statistical Analyses of ToF-SIMS Spectra of Increasingly Complex Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E S; Wu, L; Fortson, S L; Nelson, D O; Kulp, K S; Wu, K J

    2007-10-24

    Characterizing and classifying molecular variation within biological samples is critical for determining fundamental mechanisms of biological processes that will lead to new insights including improved disease understanding. Towards these ends, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to examine increasingly complex samples of biological relevance, including monosaccharide isomers, pure proteins, complex protein mixtures, and mouse embryo tissues. The complex mass spectral data sets produced were analyzed using five common statistical and chemometric multivariate analysis techniques: principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), and decision tree analysis by recursive partitioning. PCA was found to be a valuable first step in multivariate analysis, providing insight both into the relative groupings of samples and into the molecular basis for those groupings. For the monosaccharides, pure proteins and protein mixture samples, all of LDA, PLSDA, and SIMCA were found to produce excellent classification given a sufficient number of compound variables calculated. For the mouse embryo tissues, however, SIMCA did not produce as accurate a classification. The decision tree analysis was found to be the least successful for all the data sets, providing neither as accurate a classification nor chemical insight for any of the tested samples. Based on these results we conclude that as the complexity of the sample increases, so must the sophistication of the multivariate technique used to classify the samples. PCA is a preferred first step for understanding ToF-SIMS data that can be followed by either LDA or PLSDA for effective classification analysis. This study demonstrates the strength of ToF-SIMS combined with multivariate statistical and chemometric techniques to classify increasingly complex biological samples

  8. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part II. Changes in sampling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Lee, Larry; Flemmer, Michael M; Harper, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This second, and concluding, part of this study evaluated changes in sampling efficiency of respirable size-selective samplers due to air pulsations generated by the selected personal sampling pumps characterized in Part I (Lee E, Lee L, Möhlmann C et al. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2013). Nine particle sizes of monodisperse ammonium fluorescein (from 1 to 9 μm mass median aerodynamic diameter) were generated individually by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator from dilute solutions of fluorescein in aqueous ammonia and then injected into an environmental chamber. To collect these particles, 10-mm nylon cyclones, also known as Dorr-Oliver (DO) cyclones, were used with five medium volumetric flow rate pumps. Those were the Apex IS, HFS513, GilAir5, Elite5, and Basic5 pumps, which were found in Part I to generate pulsations of 5% (the lowest), 25%, 30%, 56%, and 70% (the highest), respectively. GK2.69 cyclones were used with the Legacy [pump pulsation (PP) = 15%] and Elite12 (PP = 41%) pumps for collection at high flows. The DO cyclone was also used to evaluate changes in sampling efficiency due to pulse shape. The HFS513 pump, which generates a more complex pulse shape, was compared to a single sine wave fluctuation generated by a piston. The luminescent intensity of the fluorescein extracted from each sample was measured with a luminescence spectrometer. Sampling efficiencies were obtained by dividing the intensity of the fluorescein extracted from the filter placed in a cyclone with the intensity obtained from the filter used with a sharp-edged reference sampler. Then, sampling efficiency curves were generated using a sigmoid function with three parameters and each sampling efficiency curve was compared to that of the reference cyclone by constructing bias maps. In general, no change in sampling efficiency (bias under ±10%) was observed until pulsations exceeded 25% for the

  9. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature. PMID:1962281

  10. Sampling Almonds for Aflatoxin, Part II: Estimating Risks Associated with Various Sampling Plans Designs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About 100 nations have established regulatory limits for aflatoxin in food and feeds. Because these limits vary widely from one country to another, FAO/WHO working through the Codex Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants (CCFAC) has initiated work to harmonize aflatoxin limits and sampling pla...

  11. Sequential sampling for estimation and classification of the incidence of hop powdery mildew II: Cone sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequential sampling models for estimation and classification of the incidence of powdery mildew (caused by Podosphaera macularis) on hop (Humulus lupulus) cones were developed using parameter estimates of the binary power law derived from the analysis of 221 transect data sets (model construction da...

  12. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Peck, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised. PMID:25445012

  13. Covalent binding of biological samples to solid supports for scanning probe microscopy in buffer solution.

    PubMed Central

    Karrasch, S; Dolder, M; Schabert, F; Ramsden, J; Engel, A

    1993-01-01

    Scanning force microscopy allows imaging of biological molecules in their native state in buffer solution. To this end samples have to be fixed to a flat solid support so that they cannot be displaced by the scanning tip. Here we describe a method to achieve the covalent binding of biological samples to glass surfaces. Coverslips were chemically modified with the photoactivatable cross-linker N-5-azido-2-nitrobenzoyloxysuccinimide. Samples are squeezed between derivatized coverslips and then cross-linked to the glass surface by irradiation with ultraviolet light. Such samples can be imaged repeatedly by the scanning force microscope without loss of image quality, whereas identical but not immobilized samples are pushed away by the stylus. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:8312482

  14. Quantitation of vitamin B6 in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hachey, D.L.; Coburn, S.P.; Brown, L.T.; Erbelding, W.F.; DeMark, B.; Klein, P.D.

    1985-11-15

    Methods have been developed for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of vitamin B6 forms in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using deuterated forms of pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine, and pyridoxic acid. The biological fluid or tissue sample was homogenized and then treated with a cocktail containing appropriate amounts of each deuterated vitamer, as well as the deuterated, phosphorylated vitamer forms. The individual vitamers were isolated from the homogenate by a complex high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure that provided separate fractions for each of the six vitamers found in biological samples. Aldehydic B6 vitamers were reduced to the alcohol form prior to acetylation and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The three resulting vitamers were analyzed by electron ionization GC/MS using a silicone capillary column. The methods have been applied to analysis of vitamin B6 in liver, milk, urine, and feces at levels as low as 0.02 nmol/ml.

  15. Development of color micro optical-CT: evaluation using phantom and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, C.; Teramoto, A.; Kaneko, C.; Fujita, H.

    2015-03-01

    Micro-optical computed tomography (MOCT) is a method for performing image reconstruction using microscopic images to obtain tomographic images of small samples. Compared with conventional observation methods, it offers the possibility to obtain tomograpic images without distortion, and create three-dimensional images. However, MOCT system which developed previously outputs monochrome images, while useful color information could not be obtained from the analysis of the sample. Therefore, we focused on the features that simplify the wavelength measurement of visible light, and developed a color MOCT system that can obtain color tomographic images. In this study, we acquired tomographic images of phantom and biological samples, and evaluated its usefulness. In this system, a digital single-lens reflex camera was used as a detector that was connected to a stereoscopic microscope, and projection images were obtained by rotating the sample. The sample was fixed in the test tube by carrageenan. The projection images were obtained from various projection angles followed by decomposing the R, G and B components. Subsequently, we performed image reconstruction for each component using filtered back projection. Finally, color tomographic image was obtained by combining the three-color component images. In the experiments, we scanned a color phantom and biological samples and evaluated the color and shape reproducibility. As a result, it was found that the color and shape of the tomographic images were similar to those of the samples. These results indicate that the proposed system may be useful to obtain the three-dimensional color structure of biological samples.

  16. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  17. Synthesis, Characterization and Biological Evaluation of Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) Complexes With Cephradine

    PubMed Central

    Jaffery, Maimoon F.

    2000-01-01

    Some Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of antibacterial drug cephradine have been prepared and characterized by their physical, spectral and analytical data. Cephradine acts as bidentate and the complexes have compositions, [M(L)2X2] where [M = Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II), L = cephradine and X = Cl2] showing octahedral geometry, and [M(L)2] where [M = Cu(II), L = cephradine] showing square planar geometry. In order to evaluate the effect of metal ions upon chelation, eephradine and its complexes have been screened for their antibacterial activity against bacterial strains, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:18475955

  18. Methods for collection and analysis of aquatic biological and microbiological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeson, Phillip E., (Edited By); Ehlke, T.A.; Irwin, G.A.; Lium, B.W.; Slack, K.V.

    1977-01-01

    Chapter A4 contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to collect, preserve, and analyze waters to determine their biological and microbiological properties. Part 1 discusses biological sampling and sampling statistics. The statistical procedures are accompanied by examples. Part 2 consists of detailed descriptions of more than 45 individual methods, including those for bacteria, phytoplankton, zooplankton, seston, periphyton, macrophytes, benthic invertebrates, fish and other vertebrates, cellular contents, productivity, and bioassays. Each method is summarized, and the application, interferences, apparatus, reagents, collection, analysis, calculations, reporting of results, precision and references are given. Part 3 consists of a glossary. Part 4 is a list of taxonomic references.

  19. Enhanced biological removal of NOχ from flue gas in a biofilter by Fe(II)Cit/Fe(II)EDTA absorption.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bi-Hong; Jiang, Yan; Cai, Ling-Lin; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Shi-Hang; Li, Wei

    2011-09-01

    A mixed absorbent had been proposed to enhance the chemical absorption-biological reduction process for NO(x) removal from flue gas. The mole ratio of the absorbent of Fe(II)Cit to Fe(II)EDTA was selected to be 3. After the biofilm was formed adequately, some influential factors, such as the concentration of NO, O(2), SO(2) and EBRT were investigated. During the long-term running, the system could keep on a steady NO removal efficiency (up to 90%) and had a flexibility in the sudden changes of operating conditions when the simulated flue gas contained 100-500 ppm NO, 100-800 ppm SO(2), 1-5% (v/v) O(2), and 15% (v/v) CO(2). However, high NO concentration (>800 ppm) and relative short EBRT (<100s) had significant negative effect on NO removal. The results indicate that the new system by using mixed-absorbent can reduce operating costs in comparison with the single Fe(II)EDTA system and possesses great potential for scale-up to industrial applications. PMID:21700449

  20. Schiff base triphenylphosphine palladium (II) complexes: Synthesis, structural elucidation, electrochemical and biological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabbir, Muhammad; Akhter, Zareen; Ahmad, Iqbal; Ahmed, Safeer; Shafiq, Maryam; Mirza, Bushra; McKee, Vickie; Munawar, Khurram Shahzad; Ashraf, Ahmad Raza

    2016-08-01

    The complexes N-(2-oxidophenyl)salicylideneiminatotriphenylphosphine palladium(II) (1) and N-(2-sulfidophenyl)salicylideneiminato triphenylphosphine palladium(II) (2) of tridentate Schiff bases derived from salicylaldehyde and an amino- or thiophenol, have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic, analytical and electro-analytical techniques. X-ray single crystal analysis of complex 1 has revealed its square planar geometry. The thermal analysis has shown the absence of coordinated water and final degradation product is PdO. The alkaline phosphatase studies have indicated that enzymatic activity is concentration dependent which is inversely proportional to the concentration of the compounds. The biological assays (brine shrimp cytotoxicity, DPPH) have reflected their biologically active and mild antioxidant nature. However, results of DNA protection assay have shown that they possess moderate protective activity against hydroxyl free radicals (rad OH). The voltammetric studies ascertain two-electron reduction of the compounds through purely diffusion controlled process and reveal intercalative mode of drug DNA interactions.

  1. From Synthesis to Biological Impact of Pd (II) Complexes: Synthesis, Characterization, and Antimicrobial and Scavenging Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nitin Kumar; Ameta, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Man

    2016-01-01

    The Pd (II) complexes with a series of halosubstituted benzylamine ligands (BLs) have been synthesized and characterized with different spectroscopic technique such as FTIR, UV/Vis, LCMS, 1H, and 13C NMR. Their molecular sustainability in different solvents such as DMSO, DMSO : H2O, and DMSO : PBS at physiological condition (pH 7.2) was determined by UV/Vis spectrophotometer. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of the complexes were investigated against Gram-positive and Gram-negative microbes and two different fungi indicated their significant biological potential. Additionally, their antioxidant activity has been analyzed with DPPH• free radical through spectrophotometric method and the result inferred them as an antioxidant. The stronger antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the synthesized complexes suggested them as a stronger antimicrobial agent. Our study advances the biological importance of palladium (II) amine complexes in the field of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. PMID:27119023

  2. From Synthesis to Biological Impact of Pd (II) Complexes: Synthesis, Characterization, and Antimicrobial and Scavenging Activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nitin Kumar; Ameta, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Man

    2016-01-01

    The Pd (II) complexes with a series of halosubstituted benzylamine ligands (BLs) have been synthesized and characterized with different spectroscopic technique such as FTIR, UV/Vis, LCMS, (1)H, and (13)C NMR. Their molecular sustainability in different solvents such as DMSO, DMSO : H2O, and DMSO : PBS at physiological condition (pH 7.2) was determined by UV/Vis spectrophotometer. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of the complexes were investigated against Gram-positive and Gram-negative microbes and two different fungi indicated their significant biological potential. Additionally, their antioxidant activity has been analyzed with DPPH(•) free radical through spectrophotometric method and the result inferred them as an antioxidant. The stronger antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the synthesized complexes suggested them as a stronger antimicrobial agent. Our study advances the biological importance of palladium (II) amine complexes in the field of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. PMID:27119023

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of bosentan in biological samples after a liquid-liquid microextraction

    PubMed Central

    Sajedi-Amin, Sanaz; Assadpour-Zeynali, Karim; Panahi-Azar, Vahid; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Khoubnasabjafari, Maryam; Ansarin, Khalil; Jouyban-Gharamaleki, Vahid; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:Microextraction processes with UV-Vis measurement have been developed and validated for analysis of bosentan in biological samples. Methods:In this work, liquid–liquid microextraction procedures (DLLME & USAEME) were employed for cleanup, pre-concentration, and determination of bosentan in biological samples by UV-Vis spectroscopy at 270 nm. The method was validated and applied to the determination of bosentan in spiked serum, exhaled breath condensate and urine samples. Results:Various experimental factors including type of extraction and dispersive solvents and their volumes, pH, sonication time and centrifuging time were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the method was linear in the range of 1.0–5.0 μg.mL-1, with coefficient of determination (R2) of > 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.07 mg.L-1. Recovery of the target analyte in biological samples was 106.2%. The method could be easily applied for higher concentration of bosentan and needs more improvement for application in the pharmacokinetic investigations where more sensitive methods are required. Conclusion:A simple, low cost, precise and accurate spectrophotometric analysis of bosentan in biological samples after liquid-liquid microextraction were developed and validated for routine analyses. PMID:26929923

  4. Design, spectral characterization and biological studies of transition metal(II) complexes with triazole Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Chohan, Zahid H.

    2013-03-01

    A new series of three biologically active triazole derived Schiff base ligands L1-L3 have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 3-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde, 4-bromo-thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde, and 5-iodo-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The prepared Schiff bases were used for further complex formation reaction with different metal elements like Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) as chlorides by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 2:1. The structure and bonding nature of all the compounds were identified by their physical, spectral and analytical data. All the metal(II) complexes possessed an octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complexes which showed a distorted octahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antibacterial, and antifungal activities, against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial strains and against six fungal strains (Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata) by using agar-well diffusion method. It has been shown that all the synthesized compounds showed moderate to significant antibacterial activity against one or more bacterial strains. In vitro Brine Shrimp bioassay was also carried out to investigate the cytotoxic properties of these compounds. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination.

  5. Design, spectral characterization and biological studies of transition metal(II) complexes with triazole Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Chohan, Zahid H

    2013-03-01

    A new series of three biologically active triazole derived Schiff base ligands L(1)-L(3) have been synthesized in equimolar reaction of 3-amino-1H-1,2,4-triazole with pyrrol-2-carboxaldehyde, 4-bromo-thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde, and 5-iodo-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde. The prepared Schiff bases were used for further complex formation reaction with different metal elements like Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) as chlorides by using a molar ratio of ligand:metal as 2:1. The structure and bonding nature of all the compounds were identified by their physical, spectral and analytical data. All the metal(II) complexes possessed an octahedral geometry except the Cu(II) complexes which showed a distorted octahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds, were studied for their in vitro antibacterial, and antifungal activities, against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial strains and against six fungal strains (Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glabrata) by using agar-well diffusion method. It has been shown that all the synthesized compounds showed moderate to significant antibacterial activity against one or more bacterial strains. In vitro Brine Shrimp bioassay was also carried out to investigate the cytotoxic properties of these compounds. The data also revealed that the metal complexes showed better activity than the ligands due to chelation/coordination. PMID:23277183

  6. Simulation of a Congress at the Chair of Biology II in Bioengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, A. V.; Reznichenco, V.; López, N.; Hernández, R.; Bajinay, S.

    2007-11-01

    This work has been developed in the Chair of Biology II, the curricular contents of which correspond to Human Anatomy. This subject is taught in the second semester of the second year of studies in Bioengineering. Our main objective is that the students attending the course may integrate the syllabus contents of Anatomy with those of other subjects in the career. Ever since 1998 we have organized a congress named Congreso Intracátedra de Biología II (Intra Chair Congress on Biology II). This is the last assignment in the semester and is compulsory for regular students of the subject. It consists in simulating a scientific congress with international characteristics. The guidelines for the congress are made known to the students at the beginning of the semester. In groups of up to three members, the students must undertake a work that relates aspects of Anatomy with Bioengineering. Students are expected to investigate on diagnostic and/or therapeutic technology in order to write a paper that must be accepted in advance of the event. The presentation of the work must be made through PowerPoint. The originality of the research work done and the wide range of topics selected are surprising. Problems are tackled from the standpoints both of the various medical fields and of bioengineering despite the fact that they are just students of the second year in Bioengineering.

  7. American Indian/Alaska Native Willingness to Provide Biological Samples for Research Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kristin L.; Nazir, Niaman; Williams, Chandler; Brown, Travis; Choi, Won S.; Greiner, K. A.; Daley, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the willingness of American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) to provide biological samples for research purposes. Prior cases of abuse and misuse of individuals, materials, and data highlight ethical research concerns. Investigators may be hesitant to engage AI/ANs in research projects. We conducted a survey of AI/ANs in the central plains region of the US over 1 year. This convenience sample completed a series of questions on biological samples and research. Survey results (N = 998) indicate that 70.15% of AI/ANs would be willing to provide saliva/spit for a specific study with the proper consent and control of samples. In conclusion, researchers should find ways to work with and for AI/ANs, assuring participant input in the research process. PMID:22057422

  8. A versatile and highly sensitive probe for Hg(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) detection individually and totally in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Tian, Xiang-Li; Li, Yan-Song; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Li; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Wang, Xin-Rui; Lu, Shi-Ying; Ren, Hong-Lin; Liu, Zeng-Shan

    2011-12-15

    The detection of heavy metal ions using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) has been reported by several research groups. However, highly sensitive and selective detection of total heavy metal ions using ELISA is a major technical limitation. Here we describe the development of a versatile and highly sensitive probe combining goat anti-mice IgG, colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). We demonstrate the utility of this probe using three kinds of heavy metal complete antigens and three monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) in one ELISA system to establish a high-throughput screening protocol. The procedure was successfully applied to analysis of Hg(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) individually and totally from different water samples. The sensitivities for the detection of Hg(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) individually and totally are 27.4, 3.9, 15.8 and 18.2 nM, respectively. And all limit of detection (LODs) are lower than 1.2 nM. The recovery results obtained from the developed technique showed a good correlation (R(2)=0.983) with those from ICP-MS. The major advantage of the probe is the versatility and high sensibility. The probe could be potentially used, upon demand, as a sensitive and versatile detector for a broad range of applications. PMID:21975341

  9. Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting.

  10. Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1989-05-30

    A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting. 3 figs.

  11. Concentration and characteristics of depleted uranium in biological and water samples collected in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guogang; Belli, Maria; Sansone, Umberto; Rosamilia, Silvia; Gaudino, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    During Balkan conflicts in 1994-1995, depleted uranium (DU) ordnance was employed and was left in the battlefield. Health concern is related to the risk arising from contamination of the environment with DU penetrators and dust. In order to evaluate the impact of DU on the environment and population in Bosnia and Herzegovina, radiological survey of DU in biological and water samples were carried out over the period 12-24 October 2002. The uranium isotopic concentrations in biological samples collected in Bosnia and Herzegovina, mainly lichens, mosses and barks, were found to be in the range of 0.27-35.7 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U, 0.24-16.8 Bq kg(-1) for (234)U, and 0.02-1.11 Bq kg(-1) for (235)U, showing uranium levels to be higher than in the samples collected at the control site. Moreover, the (236)U in some of the samples was detectable. The isotopic ratios of (234)U/(238)U showed DU to be detectable in many biological samples at most sites examined, but in very low levels. The presence of DU in the biological samples was as a result of DU contamination in air. The uranium concentrations in water samples collected in Bosnia and Herzegovina were found to be in the range of 0.27-16.2 m Bq l(-1) for (238)U, 0.41-15.6 m Bq l(-1) for (234)U and 0.012-0.695 m Bq l(-1) for (235)U, and two water samples were observed to be DU positive; these values are much lower than those in mineral water found in central Italy and below the WHO guideline for public drinking water. From radiotoxicological point of view, at this moment there is no significant radiological risk related to these investigated sites in terms of possible DU contamination of water and/or plants. PMID:16806612

  12. Tomographic imaging of transparent biological samples using the pyramid phase microscope

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    We show how a pyramid phase microscope can be used to obtain tomographic information of the spatial variation of refractive index in biological samples using the Radon transform. A method that uses the information provided by the phase microscope for axial and lateral repositioning of the sample when it rotates is also described. Its application to the reconstruction of mouse embryos in the blastocyst stage is demonstrated. PMID:27570696

  13. Tomographic imaging of transparent biological samples using the pyramid phase microscope.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    We show how a pyramid phase microscope can be used to obtain tomographic information of the spatial variation of refractive index in biological samples using the Radon transform. A method that uses the information provided by the phase microscope for axial and lateral repositioning of the sample when it rotates is also described. Its application to the reconstruction of mouse embryos in the blastocyst stage is demonstrated. PMID:27570696

  14. Electron microscopy of frozen hydrated sections of vitreous ice and vitrified biological samples.

    PubMed

    McDowall, A W; Chang, J J; Freeman, R; Lepault, J; Walter, C A; Dubochet, J

    1983-07-01

    The preparation and high resolution observation of frozen hydrated thin sections has been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and STEM) on model systems, including pure water, protein solutions, catalase crystals, myelin sheath and various tissues. The state of the ice is determined by electron diffraction. Mass measurement in the electron microscope is used to determine section thickness and control hydration. An adequate depth of vitrified material for sectioning can be obtained from many biological suspensions or untreated tissues. Frozen hydrated sections around 100 nm thick can be produced under optimal conditions from vitreous ice or from vitrified biological samples. Sectioning, transfer and observation in the electron microscope is feasible without alteration of the sample hydration or its initial vitrification. Biological structures can be preserved and observed down to 10 nm. Under favourable working conditions, specimen compression during sectioning and electron beam damage are the factors limiting high resolution observations. PMID:6350598

  15. Two-dimensional measurement of the nonlinearity parameter B/A in excised biological samples.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigemi; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2011-06-01

    The method previously developed for measuring the acoustic nonlinearity parameter B/A in a liquid sample with a volume as small as 0.1 ml [S. Saito, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 51(2010)] has been automated and applied to two-dimensional measurements of excised biological samples using a LabVIEW program. The focus of the sound beam is laterally shifted on the 3 × 3 mm(2) area of the sample while measuring the B/A successively. By displaying the result of 256 time repeated measurements with an interval of 0.2 mm in two dimensions, a C-mode image was generated for B/A. The images of linear properties such as density, sound speed, and attenuation coefficient are also obtained. The image, whose pattern can be different from those of the density and sound speed, has the capability to reveal the detailed structure of the B/A, which varies from region to region in a single biological sample. The application of the method to small samples is also demonstrated by measuring a thermally coagulated biological sample. PMID:21721718

  16. Optimization of dielectrophoretic separation and concentration of pathogens in complex biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisceglia, E.; Cubizolles, M.; Mallard, F.; Pineda, F.; Francais, O.; Le Pioufle, B.

    2013-05-01

    Sample preparation is a key issue of modern analytical methods for in vitro diagnostics of diseases with microbiological origins: methods to separate bacteria from other elements of the complex biological samples are of great importance. In the present study, we investigated the DEP force as a way to perform such a de-complexification of the sample by extracting micro-organisms from a complex biological sample under a highly non-uniform electric field in a micro-system based on an interdigitated electrodes array. Different parameters were investigated to optimize the capture efficiency, such as the size of the gap between the electrodes and the height of the capture channel. These parameters are decisive for the distribution of the electric field inside the separation chamber. To optimize these relevant parameters, we performed numerical simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics and correlated them with experimental results. The optimization of the capture efficiency of the device has first been tested on micro-organisms solution but was also investigated on human blood samples spiked with micro-organisms, thereby mimicking real biological samples.

  17. Camels, Cormorants, and Kangaroo Rats: Integration and Synthesis in Organismal Biology After World War II.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Joel B

    2015-01-01

    During the decades following World War II diverse groups of American biologists established a variety of distinctive approaches to organismal biology. Rhetorically, organismal biology could be used defensively to distinguish established research traditions from perceived threats from newly emerging fields such as molecular biology. But, organismal biologists were also interested in integrating biological disciplines and using a focus on organisms to synthesize levels of organization from molecules and cells to populations and communities. Part of this broad movement was the development of an area of research variously referred to as physiological ecology, environmental physiology, or ecophysiology. This area of research was distinctive in its self-conscious blend of field and laboratory practices and its explicit integration with other areas of biology such as ecology, animal behavior, and evolution in order to study adaptation. Comparing the intersecting careers of Knut Schmidt-Nielsen and George Bartholomew highlights two strikingly different approaches to physiological ecology. These alternative approaches to studying the interactions of organisms and environments also differed in important ways from the organismal biology championed by leading figures in the modern synthesis. PMID:25592808

  18. Current methods for detecting the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in food and other biological samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current methods for detecting the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in food and other biological samples Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the causative agents of botulism, are among the most lethal human bacterial toxins and the causative agent of botulism. BoNTs are also classified as Select Agents ...

  19. Fast quantitative retardance imaging of biological samples using quadri-wave interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of polarized spatially coherent illumination to perform linear retardance imaging and measurements of semi-transparent biological samples using a quantitative phase imaging technique [1]. Quantitative phase imaging techniques [2-5] are used in microscopy for the imaging of semi-transparent samples and gives information about the optical path difference (OPD). The strength of those techniques is their non-invasive (the sample is not labelled) and fast approach. However, this high contrast is non-specific and cannot be linked to specific properties of the sample. To overcome this limitation, we propose to use polarized light in combination with QPI. Indeed, anisotropy has been used to reveal ordered fibrous structures in biological samples without any staining or labelling with polarized light microscopy [6-8]. Recent studies have shown polarimetry as a potential diagnostic tool for various dermatological diseases on thick tissue samples [9]. Particularly, specific collagen fibers spatial distribution has been demonstrated to be a signature for the optical diagnosis and prognosis of cancer in tissues [10]. In this paper, we describe a technical improvement of our technique based on high-resolution quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) and liquid crystal retarder to perform quantitative linear birefringence measurements on biological samples. The system combines a set of quantitative phase images with different excitation polarizations to create birefringence images. These give information about the local retardance and orientation of biological anisotropic components. We propose using a commercial QWLSI [11] (SID4Bio, Phasics SA, Saint Aubin, France) directly plugged onto a lateral video port of an inverted microscope (TE2000-U, Nikon, Japan). We are able to take retardance images in less than 1 second which allows us to record dynamic phenomena (living cells study) and make high speed acquisitions to reconstruct tissues virtual

  20. The NYC native air sampling pilot project: using HVAC filter data for urban biological incident characterization.

    PubMed

    Ackelsberg, Joel; Leykam, Frederic M; Hazi, Yair; Madsen, Larry C; West, Todd H; Faltesek, Anthony; Henderson, Gavin D; Henderson, Christopher L; Leighton, Terrance

    2011-09-01

    Native air sampling (NAS) is distinguished from dedicated air sampling (DAS) devices (eg, BioWatch) that are deployed to detect aerosol disseminations of biological threat agents. NAS uses filter samples from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in commercial properties for environmental sampling after DAS detection of biological threat agent incidents. It represents an untapped, scientifically sound, efficient, widely distributed, and comparably inexpensive resource for postevent environmental sampling. Calculations predict that postevent NAS would be more efficient than environmental surface sampling by orders of magnitude. HVAC filter samples could be collected from pre-identified surrounding NAS facilities to corroborate the DAS alarm and delineate the path taken by the bioaerosol plume. The New York City (NYC) Native Air Sampling Pilot Project explored whether native air sampling would be acceptable to private sector stakeholders and could be implemented successfully in NYC. Building trade associations facilitated outreach to and discussions with property owners and managers, who expedited contact with building managers of candidate NAS properties that they managed or owned. Nominal NAS building requirements were determined; procedures to identify and evaluate candidate NAS facilities were developed; data collection tools and other resources were designed and used to expedite candidate NAS building selection and evaluation in Manhattan; and exemplar environmental sampling playbooks for emergency responders were completed. In this sample, modern buildings with single or few corporate tenants were the best NAS candidate facilities. The Pilot Project successfully demonstrated that in one urban setting a native air sampling strategy could be implemented with effective public-private collaboration. PMID:21793731

  1. Effects of different temperature treatments on biological ice nuclei in snow samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kazutaka; Maki, Teruya; Kakikawa, Makiko; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Matsuki, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    The heat tolerance of biological ice nucleation activity (INA) depends on their types. Different temperature treatments may cause varying degrees of inactivation on biological ice nuclei (IN) in precipitation samples. In this study, we measured IN concentration and bacterial INA in snow samples using a drop freezing assay, and compared the results for unheated snow and snow treated at 40 °C and 90 °C. At a measured temperature of -7 °C, the concentration of IN in untreated snow was 100-570 L-1, whereas the concentration in snow treated at 40 °C and 90 °C was 31-270 L-1 and 2.5-14 L-1, respectively. In the present study, heat sensitive IN inactivated by heating at 40 °C were predominant, and ranged 23-78% of IN at -7 °C compared with untreated samples. Ice nucleation active Pseudomonas strains were also isolated from the snow samples, and heating at 40 °C and 90 °C inactivated these microorganisms. Consequently, different temperature treatments induced varying degrees of inactivation on IN in snow samples. Differences in the concentration of IN across a range of treatment temperatures might reflect the abundance of different heat sensitive biological IN components.

  2. Rapid methods to detect organic mercury and total selenium in biological samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Organic mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant of concern and selenium is believed to afford protection against mercury risk though few approaches exist to rapidly assess both chemicals in biological samples. Here, micro-scale and rapid methods to detect organic mercury (< 1.5 ml total sample volume, < 1.5 hour) and total selenium (Se; < 3.0 ml total volume, < 3 hour) from a range of biological samples (10-50 mg) are described. Results For organic Hg, samples are digested using Tris-HCl buffer (with sequential additions of protease, NaOH, cysteine, CuSO4, acidic NaBr) followed by extraction with toluene and Na2S2O3. The final product is analyzed via commercially available direct/total mercury analyzers. For Se, a fluorometric assay has been developed for microplate readers that involves digestion (HNO3-HClO4 and HCl), conjugation (2,3-diaminonaphthalene), and cyclohexane extraction. Recovery of organic Hg (86-107%) and Se (85-121%) were determined through use of Standard Reference Materials and lemon shark kidney tissues. Conclusions The approaches outlined provide an easy, rapid, reproducible, and cost-effective platform for monitoring organic Hg and total Se in biological samples. Owing to the importance of organic Hg and Se in the pathophysiology of Hg, integration of such methods into established research monitoring efforts (that largely focus on screening total Hg only) will help increase understanding of Hg's true risks. PMID:21232132

  3. Microfluidic solutions enabling continuous processing and monitoring of biological samples: A review.

    PubMed

    Karle, Marc; Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2016-07-27

    The last decade has witnessed tremendous advances in employing microfluidic solutions enabling Continuous Processing and Monitoring of Biological Samples (CPMBS), which is an essential requirement for the control of bio-processes. The microfluidic systems are superior to the traditional inline sensors due to their ability to implement complex analytical procedures, such as multi-step sample preparation, and enabling the online measurement of parameters. This manuscript provides a backgound review of microfluidic approaches employing laminar flow, hydrodynamic separation, acoustophoresis, electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis, magnetophoresis and segmented flow for the continuous processing and monitoring of biological samples. The principles, advantages and limitations of each microfluidic approach are described along with its potential applications. The challenges in the field and the future directions are also provided. PMID:27251944

  4. Lead Assessment in Biological Samples of Children with Different Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Shah, Faheem; Ullah, Naeem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Khan, Ajmal; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Khan, Zahid; Farooq, Umar

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) levels have been evaluated in the biological samples of children with different gastrointestinal disorders. Blood, scalp hair, and urine samples of children (of age 4-10 years) complaining about different gastrointestinal disorders were analyzed. For comparison, age matched healthy subjects were also included in this study. Biological samples were digested in a microwave oven prior to Pb determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Significant differences in Pb profile were found between the diseased and referent children. Elevated Pb contents were observed in case of diseased children than WHO permissible limit, while normal results were obtained for healthy referents. The results were compared with those of healthy children having the same age, socioeconomic status, and residential areas. PMID:26085058

  5. Swabs as DNA collection devices for sampling different biological materials from different substrates.

    PubMed

    Verdon, Timothy J; Mitchell, Robert J; van Oorschot, Roland A H

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there is a variety of swabs for collection of biological evidence from crime scenes, but their comparative efficiency is unknown. Here, we report the results of an investigation into the efficiency of different swab types to collect blood, saliva and touch DNA from a range of substrates. The efficiency of extracting blood and saliva from each swab type was also tested. Some swabs were significantly more effective than others for sampling biological materials from different substrates. Swabs with the highest sampling efficiency, however, often did not have the highest extraction efficiency. Observations were recorded regarding practicality of each swab in a variety of situations. Our study demonstrates that selection of sampling device impacts greatly upon successful collection and extraction of DNA. We present guidelines to assist in evaluation of swab choice. PMID:24502761

  6. Toward greener analytical techniques for the absolute quantification of peptides in pharmaceutical and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Mangelings, Debby

    2015-09-10

    Peptide-based biopharmaceuticals represent one of the fastest growing classes of new drug molecules. New reaction types included in the synthesis strategies to reduce the rapid metabolism of peptides, along with the availability of new formulation and delivery technologies, resulted in an increased marketing of peptide drug products. In this regard, the development of analytical methods for quantification of peptides in pharmaceutical and biological samples is of utmost importance. From the sample preparation step to their analysis by means of chromatographic or electrophoretic methods, many difficulties should be tackled to analyze them. Recent developments in analytical techniques emphasize more and more on the use of green analytical techniques. This review will discuss the progresses in and challenges observed during green analytical method development for the quantification of peptides in pharmaceutical and biological samples. PMID:25864956

  7. Optimal sample preparation conditions for the determination of uranium in biological samples by kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA).

    PubMed

    Ejnik, J W; Hamilton, M M; Adams, P R; Carmichael, A J

    2000-12-15

    Kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA) is a proven technique for rapid, precise, and accurate determination of uranium in aqueous solutions. Uranium analysis of biological samples require dry-ashing in a muffle furnace between 400 and 600 degrees C followed by wet-ashing with concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to digest the organic component in the sample that interferes with uranium determination by KPA. The optimal dry-ashing temperature was determined to be 450 degrees C. At dry-ashing temperatures greater than 450 degrees C, uranium loss was attributed to vaporization. High temperatures also caused increased background values that were attributed to uranium leaching from the glass vials. Dry-ashing temperatures less than 450 degrees C result in the samples needing additional wet-ashing steps. The recovery of uranium in urine samples was 99.2+/-4.02% between spiked concentrations of 1.98-1980 ng (0.198-198 microg l(-1)) uranium, whereas the recovery in whole blood was 89.9+/-7.33% between the same spiked concentrations. The limit of quantification in which uranium in urine and blood could be accurately measured above the background was determined to be 0.05 and 0.6 microg l(-1), respectively. PMID:11130202

  8. Biological sample collections from minors for genetic research: a systematic review of guidelines and position papers.

    PubMed

    Hens, Kristien; Nys, Herman; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Dierickx, Kris

    2009-08-01

    Stored tissue samples are an important resource for epidemiological genetic research. Genetic research on biological material from minors can yield valuable information on the development and genesis of early-onset genetic disorders and the early interaction of environmental and genetic factors. The use of such tissue raises some specific ethical and governance questions, which are not completely covered by the discussion on biological materials from adults. We have retrieved 29 guidelines and position papers pertaining to the storage and use of biological tissue samples for genetic research, originating from 27 different organizations. Five documents have an international scope, three have an European scope and 21 have a national scope. We discovered that 11 of these documents did not contain a section on biological materials from minors. The content of the remaining 18 documents was categorized according to four themes: consent, principles of non-therapeutic research on vulnerable populations, ethics committee approval and difference between anonymous and identifiable samples. We found out that these themes are not consistently mentioned by each document, but that documents discussing the same themes were mostly in agreement with their recommendations. However, a systematic reflection on the ethical and policy issues arising from the participation of minors in biobank research is missing. PMID:19223929

  9. Zn(II)-coordination modulated ligand photophysical processes – the development of fluorescent indicators for imaging biological Zn(II) ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhao; Simmons, J. Tyler; Sreenath, Kesavapillai

    2014-01-01

    Molecular photophysics and metal coordination chemistry are the two fundamental pillars that support the development of fluorescent cation indicators. In this article, we describe how Zn(II)-coordination alters various ligand-centered photophysical processes that are pertinent to developing Zn(II) indicators. The main aim is to show how small organic Zn(II) indicators work under the constraints of specific requirements, including Zn(II) detection range, photophysical requirements such as excitation energy and emission color, temporal and spatial resolutions in a heterogeneous intracellular environment, and fluorescence response selectivity between similar cations such as Zn(II) and Cd(II). In the last section, the biological questions that fluorescent Zn(II) indicators help to answer are described, which have been motivating and challenging this field of research. PMID:25071933

  10. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the analysis of biological samples and pharmaceutical drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossipov, K.; Seregina, I. F.; Bolshov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in the analysis of biological samples (whole blood, serum, blood plasma, urine, tissues, etc.) and pharmaceutical drugs. The shortcomings of this method related to spectral and non-spectral interferences are manifested in full measure in determination of the target analytes in these complex samples strongly differing in composition. The spectral interferences are caused by similarity of masses of the target component and sample matrix components. Non-spectral interferences are related to the influence of sample matrix components on the physicochemical processes taking place during formation and transportation of liquid sample aerosols into the plasma, on the value and spatial distribution of plasma temperature and on the transmission of the ion beam from the interface to mass spectrometer detector. The review is devoted to analysis of different mechanisms of appearance of non-spectral interferences and to ways for their minimization or elimination. Special attention is paid to the techniques of biological sample preparation, which largely determine the mechanisms of the influence of sample composition on the results of element determination. The ways of lowering non-spectral interferences by instrumental parameter tuning and application of internal standards are considered. The bibliography includes 189 references.

  11. Specific absorption rate in electrically coupled biological samples between metal plates.

    PubMed

    Joines, W T; Blackman, C F; Spiegel, R J

    1986-01-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) in a biological sample irradiated by electromagnetic fields between the metal plates of a transmission line can be altered significantly by the spacing of the metal plates and the distance between neighboring samples. The SAR in spherical biological samples is calculated for a number of neighboring sample arrangements and metal-plate spacings by using the method of images and induced dipole coupling. For a decrease in metal-plate spacing, the derived equations predict an increase in SAR within a sample and a decrease in SAR with a decrease in neighboring-sample spacing. The calculations are compared with measurements made with the aid of an array of 1-in radius metal hemispheres on the lower plate of two parallel plates (thus forming an image system). The hemisphere on which measurements are taken is insulated from the metal plate and is connected via a coaxial center conductor to an HP 3582A spectrum analyzer that measures the voltage and hence the electric field intensity at the hemisphere. Measurements made at a frequency where wavelength is large compared with sample size (48 Hz) are in good agreement with calculations. PMID:3741491

  12. Solid Phase Microextraction and Related Techniques for Drugs in Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi; Said, Rana; Bassyouni, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    In drug discovery and development, the quantification of drugs in biological samples is an important task for the determination of the physiological performance of the investigated drugs. After sampling, the next step in the analytical process is sample preparation. Because of the low concentration levels of drug in plasma and the variety of the metabolites, the selected extraction technique should be virtually exhaustive. Recent developments of sample handling techniques are directed, from one side, toward automatization and online coupling of sample preparation units. The primary objective of this review is to present the recent developments in microextraction sample preparation methods for analysis of drugs in biological fluids. Microextraction techniques allow for less consumption of solvent, reagents, and packing materials, and small sample volumes can be used. In this review the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME), microextraction in packed sorbent (MEPS), and stir-bar sorbtive extraction (SBSE) in drug analysis will be discussed. In addition, the use of new sorbents such as monoliths and molecularly imprinted polymers will be presented. PMID:24688797

  13. On-line Determination of Zinc in Water and Biological Samples after Its Preconcentration onto Zincon Anchored Polyurethane Foam.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Sami M Abdel; Hanafi, Hassan A; El-Shahat, M F

    2015-01-01

    A fast and sensitive on-line procedure for the determination of zinc in water and biological samples was developed. Zinc was preconcentrated in a mini-column packed with polyurethane foam (PUF) chemically modified with zincon via -N=N- bonding. The optimal conditions for preconcentration were pH 8.5 and sample flow rate of 4.0 mL min(-1). Quantitative desorption of Zn(II) was obtained by 0.1 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid and subsequent spectrophotmetric determination using 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol at 498 nm. The obtained detection limit was found to be 3.0 ng mL(-1), precision (RSD) was 4.8 and 6.7% at 20 and 110 ng mL(-1), respectively, for 60 s preconcentration time and enrichment factor was 31. The linearity range was from 10 to 120 ng mL(-1) and maximum sample throughput was 20 h(-1). Finally, the method was successfully applied to the determination of zinc in tap water, Nile River water and human urine samples with RSD in the range of 1.1 - 8.3%. PMID:25958868

  14. Co(II) and Cd(II) Complexes Derived from Heterocyclic Schiff-Bases: Synthesis, Structural Characterisation, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Riyadh M.; Yousif, Enaam I.; Al-Jeboori, Mohamad J.

    2013-01-01

    New monomeric cobalt and cadmium complexes with Schiff-bases, namely, N′-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]furan-2-carbohydrazide (L1) and N′-[(E)-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]thiophene-2-carbohydrazide (L2) are reported. Schiff-base ligands L1 and L2 were derived from condensation of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (iso-vanillin) with furan-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide and thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide, respectively. Complexes of the general formula [M(L)2]Cl2 (where M = Co(II) or Cd(II), L = L1 or L2) have been obtained from the reaction of the corresponding metal chloride with the ligands. The ligands and their metal complexes were characterised by spectroscopic methods (FTIR, UV-Vis, 1H, and 13C NMR spectra), elemental analysis, metal content, magnetic measurement, and conductance. These studies revealed the formation of four-coordinate complexes in which the geometry about metal ion is tetrahedral. Biological activity of the ligands and their metal complexes against gram positive bacterial strain Bacillus (G+) and gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas (G−) revealed that the metal complexes become less resistive to the microbial activities as compared to the free ligands. PMID:24027449

  15. Effect of axial coordination on the electronic structure and biological activity of dirhodium(II,II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, J Dafhne; Lutterman, Daniel A; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M; Dunbar, Kim R; Turro, Claudia

    2007-09-01

    The reactivities toward biomolecules of a series of three dirhodium(II,II) complexes that possess an increasing number of accessible axial coordination sites are compared. In cis-[Rh2(OAc)2(np)2]2+ (1; np=1,8-naphthyridine) both axial sites are available for coordination, whereas for cis-[Rh2(OAc)2(np)(pynp)]2+ (2; pynp=2-(2-pyridyl)1,8-naphthyridine) and cis-[Rh2(OAc)2(pynp)2]2+ (3) the bridging pynp ligand blocks one and two of the axial coordination sites in the complexes, respectively. The electronic absorption spectra of the complexes are consistent with strong metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions at low energy and ligand-centered peaks localized on the np and/or pynp ligands in the UV and near-UV regions. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations were used to aid in the assignments. The three complexes exhibit metal-centered oxidations and reductions, localized on the aromatic ligands. The ability of the complexes to stabilize duplex DNA and to inhibit transcription in vitro is greatly affected by the availability of an open axial coordination site. The present work shows that open axial coordination sites on the dirhodium complexes are necessary for biological activity. PMID:17685607

  16. Will Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer Provide Biological Samples for Research Purposes?

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Shelley A.; Boucher, Beatrice A.; Cotterchio, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the response rates for biological sample donation and attitudes towards control recruitment, especially in younger women. The goals of this pilot study were to determine in women recently diagnosed with breast cancer, the proportion of cases willing to provide biological samples and for purposes of control recruitment, contact information for friends or colleagues. Methods A population-based sample of breast cancer cases (n = 417, 25-74 years) was recruited from the Ontario Cancer Registry in 2010 and self-administered questionnaires were completed to determine willingness to provide samples (spot or 24-hr urine, saliva, blood) and contact information for friends/colleagues for control recruitment. Using Χ2 analyses of contingency tables we evaluated if these proportions varied by age group (<45 and 45+) and other factors such as ethnicity, education, income, body mass index (BMI), smoking status and alcohol consumption. Results Cases were willing to provide blood samples, by visiting a clinic (62%) or by having a nurse visit the home (61%). Moreover, they would provide saliva (73%), and morning or 24-hr urine samples (66% and 52%). Younger cases (≤45) were 3 times (OR) more likely more than older cases to agree to collect morning urine (95% CI: 1.15-8.35). Only 26% of cases indicated they would provide contact information of friends or work colleagues to act as controls. Educated cases were more likely to agree to provide samples, and cases who consumed alcohol were more willing to provide contact information. Ethnicity, income, BMI and smoking had little effect on response rates. Conclusions Reasonable response rates for biological sample collection should be expected in future case controls studies in younger women, but other methods of control selection must be devised. PMID:26061089

  17. A supplement to "Methods for collection and analysis of aquatic biological and microbiological samples"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1979-01-01

    The report contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to collect, preserve, and analyze waters to determine their biological and microbiological properties. It supplements, "Methods for Collection and Analysis of Aquatic Biological and Microbiological Samples" (TWRI, Book 5, Chapter A4, 1977, edited by P. E. Greeson, T. A. Ehlke, G. A. Irwin, B. W. Lium, and K. V. Slack). Included in the supplement are 5 new methods, a new section of selected taxonomic references for Ostracoda, and 6 revised methods.

  18. Methods for collection and analysis of aquatic biological and microbiological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Britton, L.J.; Greeson, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    Chapter A4, methods for collection and analyses of aquatic biological and microbiological samples, contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to collect, preserve, and analyze waters to determine their biological and microbiological properties. Part 1 consists of detailed descriptions of more than 45 individual methods, including those for bacteria, phytoplankton, zooplankton, seston, periphyton, macrophytes, benthic invertebrates, fish and other vertebrates, cellular contents, productivity and bioassay. Each method is summarized, and the applications, interferences, apparatus, reagents, analyses, calculations, reporting of results, precisions, and references are given. Part 2 consists of a glossary. Part 3 is a list of taxonomic references. (USGS)

  19. Urotensin II((4-11)) Azasulfuryl Peptides: Synthesis and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Merlino, Francesco; Yousif, Ali M; Billard, Étienne; Dufour-Gallant, Julien; Turcotte, Stéphane; Grieco, Paolo; Chatenet, David; Lubell, William D

    2016-05-26

    Cyclic azasulfuryl (As) peptide analogs of the urotensin II (UII, 1, H-Glu-Thr-Pro-Asp-c[Cys-Phe-Trp-Lys-Tyr-Cys]-Val-OH) fragment 4-11 were synthesized to explore the influences of backbone structure on biological activity. N-Aminosulfamides were inserted as surrogates of the Trp(7) and Lys(8) residues in the biologically relevant Trp-Lys-Tyr triad. A combination of solution- and solid-phase methods were used to prepare novel UII((4-11)) analogs 6-11 by routes featuring alkylation of azasulfuryl-glycine tripeptide precursors to install various side chains. The pharmacological profiles of derivatives 6-11 were tested in vitro using a competitive binding assay and ex vivo using a rat aortic ring bioassay. Although the analogs exhibited weak affinity for the urotensin II receptor (UT) without agonistic activity, azasulfuryl-UII((4-11)) derivatives 7-9 reduced up to 50% of the effects of UII and urotensin II-related peptide (URP) without affecting their potency. PMID:27140209

  20. Water masers associated with compact molecular clouds and ultracompact H II regions - The extended sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Comoretto, G.; Felli, M.; Palla, F.; Brand, J.; Caselli, P.

    We present the results of a survey of water maser emission at 22.2 GHz towards a selected sample of IRAS-PSC sources which are believed to be associated with very young massive stars. The sample consists of 591 sources. The observations have been carried out using the Medicina 32-m radiotelescope, operated by the Istituto di Radioastronomia - C.N.R., Bologna. Whereas previous searches for maser emission have been directed towards known H II regions, the aim of the present survey is to identify new sources in an even earlier evolutionary phase, corresponding to the development of an ultracompact H II region. It is shown that our sample contains a significant number of sources that could be considered good candidates of massive protostellar cores still in the main accretion phase.

  1. Biological sampling methods and effects of exposure to municipal and chemical landfill leachate on aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Janisz, A.J.; Butterfield, W.S.

    1983-03-01

    Extensive biological sampling on five abandoned hazardous waste sites in New York, New Jersey, and Puerto Rico was undertaken during 1981 and 1982 to determine the impact of priority pollutants on aquatic fauna and, potentially, on human health. The selection criteria for sites, sampling equipment, problems in personnel protection, and sample handling procedures are presented. The effects of the hazardous waste sites were assessed using a wide range of fish and invertebrate species. Tissue specimens from eleven vertebrate and eight invertebrate species were analyzed. Forty samples of these tissue specimens were analyzed for all inorganic priority pollutant parameters; an additional 35 samples were analyzed for organic priority pollutants or an appropriate subset of them. High concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were found in aquatic organisms exposed to chemical landfill leachate; the results of the tissue analyses at other sites were negative.

  2. Polymerase chain reaction for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in human biological samples.

    PubMed

    Cermáková, Z; Rysková, O; Plísková, L

    2005-01-01

    Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Toxoplasma gondii from gene TGR1E with primers TGR1E-1, TGR1E-2 (standard PCR), and from B1 gene with primers TM1, TM2, TM3 (hemi-nested PCR) was detected in biological samples from 347 individuals (441 biological materials). Of the total of 441 biological materials, T. gondii DNA was detected in 5.2 %; it was positive in the following samples: blood (n = 6), blood from newborns (2), biopsies (2) and samples of progenitor cells (2) (from candidates for bone marrow transplantation). DNA of T. gondii was also revealed in 11 samples (8.3 %) of 120 cases of pregnant women during prenatal examinations. A positive result in the blood was also found in two cases of newborn babies from mothers who were infected in later pregnancy. The positive PCR examination was confirmed by serological methods (ELISA and complement fixation test). Agreement of PCR results and the detection of antibodies against toxoplasma was found in 83.3 %. Rapid PCR examination for the confirmation of acute parasitemia T. gondii is particularly important for the patients in whom the infection may cause serious consequences (e.g., for fetus in pregnant women or for patients suffering from imunosuppression). PMID:16408853

  3. Hyperspectral imaging of nanoparticles in biological samples: Simultaneous visualization and elemental identification.

    PubMed

    Peña, María Del Pilar Sosa; Gottipati, Abhishek; Tahiliani, Sahil; Neu-Baker, Nicole M; Frame, Mary D; Friedman, Adam J; Brenner, Sara A

    2016-05-01

    While engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly incorporated into industrial processes and consumer products, the potential biological effects and health outcomes of exposure remain unknown. Novel advanced direct visualization techniques that require less time, cost, and resource investment than electron microscopy (EM) are needed for identifying and locating ENMs in biological samples. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) combines spectrophotometry and imaging, using advanced optics and algorithms to capture a spectrum from 400 to 1000 nm at each pixel in an enhanced dark-field microscopic (EDFM) image. HSI-EDFM can be used to confirm the identity of the materials of interest in a sample and generate an image "mapping" their presence and location in a sample. Hyperspectral mapping is particularly important for biological samples, where ENM morphology is visually indistinct from surrounding tissue structures. While use of HSI (without mapping) is increasing, no studies to date have compared results from hyperspectral mapping with conventional methods. Thus, the objective of this study was to utilize EDFM-HSI to locate, identify, and map metal oxide ENMs in ex vivo histological porcine skin tissues, a toxicological model of cutaneous exposure, and compare findings with those of Raman spectroscopy (RS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results demonstrate that EDFM-HSI mapping is capable of locating and identifying ENMs in tissue, as confirmed by conventional methods. This study serves as initial confirmation of EDFM-HSI mapping as a novel and higher throughput technique for ENM identification in biological samples, and serves as the basis for further protocol development utilizing EDFM-HSI for semiquantitation of ENMs. PMID:26864497

  4. Overcoming the Rare Event Sampling Problem in Biological Systems with Infinite Swapping.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Nuria; Doll, J D; Meuwly, Markus

    2013-09-10

    Infinite swapping (INS) is a recently developed method to address the rare event sampling problem. For INS, an expanded computational ensemble composed of a number of replicas at different temperatures is used, similar to the widely used parallel tempering (PT) method. While the basic concept of PT is to sample various replicas of the system at different temperatures and exchange information between the replicas occasionally, INS uses the symmetrized distribution of configurations in temperature space, which corresponds to the infinite swapping limit of PT. The effect of this symmetrization and the enhanced information exchange between replicas is evaluated for three different biological systems representing different sampling problems in biology: (1) blocked alanine dipeptide, which is a small system and therefore optimal to evaluate sampling efficiency quantitatively, (2) Villin headpiece, which is used as a test case for the protein folding process, and (3) neuroglobin, which is used to evaluate the effects of enhanced information exchange between replicas for sampling the substate space of a folded protein. For these three test systems, PINS is compared to PT, and it is found that in all cases the sampling with PINS is substantially more efficient. PMID:26592410

  5. Presence of Atrazine in the Biological Samples of Cattle and Its Consequence Adversity in Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Peighambarzadeh, SZ; Safi, S; Shahtaheri, SJ; Javanbakht, M; Rahimi Forushani, A

    2011-01-01

    Background Cattle can be considered as an important source for herbicides through nutrition. Therefore, herbicide residue in animal products is a potential human exposure to herbicides causing public health problems in human life. Triazines are a group of herbicides primarily used to control broadleaf weeds in corn and other feed ingredients and are considered as possible human carcinogens. To evaluate trace residue of these pollutants molecular imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) method has been developed, using biological samples. Methods: Blood samples were taken from the jugular vein of 45 Holstein cows in 3 commercial dairy farms in Khuzestan Province, Iran. Urine samples were also taken from the cows. Results: The mean ± SD concentrations of atrazine in serum and urine samples of the study group (0.739 ± 0.567 ppm and 1.389 ± 0.633 ppm, respectively) were higher (P < 0.05) than the concentrations in serum and urine samples of the control group (0.002 ± 0.005 ppm and 0.012 ± 0.026 ppm, respectively). Conclusion: Atrazine in the feed ingredients ingested by cattle could be transferred into the biological samples and consequently can be considered as a potential hazard for the public health. PMID:23113110

  6. Elemental and isotopic imaging of biological samples using NanoSIMS.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L

    2014-01-01

    With its low detection limits and the ability to analyze most of the elements in the periodic table, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) represents one of the most versatile in situ analytical techniques available, and recent developments have resulted in significant advantages for the use of imaging mass spectrometry in biological and biomedical research. Increases in spatial resolution and sensitivity allow detailed interrogation of samples at relevant scales and chemical concentrations. Advances in dynamic SIMS, specifically with the advent of NanoSIMS, now allow the tracking of stable isotopes within biological systems at subcellular length scales, while static SIMS combines subcellular imaging with molecular identification. In this chapter, we present an introduction to the SIMS technique, with particular reference to NanoSIMS, and discuss its application in biological and biomedical research. PMID:24357388

  7. Shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy for in vitro and in vivo biological samples analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva Martins, Mário Augusto; Ribeiro, Dayana Gonçalves; Pereira Dos Santos, Edson Aparecido; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Fontes, Adriana; da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2010-01-01

    The contamination of the Raman scattering signal with luminescence is a well-known problem when dealing with biological media excited by visible light. The viability of the shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) technique for luminescence suppression on Raman spectra of biological samples was studied in this work. A tunable Lithrow-configuration diode laser (λ = 785 and 830 nm) coupled (directly or by optical fiber) to a dispersive Raman spectrometer was employed to study two sets of human tissues (tooth and skin) in order to determine the set of experimental parameters suitable for luminescence rejection. It was concluded that systematic and reproducible spectra of biological interest can be acquired by SERDS. PMID:21258495

  8. Estimating the biological value of soft-bottom sediments with sediment profile imaging and grab sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoey, Gert; Birchenough, Silvana N. R.; Hostens, Kris

    2014-02-01

    Biological value estimation is based on a set of assessment questions and several thresholds to delineate areas of ecological importance (e.g. biodiversity). An existing framework, that was specifically designed to assess the ecosystem biodiversity, was expanded by adding new questions on the productivity, functionality and biogeochemical status of benthic habitats. The additional ecological and sedimentological information was collected by using sediment profile imagery (SPI) and grab sampling. Additionally, information on the performance and comparability of both techniques is provided in this study. The research idea was tested at a site near the harbor of Zeebrugge, an area under consideration as a new disposal site for dredged material from the harbor entrance. The sedimentology of the area can be adequately described based on the information from both SPI and Van Veen grab samples, but only the SPI revealed structural information on the physical habitat (layering, a-RPD). The latter information represented the current status of the benthic habitat, which was confirmed by the Van Veen grab samples. All information was summarized through the biological valuation framework, and provided clear evidence of the differences in biological value for the different sediment types within the area. We concluded that the installation of a new dredged material disposal site in this area was not in conflict with the benthic ecology. This area has a low biological value and the benthic system is adapted to changing conditions, which was signaled by the dominance of mobile, short living and opportunistic species. This study showed that suitable sedimentological and ecological information can be gathered by these traditional and complementary techniques, to estimate the biological value of an area in the light of marine spatial planning and environmental impact assessments.

  9. Characterization and biological activities of two copper(II) complexes with dipropylenetriamine and diamine as ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Noaimi, Mousa; Choudhary, Mohammad I.; Awwadi, Firas F.; Talib, Wamidh H.; Hadda, Taibi Ben; Yousuf, Sammer; Sawafta, Ashraf; Warad, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Two new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes, [Cu(dipn)(Nsbnd N)]Br2(1-2) [dipn = dipropylenetriamine, Nsbnd N = ethylenediamine (en) (1) and propylenediamine (pn) (2)], have been synthesized. These complexes were characterized by spectroscopic and thermal techniques. Crystal structure for 2 shows a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry around Cu(II) ion with one solvate water molecule. Antimicrobial and antiproliferative assays were conducted to evaluate the biological activities of these complexes. The complexes exhibit a promising antimicrobial effect against an array of microbes at 200 μg/mL concentration. The antiproliferative assay shows a high potential of these complexes to target Human keratinocyte cell line with IC50 values of 155 and 152 μM. The absorption spectrum of 2 in water was modeled by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT).

  10. Applications of PIXE to biological and biomedical samples at the university of gent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, W.; Vandenhaute, J.; Duflou, H.; De Reuck, J.

    1987-03-01

    The research on biological and biomedical samples, conducted at the University of Gent during the last 4-5 years and using PIXE as analytical technique, is presented. Our optimized sample/target preparation methods are described, and the accuracy and precision obtainable with them are discussed. Two comprehensive biological/biomedical research projects, initiated at Gent, are presented. The first aims at investigating possible trace element changes in tissues of experimental animals (rats) as a result of liver necrosis or cirrhosis, induced by intraperitoneal injection with CCl 4. The second project involves the determination of the regional distribution of trace elements in the human brain. Eight elements, i.e. K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se and Rb, are being measured in up to 50 different regions of 12 normal brains, and in selected brain regions from patients with neurological disorders. Some of the results of the two projects are discussed.

  11. Microwave acid digestion and preconcentration neutron activation analysis of biological and diet samples for iodine.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Chatt, A

    1991-07-01

    A simple preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) method has been developed for the determination of low levels of iodine in biological and nutritional materials. The method involves dissolution of the samples by microwave digestion in the presence of acids in closed Teflon bombs and preconcentration of total iodine, after reduction to iodide with hydrazine sulfate, by coprecipitation with bismuth sulfide. The effects of different factors such as acidity, time for complete precipitation, and concentrations of bismuth, sulfide, and diverse ions on the quantitative recovery of iodide have been studied. The absolute detection limit of the PNAA method is 5 ng of iodine. Precision of measurement, expressed in terms of relative standard deviation, is about 5% at 100 ppb and 10% at 20 ppb levels of iodine. The PNAA method has been applied to several biological reference materials and total diet samples. PMID:1897721

  12. A psychometric investigation of the Suicide Status Form II with a psychiatric inpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Amy K; Jacoby, Aaron M; Jobes, David A; Lineberry, Timothy W; Shea, Catherine E; Arnold Ewing, Theresa D; Schmid, Phyllis J; Ellenbecker, Susan M; Lee, Joy L; Fritsche, Kathryn; Grenell, Jennifer A; Gehin, Jessica M; Kung, Simon

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the psychometric validity and reliability of the Suicide Status Form-II (SSF-II) developed by Jobes, Jacoby, Cimbolic, and Hustead (1997). Participants were 149 psychiatric inpatients (108 suicidal; 41 nonsuicidal) at the Mayo Clinic. Each participant completed assessment measures within 24 hours of admission and 48-72 hours later. Factor analyses of the SSF core assessment produced a robust two-factor solution reflecting chronic and acute response styles. The SSF core assessment had good to excellent convergent and criterion validity; pre-post SSF ratings also demonstrated moderate test-retest reliability. The results replicated previous research and show that the SSF-II is psychometrically sound with a high-risk suicidal inpatient sample. PMID:19606922

  13. A Rapid and Specific Method for the Detection of Indole in Complex Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Cynthia; Gonzales, Christopher; Okhuysen, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Indole, a bacterial product of tryptophan degradation, has a variety of important applications in the pharmaceutical industry and is a biomarker in biological and clinical specimens. Yet, specific assays to quantitate indole are complex and require expensive equipment and a high level of training. Thus, indole in biological samples is often estimated using the simple and rapid Kovács assay, which nonspecifically detects a variety of commonly occurring indole analogs. We demonstrate here a sensitive, specific, and rapid method for measuring indole in complex biological samples using a specific reaction between unsubstituted indole and hydroxylamine. We compared the hydroxylamine-based indole assay (HIA) to the Kovács assay and confirmed that the two assays are capable of detecting microgram amounts of indole. However, the HIA is specific to indole and does not detect other naturally occurring indole analogs. We further demonstrated the utility of the HIA in measuring indole levels in clinically relevant biological materials, such as fecal samples and bacterial cultures. Mean and median fecal indole concentrations from 53 healthy adults were 2.59 mM and 2.73 mM, respectively, but varied widely (0.30 mM to 6.64 mM) among individuals. We also determined that enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain H10407 produces 3.3 ± 0.22 mM indole during a 24-h period in the presence of 5 mM tryptophan. The sensitive and specific HIA should be of value in a variety of settings, such as the evaluation of various clinical samples and the study of indole-producing bacterial species in the gut microbiota. PMID:26386049

  14. Comparison of various dissolution techniques for determination of Po-210 in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Planinšek, P; Benedik, L; Smodiš, B

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare three wet digestion procedures for dissolution of biological samples in the determination of Po-210. Classical wet ashing over a gas flame with acids in a long-necked Kjeldahl flask, digestion with acids in an Erlenmeyer flask and microwave digestion in a Teflon vessel at temperatures at up to 200°C were investigated. The results obtained showed that the activity concentrations of Po-210 found in the samples analysed were comparable for all the procedures used. PMID:23562435

  15. Determination of nickel in water, food, and biological samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration on modified carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Taher, Mohammad Ali; Mazaheri, Lida; Ashkenani, Hamid; Mohadesi, Alireza; Afzali, Daryoush

    2014-01-01

    A new and sensitive SPE method using modified carbon nanotubes for extraction and preconcentration, and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of nickel (Ni) in real samples at ng/L levels was investigated. First, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were oxidized with concentrated HNO3, then modified with 2-(5-bormo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol reagent. The adsorption was achieved quantitatively on a modified carbon nanotubes column in a pH range of 6.5 to 8.5; the adsorbed Ni(II) ions were then desorbed by passing 5.0 mL of 1 M HNO3. The effects of analytical parameters, including pH of the solution, eluent type and volume, sample volume, flow rate of the eluent, and matrix ions, were investigated for optimization of the presented procedure. The enrichment factor was 180, and the LOD for Ni was 4.9 ng/L. The method was applied to the determination of Ni in water, food, and biological samples, and reproducible results were obtained. PMID:24672882

  16. Assessment of the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, A. L. C.; Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.

    2010-07-01

    New differential linear coherent scattering coefficient, μ CS, data for four biological tissue types (fat pork, tendon chicken, adipose and fibroglandular human breast tissues) covering a large momentum transfer interval (0.07≤ q≤70.5 nm -1), resulted from combining WAXS and SAXS data, are presented in order to emphasize the need to update the default data-base by including the molecular interference and the large-scale arrangements effect. The results showed that the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient demonstrates influence of the large-scale arrangement, mainly due to collagen fibrils for tendon chicken and fibroglandular breast samples, and triacylglycerides for fat pork and adipose breast samples at low momentum transfer region. While, at high momentum transfer, the μ CS reflects effects of molecular interference related to water for tendon chicken and fibroglandular samples and, fatty acids for fat pork and adipose samples.

  17. Synthesis of surface nano-molecularly imprinted polymers for sensitive baicalin detection from biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaoli; He, Hongliang; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Gao, Yankun; Zhang, Hongjuan; Hong, Junli; Du, Shuhu; Chen, Lina; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Surface molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP@SBA-15) imprinted on the surface of hybrid nanostructured organic/inorganic materials (SBA-15) were prepared for the selective extraction and detection of baicalin (BA) from biological samples. The surface morphologies and characteristics of the imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo–gravimetric analysis (TGA) and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. The results indicated that the polymers were successfully grafted on the surface of SBA-15 and possessed a highly ordered mesoporous structure. In binding tests, MIP@SBA-15 reached saturated adsorption within 80 min and exhibited significant specific recognition toward BA with large adsorption capacity. Meanwhile, the prepared MIP@SBA-15 was used as a selective sorbent for solid-phase extraction of BA from biological samples. Recoveries of BA from the liver and spleen ranged from 90.6% to 90.9% with RSD < 3.7%. All these results reveal that this method is simple, rapid and sensitive for effectively extracting and detecting trace BA in biological samples. PMID:26257892

  18. Correction of radiation absorption on biological samples using Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Marcelo O.; Conti, Claudio de Carvalho; dos Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to correct the absorbed radiation (the mass attenuation coefficient curve) in low energy (E < 30 keV) applied to a biological matrix based on the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio and the effective atomic number. For calibration, scattering measurements were performed on standard samples of radiation produced by a gamma-ray source of 241Am (59.54 keV) also applied to certified biological samples of milk powder, hay powder and bovine liver (NIST 1557B). In addition, six methods of effective atomic number determination were used as described in literature to determinate the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C), in order to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient. The results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those obtained using the transmission method. The experimental results were in good agreement with transmission values suggesting that the method to correct radiation absorption presented in this paper is adequate for biological samples.

  19. Sampling designs matching species biology produce accurate and affordable abundance indices.

    PubMed

    Harris, Grant; Farley, Sean; Russell, Gareth J; Butler, Matthew J; Selinger, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife biologists often use grid-based designs to sample animals and generate abundance estimates. Although sampling in grids is theoretically sound, in application, the method can be logistically difficult and expensive when sampling elusive species inhabiting extensive areas. These factors make it challenging to sample animals and meet the statistical assumption of all individuals having an equal probability of capture. Violating this assumption biases results. Does an alternative exist? Perhaps by sampling only where resources attract animals (i.e., targeted sampling), it would provide accurate abundance estimates more efficiently and affordably. However, biases from this approach would also arise if individuals have an unequal probability of capture, especially if some failed to visit the sampling area. Since most biological programs are resource limited, and acquiring abundance data drives many conservation and management applications, it becomes imperative to identify economical and informative sampling designs. Therefore, we evaluated abundance estimates generated from grid and targeted sampling designs using simulations based on geographic positioning system (GPS) data from 42 Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos). Migratory salmon drew brown bears from the wider landscape, concentrating them at anadromous streams. This provided a scenario for testing the targeted approach. Grid and targeted sampling varied by trap amount, location (traps placed randomly, systematically or by expert opinion), and traps stationary or moved between capture sessions. We began by identifying when to sample, and if bears had equal probability of capture. We compared abundance estimates against seven criteria: bias, precision, accuracy, effort, plus encounter rates, and probabilities of capture and recapture. One grid (49 km(2) cells) and one targeted configuration provided the most accurate results. Both placed traps by expert opinion and moved traps between capture sessions

  20. Sampling designs matching species biology produce accurate and affordable abundance indices

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Sean; Russell, Gareth J.; Butler, Matthew J.; Selinger, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife biologists often use grid-based designs to sample animals and generate abundance estimates. Although sampling in grids is theoretically sound, in application, the method can be logistically difficult and expensive when sampling elusive species inhabiting extensive areas. These factors make it challenging to sample animals and meet the statistical assumption of all individuals having an equal probability of capture. Violating this assumption biases results. Does an alternative exist? Perhaps by sampling only where resources attract animals (i.e., targeted sampling), it would provide accurate abundance estimates more efficiently and affordably. However, biases from this approach would also arise if individuals have an unequal probability of capture, especially if some failed to visit the sampling area. Since most biological programs are resource limited, and acquiring abundance data drives many conservation and management applications, it becomes imperative to identify economical and informative sampling designs. Therefore, we evaluated abundance estimates generated from grid and targeted sampling designs using simulations based on geographic positioning system (GPS) data from 42 Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos). Migratory salmon drew brown bears from the wider landscape, concentrating them at anadromous streams. This provided a scenario for testing the targeted approach. Grid and targeted sampling varied by trap amount, location (traps placed randomly, systematically or by expert opinion), and traps stationary or moved between capture sessions. We began by identifying when to sample, and if bears had equal probability of capture. We compared abundance estimates against seven criteria: bias, precision, accuracy, effort, plus encounter rates, and probabilities of capture and recapture. One grid (49 km2 cells) and one targeted configuration provided the most accurate results. Both placed traps by expert opinion and moved traps between capture sessions, which

  1. Determination of Orange II in food samples after cloud point extraction using mixed micelles.

    PubMed

    Pourreza, N; Zareian, M

    2009-06-15

    In this paper, a cloud point extraction method for the determination of trace amounts of Orange II by spectrophotometry is described. The method is based on the extraction of Orange II from aqueous solution using mixed micelles of non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-100 and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) in acidic media. The extracted surfactant rich phase is diluted with water and its absorbance is measured at 484 nm by a spectrophotometer. The effects of surfactant, acid and salt concentration, incubation time and temperature were investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 2.1-420 ng mL(-1) of Orange II in the initial solution with r=0.9991 (n=12). Detection limit based on three times the standard deviation of the blank (3S(b)) was 0.67 ng mL(-1) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for 35 and 105 ng mL(-1) of Orange II was 1.20% and 1.49% (n=10), respectively. The method was applied to the determination of Orange II in different food samples. PMID:19111980

  2. Attempts to develop a new nuclear measurement technique of β-glucuronidase levels in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünak, T.; Avcibasi, U.; Yildirim, Y.; Çetinkaya, B.

    2003-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase is one of the most important hydrolytic enzymes in living systems and plays an essential role in the detoxification pathway of toxic materials incorporated into the metabolism. Some organs, especially liver and some tumour tissues, have high level of β-glucuronidase activity. As a result the enzymatic activity of some kind of tumour cells, the radiolabelled glucuronide conjugates of cytotoxic, as well as radiotoxic compounds have potentially very valuable diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer research. For this reason, a sensitive measurement of β-glucuronidase levels in normal and tumour tissues is a very important step for these kinds of applications. According to the classical measurement method of β-glucuronidase activity, in general, the quantity of phenolphthalein liberated from its glucuronide conjugate, i.e. phenolphthalein-glucuronide, by β-glucuronidase has been measured by use of the spectrophotometric technique. The lower detection limit of phenolphthalein by the spectrophotometric technique is about 1 3 μg. This means that the β-glucuronidase levels could not be detected in biological samples having lower levels of β-glucuronidase activity and therefore the applications of the spectrophotometric technique in cancer research are very seriously limited. Starting from this consideration, we recently attempted to develop a new nuclear technique to measure much lower concentrations of β-glucuronidase in biological samples. To improve the detection limit, phenolphthalein-glucuronide and also phenyl-N-glucuronide were radioiodinated with 131I and their radioactivity was measured by use of the counting technique. Therefore, the quantity of phenolphthalein or aniline radioiodinated with 131I and liberated by the deglucuronidation reactivity of β-glucuronidase was used in an attempt to measure levels lower than the spectrophotometric measurement technique. The results obtained clearly verified that 0.01 pg level of

  3. Attempts to develop a new nuclear measurement technique of β-glucuronidase levels in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünak, T.; Avcibasi, U.; Yildirim, Y.; Çetinkaya, B.

    2003-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase is one of the most important hydrolytic enzymes in living systems and plays an essential role in the detoxification pathway of toxic materials incorporated into the metabolism. Some organs, especially liver and some tumour tissues, have high level of β-glucuronidase activity. As a result the enzymatic activity of some kind of tumour cells, the radiolabelled glucuronide conjugates of cytotoxic, as well as radiotoxic compounds have potentially very valuable diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer research. For this reason, a sensitive measurement of β-glucuronidase levels in normal and tumour tissues is a very important step for these kinds of applications. According to the classical measurement method of β-glucuronidase activity, in general, the quantity of phenolphthalein liberated from its glucuronide conjugate, i.e. phenolphthalein-glucuronide, by β-glucuronidase has been measured by use of the spectrophotometric technique. The lower detection limit of phenolphthalein by the spectrophotometric technique is about 1-3 μg. This means that the β-glucuronidase levels could not be detected in biological samples having lower levels of β-glucuronidase activity and therefore the applications of the spectrophotometric technique in cancer research are very seriously limited. Starting from this consideration, we recently attempted to develop a new nuclear technique to measure much lower concentrations of β-glucuronidase in biological samples. To improve the detection limit, phenolphthalein-glucuronide and also phenyl-N-glucuronide were radioiodinated with 131I and their radioactivity was measured by use of the counting technique. Therefore, the quantity of phenolphthalein or aniline radioiodinated with 131I and liberated by the deglucuronidation reactivity of β-glucuronidase was used in an attempt to measure levels lower than the spectrophotometric measurement technique. The results obtained clearly verified that 0.01 pg level of

  4. Biological rhythms, metabolic syndrome and current depressive episode in a community sample.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fernanda Pedrotti; Jansen, Karen; Mondin, Thaíse Campos; Cardoso, Taiane de Azevedo; Magalhães, Pedro Vieira da Silva; Kapczinski, Flavio; Frey, Benicio N; Oses, Jean Pierre; Souza, Luciano Dias de Mattos; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Wiener, Carolina David

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the disruption in biological rhythms and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in individuals with depressive episode. This was a cross-sectional, population-based study with a representative sample of 905 young adults. Current depressive episode were confirmed by a psychologist using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI)-Plus. Self-reported biological rhythms were assessed using the Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN). MetS was defined using modified NCEP/ATPIII criteria. Significant main effects of current depressive episode (p<0.001, η(2)=0.163) and MetS (p=0.001, η(2)=0.011) were observed on total BRIAN score. There was a significant interaction between depression and MetS in total biological rhythm scores (p=0.002, η(2)=0.011) as well as sleep (p=0.001, η(2)=0.016) and social domains (p<0.001, η(2)=0.014). In the depressive group, subjects with MetS had a higher disruption in total BRIAN scores (p=0.010), sleep domain (p=0.004), social domain (p=0.005) and in the eating pattern domain approached the level of significance (p=0.098), when compared to subjects with no MetS. The results of the present study showed that self-reported disruptions in biological rhythms are associated with key components of the MetS in community adults with MDD. The understanding of the complex interactions between biological rhythms, MetS and depression are important in the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27343724

  5. Offer of rapid testing and alternative biological samples as practical tools to implement HIV screening programs.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Di Perri, Giovanni; Tiberi, Simon; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lillo, Flavia B

    2009-10-01

    Implementation of HIV testing has the objective to increase screening, identify and counsel persons with infection, link them to clinical services and reduce transmission. Rapid tests and/or alternative biological samples (like oral fluid) give the option for a better general consent in approaching screening, immediate referral of HIV positives to medical treatment and partner notification. We tested the performance characteristics of an oral fluid-based rapid HIV test (Rapidtest HIV lateral flow-Healthchem diag. LLC) in comparison with routinely utilized methods in a selected population of known positive (N = 121) or negative (N = 754) subjects. The sensitivity of the rapid test was 99.1% (one false negative sample) and the specificity 98.8%. Five negatives showed a faint reactivity, 3 of these were reactive also in the reference test, one with a p24 only reaction in Western blot. If these 3 samples were excluded from the analysis the specificity increases to 99.2%. Results from our study confirm that, although a continuous improvement of the test performance is still needed to minimize false negative and positive results, rapid test and alternative biological samples may contribute to HIV prevention strategies by reaching a larger population particularly when and where regular screening procedures are difficult to obtain. PMID:20128446

  6. Tailored magnetic nanoparticles for direct and sensitive detection of biomolecules in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fornara, Andrea; Johansson, Petter; Petersson, Karolina; Gustafsson, Stefan; Qin, Jian; Olsson, Eva; Ilver, Dag; Krozer, Anatol; Muhammed, Mamoun; Johansson, Christer

    2008-10-01

    We developed nanoparticles with tailored magnetic properties for direct and sensitive detection of biomolecules in biological samples in a single step. Thermally blocked nanoparticles obtained by thermal hydrolysis, functionalized with specific ligands, are mixed with sample solutions, and the variation of the magnetic relaxation due to surface binding is used to detect the presence of biomolecules. The binding significantly increases the hydrodynamic volume of nanoparticles, thus changing their Brownian relaxation frequency which is measured by a specifically developed AC susceptometer. The system was tested for the presence of Brucella antibodies, a dangerous pathogen causing brucellosis with severe effects both on humans and animals, in serum samples from infected cows and the surface of the nanoparticles was functionalized with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Brucella abortus. The hydrodynamic volume of LPS-functionalized particles increased by 25-35% as a result of the binding of the antibodies, measured by changes in the susceptibility in an alternating magnetic field. The method has shown high sensitivity, with detection limit of 0.05 microg x mL(-1) of antibody in the biological samples without any pretreatment. This magnetic-based assay is very sensitive, cost-efficient, and versatile, giving a direct indication whether the animal is infected or not, making it suitable for point-of-care applications. The functionalization of tailored magnetic nanoparticles can be modified to suit numerous homogeneous assays for a wide range of applications. PMID:18754596

  7. Direct Observation of Wet Biological Samples by Graphene Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungwon; Park, Hyesung; Ercius, Peter; Pegoraro, Adrian F; Xu, Chen; Kim, Jin Woong; Han, Sang Hoon; Weitz, David A

    2015-07-01

    Recent development of liquid phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) enables the study of specimens in wet ambient conditions within a liquid cell; however, direct structural observation of biological samples in their native solution using TEM is challenging since low-mass biomaterials embedded in a thick liquid layer of the host cell demonstrate low contrast. Furthermore, the integrity of delicate wet samples is easily compromised during typical sample preparation and TEM imaging. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a graphene liquid cell (GLC) using multilayer graphene sheets to reliably encapsulate and preserve biological samples in a liquid for TEM observation. We achieve nanometer scale spatial resolution with high contrast using low-dose TEM at room temperature, and we use the GLC to directly observe the structure of influenza viruses in their native buffer solution at room temperature. The GLC is further extended to investigate whole cells in wet conditions using TEM. We also demonstrate the potential of the GLC for correlative studies by TEM and fluorescence light microscopy imaging. PMID:26065925

  8. Challenges of biological sample preparation for SIMS imaging of elements and molecules at subcellular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2008-12-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging techniques capable of subcellular resolution characterization of elements and molecules are becoming valuable tools in many areas of biology and medicine. Due to high vacuum requirements of SIMS, the live cells cannot be analyzed directly in the instrument. The sample preparation, therefore, plays a critical role in preserving the native chemical composition for SIMS analysis. This work focuses on the evaluation of frozen-hydrated and frozen freeze-dried sample preparations for SIMS studies of cultured cells with a CAMECA IMS-3f dynamic SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing SIMS images with a spatial resolution of 500 nm. The sandwich freeze-fracture method was used for fracturing the cells. The complimentary fracture planes in the plasma membrane were characterized by field-emission secondary electron microscopy (FESEM) in the frozen-hydrated state. The cells fractured at the dorsal surface were used for SIMS analysis. The frozen-hydrated SIMS analysis of individual cells under dynamic primary ion beam (O 2+) revealed local secondary ion signal enhancements correlated with the water image signals of 19(H 3O) +. A preferential removal of water from the frozen cell matrix in the Z-axis was also observed. These complications render the frozen-hydrated sample type less desirable for subcellular dynamic SIMS studies. The freeze-drying of frozen-hydrated cells, either inside the instrument or externally in a freeze-drier, allowed SIMS imaging of subcellular chemical composition. Morphological evaluations of fractured freeze-dried cells with SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed well-preserved mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and stress fibers. SIMS analysis of fractured freeze-dried cells revealed well-preserved chemical composition of even the most highly diffusible ions like K + and Na + in physiologically relevant concentrations. The high K-low Na signature in individual cells

  9. Multilayer three-dimensional super resolution imaging of thick biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Alipasha; Tang, Jianyong; Shroff, Hari; Shank, Charles V.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit at nanometer resolution. A general feature of most of the techniques based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) or stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) has been the use of thin biological samples in combination with total internal reflection, thus limiting the imaging depth to a fraction of an optical wavelength. However, to study whole cells or organelles that are typically up to 15 μm deep into the cell, the extension of these methods to a three-dimensional (3D) super resolution technique is required. Here, we report an advance in optical microscopy that enables imaging of protein distributions in cells with a lateral localization precision better than 50 nm at multiple imaging planes deep in biological samples. The approach is based on combining the lateral super resolution provided by PALM with two-photon temporal focusing that provides optical sectioning. We have generated super-resolution images over an axial range of ≈10 μm in both mitochondrially labeled fixed cells, and in the membranes of living S2 Drosophila cells. PMID:19088193

  10. Measurement of Beryllium in Biological Samples by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Applications for Studying Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarappa-Zucca, M L; Finkel, R C; Martinelli, R E; McAninch, J E; Nelson, D O; Turtletaub, K W

    2004-04-15

    A method using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been developed for quantifying attomoles of beryllium (Be) in biological samples. This method provides the sensitivity to trace Be in biological samples at very low doses with the purpose of identifying the molecular targets involved in chronic beryllium disease. Proof of the method was tested by administering 0.001, 0.05, 0.5 and 5.0 {micro}g {sup 9}Be and {sup 10}Be by intraperitoneal injection to male mice and removing spleen, liver, femurs, blood, lung, and kidneys after 24 h exposure. These samples were prepared for AMS analysis by tissue digestion in nitric acid, followed by further organic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and ammonium persulfate and lastly, precipitation of Be with ammonium hydroxide, and conversion to beryllium oxide at 800 C. The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio of the extracted beryllium oxide was measured by AMS and Be in the original sample was calculated. Results indicate that Be levels were dose-dependent in all tissues and the highest levels were measured in the spleen and liver. The measured {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios spanned 4 orders of magnitude, from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -14}, with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10{sup -14}, which is equivalent to 0.8 attomoles of {sup 10}Be. These results show that routine quantification of nanogram levels of Be in tissues is possible and that AMS is a sensitive method that can be used in biological studies to understand the molecular dosimetry of Be and mechanisms of toxicity.

  11. Mapping molecular orientational distributions for biological sample in 3D (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HE, Wei; Ferrand, Patrick; Richter, Benjamin; Bastmeyer, Martin; Brasselet, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Measuring molecular orientation properties is very appealing for scientists in molecular and cell biology, as well as biomedical research. Orientational organization at the molecular scale is indeed an important brick to cells and tissues morphology, mechanics, functions and pathologies. Recent work has shown that polarized fluorescence imaging, based on excitation polarization tuning in the sample plane, is able to probe molecular orientational order in biological samples; however this applies only to information in 2D, projected in the sample plane. To surpass this limitation, we extended this approach to excitation polarization tuning in 3D. The principle is based on the decomposition of any arbitrary 3D linear excitation in a polarization along the longitudinal z-axis, and a polarization in the transverse xy-sample plane. We designed an interferometer with one arm generating radial polarization light (thus producing longitudinal polarization under high numerical aperture focusing), the other arm controlling a linear polarization in the transverse plane. The amplitude ratio between the two arms can vary so as to get any linear polarized excitation in 3D at the focus of a high NA objective. This technique has been characterized by polarimetry imaging at the back focal plane of the focusing objective, and modeled theoretically. 3D polarized fluorescence microscopy is demonstrated on actin stress fibers in non-flat cells suspended on synthetic polymer structures forming supporting pillars, for which heterogeneous actin orientational order could be identified. This technique shows a great potential in structural investigations in 3D biological systems, such as cell spheroids and tissues.

  12. The XAS model of dissolved Cu(II) and its significance to biological electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Patrick; Benfatto, Maurizio; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2009-11-01

    The standard model for dissolved Cu(II) portrays the complex ion as an axially elongated, equatorially planar octahedron. Using EXAFS and MXAN analyses of copper K-edge XAS spectra, new structural models for dissolved [Cu(aq)]2+ and [Cu(amm)]2+ have been determined. These structures uniformly depart from the octahedral model in favour of an axially elongated square pyramidal core. MXAN results also indicate that the equatorial ligands need not be coplanar with copper. Further structural elements include a -z axially localized scatterer at ~3 Å. Even more distant scatterers imply second shell solvent organization, which can vary with the medium. Preliminary results from new extended, k = 18 Å-1, higher resolution copper K-edge XAS data sets are reported. The low symmetry of dissolved Cu(II) ion contradicts the central thesis of the rack-induced bonding hypothesis of copper electron transfer proteins. The asymmetry of biological copper is not a frozen vibronic excited state enforced by a rigid protein scaffold, but is entirely in harmony with the structural ground state of the dissolved aqueous Cu(II) complex ion.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of Rutin-zinc(II) flavonoid -metal complex.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Norma Estefania Andrades; Novak, Estela Maria; Maria, Durvanei Augusto; Velosa, Adélia Segin; Pereira, Regina Mara Silva

    2015-09-01

    Synthesis of compounds analogous to natural products from secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids, is a promising source of novel drugs. Rutin (quercetin-3-O-rutinoside) is a natural flavone, which has, in its chemical structure, different sites for coordination with transition metals and the complexation with these metals enhances its biological properties. Rutin-zinc(II), a flavonoid-metal complex, was synthesized and characterized by UV-VIS, FT-IR, elemental analysis and (1)H NMR. The antioxidant and antitumor activities, as well as the cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity of this complex were evaluated and compared with the free rutin. Rutin-zinc(II) has not shown any cytotoxicity against normal cells (fibroblasts and HUVECs) or toxicity in BALB/c mice, but has shown antioxidant activity in vitro and cytotoxicity against leukemia (KG1, K562 and Jurkat), multiple myeloma (RPMI8226) and melanoma (B16F10 and SK-Mel-28) cell lines in vitro. In Ehrlich ascites carcinoma model, Rutin-zinc(II) modulated the mitochondrial membrane potential and the expression of genes related to cell cycle progression, angiogenesis and apoptosis. PMID:26091902

  14. A Systematic Review of Published Respondent-Driven Sampling Surveys Collecting Behavioral and Biologic Data.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Lisa G; Hakim, Avi J; Dittrich, Samantha; Burnett, Janet; Kim, Evelyn; White, Richard G

    2016-08-01

    Reporting key details of respondent-driven sampling (RDS) survey implementation and analysis is essential for assessing the quality of RDS surveys. RDS is both a recruitment and analytic method and, as such, it is important to adequately describe both aspects in publications. We extracted data from peer-reviewed literature published through September, 2013 that reported collected biological specimens using RDS. We identified 151 eligible peer-reviewed articles describing 222 surveys conducted in seven regions throughout the world. Most published surveys reported basic implementation information such as survey city, country, year, population sampled, interview method, and final sample size. However, many surveys did not report essential methodological and analytical information for assessing RDS survey quality, including number of recruitment sites, seeds at start and end, maximum number of waves, and whether data were adjusted for network size. Understanding the quality of data collection and analysis in RDS is useful for effectively planning public health service delivery and funding priorities. PMID:26992395

  15. MALDI-MS drug analysis in biological samples: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Andrea E; Poetzsch, Michael; Kraemer, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Drug analysis represents a large field in different disciplines. Plasma is commonly considered to be the biosample of choice for that purpose. However, concentrations often do not represent the levels present within deeper compartments and therefore cannot sufficiently explain efficacy or toxicology of drugs. MALDI-MS in drug analysis is of great interest for high-throughput quantification and particularly spatially resolved tissue imaging. The current perspective article will deal with challenges and opportunities of MALDI-MS drug analysis in different biological samples. A particular focus will be on hair samples. Recent applications were included, reviewed for their instrumental setup and sample preparation and pros and cons as well as future perspectives are critically discussed. PMID:27524467

  16. A direct solid sampling analysis method for the detection of silver nanoparticles in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Feichtmeier, Nadine S; Ruchter, Nadine; Zimmermann, Sonja; Sures, Bernd; Leopold, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are implemented in food contact materials due to their powerful antimicrobial properties and so may enter the human food chain. Hence, it is desirable to develop easy, sensitive and fast analytical screening methods for the determination of AgNPs in complex biological matrices. This study describes such a method using solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A recently reported novel evaluation strategy uses the atomization delay of the respective GFAAS signal as significant indicator for AgNPs and thereby allows discrimination of AgNPs from ionic silver (Ag(+)) in the samples without elaborate sample pre-treatment. This approach was further developed and applied to a variety of biological samples. Its suitability was approved by investigation of eight different food samples (parsley, apple, pepper, cheese, onion, pasta, maize meal and wheat flour) spiked with ionic silver or AgNPs. Furthermore, the migration of AgNPs from silver-impregnated polypropylene food storage boxes to fresh pepper was observed and a mussel sample obtained from a laboratory exposure study with silver was investigated. The differences in the atomization delays (Δt(ad)) between silver ions and 20-nm AgNPs vary in a range from -2.01 ± 1.38 s for maize meal to +2.06 ± 1.08 s for mussel tissue. However, the differences were significant in all investigated matrices and so indicative of the presence/absence of AgNPs. Moreover, investigation of model matrices (cellulose, gelatine and water) gives the first indication of matrix-dependent trends. Reproducibility and homogeneity tests confirm the applicability of the method. PMID:26483187

  17. H2S Analysis in Biological Samples Using Gas Chromatography with Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a metabolite and signaling molecule in biological tissues that regulates many physiological processes. Reliable and sensitive methods for H2S analysis are necessary for a better understanding of H2S biology and for the pharmacological modulation of H2S levels in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the use of gas chromatography coupled to sulfur chemiluminescence detection to measure the rates of H2S production and degradation by tissue homogenates at physiologically relevant concentrations of substrates. This method allows separation of H2S from other sulfur compounds and provides sensitivity of detection to ~15 pg (or 0.5 pmol) of H2S per injected sample. PMID:25725519

  18. Autophagy Induction by Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide II Contributes to the Inhibition of Malignant Biological Behaviors by the Combination of EMAP II with Rapamycin in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Meng, Fanjie; Li, Shuai; Liu, Libo; Zhao, Lini; Liu, Yunhui; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhen; Yao, Yilong; Xi, Zhuo; Teng, Hao; Xue, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) on human glioblastoma (GBM) cells and glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) as well as its possible mechanisms. In this study, EMAP II inhibited the cell viability and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in human GBM cells and GSCs, and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine (3-MA) blocked these effects. Autophagic vacuoles were formed in these cells after EMAP II treatment and this phenomenon was blocked by 3-MA. In addition, the up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3)-II and the down-regulation of autophagic degraded substrate p62/SQSTM1 caused by EMAP II were observed. Cells treated with EMAP-II inhibited the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, and PI3K/Akt agonist insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) blocked the effect of EMAP II on the expression of LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1. Cells exposed to EMAP-II experienced mitophagy and ER stress. Furthermore, the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM cells and GSCs were more remarkable by the combination of EMAP II and rapamycin than either agent alone in vitro and in vivo. The current study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of EMAP II in human GBM cells and GSCs was induced by autophagy, accompanied by the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, mitophagy and ER stress. The combination of EMAP II with rapamycin demonstrated the inhibitory effect on the malignant biological behaviors of human GBM cells and GSCs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26648842

  19. Measurement of copper in biological samples by flame or electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Evenson, M A

    1988-01-01

    Guidelines presented here allow for copper analysis of biological materials by methods that are very sensitive, that require little sample preparation, that have few chemical or spectral interferences, that are inexpensive, and that require only usual care in contamination control. The commercial instruments for FAAS and ETAAS from Perkin-Elmer, from Varian, and from Instrumentation Laboratories Inc. (Allied Analytical Systems) all work well in either the flame or the flameless mode. Background correction techniques are not essential for copper analysis if care is taken with the sample preparation to minimize the background signals. Different types of burners will work adequately if one makes certain that the viscosity of the sample and the control products are similar to the calibration standards. Further, dilution of samples is preferred over increasing the viscosity of the calibration standards by the addition of a protein containing solution or a substance such as glycerol. A 1:10 dilution of blood plasma or serum with dilute nitric acid or water is all that is necessary for copper analysis by the FFAS methods. Cation and anion effects should be tested by bracketing the concentrations of the ions found in the sample with known amounts of ions in the sample solutions. Increasing the concentrations of the ions thought to interfere while keeping the copper concentration constant is another way to test for ion interferences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3374386

  20. New hybrid materials as Zn(II) sorbents in water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Quintanilla, Damian

    2010-09-15

    Mesoporous silicas have been chemically modified with 5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole (MTTZ) obtaining hybrid materials denominated MTTZ-MSU-2 and MTTZ-HMS. These materials were employed as Zn(II) sorbents from aqueous media at room temperature. The effect of several variables (stirring time, pH, presence of other metals) has been studied using batch and column techniques. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was used to determinate Zn(II) concentration in the filtrate or in the eluted solution after the adsorption process. The results indicate that under pH 8, the maximum adsorption value was 0.94 {+-} 0.01 and 0.72 {+-} 0.01 mmol Zn(II)/g for MTTZ-MSU-2 and MTTZ-HMS, respectively. In tap water samples, a preconcentration factor of 200 was obtained. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that it is possible to modify chemically MSU-2 and HMS with 5-mercapto-1-methyltetrazole and to use the resulting modified mesoporous silica as an effective adsorbent for Zn(II) in aqueous media.

  1. DSM-5 section III personality traits and section II personality disorders in a Flemish community sample.

    PubMed

    Bastiaens, Tim; Smits, Dirk; De Hert, Marc; Vanwalleghem, Dominique; Claes, Laurence

    2016-04-30

    The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger et al., 2012) is a dimensional self-report questionnaire designed to measure personality pathology according to the criterion B of the DSM-5 Section III personality model. In the current issue of DSM, this dimensional Section III personality model co-exists with the Section II categorical personality model derived from DSM-IV-TR. Therefore, investigation of the inter-relatedness of both models across populations and languages is warranted. In this study, we first examined the factor structure and reliability of the PID-5 in a Flemish community sample (N=509) by means of exploratory structural equation modeling and alpha coefficients. Next, we investigated the predictive ability of section III personality traits in relation to section II personality disorders through correlations and stepwise regression analyses. Results revealed a five factor solution for the PID-5, with adequate reliability of the facet scales. The variance in Section II personality disorders could be predicted by their theoretically comprising Section III personality traits, but additional Section III personality traits augmented this prediction. Based on current results, we discuss the Section II personality disorder conceptualization and the Section III personality disorder operationalization. PMID:27086247

  2. [Blood biological constants in the deer Rusa (Cervus timorensis russa) in New-Caledonia. II. Biological constants].

    PubMed

    Audigé, L

    1990-01-01

    Since the beginning of the year 1987, the deer "Rusa" breeding has been developing in New Caledonia. In 1988, during a slaughter operation in the herds, nearly 90 blood samples were collected in order to define the blood biological parameters (or constants) of this species. As for biochemistry, the following parameters have been search for: urea (6.8 mmol/l), creatinin rate (151.7 mmol/l), the activity of the creatin kinase (295.2 U/l), transaminase (ALAT: 60.1 UI/l; ASAT: 22.3 UI/l) and alcalin phosphatases (115.1 U/l), total bilirubin rate (2.76 mumol/l), total proteins rate (61.4 g/l) and albumin (32.6 g/l), calcium (2.42 mmol/l) and phosphorus (3.08 mmol/l). In course of the study, fluctuations of these parameters were detected, according to various criteria and to sampling conditions. PMID:2218040

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of silver nanoparticles in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiyuan; Xing, Baoshan; Hamlet, Leigh C; Chica, Andrea; He, Lili

    2016-06-01

    Growing concerns over the potential release and threat of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to environmental and biological systems urge researchers to investigate their fate and behavior. However, current analytical techniques cannot meet the requirements for rapidly, sensitively and reliably probing AgNPs in complex matrices. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has shown great capability for rapid detection of AgNPs based on an indicator molecule that can bind on the AgNP surface. The objective of this study was to exploit SERS to detect AgNPs in environmental and biological samples through optimizing the Raman indicator for SERS. Seven indicator molecules were selected and determined to obtain their SERS signals at optimal concentrations. Among them, 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene (BPE), crystal violet and ferric dimethyl-dithiocarbamate (ferbam) produced the highest SERS intensities. Further experiments on binding competition between each two of the three candidates showed that ferbam had the highest AgNPs-binding ability. The underlying mechanism lies in the strong binding affinity of ferbam with AgNPs via multiple sulfur atoms. We further validated ferbam to be an effective indicator for SERS detection of as low as 0.1mg/L AgNPs in genuine surface water and 0.57 mg/L in spinach juice. Moreover, limited interference on SERS detection of AgNPs was found from environmentally relevant inorganic ions, organic matter, inorganic particles, as well as biologically relevant components, demonstrating the ferbam-assisted SERS is an effective and sensitive method to detect AgNPs in complex environmental and biological samples. PMID:26956173

  4. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological evaluation of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with thiosemicarbazone ending by pyrazole and pyridyl rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Al-Jahdali, M.; El-Rakhawy, El-Bastawesy R.

    2014-08-01

    Here we present the synthesis of the new Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with chelating ligand (Z)-(2-((1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methylene) hydrazinyl)(pyridin-2-ylamino)methanethiol. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, UV-vis, magnetic susceptibility measurements and EPR spectral studies. IR spectra of complexes showed that the ligand behaves as NN neutral bidentate, NSN mononegative tridentate and NSNN mononegative tetradentate. The electronic spectra and the magnetic measurements suggested the octahedral geometry for all complexes as well as the EPR confirmed the tetragonal distorted octahedral for Cu(II) complex. Cd(II) complex showed the highest inhibitory antioxidant activity either using ABTS method. The SOD-like activity exhibited those Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes have strong antioxidative properties. We tested the synthesized compounds for antitumor activity and showed that the ability to kill liver (HePG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells definitely.

  5. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological evaluation of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with thiosemicarbazone ending by pyrazole and pyridyl rings.

    PubMed

    Yousef, T A; Abu El-Reash, G M; Al-Jahdali, M; El-Rakhawy, El-Bastawesy R

    2014-08-14

    Here we present the synthesis of the new Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with chelating ligand (Z)-(2-((1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methylene) hydrazinyl)(pyridin-2-ylamino)methanethiol. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1)H NMR, UV-vis, magnetic susceptibility measurements and EPR spectral studies. IR spectra of complexes showed that the ligand behaves as NN neutral bidentate, NSN mononegative tridentate and NSNN mononegative tetradentate. The electronic spectra and the magnetic measurements suggested the octahedral geometry for all complexes as well as the EPR confirmed the tetragonal distorted octahedral for Cu(II) complex. Cd(II) complex showed the highest inhibitory antioxidant activity either using ABTS method. The SOD-like activity exhibited those Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes have strong antioxidative properties. We tested the synthesized compounds for antitumor activity and showed that the ability to kill liver (HePG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells definitely. PMID:24727176

  6. Bayesian Model Comparison and Parameter Inference in Systems Biology Using Nested Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Pullen, Nick; Morris, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Inferring parameters for models of biological processes is a current challenge in systems biology, as is the related problem of comparing competing models that explain the data. In this work we apply Skilling's nested sampling to address both of these problems. Nested sampling is a Bayesian method for exploring parameter space that transforms a multi-dimensional integral to a 1D integration over likelihood space. This approach focusses on the computation of the marginal likelihood or evidence. The ratio of evidences of different models leads to the Bayes factor, which can be used for model comparison. We demonstrate how nested sampling can be used to reverse-engineer a system's behaviour whilst accounting for the uncertainty in the results. The effect of missing initial conditions of the variables as well as unknown parameters is investigated. We show how the evidence and the model ranking can change as a function of the available data. Furthermore, the addition of data from extra variables of the system can deliver more information for model comparison than increasing the data from one variable, thus providing a basis for experimental design. PMID:24523891

  7. Cellular characterization of compression induced-damage in live biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Chiara; Balzer, Jens; Hahnel, Mark; Rankin, Sara M.; Brown, Katherine A.; Proud, William G.

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the dysfunctions that high-intensity compression waves induce in human tissues is critical to impact on acute-phase treatments and requires the development of experimental models of traumatic damage in biological samples. In this study we have developed an experimental system to directly assess the impact of dynamic loading conditions on cellular function at the molecular level. Here we present a confinement chamber designed to subject live cell cultures in liquid environment to compression waves in the range of tens of MPa using a split Hopkinson pressure bars system. Recording the loading history and collecting the samples post-impact without external contamination allow the definition of parameters such as pressure and duration of the stimulus that can be related to the cellular damage. The compression experiments are conducted on Mesenchymal Stem Cells from BALB/c mice and the damage analysis are compared to two control groups. Changes in Stem cell viability, phenotype and function are assessed flow cytometry and with in vitro bioassays at two different time points. Identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the damage caused by dynamic loading in live biological samples could enable the development of new treatments for traumatic injuries.

  8. Analytical approaches for assaying metallodrugs in biological samples: recent methodological developments and future trends.

    PubMed

    Timerbaev, Andrei; Sturup, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Contemporary medicine increasingly relies on metal-based drugs and correspondingly growing in importance is the monitoring of the drugs and their metabolites in biological samples. Over the last decade, a range of analytical techniques have been developed in order to improve administration strategies for clinically approved compounds and understand pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and metabolism of new drugs so as ultimately to make their clinical development more effective. This paper gives an overview of various separation and detection methods, as well as common sample preparation strategies, currently in use to achieve the intended goals. The critical discussion of existing analytical technologies encompasses notably their detection capability, ability to handle biological matrices with minimum pretreatment, sample throughput, and cost efficiency. The main attention is devoted to those applications that are progressed to real-world biosamples and selected examples are given to illustrate the overall performance and applicability of advanced analytical systems. Also emphasized is the emerging role of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), both as a standalone instrument (for determination of metals originating from drug compounds) and as an element-specific detector in combinations with liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis (for drug metabolism studies). An increasing number of academic laboratories are using ICP-MS technology today, and this review will focus on the analytical possibilities of ICP-MS which would before long provide the method with the greatest impact on the clinical laboratory. PMID:21838702

  9. Bayesian model comparison and parameter inference in systems biology using nested sampling.

    PubMed

    Pullen, Nick; Morris, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Inferring parameters for models of biological processes is a current challenge in systems biology, as is the related problem of comparing competing models that explain the data. In this work we apply Skilling's nested sampling to address both of these problems. Nested sampling is a Bayesian method for exploring parameter space that transforms a multi-dimensional integral to a 1D integration over likelihood space. This approach focuses on the computation of the marginal likelihood or evidence. The ratio of evidences of different models leads to the Bayes factor, which can be used for model comparison. We demonstrate how nested sampling can be used to reverse-engineer a system's behaviour whilst accounting for the uncertainty in the results. The effect of missing initial conditions of the variables as well as unknown parameters is investigated. We show how the evidence and the model ranking can change as a function of the available data. Furthermore, the addition of data from extra variables of the system can deliver more information for model comparison than increasing the data from one variable, thus providing a basis for experimental design. PMID:24523891

  10. Dithizone modified magnetic nanoparticles for fast and selective solid phase extraction of trace elements in environmental and biological samples prior to their determination by ICP-OES.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guihong; He, Man; Peng, Hanyong; Hu, Bin

    2012-01-15

    A fast and simple method for analysis of trace amounts of Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) in environmental and biological samples was developed by combining magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) detection. Dithizone modified silica-coated magnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (H(2)Dz-SCMNPs) were prepared and used for MSPE of trace amounts of Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The prepared magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The factors affecting the extraction of the target metal ions such as pH, sample volume, eluent, and interfering ions had been investigated and the adsorption mechanism of the target metals on the self-prepared H(2)Dz-SCMNPs was investigated by FT-IR and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS). Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of the developed method for Cr(III), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) were 35, 11, 62, and 8ngL(-1), respectively, with the enrichment factor of 100. The relative standard deviations (RSDs, c=10μgL(-1), n=7) were in the range of 1.7-3.1% and the linear range was 0.1-100μgL(-1). The proposed method had been validated by two certified reference materials (GSBZ50009-88 environmental water and GBW07601 human hair), and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. The method was also applied for the determination of trace metals in real water and human hair samples with recoveries in the range of 85-110% for the spiked samples. The developed MSPE-ICP-OES method has the advantages of simplicity, rapidity, selectivity, high extraction efficiency and is suitable for the analysis of samples with large volume and complex matrix. PMID:22265534

  11. 3D nanoscale imaging of biological samples with laboratory-based soft X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehlinger, Aurélie; Blechschmidt, Anne; Grötzsch, Daniel; Jung, Robert; Kanngießer, Birgit; Seim, Christian; Stiel, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In microscopy, where the theoretical resolution limit depends on the wavelength of the probing light, radiation in the soft X-ray regime can be used to analyze samples that cannot be resolved with visible light microscopes. In the case of soft X-ray microscopy in the water-window, the energy range of the radiation lies between the absorption edges of carbon (at 284 eV, 4.36 nm) and oxygen (543 eV, 2.34 nm). As a result, carbon-based structures, such as biological samples, posses a strong absorption, whereas e.g. water is more transparent to this radiation. Microscopy in the water-window, therefore, allows the structural investigation of aqueous samples with resolutions of a few tens of nanometers and a penetration depth of up to 10μm. The development of highly brilliant laser-produced plasma-sources has enabled the transfer of Xray microscopy, that was formerly bound to synchrotron sources, to the laboratory, which opens the access of this method to a broader scientific community. The Laboratory Transmission X-ray Microscope at the Berlin Laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies (BLiX) runs with a laser produced nitrogen plasma that emits radiation in the soft X-ray regime. The mentioned high penetration depth can be exploited to analyze biological samples in their natural state and with several projection angles. The obtained tomogram is the key to a more precise and global analysis of samples originating from various fields of life science.

  12. Quantitative LC-MS/MS Glycomic Analysis of Biological Samples Using AminoxyTMT.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiyue; Hu, Yunli; Veillon, Lucas; Snovida, Sergei I; Rogers, John C; Saba, Julian; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-08-01

    Protein glycosylation plays an important role in various biological processes, such as modification of protein function, regulation of protein-protein interactions, and control of turnover rates of proteins. Moreover, glycans have been considered as potential biomarkers for many mammalian diseases and development of aberrant glycosylation profiles is an important indicator of the pathology of a disease or cancer. Hence, quantitation is an important aspect of a comprehensive glycomics study. Although numerous MS-based quantitation strategies have been developed in the past several decades, some issues affecting sensitivity and accuracy of quantitation still exist, and the development of more effective quantitation strategies is still required. Aminoxy tandem mass tag (aminoxyTMT) reagents are recently commercialized isobaric tags which enable relative quantitation of up to six different glycan samples simultaneously. In this study, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry conditions have been optimized to achieve reliable LC-MS/MS quantitative glycomic analysis using aminoxyTMT reagents. Samples were resuspended in 0.2 M sodium chloride solution to promote the formation of sodium adduct precursor ions, which leads to higher MS/MS reporter ion yields. This method was first evaluated with glycans from model glycoproteins and pooled human blood serum samples. The observed variation of reporter ion ratios was generally less than 10% relative to the theoretical ratio. Even for the highly complex minor N-glycans, the variation was still below 15%. This strategy was further applied to the glycomic profiling of N-glycans released from blood serum samples of patients with different esophageal diseases. Our results demonstrate the benefits of utilizing aminoxyTMT reagents for reliable quantitation of biological glycomic samples. PMID:27377957

  13. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, A.; Watson, S.; Griffiths, H.; Patz, R.

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode-sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50-400 g l-1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m-1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m-1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality.

  14. High resolution x-ray microtomography of biological samples: Requirements and strategies for satisfying them

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W. Jr. ||; Rothman, S.S. |

    1997-02-01

    High resolution x-ray microscopy has been made possible in recent years primarily by two new technologies: microfabricated diffractive lenses for soft x-rays with about 30-50 nm resolution, and high brightness synchrotron x-ray sources. X-ray microscopy occupies a special niche in the array of biological microscopic imaging methods. It extends the capabilities of existing techniques mainly in two areas: a previously unachievable combination of sub-visible resolution and multi-micrometer sample size, and new contrast mechanisms. Because of the soft x-ray wavelengths used in biological imaging (about 1-4 nm), XM is intermediate in resolution between visible light and electron microscopies. Similarly, the penetration depth of soft x-rays in biological materials is such that the ideal sample thickness for XM falls in the range of 0.25 - 10 {mu}m, between that of VLM and EM. XM is therefore valuable for imaging of intermediate level ultrastructure, requiring sub-visible resolutions, in intact cells and subcellular organelles, without artifacts produced by thin sectioning. Many of the contrast producing and sample preparation techniques developed for VLM and EM also work well with XM. These include, for example, molecule specific staining by antibodies with heavy metal or fluorescent labels attached, and sectioning of both frozen and plastic embedded tissue. However, there is also a contrast mechanism unique to XM that exists naturally because a number of elemental absorption edges lie in the wavelength range used. In particular, between the oxygen and carbon absorption edges (2.3 and 4.4 nm wavelength), organic molecules absorb photons much more strongly than does water, permitting element-specific imaging of cellular structure in aqueous media, with no artifically introduced contrast agents. For three-dimensional imaging applications requiring the capabilities of XM, an obvious extension of the technique would therefore be computerized x-ray microtomography (XMT).

  15. Flow Injection Potentiometric Assay of Hexoprenaline in Its Pure State, Pharmaceutical Preparations, and Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    El-Nashar, Rasha M.

    2008-01-01

    Different hexoprenaline (Hx2SO4) conventional and coated wire electrodes were constructed and evaluated. Membranes were based on hexoprenalinium phosphotungstate (Hx-PTA) and hexporenalinium phosphomolybdate (Hx-PMA). The electrodes were fully characterized in terms of their composition, response time, life span, pH, and temperature and then were applied to the potentiometric determination of the hexoprenalinium ion in its pure state, pharmaceutical preparations, and biological samples, urine and plasma, under batch and flow injection conditions. The selectivity of the electrodes towards many inorganic cations, sugars, amino acids, and some other brochodilatures of close chemical composition was also tested. PMID:18483573

  16. On the Applications of IBA Techniques to Biological Samples Analysis: PIXE and RBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón-González, J. M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; García-León, M.; García-Tenorio, R.; García, Y. Morilla; Sosa, M.

    2008-08-01

    The analytical techniques based on ion beams or IBA techniques give quantitative information on elemental concentration in samples of a wide variety of nature. In this work, we focus on PIXE technique, analyzing thick target biological specimens (TTPIXE), using 3 MeV protons produced by an electrostatic accelerator. A nuclear microprobe was used performing PIXE and RBS simultaneously, in order to solve the uncertainties produced in the absolute PIXE quantifying. The advantages of using both techniques and a nuclear microprobe are discussed. Quantitative results are shown to illustrate the multielemental resolution of the PIXE technique; for this, a blood standard was used.

  17. Non-destructive high-resolution thermal imaging techniques to evaluate wildlife and delicate biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, C.; Franklin, P.; Franklin, P.; Plowman, A.; Sayers, G.; Bol, J.; Shepard, D.; Fields, D.

    2009-07-01

    Thermal imaging cameras now allows routine monitoring of dangerous yet endangered wildlife in captivity. This study looks at the potential applications of radiometrically calibrated thermal data to wildlife, as well as providing parameters for future materials applications. We present a non-destructive active testing technique suitable for enhancing imagery contrast of thin or delicate biological specimens yielding improved thermal contrast at room temperature, for analysis of sample thermal properties. A broad spectrum of animals is studied with different textured surfaces, reflective and emissive properties in the infra red part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Some surface features offer biomimetic materials design opportunities.

  18. Chlorinated and brominated persistent organic compounds in biological samples from the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, B.; Andersson, R.; Asplund, L.; Litzen, K.; Nylund, K.; Sellstroem, U.; Uvemo, U.; Wahlberg, C.; Wideqvist, U. . Inst. of Applied Environmental Research); Odsjoe, T.; Olsson, M. . Section for Vertebrate Zoology)

    1993-07-01

    Eleven selected biological samples representing different ecosystems, trophic levels, and areas mainly in Sweden have been analyzed for 31 halogenated organic compounds or compound groups. The multiresidue analytical method provides a good opportunity to compare the concentrations of the different compounds in the investigated samples. By the use of ratios of these concentrations, comparisons can be done between species and areas. An attempt to describe an environmental distribution profile is demonstrated for some of the compounds using the concentration ratio between these compounds and 2,2[prime],4,4[prime],5,5[prime]-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153). Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) were found in all samples and in some of them at higher concentrations than the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The ratio of CP to PCB 153 is higher in the investigated terrestrial species than in the aquatic, which is not the case for the other compounds. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers were also found in all but one sample. The concentrations were highest in industrialized areas but were also present in samples from background areas. Seven major cogeners of PCBs were determined; the sum ranged from 50 to 200,000 ng/g lw in the investigated samples. Three coplanar PCB congeners were also analyzed as well as polychlorinated naphthalenes, which were found at levels between 0.038 and 50 ng/g lw. The latter two groups do not seem to biomagnify in the foot chain of herring to grey seal to the same extent as the major PCB compounds. Pentachlorobenzene was found in only three of the samples, whereas hexachlorobenzene was present in all samples.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, electrochemical and biological studies on some metal(II) Schiff base complexes containing quinoxaline moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justin Dhanaraj, Chellaian; Johnson, Jijo

    2014-01-01

    Novel Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of Schiff base derived from quinoxaline-2,3-(1,4H)-dione and 4-aminoantipyrine (QDAAP) were synthesized. The ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, FTIR, UV-Vis., mass and 1H NMR spectral studies. The X band ESR spectrum of the Cu(II) complex at 300 and 77 K were also recorded. Thermal studies of the ligand and its complexes show the presence of coordinated water in the Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes. The coordination behavior of QDAAP is also discussed. All the complexes are mono nuclear and tetrahedral geometry was found for Co(II) complex. For the Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes, octahedral geometry was assigned and for the Cu(II) complex, square planar geometry has been suggested. The grain size of the complexes was estimated using powder XRD. The surface morphology of the compounds was studied using SEM analysis. Electrochemical behavior of the synthesized complexes in DMF at room temperature was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The in vitro biological screening of QDAAP and its metal complexes were tested against bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The fungal species include Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans. The DNA cleavage activity of QDAAP and its complexes were also discussed.

  20. Evaluation of chemical and biological methods for the identification of mutagenic and cytotoxic hazardous waste samples

    SciTech Connect

    Andon, B.; Jackson, M.; Houk, V.; Claxton, L.

    1984-06-01

    To assist in the development of methods for identifying potentially hazardous wastes, the authors have conducted studies on the extraction of toxicants from several solid waste samples. The extracts were tested for toxicity in the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cytotoxicity Test and for mutagenic potential in the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay. A new technique was also employed which measured the mutagenicity of neat waste samples by coupling Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) with the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay. The wastes selected for study were coke plant waste, herbicide manufacturing acetone-water effluent, and oil refining waste. Three extraction solvents, ethanol (ETOH), dichloromethane (DCM), and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), were chosen based on their solubility and compatibility with bioassay procedures. Each sample was divided into three parts and extracted with each of the three solvents separately. All extracts were tested in the Salmonella assay at five dose levels with five Ames tester strains in the presence and in the absence of an exogenous metabolizing system. DMSO and DCM extracts were utilized for CHO cytotoxicity evaluations. The three neat waste samples and two extracts were assayed with the TLC technique. In addition to the biological assessments, the gross chemical parameters for each sample were determined. Results showed that coke plant waste and herbicide mfg. acetone-water were mutagenic to S. typhimurium with the standard plate test. With the TLC technique, the neat coke plant waste was mutagenic and oil refining waste was toxic. Oil refining waste was also toxic to CHO cells.

  1. Combined LIBS-Raman for remote detection and characterization of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Aaron S.; Mukundan, Harshini; McInroy, Rhonda E.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-03-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman Spectroscopy have rich histories in the analysis of a wide variety of samples in both in situ and remote configurations. Our team is working on building a deployable, integrated Raman and LIBS spectrometer (RLS) for the parallel elucidation of elemental and molecular signatures under Earth and Martian surface conditions. Herein, results from remote LIBS and Raman analysis of biological samples such as amino acids, small peptides, mono- and disaccharides, and nucleic acids acquired under terrestrial and Mars conditions are reported, giving rise to some interesting differences. A library of spectra and peaks of interest were compiled, and will be used to inform the analysis of more complex systems, such as large peptides, dried bacterial spores, and biofilms. These results will be presented and future applications will be discussed, including the assembly of a combined RLS spectroscopic system and stand-off detection in a variety of environments.

  2. Multi-target screening of biological samples using LC-MS/MS: focus on chromatographic innovations.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Isabelle; Guillarme, Davy

    2014-05-01

    Multi-target screening of biological fluids is a key tool in clinical and forensic toxicology. A complete toxicological analysis encompasses the sample preparation, the chromatographic separation and the detection. The present review briefly covers the new trends in sample preparation and detection and mainly focuses on the chromatographic stage, since a lot of technical improvements have been proposed over the last years. Among them, columns packed with sub-2 μm fully porous particles and sub-3 μm core-shell particles allow for significant improvements of resolution and higher throughput. Even if reversed-phase LC remains the most widely used chromatographic mode for toxicological screening, hydrophilic interaction chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography appear as promising alternatives for attaining orthogonal selectivity, retention of polar compounds, and enhanced MS sensitivity. PMID:24946925

  3. Comparison of different sample and target preparation procedures for PIXE analysis of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, W.; De Reu, L.; Vandenhaute, J.

    1984-04-01

    Four different methods for preparing PIXE targets from biological samples were compared. All methods involved doping with an internal standard and preparing target deposits of 1-4 mg/cm 2 on a thin substrate. In method A targets were prepared using powdered freeze-dried material. Methods B and C both included a low temperature ashing preconcentration step and method D involved an acid digestion in a teflon bomb. The procedures were applied to reference materials (e.g. NBS standards) and to "real" samples such as human kidneys and a liver, which had been analyzed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). For most elements good agreement was observed between the results of the four target preparation methods and the reference values or the NAA results. Exceptions, however, were Br, Se and Cd, which were lost in some methods. The detection limits in the different methods are compared.

  4. An efficient and sensitive method for preparing cDNA libraries from scarce biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Catherine H.; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Ambros, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The preparation and high-throughput sequencing of cDNA libraries from samples of small RNA is a powerful tool to quantify known small RNAs (such as microRNAs) and to discover novel RNA species. Interest in identifying the small RNA repertoire present in tissues and in biofluids has grown substantially with the findings that small RNAs can serve as indicators of biological conditions and disease states. Here we describe a novel and straightforward method to clone cDNA libraries from small quantities of input RNA. This method permits the generation of cDNA libraries from sub-picogram quantities of RNA robustly, efficiently and reproducibly. We demonstrate that the method provides a significant improvement in sensitivity compared to previous cloning methods while maintaining reproducible identification of diverse small RNA species. This method should have widespread applications in a variety of contexts, including biomarker discovery from scarce samples of human tissue or body fluids. PMID:25056322

  5. Fiber laser-microscope system for femtosecond photodisruption of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Yavaş, Seydi; Erdogan, Mutlu; Gürel, Kutan; Ilday, F. Ömer; Eldeniz, Y. Burak; Tazebay, Uygar H.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development of a ultrafast fiber laser-microscope system for femtosecond photodisruption of biological targets. A mode-locked Yb-fiber laser oscillator generates few-nJ pulses at 32.7 MHz repetition rate, amplified up to ∼125 nJ at 1030 nm. Following dechirping in a grating compressor, ∼240 fs-long pulses are delivered to the sample through a diffraction-limited microscope, which allows real-time imaging and control. The laser can generate arbitrary pulse patterns, formed by two acousto-optic modulators (AOM) controlled by a custom-developed field-programmable gate array (FPGA) controller. This capability opens the route to fine optimization of the ablation processes and management of thermal effects. Sample position, exposure time and imaging are all computerized. The capability of the system to perform femtosecond photodisruption is demonstrated through experiments on tissue and individual cells. PMID:22435105

  6. Combined LIBS-Raman for remote detection and characterization of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Aaron S.; Mukundan, Harshini; Mcinroy, Rhonda E.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-02-07

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman Spectroscopy have rich histories in the analysis of a wide variety of samples in both in situ and remote configurations. Our team is working on building a deployable, integrated Raman and LIBS spectrometer (RLS) for the parallel elucidation of elemental and molecular signatures under Earth and Martian surface conditions. Herein, results from remote LIBS and Raman analysis of biological samples such as amino acids, small peptides, mono- and disaccharides, and nucleic acids acquired under terrestrial and Mars conditions are reported, giving rise to some interesting differences. A library of spectra and peaks of interest were compiled, and will be used to inform the analysis of more complex systems, such as large peptides, dried bacterial spores, and biofilms. Lastly, these results will be presented and future applications will be discussed, including the assembly of a combined RLS spectroscopic system and stand-off detection in a variety of environments.

  7. Combined LIBS-Raman for remote detection and characterization of biological samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Aaron S.; Mukundan, Harshini; Mcinroy, Rhonda E.; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-02-07

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman Spectroscopy have rich histories in the analysis of a wide variety of samples in both in situ and remote configurations. Our team is working on building a deployable, integrated Raman and LIBS spectrometer (RLS) for the parallel elucidation of elemental and molecular signatures under Earth and Martian surface conditions. Herein, results from remote LIBS and Raman analysis of biological samples such as amino acids, small peptides, mono- and disaccharides, and nucleic acids acquired under terrestrial and Mars conditions are reported, giving rise to some interesting differences. A library of spectra and peaks of interestmore » were compiled, and will be used to inform the analysis of more complex systems, such as large peptides, dried bacterial spores, and biofilms. Lastly, these results will be presented and future applications will be discussed, including the assembly of a combined RLS spectroscopic system and stand-off detection in a variety of environments.« less

  8. Analytical Methodologies for the Determination of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Biological and Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Mahugo-Santana, Cristina; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine-disruptor compounds (EDCs) can mimic natural hormones and produce adverse effects in the endocrine functions by interacting with estrogen receptors. EDCs include both natural and synthetic chemicals, such as hormones, personal care products, surfactants, and flame retardants, among others. EDCs are characterised by their ubiquitous presence at trace-level concentrations and their wide diversity. Since the discovery of the adverse effects of these pollutants on wildlife and human health, analytical methods have been developed for their qualitative and quantitative determination. In particular, mass-based analytical methods show excellent sensitivity and precision for their quantification. This paper reviews recently published analytical methodologies for the sample preparation and for the determination of these compounds in different environmental and biological matrices by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The various sample preparation techniques are compared and discussed. In addition, recent developments and advances in this field are presented. PMID:23738329

  9. An introduction to sample preparation and imaging by cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Rebecca F; Walker, Matt; Siebert, C Alistair; Muench, Stephen P; Ranson, Neil A

    2016-05-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (EM) is a versatile technique that can be used to image biological specimens ranging from intact eukaryotic cells to individual proteins >150kDa. There are several strategies for preparing samples for imaging by EM, including negative staining and cryogenic freezing. In the last few years, cryo-EM has undergone a 'resolution revolution', owing to both advances in imaging hardware, image processing software, and improvements in sample preparation, leading to growing number of researchers using cryo-EM as a research tool. However, cryo-EM is still a rapidly growing field, with unique challenges. Here, we summarise considerations for imaging of a range of specimens from macromolecular complexes to cells using EM. PMID:26931652

  10. An introduction to sample preparation and imaging by cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Rebecca F.; Walker, Matt; Siebert, C. Alistair; Muench, Stephen P.; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (EM) is a versatile technique that can be used to image biological specimens ranging from intact eukaryotic cells to individual proteins >150 kDa. There are several strategies for preparing samples for imaging by EM, including negative staining and cryogenic freezing. In the last few years, cryo-EM has undergone a ‘resolution revolution’, owing to both advances in imaging hardware, image processing software, and improvements in sample preparation, leading to growing number of researchers using cryo-EM as a research tool. However, cryo-EM is still a rapidly growing field, with unique challenges. Here, we summarise considerations for imaging of a range of specimens from macromolecular complexes to cells using EM. PMID:26931652

  11. Rh2(CF3CONH)4: The First Biological Assays of a Rhodium (II) Amidate

    PubMed Central

    Zyngier, Szulim Ber; de Souza, Aparecido Ribeiro; Najjar, Renato

    1997-01-01

    The rhodium (II) complexes Rh2(tfa)4.2(tfac) and Rh2(tfacam)4 (tfacam = CF3CONH-,tfa = CF3COO-,tfac = CF3CONH2) were synthesized and characterized by microanalysis and electronic and vibrational spectroscopies. Rh2(tfacam)4 was tested both in vitro (U937 and K562 human leukemia cells and Ehrlich ascitic tumor cells) and in vivo for cytostatic activity and lethal dose determination, respectively. This is the first rhodium tetra-amidate to have its biological activity evaluated. The LD50 value for Rh2(tfacam)4 is of the same order as that of cisplatin, and it was verified that the rhodium complex usually needs lower doses than cisplatin to promote the same inhibitory effects. PMID:18475814

  12. Quantification of malondialdehyde by HPLC-FL - application to various biological samples.

    PubMed

    Domijan, Ana-Marija; Ralić, Jovica; Radić Brkanac, Sandra; Rumora, Lada; Žanić-Grubišić, Tihana

    2015-01-01

    Malondialdehyde (MDA) is stabile product of lipid peroxidation (LPO), and therefore MDA is frequently used as a biomarker of LPO. To determine MDA level in various biological samples (human plasma, fish liver tissue and cells in culture), we used an HPLC method with fluorescent detection based on 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay. The method was validated by the use of spiked pooled plasma samples. In tested concentration range (0.15-3.0 µmol/L) the method was linear (R(2)  = 0.9963), the between-day variability (coefficient of variations, CVs) was between 4.7 and 7.6%, the within-day variability CVs was between 2.6 and 6.4% and recovery was between 91.2 and 107.6%. The level of MDA in human plasma (healthy male, non-smokers, 46.3 ± 4.7 years; N = 38) was 2.2 ± 1.4 µmol/L; that in liver tissue of common carp (Cyprinus carpio; N = 12) was 0.02 ± 0.004 µmol/g tissue, and in cultured cells (human laryngeal carcinoma cells; N = 10) it was 0.18 ± 0.02 nmol/mg proteins. The HPLC-FL method is rapid, accurate and reliable to follow the extent of LPO in various biological samples, particularly in samples in which a low level of MDA is expected, such as cells in culture. Owing to the rapid analytical process and run time, it can be used for routine analysis of MDA in clinical laboratory. PMID:25355691

  13. Respondent driven sampling for HIV biological and behavioral surveillance in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Jane R; Johnston, Lisa G; Murrill, Christopher; Monterroso, Edgar

    2013-09-01

    Since 2005, respondent driven sampling (RDS) has been widely used for HIV biological and behavioral surveillance surveys (BBSS) in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). In this manuscript, we provide a focused review of RDS among hard-to-reach high-risk populations in LAC and describe their principal operational, design, and analytical considerations. We reviewed published and unpublished reports, protocols, and manuscripts for RDS studies conducted in LAC between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. We abstracted key operational information and generated summary statistics across all studies. Between 2005 and 2011, 87 RDS studies were conducted in 15 countries in LAC (68 % in South America, 18 % in Mexico and Central America, and 14 % in the Caribbean). The target populations were primarily men who have sex with men (43 %), sex workers (29 %), and drug users (26 %). Study considerations included establishing clear eligibility criteria, measuring social network sizes, collecting specimens for biological testing, among others. Most of the reviewed studies are the first in their respective countries to collect data on hard-to-reach populations and the first attempt to use a probability-based sampling method. These RDS studies allowed researchers and public health practitioners in LAC to access hard-to-reach HIV high-risk populations and collect valuable data on the prevalence of HIV and other infections, as well as related risk behaviors. PMID:23568227

  14. Mass-spectrometric profiling of porphyrins in complex biological samples with fundamental, toxicological, and pharmacological applications

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Sarah A.; Streit, Bennett R.; Ferguson, Ethan L.; Jean, Paul A.; McNett, Debra A.; Llames, Louis T.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid, high-throughput, and quantitative evaluations of biological metabolites in complex milieu are increasingly required for biochemical, toxicological, pharmacological, and environmental analyses. They are also essential for the development, testing, and improvement of new commercial chemical products. We demonstrate the application of ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (uHPLC-MS), employing an electrospray ionization source and a high accuracy quadrupole time-of-flight mass analyzer, for the identification and quantification of a series of porphyrin derivatives in liver: a matrix of particular relevance in toxicological or pharmacological testing. Exact mass is used to identify and quantify the metabolites. Chromatography enhances sensitivity and alleviates potential saturation issues by fanning out the contents of a complex sample before their injection into the spectrometer, but is not strictly necessary for the analysis. Extraction and sample treatment procedures are evaluated and matrix effects discussed. Using this method, the known mechanism of action of a well-characterized porphyrinogenic agent was verified in liver extracts from treated rats. The method was also validated for use with bacterial cells. This exact-mass method uses workhorse instruments available in many laboratories, providing a highly flexible alternative to existing HPLC- and MS/MS-based approaches for the simultaneous analysis of multiple compounds in biological media. PMID:25769421

  15. Mass-spectrometric profiling of porphyrins in complex biological samples with fundamental, toxicological, and pharmacological applications.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Sarah A; Streit, Bennett R; Ferguson, Ethan L; Jean, Paul A; McNett, Debra A; Llames, Louis T; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    Rapid, high-throughput, and quantitative evaluations of biological metabolites in complex milieu are increasingly required for biochemical, toxicological, pharmacological, and environmental analyses. They are also essential for the development, testing, and improvement of new commercial chemical products. We demonstrate the application of ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (uHPLC-MS), employing an electrospray ionization source and a high accuracy quadrupole time-of-flight mass analyzer, for the identification and quantification of a series of porphyrin derivatives in liver: a matrix of particular relevance in toxicological or pharmacological testing. Exact mass is used to identify and quantify the metabolites. Chromatography enhances sensitivity and alleviates potential saturation issues by fanning out the contents of a complex sample before their injection into the spectrometer, but is not strictly necessary for the analysis. Extraction and sample treatment procedures are evaluated and matrix effects discussed. Using this method, the known mechanism of action of a well-characterized porphyrinogenic agent was verified in liver extracts from treated rats. The method was also validated for use with bacterial cells. This exact-mass method uses workhorse instruments available in many laboratories, providing a highly flexible alternative to existing HPLC- and MS/MS-based approaches for the simultaneous analysis of multiple compounds in biological media. PMID:25769421

  16. Preparation of chitosan grafted graphite composite for sensitive detection of dopamine in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Selvakumar; Thangavelu, Kokulnathan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Gnanaprakasam, P; Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2016-10-20

    The accurate detection of dopamine (DA) levels in biological samples such as human serum and urine are essential indicators in medical diagnostics. In this work, we describe the preparation of chitosan (CS) biopolymer grafted graphite (GR) composite for the sensitive and lower potential detection of DA in its sub micromolar levels. The composite modified electrode has been used for the detection of DA in biological samples such as human serum and urine. The GR-CS composite modified electrode shows an enhanced oxidation peak current response and low oxidation potential for the detection of DA than that of electrodes modified with bare, GR and CS discretely. Under optimum conditions, the fabricated GR-CS composite modified electrode shows the DPV response of DA in the linear response ranging from 0.03 to 20.06μM. The detection limit and sensitivity of the sensor were estimated as 0.0045μM and 6.06μA μM(-1)cm(-2), respectively. PMID:27474582

  17. A comparison of quantitative reconstruction techniques for PIXE-tomography analysis applied to biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, D. G.; Alves, L. C.; Barberet, Ph.; Bourret, S.; Devès, G.; Gordillo, N.; Michelet, C.; Le Trequesser, Q.; Marques, A. C.; Seznec, H.; da Silva, R. C.

    2014-07-01

    The tomographic reconstruction of biological specimens requires robust algorithms, able to deal with low density contrast and low element concentrations. At the IST/ITN microprobe facility new GPU-accelerated reconstruction software, JPIXET, has been developed, which can significantly increase the speed of quantitative reconstruction of Proton Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) data. It has a user-friendly graphical user interface for pre-processing, data analysis and reconstruction of PIXE-T and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T). The reconstruction of PIXE-T data is performed using either an algorithm based on a GPU-accelerated version of the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximisation (MLEM) method or a GPU-accelerated version of the Discrete Image Space Reconstruction Algorithm (DISRA) (Sakellariou (2001) [2]). The original DISRA, its accelerated version, and the MLEM algorithm, were compared for the reconstruction of a biological sample of Caenorhabditis elegans - a small worm. This sample was analysed at the microbeam line of the AIFIRA facility of CENBG, Bordeaux. A qualitative PIXE-T reconstruction was obtained using the CENBG software package TomoRebuild (Habchi et al. (2013) [6]). The effects of pre-processing and experimental conditions on the elemental concentrations are discussed.

  18. Wavelet data processing of micro-Raman spectra of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerlingo, C.; Zenone, F.; Gaeta, G. M.; Riccio, R.; Lepore, M.

    2006-02-01

    A wavelet multi-component decomposition algorithm is proposed for processing data from micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) of biological tissue. The μ-RS has been recently recognized as a promising tool for the biopsy test and in vivo diagnosis of degenerative human tissue pathologies, due to the high chemical and structural information contents of this spectroscopic technique. However, measurements of biological tissues are usually hampered by typically low-level signals and by the presence of noise and background components caused by light diffusion or fluorescence processes. In order to overcome these problems, a numerical method based on discrete wavelet transform is used for the analysis of data from μ-RS measurements performed in vitro on animal (pig and chicken) tissue samples and, in a preliminary form, on human skin and oral tissue biopsy from normal subjects. Visible light μ-RS was performed using a He-Ne laser and a monochromator with a liquid nitrogen cooled charge coupled device equipped with a grating of 1800 grooves mm-1. The validity of the proposed data procedure has been tested on the well-characterized Raman spectra of reference acetylsalicylic acid samples.

  19. Automated AFM force curve analysis for determining elastic modulus of biomaterials and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yow-Ren; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Garland, Shaun P; Morgan, Joshua T; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J

    2014-09-01

    The analysis of atomic force microscopy (AFM) force data requires the selection of a contact point (CP) and is often time consuming and subjective due to influence from intermolecular forces and low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). In this report, we present an automated algorithm for the selection of CPs in AFM force data and the evaluation of elastic moduli. We propose that CP may be algorithmically easier to detect by identifying a linear elastic indentation region of data (high SNR) rather than the contact point itself (low SNR). Utilizing Hertzian mechanics, the data are fitted for the CP. We first detail the algorithm and then evaluate it on sample polymeric and biological materials. As a demonstration of automation, 64 × 64 force maps were analyzed to yield spatially varying topographical and mechanical information of cells. Finally, we compared manually selected CPs to automatically identified CPs and demonstrated that our automated approach is both accurate (< 10nm difference between manual and automatic) and precise for non-interacting polymeric materials. Our data show that the algorithm is useful for analysis of both biomaterials and biological samples. PMID:24951927

  20. Characterization of α-Synuclein Multimer Stoichiometry in Complex Biological Samples by Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Killinger, Bryan A; Moszczynska, Anna

    2016-04-01

    The aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein in the brain is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). In vivo soluble α-synuclein occurs as a monomer and several multimers, the latter of which may be important for the biological function of α-synuclein. Currently, there is a lack of reproducible methods to compare α-synuclein multimer abundance between complex biological samples. Here we developed a method, termed "multimer-PAGE," that combines in-gel chemical cross-linking with several common electrophoretic techniques to measure the stoichiometry of soluble α-synuclein multimers in brain tissue lysates. Results show that soluble α-synuclein from the rat brain exists as several high molecular weight species of approximately 56 kDa (αS56), 80 kDa (αS80), and 100 kDa (αS100) that comigrate with endogenous lipids, detergents, and/or micelles during blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Co-extraction of endogenous lipids with α-synuclein was essential for the detection of soluble α-synuclein multimers. Homogenization of brain tissue in small buffer volumes (>50 mg tissue per 1 mL buffer) increased relative lipid extraction and subsequently resulted in abundant soluble multimer detection via multimer-PAGE. α-Synuclein multimers captured by directly cross-linking soluble lysates resembled those observed following multimer-PAGE. The ratio of multimer (αS80) to monomer (αS17) increased linearly with protein input into multimer-PAGE, suggesting to some extent, multimers were also formed during electrophoresis. Overall, soluble α-synuclein maintains lipid interactions following tissue disruption and readily forms multimers when this lipid-protein complex is preserved. Once the multimer-PAGE technique was validated, relative stoichiometric comparisons could be conducted simultaneously between 14 biological samples. Multimer-PAGE provides a simple inexpensive biochemical technique to study the molecular factors influencing α-synuclein multimerization. PMID

  1. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction.

    PubMed

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz

    2006-11-01

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 mug g(-1) and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. PMID:16896613

  2. Label-free three dimensional reconstruction of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of spatially incoherent illumination combined with quantitative phase imaging (QPI) [1] to make tridimensional reconstruction of semi-transparent biological samples. Quantitative phase imaging is commonly used with coherent illumination for the relatively simple interpretation of the phase measurement. We propose to use spatially incoherent illumination which is known to increase lateral and axial resolution compared to classical coherent illumination. The goal is to image thick samples with intracellular resolution [2]. The 3D volume is imaged by axially scanning the sample with a quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer used as a conventional camera while using spatially incoherent white-light illumination (native microscope halogen source) or NIR light. We use a non-modified inverted microscope equipped with a Z-axis piezo stage. A z-stack is recorded by objective translation along the optical axis. The main advantages of this approach are its easy implementation, compared to the other state-of-the-art diffraction tomographic setups, and its speed which makes even label-free 3D living sample imaging possible. A deconvolution algorithm is used to compensate for the loss in contrast due to spatially incoherent illumination. This makes the tomographic volume phase values quantitative. Hence refractive index could be recovered from the optical slices. We will present tomographic reconstruction of cells, thick fixed tissue of few tens of micrometers using white light, and the use of NIR light to reach deeper planes in the tissue.

  3. Label-free three-dimensional reconstruction of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of spatially incoherent illumination combined with quantitative phase imaging (QPI) [1] to make tridimensional reconstruction of semi-transparent biological samples. Quantitative phase imaging is commonly used with coherent illumination for the relatively simple interpretation of the phase measurement. We propose to use spatially incoherent illumination which is known to increase lateral and axial resolution compared to classical coherent illumination. The goal is to image thick samples with intracellular resolution [2]. The 3D volume is imaged by axially scanning the sample with a quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer used as a conventional camera while using spatially incoherent white-light illumination (native microscope halogen source) or NIR light. We use a non-modified inverted microscope equipped with a Z-axis piezo stage. A z-stack is recorded by objective translation along the optical axis. The main advantages of this approach are its easy implementation, compared to the other state-of-the-art diffraction tomographic setups, and its speed which makes even label-free 3D living sample imaging possible. A deconvolution algorithm is used to compensate for the loss in contrast due to spatially incoherent illumination. This makes the tomographic volume phase values quantitative. Hence refractive index could be recovered from the optical slices. We will present tomographic reconstruction of cells, thick fixed tissue of few tens of micrometers using white light, and the use of NIR light to reach deeper planes in the tissue.

  4. Spectroscopic and biological approach of Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Raizada, Smriti; Tyagi, Monika; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2008-03-01

    Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes having the general composition [M(L) 2X 2] [where L = 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone, M = Ni(II) and Cu(II), X = Cl -, NO 3- and 1/2 SO 42-] have been synthesized. All the metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment, mass, IR, EPR and electronic spectral studies. The magnetic moment measurements of the complexes indicate that all the complexes are of high-spin type. On the basis of spectral studies an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) complexes whereas tetragonal geometry for Cu(II) except [Cu(L) 2SO 4] which posseses five coordinated geometry. The ligand and its metal complexes were screened against phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria in vitro.

  5. Exploring Earth's Atmospheric Biology using a Platform-Extensible Sampling Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, D.; Rothschild, L.

    2012-12-01

    The interactions between Earth's atmosphere and its biosphere, or aerobiology, remain a significant unknown. What few studies have been done conclusively show that Earth's atmosphere has a rich and dynamic microbial presence[Bowers et al., 2010]; that microbes suspended in air survive over long times (1-2 weeks)[Smith et al., 2010] and travel great distances (>5000 km)[Kellogg and Griffin, 2006]; that some airborne bacteria actively nucleate ice crystals, affecting meteorology[Delort et al., 2010]; and that the presence of microbes in the atmosphere has other planetary-scale effects[Delort et al., 2010]. Basic questions, however, such as the number of microbes present, their activity level and state, the different species present and their variance over time and space, remain largely unquantified. Compounding the significant physical and environmental challenges of reliable aerobiological sampling, collection and analysis of biological samples at altitudes above ~10-20 km has traditionally used ad hoc instrumentation and techniques, yielding primarily qualitative analytical results that lack a common basis for comparison[Bowers et al., 2010]. There is a strong need for broad-basis, repeatable, reliably comparable data about aerobiological basics. We describe here a high-altitude environmental and biological sampling project designed specifically to address these issues. The goal is a robust, reliable, re-usable sampling system, with open reproducibility and adaptability for multiple low-cost flight platforms (including ground-tethered systems, high-altitude balloons, and suborbital sounding rockets); by establishing a common modular payload structure for high-altitude sampling with appeal to a broad user base, we hope to encourage widespread collection of comparable aerobiological data. We are on our third prototype iteration, with demonstrated function of two sample capture modules, a support backbone (tracking, data logging, event response, etc.), a simple ground

  6. Investigation of resins suitable for the preparation of biological sample for 3-D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kizilyaprak, Caroline; Longo, Giovanni; Daraspe, Jean; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-02-01

    In the last two decades, the third-dimension has become a focus of attention in electron microscopy to better understand the interactions within subcellular compartments. Initially, transmission electron tomography (TEM tomography) was introduced to image the cell volume in semi-thin sections (∼ 500 nm). With the introduction of the focused ion beam scanning electron microscope, a new tool, FIB-SEM tomography, became available to image much larger volumes. During TEM tomography and FIB-SEM tomography, the resin section is exposed to a high electron/ion dose such that the stability of the resin embedded biological sample becomes an important issue. The shrinkage of a resin section in each dimension, especially in depth, is a well-known phenomenon. To ensure the dimensional integrity of the final volume of the cell, it is important to assess the properties of the different resins and determine the formulation which has the best stability in the electron/ion beam. Here, eight different resin formulations were examined. The effects of radiation damage were evaluated after different times of TEM irradiation. To get additional information on mass-loss and the physical properties of the resins (stiffness and adhesion), the topography of the irradiated areas was analysed with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Further, the behaviour of the resins was analysed after ion milling of the surface of the sample with different ion currents. In conclusion, two resin formulations, Hard Plus and the mixture of Durcupan/Epon, emerged that were considerably less affected and reasonably stable in the electron/ion beam and thus suitable for the 3-D investigation of biological samples. PMID:25433274

  7. Determination of Iodine-129 in fish samples as new tracer of marine biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusuno, Haruka; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Toshi; Miyairi, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2014-05-01

    Most of Iodine-129 in the surface environment is the anthropogenic origin, i.e., the result of the human nuclear activities. In the marine environment, like Pacific ocean, I-129 is transferred from atmosphere and slowly diffuses into deeper layer so that there is steep gradient of I-129 concentration, i.e., the surface layer has high I-129 concentration and it suddenly decreases going deeper. This peculiar depth profile is thus reflected by the isotopic ratio (I-129/I-127) profile because stable iodine (I-127) concentration is almost uniform in the seawater (ca. 60 ppb). Iodine isotopic ratio (I-129/I-127) of marine lives like fish should be determined by their habitats and the ways exchanging iodine with seawater. This means that the iodine isotopic ratio is potential indicator of marine biology. However there have been only few studies using I-129 for marine biology. This is because I-129 is so rare in the marine lives that ordinary analytical techniques cannot detect. Recently, the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry has been developed and demonstrates excellent sensitivity to detect I-129/I-127 ratio as low as 1E-14. However it requires typically 1 mg AgI sample. To obtain such amount of iodine several hundreds gram should be treated in the case of typical fish. In this study "carrier method" was adopted to overcome this difficulty. Our procedure is following: A fish sample was first dried completely then homogenized well. Iodine was extracted into an alkaline solution by the thermal hydrolysis from 0.1 to 0.5g of dried sample. An aliquot of this solution was taken for ICP-MS analysis to determine the stable iodine concentration. The remaining was, added with carrier iodine (about 1 mg), purified by solvent extraction and collected as AgI precipitation. I-129/I-127 ratio of obtained AgI was determined by AMS. From the AMS result and the stable iodine concentration, the isotopic ratio of the fish samples themselves can be calculated. The result of fish

  8. Characterisation of radiation field for irradiation of biological samples at nuclear reactor-comparison of twin detector and recombination methods.

    PubMed

    Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A; Kowalska, M; Meronka, K; Tulik, P

    2014-10-01

    Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection is involved in achieving scientific project on biological dosimetry. The project includes irradiation of blood samples in radiation fields of nuclear reactor. A simple facility for irradiation of biological samples has been prepared at horizontal channel of the nuclear reactor MARIA in NCBJ in Poland. The radiation field, composed mainly of gamma radiation and thermal neutrons, has been characterised in terms of tissue kerma using twin-detector technique and recombination chambers. PMID:24366246

  9. QUANTIFICATION OF CERAMIDE SPECIES IN BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-ELECTROSPRAY TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Kasumov, Takhar; Huang, Hazel; Chung, Yoon-Mi; Zhang, Renliang; McCullough, Arthur J.; Kirwan, John P.

    2010-01-01

    We present an optimized and validated liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous measurement of concentrations of different ceramide species in biological samples. The method of analysis of tissue samples is based on Bligh and Dyer extraction, reverse-phase HPLC separation and multiple reaction monitoring of ceramides. Preparation of plasma samples also requires isolation of sphingolipids by silica gel column chromatography prior to LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. The limits of detection and quantification are in a range of 5–50 pg/ml for distinct ceramides. The method was reliable for inter-assay and intra-assay precision, accuracy and linearity. Recovery of ceramide subspecies from human plasma, rat liver and muscle tissue were 78–91%, 70–99%, and 71–95%, respectively. The separation and quantification of several endogenous long-chain and very-long-chain ceramides using two non-physiological odd chain ceramide (C17 and C25) internal standards was achieved within a single 21 min chromatographic run. The technique was applied to quantify distinct ceramide species in different rat tissues (muscle, liver, and heart) and in human plasma. Using this analytical technique we demonstrated that a clinical exercise training intervention reduces the levels of ceramides in plasma of obese adults. This technique could be extended for quantification of other ceramides and sphyngolipids with no significant modification. PMID:20178771

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26766517

  11. New photoacoustic cell with diamond window for mid-infrared investigations on biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottmann, Jonas; Rey, Julien M.; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-02-01

    We present a new photoacoustic (PA) cell, which is sealed on the sample side with a 163 μm thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond window. The investigation of samples containing volatile compounds with an openended PA cell leads to varying conditions in the PA chamber (changing light absorption or relative humidity) and thus causes unstable signals. In contrast the diamond cover ensures stable conditions in the PA chamber and thereby enables sensitive measurements. This is particularly important for the investigation of biological samples with a high water content. Due to the high thermal conductivity of CVD diamond (1800 W/mK) strong PA signals are generated and the broad optical transmission range (250 nm to THz) renders the cell useful for various applications. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by tracking glucose in aqueous keratinocyte solutions with an external-cavity quantum cascade laser (1010-1095 cm-1). These measurements yield a detection limit of 100 mg/dl (SNR=3). Although glucose measurements within the human physiological range (30-500 mg/dl) are feasible, further improvements are needed for non-invasive glucose monitoring of diabetes patients. First in vivo measurements at the human forearm show an additional PA signal induced by blood pulsation at a frequency around 1 Hz and a steadily increasing relative humidity in the PA chamber due to transepidermal water loss if the cell is neither closed with a diamond window nor ventilated with N2.

  12. Automated system for sampling, counting, and biological analysis of rotifer populations

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Claus-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Zooplankton organisms with short generation times, such as rotifers, are ideal models to study general ecological and evolutionary questions on the population level, because meaningful experiments can often be completed within a couple of weeks. Yet biological analysis of such populations is often extremely time consuming, owing to abundance estimation by counting, measuring body size, or determining the investment into sexual versus asexual reproduction. An automated system for sampling and analyzing experimental rotifer populations is described. It relies on image analysis of digital photographs taken from subsamples of the culture. The system works completely autonomously for up to several weeks and can sample up to 12 cultures at time intervals down to a few hours. It allows quantitative analysis of female population density at a precision equivalent to that of conventional methods (i.e., manual counts of samples fixed in Lugol solution), and it can also recognize males, which allows detecting temporal variation of sexual reproduction in such cultures. Another parameter that can be automatically measured with the image analysis system is female body size. This feature may be useful for studies of population productivity and/or in competition experiments with clones of different body size. In this article, I describe the basic setup of the system and tests on the efficiency of data collection, and show some example data sets on the population dynamics of different strains of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus. PMID:21151824

  13. Beta camera for static and dynamic imaging of charged-particle emitting radionuclides in biologic samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ljunggren, K.; Strand, S.E. )

    1990-12-01

    A detection system based on microchannel plates has been constructed to image charged particles emitted by radionuclides in biomedical samples. This technique has significant advantages over conventional film autoradiography for investigating the distribution of radiolabeled compounds: shorter acquisition times due to the high sensitivity, easier sample handling, direct quantification and the ability to perform dynamic studies. The detector performance shows a spatial resolution of 0.9 mm for carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) (0.156 MeV), good linearity and homogeneity. The noise level is below 50/(cm{sup 2}.sec). Successful imaging with this system has been performed with beta-emitters {sup 14}C, sulfur-35 ({sup 35}S), iodine-131 ({sup 131}I), yttrium-90 (90Y), and positron emitters gallium-68 ({sup 68}Ga), and fluorine-18 ({sup 18}F). Dynamic studies of axonal transport of {sup 35}S-methionine in a nerve, and static images of 90Y-labeled monoclonal antibodies in slices of tumors are presented. The system shows promise for rapid quantitative imaging of charged-particle emitting radionuclides in small biologic samples.

  14. Biological Role of Anions (Sulfate, Nitrate , Oxalate and Acetate) on the Antibacterial Properties of Cobalt (II) and Nickel(II) Complexes With Pyrazinedicarboxaimide Derived, Furanyl and Thienyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Z H; Praveen, M

    1999-01-01

    A number of biologically active complexes of cobalt(II) and nickel(II) with pyrazinedicarboxaimido derived thienyl and furanyl compounds having the same metal ion but different anions such as sulphate, nitrate, oxalate and acetate have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of their physical, spectral and analytical data. In order to evaluate the role of anions on their antibacterial properties, these ligands and their synthesized metal complexes with various anions have been screened against bacterial species Escherichia coil,Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The title studies have proved a definitive role of anions in increasing the antibacterial properties. PMID:18475887

  15. Biological Role of Anions (Sulfate, Nitrate , Oxalate and Acetate) on the Antibacterial Properties of Cobalt (II) and Nickel(II) Complexes With Pyrazinedicarboxaimide Derived, Furanyl and Thienyl Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Praveen, M.

    1999-01-01

    A number of biologically active complexes of cobalt(II) and nickel(II) with pyrazinedicarboxaimido derived thienyl and furanyl compounds having the same metal ion but different anions such as sulphate, nitrate, oxalate and acetate have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of their physical, spectral and analytical data. In order to evaluate the role of anions on their antibacterial properties, these ligands and their synthesized metal complexes with various anions have been screened against bacterial species Escherichia coil,Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The title studies have proved a definitive role of anions in increasing the antibacterial properties. PMID:18475887

  16. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  17. Determination of steroid hormones in biological and environmental samples using green microextraction techniques: an overview.

    PubMed

    Aufartová, Jana; Mahugo-Santana, Cristina; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan; Nováková, Lucie; Solich, Petr

    2011-10-17

    Residues of steroid hormones have become a cause for concern because they can affect the biological activity of non-target organisms. Steroid hormones are a potential risk for wildlife and humans through the consumption of contaminated food or water. Their determination requires extraction and clean-up steps, prior to detection, to reach low concentration levels. In recent years, a great effort has been made to develop new analytical methodologies, such as microextraction techniques, that reduce environmental pollution. Researchers have modified old methods to incorporate procedures that use less-hazardous chemicals or that use smaller amounts of them. They are able to do direct analysis using miniaturised equipment and reduced amounts of solvents and wastes. These accomplishments are the main objectives of green analytical chemistry. In this overview, we focus on microextraction techniques for the determination of steroid hormones in biological (e.g., human urine, human serum, fish, shrimp and prawn tissue and milk) and environmental (e.g., wastewaters, surface waters, tap waters, river waters, sewage sludges, marine sediments and river sediments) samples. We comment on the most recent applications in sorptive-microextraction modes, such as solid phase microextraction (SPME) with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), in-tube solid-phase microextraction (IT-SPME), stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and microextraction in packed sorbent (MEPS). We also describe liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) approaches reported in the literature that are applied to the determination of steroid hormones. PMID:21907019

  18. Biological sample preparation and {sup 41}Ca AMS measurement at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Southon, J.R.; Bench, G.S.; McAninch, J.E.; Serfass, R.E.; Fang, Y.; King, J.C.; Woodhouse, L.R.

    1994-10-10

    Calcium metabolism in biology may be better understood by the use of {sup 41}Ca labels, although detection by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is required. Methodologies for preparation of urine samples and subsequent AMS measurement were investigated. Novel attempts at preparing CaH{sub 2} were unsuccessful, but CaF{sub 2} of sufficient purity could be produced by precipitation of calcium from urine as oxalate, followed by separation of calcium by cation exchange chromatography and washing the CaF{sub 2} precipitate. The presence of some remaining impurities could be compensated for by selecting the appropriate accelerated ion charge state for AMS. The use of projectile x rays for isobar discrimination was explored as an alternative to the conventional dE/dx device.

  19. Secondary ion mass spectrometers (SIMS) for calcium isotope measurements as an application to biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Craven, S.M.; Hoenigman, J.R.; Moddeman, W.E.

    1981-11-20

    The potential use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) to analyze biological samples for calcium isotopes is discussed. Comparison of UTI and Extranuclear based quadrupole systems is made on the basis of the analysis of CaO and calcium metal. The Extranuclear quadrupole based system is superior in resolution and sensitivity to the UTI system and is recommended. For determination of calcium isotopes to within an accuracy of a few percent a high resolution quadrupole, such as the Extranuclear, and signal averaging capability are required. Charge neutralization will be mandated for calcium oxide, calcium nitrate, or calcium oxalate. SIMS is not capable of the high precision and high accuracy results possible by thermal ionization methods, but where faster analysis is desirable with an accuracy of a few percent, SIMS is a viable alternative.

  20. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometers (SIMS) for calcium isotope measurements as an application to biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, S. M.; Hoenigman, J. R.; Moddeman, W. E.

    1981-11-01

    The potential use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) to analyze biological samples for calcium isotopes is discussed. Comparison of UTI and Extranuclear based quadrupole systems is made on the basis of the analysis of CaO and calcium metal. The Extranuclear quadrupole based system is superior in resolution and sensitivity to the UTI system and is recommended. For determination of calcium isotopes to within an accuracy of a few percent a high resolution quadrupole, such as the Extranuclear, and signal averaging capability are required. Charge neutralization will be mandated for calcium oxide, calcium nitrate, or calcium oxalate. SIMS is not capable of the high precision and high accuracy results possible by thermal ionization methods, but where faster analysis is desirable with an accuracy of a few percent, SIMS is a viable alternative.

  1. Trace Level Arsenic Quantification through Cloud Point Extraction: Application to Biological and Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Suresh Kumar, Kempahanumakkagari; Pandurangappa, Malingappa

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive solvent-free extraction protocol for the quantification of arsenic at trace level has been described. It is based on the reaction of arsenic (V) with molybdate in acidic medium in presence of antimony (III) and ascorbic acid as a reducing agent to form a blue-colored arsenomolybdenum blue complex. The complex has been extracted into surfactant phase using Triton X-114, and its absorbance was measured at 690 nm. The detection limit, working range, and the relative standard deviation were found to be 1 ng mL−1, 10–200 ng mL−1, and 1.2%, respectively. The effect of common ions was studied, and the method has been applied to determine trace levels of As(III) and As(V) from a variety of samples like environmental, biological, and commercially procured chemicals. PMID:22666159

  2. Magnetically responsive polycaprolactone nanoparticles for progesterone screening in biological and environmental samples using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Es'haghi, Zarrin; Nezhadali, Azizollah; Khatibi, Aram-Dokht

    2016-08-01

    A new Fe3O4/poly(є-caprolactone) (PCL) magnetite nanocomposite was fabricated and used as a sorbent for magnetically mediated PCL microspheres solid-phase extraction (MM-PCL-SPE) followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) for monitoring of progesterone (PGN) hormone in biological and environmental matrices, namely blood serum, tap water, urine, and hospital wastewater. The nanomagnetite core of the sorbent was synthesized by a co-precipitation method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were then microencapsulated with PCL microspheres using emulsion polymerization. The nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The magnetite sorbent can be effectively dispersed in aqueous solution and attracted to an external magnetic field. The MM-PCL-SPE process for PGN assay involved (a) dispersion of the sorbent in the donor phase aqueous solution with sonication, (b) exposure to a magnetic field to collect sorbent that had adsorbed the analyte, and (c) solvent desorption of extracted PGN for GC-FID analysis. The work demonstrates the usefulness of MM-PCL-SPE in the rapid and sensitive monitoring of trace amounts of PGN in real samples. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 1.00 and 3.30 ng/mL, respectively. The relative recoveries in real samples were adequate. Linearity was observed over a wide range of 2.2-10,000.0 ng/mL in aqueous media and urine and 0.01-70.0 μg/mL in blood serum. Graphical Abstract In this research new Fe3O4/poly(є-caprolactone) (PCL) magnetite microspheres were developed as an efficient sorbent for solid-phase extraction of progesterone hormone in biological and environmental matrices. PMID:27299775

  3. Integrated quantification and identification of aldehydes and ketones in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Siegel, David; Meinema, Anne C; Permentier, Hjalmar; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Bischoff, Rainer

    2014-05-20

    The identification of unknown compounds remains to be a bottleneck of mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics screening experiments. Here, we present a novel approach which facilitates the identification and quantification of analytes containing aldehyde and ketone groups in biological samples by adding chemical information to MS data. Our strategy is based on rapid autosampler-in-needle-derivatization with p-toluenesulfonylhydrazine (TSH). The resulting TSH-hydrazones are separated by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) and detected by electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight (ESI-QqTOF) mass spectrometry using a SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all Theoretical Fragment-Ion Spectra) data-independent high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) approach. Derivatization makes small, poorly ionizable or retained analytes amenable to reversed phase chromatography and electrospray ionization in both polarities. Negatively charged TSH-hydrazone ions furthermore show a simple and predictable fragmentation pattern upon collision induced dissociation, which enables the chemo-selective screening for unknown aldehydes and ketones via a signature fragment ion (m/z 155.0172). By means of SWATH, targeted and nontargeted application scenarios of the suggested derivatization route are enabled in the frame of a single UHPLC-ESI-QqTOF-HR-MS workflow. The method's ability to simultaneously quantify and identify molecules containing aldehyde and ketone groups is demonstrated using 61 target analytes from various compound classes and a (13)C labeled yeast matrix. The identification of unknowns in biological samples is detailed using the example of indole-3-acetaldehyde. PMID:24745975

  4. Carbon accumulation by biological soil crusts in relation to relief and sampling depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetter, Stefan; Drahorad, Sylvie; Felix-Henningsen, Peter

    2010-05-01

    In arid and semiarid ecosystems the soil surface is covered by biological soil crusts (BSC). These BSC are microbial communities of cyanobacteria, lichens and mosses. Due to the photosynthetic activity of these microorganisms, BSC are main carbon contributors to arid ecosystems. The cover is related to ecosystem functions like surface stabilization, water redistribution and nutrient fixation. These functions rely on the microbial community composition of the BSC. Cyanobacteria and cyanolichens excrete exopolysaccharides, which build microaggregates with soil particles. This stabilizes and seals the soil surface. Therefore cyanobacteria and cyanolichen dominated crusts introduce runoff, which affects the distribution of carbon. The total amount of soil organic carbon was determined in relation to the relief position and BSC thickness showing a strong correlation between relief, sampling depth and carbon amounts. At the Arid Ecosystem Research Center (AERC) station of the Nizzana sand dunes (NW Negev, Israel) the dunes and the interdune corridor are covered by BSC up to 80% of the total area. The BSC are composed of a thin topcrust section and a mineral subcrust section. The overall thickness changes in relation to the relief position. Along a dune transect topcrust and subcrust samples were taken and analyzed on their C_org, C_carb, and C_total concentration. The total amount of carbon (g m^-2) was calculated from the carbon concentrations, the BSC bulk density and the sampling depth. Comparing the topcrust and subcrust values of the sampling points the topcrust sections showed 3-4 times higher concentrations of organic carbon than the subcrust sections. The light intensity decreases with soil depth, resulting in a higher biological activity and carbon fixation in the topcrust sections. The subcrust showed relative higher amounts of C_carb contributing to the soil surface stability. Depending on the relief position the total amount of accumulated carbon was 4 times

  5. Potent and specific inhibition of the biological activity of the type-II transmembrane serine protease matriptase by the cyclic microprotein MCoTI-II.

    PubMed

    Gray, K; Elghadban, S; Thongyoo, P; Owen, K A; Szabo, R; Bugge, T H; Tate, E W; Leatherbarrow, R J; Ellis, V

    2014-08-01

    Matriptase is a type-II transmembrane serine protease involved in epithelial homeostasis in both health and disease, and is implicated in the development and progression of a variety of cancers. Matriptase mediates its biological effects both via as yet undefined substrates and pathways, and also by proteolytic cleavage of a variety of well-defined protein substrates, several of which it shares with the closely-related protease hepsin. Development of targeted therapeutic strategies will require discrimination between these proteases. Here we have investigated cyclic microproteins of the squash Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin-inhibitor family (generated by total chemical synthesis) and found MCoTI-II to be a high-affinity (Ki 9 nM) and highly selective (> 1,000-fold) inhibitor of matriptase. MCoTI-II efficiently inhibited the proteolytic activation of pro-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by matriptase but not by hepsin, in both purified and cell-based systems, and inhibited HGF-dependent cell scattering. MCoTI-II also selectively inhibited the invasion of matriptase-expressing prostate cancer cells. Using a model of epithelial cell tight junction assembly, we also found that MCoTI-II could effectively inhibit the re-establishment of tight junctions and epithelial barrier function in MDCK-I cells after disruption, consistent with the role of matriptase in regulating epithelial integrity. Surprisingly, MCoTI-II was unable to inhibit matriptase-dependent proteolytic activation of prostasin, a GPI-anchored serine protease also implicated in epithelial homeostasis. These observations suggest that the unusually high selectivity afforded by MCoTI-II and its biological effectiveness might represent a useful starting point for the development of therapeutic inhibitors, and further highlight the role of matriptase in epithelial maintenance. PMID:24696092

  6. Microscopic linear liquid streams in vacuum: Injection of solvated biological samples into X-ray free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Doak, R. B.; DePonte, D. P.; Nelson, G.; Camacho-Alanis, F.; Ros, A.; Spence, J. C. H.; Weierstall, U.

    2012-11-27

    Microscopic linear liquid free-streams offer a means of gently delivering biological samples into a probe beam in vacuum while maintaining the sample species in a fully solvated state. By employing gas dynamic forces to form the microscopic liquid stream (as opposed to a conventional solid-walled convergent nozzle), liquid free-streams down to 300 nm diameter have been generated. Such 'Gas Dynamic Virtual Nozzles' (GDVN) are ideally suited to injecting complex biological species into an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) to determine the structure of the biological species via Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SFX). GDVN injector technology developed for this purpose is described.

  7. Introduction of a cryosectioning-ToF-SIMS instrument for analysis of non-dehydrated biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, J.; Beumer, A.; Lipinsky, D.; Arlinghaus, H. F.

    2006-07-01

    Tof-SIMS and laser-SNMS are becoming increasingly important tools for analysing the elemental and molecular distribution in biological samples. We have developed the prototype of an in-vacuum cryosectioning instrument directly attached to a ToF-SIMS/laser-SNMS instrument, which allows preparing and analyzing frozen non-dehydrated biological samples. Due to unavoidable effects during the handling, storing, and preparation of frozen samples, even inside the vacuum, it must be ensured that the analyzed surface is from the sample and not a preparation artefact. To this effect, a model structure, similar to the biological samples and with a defined chemical composition, was analyzed under varying thermal treatment before and during analysis, respectively, in order to identify a balance between evaporating and subliming adsorbed materials and the effect of freeze-drying on the measured signal.

  8. Nested sampling for parameter inference in systems biology: application to an exemplar circadian model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Model selection and parameter inference are complex problems that have yet to be fully addressed in systems biology. In contrast with parameter optimisation, parameter inference computes both the parameter means and their standard deviations (or full posterior distributions), thus yielding important information on the extent to which the data and the model topology constrain the inferred parameter values. Results We report on the application of nested sampling, a statistical approach to computing the Bayesian evidence Z, to the inference of parameters, and the estimation of log Z in an established model of circadian rhythms. A ten-fold difference in the coefficient of variation between degradation and transcription parameters is demonstrated. We further show that the uncertainty remaining in the parameter values is reduced by the analysis of increasing numbers of circadian cycles of data, up to 4 cycles, but is unaffected by sampling the data more frequently. Novel algorithms for calculating the likelihood of a model, and a characterisation of the performance of the nested sampling algorithm are also reported. The methods we develop considerably improve the computational efficiency of the likelihood calculation, and of the exploratory step within nested sampling. Conclusions We have demonstrated in an exemplar circadian model that the estimates of posterior parameter densities (as summarised by parameter means and standard deviations) are influenced predominately by the length of the time series, becoming more narrowly constrained as the number of circadian cycles considered increases. We have also shown the utility of the coefficient of variation for discriminating between highly-constrained and less-well constrained parameters. PMID:23899119

  9. Development of a fluorescent probe for measurement of peroxyl radical scavenging activity in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Güçlü, Kubilay; Kıbrıslıoğlu, Gülşah; Özyürek, Mustafa; Apak, Reşat

    2014-02-26

    In antioxidant activity testing, it has been argued that assays capable of measuring the inhibitive action against the biologically relevant peroxyl radicals (ROO(•)) from a controllable source are preferable in terms of simulating physiological conditions because ROO(•) is the predominant free radical found in lipid oxidation in foods and biological systems. A new fluorescent probe, p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), was developed for selective measurement of peroxyl radical scavenging (PRS) activity of biological samples, in view of the fact that the existing PRS assays are quite laborious and require the application of strictly optimized conditions. The earlier probe, β-phycoerythrin, of a similar PRS assay of wide use, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), varies from lot to lot of production, undergoes photobleaching, and interacts with polyphenols via non-specific protein binding, while the current probe, fluorescein, undergoes undesired fluorescence (FL) quenching and side reactions. The developed technique is based on the fluorescence decrease of the PABA probe (within an optimal time of 30 min) because of its oxidation by ROO(•), generated from the thermal dissociation of 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH). In the absence of the scavenger, ROO(•) reacted with the probe, generating non-fluorescent products, and caused a decrease in PABA fluorescence, whereas the ROO(•) scavenger resulted in a fluorescence increase because of the inhibition of the probe oxidation by ROO(•). Thus, the fluorescence increment of intact PABA is proportional to the ROO(•) scavenging activity of samples. The linear range of relative fluorescence intensity versus the PABA concentration was in the interval of 0.5-5.0 μM. Assay precision and accuracy were assessed by analyzing two spiked homogenates of liver and kidney at clinically relevant concentrations with 97-105% recovery and 2.3% interday reproducibility. The proposed method was

  10. Characterization of α-Synuclein Multimer Stoichiometry in Complex Biological Samples by Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein in the brain is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In vivo soluble α-synuclein occurs as a monomer and several multimers, the latter of which may be important for the biological function of α-synuclein. Currently, there is a lack of reproducible methods to compare α-synuclein multimer abundance between complex biological samples. Here we developed a method, termed “multimer-PAGE,” that combines in-gel chemical cross-linking with several common electrophoretic techniques to measure the stoichiometry of soluble α-synuclein multimers in brain tissue lysates. Results show that soluble α-synuclein from the rat brain exists as several high molecular weight species of approximately 56 kDa (αS56), 80 kDa (αS80), and 100 kDa (αS100) that comigrate with endogenous lipids, detergents, and/or micelles during blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Co-extraction of endogenous lipids with α-synuclein was essential for the detection of soluble α-synuclein multimers. Homogenization of brain tissue in small buffer volumes (>50 mg tissue per 1 mL buffer) increased relative lipid extraction and subsequently resulted in abundant soluble multimer detection via multimer-PAGE. α-Synuclein multimers captured by directly cross-linking soluble lysates resembled those observed following multimer-PAGE. The ratio of multimer (αS80) to monomer (αS17) increased linearly with protein input into multimer-PAGE, suggesting to some extent, multimers were also formed during electrophoresis. Overall, soluble α-synuclein maintains lipid interactions following tissue disruption and readily forms multimers when this lipid–protein complex is preserved. Once the multimer-PAGE technique was validated, relative stoichiometric comparisons could be conducted simultaneously between 14 biological samples. Multimer-PAGE provides a simple inexpensive biochemical technique to study the molecular factors influencing α-synuclein multimerization

  11. Type-II generalized family-wise error rate formulas with application to sample size determination.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Phillipe; de Micheaux, Pierre Lafaye; Liquet, Benoit; Riou, Jérémie

    2016-07-20

    Multiple endpoints are increasingly used in clinical trials. The significance of some of these clinical trials is established if at least r null hypotheses are rejected among m that are simultaneously tested. The usual approach in multiple hypothesis testing is to control the family-wise error rate, which is defined as the probability that at least one type-I error is made. More recently, the q-generalized family-wise error rate has been introduced to control the probability of making at least q false rejections. For procedures controlling this global type-I error rate, we define a type-II r-generalized family-wise error rate, which is directly related to the r-power defined as the probability of rejecting at least r false null hypotheses. We obtain very general power formulas that can be used to compute the sample size for single-step and step-wise procedures. These are implemented in our R package rPowerSampleSize available on the CRAN, making them directly available to end users. Complexities of the formulas are presented to gain insight into computation time issues. Comparison with Monte Carlo strategy is also presented. We compute sample sizes for two clinical trials involving multiple endpoints: one designed to investigate the effectiveness of a drug against acute heart failure and the other for the immunogenicity of a vaccine strategy against pneumococcus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26914402

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of Cu(II) in soil and vegetable samples collected from Abraha Atsbeha, Tigray, Ethiopia using heterocyclic thiosemicarbazone.

    PubMed

    Admasu, Daniel; Reddy, Desam Nagarjuna; Mekonnen, Kebede Nigussie

    2016-01-01

    Two selective and sensitive reagents, 2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone (2-APT) and 3-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone (3-APT) were used for the spectrophotometric determination of Cu(II). Both reagents gave yellowish Cu(II) complex at a pH range of 8.0-10.0. Beer's law was obeyed for Cu(II)-2-APT and Cu(II)-3-APT in the concentration range of 0.16-1.3 and 0.44-1.05 µg/mL, respectively. The molar absorptivity and of Cu(II)-2-APT and Cu(II)-3-APT were 2.14 × 10(4) at 370 nm, and 6.7 × 10(3) L/mol cm at 350 nm, respectively, while the Sandell's sensitivity were 0.009 and 0.029 µg/cm(2) in that order. The correlation coefficient of the standard curves of Cu(II)-2-APT and Cu(II)-3-APT were 0.999 and 0.998, respectively. The detection limit of the Cu(II)-2-APT and Cu(II)-3-APT methods were 0.053 and 0.147 µg/mL, respectively. The results demonstrated that the procedure is precise (relative standard deviation <2 %, n = 10). The method was tested for Cu(II) determination in soil and vegetable samples. Comparisons of the results with those obtained using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer for Cu(II) determination also tested the validity of the method using paired sample t test at the 0.05 level showing a good agreement between them. PMID:27512628

  13. Assessment of DDT levels in selected environmental media and biological samples from Mexico and Central America.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N; Trejo, Antonio; Ruepert, Clemens; Jovel, Reyna del Carmen; Méndez, Mónica Patricia; Ferrari, Mirtha; Saballos-Sobalvarro, Emilio; Alexander, Carlos; Yáñez-Estrada, Leticia; Lopez, Dania; Henao, Samuel; Pinto, Emilio R; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando

    2010-03-01

    Taking into account the environmental persistence and the toxicity of DDT, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) organized a surveillance program in Mesoamerica which included the detection of residual DDT in environmental (soil) and biological samples (fish tissue and children's blood). This program was carried out in communities from Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. This paper presents the first report of that program. As expected, the results show that the levels for [summation operator] DDT in soil (outdoor or indoor) and fish samples in the majority of the locations studied are below guidelines. However, in some locations, we found children with high concentrations of DDT as in Mexico (mean level 50.2 ng/mL). Furthermore, in some communities and for some matrices, the DDT/DDE quotient is higher than one and this may reflect a recent DDT exposure. Therefore, more efforts are needed to avoid exposure and to prevent the reintroduction of DDT into the region. In this regard it is important to know that under the surveillance of PAHO and with the support of UNEP, a regional program in Mesoamerica for the collection and disposal of DDT and other POPs stockpiles is in progress. PMID:20092871

  14. 3D surface scan of biological samples with a Push-broom Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haibo; Kincaid, Russell; Hruska, Zuzana; Brown, Robert L.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2013-08-01

    The food industry is always on the lookout for sensing technologies for rapid and nondestructive inspection of food products. Hyperspectral imaging technology integrates both imaging and spectroscopy into unique imaging sensors. Its application for food safety and quality inspection has made significant progress in recent years. Specifically, hyperspectral imaging has shown its potential for surface contamination detection in many food related applications. Most existing hyperspectral imaging systems use pushbroom scanning which is generally used for flat surface inspection. In some applications it is desirable to be able to acquire hyperspectral images on circular objects such as corn ears, apples, and cucumbers. Past research describes inspection systems that examine all surfaces of individual objects. Most of these systems did not employ hyperspectral imaging. These systems typically utilized a roller to rotate an object, such as an apple. During apple rotation, the camera took multiple images in order to cover the complete surface of the apple. The acquired image data lacked the spectral component present in a hyperspectral image. This paper discusses the development of a hyperspectral imaging system for a 3-D surface scan of biological samples. The new instrument is based on a pushbroom hyperspectral line scanner using a rotational stage to turn the sample. The system is suitable for whole surface hyperspectral imaging of circular objects. In addition to its value to the food industry, the system could be useful for other applications involving 3-D surface inspection.

  15. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging and elemental mapping from biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    D Rao; M Swapna; R Cesareo; A Brunetti; T Akatsuka; T Yuasa; T Takeda; G Gigante

    2011-12-31

    The present study utilized the new hard X-ray microspectroscopy beamline facility, X27A, available at NSLS, BNL, USA, for elemental mapping. This facility provided the primary beam in a small spot of the order of {approx}10 {mu}m, for focussing. With this spatial resolution and high flux throughput, the synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescent intensities for Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Ti and Cu were measured using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled 13-element energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector. The sample is scanned in a 'step-and-repeat' mode for fast elemental mapping measurements and generated elemental maps at 8, 10 and 12 keV, from a small animal shell (snail). The accumulated trace elements, from these biological samples, in small areas have been identified. Analysis of the small areas will be better suited to establish the physiology of metals in specific structures like small animal shell and the distribution of other elements.

  16. Methods of biological fluids sample preparation - biogenic amines, methylxanthines, water-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Płonka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In recent years demands on the amount of information that can be obtained from the analysis of a single sample have increased. For time and economic reasons it is necessary to examine at the same time larger number of compounds, and compounds from different groups. This can best be seen in such areas as clinical analysis. In many diseases, the best results for patients are obtained when treatment fits the individual characteristics of the patient. Dosage monitoring is important at the beginning of therapy and in the full process of treatment. In the treatment of many diseases biogenic amines (dopamine, serotonin) and methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine, caffeine) play an important role. They are used as drugs separately or in combination with others to support and strengthen the action of other drugs - for example, the combination of caffeine and paracetamol. Vitamin supplementation may be also an integral part of the treatment process. Specification of complete sample preparation parameters for extraction of the above compounds from biological matrices has been reviewed. Particular attention was given to the preparation stage and extraction methods. This review provides universal guidance on establishing a common procedures across laboratories to facilitate the preparation and analysis of all discussed compounds. PMID:25381720

  17. Biological Monitoring of Human Exposure to Neonicotinoids Using Urine Samples, and Neonicotinoid Excretion Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kouji H.; Tanaka, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Imanaka, Mie; Niisoe, Tamon; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Inoue, Sumiko; Kusakawa, Koichi; Oshima, Masayo; Watanabe, Kiyohiko; Yasojima, Makoto; Takasuga, Takumi; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background Neonicotinoids, which are novel pesticides, have entered into usage around the world because they are selectively toxic to arthropods and relatively non-toxic to vertebrates. It has been suggested that several neonicotinoids cause neurodevelopmental toxicity in mammals. The aim was to establish the relationship between oral intake and urinary excretion of neonicotinoids by humans to facilitate biological monitoring, and to estimate dietary neonicotinoid intakes by Japanese adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and imidacloprid) microdoses were orally ingested by nine healthy adults, and 24 h pooled urine samples were collected for 4 consecutive days after dosing. The excretion kinetics were modeled using one- and two-compartment models, then validated in a non-deuterium-labeled neonicotinoid microdose study involving 12 healthy adults. Increased urinary concentrations of labeled neonicotinoids were observed after dosing. Clothianidin was recovered unchanged within 3 days, and most dinotefuran was recovered unchanged within 1 day. Around 10% of the imidacloprid dose was excreted unchanged. Most of the acetamiprid was metabolized to desmethyl-acetamiprid. Spot urine samples from 373 Japanese adults were analyzed for neonicotinoids, and daily intakes were estimated. The estimated average daily intake of these neonicotinoids was 0.53–3.66 μg/day. The highest intake of any of the neonicotinoids in the study population was 64.5 μg/day for dinotefuran, and this was <1% of the acceptable daily intake. PMID:26731104

  18. Analytical performance evaluation of Anyplex II HPV28 and Euroarray HPV for genotyping of cervical samples.

    PubMed

    Latsuzbaia, Ardashel; Tapp, Jessica; Nguyen, Trung; Fischer, Marc; Arbyn, Marc; Weyers, Steven; Mossong, Joël

    2016-07-01

    Analytically accurate human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping methods are required to assess the impact of HPV vaccination. The aim of this study was to evaluate the analytical performance of Anyplex II HPV28 (Seegene, Korea) and Euroarray HPV (Euroimmun, Germany) genotyping kits, for conducting a future HPV vaccine efficacy monitoring study in Luxembourg. A total number of 150 cervical swabs were collected from women with mean age 31.4 years. Agreements for detecting any HPV between Aptima/Anyplex (88.0%) and Aptima/Euroarray (90.7%) were similar. Agreement of Anyplex/EuroArray with Aptima was higher for Genotypes 16, 18 or 45 than for the other 11 HPVs. The average number of HPV genotypes detected per sample was similar with 2.6 and 2.5, for Anyplex and EuroArray, respectively. In conclusion, Anyplex and Euroarray showed high agreement in general and in particular for detecting genotypes contained in HPV vaccines. PMID:27156793

  19. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples. PMID:25670027

  20. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples. PMID:25670027

  1. Parameters Affecting Spore Recovery from Wipes Used in Biological Surface Sampling ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Sandra M.; Filliben, James J.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2011-01-01

    The need for the precise and reliable collection of potential biothreat contaminants has motivated research in developing a better understanding of the variability in biological surface sampling methods. In this context, the objective of this work was to determine parameters affecting the efficiency of extracting Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores from commonly used wipe sampling materials and to describe performance using the interfacial energy concept. In addition, surface thermodynamics was applied to understand and predict surface sampling performance. Wipe materials were directly inoculated with known concentrations of B. anthracis spores and placed into extraction solutions, followed by sonication or vortexing. Experimental factors investigated included wipe material (polyester, cotton, and polyester-rayon), extraction solution (sterile deionized water [H2O], deionized water with 0.04% Tween 80 [H2O-T], phosphate-buffered saline [PBS], and PBS with 0.04% Tween 80 [PBST]), and physical dissociation method (vortexing or sonication). The most efficient extraction from wipes was observed for solutions containing the nonionic surfactant Tween 80. The increase in extraction efficiency due to surfactant addition was attributed to an attractive interfacial energy between Tween 80 and the centrifuge tube wall, which prevented spore adhesion. Extraction solution significantly impacted the extraction efficiency, as determined by statistical analysis (P < 0.05). Moreover, the extraction solution was the most important factor in extraction performance, followed by the wipe material. Polyester-rayon was the most efficient wipe material for releasing spores into solution by rank; however, no statistically significant difference between polyester-rayon and cotton was observed (P > 0.05). Vortexing provided higher spore recovery in H2O and H2O-T than sonication, when all three wipe materials and the reference control were considered (P < 0.05). PMID:21296945

  2. Multispectral diode laser based shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy for biological sample identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowoidnich, Kay; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2012-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a well established analytical method with applications in many areas, e.g. analysis of biological samples. To overcome the problem of an undesired fluorescence background masking the Raman signals we present a multi-spectral approach using shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS). For our investigations we applied microsystem diode lasers which realize two slightly shifted excitation wavelengths required to perform SERDS at 488 nm, 671 nm, and 785 nm. The emission at 488 nm with an optical power of up to 30 mW and a spectral shift of 0.3 nm (12 cm-1) is realized by frequency doubling of a 976 nm distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser. The 671 nm laser diode contains two separate laser cavities (spectral shift: 0.7 nm (13 cm-1)) each incorporating a volume Bragg grating as frequency selective element. In that case, optical powers up to 50 mW can be obtained. For investigations at 785 nm we used a DFB laser with a maximum optical power of 110 mW and a spectral shift of 0.5 nm (7 cm-1). Meat, fat tissue, connective tissue and bones from pork and beef were used as test samples to demonstrate the effective background removal using SERDS. For all three wavelengths integration times of only 5 - 10 seconds were necessary showing the possibility of SERDS for rapid sample identification. A comparison with conventional Raman spectra is given pointing out the improvement of spectral quality. The applicability of SERDS for other analytical applications, e.g. medical diagnosis will be discussed.

  3. Decommissioning samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA, solvent refined coal pilot plant: chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, W.C.; Wright, C.W.

    1985-10-01

    This report presents the results from chemical analyses and limited biological assays of three sets of samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA solvent refined coal (SRC) pilot plant. The samples were collected during the process of decommissioning this facility. Chemical composition was determined for chemical class fractions of the samples by using high-resolution gas chromatography (GC), high-resolution GC/mass spectrometry (MS) and high-resolution MS. Biological activity was measuring using both the histidine reversion microbial mutagenicity assay with Salmonella typhimurium, TA98 and an initiation/promotion mouse-skin tumorigenicity assay. 19 refs., 7 figs., 27 tabs.

  4. Antitumor and biological investigation of doubly cyclometalated ruthenium(ii) organometallics derived from benzimidazolyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Elumalai, Palani; Jeong, Yong Joon; Park, Dae Won; Kim, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hyunuk; Kang, Se Chan; Chi, Ki-Whan

    2016-04-12

    In this study, we report the synthesis, anticancer and biological properties of three doubly cyclometalated phenylbenzimidazole derived ruthenium(ii) organometallics () and their corresponding three organic ligands. The structures of were fully characterized by various analytical techniques, and the meso stereoisomer of the doubly cyclometalated ruthenacycle was unambiguously confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The anticancer effects of the newly synthesized compounds were tested against selected human cancer cell lines AGS (gastric carcinoma), SK-hep-1 (hepatocellular carcinoma), and HCT-15 (colorectal carcinoma). The growth inhibitory effects of ruthenacycles on cancer cells were found to be considerably more effective against the abovementioned cancer cells than the reference drug oxaliplatin. Compound exhibited a more specific effect on the AGS cells. Gene-fishing and ELISA array were performed to analyze the target genes and cytokine secretion by . As a result, a significant reduction was observed in RPS21 by . Moreover, increased the secretion of cytokines such as IFNγ in macrophages and reduced the release of cytokines such as rantes and IGF-1. These results show that could be a very good anticancer drug through the regulation of the RPS21 gene and cytokines. PMID:26974823

  5. Combined chelation of lead (II) by deferasirox and deferiprone in rats as biological model.

    PubMed

    Balooch, F Dahooee; Fatemi, S J; Iranmanesh, M

    2014-02-01

    In order to investigate the capability of two chelators deferasirox (DFX or ICL670) and deferiprone (L1) in removing lead from the body, the present research was performed. Two does levels of 40 and 80 mg/kg body weight of lead (II) chloride was given to rats as biological model for 45 days. After 45 days, some toxicity symptoms were observed in rats such as loss of hair and weight, appearance of red dots around eyes, weakness and irritability. After lead application, chelation therapy with DFX and L1 as mono and combined (DFX, L1 and DFX + L1) was done for 10 days. After chelation therapy, lead level in different tissues reduced. The combined chelation therapy results showed that these chelators are able to remove lead from the body and toxicity symptoms decreased. The combined therapy results (DFX + L1) show higher efficacy and lower toxicity compared to single therapies. PMID:24309925

  6. Synthesis, structure and biological activity of nickel(II) complexes of 5-methyl 2-furfural thiosemicarbazone.

    PubMed

    Jouad, E M; Larcher, G; Allain, M; Riou, A; Bouet, G M; Khan, M A; Thanh, X D

    2001-09-01

    5-Methyl 2-furfuraldehyde thiosemicarbazone (M5HFTSC) with nickel(II) leads to three types of complexes: [Ni(M5HFTSC)(2)X(2)], [Ni(M5FTSC)(2)] and [Ni(M5FTSC)(2)] x 2DMF. In the first type the ligand remains in thione form, while in the two other, the anionic thiolato form is involved. The species [Ni(M5HFTSC)(2)X(2)] has been characterized spectroscopically. The structures of [Ni(M5FTSC)(2)] x 2DMF and [Ni(M5FTSC)(2)] have been solved using X-ray diffraction. Biological studies of [Ni(M5HFTSC)(2)Cl(2)] have been carried out in vitro for antifungal activity on human pathogenic fungi, Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans, and in vivo for toxicity on mice. The results are compared to those of the ligand, the metal salt and a similar copper complex [Cu(M5HFTSC)Cl(2)]. PMID:11566328

  7. RNA-seq of human reference RNA samples using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Nottingham, Ryan M; Wu, Douglas C; Qin, Yidan; Yao, Jun; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized our ability to analyze transcriptomes. Current RNA-seq methods are highly reproducible, but each has biases resulting from different modes of RNA sample preparation, reverse transcription, and adapter addition, leading to variability between methods. Moreover, the transcriptome cannot be profiled comprehensively because highly structured RNAs, such as tRNAs and snoRNAs, are refractory to conventional RNA-seq methods. Recently, we developed a new method for strand-specific RNA-seq using thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases (TGIRTs). TGIRT enzymes have higher processivity and fidelity than conventional retroviral reverse transcriptases plus a novel template-switching activity that enables RNA-seq adapter addition during cDNA synthesis without using RNA ligase. Here, we obtained TGIRT-seq data sets for well-characterized human RNA reference samples and compared them to previous data sets obtained for these RNAs by the Illumina TruSeq v2 and v3 methods. We find that TGIRT-seq recapitulates the relative abundance of human transcripts and RNA spike-ins in ribo-depleted, fragmented RNA samples comparably to non-strand-specific TruSeq v2 and better than strand-specific TruSeq v3. Moreover, TGIRT-seq is more strand specific than TruSeq v3 and eliminates sampling biases from random hexamer priming, which are inherent to TruSeq. The TGIRT-seq data sets also show more uniform 5' to 3' gene coverage and identify more splice junctions, particularly near the 5' ends of mRNAs, than do the TruSeq data sets. Finally, TGIRT-seq enables the simultaneous profiling of mRNAs and lncRNAs in the same RNA-seq experiment as structured small ncRNAs, including tRNAs, which are essentially absent with TruSeq. PMID:26826130

  8. A validated HPTLC method for determination of terbutaline sulfate in biological samples: Application to pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Faiyazuddin, Md.; Rauf, Abdul; Ahmad, Niyaz; Ahmad, Sayeed; Iqbal, Zeenat; Talegaonkar, Sushma; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Khar, Roop K.; Ahmad, Farhan J.

    2011-01-01

    Terbutaline sulfate (TBS) was assayed in biological samples by validated HPTLC method. Densitometric analysis of TBS was carried out at 366 nm on precoated TLC aluminum plates with silica gel 60F254 as a stationary phase and chloroform–methanol (9.0:1.0, v/v) as a mobile phase. TBS was well resolved at RF 0.34 ± 0.02. In all matrices, the calibration curve appeared linear (r2 ⩾ 0.9943) in the tested range of 100–1000 ng spot−1 with a limit of quantification of 18.35 ng spot−1. Drug recovery from biological fluids averaged ⩾95.92%. In both matrices, rapid degradation of drug favored and the T0.5 of drug ranged from 9.92 to 12.41 h at 4 °C and from 6.31 to 9.13 h at 20 °C. Frozen at −20 °C, this drug was stable for at least 2 months (without losses >10%). The maximum plasma concentration (Cpmax) was found to be 5875.03 ± 114 ng mL−1, which is significantly higher than the maximum saliva concentration (Csmax, 1501.69 ± 96 ng mL−1). Therefore, the validated method could be used to carry out pharmacokinetic studies of the TBS from novel drug delivery systems. PMID:23960758

  9. Depletion of cells and abundant proteins from biological samples by enhanced dielectrophoresis✩

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, C.; Provine, J.; Davis, R.W.; Howe, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    Platforms that are sensitive and specific enough to assay low-abundance protein biomarkers, in a high throughput multiplex format, within a complex biological fluid specimen, are necessary to enable protein biomarker based diagnostics for diseases such as cancer. The signal from an assay for a low-abundance protein biomarker in a biological fluid sample like blood is typically buried in a background that arises from the presence of blood cells and from high-abundance proteins that make up 90% of the assayed protein mass. We present an automated on-chip platform for the depletion of cells and highly abundant serum proteins in blood. Our platform consists of two components, the first of which is a microfluidic mixer that mixes beads containing antibodies against the highly abundant proteins in the whole blood. This complex mixture (consisting of beads, cells, and serum proteins) is then injected into the second component of our microfluidic platform, which comprises a filter trench to capture all the cells and the beads. The size-based trapping of the cells and beads into the filter trench is significantly enhanced by leveraging additional negative dielectrophoretic forces to push the micron sized particles (cells and beads which have captured the highly abundant proteins) down into the trench, allowing the serum proteins of lower abundance to flow through. In general, dielectrophoresis using bare electrodes is incapable of producing forces beyond the low piconewton range that tend to be insufficient for separation applications. However, by using electrodes passivated with atomic layer deposition, we demonstrate the application of enhanced negative DEP electrodes together with size-based flltration induced by the filter trench, to deplete 100% of the micron sized particles in the mixture. PMID:26924893

  10. Levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese and zinc in biological samples of paralysed steel mill workers with related to controls.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Atif G; Shah, Faheem; Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Kolachi, Nida Fatima; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kazi, Naveed

    2011-12-01

    The determination of essential trace and toxic elements in the biological samples of human beings is an important clinical screening procedure. This study aimed to assess the possible effects of environmental exposure on paralysed male workers (n = 75) belonging to the production and quality control departments of a steel mill. In this investigation, the concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese and zinc were determined in biological samples (blood, urine and scalp hair samples) of exposed paralysis and non-paralysed steel mill workers. For comparative purposes, unexposed healthy subjects of same age group were selected as referents. The elements in the biological samples were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry prior to microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity of the methodology was checked by the biological certified reference materials. The results indicate that the level understudy elements in all three biological samples were significantly higher in paralysed workers of both groups (quality control and production) as compared to referents (p < 0.01). The possible connection of these elements with the aetiology of disease is discussed. The results also show the need for immediate improvements of workplace ventilation and industrial hygiene practices. PMID:21547399

  11. Effect of Cu(II) shock loads on shortcut biological nitrogen removal in a hybrid biofilm nitrogen removal reactor.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Xu, Hengjuan; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Kun; Lin, Ying

    2015-06-01

    The effect of Cu(II) shock loads on shortcut biological nitrogen removal during a continuous-flow anoxic/aerobic process was investigated using a hybrid biofilm nitrogen removal reactor. The results demonstrated that [Formula: see text]-N removal was not affected by any Cu(II) shock loads, but TN removal was inhibited by Cu(II) of shock loads of 2 and 5 mg/L, and the performance could not be recovered at 5 mg/L. Furthermore, the TN removal pathway also changed in response to Cu(II) concentrations of 2 and 5 mg/L. Denitrification is more sensitive to Cu(II) shock in SBNR processes. Examination of amoA communities using quantitative PCR showed that the abundance of AOB in the aerobic tank decreased after Cu(II) shock with 5 mg/L, which supported the observed changes in [Formula: see text]-N removal efficiency. The abundance of denitrification genes declined obviously at Cu(II) concentrations of 2 and 5 mg/L, which explained the decreased TN removal efficiency at those concentrations. PMID:25833010

  12. Characterization and biological studies on Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes of carbohydrazones ending by pyridyl ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu El-Reash, G. M.; El-Gammal, O. A.; Ghazy, S. E.; Radwan, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    The chelating behavior of ligands based on carbohydrazone core modified with pyridine end towards Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions have been examined. The ligands derived from the condensation of carbohydrazide with 2-acetylpyridine (H2APC) and 4-acetylpyridine (H2APEC). The 1H NMR, IR data and the binding energy calculations of H2APC revealed the presence of two stereoisomers syn and anti in the solid state and in the solution. The 1H NMR, IR data and the binding energy calculations confirmed the presence of H2APEC in one keto form only in the solid state and in the solution. The spectroscopic data confirmed that H2APC behaves as a monobasic pentadentate in Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes and as mononegative tetradentate in Ni(II) complex. On the other hand, H2APEC acts as a mononegative tridentate in Co(II) complex, neutral tridentate in Ni(II) complex and neutral bidentate in Cu(II) complex. The electronic spectra and the magnetic measurements of complexes as well as the ESR of the copper complexes suggested the octahedral geometry. The bond length and bond angles were evaluated by DFT method using material studio program. The thermal behavior and the kinetic parameters of degradation were determined using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The antioxidant (DDPH and ABTS methods), anti-hemolytic and in vitro Ehrlich ascites of the compounds have been screened.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, DFT and biological studies of isatinpicolinohydrazone and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Rakha, T. H.; Metwally, H. M.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Isatinpicolinohydrazone (H2IPH) and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes have been synthesized and investigated using physicochemical techniques viz. IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis spectrometric methods and magnetic moment measurements. The investigation revealed that H2IPH acts as binegative tetradentate in Zn(II), neutral tridentate in Cd(II) and as neutral bidentate towards Hg(II) complex. Octahedral geometry is proposed for all complexes. The bond length, bond angle, chemical reactivity, energy components (kcal/mol), binding energy (kcal/mol) and dipole moment (Debyes) for all the title compounds were evaluated by DFT and also MEP for the ligand is shown. Theoretical infrared intensities of H2IPH and also the theoretical electronic spectra of the ligand and its complexes were calculated. The thermal behavior and the kinetic parameters of degradation were determined using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The in vitro antibacterial studies of the complexes proved them as growth inhibiting agents. The DDPH antioxidant of the compounds have been screened. Antitumor activity, carried out in vitro on human mammary gland (breast) MCF7, have shown that Hg(II) complex exhibited potent activity followed by Zn(II), Cd(II) complexes and the ligand.

  14. Mass amplifying probe for sensitive fluorescence anisotropy detection of small molecules in complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liang; Zou, Yuan; Lin, Ninghang; Zhu, Zhi; Jenkins, Gareth; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-07-01

    detection of small molecules by means of FA in complex biological samples. PMID:22686244

  15. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. E.; Hashim, U.; Mustafa, S.; Che Man, Y. B.; Yusop, M. H. M.; Bari, M. F.; Islam, Kh N.; Hasan, M. F.

    2011-05-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml - 1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  16. Trace elements analysis in biological samples by radioisotopic x-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Cesareo, R

    1976-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence technique, induced by radioisotopic sources, provides a very simple method for the simultaneous analysis of trace elements in biological samples. For blood, serum, platelets, etc., samples of about 0.1 ml were deposited on filter paper disks, dried, and analyzed. In such a way the "thin specimen" approximation is realized, resulting in the following advantages: The X-ray intensity of a given element is a liner function of mass per unit area over several orders of magnitude. Interelement effects became negligible. The ratio of fluorescent X-rays to scattered radiation is increased. The sensitivity of the technique for elements with atomic number ranging from about 20-92 varies from some units to some tens of parts per million by weight in 100 s measuring time, by using a gas proportional counter, and from about some tenths to some parts per million by using an X-ray semiconductor detector, in a measuring time of 10(3)-10(4)s. In such a way and with the described features, the Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br content of several speciments of blood and serum was determined. Measurements were further carried out in order to labelling blood components with stable tracers and to detect their concentration by means of the X-ray fluorescence technique. The life span of platelets was, for example, measured after labelling platelets with stable Selenocystine. The sensitivity of the XRF technique can further be enhanced by about three orders of magnitude by using a pre-enrichment step with ion-exchange resins and liquid volumes not lower than 500 ml. Urine analyses have been carried in such a way, and copper in about 20 ml serum after selective extraction. PMID:1017430

  17. 7 CFR 42.110 - Sampling plans for tightened condition of container inspection; Tables II and II-A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF... Inspection Code Lot size ranges—Number of containers in lot Type of plan AQL 0.15 Sample size Ac Re Sample... Condition of Container Inspection Code Lot size ranges—No. of containers in lot Type of plan Sample...

  18. 7 CFR 42.110 - Sampling plans for tightened condition of container inspection; Tables II and II-A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF... Inspection Code Lot size ranges—Number of containers in lot Type of plan AQL 0.15 Sample size Ac Re Sample... Condition of Container Inspection Code Lot size ranges—No. of containers in lot Type of plan Sample...

  19. 7 CFR 42.110 - Sampling plans for tightened condition of container inspection; Tables II and II-A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF... Inspection Code Lot size ranges—Number of containers in lot Type of plan AQL 0.15 Sample size Ac Re Sample... Condition of Container Inspection Code Lot size ranges—No. of containers in lot Type of plan Sample...

  20. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of novel Ru(II)-arene complexes containing intercalating ligands.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Stefan; Rangasamy, Loganathan; Gligorijević, Nevenka; Aranđelović, Sandra; Radulović, Siniša; Gasser, Gilles; Grgurić-Šipka, Sanja

    2016-07-01

    Three new ruthenium(II)-arene complexes, namely [(η(6)-p-cymene)Ru(Me2dppz)Cl]PF6 (1), [(η(6)-benzene)Ru(Me2dppz)Cl]PF6 (2) and [(η(6)-p-cymene)Ru(aip)Cl]PF6 (3) (Me2dppz=11,12-dimethyldipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine; aip=2-(9-anthryl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f] [1,10] phenanthroline) have been synthesized and characterized using different spectroscopic techniques including elemental analysis. The complexes were found to be well soluble and stable in DMSO. The biological activity of the three complexes was tested in three different human cancer cell lines (A549, MDA-MB-231 and HeLa) and in one human non-cancerous cell line (MRC-5). Complexes 1 and 3, carrying η(6)-p-cymene as the arene ligand, were shown to be toxic in all cell lines in the low micromolar/subnanomolar range, with complex 1 being the most cytotoxic complex of the series. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that complex 1 caused concentration- and time-dependent arrest of the cell cycle in G2-M and S phases in HeLa cells. This event is followed by the accumulation of the sub-G1 DNA content after 48h, in levels higher than cisplatin and in the absence of phosphatidylserine externalization. Fluorescent microscopy and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining revealed that complex 1 induced both apoptotic and necrotic cell morphology characteristics. Drug-accumulation and DNA-binding studies performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in HeLa cells showed that the total ruthenium uptake increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and that complex 1 accumulated more efficiently than cisplatin at equimolar concentrations. The introduction of a Me2dppz ligand into the ruthenium(II)-p-cymene scaffold was found to allow the discovery of a strongly cytotoxic complex with significantly higher cellular uptake and DNA-binding properties than cisplatin. PMID:26818702

  1. Chemical and biological effects of heavy distillate recycle in the SRC-II process

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Anderson, R.P.; Freel, J.

    1983-12-01

    Recent work from the Merriam Laboratory continuous coal liquefaction units shows that heavy distillate from the SRC-II process can be recycled to extinction, and hence a distillate product boiling entirely below 310/sup 0/C (590/sup 0/F) (or other selected boiling points) is feasible. In these runs distillate yield was not reduced; gas make was unaffected; and hydrogen consumption was increased only slightly, in keeping with the generally higher hydrogen content of lighter end products. Total distillate yield (C/sub 5/-590/sup 0/F) was 56 wt %, MAF coal in runs with subbituminous coal from the Amax Belle Ayr mine. Product endpoint is well below 371/sup 0/C (700/sup 0/F), the temperature above which coal distillates appear to become genotoxic; and the product was shown to be free of mutagenic activity in the Ames test. Chemical analyses showed both the < 270/sup 0/C (< 518/sup 0/F) and the < 310/sup 0/C (< 590/sup 0/F) distillates to be essentially devoid of several reference polycyclic compounds known to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Tests for tumorigenic or carcinogenic activity were not carried out on these materials. However, a comparison of chemical data from the Merriam heavy distillate samples with data on the other SRC-II distillates where carcinogenesis or tumorigenesis data is available leads to the expectation that < 371/sup 0/C (< 700/sup 0/F) materials from the Merriam Laboratory will have greatly reduced tumorigenic and carcinogenic activity in skin painting tests. Other studies suggest the product should be more readily upgraded than full-range (C/sub 5/-900/sup 0/F) distillate.

  2. Conserved motifs II to VI of DNA helicase II from Escherichia coli are all required for biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G; Deng, E; Baugh, L R; Hamilton, C M; Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1997-01-01

    There are seven conserved motifs (IA, IB, and II to VI) in DNA helicase II of Escherichia coli that have high homology among a large family of proteins involved in DNA metabolism. To address the functional importance of motifs II to VI, we employed site-directed mutagenesis to replace the charged amino acid residues in each motif with alanines. Cells carrying these mutant alleles exhibited higher UV and methyl methanesulfonate sensitivity, increased rates of spontaneous mutagenesis, and elevated levels of homologous recombination, indicating defects in both the excision repair and mismatch repair pathways. In addition, we also changed the highly conserved tyrosine(600) in motif VI to phenylalanine (uvrD309, Y600F). This mutant displayed a moderate increase in UV sensitivity but a decrease in spontaneous mutation rate, suggesting that DNA helicase II may have different functions in the two DNA repair pathways. Furthermore, a mutation in domain IV (uvrD307, R284A) significantly reduced the viability of some E. coli K-12 strains at 30 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C. The implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:9393722

  3. Preparation and characterization of magnetic nanocomposite of Schiff base/silica/magnetite as a preconcentration phase for the trace determination of heavy metal ions in water, food and biological samples using atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Hasan; Afkhami, Abbas; Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Khoshsafar, Hosein

    2012-08-15

    A versatile and robust solid phase with both magnetic property and a very high adsorption capacity is presented on the basis of modification of iron oxide-silica magnetic particles with a newly synthesized Schiff base (Fe(3)O(4)/SiO(2)/L). The structure of the resulting product was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We developed an efficient and cost-effective method for the preconcentration of trace amounts of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) in environmental and biological samples using this novel magnetic solid phase. Prepared magnetic solid phase is an ideal support because it has a large surface area, good selectivity and can be easily retrieved from large volumes of aqueous solutions. The possible parameters affecting the enrichment were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the method detection limit was 0.14, 0.19 and 0.12 μg L(-1) for Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions, respectively. The established method has been successfully applied to analyze real samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. All these indicated that this magnetic phase had a great potential in environmental and biological fields. PMID:22841051

  4. Microwave-accelerated bioassay technique for rapid and quantitative detection of biological and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Muzaffer; Syed, Maleeha F; Aslan, Kadir

    2016-01-15

    Quantitative detection of molecules of interest from biological and environmental samples in a rapid manner, particularly with a relevant concentration range, is imperative to the timely assessment of human diseases and environmental issues. In this work, we employed the microwave-accelerated bioassay (MAB) technique, which is based on the combined use of circular bioassay platforms and microwave heating, for rapid and quantitative detection of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Shiga like toxin (STX 1). The proof-of-principle use of the MAB technique with the circular bioassay platforms for the rapid detection of GFAP in buffer based on colorimetric and fluorescence readouts was demonstrated with a 900W kitchen microwave. We also employed the MAB technique with a new microwave system (called the iCrystal system) for the detection of GFAP from mice with brain injuries and STX 1 from a city water stream. Control bioassays included the commercially available gold standard bioassay kits run at room temperature. Our results show that the lower limit of detection (LLOD) of the colorimetric and fluorescence based bioassays for GFAP was decreased by ~1000 times using the MAB technique and our circular bioassay platforms as compared to the commercially available bioassay kits. The overall bioassay time for GFAP and STX 1 was reduced from 4h using commercially available bioassay kits to 10min using the MAB technique. PMID:26356762

  5. Smart oxygen cuvette for optical monitoring of dissolved oxygen in biological blood samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabhi, Harish; Alla, Suresh Kumar; Shahriari, Mahmoud R.

    2010-02-01

    A smart Oxygen Cuvette is developed by coating the inner surface of a cuvette with oxygen sensitive thin film material. The coating is glass like sol-gel based sensor that has an embedded ruthenium compound in the glass film. The fluorescence of the ruthenium is quenched depending on the oxygen level. Ocean Optics phase fluorometer, NeoFox is used to measure this rate of fluorescence quenching and computes it for the amount of oxygen present. Multimode optical fibers are used for transportation of light from an LED source to cuvette and from cuvette to phase fluorometer. This new oxygen sensing system yields an inexpensive solution for monitoring the dissolved oxygen in samples for biological and medical applications. In addition to desktop fluorometers, smart oxygen cuvettes can be used with the Ocean Optics handheld Fluorometers, NeoFox Sport. The Smart Oxygen Cuvettes provide a resolution of 4PPB units, an accuracy of less than 5% of the reading, and 90% response in less than 10 seconds.

  6. Development of novel separation techniques for biological samples in capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.T.

    1994-07-27

    This dissertation includes three different topics: general introduction of capillary electrophoresis (CE); gradient in CE and CE in biological separations; and capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) for DNA separation. Factors such as temperature, viscosity, pH, and the surface of capillary walls affecting the separation performance are demonstrated. A pH gradient between 3.0 and 5.2 is useful to improve the resolution among eight different organic acids. A flow gradient due to the change in the concentration of surfactant, which is able to coat to the capillary wall to change the flow rate and its direction, is also shown as a good way to improve the resolution for organic compounds. A temperature gradient caused by joule heat is shown by voltage programming to enhance the resolution and shorten the separation time for several phenolic compounds. The author also shows that self-regulating dynamic control of electroosmotic flow in CE by simply running separation in different concentrations of surfactant has less matrix effect on the separation performance. One of the most important demonstrations in this dissertation is that the author proposes on-column reaction which gives several advantages including the use of a small amount of sample, low risk of contamination, and time saving and kinetic features. The author uses this idea with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) as a detection mode to detect an on-column digestion of sub-ng of protein. This technique also is applied to single cell analysis in the group.

  7. Spectral variation of the infrared absorption coefficient in pulsed photothermal profiling of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Majaron, Boris; Verkruysse, Wim; Tanenbaum, B Samuel; Milner, Thomas E; Nelson, J Stuart

    2002-06-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry can be used for non-invasive depth profiling of optically scattering samples, including biological tissues such as human skin. Computational reconstruction of the laser-induced temperature profile from recorded radiometric signals is sensitive to the value of the tissue absorption coefficient in the infrared detection band (muIR). While assumed constant in reported reconstruction algorithms, muIR of human skin varies by two orders of magnitude in the commonly used 3-5 microm detection band. We analyse the problem of selecting the effective absorption coefficient value to be used with such algorithms. In a numerical simulation of photothermal profiling we demonstrate that results can be markedly impaired, unless the reconstruction algorithm is augmented by accounting for spectral variation muIR(lambda). Alternatively, narrowing the detection band to 4.5-5 microm reduces the spectral variation muIR(lambda) to a level that permits the use of the simpler, unaugmented algorithm. Implementation of the latter approach for depth profiling of port wine stain birthmarks in vivo is presented and discussed. PMID:12108776

  8. The method of radioactive tracer for measuring the amount of inorganic nanoparticles in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzulukov, Yu; Antsiferova, A.; Demin, V. A.; Demin, V. F.; Kashkarov, P.

    2015-11-01

    The method to measure the mass of inorganic nanoparticles in biological (or any other samples) using nanoparticles labeled with radioactive tracers is developed and applied to practice. The tracers are produced in original nanoparticles by radioactive activation of some of their atomic nuclei. The method of radioactive tracers demonstrates a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy equal or better than popular methods of optical and mass spectrometry, or electron microscopy and has some specific advantages. The method can be used for study of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in living organism, as well as in ecological and fundamental research. It was used in practice to study absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of nanoparticles of Ag, Au, Se, ZnO, TiO2 as well as to study transportation of silver nanoparticles through the barriers of blood-brain, placenta and milk gland of rats. Brief descriptions of data obtained in experiments with application of this method included in the article. The method was certified in Russian Federation standard system GOST-R and recommended by the Russian Federation regulation authority ROSPOTREBNADZOR for measuring of toxicokinetic and organotropy parameters of nanoparticles.

  9. Substrate-zymography: a still worthwhile method for gelatinases analysis in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Serena; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Oriente, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Di Carlo, Angelina

    2016-08-01

    Matrix metallo-proteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases, capable of degrading all the molecular components of extracellular matrix. A class of MMPs is gelatinases which includes gelatinase A or MMP-2 (72 kDa) and gelatinase B or MMP-9 (92 kDa), which have been shown to play critical roles in pathophysiology of many human disease and, in particular, cancer progression. For these reasons they obtained a great interest as potential non-invasive biomarker in providing useful clinical information in cancer diagnosis and therapy. A sensitive and unexpensive method for analysis of gelatinases is the gelatine zymography, which allows to measure the relative amounts of active and inactive enzymes in body fluids and tissue extracts. The procedure involves the electrophoretic separation of proteins under denaturing but non reducing conditions through a polyacrylamide gel containing a synthetic substrate (gelatin). The aim of this mini-review has been to describe the general principles of gelatine zymography technique, underling the main advantages and disadvantages. Even though an improvement of this method is necessary for a better applicability in laboratory medicine, gelatine zymography represents the most convenient method to detect the activity of the different gelatinases from a wide range of biological samples. PMID:26641968

  10. Unbiased Rare Event Sampling in Spatial Stochastic Systems Biology Models Using a Weighted Ensemble of Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Rory M.; Tapia, Jose-Juan; Sullivan, Devin P.; Faeder, James R.; Murphy, Robert F.; Dittrich, Markus; Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    The long-term goal of connecting scales in biological simulation can be facilitated by scale-agnostic methods. We demonstrate that the weighted ensemble (WE) strategy, initially developed for molecular simulations, applies effectively to spatially resolved cell-scale simulations. The WE approach runs an ensemble of parallel trajectories with assigned weights and uses a statistical resampling strategy of replicating and pruning trajectories to focus computational effort on difficult-to-sample regions. The method can also generate unbiased estimates of non-equilibrium and equilibrium observables, sometimes with significantly less aggregate computing time than would be possible using standard parallelization. Here, we use WE to orchestrate particle-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, which include spatial geometry (e.g., of organelles, plasma membrane) and biochemical interactions among mobile molecular species. We study a series of models exhibiting spatial, temporal and biochemical complexity and show that although WE has important limitations, it can achieve performance significantly exceeding standard parallel simulation—by orders of magnitude for some observables. PMID:26845334

  11. An integrative strategy for quantitative analysis of the N-glycoproteome in complex biological samples

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The complexity of protein glycosylation makes it difficult to characterize glycosylation patterns on a proteomic scale. In this study, we developed an integrated strategy for comparatively analyzing N-glycosylation/glycoproteins quantitatively from complex biological samples in a high-throughput manner. This strategy entailed separating and enriching glycopeptides/glycoproteins using lectin affinity chromatography, and then tandem labeling them with 18O/16O to generate a mass shift of 6 Da between the paired glycopeptides, and finally analyzing them with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and the automatic quantitative method we developed based on Mascot Distiller. Results The accuracy and repeatability of this strategy were first verified using standard glycoproteins; linearity was maintained within a range of 1:10–10:1. The peptide concentration ratios obtained by the self-build quantitative method were similar to both the manually calculated and theoretical values, with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.023–0.186 for glycopeptides. The feasibility of the strategy was further confirmed with serum from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and healthy individuals; the expression of 44 glycopeptides and 30 glycoproteins were significantly different between HCC patient and control serum. Conclusions This strategy is accurate, repeatable, and efficient, and may be a useful tool for identification of disease-related N-glycosylation/glycoprotein changes. PMID:24428921

  12. Synthesis of [13C6]-labelled phenethylamine derivatives for drug quantification in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, HuiLing; Berg, Thomas; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2014-05-15

    The availability of high-quality (13)C-labelled internal standards will improve accurate quantification of narcotics and drugs in biological samples. Thus, the synthesis of 10 [(13)C6]-labelled phenethylamine derivatives, namely amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine, 4-methoxyamphetamine, 4-methoxymethamphetamine, 3,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine, have been undertaken. [(13)C6]-Phenol proved to be an excellent starting material for making (13)C-labelled narcotic substances in the phenethylamine class, and a developed Stille-type coupling enabled an efficient synthesis of the 3,4-methylenedioxy and 4-methoxy derivatives. The pros and cons of alternative routes and transformations are also discussed. The [(13)C6]-labelled compounds are intended for use as internal standards in forensic analysis, health sciences and metabolomics studies by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:24634286

  13. Development of a radioimmunoassay for the measurement of Bisphenol A in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Kaddar, Nisrin; Bendridi, Nadia; Harthé, Catherine; de Ravel, Marc Rolland; Bienvenu, Anne-Lise; Cuilleron, Claude-Yves; Mappus, Elisabeth; Pugeat, Michel; Déchaud, Henri

    2009-07-10

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in the manufacturing of polycarbonate plastic food and drink packaging. Possessing a weak estrogenic activity, BPA is listed among a growing list of endocrine disrupting compounds. In this study, a polyclonal anti-BPA antibody was obtained by immunization with BPA-monocarboxymethylether covalently linked to BSA. The antibody demonstrates negligible cross-reactivity with most analogous BPA phenolic structures, and no cross-reactivity with endogenous steroids. An extraction step with ethyl acetate minimized matrix effects and allowed the BPA measurement in plasma and other biological samples. Recovery after loading test was 96 +/- 4% and dilution tests had a linear profile (r2 > 0.93). The limit of detection of the BPA RIA was 0.08 microg L(-1) with an IC50 of 1.25 microg L(-1). The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 5.6 and 8.6%, respectively at a BPA concentration of 0.7 microg L(-1) and 6.9 and 5.7% at a BPA concentration of 1.3 microg L(-1). A significant correlation was found between the values obtained by the RIA and HPLC-MS (r2 = 0.92) or HPLC coupled to a fluorescence detector (r2 = 0.80). In conclusion, we described a BPA-RIA that is a suitable tool for evaluating human exposure to BPA. PMID:19481623

  14. Towards national mapping of aquatic condition (II): Predicting the probable biological condition of USA streams and rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA’s National River and Stream Assessment (NRSA) uses spatially balanced sampling to estimate the proportion of streams within the conterminous US (CONUS) that deviate from least-disturbed biological condition (BC). These assessments do not infer BC at un-sampled st...

  15. Predicting Hemagglutinin MHC-II Ligand Analogues in Anti-TNFα Biologics: Implications for Immunogenicity of Pharmaceutical Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Brianna; O’Donnell, Lauren A.; Meng, Wilson S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of overlapping immunogenic peptides between three pharmaceutical biologics and influenza viruses. Clinical studies have shown that subsets of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develop anti-drug antibodies towards anti-TNFα biologics. We postulate that common infectious pathogens, including influenza viruses, may sensitize RA patients toward recombinant proteins. We hypothesize that embedded within infliximab (IFX), adalimumab (ADA), and etanercept (ETN) are ligands of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) that mimic T cell epitopes derived from influenza hemagglutinin (HA). The rationale is that repeated administration of the biologics would reactivate HA-primed CD4 T cells, stimulating B cells to produce cross-reactive antibodies. Custom scripts were constructed using MATLAB to compare MHC-II ligands of HA and the biologics; all ligands were predicted using tools in Immune Epitope Database and Resources (IEDB). We analyzed three HLA-DR1 alleles (0101, 0401 and 1001) that are prominent in RA patients, and two alleles (0103 and 1502) that are not associated with RA. The results indicate that 0401 would present more analogues of HA ligands in the three anti-TNFα biologics compared to the other alleles. The approach led to identification of potential ligands in IFX and ADA that shares sequence homology with a known HA-specific CD4 T cell epitope. We also discovered a peptide in the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR-3) of ADA that encompasses both a potential CD4 T cell epitope and a known B cell epitope in HA. The results may help generate new hypotheses for interrogating patient variability of immunogenicity of the anti-TNFα drugs. The approach would aid development of new recombinant biologics by identifying analogues of CD4 T cell epitopes of common pathogens at the preclinical stage. PMID:26270649

  16. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Northwest Atlantic through Eastern Tropical Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Sutton, Granger; Heidelberg, Karla B; Williamson, Shannon; Yooseph, Shibu; Wu, Dongying; Eisen, Jonathan A; Hoffman, Jeff M; Remington, Karin; Beeson, Karen; Tran, Bao; Smith, Hamilton; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Stewart, Clare; Thorpe, Joyce; Freeman, Jason; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Venter, Joseph E; Li, Kelvin; Kravitz, Saul; Heidelberg, John F; Utterback, Terry; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Falcón, Luisa I; Souza, Valeria; Bonilla-Rosso, Germán; Eguiarte, Luis E; Karl, David M; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor; Bermingham, Eldredge; Gallardo, Victor; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Ferrari, Michael R; Strausberg, Robert L; Nealson, Kenneth; Friedman, Robert; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J. Craig

    2007-01-01

    The world's oceans contain a complex mixture of micro-organisms that are for the most part, uncharacterized both genetically and biochemically. We report here a metagenomic study of the marine planktonic microbiota in which surface (mostly marine) water samples were analyzed as part of the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition. These samples, collected across a several-thousand km transect from the North Atlantic through the Panama Canal and ending in the South Pacific yielded an extensive dataset consisting of 7.7 million sequencing reads (6.3 billion bp). Though a few major microbial clades dominate the planktonic marine niche, the dataset contains great diversity with 85% of the assembled sequence and 57% of the unassembled data being unique at a 98% sequence identity cutoff. Using the metadata associated with each sample and sequencing library, we developed new comparative genomic and assembly methods. One comparative genomic method, termed “fragment recruitment,” addressed questions of genome structure, evolution, and taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity, as well as the biochemical diversity of genes and gene families. A second method, termed “extreme assembly,” made possible the assembly and reconstruction of large segments of abundant but clearly nonclonal organisms. Within all abundant populations analyzed, we found extensive intra-ribotype diversity in several forms: (1) extensive sequence variation within orthologous regions throughout a given genome; despite coverage of individual ribotypes approaching 500-fold, most individual sequencing reads are unique; (2) numerous changes in gene content some with direct adaptive implications; and (3) hypervariable genomic islands that are too variable to assemble. The intra-ribotype diversity is organized into genetically isolated populations that have overlapping but independent distributions, implying distinct environmental preference. We present novel methods for measuring the genomic similarity

  17. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: northwest Atlantic through eastern tropical Pacific.

    PubMed

    Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Sutton, Granger; Heidelberg, Karla B; Williamson, Shannon; Yooseph, Shibu; Wu, Dongying; Eisen, Jonathan A; Hoffman, Jeff M; Remington, Karin; Beeson, Karen; Tran, Bao; Smith, Hamilton; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Stewart, Clare; Thorpe, Joyce; Freeman, Jason; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Venter, Joseph E; Li, Kelvin; Kravitz, Saul; Heidelberg, John F; Utterback, Terry; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Falcón, Luisa I; Souza, Valeria; Bonilla-Rosso, Germán; Eguiarte, Luis E; Karl, David M; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor; Bermingham, Eldredge; Gallardo, Victor; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Ferrari, Michael R; Strausberg, Robert L; Nealson, Kenneth; Friedman, Robert; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

    2007-03-01

    The world's oceans contain a complex mixture of micro-organisms that are for the most part, uncharacterized both genetically and biochemically. We report here a metagenomic study of the marine planktonic microbiota in which surface (mostly marine) water samples were analyzed as part of the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition. These samples, collected across a several-thousand km transect from the North Atlantic through the Panama Canal and ending in the South Pacific yielded an extensive dataset consisting of 7.7 million sequencing reads (6.3 billion bp). Though a few major microbial clades dominate the planktonic marine niche, the dataset contains great diversity with 85% of the assembled sequence and 57% of the unassembled data being unique at a 98% sequence identity cutoff. Using the metadata associated with each sample and sequencing library, we developed new comparative genomic and assembly methods. One comparative genomic method, termed "fragment recruitment," addressed questions of genome structure, evolution, and taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity, as well as the biochemical diversity of genes and gene families. A second method, termed "extreme assembly," made possible the assembly and reconstruction of large segments of abundant but clearly nonclonal organisms. Within all abundant populations analyzed, we found extensive intra-ribotype diversity in several forms: (1) extensive sequence variation within orthologous regions throughout a given genome; despite coverage of individual ribotypes approaching 500-fold, most individual sequencing reads are unique; (2) numerous changes in gene content some with direct adaptive implications; and (3) hypervariable genomic islands that are too variable to assemble. The intra-ribotype diversity is organized into genetically isolated populations that have overlapping but independent distributions, implying distinct environmental preference. We present novel methods for measuring the genomic similarity between

  18. Dimensional comparison between amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy and scanning ion conductance microscopy of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonhui; Choi, MyungHoon; Jung, Goo-Eun; Rahim Ferhan, Abdul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Cho, Sang-Joon

    2016-08-01

    The range of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) applications for atomic force microscopy (AFM) is expanding in the biological sciences field, reflecting an increasing demand for tools that can improve our fundamental understanding of the physics behind biological systems. However, the complexity associated with applying SPM techniques in biomedical research hampers the full exploitation of its capabilities. Recently, the development of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) has overcome these limitations and enabled contact-free, high resolution imaging of live biological specimens. In this work, we demonstrate the limitation of AFM for imaging biological samples in liquid due to artifacts arising from AFM tip–sample interaction, and how SICM imaging is able to overcome those limitations with contact-free scanning. We also demonstrate that SICM measurements, when compared to AFM, show better fit to the actual dimensions of the biological samples. Our results highlight the superiority of SICM imaging, enabling it to be widely adopted as a general and versatile research tool for biological studies in the nanoscale.

  19. Method development for mass spectrometry based molecular characterization of fossil fuels and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahat, Rajendra K.

    In an analytical (chemical) method development process, the sample preparation step usually determines the throughput and overall success of the analysis. Both targeted and non-targeted methods were developed for the mass spectrometry (MS) based analyses of fossil fuels (coal) and lipidomic analyses of a unique micro-organism, Gemmata obscuriglobus. In the non-targeted coal analysis using GC-MS, a microwave-assisted pressurized sample extraction method was compared with the traditional extraction method, such as Soxhlet. On the other hand, methods were developed to establish a comprehensive lipidomic profile and to confirm the presence of endotoxins (a.k.a. lipopolysaccharides, LPS) in Gemmata.. The performance of pressurized heating techniques employing hot-air oven and microwave irradiation were compared with that of Soxhlet method in terms of percentage extraction efficiency and extracted analyte profiles (via GC-MS). Sub-bituminous (Powder River Range, Wyoming, USA) and bituminous (Fruitland formation, Colorado, USA) coal samples were tested. Overall 30-40% higher extraction efficiencies (by weight) were obtained with a 4 hour hot-air oven and a 20 min microwave-heating extraction in a pressurized container when compared to a 72 hour Soxhlet extraction. The pressurized methods are 25 times more economic in terms of solvent/sample amount used and are 216 times faster in term of time invested for the extraction process. Additionally, same sets of compounds were identified by GC-MS for all the extraction methods used: n-alkanes and diterpanes in the sub-bituminous sample, and n-alkanes and alkyl aromatic compounds in the bituminous coal sample. G. obscuriglobus, a nucleated bacterium, is a micro-organism of high significances from evolutionary, cell and environmental biology standpoints. Although lipidomics is an essential tool in microbiological systematics and chemotaxonomy, complete lipid profile of this bacterium is still lacking. In addition, the presence of

  20. Biological low pH Mn(II) oxidation in a manganese deposit influenced by metal-rich groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohu, Tsing; Akob, Denise M.; Abratis, Michael; Lazar, Cassandre S.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms, key organisms, and geochemical significance of biological low-pH Mn(II) oxidation are largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the structure of indigenous Mn(II)-oxidizing microbial communities in a secondary subsurface Mn oxide deposit influenced by acidic (pH 4.8) metal-rich groundwater in a former uranium mining area. Microbial diversity was highest in the Mn deposit compared to the adjacent soil layers and included the majority of known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and two genera of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (MOF). Electron X-ray microanalysis showed that romanechite [(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10] was conspicuously enriched in the deposit. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that certain fungal, bacterial, and archaeal groups were firmly associated with the autochthonous Mn oxides. Eight MOB within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and one MOF strain belonging to Ascomycota were isolated at pH 5.5 or 7.2 from the acidic Mn deposit. Soil-groundwater microcosms demonstrated 2.5-fold-faster Mn(II) depletion in the Mn deposit than adjacent soil layers. No depletion was observed in the abiotic controls, suggesting that biological contribution is the main driver for Mn(II) oxidation at low pH. The composition and species specificity of the native low-pH Mn(II) oxidizers were highly adapted to in situ conditions, and these organisms may play a central role in the fundamental biogeochemical processes (e.g., metal natural attenuation) occurring in the acidic, oligotrophic, and metalliferous subsoil ecosystems.

  1. Evaluation of thiosemicarbazone derivative as chelating agent for the simultaneous removal and trace determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in food and water samples.

    PubMed

    Koduru, Janardhan Reddy; Lee, Kap Duk

    2014-05-01

    In the present investigation, prepared N-ethyl-3-carbazolecarbaxaldehyde-3-thiosemicarbazone (ECCT) and employed for the simultaneous removal and determination of trace amounts of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from food and water samples. Cd(II) and Pb(II) gave yellow and orange colored complexes with ECCT in acetate buffer at pH 6.0 with λmax, 380 and 440nm, respectively. Both complexes were easily extractable into kerosene at 1:1(M:L) composition. It was in accordance with Beer's law in the range of 0.0-12.0 and 0.0-10.0μgmL(-1) with 0.999 and 0.997 correlation coefficient for Cd(II) and Pb(II) complexes, respectively, indicated a good linearity between the two variables. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity were found to be 0.740×10(4)Lmol(-1)cm(-1), 1.52×10(-3)μgcm(-2) for Cd(II) and 1.809×10(4)L mol(-1)cm(-1), 1.15×10(-3)μgcm(-2) for Pb(II). The precision and accuracy of the method was checked for both metal ions by finding the relative standard deviations (n=8), which were 0.689% and 0.443%, with detection limits of 0.00151μgL(-1) and 0.00264μgL(-1) for Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively. Further validation using certified reference material, NIST 1568b, resulted in determined concentrations of 0.028±0.253μgg(-1) for Cd(II) and 0.046±0.325μgg(-1) for Pb(II). These determined values agree well with the certified values in the reference materials. The interfering effects of various cations and anions were also studied. The proposed method performance was also evaluated in terms of Student 'T' test and Variance 'F' test, which indicated the significance of the present method parameters, as an inter comparison of the experimental values using ICP-OES. PMID:24360411

  2. Study on column SPE with synthesized graphene oxide and FAAS for determination of trace amount of Co(II) and Ni(II) ions in real samples.

    PubMed

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Jamali, Mohammad Reza; Rezaee, Mohammad; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Sehat, Ali Akbari

    2015-02-01

    A selective method for the preconcentration and separation of trace amounts of Co(II) and Ni(II) by column solid phase extraction has been developed. The method is based on the adsorption of metal ions as N-(5-methyl-2-hydroxyacetophenone)-N'-(2-hydroxyacetophenone) ethylene diamine (MHE) complex on synthesized graphene oxide. Computational modeling based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface was utilized to investigate the interaction of metallic complexes with graphene oxide sheet. The adsorption was achieved quantitatively on graphene oxide at pH6.0 and then the retained analyte contents on the column were quantitatively eluted with 3.0 mol L(-1) HNO3. Experimental conditions for effective separation of trace levels of the analyte ions such as pH, flow rate, concentration of eluent, sample volume and interference ions were investigated. A preconcentration factor of 250 was achieved by passing 1250 mL of sample through the solid phase, while the limit of detection of Co(II) and Ni(II) ions were found to be 0.25 and 0.18 ng mL(-1), respectively. The method was applied to the determination of analyte ions in water, black tea and tomato samples. PMID:25492179

  3. Mode 3 Project-Based O-Level: Part II Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greatorex, D.; Lock, R.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a British biology course for the O-level which aims to promote the understanding of broad biological principles through an environmental approach. Results of proper assessment and overall examination performance are also revealed. (HM)

  4. Synthesis of uranyl(II), vanadyl(II) and zirconyl urate complexes, spectral, thermal and biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; El-Metwaly, Nashwa M.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-10-01

    Three urate chelations were obtained when uric acid was reacted with UO2(CH3COO)2H2O, VOSO4·XH2O and ZrOCl2·XH2O salts with neutralized with 0.1 M NaOH aqueous media. The 1:2 metal-to-ligand complexes [(UO2)2(C5H2N4O3)2](H2O), [(ZrO)2(H2O)2(C5H2N4O3)2] and [VO((C5H3N4O3)2] were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, Raman and UV-vis) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, and thermal analysis (TG/DTG). The urate ligand coordinates as mononegative bidentate donor towards the mononuclear central vanadium atom and coordinated as binegative tetradentate mode towards the binuclear dioxouranium and zirconyl centers. The antibacterial activity of the metal complexes were tested against some kind of bacteria and fungi strains and compared with uric acid. The ligand, ZrO(II) and UO2(II) complex showed a week potential degradation on calf thymus DNA, whereas VO(II) complex slightly degraded the DNA.

  5. Crystal structure, DFT, spectroscopic and biological activity evaluation of analgin complexes with Co(ii), Ni(ii) and Cu(ii).

    PubMed

    Mansour, Ahmed M

    2014-11-14

    Reaction of analgin (NaL) with Co(ii), Ni(ii) and Cu(ii) salts in ethanol affords complexes of the type [ML2], which were characterized by elemental analysis, FT IR, UV-Vis, EPR, TG/DTA, magnetic susceptibility and conductance measurements. The copper(ii) complex crystallizes in the orthorhombic Pbca space group. Analgin behaves as a mono-negatively tridentate ligand via pyrazolone O, sulfonate O and tertiary amino groups. The interaction of the tertiary nitrogen with M(n+) ions is the main factor which determines the stability of complexes as revealed from natural bond orbital analysis data, where the binding energy of [ML2] decreases with an increase in the bond length of the M-N bond. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations were applied in order to realize the electronic structures and to explain the related experimental observations. The anti-bacterial activity was studied on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Coordination of analgin to Ni(ii) and Cu(ii) leads to a significant increase in its antibacterial activity as compared with the Co(ii) complex. PMID:25231028

  6. Humidity-controlled preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2012-05-15

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM) has the potential to visualize the structures of micro- to sub-micrometer-sized biological particles, such as cells and organelles, at high resolution. Toward advancing structural studies on the functional states of such particles, here, we developed a system for the preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments. The system, which comprised a moist air generator, microscope, micro-injector mounted on a micromanipulator, custom-made sample preparation chamber, and flash-cooling device, allowed for the manipulation of sample particles in the relative humidity range of 20%-94%rh at 293 K to maintain their hydrated and functional states. Here, we report the details of the system and the operation procedure, including its application to the preparation of a frozen-hydrated chloroplast sample. Sample quality was evaluated through a cryogenic CXDM experiment conducted at BL29XUL of SPring-8. Taking the performance of the system and the quality of the sample, the system was suitable to prepare frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments.

  7. Humidity-controlled preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2012-05-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM) has the potential to visualize the structures of micro- to sub-micrometer-sized biological particles, such as cells and organelles, at high resolution. Toward advancing structural studies on the functional states of such particles, here, we developed a system for the preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments. The system, which comprised a moist air generator, microscope, micro-injector mounted on a micromanipulator, custom-made sample preparation chamber, and flash-cooling device, allowed for the manipulation of sample particles in the relative humidity range of 20%-94%rh at 293 K to maintain their hydrated and functional states. Here, we report the details of the system and the operation procedure, including its application to the preparation of a frozen-hydrated chloroplast sample. Sample quality was evaluated through a cryogenic CXDM experiment conducted at BL29XUL of SPring-8. Taking the performance of the system and the quality of the sample, the system was suitable to prepare frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments.

  8. Spectroscopic and biological approach of Ni(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes of 4-methoxy/ethoxybenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone glyoxime.

    PubMed

    Babahan, Ilknur; Eyduran, Fatih; Coban, Esin Poyrazoglu; Orhan, Nil; Kazar, Didem; Biyik, Halil

    2014-01-01

    Two novel vicinal dioxime ligands containing (4-methoxybenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone glyoxime (L(1)H2) or 4-ethoxybenzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone glyoxime (L(2)H2)) thiosemicarbazone units were synthesized and characterized using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HMQC, MS, infrared and, UV-VIS. spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Mononuclear nickel(II), copper(II) and cobalt(II) complexes with a metal:ligand ratio of 1:2 for L(1)H2 and L(2)H2 were also synthesized. The effect of pH and solvent on the absorption spectra of both ligands and complexes was determined. IR spectra show that the ligands act in a bidentate manner and coordinates N4 donor groups of the ligands to Ni(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) ions. The detection of H-bonding (O-H⋯O) in the [M(LH)2] metal complexes by IR spectra supported the square-planar MN4 coordination of mononuclear complexes. The antimicrobial activities of compounds L(1)H2, L(2)H2, and their Ni(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes were evaluated using the disc diffusion method against 12 bacteria and 4 yeasts. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against 7 bacteria and 3 yeasts were also determined. Among the test compounds attempted, L(1)H2, [Ni(L1H)2], [Cu(L1H)2], L2H2, [Ni(L2H)2] and [Cu(L2H)2] showed some activities against certain Gram-positive bacteria and some of the yeasts tested. PMID:24239764

  9. A reconfigurable real-time compressive-sampling camera for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Pitter, Mark C; Russell, Noah A

    2011-01-01

    Many applications in biology, such as long-term functional imaging of neural and cardiac systems, require continuous high-speed imaging. This is typically not possible, however, using commercially available systems. The frame rate and the recording time of high-speed cameras are limited by the digitization rate and the capacity of on-camera memory. Further restrictions are often imposed by the limited bandwidth of the data link to the host computer. Even if the system bandwidth is not a limiting factor, continuous high-speed acquisition results in very large volumes of data that are difficult to handle, particularly when real-time analysis is required. In response to this issue many cameras allow a predetermined, rectangular region of interest (ROI) to be sampled, however this approach lacks flexibility and is blind to the image region outside of the ROI. We have addressed this problem by building a camera system using a randomly-addressable CMOS sensor. The camera has a low bandwidth, but is able to capture continuous high-speed images of an arbitrarily defined ROI, using most of the available bandwidth, while simultaneously acquiring low-speed, full frame images using the remaining bandwidth. In addition, the camera is able to use the full-frame information to recalculate the positions of targets and update the high-speed ROIs without interrupting acquisition. In this way the camera is capable of imaging moving targets at high-speed while simultaneously imaging the whole frame at a lower speed. We have used this camera system to monitor the heartbeat and blood cell flow of a water flea (Daphnia) at frame rates in excess of 1500 fps. PMID:22028852

  10. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Tsukube, Takuro; Yagi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching. PMID:25343804

  11. Correlations among Five Variables and the Biology Performance of a Sample of Jamaican High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair-Walters, Shonette; Soyibo, Kola

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates whether or not (a) 252 Jamaican high school students (168 boys, 84 girls, 171 grade 10 and 81 grade 11 students) had favourable attitudes to biology, (b) their level of biology performance was satisfactory, (c) there were significant differences in their performance based on their gender, grade level, school-type,…

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and 14C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the 14C concentration in 14C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) - AMS system. The calibration curves of 14C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a 14C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. 14C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean 14C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of 14C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, 14C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. 14C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; 14C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  13. Development of a biaxial compression device for biological samples: preliminary experimental results for a closed cell foam.

    PubMed

    Little, J P; Tevelen, G; Adam, C J; Evans, J H; Pearcy, M J

    2009-07-01

    Biological tissues are subjected to complex loading states in vivo and in order to define constitutive equations that effectively simulate their mechanical behaviour under these loads, it is necessary to obtain data on the tissue's response to multiaxial loading. Single axis and shear testing of biological tissues is often carried out, but biaxial testing is less common. We sought to design and commission a biaxial compression testing device, capable of obtaining repeatable data for biological samples. The apparatus comprised a sealed stainless steel pressure vessel specifically designed such that a state of hydrostatic compression could be created on the test specimen while simultaneously unloading the sample along one axis with an equilibrating tensile pressure. Thus a state of equibiaxial compression was created perpendicular to the long axis of a rectangular sample. For the purpose of calibration and commissioning of the vessel, rectangular samples of closed cell ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) foam were tested. Each sample was subjected to repeated loading, and nine separate biaxial experiments were carried out to a maximum pressure of 204 kPa (30 psi), with a relaxation time of two hours between them. Calibration testing demonstrated the force applied to the samples had a maximum error of 0.026 N (0.423% of maximum applied force). Under repeated loading, the foam sample demonstrated lower stiffness during the first load cycle. Following this cycle, an increased stiffness, repeatable response was observed with successive loading. While the experimental protocol was developed for EVA foam, preliminary results on this material suggest that this device may be capable of providing test data for biological tissue samples. The load response of the foam was characteristic of closed cell foams, with consolidation during the early loading cycles, then a repeatable load-displacement response upon repeated loading. The repeatability of the test results demonstrated the

  14. The IRAS 1 Jy Sample of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies. II. Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-C.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Sanders, D. B.

    1998-12-01

    This is the second paper in a series discussing the properties of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs: LIR > 1012 L⊙ H0 = 75 km s-1 Mpc-1 and q0 = 0.0) from the 1 Jy sample of Kim. This paper presents the first results of a spectroscopic survey at optical wavelengths of a randomly selected subset of 45 ULIGs from Kim & Sanders. These new data are combined with previous data from Veilleux et al. to determine the spectral properties of luminous infrared galaxies (LIGs) with LIR ~ 1010.5-1013 L⊙. We find that the fraction of Seyfert galaxies among LIGs increases dramatically above LIR ~ 1012.3 L⊙--nearly one-half of the galaxies with LIR > 1012.3 L⊙ present Seyfert characteristics. Many of the optical properties of these Seyfert galaxies are consistent with the presence of genuine active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the cores of these objects. The continuum colors and strengths of the stellar Hβ and Mg I b features in and out of the nuclei of ULIGs indicate that star formation has recently (~107 yr) taken place in the nuclear and circumnuclear regions of many of these objects. As expected, photoionization by hot stars appears to be the dominant source of ionization in the objects with H II region-like spectra. Evidence is presented that the ionization source in infrared-selected galaxies with nuclear LINER-like spectra (38% of the ULIGs in our sample) is likely to be shocks or of stellar origins rather than AGNs. Shock ionization associated with starburst-driven outflows may also explain the LINER-like emission detected outside the nuclei of some galaxies. No significant differences are found between the mean color excess of ULIGs and that of IRAS galaxies of lower infrared luminosity. However, in contrast to what was found in low-luminosity infrared galaxies, the color excess in the nuclei of ULIGs does not seem to depend on spectral types. The reddening in ULIGs is generally observed to decrease with distance from the nucleus as in their low

  15. Critical tests for determination of microbiological quality and biological activity in commercial vermicompost samples of different origins.

    PubMed

    Grantina-Ievina, Lelde; Andersone, Una; Berkolde-Pīre, Dace; Nikolajeva, Vizma; Ievinsh, Gederts

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present paper was to show that differences in biological activity among commercially produced vermicompost samples can be found by using a relatively simple test system consisting of microorganism tests on six microbiological media and soilless seedling growth tests with four vegetable crop species. Significant differences in biological properties among analyzed samples were evident both at the level of microbial load as well as plant growth-affecting activity. These differences were mostly manufacturer- and feedstock-associated, but also resulted from storage conditions of vermicompost samples. A mature vermicompost sample that was produced from sewage sludge still contained considerable number of Escherichia coli. Samples from all producers contained several potentially pathogenic fungal species such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Pseudallescheria boidii, Pseudallescheria fimeti, Pseudallescheria minutispora, Scedosporium apiospermum, Scedosporium prolificans, Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, Stachybotrys chartarum, Geotrichum spp., Aphanoascus terreus, and Doratomyces columnaris. In addition, samples from all producers contained plant growth-promoting fungi from the genera Trichoderma and Mortierella. The described system can be useful both for functional studies aiming at understanding of factors affecting quality characteristics of vermicompost preparations and for routine testing of microbiological quality and biological activity of organic waste-derived composts and vermicomposts. PMID:23504062

  16. Polypyrrole/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite for the solid phase extraction of lead(II) in water samples.

    PubMed

    Sahmetlioglu, Ertugrul; Yilmaz, Erkan; Aktas, Ece; Soylak, Mustafa

    2014-02-01

    A multi-walled carbon nanotubes-polypyrrole conducting polymer nanocomposite has been synthesized, characterized and used for the separation and preconcentration of lead at trace levels in water samples prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric detection. The analytical parameters like pH, sample volume, eluent, sample flow rate that were affected the retentions of lead(II) on the new nanocomposite were optimized. Matrix effects were also investigated. Limit of detection and preconcentration factors were 1.1 µg L(-1) and 200, respectively. The adsorption capacity of the nanocomposite was 25.0mg lead(II) per gram composite. The validation of the method was checked by using SPS-WW2 Waste water Level 2 certified reference material. The method was applied to the determination of lead in water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:24401439

  17. Hybrid random walk-linear discriminant analysis method for unwrapping quantitative phase microscopy images of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Diane N. H.; Teitell, Michael A.; Reed, Jason; Zangle, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Standard algorithms for phase unwrapping often fail for interferometric quantitative phase imaging (QPI) of biological samples due to the variable morphology of these samples and the requirement to image at low light intensities to avoid phototoxicity. We describe a new algorithm combining random walk-based image segmentation with linear discriminant analysis (LDA)-based feature detection, using assumptions about the morphology of biological samples to account for phase ambiguities when standard methods have failed. We present three versions of our method: first, a method for LDA image segmentation based on a manually compiled training dataset; second, a method using a random walker (RW) algorithm informed by the assumed properties of a biological phase image; and third, an algorithm which combines LDA-based edge detection with an efficient RW algorithm. We show that the combination of LDA plus the RW algorithm gives the best overall performance with little speed penalty compared to LDA alone, and that this algorithm can be further optimized using a genetic algorithm to yield superior performance for phase unwrapping of QPI data from biological samples. PMID:26305212

  18. Hybrid random walk-linear discriminant analysis method for unwrapping quantitative phase microscopy images of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Diane N H; Teitell, Michael A; Reed, Jason; Zangle, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Standard algorithms for phase unwrapping often fail for interferometric quantitative phase imaging (QPI) of biological samples due to the variable morphology of these samples and the requirement to image at low light intensities to avoid phototoxicity. We describe a new algorithm combining random walk-based image segmentation with linear discriminant analysis (LDA)-based feature detection, using assumptions about the morphology of biological samples to account for phase ambiguities when standard methods have failed. We present three versions of our method: first, a method for LDA image segmentation based on a manually compiled training dataset; second, a method using a random walker (RW) algorithm informed by the assumed properties of a biological phase image; and third, an algorithm which combines LDA-based edge detection with an efficient RW algorithm. We show that the combination of LDA plus the RW algorithm gives the best overall performance with little speed penalty compared to LDA alone, and that this algorithm can be further optimized using a genetic algorithm to yield superior performance for phase unwrapping of QPI data from biological samples. PMID:26305212

  19. Hybrid random walk-linear discriminant analysis method for unwrapping quantitative phase microscopy images of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Diane N. H.; Teitell, Michael A.; Reed, Jason; Zangle, Thomas A.

    2015-11-01

    Standard algorithms for phase unwrapping often fail for interferometric quantitative phase imaging (QPI) of biological samples due to the variable morphology of these samples and the requirement to image at low light intensities to avoid phototoxicity. We describe a new algorithm combining random walk-based image segmentation with linear discriminant analysis (LDA)-based feature detection, using assumptions about the morphology of biological samples to account for phase ambiguities when standard methods have failed. We present three versions of our method: first, a method for LDA image segmentation based on a manually compiled training dataset; second, a method using a random walker (RW) algorithm informed by the assumed properties of a biological phase image; and third, an algorithm which combines LDA-based edge detection with an efficient RW algorithm. We show that the combination of LDA plus the RW algorithm gives the best overall performance with little speed penalty compared to LDA alone, and that this algorithm can be further optimized using a genetic algorithm to yield superior performance for phase unwrapping of QPI data from biological samples.

  20. Interaction between selenium and mercury in biological samples of Pakistani myocardial infarction patients at different stages as related to controls.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Talpur, Farah Naz; Kazi, Atif; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah

    2014-05-01

    It has been speculated that trace elements may a play role in the pathogenesis of heart diseases. In the present study, we aimed to assess the levels of selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) in biological samples (whole blood, urine, and scalp hair) of myocardial infarction (MI) patients of both genders (age range 45-60 years) at the first, second, and third heart attack (n = 130), hospitalized in a cardiac ward of a civil hospital of Hyderabad City (Pakistan). For comparison, healthy age-matched referent subjects (n = 61) of both genders were also selected. Se and Hg in biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, prior to microwave acid digestion, respectively. The validity of the methodology was checked by biological certified reference materials. During this study, 78 % of the 32 registered patients of third MI attack (aged >50 years) died. The concentration of Se was decreased in scalp hair and blood samples of MI patients, while Hg was higher in all biological samples as compared to referent subjects. Se concentration was inversely associated with the risk of MI attacks in both genders. These results add to an increasing body of evidence that Se is a protective element for cardiovascular health. PMID:24643467

  1. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample

    PubMed Central

    Florián-Vargas, Karla; Honores, Marcos J. Carruitero; Bernabé, Eduardo; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively) from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare RSES scores among adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions, with participants' demographic factors being controlled. Results: Mean RSES scores for adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions were 20.47 ± 3.96, 21.96 ± 3.27 and 21.26 ± 4.81, respectively. The ANCOVA test showed that adolescents with Class II malocclusion had a significantly higher RSES score than those with Class I malocclusion, but there were no differences between other malocclusion groups. Supplemental analysis suggested that only those with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion might have greater self-esteem when compared to adolescents with Class I malocclusion. Conclusion: This study shows that, in general, self-esteem did not vary according to adolescents' malocclusion in the sample studied. Surprisingly, only adolescents with Class II malocclusion, particularly Class II, Division 2, reported better self-esteem than those with Class I malocclusion. A more detailed analysis assessing the impact of anterior occlusal features should be conducted. PMID:27275616

  2. Synthesis, characterization, equilibrium study and biological activity of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes of polydentate Schiff base ligand.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A; Shehata, Mohamed R; Shoukry, Mohamed M; Barakat, Mohammad H

    2012-10-01

    Schiff base ligand, 1,4-bis[(2-hydroxybenzaldehyde)propyl]piperazine (BHPP), and its Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR and UV-vis) studies. The ground state of BHPP ligand was investigated using the BUILDER module of MOE. Metal complexes are formed in the 1:1 (M:L) ratio as found from the elemental analysis and found to have the general formula [ML]·nH(2)O, where M=Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), L=BHPP. In all the studied complexes, the (BHPP) ligand behaves as a hexadentate divalent anion with coordination involving the two azomethine nitrogen's, the two nitrogen atoms of piperazine ring and the two deprotonated phenolic OH-groups. The magnetic and spectral data indicates octahedral geometry of metal(II) complexes. The ligand and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disc diffusion method against the selected bacteria and fungi. They were found to be more active against Gram-positive than Gram-negative bacteria. Protonation constants of (BHPP) ligand and stability constants of its Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes were determined by potentiometric titration method in 50% DMSO-water solution at ionic strength of 0.1 M sodium nitrate. It has been observed that the protonated Schiff base ligand (BHPP) have four protonation constants. The divalent metal ions Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+) form 1:1 complexes. PMID:22935596

  3. Synthesis, characterization, equilibrium study and biological activity of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes of polydentate Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ahmed A.; Shehata, Mohamed R.; Shoukry, Mohamed M.; Barakat, Mohammad H.

    2012-10-01

    Schiff base ligand, 1,4-bis[(2-hydroxybenzaldehyde)propyl]piperazine (BHPP), and its Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) metal complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance and spectral (IR and UV-vis) studies. The ground state of BHPP ligand was investigated using the BUILDER module of MOE. Metal complexes are formed in the 1:1 (M:L) ratio as found from the elemental analysis and found to have the general formula [ML]·nH2O, where M = Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), L = BHPP. In all the studied complexes, the (BHPP) ligand behaves as a hexadentate divalent anion with coordination involving the two azomethine nitrogen's, the two nitrogen atoms of piperazine ring and the two deprotonated phenolic OH-groups. The magnetic and spectral data indicates octahedral geometry of metal(II) complexes. The ligand and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disc diffusion method against the selected bacteria and fungi. They were found to be more active against Gram-positive than Gram-negative bacteria. Protonation constants of (BHPP) ligand and stability constants of its Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ complexes were determined by potentiometric titration method in 50% DMSO-water solution at ionic strength of 0.1 M sodium nitrate. It has been observed that the protonated Schiff base ligand (BHPP) have four protonation constants. The divalent metal ions Cu2+, Ni2+ and Co2+ form 1:1 complexes.

  4. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II) in the Standardization Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donders, Jacobus

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the latent structure of the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II; Delis, Kramer, Kaplan, & Ober, 2000) at three different age levels, using the standardization sample. Maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analyses are performed to test four competing hypothetical models for fit and…

  5. Selective ionic liquid ferrofluid based dispersive-solid phase extraction for simultaneous preconcentration/separation of lead and cadmium in milk and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fasih Ramandi, Negin; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, a selective ionic liquid ferrofluid has been used in dispersive solid phase extraction (IL-FF-D-SPE) for simultaneous preconcentration and separation of lead and cadmium in milk and biological samples combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. To improve the selectivity of the ionic liquid ferrofluid, the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles with a magnetic core as sorbent was modified by loading 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphtol. Due to the rapid injection of an appropriate amount of ionic liquid ferrofluid into the aqueous sample by a syringe, extraction can be achieved within a few seconds. In addition, based on the attraction of the ionic liquid ferrofluid to a magnet, no centrifugation step is needed for phase separation. The experimental parameters of IL-FF-D-SPE were optimized using a Box-Behnken design (BBD) after a Plackett-Burman screening design. Under the optimum conditions, the relative standard deviations of 2.2% and 2.4% were obtained for lead and cadmium, respectively (n=7). The limit of detections were 1.21 µg L(-1) for Pb(II) and 0.21 µg L(-1) for Cd(II). The preconcentration factors were 250 for lead and 200 for cadmium and the maximum adsorption capacities of the sorbent were 11.18 and 9.34 mg g(-1) for lead and cadmium, respectively. PMID:25281121

  6. New Methods of Simulation of Mn(II) EPR Spectra: Single Crystals, Polycrystalline and Amorphous (Biological) Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sushil K.

    Biological systems exhibit properties of amorphous materials. The Mn(II) ion in amorphous materials is characterized by distributions of spin-Hamiltonian parameters around mean values. It has a certain advantage over other ions, being one of the most abundant elements on the earth. The extent to which living organisms utilize manganese varies from one organism to the other. There is a fairly high concentration of the Mn(II) ion in green plants, which use it in the O2 evolution reaction of photosynthesis (Sauer, 1980). Structure-reactivity relationships in Mn(II)-O2 complexes are given in a review article by Coleman and Taylor (1980). Manganese is a trace requirement in animal nutrition; highly elevated levels of manganese in the diet can be toxic, probably because of an interference with iron homeostasis (Underwood, 1971). On the other hand, animals raised with a dietary deficiency of manganese exhibit severe abnormalities in connective tissue; these problems have been attributed to the obligatory role of Mn(II) in mucopolysaccharide metabolism (Leach, 1971). Mn(II) has been detected unequivocally in living organisms.

  7. Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) Complexes of Salan-Type Ligand Containing Ester Groups: Synthesis, Characterization, Electrochemical Properties, and In Vitro Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jeslin Kanaga Inba, P.; Annaraj, B.; Thalamuthu, S.; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A salen ligand on reduction and N-alkylation affords a novel [N2O2] chelating ligand containing ester groups [L = diethyl-2,2′-(propane-1,3-diylbis((2-hydroxy-3-methoxy benzyl)azanediyl))diacetate]. The purity of the ligand was confirmed by NMR and HPLC chromatograms. Its Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized and characterized by a combination of elemental analysis, IR, NMR, UV-Vis, and mass spectral data, and thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTA). The magnetic moments, UV-Vis, and EPR spectral studies support square planar geometry around the Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions. A tetrahedral geometry is observed in four-coordinate zinc with bulky N-alkylated salan ligand. The redox properties of the copper complex were examined in DMSO by cyclic voltammetry. The voltammograms show quasireversible process. The interaction of metal complexes with CT DNA was investigated by UV-Vis absorption titration, ethidium bromide displacement assay, cyclic voltammetry methods, and agarose gel electrophoresis. The apparent binding constant values suggest moderate intercalative binding modes between the complexes and DNA. The in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial potentials of the synthesized compounds were also determined. PMID:23983672

  8. Standard Reporting Requirements for Biological Samples in Metabolomics Experiments: Environmental Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomic technologies are increasingly being applied to study biological questions in a range of different settings from clinical through to environmental. As with other high-throughput technologies, such as those used in transcriptomics and proteomics, metabolomics continues...

  9. J-Band Infrared Spectroscopy of a Sample of Brown Dwarfs Using NIRSPEC on Keck II.

    PubMed

    McLean; Wilcox; Becklin; Figer; Gilbert; Graham; Larkin; Levenson; Teplitz; Kirkpatrick

    2000-04-10

    Near-infrared spectroscopic observations of a sample of very cool, low-mass objects are presented with higher spectral resolution than in any previous studies. Six of the objects are L dwarfs, ranging in spectral class from L2 to L8/9, and the seventh is a methane or T dwarf. These new observations were obtained during commissioning of the near-infrared spectrometer (NIRSPEC), the first high-resolution near-infrared cryogenic spectrograph for the Keck II 10 m telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Spectra with a resolving power of R approximately 2500 from 1.135 to 1.360 µm (approximately J band) are presented for each source. At this resolution, a rich spectral structure is revealed, much of which is due to blending of unresolved molecular transitions. Strong lines due to neutral potassium (K i) and bands due to iron hydride (FeH) and steam (H2O) change significantly throughout the L sequence. Iron hydride disappears between L5 and L8, the steam bands deepen, and the K i lines gradually become weaker but wider because of pressure broadening. An unidentified feature occurs at 1.22 µm that has a temperature dependence like FeH but has no counterpart in the available FeH opacity data. Because these objects are 3-6 mag brighter in the near-infrared compared with the I band, spectral classification is efficient. One of the objects studied (2MASSW J1523+3014) is the coolest L dwarf discovered so far by the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), but its spectrum is still significantly different from the methane-dominated objects such as Gl 229B or SDSS 1624+0029. PMID:10727388

  10. State of the art of environmentally friendly sample preparation approaches for determination of PBDEs and metabolites in environmental and biological samples: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Berton, Paula; Lana, Nerina B; Ríos, Juan M; García-Reyes, Juan F; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2016-01-28

    Green chemistry principles for developing methodologies have gained attention in analytical chemistry in recent decades. A growing number of analytical techniques have been proposed for determination of organic persistent pollutants in environmental and biological samples. In this light, the current review aims to present state-of-the-art sample preparation approaches based on green analytical principles proposed for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and metabolites (OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs) in environmental and biological samples. Approaches to lower the solvent consumption and accelerate the extraction, such as pressurized liquid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, and ultrasound-assisted extraction, are discussed in this review. Special attention is paid to miniaturized sample preparation methodologies and strategies proposed to reduce organic solvent consumption. Additionally, extraction techniques based on alternative solvents (surfactants, supercritical fluids, or ionic liquids) are also commented in this work, even though these are scarcely used for determination of PBDEs. In addition to liquid-based extraction techniques, solid-based analytical techniques are also addressed. The development of greener, faster and simpler sample preparation approaches has increased in recent years (2003-2013). Among green extraction techniques, those based on the liquid phase predominate over those based on the solid phase (71% vs. 29%, respectively). For solid samples, solvent assisted extraction techniques are preferred for leaching of PBDEs, and liquid phase microextraction techniques are mostly used for liquid samples. Likewise, green characteristics of the instrumental analysis used after the extraction and clean-up steps are briefly discussed. PMID:26755134

  11. Single-step microwave assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction of trihalomethanes and haloketones in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Alsharaa, Abdulnaser; Basheer, Chanbasha; Sajid, Muhammad

    2015-12-15

    A single-step microwave assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction (MA-HS-LPME) method was developed for determination of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloketones (HKs) in biological samples. In this method, a porous membrane envelope was filled with few microliters of extraction solvent and then placed inside the microwave extraction vial. A PTFE ring was designed to support the membrane envelope over a certain height inside the vial. An optimum amount of biological sample was placed in the vial equipped with magnetic stirrer. After that nitric acid was added to the vial for digestion of biological sample. The sample was digested and the volatile THMs and HKs were extracted at headspace in the solvent containing porous membrane. After simultaneous digestion and extraction, the extract was injected to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for analysis. Factors affecting the extraction efficiency were optimized to achieve higher extraction performance. Quantification was carried out over a concentration range of 0.3-100ngg(-1) for brominated compounds while for the chlorinated ones linear range was between 0.5-100ngg(-1). Limit of detections (LODs) were ranged from 0.051 to 0.110ngg(-1) while limit of quantification (LOQ) were in the range of 0.175-0.351ngg(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the calibrations were ranged between 1.1 and 6.8%. The MA-HS-LPME was applied for the determination of trace level THMs and HKs in fish tissue and green alga samples. PMID:26571453

  12. A solid phase extraction procedure for the determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in food and water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet; Kartal, Şenol

    2015-05-01

    A relatively rapid, accurate and precise solid phase extraction method is presented for the determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) in various food and water samples. Quantitation is carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method is based on the retention of the trace metal ions on Dowex Marathon C, a strong acid cation exchange resin. Some important parameters affecting the analytical performance of the method such as pH, flow rate and volume of the sample solution; type, concentration, volume, flow rate of the eluent; and matrix effects on the retention of the metal ions were investigated. Common coexisting ions did not interfere on the separation and determination of the analytes. The detection limits (3 σb) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were found as 0.13 and 0.18 μg L(-1), respectively, while the limit of quantification values (10 σb) were computed as 0.43 and 0.60 μg L(-1) for the same sequence of the analytes. The precision (as relative standard deviation was lower than 4% at 5 μg L(-1) Cd(II) and 10 μg L(-1) Pb(II) levels, and the preconcentration factor was found to be 250. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was verified by analysing the certified reference materials, SPS-WW2 Batch 108 wastewater level 2 and INCT-TL-1 tea leaves, with the satisfactory results. In addition, for the accuracy of the method the recovery studies (⩾ 95%) were carried out. The method was applied to the determination of the analytes in the various natural waters (lake water, tap water, waste water with boric acid, waste water with H2SO4) and food samples (pomegranate flower, organic pear, radish leaf, lamb meat, etc.), and good results were obtained. While the food samples almost do not contain cadmium, they have included lead at low levels of 0.13-1.12 μg g(-1). PMID:25529724

  13. Bio-generation of stable isotope-labeled internal standards for absolute and relative quantitation of phase II drug metabolites in plasma samples using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei; Li, Zi; Beck, Wayne D; Callahan, Patrick M; Terry, Alvin V; Bar-Peled, Maor; Bartlett, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    Quantification of drug metabolites in biological samples has been of great interest in current pharmaceutical research, since metabolite concentrations and pharmacokinetics can contribute to a better understanding of the toxicity of drug candidates. Two major categories of Phase II metabolites, glucuronide conjugates and glutathione conjugates, may cause significant drug toxicity and therefore require close monitoring at early stages of drug development. In order to achieve high precision, accuracy, and robustness, stable isotope-labeled (SIL) internal standards (IS) are widely used in quantitative bioanalytical methods using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), due to their capability of compensating for matrix effects, extraction variations and instrument response fluctuations. However, chemical synthesis of SIL analogues of Phase II metabolites can often be very difficult and require extensive exploratory research, leading to higher cost and significant delays in drug research and development. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a generic method which can synthesize SIL analogues of Phase II metabolites from more available SIL parent drugs or SIL conjugation co-factors, using in vitro biotransformation. This methodology was successfully applied to the bio-generation of SIL glucuronide conjugates and glutathione conjugates. The method demonstrated satisfactory performance in both absolute quantitation and assessment of relative exposure coverage across species in safety tests of drug metabolites (MIST). This generic technique can be utilized as an alternative to chemical synthesis and potentially save time and cost for drug research and development. PMID:25804729

  14. The bank of biological samples representing individuals exposed to long-term ionizing radiation at various doses.

    PubMed

    Takhauov, Ravil M; Karpov, Andrey B; Albach, Elena N; Khalyuzova, Maria V; Freidin, Maxim B; Litviakov, Nicolai V; Sazonov, Aleksey E; Isubakova, Daria S; Bolshakov, Mikhail A; Mezheritskiy, Stanislav A; Mironova, Elena B; Semenova, Julia V; Nekrasov, Gennadiy B; Izosimov, Andrey S; Gagarin, Aleksey A; Brendakov, Roman V; Maksimov, Dmitriy E; Ermolaev, Yuriy D

    2015-04-01

    Collection and storage of biological specimens in biobanks aims to obtain and preserve samples of different kinds for biological and medical studies. Here we present a description of the Bank of Biological Materials (BBM) housed by the Seversk Biophysical Research Centre (SBRC; Seversk, Russia). The main goal of maintaining the BBM is to collect and store biological samples suitable for genetic studies of people exposed to long-term ionizing radiation. Currently, the collection includes 19,194 biological specimens obtained from 8105 donors, of whom 42.3% are diagnosed with malignant neoplasms, 28.7% are healthy residents of the city of Seversk, 18.8% are healthy employees of the Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises (SGCE), and 10.2% are patients diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. The donors were enrolled using the Regional Medical and Dosimetric Register database created by the SBRC. For each donor, DNA specimens were extracted from peripheral blood and tissues and cell suspensions for cytogenetic analysis were prepared routinely. The BBM's unique collection is suitable primarily for studies of individual radiosensitivity of humans (IRH), and genetic aspects of the pathophysiology of common human diseases, especially in populations exposed to long-term low-dose ionizing radiation. PMID:25574933

  15. Raman Spectroscopy Techniques for the Detection of Biological Samples in Suspensions and as Aerosol Particles: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Félix-Rivera, Hilsamar; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews current scientific literature focusing on Raman spectroscopy modalities that have been successfully applied to the detection of biological samples in aqueous suspensions and in aerosols. Normal Raman, surface enhanced Raman scattering, coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering, resonance Raman and UV-Raman spectropies, allow the detection of biological samples in situ in the near field and as well as in the far field at standoff distances. Applications span from fundamental studies to applied research in areas of defense and security and in monitoring of environmental pollution. A primary focus has been placed on biological samples including bacteria, pollen, virus, and biological contents in these specimens, in suspensions, and in aerosols. Several Raman spectroscopy studies have been reviewed to show how various modalities can achieve detection in these biosystems. Current data generated by our group is also included. Necessary parameters used to accomplish the detection and data analysis, which could also be used to interpret the results and to render the methodologies robust and reliable, are discussed.

  16. BASIC Simulation Programs; Volumes I and II. Biology, Earth Science, Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digital Equipment Corp., Maynard, MA.

    Computer programs which teach concepts and processes related to biology, earth science, and chemistry are presented. The seven biology problems deal with aspects of genetics, evolution and natural selection, gametogenesis, enzymes, photosynthesis, and the transport of material across a membrane. Four earth science problems concern climates, the…

  17. Biology Labs That Work: The Best of How-To-Do-Its. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Suzanne, Ed.; Moore, Randy, Ed.; Haugen, Heidi, Ed.

    This selected collection of How-To-Do-It articles published in the American Biology Teacher during the past six years presents experiments that can be conducted safely under properly trained and responsible teacher supervision. Contents include: (1) "General Biology and the Nature of Science"; (2) "Cells and Molecules"; (3) "Microbes and Fungi";…

  18. Australian Biology Test Item Bank, Years 11 and 12. Volume II: Year 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Sewell, Jeffrey J., Ed.

    This document consists of test items which are applicable to biology courses throughout Australia (irrespective of course materials used); assess key concepts within course statement (for both core and optional studies); assess a wide range of cognitive processes; and are relevant to current biological concepts. These items are arranged under…

  19. An Integrated Microfabricated Device for Dual Microdialysis and On-line ESI Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Complex Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Fan; Lin, Yuehe ); Wen, Jian Y.; Matson, Dean W. ); Smith, Richard D. )

    1999-05-01

    A microfabricated dual-microdialysis device in a single integrated microfabricated platform was constructed using laser micromachining techniques for the rapid fractionation and cleanup of complex biological samples. Results suggest the potential for integration of such microfabricated devices with other sample manipulations for the rapid ESI-MS analysis of complex biological samples.

  20. Ca II AND Na I QUASAR ABSORPTION-LINE SYSTEMS IN AN EMISSION-SELECTED SAMPLE OF SDSS DR7 GALAXY/QUASAR PROJECTIONS. I. SAMPLE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cherinka, B.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this project is to identify low-redshift host galaxies of quasar absorption-line systems by selecting galaxies that are seen in projection onto quasar sightlines. To this end, we use the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to construct a parent sample of 97,489 galaxy/quasar projections at impact parameters of up to 100 kpc to the foreground galaxy. We then search the quasar spectra for absorption-line systems of Ca II and Na I within {+-}500 km s{sup -1} of the galaxy's velocity. This yields 92 Ca II and 16 Na I absorption systems. We find that most of the Ca II and Na I systems are sightlines through the Galactic disk, through high-velocity cloud complexes in our halo, or Virgo Cluster sightlines. Placing constraints on the absorption line rest equivalent width significance ({>=}3.0{sigma}), the local standard of rest velocity along the sightline ({>=}345 km s{sup -1}), and the ratio of the impact parameter to the galaxy optical radius ({<=}5.0), we identify four absorption-line systems that are associated with low-redshift galaxies at high confidence, consisting of two Ca II systems (one of which also shows Na I) and two Na I systems. These four systems arise in blue, {approx}L*{sub r} galaxies. Tables of the 108 absorption systems are provided to facilitate future follow-up.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, biological activity of binuclear Co(II), Cu(II) and mononuclear Ni(II) complexes of bulky multi-dentate thiosemicarbazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Abd Al-Gader, I. M.; El-Asmy, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    The chelation behavior of 9,10-dihydro-9,10-ethanoanthracene-11,12-dicarbonyl) bis (N-ethylhydrazine-1-carbothioamide) (H6ETS)(1) towards Co2+, Ni2+and Cu2+ have been studied. The spectral data revealed that the ligand acts as a bi- and/or mono-negative multi-dentate. The isolated Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes are square-planar while the Co(II) is tetrahedral. EPR spectrum of Cu(II) complex confirmed simulated an axial spin-Hamiltonian exhibiting a four-line pattern with nitrogen super-hyperfine couplings originating from imine hydrazinic nitrogen atoms and possess a significant amount of tetrahedral distortion leading to a pseudo-square-planar geometry with unpaired electron has d ground state. Also, the thermal behavior and kinetic parameters were determined. Furthermore, the title compounds were investigated for their antibacterial activity using inhibition zone diameter and for DNA degradation, superoxide-scavenging activity as well as hydroxyl radicals that generated by the oxidation of cytochrome c in L-ascorbic acid/CuSO4-cytochrome c system.

  2. Mercury Analysis of Acid- and Alkaline-Reduced Biological Samples: Identification of meta-Cinnabar as the Major Biotransformed Compound in Algae†

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, David; Budd, Kenneth; Lefebvre, Daniel D.

    2006-01-01

    The biotransformation of HgII in pH-controlled and aerated algal cultures was investigated. Previous researchers have observed losses in Hg detection in vitro with the addition of cysteine under acid reduction conditions in the presence of SnCl2. They proposed that this was the effect of Hg-thiol complexing. The present study found that cysteine-Hg, protein and nonprotein thiol chelates, and nucleoside chelates of Hg were all fully detectable under acid reduction conditions without previous digestion. Furthermore, organic (R-Hg) mercury compounds could not be detected under either the acid or alkaline reduction conditions, and only β-HgS was detected under alkaline and not under acid SnCl2 reduction conditions. The blue-green alga Limnothrix planctonica biotransformed the bulk of HgII applied as HgCl2 into a form with the analytical properties of β-HgS. Similar results were obtained for the eukaryotic alga Selenastrum minutum. No evidence for the synthesis of organomercurials such as CH3Hg+ was obtained from analysis of either airstream or biomass samples under the aerobic conditions of the study. An analytical procedure that involved both acid and alkaline reduction was developed. It provides the first selective method for the determination of β-HgS in biological samples. Under aerobic conditions, HgII is biotransformed mainly into β-HgS (meta-cinnabar), and this occurs in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae. This has important implications with respect to identification of mercury species and cycling in aquatic habitats. PMID:16391065

  3. Comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and measurement with a 3D polymer gel dosimeter for dose distributions in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, T.; Maeyama, T.; Ishikawa, K. L.; Fukunishi, N.; Fukasaku, K.; Takagi, S.; Noda, S.; Himeno, R.; Hayashi, S.

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we used a 135 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beam to irradiate a biological sample composed of fresh chicken meat and bones, which was placed in front of a PAGAT gel dosimeter, and compared the measured and simulated transverse-relaxation-rate (R2) distributions in the gel dosimeter. We experimentally measured the three-dimensional R2 distribution, which records the dose induced by particles penetrating the sample, by using magnetic resonance imaging. The obtained R2 distribution reflected the heterogeneity of the biological sample. We also conducted Monte Carlo simulations using the PHITS code by reconstructing the elemental composition of the biological sample from its computed tomography images while taking into account the dependence of the gel response on the linear energy transfer. The simulation reproduced the experimental distal edge structure of the R2 distribution with an accuracy under about 2 mm, which is approximately the same as the voxel size currently used in treatment planning.

  4. Comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and measurement with a 3D polymer gel dosimeter for dose distributions in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Furuta, T; Maeyama, T; Ishikawa, K L; Fukunishi, N; Fukasaku, K; Takagi, S; Noda, S; Himeno, R; Hayashi, S

    2015-08-21

    In this research, we used a 135 MeV/nucleon carbon-ion beam to irradiate a biological sample composed of fresh chicken meat and bones, which was placed in front of a PAGAT gel dosimeter, and compared the measured and simulated transverse-relaxation-rate (R2) distributions in the gel dosimeter. We experimentally measured the three-dimensional R2 distribution, which records the dose induced by particles penetrating the sample, by using magnetic resonance imaging. The obtained R2 distribution reflected the heterogeneity of the biological sample. We also conducted Monte Carlo simulations using the PHITS code by reconstructing the elemental composition of the biological sample from its computed tomography images while taking into account the dependence of the gel response on the linear energy transfer. The simulation reproduced the experimental distal edge structure of the R2 distribution with an accuracy under about 2 mm, which is approximately the same as the voxel size currently used in treatment planning. PMID:26266894

  5. Correlation of Arsenic Levels in Smokeless Tobacco Products and Biological Samples of Oral Cancer Patients and Control Consumers.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Talpur, Farah N; Kazi, Atif G; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Kamboh, Muhammad A

    2015-12-01

    It has been extensively reported that chewing of smokeless tobacco (SLT) can lead to cancers of oral cavity. In present study, the relationship between arsenic (As) exposure via chewing/inhaling different SLT products in oral cancer patients have or/not consumed SLT products was studied. The As in different types of SLT products (gutkha, mainpuri, and snuff) and biological (scalp hair and blood) samples of different types of oral cancer patients and controls were analyzed. Both controls and oral cancer patients have same age group (ranged 30-60 years), socio-economic status, localities, and dietary habits. The concentrations of As in SLT products and biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by certified reference materials. The resulted data of present study indicates that the concentration of As was significantly higher in scalp hair and blood samples of oral cancer patients than those of controls (p<0.001). It was also observed that the values of As were two- to threefolds higher in biological samples of controls subjects, consuming SLT products as compared to those have none of these habits (p>0.01). The intake of As via consuming different SLT may have synergistic effects, in addition to other risk factors associated with oral cancer. PMID:25975948

  6. Automatic instrument for chemical processing to detect microorganism in biological samples by measuring light reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelbaugh, B. N.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Colburn, M. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automated apparatus is reported for sequentially assaying urine samples for the presence of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that comprises a rotary table which carries a plurality of sample containing vials and automatically dispenses fluid reagents into the vials preparatory to injecting a light producing luciferase-luciferin mixture into the samples. The device automatically measures the light produced in each urine sample by a bioluminescence reaction of the free bacterial adenosine triphosphate with the luciferase-luciferin mixture. The light measured is proportional to the concentration of bacterial adenosine triphosphate which, in turn, is proportional to the number of bacteria present in the respective urine sample.

  7. Direct determination and speciation of mercury compounds in environmental and biological samples by carbon bed atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for the direct determination of mercury in water and biological samples using a unique carbon bed atomizer for atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method avoided sources of error such as loss of volatile mercury during sample digestion and contamination of samples through added reagents by eliminating sample pretreatment steps. The design of the atomizer allowed use of the 184.9 nm mercury resonance line in the vacuum ultraviolet region, which increased sensitivity over the commonly used spin-forbidden 253.7 nm line. The carbon bed atomizer method was applied to a study of mercury concentrations in water, hair, sweat, urine, blood, breath and saliva samples from a non-occupationally exposed population. Data were collected on the average concentration, the range and distribution of mercury in the samples. Data were also collected illustrating individual variations in mercury concentrations with time. Concentrations of mercury found were significantly higher than values reported in the literature for a ''normal'' population. This is attributed to the increased accuracy gained by eliminating pretreatment steps and increasing atomization efficiency. Absorption traces were obtained for various solutions of pure and complexed mercury compounds. Absorption traces of biological fluids were also obtained. Differences were observed in the absorption-temperatures traces of various compounds. The utility of this technique for studying complexation was demonstrated.

  8. Elemental analysis of biological samples by graphite furnace, inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (GF-ICP-AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Grabau, F.; Zu-cheng, J.

    1984-08-01

    The large number of analyses required for monitoring environmental pollution and its ecological impacts suggests that an analytical screening method would be very useful if it could rapidly distinguish those samples containing environmentally significant concentrations of pollutants from those that do not. In the trace elemental analysis of solids the most time consuming step is often the conversion of the sample into a suitable analytical form, usually a digestion and dissolution process. We have addressed these problems by combining a graphite furnace with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. With this system solid samples of plant and animal tissue, as well as solutions, can be vaporized and introduced directly into the inductively coupled plasma. A simple standard additions technique was developed for solid samples that yielded acceptable results for a number of elements in biological samples. Powers of detection were not satisfactory for the lowest concentrations of several elements in the NBS biological SRMs and analytical uncertainties were relatively high for quantitative analyses but were generally satisfactory for screening methods. The design of the interface between the graphite furnace and the inductively coupled plasma and the pulse effect caused by the vaporization of the sample are critical factors in the GF-ICP-AES method. 31 references, 21 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Determination of cobalt in biological samples by line-source and high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using solid sampling or alkaline treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Anderson Schwingel; Vieira, Mariana Antunes; da Silva, Alessandra Furtado; Borges, Daniel L. Gallindo; Welz, Bernhard; Heitmann, Uwe; Curtius, Adilson José

    2005-06-01

    Two procedures for the determination of Co in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) were compared: solid sampling (SS) and alkaline treatment with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using two different instruments for the investigation: a conventional line-source (LS) atomic absorption spectrometer and a prototype high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer. For the direct introduction of the solid samples, certified reference materials (CRM) were ground to a particle size ≤50 μm. Alkaline treatment was carried out by placing about 250 mg of the sample in polypropylene flasks, adding 2 mL of 25% m/v tetramethylammonium hydroxide and de-ionized water. Due to its unique capacity of providing a 3-D spectral plot, a high-resolution continuum source (HR-CS) graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used as a tool to evaluate potential spectral interferences, including background absorption for both sample introduction procedures, revealing that a continuous background preceded the atomic signal for pyrolysis temperatures lower than 700 °C. Molecular absorption bands with pronounced rotational fine structure appeared for atomization temperatures >1800 °C probably as a consequence of the formation of PO. After optimization had been carried out using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry, the optimized conditions were adopted also for line-source atomic absorption spectrometry. Six biological certified reference materials were analyzed, with calibration against aqueous standards, resulting in agreement with the certified values (according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level) and in detection limits as low as 5 ng g -1.

  10. Application of a complex constraint for biological samples in coherent diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, M W M; Peele, A G; van Riessen, G A

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate the application of a complex constraint in the reconstruction of images from phase-diverse Fresnel coherent diffraction data for heterogeneous biological objects. The application of this constraint is shown to improve the quality of the reconstruction of both the phase and the magnitude of the complex object transmission function. PMID:24514606

  11. A COMPARISON OF TWO RAPID BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT SAMPLING METHODS FOR MACROINVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2003, the Office of Research and Developments (ORD's) National Exposure Research Laboratory initiated a collaborative research effort with U.S. EPA Region 3 to conduct a study comparing two rapid biological assessment methods for collecting stream macroinvertebrates. One metho...

  12. Perceived Use of Inquiry Teaching by a Sample of Malaysian Biology Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Nor Asma; Rubba, Peter A.

    1981-01-01

    Determined degree to which Malaysian biology teachers (N=26) perceived they understood and used inquiry teaching. Data indicated that these teachers perceived they had a moderate amount of knowledge about inquiry and occasionally used the 21 inquiry-related behaviors assessed by "A Generic Problem Solving (Inquiry) Model" (Hungerford, 1975).…

  13. Active Learning "Not" Associated with Student Learning in a Random Sample of College Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, T. M.; Leonard, M. J.; Colgrove, C. A.; Kalinowski, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that adding active learning to traditional college science lectures substantially improves student learning. However, this research predominantly studied courses taught by science education researchers, who are likely to have exceptional teaching expertise. The present study investigated introductory biology courses…

  14. neutron activation analysis using thermochromatography. III. analysis of samples of biological origin

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.V.; Khamatov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    The use of gas thermochromatography (GTC) in the radioactivation analysis of biological materials is discussed. A group separation of a number of highly volatile elements from sodium and bromine radionuclides has been achieved. The limit of detection of the elements by INAA and neutron activation analysis was estimated using GTC. The advantages of the procedure and the analytical parameters are discussed.

  15. Determination of the Biologically Relevant Sampling Depth for Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessments (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical paper provides defensible approximations for what the depth of the biologically active zone, or “biotic zone” is within certain environments. The methods used in this study differ somewhat between Part 1 (Terrestrial Biotic Zone) and Part 2 (Aquatic Biotic Zone). ...

  16. Preparation of Plant Samples for Phytochemical Research and the Study of Their Biological Activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior to investigating plant natural products for biologically active constituents, it is necessary to establish guidelines and procedures for carefully collecting, cataloging, and storing specimens. All field collections should begin with detailed records on location, which should include a list o...

  17. How Parents Influence School Grades: Hints from a Sample of Adoptive and Biological Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2007-01-01

    Using the biological and adoptive families in the Minnesota-based Sibling Interaction and Behavior Study, we investigated the associations among genetic and environmental influences on IQ, parenting, parental expectations for offspring educational attainment, engagement in school, and school grades. All variables showed substantial genetic…

  18. Combining partially ranked data in plant breeding and biology: II. Analysis with Rasch model.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many years of breeding experiments, germplasm screening, and molecular biologic experimentation have generated volumes of sequence, genotype, and phenotype information that have been stored in public data repositories. These resources afford genetic and genomic researchers the opportunity to handle ...

  19. Effect of sulfur compounds on biological reduction of nitric oxide in aqueous Fe(II)EDTA2- solutions.

    PubMed

    Manconi, Isabella; van der Maas, Peter; Lens, Piet N L

    2006-08-01

    Biological reduction of nitric oxide (NO) in aqueous solutions of EDTA chelated Fe(II) is one of the main steps in the BioDeNOx process, a novel bioprocess for the removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from polluted gas streams. Since NOx contaminated gases usually also contain sulfurous pollutants, the possible interferences of these sulfur compounds with the BioDeNOx process need to be identified. Therefore, the effect of the sulfur compounds Na2SO4, Na2SO3, and H2S on the biological NO reduction in aqueous solutions of Fe(II)EDTA2- (25 mM, pH 7.2, 55 degrees C) was studied in batch experiments. Sulfate and sulfite were found to not affect the reduction rate of Fe(II)EDTA2- complexed NO under the conditions tested. Sulfide, either dosed externally or formed during the batch incubation out of endogenous sulfur sources or the supplied sulfate or sulfite, influences the production and consumption of the intermediate nitrous oxide (N2O) during Fe(II)EDTA2- bound NO reduction. At low concentrations (0.2 g VSS/l) of denitrifying sludge, 0.2 mM free sulfide completely inhibited the nitrosyl-complex reduction. At higher biomass concentrations (1.3-2.3 g VSS/l), sulfide (from 15 microM to 0.8 mM) induced an incomplete NO denitrification with N2O accumulation. The reduction rates of NO to N2O were enhanced by anaerobic sludge, presumably because it kept FeEDTA in the reduced state. PMID:16517188

  20. Automated sample mounting and alignment system for biological crystallography at a synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Snell, Gyorgy; Cork, Carl; Nordmeyer, Robert; Cornell, Earl; Meigs, George; Yegian, Derek; Jaklevic, Joseph; Jin, Jian; Stevens, Raymond C; Earnest, Thomas

    2004-04-01

    High-throughput data collection for macromolecular crystallography requires an automated sample mounting and alignment system for cryo-protected crystals that functions reliably when integrated into protein-crystallography beamlines at synchrotrons. Rapid mounting and dismounting of the samples increases the efficiency of the crystal screening and data collection processes, where many crystals can be tested for the quality of diffraction. The sample-mounting subsystem has random access to 112 samples, stored under liquid nitrogen. Results of extensive tests regarding the performance and reliability of the system are presented. To further increase throughput, we have also developed a sample transport/storage system based on "puck-shaped" cassettes, which can hold sixteen samples each. Seven cassettes fit into a standard dry shipping Dewar. The capabilities of a robotic crystal mounting and alignment system with instrumentation control software and a relational database allows for automated screening and data collection to be developed. PMID:15062077

  1. Automated sample mounting and technical advance alignment system for biological crystallography at a synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Gyorgy; Cork, Carl; Nordmeyer, Robert; Cornell, Earl; Meigs, George; Yegian, Derek; Jaklevic, Joseph; Jin, Jian; Stevens, Raymond C.; Earnest, Thomas

    2004-01-07

    High-throughput data collection for macromolecular crystallography requires an automated sample mounting system for cryo-protected crystals that functions reliably when integrated into protein-crystallography beamlines at synchrotrons. Rapid mounting and dismounting of the samples increases the efficiency of the crystal screening and data collection processes, where many crystals can be tested for the quality of diffraction. The sample-mounting subsystem has random access to 112 samples, stored under liquid nitrogen. Results of extensive tests regarding the performance and reliability of the system are presented. To further increase throughput, we have also developed a sample transport/storage system based on ''puck-shaped'' cassettes, which can hold sixteen samples each. Seven cassettes fit into a standard dry shipping Dewar. The capabilities of a robotic crystal mounting and alignment system with instrumentation control software and a relational database allows for automated screening and data collection to be developed.

  2. Towards targeting anticancer drugs: ruthenium(ii)-arene complexes with biologically active naphthoquinone-derived ligand systems.

    PubMed

    Kubanik, Mario; Kandioller, Wolfgang; Kim, Kunwoo; Anderson, Robert F; Klapproth, Erik; Jakupec, Michael A; Roller, Alexander; Söhnel, Tilo; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hartinger, Christian G

    2016-08-16

    Anticancer active metal complexes with biologically active ligands have the potential to interact with more than one biological target, which could help to overcome acquired and/or intrinsic resistance of tumors to small molecule drugs. In this paper we present the preparation of 2-hydroxy-[1,4]-naphthoquinone-derived ligands and their coordination to a Ru(II)(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl moiety. The synthesis of oxime derivatives resulted in the surprising formation of nitroso-naphthalene complexes, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The compounds were shown to be stable in aqueous solution but reacted with glutathione and ascorbic acid rather than undergoing reduction. One-electron reduction with pulse radiolysis revealed different behavior for the naphthoquinone and nitroso-naphthalene complexes, which was also observed in in vitro anticancer assays. PMID:27214822

  3. Binuclear biologically active Co(II) complexes with octazamacrocycle and aliphatic dicarboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasković, S. B.; Vučković, G.; Antonijević-Nikolić, M.; Stanojković, T.; Gojgić-Cvijović, G.

    2012-12-01

    Four new cationic Co(II) complexes with N,N',N'',N'''-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (tpmc) and dianion of one the aliphatic dicarboxylic acids: butanedioic acid (succinic) acid = succH2, pentanedioic (glutaric) acid = gluH2, hexanedioic acid (adipic) acid = adipH2 or decanedioic acid (sebacic) acid = sebH2 of general formula [Co2(L)(tpmc)](ClO4)2ṡxY, L2- = succ, x = 1, Y = H2O; L = glu, x = 1, Y = H2O; L = adip, x = 1.5, Y = H2O; L = seb, x = 1, Y = CH3CN were isolated. The composition and charge are proposed based on elemental analyses (C, H, N) and electrical conductivity measurements. UV-Vis and FTIR spectral data and magnetic moments were in accordance with high-spin Co(II) state. It is proposed that in all complexes Co(II) is hexa-coordinated out of cyclam ring and that both carboxylic groups from dicarboxylate bridge participate in coordination. Oxygens from one group are most likely bonded to the same Co(II) ion thus forming a four-membered ring. The in vitro antibacterial/antiproliferative activities of the complexes were in some cases enhanced compared with the simple Co(II) salt and free ligands, tested as controls.

  4. Sample Preparation Techniques for the Untargeted LC-MS-Based Discovery of Peptides in Complex Biological Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Finoulst, Inez; Pinkse, Martijn; Van Dongen, William; Verhaert, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Although big progress has been made in sample pretreatment over the last years, there are still considerable limitations when it comes to overcoming complexity and dynamic range problems associated with peptide analyses from biological matrices. Being the little brother of proteomics, peptidomics is a relatively new field of research aiming at the direct analysis of the small proteins, called peptides, many of which are not amenable for typical trypsin-based analytics. In this paper, we present an overview of different techniques and methods currently used for reducing a sample's complexity and for concentrating low abundant compounds to enable successful peptidome analysis. We focus on techniques which can be employed prior to liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for peptide detection and identification and indicate their advantages as well as their shortcomings when it comes to the untargeted analysis of native peptides from complex biological matrices. PMID:22203783

  5. X-ray-induced photo-chemistry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pushie, M. Jake; Nienaber, Kurt; Hackett, Mark J.; Ascone, Isabella; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Aitken, Jade B.; Levina, Aviva; Glover, Christopher; Lay, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    As synchrotron light sources and optics deliver greater photon flux on samples, X-ray-induced photo-chemistry is increasingly encountered in X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments. The resulting problems are particularly pronounced for biological XAS experiments. This is because biological samples are very often quite dilute and therefore require signal averaging to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratios, with correspondingly greater exposures to the X-ray beam. This paper reviews the origins of photo-reduction and photo-oxidation, the impact that they can have on active site structure, and the methods that can be used to provide relief from X-ray-induced photo-chemical artifacts. PMID:23093745

  6. Electrical manipulation of biological samples in glass-based electrofluidics fabricated by 3D femtosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Sugioka, Koji

    2014-03-01

    Electrical manipulation of biological samples using glass-based electrofluidics fabricated by femtosecond laser, in which the microfluidic structures are integrated with microelectric components, is presented. Electro-orientation of movement of living cells with asymmetric shapes such as Euglena gracilis of aquatic microorganisms in microfluidic channels is demonstrated using the fabricated electrofluidics. By integrating the properly designed microelectrodes into microfluidic channels, the orientation direction of Euglena cells can be well controlled.

  7. Spectroscopic and biological studies on newly synthesized nickel(II) complexes of semicarbazones and thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gupta, Lokesh Kumar

    2005-12-01

    Nickel(II) complexes, having the general composition Ni(L) 2X 2, have been synthesized [where L: isopropyl methyl ketone semicarbazone (LLA), isopropyl methyl ketone thiosemicarbazone (LLB), 4-aminoacetophenone semicarbazone (LLC) and 4-aminoacetophenone thiosemicarbazone (LLD) and X = Cl -, 1/2SO 42-]. All the Ni(II) complexes reported here have been characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moments, IR, electronic and mass spectral studies. All the complexes were found to have magnetic moments corresponding to two unpaired electrons. The possible geometries of the complexes were assigned on the basis of electronic and infrared spectral studies. Newly synthesized ligand and its nickel(II) complexes have been screened against different bacterial and fungal growth.

  8. Determination of total tin in environmental biological and water samples by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Dogan, S; Haerdi, W

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of traces of tin using several analytical techniques (X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, polarographic techniques and atomic absorption) have been tested. Parameters such as simplicity, rapidity, sensitivity and interferences are compared in order to choose the most useful method for practical purpose. Finally, flameless atomic absorption was chosen for the determination of total tin concentration in different natural samples. Digestion of biological samples (plant, plankton, fish, etc.) was achieved by using Lumatom (a trade organic chemical). Thus, the digested sample is directly injected into the graphite furnace. This digestion technique is suitable and rapid with a minimum of error (contamination and losses). For tin analysis in water samples, a preconcentration of tin is carried out by coprecipitation with 1, 10-phenanthroline and tetraphenyl boron. The precipitate is separated and dissolved in alcohol or in Lumatom. The sensitivity of this method is 0.1 ng absolute tin. PMID:7451013

  9. Assessment and modelling of Ni(II) retention by an ion-imprinted polymer: application in natural samples.

    PubMed

    Lenoble, Véronique; Meouche, Walid; Laatikainen, Katri; Garnier, Cédric; Brisset, Hugues; Margaillan, André; Branger, Catherine

    2015-06-15

    Three novel Ni(II)-Ion-Imprinted Polymer (IIP) were synthesized by precipitation polymerization of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (crosslinker) with a complex of nickel(II) and vinylbenzyl iminodiacetic acid (VbIDA). The three IIPs were prepared with various mixtures of porogen solvents: methanol, methanol/2-methoxyethanol and methanol/acetonitrile (IIP1, IIP2 and IIP3, respectively). Non-Imprinted Polymers (NIP1, NIP2 and NIP3) were prepared as control polymers in similar conditions but with pure VbIDA instead of VbIDA-Ni. These polymers were characterized by FTIR, BET, SEM and tested for their efficiency and selectivity in Ni(II) retention. The most efficient (IIP1, around 12 mg g(-1) of nickel) was then positively checked for Ni(II) retention in presence of some competing species over a wide range of concentration. Finally Ni(II) retention by IIP1 was successfully demonstrated in natural samples. The modelling of the different experiments (Langmuir, Freundlich but also PROSECE and WHAM VII, frequently used in environmental studies) allowed demonstrating the presence of completely different binding sites when considering the ion-imprinted polymer and the non-imprinted one, and therefore led to a better understanding of what the imprinting effect is. PMID:25771289

  10. Interactions between cadmium and zinc in the biological samples of Pakistani smokers and nonsmokers cardiovascular disease patients.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Naveed; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Shah, Abdul Qadir

    2011-03-01

    The pathogenesis of some cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) has been altered with changes in the balance of certain trace and toxic elements. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) in smoker and nonsmoker male CVD patients (n = 457) of two age groups (31-45) and (46-60). The both elements were determined in biological samples (scalp hair, blood, and urine) of CVD patients and healthy referents for comparison purpose. The concentrations of Zn and Cd were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometer prior to microwave-assisted acid digestion. It was observed that the mean values of Cd were significantly higher in the biological samples of smokers CVD as compared to nonsmoker CVD patients, while the level of Zn was lower in both smoker and nonsmoker patients. The concentrations of Zn in whole blood and scalp hair samples were lower in CVD patients as compared to referents (p > 0.001). Results showed significant changes of levels of Cd and Zn in blood and scalp hair samples of CVD patients when compared with healthy referents, while reverse in the case of urine samples. It was observed that low Zn levels were associated with both smoker and nonsmoker CVD patients, while increased cadmium accumulation was observed in smoker patients as compared to nonsmoker patients (p > 0.025). PMID:20162377

  11. The ethics of research on stored biological samples: outcomes of a Workshop.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Manjulika; Sridhar, T S; Pai, Sanjay A

    2016-01-01

    Research is often conducted using laboratory samples and data. The ethical issues that arise in a study involving residual samples are considerably different from those arising in a prospective study. Some of these ethical issues concern the risks to confidentiality, individual autonomy, trust in and credibility of the researcher or the research, commercialisation and even the nomenclature involved. PMID:27260824

  12. Environmental Sampling Procedures and Methods to Respond to Biological Contamination (White Powder)

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2008-11-01

    This is a contribution to the annual report for the DHS Standards Office. It summarizes statistics-focused work associated with developing validated sampling procedures and methods. The main focus is on the experimental and sampling design constructed for contamination and decontamination field tests conducted during September 2007 in a remote, unused office building on the Idaho National Laboratory site.

  13. Data mining and biological sample exportation from South Africa: A new wave of bioexploitation under the guise of clinical care?

    PubMed

    Staunton, Ciara; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2016-02-01

    Discovery Health, one of the leading healthcare funders in South Africa (SA), will offer genetic testing to its members for USD250 (approximately ZAR3 400) per test from 2016. On the surface, this appears to be innovative and futuristic. However, a deeper look at this announcement reveals considerable problems in the exportation of biological samples and data out of SA, and brings into sharp focus the lack of protection in place for potential donors. In return for a reduced-cost genetic test, which will nevertheless be billed to a member's savings plan, data from the patient's results, and probably the sample itself, will be sent to the USA for storage, research purposes and possible commercial use, with no further benefit for the patient. This development has demonstrated the need for more stringent protection of the movement of biological samples and data out of SA, particularly with reference to consenting procedures, material transfer agreements, and the export of biological data themselves. PMID:26821890

  14. A high-performance direct transmethylation method for total fatty acids assessment in biological and foodstuff samples.

    PubMed

    Castro-Gómez, Pilar; Fontecha, Javier; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis M

    2014-10-01

    Isolation is the main bottleneck in the analysis of fatty acids in biological samples and foods. In the last few decades some methods described direct derivatization procedures bypassing these steps. They involve the utilization of methanolic HCL or BF3 as catalysts, but several evidences from previous works suggest these reagents are unstable, lead to the formation of artifacts and alter the distribution of specific compounds as hydroxy fatty acids or CLA. However, the main issue is that they are excellent esterification reagents but poor in transterification, being not suitable for the analysis of all lipid classes and leading to erroneous composition quantitations. The present research work is a comprehensive comparison of six general methylation protocols using base, acid or base/acid catalysts plus a proposed method in the analysis of total fatty acids in lipid standards mixtures, foodstuff and biological samples. The addition of aprotic solvents to the reaction mixture to avoid alterations was also tested. Results confirmed that procedures solely involving acid catalyst resulted in incomplete derivatizations and alteration of the fatty acid profile, partially corrected by addition of the aprotic solvent. The proposed method combining sodium methoxyde and sulfuric acid showed absence of alteration of the FAME profile and the best values for response factors (short chain fatty acids to PUFA), accuracy in the determination of total cholesterol and derivatization performance, thus showing a high reliability in the determination of the total fatty acid composition in biological samples and foods. PMID:25059195

  15. Magnetic ion-imprinted and -SH functionalized polymer for selective removal of Pb(II) from aqueous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bin; Deng, Fang; Zhao, Yu; Luo, Xubiao; Luo, Shenglian; Au, Chaktong

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic ion-imprinted polymer (Fe3O4@SiO2-IIP) functionalized with -SH groups for the selective removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous samples was synthesized by surface imprinting technique combined with a sol-gel process using 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane as monomer, tetraethyl orthosilicate as cross-linking agent, and Pb(II) ion as template. The Fe3O4@SiO2-IIP was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry. Fe3O4@SiO2-IIP showed higher capacity and selectivity than that of Fe3O4@SiO2-NIP. The effects of initial concentration of Pb(II) and pH of medium on adsorption capacity of Fe3O4@SiO2-IIP were studied. The experimental data fits well with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The maximum Pb(II)-sorption capacity calculated from Langmuir isotherm is 32.58 mg/g and 16.50 mg/g for Fe3O4@SiO2-IIP and Fe3O4@SiO2-NIP, respectively. Kinetics studies show that the adsorption process obeys a pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.9982). The separation factor of Fe3O4@SiO2-IIP for Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Zn(II), and Pb(II)/Co(II) are 50.54, 52.14, and 37.39, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH and ΔS were -4.98 kJ/mol, 3.27 kJ/mol and 28.84 J/mol/K, respectively. In addition, the spent Fe3O4@SiO2-IIP can be refreshed by simple washing with aqueous HCl solution, and there is no significant decrease in adsorption capacity after a test of up to five cycles, demonstrating that the Fe3O4@SiO2-IIP is stable and reusable.

  16. Gelatin embedding: a novel way to preserve biological samples for terahertz imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuting; Ung, Benjamin; Parrott, Edward P. J.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-04-01

    Sample dehydration has traditionally been a challenging problem in ex vivo terahertz biomedical experiments as water content changes significantly affect the terahertz properties and can diminish important contrast features. In this paper, we propose a novel method to prevent sample dehydration using gelatin embedding. By looking at terahertz image data and calculating the optical properties of the gelatin-embedded sample, we find that our method successfully preserves the sample for at least 35 h, both for imaging and spectroscopy. Our novel preservation method demonstrates for the first time the capability to simultaneously maintain sample structural integrity and prevent dehydration at room temperature. This is particularly relevant for terahertz studies of freshly excised tissues but could be beneficial for other imaging and spectroscopy techniques.

  17. Testing biological liquid samples using modified m-line spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusciuk, Elzbieta; Rybiński, Grzegorz

    2005-09-01

    Non-chemical method of detection of sugar concentration in biological (animal and plant source) liquids has been investigated. Simplified set was build to show the easy way of carrying out the survey and to make easy to gather multiple measurements for error detecting and statistics. Method is suggested as easy and cheap alternative for chemical methods of measuring sugar concentration, but needing a lot effort to be made precise.

  18. A sensitive method for the determination of uranium in biological samples utilizing kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA).

    PubMed

    Hedaya, M A; Birkenfeld, H P; Kathren, R L

    1997-05-01

    Kinetic phosphorescence analysis is a technique that provides rapid, precise and accurate determination of uranium concentration in aqueous solutions. This technique utilizes a laser source to excite an aqueous solution of uranium, and measures the emission luminescence intensity over time to determine the luminescence decay profile. The lifetime of the luminescence decay profile and the linearity of the log luminescence intensity versus time profile are indications of the specificity of the technique for uranium determination. The luminescence intensity at the onset of decay (the initial luminescence intensity), which is the luminescence intensity at time zero after termination of the laser pulse used for excitation, is proportional to the uranium concentration in the sample. Calibration standards of known uranium concentrations are used to construct the calibration curve between the initial luminescence intensity and uranium concentration. This calibration curve is used to determine the uranium concentration of unknown samples from their initial luminescence intensity. We developed the sample preparation method that allows the determination of uranium concentrations in urine, plasma, kidney, liver, bone spleen and soft tissue samples. Tissue samples are subjected to dry-ashing in a muffle furnace at 600 degrees C and wet-ashing with concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide twice to destroy the organic component in the sample that may interfere with uranium determination by KPA. Samples are then solubilized in 0.82 M nitric acid prior to analysis by KPA. The assay calibration curves are linear and cover the range of uranium concentrations between 0.05 micrograms l-1 and 1000 micrograms l-1 (0.05-1000 ppb). The developed sample preparation procedures coupled with the KPA technique provide a specific, sensitive, precise and accurate method for the determination of uranium concentration in tissue samples. This method was used to quantify uranium in different

  19. Stability of heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine, and morphine in biological samples and validation of an LC-MS assay for delayed analyses of pharmacokinetic samples in rats.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jessica M; Raleigh, Michael D; Pentel, Paul R; Harmon, Theresa M; Keyler, Daniel E; Remmel, Rory P; Birnbaum, Angela K

    2013-02-23

    Degradation of heroin to 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and then morphine happens rapidly in vivo and in vitro. The rates of heroin and 6-MAM degradation depend on the type of biological samples, and the duration and conditions of storage. In order to optimize conditions for measuring heroin and its metabolites in samples collected for pharmacokinetic studies in rats, we investigated the time course of degradation of heroin, 6-MAM, and morphine in four biological matrices: rat blood, rat brain homogenate, bovine serum, and human plasma under various conditions. Analyte concentrations were measured by LC-MS. The goal was to identify conditions that allow maximum flexibility in scheduling sample collection and analysis, as well as gain more information on the stability of heroin in blood and tissue samples. A solid-phase extraction method with ice-cold solvents, sodium fluoride (NaF) and a low pH (3.0) maintained sample stability. Quality controls were within 94.0-105% of the target value. Variability was 4.0-8.9% for all analytes within the range of 5-200 ng/mL for heroin, 5-1000 ng/mL for 6-MAM, and 10-200 ng/mL for morphine. Heroin degradation to 6-MAM was faster in rat whole blood than in plasma, and faster in rat plasma than in rat brain homogenate. Maintaining NaF at 4 mg/mL throughout processing enhanced stability; higher NaF concentrations added to whole blood caused hemolysis. Samples processed through solid phase extraction and stored as dried pellets at 80°C constituted the most stable environment for heroin, and was superior to the storing of samples in solution prior to or after extraction. Nevertheless, post-extraction heroin and 6-MAM levels declined by 6.7-8.3% over one week in rat plasma under these conditions, and by <1-4.7% in bovine serum or human plasma. PMID:23245263

  20. Impact of Processing Method on Recovery of Bacteria from Wipes Used in Biological Surface Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nathan D.; Filliben, James J.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental sampling for microbiological contaminants is a key component of hygiene monitoring and risk characterization practices utilized across diverse fields of application. However, confidence in surface sampling results, both in the field and in controlled laboratory studies, has been undermined by large variation in sampling performance results. Sources of variation include controlled parameters, such as sampling materials and processing methods, which often differ among studies, as well as random and systematic errors; however, the relative contributions of these factors remain unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the relative impacts of sample processing methods, including extraction solution and physical dissociation method (vortexing and sonication), on recovery of Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Burkholderia thailandensis and Escherichia coli) bacteria from directly inoculated wipes. This work showed that target organism had the largest impact on extraction efficiency and recovery precision, as measured by traditional colony counts. The physical dissociation method (PDM) had negligible impact, while the effect of the extraction solution was organism dependent. Overall, however, extraction of organisms from wipes using phosphate-buffered saline with 0.04% Tween 80 (PBST) resulted in the highest mean recovery across all three organisms. The results from this study contribute to a better understanding of the factors that influence sampling performance, which is critical to the development of efficient and reliable sampling methodologies relevant to public health and biodefense. PMID:22706055

  1. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed. PMID:26691180

  2. Authentic Instruction in Laptop Classrooms: Sample Lessons that Integrate Type II Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ann E.; Harmes, J. Christine

    2006-01-01

    Laptop computers and Type II applications can provide powerful tools for elementary classrooms, especially if they are combined with authentic instruction. This article provides information and lessons learned from a laptop initiative in an urban elementary school. The goal of the initiative was to develop lesson plans and document techniques that…

  3. The World War II Homefront: An ERIC/ChESS Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinhey, Laura

    2002-01-01

    Provides citations with abstracts from the ERIC database focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Includes background information and teaching materials on topics such as popular music from 1941-1945, propaganda directed towards women, and learning about Japanese American internment. (CMK)

  4. Multifrequency Pulsed EPR Studies of Biologically Relevant Manganese(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Stich, T. A.; Lahiri, S.; Yeagle, G.; Dicus, M.; Brynda, M.; Gunn, A.; Aznar, C.; DeRose, V. J.; Britt, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance studies at multiple frequencies (MF EPR) can provide detailed electronic structure descriptions of unpaired electrons in organic radicals, inorganic complexes, and metalloenzymes. Analysis of these properties aids in the assignment of the chemical environment surrounding the paramagnet and provides mechanistic insight into the chemical reactions in which these systems take part. Herein, we present results from pulsed EPR studies performed at three different frequencies (9, 31, and 130 GHz) on [Mn(II)(H2O)6]2+, Mn(II) adducts with the nucleotides ATP and GMP, and the Mn(II)-bound form of the hammerhead ribozyme (MnHH). Through line shape analysis and interpretation of the zero-field splitting values derived from successful simulations of the corresponding continuous-wave and field-swept echo-detected spectra, these data are used to exemplify the ability of the MF EPR approach in distinguishing the nature of the first ligand sphere. A survey of recent results from pulsed EPR, as well as pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance and electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopic studies applied to Mn(II)-dependent systems, is also presented. PMID:22190766

  5. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of phthalimide derivatives of Cu(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingappa, Y.; Rao, S. Sreenivasa; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.; Rao, P. Sambasiva

    The Cu(II) complex of phthalimide-o-aminophenylenediamine has been synthesized by a template method. The complex is characterized by elemental analysis, conductivity measurements and electronic and EPR spectral techniques. The electronic spectra reveal four coordinations for the Cu(II) ion with the ligand. The evaluated spin-Hamiltonian parameters from the EPR spectrum are g|D2.2041, g⊥D2.0263 and A|D166×10-4 cm-1 and A⊥D46×10-4 cm-1E By correlating EPR and electronic data, the calculated bonding parameters are α2D0.7132, αD0.8445, α'D0.6073 and ?. These bonding parameters suggest a moderate covalent nature of the Cu(II) ion with the ligand. Antimicrobial activities of this Cu(II) complex against six bacterial isolates like Bacillus faecalis, Escherichia coil, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and Klebsiella pneumoniae are determined.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, biological activity, molecular modeling and docking studies of complexes 4-(4-hydroxy)-3-(2-pyrazine-2-carbonyl)hydrazonomethylphenyl-diazen-yl-benzenesulfonamide with manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), zinc(II) and cadmium(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Zayed, Mohamed E.; Alharbi, Suliman A.; Ammar, Reda A. A.; Elhenawy, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    A new series of complexes of 4-(4-hydroxy)-3-(2-pyrazine-2-carbonyl)hydrazonomethylphenyl-diazen-yl-benzenesulfonamide (HL) with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) have been prepared and characterized by different physical techniques. The IR spectra of the prepared complexes were suggested that the ligand behaves as a tri-dentate ligand through the carbonyl oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and phenolic oxygen atoms (ONO). Electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal octahedral geometry for all complexes. The elemental analyses and mass spectral data have justified the ML2 composition of complexes. The EPR spectra of Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes support the mononuclear structure. The crystal field splitting, Racah repulsion and nephelauxetic parameters and determined from the electronic spectra of the complexes. Thermal properties and decomposition kinetics of all complexes are investigated. The geometry of the metal complexes has been optimized with the help of molecular modeling. The biological activity of these compounds against various fungi has been investigated.

  7. The chemical biology of Cu(II) complexes with imidazole or thiazole containing ligands: Synthesis, crystal structures and comparative biological activity.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Adam; McDonald, Molly; Scharbach, Stephanie; Hamaway, Stefan; Plooster, Melissa; Peters, Kyle; Fox, Kristin M; Cassimeris, Lynne; Tanski, Joseph M; Tyler, Laurie A

    2016-04-01

    The synthesis and characterization of two copper(II) complexes containing 2-(2-pyridyl)benzimidazole (PyBIm) are reported with the biological activity of these two complexes and a third Cu(II) complex containing 2-(2-pyridyl)benzothiazole (PyBTh). Complex 1, [Cu(PyBIm)(NO3)(H2O)](NO3), is a four coordinate, distorted square planar species with one ligand (N,N), nitrate and water bound to Cu(II). The [Cu(PyBIm)3](BF4)2 complex (2) has distorted octahedral geometry with a 3:1 Py(BIm) ligand to metal ratio. The distorted trigonal bi-pyramidal geometry of compound 3, [Cu(PyBTh)2(H2O)](BF4)2, is comprised of two PyBTh ligands and one water. Biological activity of 1-3 has been assessed by analyzing DNA interaction, nuclease ability, cytotoxic activity and antibacterial properties. Complex 3 exhibits potent concentration dependent SC-DNA cleavage forming single- and double-nicked DNA in contrast to the weak activity of complexes 1 and 2. Mechanistic studies indicate that all complexes utilize an oxidative mechanism however 1 and 2 employ O2(-) as the principal reactive oxygen species while the highly active 3 utilizes (1)O2. The interaction between 1-3 and DNA was investigated using fluorescence emission spectroscopy and revealed all complexes strongly intercalate DNA with Kapp values of 2.65×10(6), 1.85×10(6) and 2.72×10(6)M(-1), respectively. Cytotoxic effects of 1-3 were examined using HeLa and K562 cells and show cell death in the micromolar range with the activity of 1≈2 and were slightly higher than 3. Similar reactivity was observed in the antibacterial studies with E. coli and S. aureus. A detailed comparative analysis of the three complexes is presented. PMID:26828284

  8. Automated Sample Exchange Robots for the Structural Biology Beam Lines at the Photon Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraki, Masahiko; Watanabe, Shokei; Yamada, Yusuke; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Gaponov, Yurii; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2007-01-19

    We are now developing automated sample exchange robots for high-throughput protein crystallographic experiments for onsite use at synchrotron beam lines. It is part of the fully automated robotics systems being developed at the Photon Factory, for the purposes of protein crystallization, monitoring crystal growth, harvesting and freezing crystals, mounting the crystals inside a hutch and for data collection. We have already installed the sample exchange robots based on the SSRL automated mounting system at our insertion device beam lines BL-5A and AR-NW12A at the Photon Factory. In order to reduce the time required for sample exchange further, a prototype of a double-tonged system was developed. As a result of preliminary experiments with double-tonged robots, the sample exchange time was successfully reduced from 70 seconds to 10 seconds with the exception of the time required for pre-cooling and warming up the tongs.

  9. Sample Preparation Approaches for iTRAQ Labeling and Quantitative Proteomic Analyses in Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Christos; Moore, J Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of global quantification strategies utilized in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) are an attractive option for examining the relative amounts of proteins in different samples. The inherent complexity of mammalian proteomes and the diversity of protein physicochemical properties mean that complete proteome coverage is still unlikely from a single analytical method. Numerous options exist for reducing protein sample complexity and resolving digested peptides prior to MS analysis. Indeed, the reliability and efficiency of protein identification and quantitation from an iTRAQ workflow strongly depend on sample preparation upstream of MS. Here we describe our methods for: (1) total protein extraction from immortalized cells; (2) subcellular fractionation of murine tissue; (3) protein sample desalting, digestion, and iTRAQ labeling; (4) peptide separation by strong cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography; and (5) peptide separation by isoelectric focusing. PMID:26700038

  10. A dinuclear ruthenium(II) complex as a one- and two-photon luminescent probe for biological Cu(2+) detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingyu; Pei, Lingmin; Chen, Yu; Xu, Wenchao; Lin, Qitian; Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Jingheng; Shen, Yong; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2013-11-11

    A new dinuclear Ru(II) polypyridyl complex, [(bpy)2 Ru(H2 bpip)Ru(bpy)2 ](4+) (RuH2 bpip, bpy=2,2-bipyridine, H2 bpip=2,6-pyridyl(imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline), was developed to act as a one- and two-photon luminescent probe for biological Cu(2+) detection. This Ru(II) complex shows a significant two-photon absorption cross section (400 GM) and displays a remarkable one- and two-photon luminescence switch in the presence of Cu(2+) ions. Importantly, RuH2 bpip can selectively recognise Cu(2+) in aqueous media in the presence of other abundant cellular cations (such as Na(+) , K(+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ), trace metal ions in organisms (such as Zn(2+) , Ag(+) , Fe(3+) , Fe(2+) , Ni(2+) , Mn(2+) , and Co(2+) ), prevalent toxic metal ions in the environment (such as Cd(2+) , Hg(2+) , and Cr(3+) ), and amino acids, with high sensitivity (detection limit≤3.33×10(-8)  M) and a rapid response time (≤15 s). The biological applications of RuH2 bpip were also evaluated and it was found to exhibit low cytotoxicity, good water solubility, and membrane permeability; RuH2 bpip was, therefore, employed as a sensing probe for the detection of Cu(2+) in living cells and zebrafish. PMID:24166837

  11. A New Chelating Reagent: Its Synthesis/Characterization and Application for the Determination of Cd(II) and Ni(II) in Various Food and Make-Up Product Samples by FAAS Using Simultaneous Microextraction Sampling.

    PubMed

    Saçmacı, Şerife; Saçmacı, Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    A new and simple dispersive liquid-liquid simultaneous microextraction procedure was developed for the rapid separation and simultaneous extraction/preconcentration of Cd(II) and Ni(II) at ultratrace amounts. Microextraction of the analytes was carried out in the presence of 2-methyl-5-[(Z)-pyridin-4-yldiazenyl]quinolin-8-ol as the chelating reagent. Chloroform and ethanol were used as the extraction and dispersive solvents. Various parameters that influence the microextraction procedure's efficiency-such as pH, centrifugation rate and time, reagent concentration, and sampling volume on the recovery of analytes-were examined. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.01-1.25 and 0.075-5 mg/L with LODs of 0.25 and 0.84 μg/L, and with a preconcentration factor of 94, for Cd(II) and Ni(II), respectively. Precision was >1.0%. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analyzing the Certified Standard Reference Material (CWW-TMD: Certified wastewater-Trace metals, wastewater). The results show that the dispersive liquid-liquid simultaneous microextraction pretreatment is a sensitive, rapid, simple, green, and safe method for the separation/preconcentration of cadmium and nickel. PMID:27301349

  12. Oxygen bomb combustion of biological samples for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Gilberto B.; Carrilho, Elma Neide V. M.; Oliveira, Camila V.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2002-12-01

    A rapid sample preparation method is proposed for decomposition of milk powder, corn bran, bovine and fish tissues, containing certified contents of the analytes. The procedure involves sample combustion in a commercial stainless steel oxygen bomb operating at 25 bar. Most of the samples were decomposed within 5 min. Diluted nitric acid or water-soluble tertiary amines 10% v/v were used as absorption solutions. Calcium, Cu, K, Mg, Na, P, S and Zn were recovered with the bomb washings and determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Ethanol mixed with paraffin was used as a combustion aid to allow complete combustion. A cooling step prior releasing of the bomb valve was employed to increase the efficiency of sample combustion. Iodine was also determined in milk samples spiked with potassium iodide to evaluate the volatilization and collection of iodine in amine CFA-C medium and the feasibility of its determination by ICP-OES with axial view configuration. Most of the element recoveries in the samples were between 91 and 105% and the certified and found contents exhibited a fair agreement at a 95% confidence level.

  13. Evaluation of a focused sonication probe for arsenic speciation in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Sanz, E; Muñoz-Olivas, R; Cámara, C

    2005-12-01

    Arsenic speciation analysis suffers in general from high sample handling time required by sample preparation. In a previous work, ultrasonic probe has been proved to reduce sample treatment time for arsenic extraction in rice to only a few minutes. Base upon the obtained results, here several extraction media for chicken, fish and soil samples (SEAS G6RD-CT2001-00473) have been studied and evaluated employing the same technique. Chicken sample needed an enzymatic treatment in order to liberate the species linked to the protein matrix. Extraction of the major species in fish, AsB, was quantitatively achieved in water in 1 min. Also 1 min was enough to leach about 85% of species present in soils and sediments, mainly the inorganic ones, using H(3)PO(4). In all cases, no inter-conversion among As species was observed. The five species found in those samples were separated using an improved HPLC-ICP-MS method in only 11 min, with detection limits at the ng l(-1) level. The proposed methods were validated by analysing several Certified Reference Materials: SRM 1,568 a rice flour, CRM-627 tuna fish tissue, SOIL-7 soil and MURST-ISS-A1 Antarctic sediment. PMID:16298179

  14. Methods for collection and analysis of aquatic biological and microbiological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Britton, Linda J., (Edited By); Greeson, Phillip E.

    1989-01-01

    Chapter A4 contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to collect, preserve, and analyze water to determine its biological and microbiological properties. Part 1 consists of detailed descriptions of more than 45 individual methods, including those for bacteria, phytoplankton, zooplankton, seston, periphyton, macrophytes, benthic invertebrates, fish and other vertebrates, cellular contents, productivity, and bioassays. Each method is summarized, and the applications, interferences, apparatus, reagents, analyses, calculations, reporting of results, precisions, and references are given. Part 2 consists of a glossary. Part 3 is a list of taxonomic references.

  15. Design of sample carrier for neutron irradiation facility at TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Y.; Hamid, N. A.; Mansor, M. A.; Ahmad, M. H. A. R. M.; Yusof, M. R.; Yazid, H.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work is to design a sample carrier for neutron irradiation experiment at beam ports of research nuclear reactor, the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP). The sample carrier was designed so that irradiation experiment can be performed safely by researchers. This development will resolve the transferring of sample issues faced by the researchers at the facility when performing neutron irradiation studies. The function of sample carrier is to ensure the sample for the irradiation process can be transferred into and out from the beam port of the reactor safely and effectively. The design model used was House of Quality Method (HOQ) which is usually used for developing specifications for product and develop numerical target to work towards and determining how well we can meet up to the needs. The chosen sample carrier (product) consists of cylindrical casing shape with hydraulic cylinders transportation method. The sample placing can be done manually, locomotion was by wheel while shielding used was made of boron materials. The sample carrier design can shield thermal neutron during irradiation of sample so that only low fluencies fast neutron irradiates the sample.

  16. EVALUATION OF LEACHATE TREATMENT. VOLUME II. BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A completely mixed anaerobic filter was found to effectively remove organic matter concentrations in high-strength solid waste leachate over a range of organic loadings and shockloads. Recirculation eliminated the need for buffer solutions. Testing of a fixed film biological reac...

  17. PERFORMANCE OF NORTH AMERICAN BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: II. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to examine the performance of five North American bioreactor landfills. This paper represents the second of a two part series and addresses biological and chemical aspects of bioreactor performance including gas production and management, and l...

  18. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF SOME METALS AS AIR POLLUTANTS. PART II. MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was undertaken in order to elucidate the association between low atmospheric mercury levels and changes in some biological parameters likely to react to such exposures. The study covered four populations believed to be exposed to four different levels of atmospheric mer...

  19. [Adaptation and Neurosciences II: Biological, Psychological and Social Adaptation, and Psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Desseilles, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we address adaptation in relation to the neurosciences. Adaptation is examined at the individual as well as various environmental levels: biological, psychological, and social. We then briefly discuss, from a neuroscientific perspective, the concept of adaptation in relation to psychopathology, including attachment theory and the third wave of cognitive-behavioral therapies. PMID:27570964

  20. The Didactics of Biology. A Selected Bibliography for 1979. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1979 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 18 journals representing 11 different countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  1. Biology-Chemistry-Physics, Teachers' Guide, a Three-Year Sequence, Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Arthur; And Others

    This is one of two teacher's guides for a three-year integrated biology, chemistry, and physics course being prepared by the Portland Project Committee. This committee reviewed and selected material developed by the national course improvement groups--Physical Science Study Committee, Chemical Bond Approach, Chemical Education Materials Study,…

  2. The Didactics of Biology. Selected Bibliography for 1980. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1979 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 19 journals representing 11 different countres are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  3. Didactics of Biology. Selected Bibliography for 1982. Parts I and II. Information Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Paula, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1982 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 25 journals representing 12 countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia; Federal…

  4. Didactics of Biology. Selective Bibliography, 1981. Part I [and] Part II. Information Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1980 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 19 journals representing 11 different countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  5. Low Budget Biology II: A Collection of Low Cost Labs and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartski, Bert; Wartski, Lynn Marie

    This document contains 13 low budget labs, demonstrations, and activities to be used in the biology classroom. Each activity has a teacher preparation section which states the purpose of each lab, some basic information, a list of materials and what they do, and how to prep the different solutions and chemicals. All labs are designed for a…

  6. Supercritical fluid extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography of respiratory quinones for microbial community analysis in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Atsuta, Yoichi; Fujie, Koichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ) in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA) detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ) and menaquinones (MK) without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost) and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces). PMID:22391598

  7. Measurement of the unstained biological sample by a novel scanning electron generation X-ray microscope based on SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-08-07

    We introduced a novel X-ray microscope system based on scanning electron microscopy using thin film, which enables the measurement of unstained biological samples without damage. An unstained yeast sample was adsorbed under a titanium (Ti)-coated silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) film 90 nm thick. The X-ray signal from the film was detected by an X-ray photodiode (PD) placed below the sample. With an electron beam at 2.6 kV acceleration and 6.75 nA current, the yeast image is obtained using the X-ray PD. The image is created by soft X-rays from the Ti layer. The Ti layer is effective in generating the characteristic 2.7-nm wavelength X-rays by the irradiation of electrons. Furthermore, we investigated the electron trajectory and the generation of the characteristic X-rays within the Ti-coated Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} film by Monte Carlo simulation. Our system can be easily utilized to observe various unstained biological samples of cells, bacteria, and viruses.

  8. Detection of motile micro-organisms in biological samples by means of a fully automated image processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanis, Elvio; Romero, Graciela; Alvarez, Liliana; Martinez, Carlos C.; Hoyos, Daniel; Basombrio, Miguel A.

    2001-08-01

    A fully automated image processing system for detection of motile microorganism is biological samples is presented. The system is specifically calibrated for determining the concentration of Trypanosoma Cruzi parasites in blood samples of mice infected with Chagas disease. The method can be adapted for use in other biological samples. A thin layer of blood infected by T. cruzi parasites is examined in a common microscope in which the images of the vision field are taken by a CCD camera and temporarily stored in the computer memory. In a typical field, a few motile parasites are observable surrounded by blood red cells. The parasites have low contrast. Thus, they are difficult to detect visually but their great motility betrays their presence by the movement of the nearest neighbor red cells. Several consecutive images of the same field are taken, decorrelated with each other where parasites are present, and digitally processed in order to measure the number of parasites present in the field. Several fields are sequentially processed in the same fashion, displacing the sample by means of step motors driven by the computer. A direct advantage of this system is that its results are more reliable and the process is less time consuming than the current subjective evaluations made visually by technicians.

  9. DpnA, a methylase for single-strand DNA in the Dpn II restriction system, and its biological function

    SciTech Connect

    Cerritelli, S.; Springhorn, S.S.; Lacks, S.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The two DNA-adenine methylases encoded by the Dpn II restriction gene cassette were purified, and their activities were compared on various DNA substrates. DpnA was able to methylate single-strand DNA and double-strand DNA, whereas DpnM methylated only double-strand DNA. Although both enzymes act at 5{prime}-GATC-3{prime} in DNA, DpnA can also methylate sequences altered in the guanine position, but at a lower rate. A deletion mutation in the dpnA gene was constructed and transferred to the chromosome. Transmission by way of the transformation pathway of methylated and unmethylated plasmids to dpnA mutant and wild-type recipients was examined. The mutant cells restricted unmethylated donor plasmic establishment much more strongly than did wild-type cells. In the wild type, the single strands of donor plasmid DNA that enter by the transformation pathway are apparently methylated by DpnA prior to conversion of the plasmid to a double-strand form, in which the plasmid would be susceptible to the Dpn II endonuclease. The biological function of DpnA may, therefore, be the enhancement of plasmid transfer to Dpn II-containing strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  10. Synthesis, structure, and biological evaluation of a copper(ii) complex with fleroxacin and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Wang, Qing; Huang, Yanmei; Ma, Xiangling; Xiong, Xinnuo; Li, Hui

    2016-07-01

    A novel mixed-ligand Cu(ii) complex combined with the quinolone drug fleroxacin and 1,10-phenanthroline was synthesized in this work. The crystal structure of the complex was characterized via X-ray crystallography, which was the first reported single crystal complex of fleroxacin. Results showed that Cu(ii) was coordinated through pyridone oxygen and one carboxylate oxygen atom of fleroxacin, as well as two nitrogen atoms from 1,10-phenanthroline. Various characterization methods, including Fourier transform infrared, elementary analysis, thermogravimetry, and X-ray powder diffraction, were applied. The Cu(ii)-quinolone complex exhibited favorable biological activities, and was proved to be capable of transforming supercoiled PUC19 DNA into nicked form under hydrolytic conditions. The obtained pseudo-Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameter was 12.64 h(-1), which corresponded to a million-fold rate enhancement in DNA cleavage. In addition, the interaction capacity of the complex with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated. The results demonstrated a moderately intense combination between HSA and the complex. The complex evidently quenched the fluorescence of HSA. Approximately 19.2% of the quenching was attributed to Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), whereas the rest was caused by ground-state complex formation (molar ratio of HSA : complex = 1 : 2). The energy of the complex was excited during FRET, which increased the fluorescence of the complex by approximately 18%. PMID:27301999

  11. Validity of extracellular water assessment with saliva samples using plasma as the reference biological fluid.

    PubMed

    Matias, Catarina N; Silva, Analiza M; Santos, Diana A; Gobbo, Luis A; Schoeller, Dale A; Sardinha, Luís B

    2012-11-01

    Extracellular water (ECW) assessment is based on dilution techniques, commonly using blood sampling. However, plasma collection is an invasive procedure. We aimed to validate the use of saliva for ECW estimation by the bromide dilution technique using plasma as the reference method, in a sample of elite athletes. A total of 89 elite athletes with a mean age of 20.4 ± 4.4 years were evaluated. Baseline samples were collected before sodium bromide oral dose administration, and enriched samples were collected 3 h post-dose administration. The bromide concentration was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Comparison of means, concordance coefficient correlation (CCC), multiple regression and Bland-Altman analysis were performed. The ECW from saliva explained 91% of the variance in ECW by plasma with a standard error of estimation of 0.91 kg. The CCC between alternative and reference methods was 0.952. No significant trend was observed between the mean and difference of the methods, with limits of agreement ranging between -1.5 and 2.1 kg. These findings reveal that bromide dilution volume calculated from saliva samples is a valid noninvasive method for ECW assessment in elite athletes. PMID:22275182

  12. Set-up and calibration of a method to measure 10B concentration in biological samples by neutron autoradiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadan, M. A.; Bortolussi, S.; Postuma, I.; Ballarini, F.; Bruschi, P.; Protti, N.; Santoro, D.; Stella, S.; Cansolino, L.; Clerici, A.; Ferrari, C.; Zonta, A.; Zonta, C.; Altieri, S.

    2012-03-01

    A selective uptake of boron in the tumor is the base of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, which can destroy the tumor substantially sparing the normal tissue. In order to deliver a lethal dose to the tumor, keeping the dose absorbed by normal tissues below the tolerance level, it is mandatory to know the 10B concentration present in each kind of tissue at the moment of irradiation. This work presents the calibration procedure adopted for a boron concentration measurement method based on neutron autoradiography, where biological samples are deposited on sensitive films and irradiated in the thermal column of the TRIGA reactor (University of Pavia). The latent tracks produced in the film by the charged particles coming from the neutron capture in 10B are made visible by a proper etching, allowing the measurement of the track density. A calibration procedure with standard samples provides curves of track density as a function of boron concentration, to be used in the measurement of biological samples. In this paper, the bulk etch rate parameter and the calibration curves obtained for both liquid samples and biological tissues with known boron concentration are presented. A bulk etch rate value of (1.64 ± 0.02) μm/h and a linear dependence with etching time were found. The plots representing the track density versus the boron concentration in a range between 5 and 50 μg/g (ppm) are linear, with an angular coefficient of (1.614 ± 0.169)·10-3 tracks/(μm2 ppm) for liquids and (1.598 ± 0.097)·10-2 tracks/(μm2 ppm) for tissues.

  13. [Blood sampling using "dried blood spot": a clinical biology revolution underway?].

    PubMed

    Hirtz, Christophe; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Blood testing using the dried blood spot (DBS) is used since the 1960s in clinical analysis, mainly within the framework of the neonatal screening (Guthrie test). Since then numerous analytes such as nucleic acids, small molecules or lipids, were successfully measured on the DBS. While this pre-analytical method represents an interesting alternative to classic blood sampling, its use in routine is still limited. We review here the different clinical applications of the blood sampling on DBS and estimate its future place, supported by the new methods of analysis as the LC-MS mass spectrometry. PMID:25582720

  14. Determination of trace elements in biological samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with tetramethylammonium hydroxide solubilization at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Batista, Bruno Lemos; Grotto, Denise; Rodrigues, Jairo Lisboa; Souza, Vanessa Cristina de Oliveira; Barbosa, Fernando

    2009-07-30

    A simple method for sample preparation of biological samples for trace elements determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is described. Prior to analysis, 75 mg of the biological samples were accurately weighed into (15 mL) conical tubes. Then, 1 mL of 50% (v/v) tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution was added to the samples, incubated at room temperature for 12 h and the volume made up to 10 mL with a solution containing 0.5% (v/v) HNO(3), 0.01% (v/v) Triton X-100 and 10 microg L(-1) of Rh. After preparation samples may be stored at -20 degrees C during 3 days until the analysis by ICP-MS. With these conditions, the use of the dynamic reaction cell was only mandatory for chromium determination. Method detection limits were 0.2145, 0.0020, 0.0051, 0.0017, 0.0027, 0.0189, 0.02, 0.5, 0.1, 0.0030, 0.0043, 0.0066, 0.0009, 0.020, 0.0043, 0.1794, 0.1 microg(-1) for Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, V and Zn, respectively. Validation data are provided based on the analysis of six certified reference materials (CRMs) purchased from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and National Research Council Canada (NRCC). Additional validation was provided by the analysis of brain, kidney, liver and heart samples collected from rats and analyzed by the proposed method and by using microwave digestion. PMID:19523552

  15. Restricted-access nanoparticles for magnetic solid-phase extraction of steroid hormones from environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Wang, Qing; Xu, Jinping; Shi, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Li

    2012-06-29

    Restricted-access materials based on non-ionic surfactant-coated dodecyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and applied to extract steroid hormones from environmental and biological samples. The magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation, and were functionalized with dodecyltriethoxysilane, giving dodecyl-grafted magnetic nanoparticles (C₁₂-Fe₃O₄). They were further modified with different non-ionic surfactants by self-assembly adsorption. Several types of non-ionic surfactants, Tween-20, 40, 60 and 85, and Span-40, 60 and 80, were investigated as the coatings. Tween surfactants coated C₁₂-Fe₃O₄, named as TW-20 (40, 60, 85)-C₁₂, exhibited good dispersibility in aqueous solution, which was a preferred character in extraction; besides, TW-20-C₁₂ and TW-40-C₁₂ showed good anti-interference ability and satisfactory reproducibility when they were used as magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) sorbents. The factors that may influence the extraction, including the amount of magnetic nanoparticles, extraction and desorption time, the amount of salt addition, the type and volume of desorption solvent, the volume of methanol addition and pH of sample solution, were investigated in detail. High performance liquid chromatography-UV detection was employed for analysis of target analytes (steroid hormone compounds). The developed method was successfully used for the determination of the target analytes in environmental and urine samples. Both tested materials afforded good recovery, satisfactory reproducibility and low limits of detection for environmental samples, which indicates that the materials possessed anti-interference ability. However, compared to TW-40-C₁₂, TW-20-C₁₂ nanoparticles provided better recovery in relatively complex biological samples, which may indicate that the latter one is more appreciated in complex samples. PMID:22621888

  16. Ca II Triplet Spectroscopy of Small Magellanic Cloud Red Giants. III. Abundances and Velocities for a Sample of 14 Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, M. C.; Geisler, D.; Clariá, J. J.; Villanova, S.; Marcionni, N.; Sarajedini, A.; Grocholski, A. J.

    2015-05-01

    We obtained spectra of red giants in 15 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters in the region of the Ca ii lines with FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope. We determined the mean metallicity and radial velocity with mean errors of 0.05 dex and 2.6 km s-1, respectively, from a mean of 6.5 members per cluster. One cluster (B113) was too young for a reliable metallicity determination and was excluded from the sample. We combined the sample studied here with 15 clusters previously studied by us using the same technique, and with 7 clusters whose metallicities determined by other authors are on a scale similar to ours. This compilation of 36 clusters is the largest SMC cluster sample currently available with accurate and homogeneously determined metallicities. We found a high probability that the metallicity distribution is bimodal, with potential peaks at -1.1 and -0.8 dex. Our data show no strong evidence of a metallicity gradient in the SMC clusters, somewhat at odds with recent evidence from Ca ii triplet spectra of a large sample of field stars. This may be revealing possible differences in the chemical history of clusters and field stars. Our clusters show a significant dispersion of metallicities, whatever age is considered, which could be reflecting the lack of a unique age-metallicity relation in this galaxy. None of the chemical evolution models currently available in the literature satisfactorily represents the global chemical enrichment processes of SMC clusters.

  17. PROPERTIES OF M31. II. A CEPHEID DISK SAMPLE DERIVED FROM THE FIRST YEAR OF PS1 PANDROMEDA DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Kodric, Mihael; Riffeser, Arno; Hopp, Ulrich; Seitz, Stella; Koppenhoefer, Johannes; Bender, Ralf; Goessl, Claus; Snigula, Jan; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Chambers, K. C.; Magnier, E. A.; Price, P. A.; Burgett, W. S.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.

    2013-04-15

    We present a sample of Cepheid variable stars toward M31 based on the first year of regular M31 observations of the PS1 survey in the r{sub P1} and i{sub P1} filters. We describe the selection procedure for Cepheid variable stars from the overall variable source sample and develop an automatic classification scheme using Fourier decomposition and the location of the instability strip. We find 1440 fundamental mode (classical {delta}) Cep stars, 126 Cepheids in the first overtone mode, and 147 belonging to the Population II types. Two hundred ninety-six Cepheids could not be assigned to one of these classes and three hundred fifty-four Cepheids were found in other surveys. These 2009 Cepheids constitute the largest Cepheid sample in M31 known so far and the full catalog is presented in this paper. We briefly describe the properties of our sample in its spatial distribution throughout the M31 galaxy, in its age properties, and we derive an apparent period-luminosity relation (PLR) in our two bands. The Population I Cepheids nicely follow the dust pattern of the M31 disk, whereas the 147 Type II Cepheids are distributed throughout the halo of M31. We outline the time evolution of the star formation in the major ring found previously and find an age gradient. A comparison of our PLR to previous results indicates a curvature term in the PLR.

  18. Synthesis, structure, magnetic and biological activity studies of bis-hydrazone derived Cu(ii) and Co(ii) coordination compounds.

    PubMed

    Golla, Upendarrao; Adhikary, Amit; Mondal, Amit Kumar; Tomar, Raghuvir Singh; Konar, Sanjit

    2016-08-01

    Four coordination compounds of formulae [Cu(II)2(H2L(1))(HL(1))](ClO4)3·H2O (1), [Cu(II)2(H2L(2))(CH3OH)2](ClO4)2·2CH3OH (2), [Co(II)2(H2L(1))2](ClO4)4 (3) and [Co(II)2(H2L(2))2]·2H2O (4) were synthesized via self-assembly of succinohydrazone derived ligands (H2L(1) = N',N'-4-bis(2-pyridyl)succinohydrazide, H4L(2) = N',N'-4-bis(2-hydroxybenzylidene)succinohydrazide) and Cu(2+) and Co(2+) ions, respectively. The compounds were characterized by crystal structure determination, magnetic measurements and biological activities. Compounds 1, 3 and 4 have discrete double helicate structures, whereas compound 2 is a one-dimensional chain. Magnetic studies show antiferromagnetic exchange interactions in 2 with a J value of -67.1 cm(-1) and antiferromagnetic spin-canting in compound 3 originates through supramolecular H-bonding. For compound 3, a clear bifurcation was observed in zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) measurement at a temperature of 3.5 K and field of 0.1 T, implying long range magnetic ordering below this temperature. Interestingly, all of compounds 1-4 show significant changes in their absorption (hypo- and hyperchromism) in the presence of SS-DNA, inferring interaction between the compounds and DNA. In addition, compounds 1-4 significantly exhibited nuclease activities on both RNA and pUC19 plasmid DNA. Moreover, the nuclease activity was further enhanced in the presence of oxidant (H2O2) and suggests the possible role of reactive oxygen species in DNA nicking ability of compounds 1-4. Furthermore, compounds 1, 2 and 4 exhibited significant cytotoxicity against mammalian cancer cell lines (HeLa, A549 and MDAMB-231). In addition, our results from Annexin/PI staining and DNA fragmentation assays revealed that these compounds are capable of inducing apoptosis and have potential to act as anticancer drugs. PMID:27377047

  19. Comparative quantification of Campylobacter jejuni from environmental samples using traditional and molecular biological techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is one of the most common causes of gastroenteritis in the world. Given the potential risks to human, animal and environmental health the development and optimization of methods to quantify this important pathogen in environmental samples is essential. Two of the mos...

  20. BUNKER HILL SITE, IDAHO. AQUATIC BIOLOGY SAMPLING, AQUATIC ECOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY, SEPTEMBER 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the low flow sampling conducted September 18 through 27, 1987. The low flow studies included an assessment of the composition and abundance of benthic invertebrate and fish populations, an evaluation of the toxicity of the South Fork of the ...

  1. Micellar electrokinetic chromatographic method for the dabrafenib determination in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Juana; Castañeda, Gregorio; Muñoz, Lorena; Lizcano, Isabel; Berciano, Miguel A

    2016-05-01

    Two different micellar electrokinetic chromatographic methods to determine dabrafenib in urine and serum, both using borate buffer (pH 9.2, 20 mM) and SDS as separation electrolyte, are developed and validated. The analyses were carried out in a fused-silica capillary of 75 μm of internal diameter and total length of 47 and 37 cm for urine and serum determination, respectively. The detection of the target compound was performed at 227 nm in urine samples and at 251 nm in serum samples. The linearity range was from 1 to 21 mg/L of dabrafenib in urine and from 2 to 40 mg/L in serum. In all cases, inter- and intraday RSDs were <4%. Sample preparation of serum samples consists of an only step of 1:1 dilution with water before its injection in the electrophoretic system. These simple, sensitive, accurate, and cost-effective methods can be used in routine clinical practice to monitor dabrafenib concentrations in urine and serum of metastatic melanoma skin cancer patients. PMID:26879119

  2. EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL METHODS FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF MUTAGENIC AND CYTOTOXIC HAZARDOUS WASTE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assist in the development of methods for identifying potentially hazardous wastes, the authors have conducted studies on the extraction of toxicants from several solid waste samples. The extracts were tested for toxicity in the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cytotoxicity Test and...

  3. Detection of triglycerides using immobilized enzymes in food and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichur, Ashish; Lesi, Abiodun; Pedersen, Henrik

    1996-04-01

    A scheme for the determination of total triglyceride (fat) content in biomedical and food samples is being developed. The primary emphasis is to minimize the reagents used, simplify sample preparation and develop a robust system that would facilitate on-line monitoring. The new detection scheme developed thus far involves extracting triglycerides into an organic solvent (cyclohexane) and performing partial least squares (PLS) analysis on the NIR (1100 - 2500 nm) absorbance spectra of the solution. A training set using 132 spectra of known triglyceride mixtures was complied. Eight PLS calibrations were generated and were used to predict the total fat extracted from commercial samples such as mayonnaise, butter, corn oil and coconut oil. The results typically gave a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.99 or better. Predictions were typically within 90% and better at higher concentrations. Experiments were also performed using an immobilized lipase reactor to hydrolyze the fat extracted into the organic solvent. Performing PLS analysis on the difference spectra of the substrate and product could enhance specificity. This is being verified experimentally. Further work with biomedical samples is to be performed. This scheme may be developed into a feasible detection method for triglycerides in the biomedical and food industries.

  4. Quantitation of Bacillus clausii in biological samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Mario; Mancini, Nicasio; Cavallero, Annalisa; Carletti, Silvia; Canducci, Filippo; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo

    2006-06-01

    A real-time PCR assay targeting the highly specific erm34 sequence of Bacillus clausii DNA was developed and optimized. The quantitative assay showed a sensitivity level of 10(2) CFU/microl of sample. The method may represent a useful tool for monitoring the role of B. clausii as probiotic in vivo. PMID:16318892

  5. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and biological activities of N4O2 Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Shakir, Mohammad; Abbasi, Ambreen; Amin, Kr. Mohammad Yusuf; Lateef, Abdul

    The Schiff base ligand, bis(indoline-2-one)triethylenetetramine (L) obtained from condensation of triethylenetetramine and isatin was used to synthesize the complexes of type, [ML]Cl2 [M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)]. L was characterized on the basis of the results of elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR, mass spectroscopic studies. The stoichiometry, bonding and stereochemistries of complexes were ascertained on the basis of results of elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility values, molar conductance and various spectroscopic studies. EPR, UV-vis and magnetic moments revealed an octahedral geometry for complexes. L and its Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity. Analgesic activity of Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes was also tested in rats by tail flick method. Both complexes were found to possess good antibacterial and moderate analgesic activity.

  6. [Ambroxol, studies of biotransformation in man and determination in biological samples (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Jauch, R; Bozler, G; Hammer, R; Koss, F W; Karlsson, M; Vitek, E; Häring, I; Beschke, K; Hadamovsky, S; Maass, D; Wollmann, R

    1978-01-01

    15 mg trans-4-[2-amino-3,5-dibromo-benzyl)-amino]-cyclohexanol-hydrochloride (ambroxol, NA 872) was administered i.v. and orally to healthy volunteers. The metabolic pattern in urine and plasma was similar for both routes of administration. Biotransformation reactions are straightforward, yielding two major products of phage I reactions identified as 6,8-dibromo-3-(trans-4-hydroxycyclohexyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-quinazoline and 3,5-dibromo-anthranilic acid. These metabolites as well as the parent compound are also converted to conjugates, predominantly glucuronides. Quantification of unlabelled ambroxol in biological fluids is achieved by radiochemical derivatisation with 14C-labelled formaldehyde in imitation of the biotransformation. PMID:581989

  7. How Parents Influence School Grades: Hints from a Sample of Adoptive and Biological Families

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Wendy; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Using the biological and adoptive families in the Minnesota-based Sibling Interaction and Behavior Study, we investigated the associations among genetic and environmental influences on IQ, parenting, parental expectations for offspring educational attainment, engagement in school, and school grades. All variables showed substantial genetic influence, and very modest shared environmental influence. No gender differences were evident. There were significant genetic influences common to IQ and parental expectations of educational attainment, parenting and engagement in school, school grades and engagement in school, parental expectations for offspring educational attainment and school grades, and IQ and school grades. A possible interpretation of the common genetic influences involving parenting is that parents use their own experience with school in shaping the ways in which they parent their offspring. PMID:19081831

  8. Electrophoresis tests on STS-3 and ground control experiments - A basis for future biological sample selections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    Static zone electrophoresis is an electrokinetic method of separating macromolecules and small particles. However, its application for the isolation of biological cells and concentrated protein solutions is limited by sedimentation and convection. Microgravity eliminates or reduces sedimentation, floatation, and density-driven convection arising from either Joule heating or concentration differences. The advantages of such an environment were first demonstrated in space during the Apollo 14 and 16 missions. In 1975 the Electrophoresis Technology Experiment (MA-011) was conducted during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project flight. In 1979 a project was initiated to repeat the separations of human kidney cells. One of the major objectives of the Electrophoresis Equipment Verification Tests (EEVT) on STS-3 was to repeat and thereby validate the first successful electrophoretic separation of human kidney cells. Attention is given to the EEVT apparatus, the preflight electrophoresis, and inflight operational results.

  9. Determination of S-nitrosothiols in biological and clinical samples using electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry with spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Winyard, Paul G; Knight, Iona A; Shaw, Frances L; Rocks, Sophie A; Davies, Claire A; Eggleton, Paul; Haigh, Richard; Whiteman, Matthew; Benjamin, Nigel

    2008-01-01

    S-Nitroso moieties, such as the S-nitroso group within S-nitrosated albumin, constitute a potential endogenous reservoir of nitric oxide (NO.) in human tissues and other biological systems. Moreover, S-nitroso compounds are under investigation as therapeutic agents in humans. Therefore, it is important to be able to detect S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) in human extracellular fluids, such as plasma and synovial fluid, as well as other biological samples. This chapter describes a method for the determination of S-nitrosothiols in biofluids. The method is based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry, in combination with spin trapping using a ferrous ion complex of the iron chelator N-methyl-d-glucamine dithiocarbamate under alkaline conditions. This iron complex mediates the decomposition of RSNO to NO., as well as spin trapping the generated NO.. The resulting spin adduct has a unique EPR signal that can be quantified. PMID:18554533

  10. A self-contained polymeric cartridge for automated biological sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guolin; Lee, Daniel Yoke San; Xie, Hong; Chiew, Deon; Hsieh, Tseng-Ming; Ali, Emril Mohamed; Lun Looi, Xing; Li, Mo-Huang; Ying, Jackie Y

    2011-09-01

    Sample preparation is one of the most crucial processes for nucleic acids based disease diagnosis. Several steps are required for nucleic acids extraction, impurity washes, and DNA/RNA elution. Careful sample preparation is vital to the obtaining of reliable diagnosis, especially with low copies of pathogens and cells. This paper describes a low-cost, disposable lab cartridge for automatic sample preparation, which is capable of handling flexible sample volumes of 10 μl to 1 ml. This plastic cartridge contains all the necessary reagents for pathogen and cell lysis, DNA/RNA extraction, impurity washes, DNA/RNA elution and waste processing in a completely sealed cartridge. The entire sample preparation processes are automatically conducted within the cartridge on a desktop unit using a pneumatic fluid manipulation approach. Reagents transportation is achieved with a combination of push and pull forces (with compressed air and vacuum, respectively), which are connected to the pneumatic inlets at the bottom of the cartridge. These pneumatic forces are regulated by pinch valve manifold and two pneumatic syringe pumps within the desktop unit. The performance of this pneumatic reagent delivery method was examined. We have demonstrated the capability of the on-cartridge RNA extraction and cancer-specific gene amplification from 10 copies of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The on-cartridge DNA recovery efficiency was 54-63%, which was comparable to or better than the conventional manual approach using silica spin column. The lab cartridge would be suitable for integration with lab-chip real-time polymerase chain reaction devices in providing a portable system for decentralized disease diagnosis. PMID:22662036

  11. Development of a micro-XRF system for biological samples based on proton-induced quasimonochromatic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploykrachang, K.; Hasegawa, J.; Kondo, K.; Fukuda, H.; Oguri, Y.

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a micro-XRF system based on a proton-induced quasimonochromatic X-ray (QMXR) microbeam for in vivo measurement of biological samples. A 2.5-MeV proton beam impinged normally on a Cu foil target that was slightly thicker than the proton range. The emitted QMXR behind the Cu target was focused with a polycapillary X-ray half lens. For application to analysis of wet or aquatic samples, we prepared a QMXR beam with an incident angle of 45° with respect to the horizontal plane by using a dipole magnet in order to bend the primary proton beam downward by 45°. The focal spot size of the QMXR microbeam on a horizontal sample surface was evaluated to be 250 × 350 μm by a wire scanning method. A microscope camera with a long working distance was installed perpendicular to the sample surface to identify the analyzed position on the sample. The fluorescent radiation from the sample was collected by a Si-PIN photodiode X-ray detector. Using the setup above, we were able to successfully measure the accumulation and distribution of Co in the leaves of a free-floating aquatic plant on a dilute Co solution surface.

  12. Sensitive spectrophotometric determination of Co(II) using dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction method in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Hasanpour, Foroozan; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Taei, Masoumeh; Nekouei, Mohsen; Mozafari, Elmira

    2016-05-01

    Analytical performance of conventional spectrophotometer was developed by coupling of effective dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction method with spectrophotometric determination for ultra-trace determination of cobalt. The method was based on the formation of Co(II)-alpha-benzoin oxime complex and its extraction using a dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction technique. During the present work, several important variables such as pH, ligand concentration, amount and type of dispersive, and extracting solvent were optimized. It was found that the crucial factor for the Co(II)-alpha benzoin oxime complex formation is the pH of the alkaline alcoholic medium. Under the optimized condition, the calibration graph was linear in the ranges of 1.0-110 μg L(-1) with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.5 μg L(-1). The preconcentration operation of 25 mL of sample gave enhancement factor of 75. The proposed method was applied for determination of Co(II) in soil samples. PMID:27040110

  13. A Review on the Wettability of Dental Implant Surfaces II: Biological and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Gittens, Rolando A.; Scheideler, Lutz; Rupp, Frank; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Dental and orthopaedic implants have been under continuous advancement to improve their interactions with bone and ensure a successful outcome for patients. Surface characteristics such as surface topography and surface chemistry can serve as design tools to enhance the biological response around the implant, with in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies confirming their effects. However, the comprehensive design of implants to promote early and long-term osseointegration requires a better understanding of the role of surface wettability and the mechanisms by which it affects the surrounding biological environment. This review provides a general overview of the available information about the contact angle values of experimental and of marketed implant surfaces, some of the techniques used to modify surface wettability of implants, and results from in vitro and clinical studies. We aim to expand the current understanding on the role of wettability of metallic implants at their interface with blood and the biological milieu, as well as with bacteria, and hard and soft tissues. PMID:24709541

  14. Basics of particle therapy II biologic and dosimetric aspects of clinical hadron therapy.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James

    2010-12-01

    Besides photons and electrons, high-energy particles like protons, neutrons, ⁴He ions or heavier ions (C, Ne, etc) have been finding increasing applications in the treatment of radioresistant tumors and tumors located near critical structures. The main difference between photons and hadrons is their different biologic effect and depth-dose distribution. Generally speaking, protons are superior in dosimetric aspects whereas neutrons have advantages in biologic effectiveness because of the high linear energy transfer. In 1946 Robert Wilson first published the physical advantages in dose distribution of ion particles for cancer therapy. Since that time hadronic radiotherapy has been intensively studied in physics laboratories worldwide and clinical application have gradually come to fruition. Hadron therapy was made possible by the advances in accelerator technology, which increases the particles' energy high enough to place them at any depth within the patient's body. As a follow-up to the previous article Introduction to Hadrons, this review discusses certain biologic and dosimetric aspects of using protons, neutrons, and heavy charged particles for radiation therapy. PMID:20395789

  15. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of some new VO(IV), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of chromone based NNO Schiff base derived from 2-aminothiazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalanithi, M.; Kodimunthiri, D.; Rajarajan, M.; Tharmaraj, P.

    2011-11-01

    Coordination compounds of VO(IV), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with the Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminothiazole with 3-formyl chromone were synthesized. The compounds were characterized by 1H, 13C NMR, UV-Vis, IR, Mass, EPR, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The Cu(II) complex possesses tetrahedrally distorted square planar geometry whereas Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) show distorted tetrahedral geometry. The VO(IV) complex shows square pyramidal geometry. The cyclic voltammogram of Cu (II) complex showed a well defined redox couple Cu(II)/Cu(I) with quasireversible nature. The antimicrobial activity against the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albigans and Aspergillus niger was screened and compared to the activity of the ligand. Emission spectrum was recorded for the ligand and the metal(II) complexes. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was measured and found to have one fourth of the activity of urea. The SEM image of the copper(II) complex implies that the size of the particles is 2 μm.

  16. Chromatographic and spectroscopic characterization of urolithins for their determination in biological samples after the intake of foods containing ellagitannins and ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    García-Villalba, Rocío; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Ellagitannins and ellagic acid (EA) are metabolized by the gut microbiota to produce urolithins that could be responsible for the health effects attributed to ellagitannin-containing food products. Several urolithin aglycones could be present in fecal samples while glucuronide and sulphate conjugates are mainly found in plasma and urine. So far, the lack of available standards has made difficult their correct identification and quantification. In the present study, UV and MS spectra characteristics of urolithins and their phase II metabolites have been determined using different systems based on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with diode-array or mass spectrometer detectors with different analyzers (triple quadrupole (QqQ) and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF)). Chromatographic separation was achieved on a reversed-phase Poroshell C18 column (3×100mm, 2.7μm). Elution order, characteristic UV spectra, and relative response factors (RRFs) with respect to their parental compound (EA) and the most common metabolite urolithin A (Uro-A) were determined. This contribution, along with the most important mass spectra characteristics (MRM transitions, qualifier/quantifier ratio, accurate mass and fragmentation pattern) will allow the determination of urolithin metabolites in different biological samples and their quantification even if not all metabolites are commercially available. The methods developed in the three systems have been fully validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, precision, recovery, matrix effect, selectivity and stability. After that, they were successfully applied to complex biological matrices (urine, feces and plasma) from two human studies in which volunteers consumed ellagitannin-containing foods, such as walnuts and pomegranate extracts. PMID:26341594

  17. Determination of lead in biological samples of children with different physiological consequences using cloud point extraction method.

    PubMed

    Shah, Faheem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Ullah, Naeem; Afridi, Hassan Imran

    2013-06-01

    In present study, lead (Pb) level in biological samples of children with physiological disorders (liver, bone, and gastrointestinal; age ranged 1-10 years) have been assessed. For comparison purpose, age-matched healthy children were also selected. Cloud point extraction (CPE) was employed for preconcentration of Pb in acid-digested biological samples prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Dithizone (diphenylthiocarbazone) and nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 (TX-114) were used as complexing reagent and extractant, respectively. The effects of several experimental variables on proposed CPE were evaluated. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the observed detection limit (LOD) and the enhancement factor (EF) were 0.08 μg L(-1) and 53, respectively. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of 10 μg L(-1) Pb was 3.4 %. It was observed that children with liver-, bone-, and gastrointestinal-related disorders had three- to fourfold higher Pb level in blood and scalp hair samples. PMID:23625698

  18. Sensor structure concepts for the analysis or local radiation exposure of biological samples at terahertz and millimeter wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornuf, Fabian; Dörr, Roland; Lämmle, David; Schlaak, Helmut F.; Krozer, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    We have studied several sensor concepts for biomedical applications operating in the millimeter wave and terahertz range. On one hand, rectangular waveguide structure were designed and extended with microfluidic channels. In this way a simple analysis of aqueous solutions at various waveguide bands is possible. In our case, we focused on the frequency range between 75 GHz and 110 GHz. On the other hand, planar sensor structures for aqueous solutions have been developed based on coplanar waveguides. With these planar sensors it is possible to concentrate the interaction volume on small sensor areas, which achieve a local exposure of the radiation to the sample. When equipping the sensor with microfluidic structures the sample volume could be reduced significantly and enabled a localized interaction with the sensor areas. The sensors are designed to exhibit a broadband behavior up to 300 GHz. Narrow-band operation can also be achieved for potentially increased sensitivity by using resonant structures. Several tests with Glucose dissolved in water show promising results for the distinction of different glucose levels at millimeter wave frequencies. The planar structures can also be used for the exposure of biological cells or cell model systems like liposomes with electromagnetic radiation. Several studies are planned to distinguish on one hand the influence of millimeter wave exposure on biological systems and also to have a spectroscopic method which enables the analysis of cell processes, like membrane transport processes, with millimeter wave and terahertz frequencies by focusing the electric field directly on the analyzing sample.

  19. Quantitative conformationally sampled pharmacophore for delta opioid ligands: reevaluation of hydrophobic moieties essential for biological activity.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Denzil; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2007-04-19

    Recent studies have indicated several therapeutic applications for delta opioid agonists and antagonists. To exploit the therapeutic potential of delta opioids developing a structural basis for the activity of ligands at the delta opioid receptor is essential. The conformationally sampled pharmacophore (CSP) method (Bernard et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 3103-3107) is extended here to obtain quantitative models of delta opioid ligand efficacy and affinity. Quantification is performed via overlap integrals of the conformational space sampled by ligands with respect to a reference compound. Iterative refinement of the CSP model identified hydrophobic groups other than the traditional phenylalanine residues as important for efficacy and affinity in DSLET and ICI 174 864. The obtained models for a structurally diverse set of peptidic and nonpeptidic delta opioid ligands offer good predictions with R2 values>0.9, and the predicted efficacy for a set of test compounds was consistent with the experimental values. PMID:17367120

  20. Implementing Self-collection of Biological Specimens With a Diverse Sample

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, April; Skinner, Martie L.; Woelfel, Tiffany; Carpenter, Thomas; Haggerty, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    Collecting saliva is the most noninvasive way to detect changing levels of cortisol (Adam & Kumari, 2009; Soo-Quee Koh & Choon-Huat Koh, 2007), a stress hormone of interest to behavioral and health scientists, where there are benefits from multiple samples taken over a period of days. Various self-collection strategies have been employed, ranging from treated cards to cotton swabs and passive drool methods. The current study investigates the effectiveness of a variety of reminder techniques in encouraging adherence with procedures requiring 4 samples per day on 3 separate days of passive drool collection among African American and European American young adults. The findings suggest that direct texts were associated with the greatest level of adherence, while phone reminders were most effective when controlling for total number of contacts. Results indicate that both traditional and novel reminder methods can positively influence adherence, even with challenging populations. PMID:24376374