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Sample records for biologically active binuclear

  1. Binuclear biologically active Co(II) complexes with octazamacrocycle and aliphatic dicarboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasković, S. B.; Vučković, G.; Antonijević-Nikolić, M.; Stanojković, T.; Gojgić-Cvijović, G.

    2012-12-01

    Four new cationic Co(II) complexes with N,N',N'',N'''-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (tpmc) and dianion of one the aliphatic dicarboxylic acids: butanedioic acid (succinic) acid = succH2, pentanedioic (glutaric) acid = gluH2, hexanedioic acid (adipic) acid = adipH2 or decanedioic acid (sebacic) acid = sebH2 of general formula [Co2(L)(tpmc)](ClO4)2ṡxY, L2- = succ, x = 1, Y = H2O; L = glu, x = 1, Y = H2O; L = adip, x = 1.5, Y = H2O; L = seb, x = 1, Y = CH3CN were isolated. The composition and charge are proposed based on elemental analyses (C, H, N) and electrical conductivity measurements. UV-Vis and FTIR spectral data and magnetic moments were in accordance with high-spin Co(II) state. It is proposed that in all complexes Co(II) is hexa-coordinated out of cyclam ring and that both carboxylic groups from dicarboxylate bridge participate in coordination. Oxygens from one group are most likely bonded to the same Co(II) ion thus forming a four-membered ring. The in vitro antibacterial/antiproliferative activities of the complexes were in some cases enhanced compared with the simple Co(II) salt and free ligands, tested as controls.

  2. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic and biological activities studies of acyclic and macrocyclic mono and binuclear metal complexes containing a hard-soft Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Hussein, Azza A. A.; Linert, Wolfgang

    Mono- and bi-nuclear acyclic and macrocyclic complexes with hard-soft Schiff base, H2L, ligand derived from the reaction of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and thiocabohydrazide, in the molar ratio 1:2 have been prepared. The H2L ligand reacts with Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Mn(II) and UO2(VI) nitrates, VO(IV) sulfate and Ru(III) chloride to get acyclic binuclear complexes except for VO(IV) and Ru(III) which gave acyclic mono-nuclear complexes. Reaction of the acyclic mono-nuclear VO(IV) and Ru(III) complexes with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol afforded the corresponding macrocyclic mono-nuclear VO(IV) and Ru(IIII) complexes. Template reactions of the 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and thiocarbohydrazide with either VO(IV) or Ru(III) salts afforded the macrocyclic binuclear VO(IV) and Ru(III) complexes. The Schiff base, H2L, ligand acts as dibasic with two NSO-tridentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes after the deprotonation of the hydrogen atoms of the phenolic groups in all the complexes, except in the case of the acyclic mononuclear Ru(III) and VO(IV) complexes, where the Schiff base behaves as neutral tetradentate chelate with N2S2 donor atoms. The ligands and the metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-vis 1H-NMR, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and ESR, as well as the measurements of conductivity and magnetic moments at room temperature. Electronic spectra and magnetic moments of the complexes indicate the geometries of the metal centers are either tetrahedral, square planar or octahedral. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated using Coats-Redfern equation, for the different thermal decomposition steps of the complexes. The ligands and the metal complexes were screened for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus as Gram-positive bacteria, and Pseudomonas fluorescens as Gram-negative bacteria in addition to Fusarium oxysporum fungus. Most of the complexes exhibit mild

  4. Anticancer activity assessment of two novel binuclear platinum (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Aseman, Marzieh Dadkhah; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Asadi, Zahra; Erfani, Nasrollah; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Niazi, Ali; Bahaoddini, Aminollah; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, two binuclear Pt (II) complexes, containing cis, cis-[Me2Pt (μ-NN) (μ-dppm) PtMe2] (1), and cis,cis-[Me2Pt(μ-NN)(μ dppm) Pt((CH2)4)] (2) in which NN=phthalazine and dppm=bis (diphenylphosphino) methane were evaluated for their anticancer activities and DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. These Pt (II) complexes, with the non-classical structures, demonstrated a significant anticancer activity against Jurkat and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The results of ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and Caspase-III activity suggest that these complexes were capable to stimulate an apoptotic mechanism of cell death in the cancer cells. Using different biophysical techniques and docking simulation analysis, we indicated that these complexes were also capable to interact efficiently with DNA via a non-intercalative mechanism. According to our results, substitution of cyclopentane (in complex 2) with two methyl groups (in complex 1) results in significant improvement of the complex ability to interact with DNA and subsequently to induce the anticancer activity. Overall, these binuclear Pt (II) complexes are promising group of the non-classical potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing of highly efficient platinum anticancer drugs. PMID:27289447

  5. Binuclear Rhodium(II) Complexes With Selective Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bień, M; Lachowicz, T M; Rybka, A; Pruchnik, F P; Trynda, L

    1997-01-01

    Binuclear rhodium(II) complexes [Rh(2)Cl(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)] {R = H, Me; N-N = 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)} and [Rh(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](RCOO)(2) (R = Me, Et;) have been synthesized and their structure and properties have been studied by electronic, IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Antibacterial activity of these complexes against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus has been investigated. The most active antibacterial agents against E. coli were [Rh(2)Cl(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)] and [Rh(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](RCOO)(2) {R = H and Me} which were considerably more active than the appropriate nitrogen ligands. The complexes show low activity against S. aureus. The activity of the complexes [Rh(2)(OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](OOCR)(2) against E. coli decreases in the series: R=H congruent withCH(3)>C(2)H(5)>C(3)H(7) congruent withC(4)H(9). The reverse order was found in the case of S. aureus. PMID:18475773

  6. Synthesis, characterization, biological activity of binuclear Co(II), Cu(II) and mononuclear Ni(II) complexes of bulky multi-dentate thiosemicarbazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Abd Al-Gader, I. M.; El-Asmy, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    The chelation behavior of 9,10-dihydro-9,10-ethanoanthracene-11,12-dicarbonyl) bis (N-ethylhydrazine-1-carbothioamide) (H6ETS)(1) towards Co2+, Ni2+and Cu2+ have been studied. The spectral data revealed that the ligand acts as a bi- and/or mono-negative multi-dentate. The isolated Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes are square-planar while the Co(II) is tetrahedral. EPR spectrum of Cu(II) complex confirmed simulated an axial spin-Hamiltonian exhibiting a four-line pattern with nitrogen super-hyperfine couplings originating from imine hydrazinic nitrogen atoms and possess a significant amount of tetrahedral distortion leading to a pseudo-square-planar geometry with unpaired electron has d ground state. Also, the thermal behavior and kinetic parameters were determined. Furthermore, the title compounds were investigated for their antibacterial activity using inhibition zone diameter and for DNA degradation, superoxide-scavenging activity as well as hydroxyl radicals that generated by the oxidation of cytochrome c in L-ascorbic acid/CuSO4-cytochrome c system.

  7. Binuclear Aromatic C-H Bond Activation at a Dirhenium Site.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Rassolov, Vitaly; Wong, Yuen Onn

    2016-01-22

    The electronically unsaturated dirhenium complex [Re2(CO)8(μ-H)(μ-Ph)] (1) has been found to exhibit aromatic C-H activation upon reaction with N,N-diethylaniline, naphthalene, and even [D6]benzene to yield the compounds [Re2(CO)8(μ-H)(μ-η(1)-NEt2C6H4)] (2), [Re2(CO)8(μ-H)(μ-η(2)-1,2-C10H7)] (3), and [D6]-1, respectively, in good yields. The mechanism has been elucidated by using DFT computational analyses, and involves a binuclear C-H bond-activation process. PMID:26643854

  8. Structure/function correlations over binuclear non-heme iron active sites.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Edward I; Park, Kiyoung

    2016-09-01

    Binuclear non-heme iron enzymes activate O2 to perform diverse chemistries. Three different structural mechanisms of O2 binding to a coupled binuclear iron site have been identified utilizing variable-temperature, variable-field magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (VTVH MCD). For the μ-OH-bridged Fe(II)2 site in hemerythrin, O2 binds terminally to a five-coordinate Fe(II) center as hydroperoxide with the proton deriving from the μ-OH bridge and the second electron transferring through the resulting μ-oxo superexchange pathway from the second coordinatively saturated Fe(II) center in a proton-coupled electron transfer process. For carboxylate-only-bridged Fe(II)2 sites, O2 binding as a bridged peroxide requires both Fe(II) centers to be coordinatively unsaturated and has good frontier orbital overlap with the two orthogonal O2 π* orbitals to form peroxo-bridged Fe(III)2 intermediates. Alternatively, carboxylate-only-bridged Fe(II)2 sites with only a single open coordination position on an Fe(II) enable the one-electron formation of Fe(III)-O2 (-) or Fe(III)-NO(-) species. Finally, for the peroxo-bridged Fe(III)2 intermediates, further activation is necessary for their reactivities in one-electron reduction and electrophilic aromatic substitution, and a strategy consistent with existing spectral data is discussed. PMID:27369780

  9. Activation of the binuclear metal center through formation of phosphotriesterase-inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Samples, Cynthia R; Raushel, Frank M; DeRose, Victoria J

    2007-03-20

    Phosphotriesterase (PTE) from Pseudomonas diminuta is a binuclear metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of organophosphate nerve agents at rates approaching the diffusion-controlled limit. The proposed catalytic mechanism postulates the interaction of the substrate with the metal center and subsequent nucleophilic attack by the bridging hydroxide. X-band EPR spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the active site of Mn/Mn-substituted PTE upon addition of two inhibitors, diisopropyl methyl phosphonate and triethyl phosphate, and the product of hydrolysis, diethyl phosphate. The effects of inhibitor and product binding on the magnetic properties of the metal center and the hydroxyl bridge were evaluated by measuring changes in the features of the EPR spectra. The EPR spectra support the proposal that the binding of substrate analogues to the binuclear metal center diminishes the population of hydroxide-bridged species. These results, in conjunction with previously published kinetic and crystallographic data, suggest that substrate binding via the phosphoryl oxygen at the beta-metal weakens the coordination of the hydroxide bridge to the beta-metal. The weakened coordination to the beta-metal ion increases the nucleophilic character of the hydroxide and is coupled to the increase in the electrophilic character of the substrate. PMID:17315951

  10. Binuclear mercury(II) complexes of sulfonium ylides: Synthesis, structural characterization and anti-bacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabounchei, Seyyed Javad; Bagherjeri, Fateme Akhlaghi; Boskovic, Colette; Gable, Robert W.; Karamian, Roya; Asadbegy, Mostafa

    2013-02-01

    Reaction of α-keto stabilized sulfonium ylides (Me)2SCHC(O)C6H4R (R = p-Me (a); p-Cl (b)) with HgX2 (X = Cl, Br and I) in equimolar ratios using methanol as solvent leads to binuclear products of the type [HgX2(ylide)]2 (X = Cl (1), Br (2) and I (3)). Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the presence of unexpected asymmetric halide-bridged dinuclear structures for 1a and 2b. Characterization of the compounds by IR, 1H- and 13C NMR spectroscopy confirmed coordination of the ylide to the metal through the carbon atom. In addition, the antibacterial effects of DMSO-solutions of the complexes were investigated by the disc diffusion method against three Gram positive and three negative bacteria. All complexes represent antibacterial activity against these bacteria with high levels of inhibitory potency exhibited against the Gram-positive species.

  11. Properties of Binuclear Rhodium(II) Complexes and Their Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Pruchnik, F P; Bień, M; Lachowicz, T

    1996-01-01

    Binuclear rhodium(II) complexes [Rh(2)Cl(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)], [Rh(2)(mu-OOCR)(2)(N-N)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](RCOO)(2) and [Rh(2)Cl(2)(mu-OOCCH(3))(terpy)(2)](H(3)O)Cl(2).9H(2)O (R = H, Me, Bu(n), ph, PhCHOH; N-N = 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmp) and 6,7-dimethyl-2,3- di(2-pyridyl)quinoxaline (dmpq); terpy 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) have been synthesized and their structure and properties have been studied by electronic, IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Antibacterial activity of these complexes against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli has been investigated. The most active antibacterial agents against S. aureus were [Rh(2)(OOCPh)(2)(phen)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](2+), [Rh(2)(OOCPh)(2)(dmpq)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](2+), [Rh(2)(OOCBu)(2)(phen)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](2+) and [Rh(2)-(OOCBu)(2)(bpy)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](2+) which were considerably more active than the appropriate nitrogen ligands. The complexes show rather low activity against E. coli. PMID:18475754

  12. Synthesis, characterization and biological studies of homo and hetero-binuclear 13-membered pentaaza bis (macrocyclic) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Hina; Kareem, Abdul; Sherwani, Asif; Mohammad, Owais; Khan, Tahir Ali

    2015-01-01

    A new series of homo and hetero binuclear 13-membered pentaaza bis (macrocyclic) complexes, [MM‧LX4], [M = Cu(II), M‧ = Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Sn(II); L = ligand and X = Cl or NO3] have been synthesized by the template reaction of dichloro/dinitrato diphenyl sulphone 1,3,6,9,12-tetra hydro pentaazacyclo pantane copper (II) complexes with formaldehyde, triethylenetetraamine, and respective metal salts in 1:2:1:1 molar ratio. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, ESI-mass, 1H, 13C and 119Sn NMR, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. The results of elemental analyses, ESI-mass and conductivity measurements confirmed the stoichiometry of the complexes while the characteristic absorption bands and resonance peaks in IR and NMR spectra confirmed the formation of macrocyclic frameworks of the complexes. These studies showed octahedral geometry around the metal ion. The thermal stability of copper complexes was also studied by TGA and DTA analyses. Some complexes of this series were also studied for their in vitro anticancer activity against cancer cells lines: Hep3B, MCF7, and HeLa. The recorded IC50 values for the tested complexes show moderate to good cytotoxicity against these cancer cell lines.

  13. Structural, spectral and biological studies of binuclear tetradentate metal complexes of N 3O Schiff base ligand synthesized from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and diethylenetriamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emara, Adel A. A.

    2010-09-01

    The binuclear Schiff base, H 2L, ligand was synthesized by reaction of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with diethylenetriamine in the molar ratio 1:2. The coordination behavior of the H 2L towards Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), Cr(III), VO(IV) and UO 2(VI) ions has been investigated. The elemental analyses, magnetic moments, thermal studies and IR, electronic, 1H NMR, ESR and mass spectra were used to characterize the isolated ligand and its metal complexes. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N 3O-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The bonding sites are the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine and amine groups and the oxygen atoms of the phenolic groups. The metal complexes exhibit either square planar, tetrahedral, square pyramid or octahedral structures. The Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes were tested against four pathogenic bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) as Gram-positive bacteria, and ( Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas phaseolicola) as Gram-negative bacteria and two pathogenic fungi ( Fusarium oxysporum and Aspergillus fumigatus) to assess their antimicrobial properties. Most of the complexes exhibit mild antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms.

  14. DNA Cleavage and Condensation Activities of Mono- and Binuclear Hybrid Complexes and Regulation by Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Dai, Mingxing; Zhang, Chunping; Jiang, Bingying; Xu, Junqiang; Zhou, Dewen; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid complexes with N,N'-bis(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine and cyclen moieties are novel enzyme mimics and controlled DNA release materials, which could interact with DNA through three models under different conditions. In this paper, the interactions between plasmid DNA and seven different complexes were investigated, and the methods to change the interaction patterns by graphene oxide (GO) or concentrations were also investigated. The cleavage of pUC19 DNA promoted by target complexes were via hydrolytic or oxidative mechanisms at low concentrations ranging from 3.13 × 10(-7) to 6.25 × 10(-5) mol/L. Dinuclear complexes 2a and 2b can promote the cleavage of plasmid pUC19 DNA to a linear form at pH values below 7.0. Furthermore, binuclear hybrid complexes could condense DNA as nanoparticles above 3.13 × 10(-5) mol/L and partly release DNA by graphene oxide with π-π stacking. Meanwhile, the results also reflected that graphene oxide could prevent DNA from breaking down. Cell viability assays showed dinuclear complexes were safe to normal human hepatic cells at relative high concentrations. The present work might help to develop novel strategies for the design and synthesis of DNA controllable releasing agents, which may be applied to gene delivery and also to exploit the new application for GO. PMID:27428945

  15. [Mono- and Binuclear Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes with Thiol-containing Ligands in Various Biosystems].

    PubMed

    Vanin, A F; Mikoyan, V D; Kubrina, L N; Borodulin, R R; Burgova, E N

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands, bound with modified bovine serum albumin with high amount of thiol groups, appeared in baker yeast or in animal tissues in the presence of exogenous or endogenous nitric oxide, respectively, are represented predominantly by EPR-silent binuclear form. This form can be transformed into EPR-active mononuclear form of dinitrosyl iron complexes with an increase in pH to basic values, into EPR-active form of mononuclear iron nitrosyl complexes in case of bielectronic recovery of the binuclear form of dinitrosyl iron complexes or under the action of dithiocarbamate derivatives. The latter induced the transformation of dinitrosyl iron complexes into EPR-active mononitrosyl iron complexes with dithiocarbamates. A significant amount of binuclear dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands in living systems and identical biological activity of these complexes and endogenous nitric oxide systems allow of considering endogenous binuclear dinitrosyl iron complexes as a "working form" of endogenous nitric oxide recognized now as a universal regulator of biological processes. PMID:26394474

  16. Enhanced activity and stability of binuclear iron (III) phthalocyanine on graphene nanosheets for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction in acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tengfei; Peng, Yingxiang; Li, Kai; Zhang, Rui; Zheng, Lirong; Xia, Dingguo; Zuo, Xia

    2015-10-01

    Binuclear iron (III) phthalocyanine (bi-FePc) and iron (III) phthalocyanine (FePc) are synthesized in situ on graphene nanosheets (GNS) by a microwave-assisted method. TEM, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy confirm that bi-FePc is supported on GNS through π-π interactions. The catalytic activity of the bi-FePc/GNS and FePc/GNS composites in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is investigated by CV and RDE measurements. The bi-FePc/GNS composite shows a more positive onset potential (0.12 V vs. Hg/Hg2SO4) for the ORR than FePc/GNS (-0.02 V vs. Hg/Hg2SO4), and a four-electron mechanism similar to commercial Pt/C (0.22 V vs. Hg/Hg2SO4). Moreover, bi-FePc/GNS exhibits good stability with 100% retention after 36,000 s, while Pt/C has a retention of only 50% after the same period. Additionally, bi-FePc/GNS shows higher tolerance toward methanol than the Pt/C catalyst. XPS and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy demonstrate that compared with FePc/GNS, bi-FePc/GNS possesses a higher concentration of Fe3+ and smaller skeleton radius of the phthalocyanine ring, which has a square-planar structure that evidently favors the ORR. Thus, bi-FePc/GNS is a promising candidate as a cathode catalyst in direct methanol fuel cells.

  17. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, electrochemistry and biological evaluation of some binuclear transition metal complexes of bicompartmental ONO donor ligands containing benzo[b]thiophene moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahendra Raj, K.; Vivekanand, B.; Nagesh, G. Y.; Mruthyunjayaswamy, B. H. M.

    2014-02-01

    A series of new binucleating Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of bicompartmental ligands with ONO donor were synthesized. The ligands were obtained by the condensation of 3-chloro-6-substituted benzo[b]thiophene-2-carbohydrazides and 4,6-diacetylresorcinol. The synthesized ligands and their complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and various spectroscopic techniques. Elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, ESI-mass, UV-Visible, TG-DTA, magnetic measurements, molar conductance and powder-XRD data has been used to elucidate their structures. The bonding sites are the oxygen atom of amide carbonyl, azomethine nitrogen and phenolic oxygen for ligands 1 and 2. The binuclear nature of the complexes was confirmed by ESR spectral data. TG-DTA studies for some complexes showed the presence of coordinated water molecules and the final product is the metal oxide. All the complexes were investigated for their electrochemical activity, only the Cu(II) complexes showed the redox property. Cu(II) complexes were square planar, whereas Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were octahedral. Powder-XRD pattern have been studied in order to test the degree of crystallinity of the complexes and unit cell calculations were made. In order to evaluate the effect of antimicrobial activity of metal ions upon chelation, both the ligands and their metal complexes were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. The results showed that the metal complexes were found to be more active than free ligands. The DNA cleaving capacities of all the complexes were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis method against supercoiled plasmid DNA. Among the compounds tested for antioxidant capacity, ligand 1 displayed excellent activity than its metal complexes.

  18. A series of binuclear lanthanide(III) complexes: Crystallography, antimicrobial activity and thermochemistry properties studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Ren, Ning; Xu, Su-Ling; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Da-Hai

    2015-02-01

    A series of novel lanthanide complexes with the general formula [Ln(3,4-DClBA)3phen]2 (Ln = Ho(1), Nd(2), Sm(3), Dy(4), Eu(5), Tb(6), Yb(7) and Er(8), 3,4-DClBA = 3,4-dichlorobenzoate, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) were prepared at room temperature and characterized. The crystal structures of complexes 1-8 have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. These complexes are isomorphous and lanthanide ions are all eight-coordinated to oxygen atoms and nitrogen atoms with distorted square-antiprism geometry. The thermal decomposition mechanism and TG-FTIR spectra of gaseous products of thermal decomposition processes for complexes 1-8 were acquired through TG/DSC-FTIR system. The heat capacities of complexes 1-8 were measured using DSC technology and fitted to a polynomial equation by the least-squares method. Complexes 3-6 display characteristic lanthanide emission bands in the visible region. Meanwhile, these complexes exhibit in good antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureu.

  19. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antimicrobial activity of binuclear metal complexes of a new asymmetrical Schiff base ligand: DNA binding affinity of copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy

    2014-01-01

    The 1:1 condensation of o-acetoacetylphenol and 1,2-diaminopropane under condition of high dilution gives the mono-condensed Schiff base, (E)-3-(1-aminopropan-2-ylimino)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)butan-1-one. The mono-condensed Schiff base has been used for further condensation with isatin to obtain the new asymmetrical dicompartmental Schiff base ligand, (E)-3-(2-((E)-4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxobutan-2-ylideneamino) propylimino)indolin-2-one (H3L) with a N2O3 donor set. Reactions of the ligand with metal salts give a series of new binuclear complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as thermal analyses. The analytical and spectroscopic tools showed that the complexes can be formulated as: [(HL)(VO)2(SO4)(H2O)]·4H2O, [(HL)Fe2Cl4(H2O)3]·EtOH, [(HL)Fe2(ox)Cl2(H2O)3]·2H2O, [(L)M2(OAc)(H2O)m]·nH2O; M = Co, Ni or Cu, m = 4, 0 and n = 2, 3, [(HL)Cu2Cl]Cl·6H2O and [(L)(UO2)2(OAc)(H2O)3]·6H2O. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometrical arrangements except copper complexes that exhibited tetrahedral geometries and uranyl complex in which the metal ion is octa-coordinated. The Schiff base and its metal complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). The ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically active. The DNA-binding properties of the copper complexes (6 and 7) have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The results obtained indicate that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant, Kb of 1.34 × 104 and 2.5 × 104 M-1, respectively.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, biological evaluation and docking studies of macrocyclic binuclear manganese(II) complexes containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthi, P.; Shobana, S.; Srinivasan, P.; Mitu, L.; Kalilur Rahiman, A.

    2015-05-01

    A series of bis(phenoxo) bridged binuclear manganese(II) complexes of the type [Mn2L1-3](ClO4)2 (1-3) containing 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl pendant-arms have been synthesized by cyclocondensation of 2,6-diformyl-4-R-phenols (where R = sbnd CH3, sbnd C(CH3)3 or sbnd Br) with 2,2‧-3,5-dinitrobenzoyliminodi(ethylamine) trihydrochloride in the presence of manganese(II) perchlorate. The IR spectra of complexes indicate the presence of uncoordinated perchlorate anions. The UV-Vis spectra of complexes suggest the distorted octahedral geometry around manganese(II) nuclei. The EPR spectra of Mn(II) complexes show a broad signal with g value 2.03-2.04, which is characteristic for octahedral high spin Mn2+ complex. The observed room temperature magnetic moment values of the Mn(II) complexes (5.60-5.62 B.M.) are less than the normal value (5.92 B.M.), indicating weak antiferromagnetic coupling interaction between the two metal ions. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show two distinct quasi-reversible one electron transfer processes in the cathodic (E1pc = -0.73 to -0.76 V, E2pc = -1.30 to -1.36 V), and anodic (E1pa = 1.02-1.11 V, E2pa = 1.32-1.79 V) potential regions. Antibacterial efficacy of complexes have been screened against four Gram (-ve) and two Gram (+ve) bacterial strains. The DNA interaction studies suggest that these complexes bind with CT-DNA by intercalation, giving the binding affinity in the order 1 > 2 > 3. All the complexes display significant cleavage activity against circular plasmid pBR322 DNA. Docking simulation was performed to insert complexes into the crystal structure of EGFR tyrosine kinase and B-DNA at active site to determine the probable binding mode.

  1. Metadata Activities in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Inigo, Gil San; HUTCHISON, VIVIAN; Frame, Mike; Palanisamy, Giri

    2010-01-01

    The National Biological Information Infrastructure program has advanced the biological sciences ability to standardize, share, integrate and synthesize data by making the metadata program a core of its activities. Through strategic partnerships, a series of crosswalks for the main biological metadata specifications have enabled data providers and international clearinghouses to aggregate and disseminate tens of thousands of metadata sets describing petabytes of data records. New efforts at the National Biological Information Infrastructure are focusing on better metadata creation and curation tools, semantic mediation for data discovery and other curious initiatives.

  2. Mono- and binuclear copper(II) complexes of new hydrazone ligands derived from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol: Synthesis, spectral studies and antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; El-ghamry, Mosad A.; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Kishk, Mona A. A.

    Two new hydrazone ligands, H2L1 and H2L2, were synthesized by the condensation of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with 3-hydrazino-5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine and isatin monohydrazone, respectively. The structures of the ligands were elucidated by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, electronic and mass spectra. Reactions of the ligands with several copper(II) salts, including AcO-, NO3-, SO42-, Cl- and Br- afforded mono- and binuclear metal complexes. Also, the ligands were allowed to react with Cu(II) ion in the presence of a secondary ligand (L‧) [N,O-donor; 8-hydroxyquinoline, N,N-donor; 1,10-phenanthroline or O,O-donor; benzoylacetone]. Characterization and structure elucidation of the prepared complexes were achieved by elemental and thermal analyses, IR, electronic, mass and ESR spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The ESR spin Hamiltonian parameters of some complexes were calculated. The spectroscopic data showed that the H2L1 ligand acts as a neutral or monobasic tridentate ligand while the H2L2 ligand acts as a bis(monobasic tridentate) ligand. The coordination sites with the copper(II) ion are phenolic oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and triazinic nitrogen (H2L1 ligand) or isatinic oxygen (H2L2 ligand). The metal complexes exhibited octahedral and square planar geometrical arrangements depending on the nature of the anion. The ligands and some metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity.

  3. Binuclear cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and palladium(II) complexes of a new Schiff-base as ligand: Synthesis, structural characterization, and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geeta, B.; Shravankumar, K.; Reddy, P. Muralidhar; Ravikrishna, E.; Sarangapani, M.; Reddy, K. Krishna; Ravinder, V.

    2010-11-01

    A binucleating new Schiff-base ligand with a phenylene spacer, afforded by the condensation of glycyl-glycine and o-phthalaldehyde has been served as an octadentate N 4O 4 ligand in designing some binuclear complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), and palladium(II). The binding manner of the ligand to the metal and the composition and geometry of the metal complexes were examined by elemental analysis, conductivity measurements, magnetic moments, IR, 1H, 13C NMR, ESR and electronic spectroscopies, and TGA measurements. There are two different coordination/chelation environments present around two metal centers of each binuclear complex. The composition of the complexes in the coordination sphere was found to be [M 2(L)(H 2O) 4] (where M = Co(II) and Ni(II)) and [M 2(L)] (where M = Cu(II) and Pd(II)). In the case of Cu(II) complexes, ESR spectra provided further information to confirm the binuclear structure and the presence of magnetic interactions. All the above metal complexes have shown moderate to good antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Reactivity of the binuclear non-heme iron active site of Δ⁹ desaturase studied by large-scale multireference ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Chalupský, Jakub; Rokob, Tibor András; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Solomon, Edward I; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Srnec, Martin

    2014-11-12

    The results of density matrix renormalization group complete active space self-consistent field (DMRG-CASSCF) and second-order perturbation theory (DMRG-CASPT2) calculations are presented on various structural alternatives for the O-O and first C-H activating step of the catalytic cycle of the binuclear nonheme iron enzyme Δ(9) desaturase. This enzyme is capable of inserting a double bond into an alkyl chain by double hydrogen (H) atom abstraction using molecular O2. The reaction step studied here is presumably associated with the highest activation barrier along the full pathway; therefore, its quantitative assessment is of key importance to the understanding of the catalysis. The DMRG approach allows unprecedentedly large active spaces for the explicit correlation of electrons in the large part of the chemically important valence space, which is apparently conditio sine qua non for obtaining well-converged reaction energetics. The derived reaction mechanism involves protonation of the previously characterized 1,2-μ peroxy Fe(III)Fe(III) (P) intermediate to a 1,1-μ hydroperoxy species, which abstracts an H atom from the C10 site of the substrate. An Fe(IV)-oxo unit is generated concomitantly, supposedly capable of the second H atom abstraction from C9. In addition, several popular DFT functionals were compared to the computed DMRG-CASPT2 data. Notably, many of these show a preference for heterolytic C-H cleavage, erroneously predicting substrate hydroxylation. This study shows that, despite its limitations, DMRG-CASPT2 is a significant methodological advancement toward the accurate computational treatment of complex bioinorganic systems, such as those with the highly open-shell diiron active sites. PMID:25313991

  5. Crystal Structure of Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), a Putative Membrane-Bound Lipid Phosphatase, Reveals a Novel Binuclear Metal Binding Site and Two Proton Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran,D.; Bonnano, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, catalyzes formation of phosphatidylglycerol from phosphatidylglycerophosphate. Phosphatidylglycerol is a multifunctional phospholipid, found in the biological membranes of many organisms. Here, we report the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes PGPase at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. PGPase, an all-helical molecule, forms a homotetramer. Each protomer contains an independent active site with two metal ions, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, forming a hetero-binuclear center located in a hydrophilic cavity near the surface of the molecule. The binuclear center, conserved ligands, metal-bound water molecules, and an Asp-His dyad form the active site. The catalytic mechanism of this enzyme is likely to proceed via binuclear metal activated nucleophilic water. The binuclear metal-binding active-site environment of this structure should provide insights into substrate binding and metal-dependent catalysis. A long channel with inter-linked linear water chains, termed 'proton wires', is observed at the tetramer interface. Comparison of similar water chain structures in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs), Cytochrome f, gramicidin, and bacteriorhodopsin, suggests that PGPase may conduct protons via proton wires.

  6. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity of binuclear Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol.

    PubMed

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M E; Taha, A; Mahdi, M A N

    2013-09-01

    Reactions of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with different cobalt(II) and copper(II) salts viz., OAc(-), Cl(-), NO3(-) and SO4(2-), yielded a new series of binuclear metal complexes. Reactions of the ligand with these metal ions in the presence of a secondary ligand (L') [O,O-donor; acetylacetone, N,O-donor; 8-hydroxyquinoline or N,N-donor; 1,10-phenanthroline and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine] in 1:2:2 (L:M:L') molar ratio yielded mixed-ligand complexes with different molar ratios. The metal complexes were characterized by elemental and thermal analyses, IR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The analytical and spectroscopic data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the type of the anion and secondary ligand used, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Electronic spectra, magnetic and conductivity measurements showed that all complexes are octahedral with non-electrolytic nature. The profile of ESR spectra of copper(II) complexes suggested the octahedral geometry and the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the complexes were calculated and discussed. Molecular orbital calculations were performed for metal complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results correlated with the experimental data. The free ligand and some of its metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus). PMID:23743042

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity of binuclear Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2013-09-01

    Reactions of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with different cobalt(II) and copper(II) salts viz., OAc-, Cl-, NO3- and SO42-, yielded a new series of binuclear metal complexes. Reactions of the ligand with these metal ions in the presence of a secondary ligand (L‧) [O,O-donor; acetylacetone, N,O-donor; 8-hydroxyquinoline or N,N-donor; 1,10-phenanthroline and N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylethylenediamine] in 1:2:2 (L:M:L‧) molar ratio yielded mixed-ligand complexes with different molar ratios. The metal complexes were characterized by elemental and thermal analyses, IR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The analytical and spectroscopic data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the type of the anion and secondary ligand used, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Electronic spectra, magnetic and conductivity measurements showed that all complexes are octahedral with non-electrolytic nature. The profile of ESR spectra of copper(II) complexes suggested the octahedral geometry and the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the complexes were calculated and discussed. Molecular orbital calculations were performed for metal complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results correlated with the experimental data. The free ligand and some of its metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  8. A binuclear complex constituted by diethyldithiocarbamate and copper(I) functions as a proteasome activity inhibitor in pancreatic cancer cultures and xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jinbin; Yue, Xiaoqiang; Chang, Jinjia; Shi, Weidong; Hua, Yongqiang

    2013-12-15

    It is a therapeutic strategy for cancers including pancreatic to inhibit proteasome activity. Disulfiram (DSF) may bind copper (Cu) to form a DSF–Cu complex. DSF–Cu is capable of inducing apoptosis in cancer cells by inhibiting proteasome activity. DSF is rapidly converted to diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) within bodies. Copper(II) absorbed by bodies is reduced to copper(I) when it enters cells. We found that DDTC and copper(I) could form a binuclear complex which might be entitled DDTC–Cu(I), and it had been synthesized by us in the laboratory. This study is to investigate the anticancer potential of this complex on pancreatic cancer and the possible mechanism. Pancreatic cancer cell lines, SW1990, PANC-1 and BXPC-3 were used for in vitro assays. Female athymic nude mice grown SW1990 xenografts were used as animal models. Cell counting kit-8 (cck-8) assay and flow cytometry were used for analyzing apoptosis in cells. A 20S proteasome assay kit was used in proteasome activity analysis. Western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used in tumor sample analysis. The results suggest that DDTC–Cu(I) inhibit pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, and increased p27 as well as decreased NF-κB expression were detected in tumor tissues of DDTC–Cu(I)-treated group. Our data indicates that DDTC–Cu(I) is an effective proteasome activity inhibitor with the potential to be explored as a drug for pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • A new structure of DDTC–Cu(I) was reported for the first time. • DDTC–Cu(I) dissolved directly in water was for in vitro and in vivo uses. • DDTC–Cu(I) demonstrated significant anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo. • DDTC–Cu(I) is capable of inhibiting proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  10. Structural Diversity Within the Mononuclear and Binuclear Active Sites of N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Deacetylase

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,R.; Brown, S.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Xu, C.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Raushel, F.

    2007-01-01

    NagA catalyzes the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate to D-glucosamine-6-phosphate and acetate. X-ray crystal structures of NagA from Escherichia coli were determined to establish the number and ligation scheme for the binding of zinc to the active site and to elucidate the molecular interactions between the protein and substrate. The three-dimensional structures of the apo-NagA, Zn-NagA, and the D273N mutant enzyme in the presence of a tight-binding N-methylhydroxyphosphinyl-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate inhibitor were determined. The structure of the Zn-NagA confirms that this enzyme binds a single divalent cation at the beta-position in the active site via ligation to Glu-131, His-195, and His-216. A water molecule completes the ligation shell, which is also in position to be hydrogen bonded to Asp-273. In the structure of NagA bound to the tight binding inhibitor that mimics the tetrahedral intermediate, the methyl phosphonate moiety has displaced the hydrolytic water molecule and is directly coordinated to the zinc within the active site. The side chain of Asp-273 is positioned to activate the hydrolytic water molecule via general base catalysis and to deliver this proton to the amino group upon cleavage of the amide bond of the substrate. His-143 is positioned to help polarize the carbonyl group of the substrate in conjunction with Lewis acid catalysis by the bound zinc. The inhibitor is bound in the {alpha}-configuration at the anomeric carbon through a hydrogen bonding interaction of the hydroxyl group at C-1 with the side chain of His-251. The phosphate group of the inhibitor attached to the hydroxyl at C-6 is ion paired with Arg-227 from the adjacent subunit. NagA from Thermotoga maritima was shown to require a single divalent cation for full catalytic activity.

  11. Structural diversity within the mononuclear and binuclear active sites of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard S; Brown, Shoshana; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Xu, Chengfu; Babbitt, Patricia C; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2007-07-10

    NagA catalyzes the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6-phosphate to d-glucosamine-6-phosphate and acetate. X-ray crystal structures of NagA from Escherichia coli were determined to establish the number and ligation scheme for the binding of zinc to the active site and to elucidate the molecular interactions between the protein and substrate. The three-dimensional structures of the apo-NagA, Zn-NagA, and the D273N mutant enzyme in the presence of a tight-binding N-methylhydroxyphosphinyl-d-glucosamine-6-phosphate inhibitor were determined. The structure of the Zn-NagA confirms that this enzyme binds a single divalent cation at the beta-position in the active site via ligation to Glu-131, His-195, and His-216. A water molecule completes the ligation shell, which is also in position to be hydrogen bonded to Asp-273. In the structure of NagA bound to the tight binding inhibitor that mimics the tetrahedral intermediate, the methyl phosphonate moiety has displaced the hydrolytic water molecule and is directly coordinated to the zinc within the active site. The side chain of Asp-273 is positioned to activate the hydrolytic water molecule via general base catalysis and to deliver this proton to the amino group upon cleavage of the amide bond of the substrate. His-143 is positioned to help polarize the carbonyl group of the substrate in conjunction with Lewis acid catalysis by the bound zinc. The inhibitor is bound in the alpha-configuration at the anomeric carbon through a hydrogen bonding interaction of the hydroxyl group at C-1 with the side chain of His-251. The phosphate group of the inhibitor attached to the hydroxyl at C-6 is ion paired with Arg-227 from the adjacent subunit. NagA from Thermotoga maritima was shown to require a single divalent cation for full catalytic activity. PMID:17567048

  12. Active Biological Materials

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2011-01-01

    Cells make use of dynamic internal structures to control shape and create movement. By consuming energy to assemble into highly organized systems of interacting parts, these structures can generate force and resist compression, as well as adaptively change in response to their environment. Recent progress in reconstituting cytoskeletal structures in vitro has provided an opportunity to characterize the mechanics and dynamics of filament networks formed from purified proteins. Results indicate that a complex interplay between length scales and timescales underlies the mechanical responses of these systems and that energy consumption, as manifested in molecular motor activity and cytoskeletal filament growth, can drive transitions between distinct material states. This review discusses the basic characteristics of these active biological materials that set them apart from conventional materials and that create a rich array of unique behaviors. PMID:18999991

  13. Binuclear metallohydrolases: complex mechanistic strategies for a simple chemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Gerhard; Mitić, Nataša; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; McGeary, Ross P; Guddat, Luke W

    2012-09-18

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a large family of enzymes that require two closely spaced transition metal ions to carry out a plethora of hydrolytic reactions. Representatives include purple acid phosphatases (PAPs), enzymes that play a role in bone metabolism and are the only member of this family with a heterovalent binuclear center in the active form (Fe(3+)-M(2+), M = Fe, Zn, Mn). Other members of this family are urease, which contains a di-Ni(2+) center and catalyzes the breakdown of urea, arginase, which contains a di-Mn(2+) center and catalyzes the final step in the urea cycle, and the metallo-β-lactamases, which contain a di-Zn(2+) center and are virulence factors contributing to the spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Binuclear metallohydrolases catalyze numerous vital reactions and are potential targets of drugs against a wide variety of human disorders including osteoporosis, various cancers, antibiotic resistance, and erectile dysfunctions. These enzymes also tend to catalyze more than one reaction. An example is an organophosphate (OP)-degrading enzyme from Enterobacter aerogenes (GpdQ). Although GpdQ is part of a pathway that is used by bacteria to degrade glycerolphosphoesters, it hydrolyzes a variety of other phosphodiesters and displays low levels of activity against phosphomono- and triesters. Such a promiscuous nature may have assisted the apparent recent evolution of some binuclear metallohydrolases to deal with situations created by human intervention such as OP pesticides in the environment. OP pesticides were first used approximately 70 years ago, and therefore the enzymes that bacteria use to degrade them must have evolved very quickly on the evolutionary time scale. The promiscuous nature of enzymes such as GpdQ makes them ideal candidates for the application of directed evolution to produce new enzymes that can be used in bioremediation and against chemical warfare. In this Account, we review the mechanisms employed by binuclear

  14. Synthesis, characterization and biological activities of some new chromium molybdenum and tungsten complexes with 2,6-diaminopyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Ahmed A.; Ali, Saadia A.; Marei, Amany H.; Nassar, Doaa H.

    2012-04-01

    The reactions of [M(CO)6], M = Cr, Mo, W with 2,6-diaminopyridine (dap) in ethanol was carried out under sun light and microwave irradiation routes of synthesis and compared with the traditional thermal reflux method. All routes resulted in the formation of the binuclear oxo complexes with the general formulas [M2(O)4(dap)2]. The prepared complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, IR, 1HNMR, mass spectrometry and magnetic measurement. The biological activity of dap and its complexes as antibacterial and antifungal reagents have been screened.

  15. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  16. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of biology experiments. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher information…

  17. Biological activity of ionene polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Ionene polymers are polyammonium salts with positive nitrogens in the backbone, resulting from the polycondensation of diamines with dihalides or from the polycondensation of halo amines. The mechanism of formation of ionene polymers of different structures and their biological activity is reviewed. The antimicrobial and antifungal properties are compared with low molecular weight ammonium salts. Ionenes were found to combine with DNA by means of ionic bonds to yield similar complexes to those obtained with polyamines (spermine and spermidine). They also combine with nerve cell receptors and exercise a more powerful and longer duration ganglionic blocking action than their monomeric analogs. The antiheparin activity of ionenes and the thromboresistance of elastomeric ionene heparin coatings is described. The enhanced biological activity of ionenes as compared with low molecular weight compounds is attributed to a cooperative effect of a large number of positive charges on the polymeric chains.

  18. Molecular characteristics versus biological activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Applegate, Vernon C.; Smith, Manning A.; Willeford, Bennett R.

    1967-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of mononitrophenols containing halogens not only play a key role in their biological activity but provide a novel example of selective toxicity among vertebrate animals. It has been reported that efforts to control the parasitic sea lamprey in the Great Lakes are directed at present to the applications of a selective toxicant to streams inhabited by lamprey larvae. Since 1961, the larvicide that has been used almost exclusively in the control program has been 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM). However, this is only one of about 15 closely related compounds, all halogen-containing mononitrophenols, that display a selectively toxic action upon lampreys. Although not all of the halogenated mononitrophenols are selectively toxic to lampreys (in fact, fewer than half of those tested), no other group of related compounds has displayed any useful larvicidal activity except for the substituted nitrosalicylanilides.

  19. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  20. A review exploring biological activities of hydrazones

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Garima; Marella, Akranth; Shaquiquzzaman, Mohammad; Akhtar, Mymoona; Ali, Mohammad Rahmat; Alam, Mohammad Mumtaz

    2014-01-01

    The development of novel compounds, hydrazones has shown that they possess a wide variety of biological activities viz. antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiplatelet, antimalarial, anticancer, antifungal, antitubercular, antiviral, cardio protective etc., Hydrazones/azomethines/imines possess-NHN = CH- and constitute an important class of compounds for new drug development. A number of researchers have synthesized and evaluated the biological activities of hydrazones. This review aims at highlighting the diverse biological activities of hydrazones. PMID:24741273

  1. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity studies on 2-aminopyridine-cyclodiphosph(V)azane derivative and its homo-binuclear zinc(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.

    2014-06-01

    Complexes of zinc(II) of general composition [Zn2(L)X2(H2O)4]nH2O have been synthesized [L = 1,3-dipyridyl-2,4-dioxo-2‧,4‧-bis(2-iminopyridine)cyclodi-phosph(V)azane and X = NO3-; n = 2, OAc-; n = 1, SO42-; n = 2 and Cl-; n = 2]. The elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, mass, IR, UV, NMR (1H and 31P), TGA, DTA, SEM and XRD spectral studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand (H2L) acts as a bidentate manner per zinc ion. The cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand forms hexa-coordinated complexes having octahedral geometry for Zn(II) complexes. The elemental analyses and mass spectral data have justified the [Zn2(L)X2(H2O)4]nH2O composition of complexes. Infrared spectra of the zinc complexes indicate deprotonation and coordination of the imine NH. It also confirms that nitrogen atoms of the pyridine group contribute to the complexation. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed of [Zn2L(SO4)2(H2O)4]2H2O complex. The XRD patterns indicate crystalline nature for the [Zn2L(SO4)2(H2O)4]2H2O complex. The measured low molar conductance values in dimethylformamide indicate that the complexes are non-electrolyte nature. The surface morphology (SEM) of the cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand and the [Zn2L(NO3)2(H2O)4]2H2O complex were studied by SEM. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In molecular modeling the geometries of cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand H2L and its zinc(II) complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31G basis set. The cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand and the zinc(II) complexes have been measured in vitro to judge their antibacterial (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) and antifungal (Aspergillus niger and Pencillium chrysogenum) activities.

  2. DNA binding and recognition by binuclear transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changlin; Yan, Rui; Xu, Yan; Yu, Siwang; Liao, Zhanru; Li, Dongfeng; Xu, Hui-Bie F.

    2001-09-01

    The development of small molecules that can bind and recognize DNA with sequence- or stereo-specificity under physiological conditions has been attracting a great interest in chemistry and biochemistry. Here, spectroscopic characterization and gel electrophoresis methods have been utilized to investigate the DNA binding and recognition by a variety of binuclear transition metal complexes. The result indicate that the structures and charges of binuclear transition metal complexes, compositions of coordination spheres, central metal ions and their coordination unsaturation, and separations between two central metal atoms can exert significant effects on the DNA binding and recognition. If there are not intercalative ligands into DNA base pairs or kinetically substitutable ligands by DNA phosphate groups within coordination sphere, the coordination saturation and compact binuclear transition metal complexes weaker bind to DNA than the coordination unsaturation and extended ones to DNA. Since the different transtiometal ions exhibit different affinities to DNA phosphate oxygen atoms, the binding interactions between their binuclear complexes and DNA are controlled by the affinity. He binuclear complexes with one or more negative charges lead to a consequence that they can not efficient associate with DNA, because DNA phosphodiester backbone is negatively charged. Whenthe separations between two central transition metal atoms is more than the distance between two DNA base pairs, the binuclear complexes could bind and recognize the DNA sequence with two or more base pairs. The protonated and positively charged ligands can strengthen the DNA binding and recognition by these binuclear metal complexes. Based on such DNA binding and recognition principles, the binuclear zinc complex designed in the study preferentially bind and recognize the following DNA sequence on pBR322 DNA with binding constant K.

  3. Spectroscopic and biological studies of new binuclear metal complexes of a tridentate ONS hydrazone ligand derived from 4-amino-6-methyl-3-thioxo-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-5(2H)-one and 4,6-diacetylresorcinol.

    PubMed

    Adly, Omima M I; Emara, Adel A A

    2014-11-11

    The binuclear hydrazone, H2L, ligand derived from 4-amino-6-methyl-3-thioxo-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-5(2H)-one and 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, in the molar ratio 2:1, and its copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II), cerium(III), iron(III), oxovanadium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) complexes have been synthesized. Structures of the ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (infrared, electronic, mass, 1H NMR and ESR) data, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductivity measurements and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The ligand acts as dibasic with two ONS tridentate sites. The bonding sites are the azomethine nitrogen, phenolate oxygen and sulfur atoms. The metal complexes exhibit different geometrical arrangements such as square planer, tetrahedral and octahedral. The Coats-Redfern equation was used to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different thermal decomposition steps of some complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity towards Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis), Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli), yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus). Structural parameters of the ligand and its metal complexes were theoretically computed on the basis of semiempirical PM3 level, and the results were correlated with their experimental data. PMID:24858350

  4. Spectroscopic and biological studies of new binuclear metal complexes of a tridentate ONS hydrazone ligand derived from 4-amino-6-methyl-3-thioxo-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-5(2H)-one and 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adly, Omima M. I.; Emara, Adel A. A.

    2014-11-01

    The binuclear hydrazone, H2L, ligand derived from 4-amino-6-methyl-3-thioxo-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-5(2H)-one and 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, in the molar ratio 2:1, and its copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II), cerium(III), iron(III), oxovanadium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) complexes have been synthesized. Structures of the ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, spectral (infrared, electronic, mass, 1H NMR and ESR) data, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductivity measurements and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The ligand acts as dibasic with two ONS tridentate sites. The bonding sites are the azomethine nitrogen, phenolate oxygen and sulfur atoms. The metal complexes exhibit different geometrical arrangements such as square planer, tetrahedral and octahedral. The Coats-Redfern equation was used to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different thermal decomposition steps of some complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes showed antimicrobial activity towards Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis), Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli), yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus). Structural parameters of the ligand and its metal complexes were theoretically computed on the basis of semiempirical PM3 level, and the results were correlated with their experimental data.

  5. [Biological activity of probiotic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Novik, G I; Samartsev, A A; Astapovich, N I; Kavrus, M A; Mikhaliuk, A N

    2006-01-01

    Adaptation of bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria to nutrient media with increased concentrations of bile (1%) and protein substrates of animal origin allowed the variants resistant to bile and displaying a high production of proteolytic enzymes (active within the pH range of 2.5-9.0) to be selected. Administration of the preparations involving the selected bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria assisted in the normalization of the intestinal microflora and activation of protein metabolism in the organism of animals. Specifically, it increased the total protein level in blood serum and redistributed protein fractions, increasing the content of globulins and decreasing albumin concentration. PMID:16761572

  6. Biological activities of heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Muthuvel; Giji, Sadhasivam

    2014-01-01

    Heparan sulfate was isolated from two bivalve mollusks such as Tridacna maxima and Perna viridis. The isolated heparin was quantified in crude as well as purified samples and they were estimated as 2.72 and 2.2g/kg (crude) and 260 and 248 mg/g (purified) in T. maxima and P. viridis, respectively. Both the bivalves showed the anticoagulant activity of the crude and purified sample as 20,128 USP units/kg and 7.4 USP units/mg, 39,000 USP units/kg and 75 USP units/mg, 9460 USP units/kg and 4.3 USP units/mg, and 13,392 USP units/kg and 54 USP units/mg correspondingly in T. maxima and P. viridis. The antiproliferative activity that was studied with pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells using RPMI media reported that the result is in a dose-dependent manner. Among the two clams, P. viridis showed more antiproliferative activity than that of T. maxima. PMID:25081081

  7. Elsholtzia: phytochemistry and biological activities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Plants of the genus Elsholtzia (Lamiaceae) have a long history of medicinal use in folk. The phytochemical investigations revealed the presence of flavonoids, phenylpropanoids, terpenoids, and other compounds. Abundant volatile components are also identified. Pure compounds, volatile constituents and crude extracts from the genus exhibited a wide spectrum of in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activities. The aims of this review hopefully provide comprehensive information on the distribution, phytochemistry, volatile components, and pharmacological research of Elsholtzia for exploring the potential and advance researches. PMID:23216850

  8. Xanthane sesquiterpenoids: structure, synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Vasas, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this review is to survey the naturally occurring xanthanes and xanthanolides, their structures, biological activities, structure–activity relationships and synthesis. There has been no comprehensive review of this topic previously. On the basis of 126 references, 112 compounds are summarized. PMID:21321751

  9. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  10. Perylenequinones: Isolation, Synthesis, and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mulrooey, Carol A.; O'Brien, Erin M.; Morgan, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    The perylenequinones are a novel class of natural products characterized by pentacyclic conjugated chromophore giving rise to photoactivity. Potentially useful light-activated biological activity, targeting protein kinase C (PKC), has been identified for several of the natural products. Recently discovered new members of this class of compound, as well as several related phenanthroperylenequinones, are reviewed. Natural product modifications that improve biological profiles, and avenues for the total synthesis of analogs, which are not available from the natural product series, are outlined. An overview of structure/function relationships is provided. PMID:24039544

  11. New biologically active hydrogen sulfide donors.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thomas; Raynaud, Francoise; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Ransy, Céline; Simonet, Serge; Crespo, Christine; Bourguignon, Marie-Pierre; Villeneuve, Nicole; Vilaine, Jean-Paul; Artaud, Isabelle; Galardon, Erwan

    2013-11-25

    Generous donors: The dithioperoxyanhydrides (CH3 COS)2 , (PhCOS)2 , CH3 COSSCO2 Me and PhCOSSCO2 Me act as thiol-activated hydrogen sulfide donors in aqueous buffer solution. The most efficient donor (CH3 COS)2 can induce a biological response in cells, and advantageously replace hydrogen sulfide in ex vivo vascular studies. PMID:24115650

  12. [Biologically Active Peptides of King Crab Hepatopancreas].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, V V; Berezin, B B; Il'ina, A P; Yamskova, V P; Yamskov, I A

    2015-01-01

    Substances of a peptide nature isolated from the hepatopancreas of the king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus exhibited physicochemical properties and membranotropic and specific activities similar to those of membranotropic homeostatic tissue-specific bioregulators previously found in different mammalian and plant tissues. Their biological effect on vertebrate tissues was demonstrated on a model of roller organotypic cultivation of Pleurodeles waltl newt liver tissue. PMID:26353409

  13. Loranthus micranthus Linn.: Biological Activities and Phytochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Hajrezaei, Maryam; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2013-01-01

    Loranthus micranthus Linn. is a medicinal plant from the Loranthaceae family commonly known as an eastern Nigeria species of the African mistletoe and is widely used in folkloric medicine to cure various ailments and diseases. It is semiparasitic plant because of growing on various host trees and shrubs and absorbing mineral nutrition and water from respective host. Hence, the phytochemicals and biological activities of L. micranthus demonstrated strong host and harvesting period dependency. The leaves have been proved to possess immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, antihypertensive, antioxidant, antidiarrhoeal, and hypolipidemic activities. This review summarizes the information and findings concerning the current knowledge on the biological activities, pharmacological properties, toxicity, and chemical constituents of Loranthus micranthus. PMID:24109490

  14. Glycosides from Marine Sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): Structures, Taxonomical Distribution, Biological Activities and Biological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Vladimir I.; Ivanchina, Natalia V.; Krasokhin, Vladimir B.; Makarieva, Tatyana N.; Stonik, Valentin A.

    2012-01-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed. PMID:23015769

  15. Glycosides from marine sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae): structures, taxonomical distribution, biological activities and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Vladimir I; Ivanchina, Natalia V; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Makarieva, Tatyana N; Stonik, Valentin A

    2012-08-01

    Literature data about glycosides from sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae) are reviewed. Structural diversity, biological activities, taxonomic distribution and biological functions of these natural products are discussed. PMID:23015769

  16. Isoflavones: estrogenic activity, biological effect and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Daniela Cristina; Piazza, Cateno; Melilli, Barbara; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Isoflavones are phytoestrogens with potent estrogenic activity; genistein, daidzein and glycitein are the most active isoflavones found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have similarity in structure with the human female hormone 17-β-estradiol, which can bind to both alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and mimic the action of estrogens on target organs, thereby exerting many health benefits when used in some hormone-dependent diseases. Numerous clinical studies claim benefits of genistein and daidzein in chemoprevention of breast and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis as well as in relieving postmenopausal symptoms. The ability of isoflavones to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases largely depends on pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds, in particular absorption and distribution to the target tissue. The chemical form in which isoflavones occur is important because it influences their bioavailability and, therefore, their biological activity. Glucose-conjugated isoflavones are highly polar, water-soluble compounds. They are hardly absorbed by the intestinal epithelium and have weaker biological activities than the corresponding aglycone. Different microbial families of colon can transform glycosylated isoflavones into aglycones. Clinical studies show important differences between the aglycone and conjugated forms of genistein and daidzein. The evaluation of isoflavone metabolism and bioavailability is crucial to understanding their biological effects. Lipid-based formulations such as drug incorporation into oils, emulsions and self-microemulsifying formulations have been introduced to increase bioavailability. Complexation with cyclodextrin also represent a valid method to improve the physicochemical characteristics of these substances in order to be absorbed and distributed to target tissues. We review and discuss pharmacokinetic issues that critically influence the biological activity of isoflavones. PMID:23161396

  17. Biological activities of selected basidiomycetes from Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Fatimi, M; Schröder, G; Kreisel, H; Lindequist, U

    2013-03-01

    In a previous paper we demonstrated the results of biological screening of Yemeni basidiomycetes. The present study was aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and the antioxidant activity of further basidiomycetes collected in Yemen. Dichloromethane, methanol and aqueous extracts of the fruiting bodies of 25 species were screened in vitro for their antibacterial activities against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphyloccocus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus flavus) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa), against six human fungal pathogens (Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Aspergillus fumigatus, Mucor sp., Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes) and against one non human pathogenic fungus (Candida maltosa). The results indicated that 75 extracts exhibited activity against one or more of the bacteria. The methanol extracts of Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Chlorophyllum molybdites, Coriolopsis polyzona, Ganoderma xylonoides, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata showed activity against all tested bacteria. The highest antibacterial activity was exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Trametes cingulata and Agaricus cf. bernardii, Agrocybe pediades, Coriolopsis polyzona, Pycnoporus sanguineus and Trametes lactinea. The methanol extracts of Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides and Pycnoporus sanguineus showed considerable antifungal activities against the tested fungal strains. Strong antioxidative effects employing the DPPH assay were exhibited by methanol extracts from Chlorophyllum molybdites, Ganoderma xylonoides, Hexagonia velutina, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Trametes lactinea and Trametes cingulata. Our previous and presented studies about 48 basidiomycetes collected in Yemen provide evidence that basidiomycetes from the Arabic region so far should attract more attention as potential source for new biologically active

  18. Mononuclear and Binuclear Ruthenium(II) Complexes Containing 2,2'-Bipyridine or 1,10-Phenanthroline and Pyrazole-3,5-Bis(benzimidazole). Synthesis, Structure, Isomerism, Spectroscopy, and Proton-Coupled Redox Activity.

    PubMed

    Baitalik, Sujoy; Flörke, Ulrich; Nag, Kamalaksha

    1999-07-12

    A number of mixed-ligand mononuclear and binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes of composition [(bpy)(2)Ru(H(3)pzbzim)](ClO(4))(2).2H(2)O (1), [(phen)(2)Ru(H(3)pzbzim)](ClO(4))(2).3H(2)O (2), [(bpy)(2)Ru(H(2)pzbzim)Ru(bpy)(2)](ClO(4))(3).5H(2)O (3), [(phen)(2)Ru(H(2)pzbzim)Ru(phen)(2)](ClO(4))(3).4H(2)O (4), [(bpy)(2)Ru(H(2)pzbzim)Ru(phen)(2)](ClO(4))(3).4H(2)O (5), [(bpy)(2)Ru(pzbzim)Ru(bpy)(2)](ClO(4)).3H(2)O (6), and [(phen)(2)Ru(pzbzim)Ru(phen)(2)](ClO(4)).2H(2)O (7), where H(3)pzbzim = pyrazole-3,5-bis(benzimidazole), bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, have been prepared and characterized. Complexes 3-5 isolated as mixtures of diastereoisomers have been separated by fractional recrystallization. In the cases of 3 and 4, the meso (LambdaDelta) and racemate (rac) (LambdaLambda, DeltaDelta) forms, and for 5, two enantiomeric pairs [(LambdaDelta, DeltaLambda) and (LambdaLambda, DeltaDelta)] have been obtained. These, as well as the meso and rac diastereoisomers of 6, have been characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of the meso (LambdaDelta) form of 3 (C(57)H(53)N(14)Cl(3)O(17)Ru(2)) has been determined, which crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with a = 11.672(2) Å, b = 41.696(9) Å, c = 12.871(2) Å, beta = 90.03(2)(o), and Z = 4. The acid-base and redox chemistry of the binuclear complexes has been studied over the pH range 1-12 in acetonitrile-water (3:2) medium. The equilibrium constants of the species involving protonation and deprotonation of the benzimidazole NH protons and the metal oxidation states covering +2 and +3 have been evaluated by spectrophotometric and cyclic voltammetric measurements. During spectrophotometric titrations of the complexes with cerium(IV), the metal-to-ligand charge transfer transitions are replaced by the newly generated ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition. The luminescence spectra of the complexes in solution (at 298 K) and in frozen glass (at 77 K) and

  19. Biologically active compounds from Aphyllophorales (polypore) fungi.

    PubMed

    Zjawiony, Jordan K

    2004-02-01

    This review describes biologically active natural products isolated from Aphyllophorales, many of which are known as polypores. Polypores are a large group of terrestrial fungi of the phylum Basdiomycota (basidiomycetes), and they along with certain Ascomycota are a major source of pharmacologically active substances. There are about 25 000 species of basidiomycetes, of which about 500 are members of the Aphyllophorales, a polyphyletic group that contains the polypores. Many of these fungi have circumboreal distributions in North America, Europe, and Asia and broad distributions on all inhabited continents and Africa; only a small number of the most common species with the most obvious fruiting bodies (basidiocarps) have been evaluated for biological activity. An estimated 75% of polypore fungi that have been tested show strong antimicrobial activity, and these may constitute a good source for developing new antibiotics. Numerous compounds from these fungi also display antiviral, cytotoxic, and/or antineoplastic activities. Additional important components of this vast arsenal of compounds are polysaccharides derived from the fungal cell walls. These compounds have attracted significant attention in recent years because of their immunomodulatory activities, resulting in antitumor effects. These high molecular weight compounds, often called biological response modifiers (BRM), or immunopotentiators, prevent carcinogenesis, show direct anticancer effects, and prevent tumor metastasis. Some of the protein-bound polysaccharides from polypores and other basidiomycetes have found their way to the market in Japan as anticancer drugs. Finally, numerous compounds with cardiovascular, phytotoxic, immunomodulatory, analgesic, antidiabetic, antioxidant, insecticidal, and nematocidal activities, isolated from polypores, are also presented. In fact many of the fungi mentioned in this paper have long been used in herbal medicine, including polypores such as Ganoderma lucidum

  20. Perspectives on Biologically Active Camptothecin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying-Qian; Li, Wen-Qun; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Qian, Keduo; Yang, Liu; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Chen, An-Liang; Zhang, Shao-Yong; Song, Zi-Long; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Camptothecins (CPTs) are cytotoxic natural alkaloids that specifically target DNA topoisomerase I. Research on CPTs has undergone a significant evolution from the initial discovery of CPT in the late 1960s through the study of synthetic small molecule derivatives to investigation of macromolecular constructs and formulations. Over the past years, intensive medicinal chemistry efforts have generated numerous CPT derivatives. Three derivatives, topotecan, irinotecan, and belotecan, are currently prescribed as anticancer drugs, and several related compounds are now in clinical trials. Interest in other biological effects, besides anticancer activity, of CPTs is also growing exponentially, as indicated by the large number of publications on the subject during the last decades. Therefore, the main focus of the present review is to provide an ample but condensed overview on various biological activities of CPT derivatives, in addition to continued up-to-date coverage of anticancer effects. PMID:25808858

  1. Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

  2. Synthesis, spectroscopic, coordination and biological activities of some organometallic complexes derived from thio-Schiff base ligands

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Hussein, Azza A.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Two series of mono- and binuclear complexes cyclic or acyclic thio-ferocine Schiff base ligands, derived from the condensation of 2-aminobenzenthiol (L) with monoacetyl ferrocene in the molar ratio 1:1 or in the molar ratio 1:2 for diacetyl ferocine have been prepared. The condensation reactions yield the corresponding Schiff Base ligands, HLa-Maf and H2Lb-Daf. The chelation of the ligands to metal ions occurs through the sulfur of the thiol group as well as the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine group of the ligands. HLa-Maf acts as monobasic bidentate or dibasic tetradentate, while H2Lb-Daf behaves as twice negatively cargend tetradentate ligand. The structures of these ligands were elucidated by elemental analysis, infrared, ultraviolet–visible spectra, as well as 1H NMR spectra. Reactions of the Schiff bases ligands with ruthenium(III), oxovanadium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) afforded the corresponding transition metal complexes. The properties of the newly prepared complexes were analyse by elemental analyses, infrared, electronic spectra, 1H NMR as well as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurement. The metal complexes exhibits different geometrical arrangements such as octahedral and square pyramidal coordination. Schiff base ligands and their metal complexes were tested against two pathogenic bacteria as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as one kind of fungi to study their biological activity. All the complexes exhibit antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms. PMID:24070648

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic, coordination and biological activities of some organometallic complexes derived from thio-Schiff base ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Hussein, Azza A.; Linert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Two series of mono- and binuclear complexes cyclic or acyclic thio-ferocine Schiff base ligands, derived from the condensation of 2-aminobenzenthiol (L) with monoacetyl ferrocene in the molar ratio 1:1 or in the molar ratio 1:2 for diacetyl ferocine have been prepared. The condensation reactions yield the corresponding Schiff Base ligands, HLa-Maf and H2Lb-Daf. The chelation of the ligands to metal ions occurs through the sulfur of the thiol group as well as the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine group of the ligands. HLa-Maf acts as monobasic bidentate or dibasic tetradentate, while H2Lb-Daf behaves as twice negatively cargend tetradentate ligand. The structures of these ligands were elucidated by elemental analysis, infrared, ultraviolet-visible spectra, as well as 1H NMR spectra. Reactions of the Schiff bases ligands with ruthenium(III), oxovanadium(IV) and dioxouranium(VI) afforded the corresponding transition metal complexes. The properties of the newly prepared complexes were analyse by elemental analyses, infrared, electronic spectra, 1H NMR as well as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurement. The metal complexes exhibits different geometrical arrangements such as octahedral and square pyramidal coordination. Schiff base ligands and their metal complexes were tested against two pathogenic bacteria as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as one kind of fungi to study their biological activity. All the complexes exhibit antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms.

  4. Thiol-derivatized minihepcidins retain biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fung, Eileen; Chua, Kristine; Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ruchala, Piotr

    2015-02-15

    Minihepcidins are small peptides that mimic biological activity of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Structurally, they contain thiol-free-cysteine residue in position 7 which is crucial for their bioactivity. Nonetheless, free sulfhydryl group is not desirable in pharmaceutical entities as it may lead to dermatological side effects. Moreover free thiol moiety is quite reactive and depending on conditions/reagents may be alkylated and/or oxidized giving various Cys-derivatives: S-alkyl cysteines, sulfoxides, sulfones, disulfides, cysteinesulfinic and cysteic acids. To limit such reactivity and maintain bioactivity of minihepcidin(s) we used thiol-protection strategy based on activated vinyl thioethers. Novel S-protected analogs of physiologically active minihepcidin PR73 were synthesized and tested in vitro showing activity comparable to parental molecule. The most active compound, PR73SH was also tested in vivo showing activity profile analogous to PR73. Collectively, our findings suggest that S-vinyl-derivatization of minihepcidin(s) may be a suitable approach in the development of physiologically active agonists of hepcidin. PMID:25599838

  5. Synthesis and biological activity of polyprenols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Lixin; Zhang, Caihong; Xie, Pujun; Zhang, Yaolei; Ding, Shasha; Xu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    The polyprenols and their derivatives are highlighted in this study. These lipid linear polymers of isoprenoid residues are widespread in nature from bacteria to human cells. This review primarily presents the synthesis and biological activities of polyprenyl derivatives. Attention is focused on the synthesis and biological activity of dolichols, polyprenyl ester derivatives and polyprenyl amines. Other polyprenyl derivatives, such as oxides of polyprenols, aromatic polyprenols, polyprenyl bromide and polyprenyl sulphates, are mentioned. It is noted that polyprenyl phosphates and polyprenyl-linked glycosylation have better antibacterial, gene therapy and immunomodulating performance, whereas polyprenyl amines have better for antibacterial and antithrombotic activity. Dolichols, polyprenyl acetic esters, polyprenyl phosphates and polyprenyl-linked glycosylation have pharmacological anti-tumour effects. Finally, the postulated prospect of polyprenols and their derivatives are discussed. Further in vivo studies on the above derivatives are needed. The compatibility of polyprenols and their derivatives with other drugs should be studied, and new preparations of polyprenyl derivatives, such as hydrogel glue and release-controlled drugs, are suggested for future research and development. PMID:26358482

  6. Biological Activities of Polyphenols from Grapes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, En-Qin; Deng, Gui-Fang; Guo, Ya-Jun; Li, Hua-Bin

    2010-01-01

    The dietary consumption of grape and its products is associated with a lower incidence of degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancers. Most recent interest has focused on the bioactive phenolic compounds in grape. Anthocyanins, flavanols, flavonols and resveratrol are the most important grape polyphenols because they possess many biological activities, such as antioxidant, cardioprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammation, antiaging and antimicrobial properties. This review summarizes current knowledge on the bioactivities of grape phenolics. The extraction, isolation and identification methods of polyphenols from grape as well as their bioavailability and potential toxicity also are included. PMID:20386657

  7. Fungal proteinaceous compounds with multiple biological activities.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Chan, Yau Sang; Dan, Xiuli; Pan, Wenliang; Wang, Hexiang; Guan, Suzhen; Chan, Ki; Ye, Xiuyun; Liu, Fang; Xia, Lixin; Chan, Wai Yee

    2016-08-01

    Fungi comprise organisms like molds, yeasts and mushrooms. They have been used as food or medicine for a long time. A large number of fungal proteins or peptides with diverse biological activities are considered as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and anticancer agents. They encompass proteases, ribosome inactivating proteins, defensins, hemolysins, lectins, laccases, ribonucleases, immunomodulatory proteins, and polysaccharopeptides. The target of the present review is to update the status of the various bioactivities of these fungal proteins and peptides and discuss their therapeutic potential. PMID:27338574

  8. Simultaneous analysis of biologically active aminoalkanephosphonic acids.

    PubMed

    Kudzin, Zbigniew H; Gralak, Dorota K; Andrijewski, Grzegorz; Drabowicz, Józef; Luczak, Jerzy

    2003-05-23

    A new approach for simultaneous analysis of biologically active aminoalkanephosphonic acids, namely glyphosate, phosphonoglycine, phosphonosarcosine, phosphonoalanine, phosphono-beta-alanine, phosphonohomoalanine, phosphono-gamma-homoalanine and glufosinate, is presented. This includes a preliminary 31p NMR analysis of these amino acids, their further derivatization to volatile phosphonates (phosphinates) by means of trifluoroacetic acid-trifluoroacetic anhydride-trimethyl orthoacetate reagent and subsequent analysis of derivatization products using MS and/or GC-MS (chemical ionization and/or electron impact ionization). PMID:12862383

  9. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunghoon; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs), which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments. PMID:26930205

  10. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyunghoon; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs), which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments. PMID:26930205

  11. Biological activities of Morus celtidifolia leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Viveros-Valdez, Ezequiel; Oranday-Cárdenas, Azucena; Rivas-Morales, Catalina; Verde-Star, María Julia; Carranza-Rosales, Pilar

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this research were to examine the antibacterial, cytotoxic and antiradical/antioxidant activities of the organic extracts obtained from the leaves of the medicinal plant Morus celtidifolia (Family: Moraceae). To evaluate its antimicrobial properties, M. celtidifolia was tested against the bacteria of medical importance: Bacillus subtilis, Staphyloccocus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter aerogenes. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by using the brine shrimp (Artemia salina) lethality assay and also by toxicity screening against human cancer cell lines: MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) and HeLa (cervix adenocarcinoma). The free radical-scavenging activity was determined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) assay. Results revealed that the hexanic extract has antibacterial activity only against Gram positive strains, while the methanolic extract showed better cytotoxic and antioxidant activities than the non- polar extract with a median lethal dose (LD₅₀) of 125μg/ml, 90μg/ml and 75μg/ml against A. salina, MCF-7 and HeLa cells respectively, and median effective concentration (EC₅₀) of 152μg/ml on radical scavenging assay. This is the first study reporting the biological activities of leaves of Morus celtidifolia. PMID:26142508

  12. SORPTION ON WASTEWATER SOLIDS: ELIMINATION OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption was found to be greatly affected by the biological activity in wastewater solids. wo experimental techniques, cyanide treatment and pasteurization, were developed for eliminating the biological activity during isotherm measurements. oth methods are effective; however, pa...

  13. [Bergenia genus - content matters and biological activity].

    PubMed

    Hendrychová, Helena; Tůmová, Lenka

    2012-10-01

    Bergenia, a genus included in the family Saxifragaceae, is a valuable source of healing matters. About 30 Bergenia species are known all over the world. Scientific research is focused on five species mainly distributed in the mountains of Central and East Asia: Bergenia ciliata (Haw.) Sternb., Bergenia stracheyi Engl., Bergenia crassifolia (L.) Fritsch, Bergenia ligulata (Wall.) Engl. and Bergenia himalaica Boriss. These taxons belong to the widely used medicinal herbs in the traditional Chinese, Nepalese and Indian medicine, for therapy of cough and pulmonary diseases, to stop bleeding, to increase immunity and to dissolve kidney or bladder stones. Bergenia consists of many different active compounds including bergenin, norbergenin, catechin, gallic acid, arbutin and other polyphenols. In the Czech Republic this species is commonly grown but it is not used for medical therapy. Individual parts of this plant demonstrate an interesting biological activity, and antibacterial, antiviral, cytoprotective and antioxidant effects. PMID:23256653

  14. Biologically Active Metabolites Synthesized by Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Vaz, Bruna da Silva; de Morais, Etiele Greque; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are microorganisms that have different morphological, physiological, and genetic traits that confer the ability to produce different biologically active metabolites. Microalgal biotechnology has become a subject of study for various fields, due to the varied bioproducts that can be obtained from these microorganisms. When microalgal cultivation processes are better understood, microalgae can become an environmentally friendly and economically viable source of compounds of interest, because production can be optimized in a controlled culture. The bioactive compounds derived from microalgae have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities, among others. Furthermore, these microorganisms have the ability to promote health and reduce the risk of the development of degenerative diseases. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss bioactive metabolites produced by microalgae for possible applications in the life sciences. PMID:26339647

  15. Aminoderivatives of cycloalkanespirohydantoins: synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Naydenova, Emilia; Pencheva, Nevena; Popova, Julita; Stoyanov, Neyko; Lazarova, Maria; Aleksiev, Boris

    2002-03-01

    3-Aminocycloalkanespiro-5-hydantoins were synthesized and their biological activity was studied. In contrast to hydantoins, these compounds failed to induce either anticonvulsive effects in the central nervous system or inhibitory effects on cholinergic contractions in the enteric nervous system. However, they exerted well pronounced, atropinsensitive, contractile effects on the guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle preparations. Structure-activity relationships established allow the assumption that: (i) the reduction of the ring size in the molecule of the spirohydantoins leads to an increase in the potency of the respective analogue to induce contractile effect; (ii) the introduction of -NH2 in position 3 increases the ability of all the compounds studied to exert contractions; (iii) the enlargement of the ring leads to: (1) an increase of the degree of desensitization of the preparations; and (2) a decrease (except 1a) of the potency of the analogues to exert contractile effects. PMID:11989796

  16. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄. PMID:27483572

  17. Spectroscopic study of biologically active glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumera, M.; Wacławska, I.; Mozgawa, W.; Sitarz, M.

    2005-06-01

    It is known that the chemical activity phenomenon is characteristic for some inorganic glasses and they are able to participate in biological processes of living organisms (plants, animals and human bodies). An example here is the selective removal of silicate-phosphate glass components under the influence of biological solutions, which has been applied in designing glasses acting as ecological fertilizers of controlled release rate of the nutrients for plants. The structure of model silicate-phosphate glasses containing the different amounts of the glass network formers, i.e. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+, as a binding components were studied. These elements besides other are indispensable of the normal growth of plants. In order to establish the function and position occupied by the particular components in the glass structure, the glasses were examined by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and XRD methods. It has been found that the increasing amount of MgO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes systematically from a structure of the cristobalite type to a structure corresponding to forsterite type. Whilst the increasing content of CaO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes from a structure typical for cristobalite through one similar to the structure of calcium orthophosphate, to a structure corresponding to calcium silicates. The changing character of domains structure is the reason of different chemical activity of glasses.

  18. Structural characterization by EXAFS spectroscopy of the binuclear iron center in protein A of methane monooxygenase from methylococcus capsulatus (bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, A.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Green, J.; Dalton, H.; Bentsen, J.G.; Beer, R.H.; Lippard, S.J.

    1988-03-30

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) activates dioxygen for incorporation into a remarkable variety of substrates including methane, which is required for bacterial growth (eq 1). MMO is a three component CH/sub 4/ + NADH + H/sup +/ + O/sub 2/ /sup MMO/ ..-->.. CH/sub 3/OH + NAD/sup +/ + H/sub 2/O (1) enzyme. Protein A (M/sub r/ 210,000), believed to be the oxygenase component, contains two iron atoms. Protein B (M/sub r/ 15,700) serves a regulatory function and lacks prosthetic groups, while protein C, the reductase component of the enzyme, is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein (M/sub r/ 42,000) responsible for electron transfer from NADH to protein A. Recently, a binuclear iron center was postulated to occur in protein A based on the finding that one-electron reduction gives rise to electron spin resonance (ESR) signals (g 1.95, 1.88, 1.78) very similar to those observed for the binuclear mixed-valence Fe/sub 2/(III,II) centers in semimet hemerythrin (Hr) and purple acid phosphatase (PAP). In conjunction with model studies, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful method for identifying bridged binuclear iron centers in Hr, ribonucleotide reductase (RR), and PAP. Here the authors report iron K-edge EXAFS results on semireduced protein A of MMO which support the occurrence of a binuclear iron center (Fe-Fe distance, 3.41 A), with no short ..mu..-oxo bridge.

  19. Structural diversity in binuclear complexes of alkaline earth metal ions with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new series of binuclear and mixed-ligand complexes with the general formula: [M 2(LO)yClz]; where M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II); H2L = 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, the secondary ligand L' = acetylacetone (acac), 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) or 2,2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), n = 0-2, m = 1, 2, x = 0, 1, 2, 4, y = 0, 2, 4, 5 and z = 0-2; have been synthesized. They have been characterized by the analytical and spectral methods (IR, 1H NMR and mass) as well as TGA and molar conductivity measurements. The spectroscopic and conductance data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the basicity of the secondary ligand, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Binuclear octahedral geometry has been assigned to all of the prepared complexes in various molar ratios 2:2; 2:2:2; 1:2:1 and 1:2:4 (L:M:L'). Molecular orbital calculations were performed for the ligands and their complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results were correlated with the experimental data. The ligand and some of its alkaline metal(II) complexes showed antibacterial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  20. Well-defined binuclear chiral spiro copper catalysts for enantioselective N-H insertion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shou-Fei; Xu, Bin; Wang, Guo-Peng; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2012-01-11

    An asymmetric N-H insertion of α-diazoesters with anilines catalyzed by well-defined copper complexes of chiral spiro bisoxazoline ligands was studied in detail. The copper-catalyzed asymmetric N-H insertion of a wide range of α-alkyl-α-diazoacetates with anilines was accomplished with excellent enantioselectivity (up to 98% ee) and provided an efficient method for the preparation of optically active α-amino acid derivatives. A correlation study of the electronic properties of the substrates with the enantioselectivity of the N-H insertion reaction supports a stepwise insertion mechanism, and the significant first-order kinetic isotope effect proves that the proton transfer is most likely the rate-limiting step. A binuclear chiral spiro copper catalyst having 14-electron copper centers, a trans coordination model, a perfect C(2)-symmetric chiral pocket, and significant Cu-Cu interaction was isolated and extensively studied. The novel structure of the binuclear chiral spiro copper catalyst leads to unique reactivity as well as enantioselectivity in the N-H insertion reaction. PMID:22066865

  1. Litchi flavonoids: isolation, identification and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiangrong; Jiang, Yueming

    2007-01-01

    The current status of the isolation, identification, biological activity, utilization and development prospects of flavonoids found in litchi fruit pericarp (LFP) tissues is reviewed. LFP tissues account for approximately 15% by weight of the whole fresh fruit and are comprised of significant amount of flavonoids. The major flavonoids in ripe LFP include flavonols and anthocyanins. The major flavanols in the LFP are reported to be procyanidin B4, procyanidin B2 and epicatechin, while cyanindin-3-rutinside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, quercetin-3-rutinosde and quercetin-3-glucoside are identified as the important anthocyanins. Litchi flavanols and anthocyanins exhibit good potential antioxidant activity. The hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion scavenging activities of procyanidin B2 are greater than those of procyanidin B4 and epicatechin, while epicatechin has the highest alpha,alpha-diphenyl-beta-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH*) scavenging activity. In addition to the antioxidant activity, LFP extract displays a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on human breast cancer, which could be attributed, in part, to its inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells through upregulation and down-regulation of multiple genes. Furthermore, various anticancer activities are observed for epicatechin, procyanidin B2, procyanidin B4 and the ethyl acetate fraction of LFP tissue extracts. Procyanidin B4 and the ethyl acetate fraction show a stronger inhibitory effect on HELF than MCF-7 proliferation, while epicatechin and procyanidin B2 have lower cytotoxicities towards MCF-7 and HELF than paclitaxel. It is therefore suggested that flavonoids from LFP might be potentially useful components for functional foods and/or anti-breast cancer drugs. PMID:17851427

  2. Biological activity of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Tfouni, Elia; Truzzi, Daniela Ramos; Tavares, Aline; Gomes, Anderson Jesus; Figueiredo, Leonardo Elias; Franco, Douglas Wagner

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide plays an important role in various biological processes, such as neurotransmission, blood pressure control, immunological responses, and antioxidant action. The control of its local concentration, which is crucial for obtaining the desired effect, can be achieved with exogenous NO-carriers. Coordination compounds, in particular ruthenium(III) and (II) amines, are good NO-captors and -deliverers. The chemical and photochemical properties of several ruthenium amine complexes as NO-carriers in vitro and in vivo have been reviewed. These nitrosyl complexes can stimulate mice hippocampus slices, promote the lowering of blood pressure in several in vitro and in vivo models, and control Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania major infections, and they are also effective against tumor cells in different models of cancer. These complexes can be activated chemically or photochemically, and the observed biological effects can be attributed to the presence of NO in the compound. Their efficiencies are explained on the basis of the [Ru(II)NO(+)](3+)/[Ru(II)NO(0)](2+) reduction potential, the specific rate constant for NO liberation from the [RuNO](2+) moiety, and the quantum yield of NO release. PMID:22178685

  3. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application. PMID:25815307

  4. [Nonequilibrium state of electrochemically activated water and its biological activity].

    PubMed

    Petrushanko, I Iu; Lobyshev, V I

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the physicochemical parameters (pH, redox potential and electroconductivity) of catholyte and anolyte produced by membrane electrolysis of distilled water and dilute (c < 10(-3) M) sodium chloride solutions were studied. The relaxation of these parameters after electrolysis and the influence of catholyte and anolyte on the growth of roots of Tradescantia viridis grafts, the development of duckweed, and the motive activity of infusoria Spirostomum ambiguum were investigated. It was found that the anolyte of distilled water stimulated development of these biological objects. The direction of shift of physicochemical parameters of catholyte and anolyte from equilibrium values and the type of their biological activity (stimulation or inhibition) depend on salt concentration in initial solution. Barbotage of initial distilled water with argon or nitrogen leads to a greater decrease in the redox potential of catholyte during electrolysis. The physicochemical parameters relax to equilibrium values, and the biological activity of catholite and anolyte decreases with time and practically disappears by the end of the day. It was found that the oxidation of reducing agent by atmospheric oxygen is not the sole cause of the relaxation of catalyte redox potential. The increase in the ionic strength of catholite and anolyte by the addition of concentrated sodium chloride after electrolysis decreases the rate of redox potential relaxation several times. The redox potential can be maintained for long periods by freezing. PMID:11449536

  5. Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT): environment and biology.

    PubMed

    Levine, James A

    2004-05-01

    Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) is the energy expended for everything that is not sleeping, eating, or sports-like exercise. It includes the energy expended walking to work, typing, performing yard work, undertaking agricultural tasks, and fidgeting. NEAT can be measured by one of two approaches. The first is to measure or estimate total NEAT. Here, total daily energy expenditure is measured, and from it "basal metabolic rate-plus-thermic effect of food" is subtracted. The second is the factoral approach, whereby the components of NEAT are quantified, and total NEAT is calculated by summing these components. The amount of NEAT that humans perform represents the product of the amount and types of physical activities and the thermogenic cost of each activity. The factors that impact a human's NEAT are readily divisible into environmental factors, such as occupation or dwelling within a "concrete jungle," and biological factors such as weight, gender, and body composition. The combined impact of these factors explains the substantial variance in human NEAT. The variability in NEAT might be viewed as random, but human and animal data contradict this. It appears that changes in NEAT subtly accompany experimentally induced changes in energy balance and are important in the physiology of weight change. Inadequate modulation of NEAT plus a sedentary lifestyle may thus be important in obesity. It then becomes intriguing to dissect mechanistic studies that delineate how NEAT is regulated into neural, peripheral, and humoral factors. A scheme is described in this review in which NEAT corresponds to a carefully regulated "tank" of physical activity that is crucial for weight control. PMID:15102614

  6. Natural phenanthrenes and their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Adriána; Vasas, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this review is to survey the various naturally occurring phenanthrene compounds that have been isolated from different plants. Only one review has previously been published on this topic. Gorham (1989) reviewed the structures, biosynthesis, separations and spectroscopy of stilbenes and phenanthrenes. The present study furnishes an overview of the hydroxy or/and methoxy-substituted 9,10-dihydro/phenanthrenes, methylated, prenylated and other monomeric derivatives, dimeric and trimeric phenanthrenes and their biological activities. A fairly large number of phenanthrenes have been reported from higher plants, mainly in the Orchidaceae family, in the species Dendrobium, Bulbophyllum, Eria, Maxillaria, Bletilla, Coelogyna, Cymbidium, Ephemerantha and Epidendrum. A few phenanthrenes have been found in the Hepaticae class and Dioscoreaceae, Combretaceae and Betulaceae families. Their distribution correlates strongly with the taxonomic divisions. These plants have often been used in traditional medicine, and phenanthrenes have therefore been studied for their cytotoxicity, antimicrobial, spasmolytic, anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet aggregation, antiallergic activities and phytotoxicity. On the basis of 120 references, this review covers the phytochemistry and pharmacology of phenanthrenes, describing 252 compounds. This contribution stems from our work on the medicinal plant Tamus communis. PMID:18243254

  7. Potential biological activity of acacia honey.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Aliyu; Odunola, Oyeronke A; Ibrahim, Mohammed A; Sallau, Abdullahi B; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Aimola, Idown A; Malami, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in functional foods-based research have increasingly become an area of major interest because it affects human health and activities. Functional foods are classes of foods with health promoting and disease preventing properties in addition to multiple nutritional values and of such type is honey. Acacia honey is a type of honey produced by bees (Apis mellifera) fed on Acacia flowers, hence the name. This review focuses on the potential biological activities of Acacia honey which includes quality, antioxidant, immuno-modulatory, antiproliferative and neurological properties at in vitro and in vivo levels. Based on our review, Acacia honey used from various researches is of high purity, contains some bioactive compounds ranging from vitamins, phenolics, flavonoids and fatty acids. It's highly nutritional with strong antioxidant and immuno-modulatory potentials which may therefore be considered a potential candidate for both cancer prevention and treatment. Neurologically, it may be considered as a viable therapeutic agent in the management of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26709666

  8. Biological Activities of Plant Pigments Betalains.

    PubMed

    Gandía-Herrero, Fernando; Escribano, Josefa; García-Carmona, Francisco

    2016-04-25

    Betalains are a family of natural pigments present in most plants of the order Caryophyllales. They provide colors ranging from yellow to violet to structures that in other plants are colored by anthocyanins. These include not only edible fruits and roots but also flowers, stems, and bracts. The recent characterization of different bioactivities in experiments with betalain containing extracts and purified pigments has renewed the interest of the research community in these molecules used by the food industry as natural colorants. Studies with multiple cancer cell lines have demonstrated a high chemopreventive potential that finds in vitro support in a strong antiradical and antioxidant activity. Experiments in vivo with model animals and bioavailability studies reinforce the possible role played by betalains in the diet. This work provides a critical review of all the claimed biological activities of betalains, showing that the bioactivities described might be supported by the high antiradical capacity of their structural unit, betalamic acid. Although more investigations with purified compounds are needed, the current evidences suggest a strong health-promoting potential. PMID:25118005

  9. Binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes for amyloid fibrils recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanczyc, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Metal-organic compounds represent a unique class of biomarkers with promising photophysical properties useful for imaging. Here interactions of insulin fibrils with two binuclear complexes [μ-(11,11‧-bidppz)(phen)4Ru2]4+ (1) and [μ-C4(cpdppz)(phen)4Ru2]4+ (2) are studied by linear dichroism (LD) and fluorescence. These ruthenium(II) compounds could provide a new generation of amyloid binding chromophores with long lived lifetimes, good luminescence quantum yields for the bound molecules and photo-stability useful in multiphoton luminescence imaging.

  10. Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach geospatial technology activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach (OBIO) in Reston, Virginia, and its Center for Biological Informatics (CBI) in Denver, Colorado, provide leadership in the development and use of geospatial technologies to advance the Nation's biological science activities.

  11. Lung biological activity of American attapulgite

    SciTech Connect

    Begin, R.; Masse, S.; Rola-Pleszczynski, M.; Geoffroy, M.; Martel, M.; Desmarais, Y.; Sebastien, P.

    1987-04-01

    Attapulgite is a fibrous mineral industrially consumed at the rate of over a million tons per year but the biological activity of the material is not fully known. To evaluate the in vivo toxicity of the fibrous materials, they exposed the tracheal lobe of 16 sheep to a single exposure of either 100 ml saline, 100 mg UICC asbestos fibers in 100 ml saline, 100 mg short asbestos fibers in 100 ml saline, or 100 mg attapulgite in 100 ml saline. The animals were studied by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at Days 2, 12, 24, 40, and 60 and by autopsy at Day 60. In the saline-exposed sheep, BAL and lung histology did not change. In the UICC asbestos-exposed animals, they reproduced the BAL changes previously reported. In the short asbestos-exposed sheep, there were no significant BAL changes. In the attapulgite sheep, they found significant and sustained increases in total BAL cells, macrophages, neutrophils, fibronectin, lactate dehydrogenase, ..beta..-glucuronidase, but BAL cellularity returned to control levels by Day 60 whereas in the UICC asbestos-exposed sheep, it remained significantly above control. Lung histology demonstrated the characteristic peribronchiolar fibrosing alveolitis in the UICC asbestos-exposed sheep, whereas macrophagic alveolitis with minimal airway distortion was seen in the short asbestos-exposed sheep, whereas macrophagic alveolitis with minimal airway distortion was seen in the short asbestos-exposed sheep and in all of the attapulgite-exposed sheep but three which had typical peribronchiolar alveolitis quite similar to that observed in UICC-exposed sheep, but of lower intensity.

  12. Magnetic and luminescent binuclear double-stranded helicates.

    PubMed

    Cucos, Paula; Tuna, Floriana; Sorace, Lorenzo; Matei, Iulia; Maxim, Catalin; Shova, Sergiu; Gheorghe, Ruxandra; Caneschi, Andrea; Hillebrand, Mihaela; Andruh, Marius

    2014-07-21

    Three new binuclear helicates, [M2L2]·3DMF (M = Co(II), 1, Zn(II), 3) and [Cu2L2]·DMF·0.4H2O (2), have been assembled using the helicand H2L that results from the 2:1 condensation reaction between o-vanillin and 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether. The metal ions within the binuclear helicates are tetracoordinated with a distorted tetrahedral geometry. Direct current magnetic characterization and EPR spectroscopy of the Co(II) derivative point to an easy axis type anisotropy for both Co(II) centers, with a separation of at least 55 K between the two doublets. Dynamic susceptibility measurements evidence slow relaxation of the magnetization in an applied dc field. Since the distance between the cobalt ions is quite large (11.59 Å), this is attributed in a first instance to the intrinsic properties of each Co(II) center (single-ion magnet behavior). However, the temperature dependence of the relaxation rate and the absence of slow dynamics in the Zn(II)-doped sample suggest that neither the simple Orbach mechanism nor Raman or direct processes can account for the relaxation, and collective phenomena have to be invoked for the observed behavior. Finally, due to the rigidization of the two organic ligands upon coordination, the pure zinc derivative exhibits fluorescence emission in solution, which was analyzed in terms of fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes. PMID:24998701

  13. The ice nucleation activity of biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, H.; Pummer, B.; Bauer, H.; Bernardi, J.

    2012-04-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen may be important for several atmospheric processes. Particularly, the ice nucleation caused by PBAPs is a topic of growing interest, since their impact on ice cloud formation and thus on radiative forcing, an important parameter in global climate is not yet fully understood. In laboratory model studies we investigated the ice nucleation activity of selected PBAPs. We studied the immersion mode freezing using water-oil emulsion, which we observed by optical microscopy. We particularly focused on pollen. We show that pollen of different species strongly differ in their ice nucleation behavior. The average freezing temperatures in laboratory experiments range from 240 K to 255 K. As the most efficient nuclei (silver birch, Scots pine and common juniper pollen) have a distribution area up to the Northern timberline, their ice nucleation activity might be a cryoprotective mechanism. For comparison the ice nucleation activity of Snomax, fungal spores, and mushrooms will be discussed as well. In the past, pollen have been rejected as important atmospheric IN, as they are not as abundant in the atmosphere as bacteria or mineral dust and are too heavy to reach higher altitudes. However, in our experiments (Pummer et al. 2011) it turned out that water, which had been in contact with pollen and then been separated from the bodies, nucleates as good as the pollen grains themselves. So the ice nuclei have to be easily-suspendable macromolecules (100-300 kDa) located on the pollen. Once extracted, they can be distributed further through the atmosphere than the heavy pollen grains and so augment the impact of pollen on ice cloud formation even in the upper troposphere. It is widely known, that material from the pollen, like allergens and sugars, can indeed leave the pollen body and be distributed independently. The most probable mechanism is the pollen grain bursting by rain, which releases

  14. The Infusion of Environmental Activities into a Secondary Biology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Helen M.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewed are "adventure-type" environmental education activities incorporated into a secondary level biology course. Student wilderness experiences included 24 weekend activities of hiking, bird watching, camping, and cross-country skiing. (SL)

  15. Synthesis, reactivity and biological activity of 5-alkoxymethyluracil analogues

    PubMed Central

    Brulikova, Lucie

    2011-01-01

    Summary This review article summarizes the results of a long-term investigation of 5-alkoxymethyluracil analogues and is aimed, in particular, at methods of syntheses. Most of the presented compounds were synthesized in order to evaluate their biological activity, therefore, a brief survey of biological activity, especially antiviral, cytotoxic and antibacterial, is also reported. PMID:21804865

  16. Multifunctional and biologically active matrices from multicomponent polymeric solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor); Rabolt, John (Inventor); Casper, Cheryl (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A functionalized electrospun matrix for the controlled-release of biologically active agents, such as growth factors, is presented. The functionalized matrix comprises a matrix polymer, a compatibilizing polymer and a biomolecule or other small functioning molecule. In certain aspects the electrospun polymer fibers comprise at least one biologically active molecule functionalized with low molecular weight heparin.

  17. Structure/function correlations among coupled binuclear copper proteins through spectroscopic and reactivity studies of NspF

    PubMed Central

    Ginsbach, Jake W.; Kieber-Emmons, Matthew T.; Nomoto, Ryohei; Noguchi, Akio; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Solomon, Edward I.

    2012-01-01

    The terminal step of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrosobenzamide biosynthesis in Streptomyces murayamaensis is performed by NspF, a mono-oxygenase that converts o-aminophenols to the corresponding nitroso product (hydroxyanilinase activity). Previous biochemical characterization of the resting form of NspF suggested that this enzyme belonged to the coupled binuclear copper enzyme (CBC) family. Another member of this enzyme family, tyrosinase, is able to mono-oxygenate monophenols (monophenolase activity) but not o-aminophenols. To gain insight into the unique reactivity of NspF, we have generated and characterized the oxy form of its active site. The observation of spectral features identical to those of oxy-tyrosinase indicates that oxy-NspF contains a Cu2O2 core where peroxide is coordinated in a μ-η2∶ η2 mode, confirming that NspF is a CBC enzyme. This oxy form is found to react with monophenols, indicating that, like tyrosinase, NspF also possesses monophenolase activity. A comparison of the two electrophilic mechanisms for the monophenolase and hydroxyanilinase activity indicates a large geometric change between their respective transition states. The potential for specific interactions between the protein pocket and the substrate in each transition state is discussed within the context of the differential reactivity of this family of enzymes with equivalent μ-η2∶η2 peroxy bridged coupled binuclear copper active sites. PMID:22711806

  18. Milk inhibits the biological activity of ricin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ricin is a highly toxic protein produced by the castor plant Ricinus communis. The toxin is relatively easy to isolate and can be used as a biological weapon. There is great interest in identifying effective inhibitors for ricin. In this study, we demonstrated by three independent assays that compon...

  19. Cyclobutane-Containing Alkaloids: Origin, Synthesis, and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sergeiko, Anastasia; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Hanuš, Lumir O; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2008-01-01

    Present review describes research on novel natural cyclobutane-containing alkaloids isolated from terrestrial and marine species. More than 60 biological active compounds have been confirmed to have antimicrobial, antibacterial, antitumor, and other activities. The structures, synthesis, origins, and biological activities of a selection of cyclobutane-containing alkaloids are reviewed. With the computer program PASS some additional biological activities are also predicted, which point toward new possible applications of these compounds. This review emphasizes the role of cyclobutane-containing alkaloids as an important source of leads for drug discovery. PMID:19696873

  20. The biology of insecticidal activity and resistance.

    PubMed

    Perry, Trent; Batterham, Philip; Daborn, Phillip J

    2011-07-01

    Identifying insecticide resistance mechanisms is paramount for pest insect control, as the understandings that underpin insect control strategies must provide ways of detecting and managing resistance. Insecticide resistance studies rely heavily on detailed biochemical and genetic analyses. Although there have been many successes, there are also many examples of resistance that still challenge us. As a precursor to rational pest insect control, the biology of the insect, within the contexts of insecticide modes of action and insecticide metabolism, must be well understood. It makes sense to initiate this research in the best model insect system, Drosophila melanogaster, and translate these findings and methodologies to other insects. Here we explore the usefulness of the D. melanogaster model in studying metabolic-based insecticide resistances, target-site mediated resistances and identifying novel insecticide targets, whilst highlighting the importance of having a more complete understanding of insect biology for insecticide studies. PMID:21426939

  1. Biology Research Activities: Teacher's Edition (with Answers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Barbara

    This book is part of the series "Explorations in Science" which contains enrichment activities for the general science curriculum. Each book in the series contains innovative and traditional projects for both the bright and average, the self-motivated, and those who find activity motivating. Each activity is self-contained and provides everything…

  2. Ficus carica L. (Moraceae): Phytochemistry, Traditional Uses and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Mawa, Shukranul; Husain, Khairana; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the botanical features of Ficus carica L. (Moraceae), its wide variety of chemical constituents, its use in traditional medicine as remedies for many health problems, and its biological activities. The plant has been used traditionally to treat various ailments such as gastric problems, inflammation, and cancer. Phytochemical studies on the leaves and fruits of the plant have shown that they are rich in phenolics, organic acids, and volatile compounds. However, there is little information on the phytochemicals present in the stem and root. Reports on the biological activities of the plant are mainly on its crude extracts which have been proven to possess many biological activities. Some of the most interesting therapeutic effects include anticancer, hepatoprotective, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and antimicrobial activities. Thus, studies related to identification of the bioactive compounds and correlating them to their biological activities are very useful for further research to explore the potential of F. carica as a source of therapeutic agents. PMID:24159359

  3. Ficus carica L. (Moraceae): Phytochemistry, Traditional Uses and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Mawa, Shukranul; Husain, Khairana; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the botanical features of Ficus carica L. (Moraceae), its wide variety of chemical constituents, its use in traditional medicine as remedies for many health problems, and its biological activities. The plant has been used traditionally to treat various ailments such as gastric problems, inflammation, and cancer. Phytochemical studies on the leaves and fruits of the plant have shown that they are rich in phenolics, organic acids, and volatile compounds. However, there is little information on the phytochemicals present in the stem and root. Reports on the biological activities of the plant are mainly on its crude extracts which have been proven to possess many biological activities. Some of the most interesting therapeutic effects include anticancer, hepatoprotective, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and antimicrobial activities. Thus, studies related to identification of the bioactive compounds and correlating them to their biological activities are very useful for further research to explore the potential of F. carica as a source of therapeutic agents. PMID:24159359

  4. Biological Activity of Recently Discovered Halogenated Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents the biological activity—antibacterial, antifungal, anti-parasitic, antiviral, antitumor, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and enzymatic activity—of halogenated marine natural products discovered in the past five years. Newly discovered examples that do not report biological activity are not included. PMID:26133553

  5. Sensitive bioassay for detection of biologically active ricin in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential use of ricin as an agent of biological warfare highlights the need to develop fast and effective methods to detect biologically active ricin. The current “gold standard” for ricin detection is an in vivo mouse bioassay; however, this method is not practical to test on a large number of...

  6. Coumarin heterocyclic derivatives: chemical synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Medina, Fernanda G; Marrero, Joaquín G; Macías-Alonso, Mariana; González, Magdalena C; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Teissier García, Ariana G; Osegueda-Robles, Soraya

    2015-09-23

    This review highlights the broad range of science that has arisen from the synthesis of coumarin-linked and fused heterocycle derivatives. Specific topics include their synthesis and biological activity. PMID:26151411

  7. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOEpatents

    Merino, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  8. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    DOEpatents

    Merino, Sandra

    2014-05-27

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  9. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, Sandra

    2014-10-28

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  10. Methods of increasing secretion of polypeptides having biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, Sandra

    2015-04-14

    The present invention relates to methods for producing a secreted polypeptide having biological activity, comprising: (a) transforming a fungal host cell with a fusion protein construct encoding a fusion protein, which comprises: (i) a first polynucleotide encoding a signal peptide; (ii) a second polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of an endoglucanase or a portion thereof; and (iii) a third polynucleotide encoding at least a catalytic domain of a polypeptide having biological activity; wherein the signal peptide and at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase increases secretion of the polypeptide having biological activity compared to the absence of at least the catalytic domain of the endoglucanase; (b) cultivating the transformed fungal host cell under conditions suitable for production of the fusion protein; and (c) recovering the fusion protein, a component thereof, or a combination thereof, having biological activity, from the cultivation medium.

  11. Multifunctional and biologically active matrices from multicomponent polymeric solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a biologically active functionalized electrospun matrix to permit immobilization and long-term delivery of biologically active agents. In particular the invention relates to a functionalized polymer matrix comprising a matrix polymer, a compatibilizing polymer and a biomolecule or other small functioning molecule. In certain aspects the electrospun polymer fibers comprise at least one biologically active molecule functionalized with low molecular weight heparin. Examples of active molecules that may be used with the multicomponent polymer of the invention include, for example, a drug, a biopolymer, for example a growth factor, a protein, a peptide, a nucleotide, a polysaccharide, a biological macromolecule or the like. The invention is further directed to the formation of functionalized crosslinked matrices, such as hydrogels, that include at least one functionalized compatibilizing polymer capable of assembly.

  12. Biological activities of Croton palanostigma Klotzsch

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Eduardo Ferreira; Rosario, Diele Magno; Silva Veiga, Andreza Socorro; Brasil, Davi Do Socorro Barros; Silveira, Fernando Tobias; Dolabela, Maria Fâni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different species of Croton are used in traditional Amazonian medicine. Among the popular uses are treatment of bacterial diseases, poorly healing wounds and fevers. Objective: This study evaluated the antileishmanial, antiplasmodial and antimicrobial activities of the extracts and diterpenes of Croton palanostigma Klotzsch (Euphorbiaceae). Materials and Methods: Leaves and bark were extracted with dichloromethane and methanol. The bark dichloromethane extract (BDE) was chromatographed on a column, obtaining cordatin and aparisthman. The extracts and diterpenes were assayed thought agar disk diffusion method and their bactericidal or fungicidal effects were evaluated by minimum bactericidal or fungicidal concentration. The antiplasmodial activity was evaluated after 24 and 72 h of exposition. The antileishmanial activity was performed on promastigotes forms of Leishmania amazonensis. Results: The bark methanol extract (BME) and cordatin were not active against any microbial strains tested; BDE and leaves methanol extract (LME) were positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and aparisthman was positive for Candida albicans. In the determination of the minimum bactericidal concentration, neither of them were active in the highest concentration tested. The extracts and diterpenes were inactive in Plasmodium falciparum, except the LME in 72 h. Any extract was shown to be active in promastigote forms of L. amazonensis. Conclusion: These results indicate that the BDE and LME did not inhibit the bacterial growth, then they probably had bacteriostatic effect. LME presented activity in P. falciparum. PMID:26246738

  13. Biological activities of Croton palanostigma Klotzsch

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Eduardo Ferreira; Rosario, Diele Magno; Silva Veiga, Andreza Socorro; Barros Brasil, Davi Do Socorro; Silveira, Fernando Tobias; Dolabela, Maria Fâni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different species of Croton are used in traditional Amazonian medicine. Among the popular uses are treatment of bacterial diseases, poorly healing wounds and fevers. Objective: This study evaluated the antileishmanial, antiplasmodial and antimicrobial activities of the extracts and diterpenes of Croton palanostigma Klotzsch (Euphorbiaceae). Materials and Methods: Leaves and bark were extracted with dichloromethane and methanol. The bark dichloromethane extract (BDE) was chromatographed on a column, obtaining cordatin and aparisthman. The extracts and diterpenes were assayed thought agar disk diffusion method and their bactericidal or fungicidal effects were evaluated by minimum bactericidal or fungicidal concentration. The antiplasmodial activity was evaluated after 24 and 72 h of exposition. The antileishmanial activity was performed on promastigotes forms of Leishmania amazonensis. Results: The bark methanol extract (BME) and cordatin were not active against any microbial strains tested; BDE and leaves methanol extract (LME) were positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and aparisthman was positive for Candida albicans. In the determination of the minimum bactericidal concentration, neither of them were active in the highest concentration tested. The extracts and diterpenes were inactive in Plasmodium falciparum, except the LME in 72 h. Any extract was shown to be active in promastigote forms of L. amazonensis. Conclusion: These results indicate that the BDE and LME did not inhibit the bacterial growth, then they probably had bacteriostatic effect. LME presented activity in P. falciparum. PMID:27041867

  14. Physical activity and biological maturation: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bacil, Eliane Denise Araújo; Mazzardo, Oldemar; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Legnani, Rosimeide Francisco dos Santos; de Campos, Wagner

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between physical activity (PA) and biological maturation in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCE: We performed a systematic review in April 2013 in the electronic databases of PubMed/MEDLINE, SportDiscus, Web of Science and LILACS without time restrictions. A total of 628 potentially relevant articles were identified and 10 met the inclusion criteria for this review: cross-sectional or longitudinal studies, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, with schoolchildren aged 9-15 years old of both genders. DATA SYNTHESIS: Despite the heterogeneity of the studies, there was an inverse association between PA and biological maturation. PA decreases with increased biological and chronological age in both genders. Boys tend to be more physically active than girls; however, when controlling for biological age, the gender differences disappear. The association between PA and timing of maturation varies between the genders. Variation in the timing of biological maturation affects the tracking of PA in early adolescent girls. This review suggests that mediators (BMI, depression, low self-esteem, and concerns about body weight) can explain the association between PA and biological maturation. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between PA and biological maturation. PA decreases with increasing biological age with no differences between genders. As for the timing of biological maturation, this association varies between genders. PMID:25583624

  15. Binuclear Cu(II) and Co(II) Complexes of Tridentate Heterocyclic Shiff Base Derived from Salicylaldehyde with 4-Aminoantipyrine

    PubMed Central

    Al-Obaidi, Omar Hamad Shihab

    2012-01-01

    New binuclear Co(II) and Co(II) complexes of ONO tridentate heterocyclic Schiff base derived from 4-aminoantipyrine with salicylaldehyde have been synthesized and characterized on the bases of elemental analysis, UV-Vis., FT-IR, and also by aid of molar conductivity measurements, magnetic measurements, and melting points. It has been found that the Schiff bases with Cu(II) or Co(II) ion forming binuclear complexes on (1 : 1) “metal : ligand” stoichiometry. The molar conductance measurements of the complexes in DMSO correspond to be nonelectrolytic nature for all prepared complexes. Distorted octahedral environment is suggested for metal complexes. A theoretical treatment of the formation of complexes in the gas phase was studied, and this was done by using the HyperChem-6 program for the molecular mechanics and semi-empirical calculations. The free ligand and its complexes have been tested for their antibacterial activities against two types of human pathogenic bacteria: the first type (Staphylococcus aureus) is Gram positive and the second type (Escherichia coli) is Gram negative (by using agar well diffusion method). Finally, it was found that compounds show different activity of inhibition on growth of the bacteria. PMID:22611346

  16. Activated Sludge. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Owen K.; Klopping, Paul H.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a seven-lesson unit on activated sludge. Topic areas addressed in the lessons include: (1) activated sludge concepts and components (including aeration tanks, aeration systems, clarifiers, and sludge pumping systems); (2) activated sludge variations and modes; (3) biological nature of activated…

  17. Biologically active triterpenoids from Cephalaria ambrosioides.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Sofia; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Pratsinis, Harris; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Chinou, Ioanna B

    2009-02-01

    The roots of Cephalaria ambrosioides yielded a new triterpene, 6alpha-hydroxyhederagenic acid ( 1), in addition to the known triterpene hederagenic acid ( 2) and four corresponding saponins, leontoside A (or akeboside Stb) ( 3), kalopanax saponin A (or alpha-hederin) ( 4), saponin PG (or sapindoside B) ( 5), and dipsacoside B ( 6). Their structures have been elucidated on the basis of their spectral data (MS, 1 D and 2 D NMR) and by some chemical transformations. The extract and all isolated compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial, molluscicidal and IN VITRO cytotoxic activities. All compounds showed strong antimicrobial activity (MIC values 1.80 - 2.50 microg/mL), with 5 and 6 exhibiting activities comparable to those of standard antibiotics. Moreover, compounds 3 - 5 were active against all assayed cancer cell lines, whereas compounds 3 and 4 exhibited higher activities against Biomphalaria Glabrata snails, with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 5.4 and 6.2 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:19152225

  18. Biologically active compounds of semi-metals.

    PubMed

    Rezanka, Tomás; Sigler, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Semi-metals (boron, silicon, arsenic and selenium) form organo-metal compounds, some of which are found in nature and affect the physiology of living organisms. They include, e.g., the boron-containing antibiotics aplasmomycin, borophycin, boromycin, and tartrolon or the silicon compounds present in "silicate" bacteria, relatives of the genus Bacillus, which release silicon from aluminosilicates through the secretion of organic acids. Arsenic is incorporated into arsenosugars and arsenobetaines by marine algae and invertebrates, and fungi and bacteria can produce volatile methylated arsenic compounds. Some prokaryotes can use arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor while others can utilize arsenite as an electron donor to generate energy. Selenium is incorporated into selenocysteine that is found in some proteins. Biomethylation of selenide produces methylselenide and dimethylselenide. Selenium analogues of amino acids, antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-infective drugs are often used as analogues of important pharmacological sulfur compounds. Other metalloids, i.e. the rare and toxic tellurium and the radioactive short-lived astatine, have no biological significance. PMID:17991498

  19. Binuclear Cells in the Lactating Mammary Gland: New Insights on an Old Concept?

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert H

    2016-06-01

    In a recent paper (Rios et al. Nat Commun. 7:11400, 2016), it was reported that polyploid cells are frequent in lactating mammary tissues. This phenomenon was observed in mammary tissue sampled from five separate mammalian species. According to that report, these binucleated cells occur late in pregnancy and early in lactation. Unfortunately, this paper did not mention a number of earlier observations and findings that remain pertinent to this day (Banerjee et al. Life sciences Pt 2: Biochemistry, general and molecular biology. 10(15):867-77, 1971; Banerjee MR, Wagner JE. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 49(2):480-7, 1972). In these classical experiments, the authors demonstrated in vivo that DNA synthesis continued without commensurate cell division during late pregnancy and lactation, and that this DNA synthesis was imperative for functional differentiation of the mammary epithelium. Later studies showed that DNA synthesis was indispensable to the induction of milk protein production in explant cultures of mammary tissue from unprimed, nulliparous mice. This dependence on DNA synthesis in mammary explant cultures stimulated by lactogenic hormones was found to be dispensable following a single pregnancy. The absolute requirement for DNA synthesis in nulliparous mouse mammary explants stimulated to synthesize milk protein in vitro has remained unexplained, as has the need for DNA synthesis prior to the onset of lactation. From a historical perspective, it is more likely that binuclear secretory cells in the lactating mammary gland are a consequence of the DNA synthesis requirement for lactation, rather than an essential element. PMID:27255141

  20. Strong DNA deformation required for extremely slow DNA threading intercalation by a binuclear ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    Almaqwashi, Ali A; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Westerlund, Fredrik; Williams, Mark C

    2014-10-01

    DNA intercalation by threading is expected to yield high affinity and slow dissociation, properties desirable for DNA-targeted therapeutics. To measure these properties, we utilize single molecule DNA stretching to quantify both the binding affinity and the force-dependent threading intercalation kinetics of the binuclear ruthenium complex Δ,Δ-[μ-bidppz-(phen)4Ru2]4+ (Δ,Δ-P). We measure the DNA elongation at a range of constant stretching forces using optical tweezers, allowing direct characterization of the intercalation kinetics as well as the amount intercalated at equilibrium. Higher forces exponentially facilitate the intercalative binding, leading to a profound decrease in the binding site size that results in one ligand intercalated at almost every DNA base stack. The zero force Δ,Δ-P intercalation Kd is 44 nM, 25-fold stronger than the analogous mono-nuclear ligand (Δ-P). The force-dependent kinetics analysis reveals a mechanism that requires DNA elongation of 0.33 nm for association, relaxation to an equilibrium elongation of 0.19 nm, and an additional elongation of 0.14 nm from the equilibrium state for dissociation. In cells, a molecule with binding properties similar to Δ,Δ-P may rapidly bind DNA destabilized by enzymes during replication or transcription, but upon enzyme dissociation it is predicted to remain intercalated for several hours, thereby interfering with essential biological processes. PMID:25245944

  1. Strong DNA deformation required for extremely slow DNA threading intercalation by a binuclear ruthenium complex

    PubMed Central

    Almaqwashi, Ali A.; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Westerlund, Fredrik; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA intercalation by threading is expected to yield high affinity and slow dissociation, properties desirable for DNA-targeted therapeutics. To measure these properties, we utilize single molecule DNA stretching to quantify both the binding affinity and the force-dependent threading intercalation kinetics of the binuclear ruthenium complex Δ,Δ-[μ‐bidppz‐(phen)4Ru2]4+ (Δ,Δ-P). We measure the DNA elongation at a range of constant stretching forces using optical tweezers, allowing direct characterization of the intercalation kinetics as well as the amount intercalated at equilibrium. Higher forces exponentially facilitate the intercalative binding, leading to a profound decrease in the binding site size that results in one ligand intercalated at almost every DNA base stack. The zero force Δ,Δ-P intercalation Kd is 44 nM, 25-fold stronger than the analogous mono-nuclear ligand (Δ-P). The force-dependent kinetics analysis reveals a mechanism that requires DNA elongation of 0.33 nm for association, relaxation to an equilibrium elongation of 0.19 nm, and an additional elongation of 0.14 nm from the equilibrium state for dissociation. In cells, a molecule with binding properties similar to Δ,Δ-P may rapidly bind DNA destabilized by enzymes during replication or transcription, but upon enzyme dissociation it is predicted to remain intercalated for several hours, thereby interfering with essential biological processes. PMID:25245944

  2. Characterization of Metastable Intermediates Formed in the Reaction Between a Mn(II) Complex and Dioxygen, Including a Crystallographic Structure of a Binuclear Mn(III)-Peroxo Species

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Michael K.; Sun, Xianru; Kwak, Yeonju; Solomon, Edward I.; Rybak-Akimova, Elena; Kovacs, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Transition-metal peroxos have been implicated as key intermediates in a variety of critical biological processes involving O2. Due to their highly reactive nature, very few metal-peroxos have been characterized. The dioxygen chemistry of manganese remains largely unexplored despite the proposed involvement of a binuclear Mn-peroxo, either as a precursor to O2, or derived from O2, in both photosynthetic H2O oxidation and DNA biosynthesis, arguably two of the most fundamental processes of life. Neither of these biological intermediates has been observed. Herein we describe the dioxygen chemistry of coordinatively unsaturated [MnII(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN))] +(1), and the characterization of intermediates formed en route to a binuclear mono-oxo bridged Mn(III) product {[MnIII(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN)]2-(μ-O)}2+ (2), the oxo atom of which is derived from 18O2. At low-temperatures, a dioxygen intermediate, [Mn(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN))(O2)]+ (4), is observed (by stopped-flow) to rapidly and irreversibly form in this reaction (k1(−10 °C)= 3780±180M−1s−1, ΔH1‡ = 26.4±1.7 kJ mol−1, ΔS1‡ = − 75.6±6.8 J mol−1K−1), and then convert more slowly (k2(−10 °C)= 417±3.2 M−1s−1, ΔH2‡ = 47.1±1.4 kJ mol−1, ΔS2‡ = − 15.0±5.7 J mol−1K−1) to a species 3 with isotopically sensitive stretches at νo-o (Δ18O) = 819(47) cm−1, kO–O= 3.02 mdyn/Å, and νMn-O(Δ18O) = 611(25) cm−1 consistent with a peroxo. Intermediate 3 releases approximately 0.5 equiv of H2O2 per Mn ion upon protonation, and the rate of conversion of 4 to 3 is dependent on [Mn(II)] concentration, consistent with the formation of a binuclear Mn-peroxo. This was verified by X-ray crystallography, where the peroxo of {[MnIII(SMe2N4(6-Me-DPEN)]2(trans–μ–1,2–O2)}2+ (3) is shown to be bridging between two Mn(III) ions in an end-on trans-μ-1,2-fashion. This represents the first characterized example of a binuclear Mn(III)-peroxo, and a rare case in which more than one intermediate is observed

  3. Flavonoids and biological activities of Jussiaea repens.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, M S; Soliman, F M; Shehata, I A; Rabee, M; Fawzy, G A

    2007-05-01

    A new acylated avicularin, namely avicularin 2''-(4'''-O-n-pentanoyl)-gallate (1) along with 12 metabolites have been isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the aerial parts of Jussiaea repens L. (Onagraceae). Their structures were established as trifolin 2''-O-gallate (2), quercetrin (3), guaijaverin (4), reynoutrin (5), juglanin (6), avicularin (7), hyperin (8), trifolin (9), hyperin 2''-O-gallate (10), rutin (11), kaempferol (12) and quercetin (13) on the basis of their chromatographic properties, chemical and spectroscopic evidences. The investigated ethyl acetate extract was found to be non-toxic (LD(50) up to the maximum soluble dose 4 g kg(-1) body wt.) and had significant antioxidant, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic activities. Also some of the isolated flavonoids showed cytotoxic activity against Ehrlich ascitis carcinoma cells. PMID:17487615

  4. Isoxanthohumol--Biologically active hop flavonoid.

    PubMed

    Żołnierczyk, Anna Katarzyna; Mączka, Wanda Krystyna; Grabarczyk, Małgorzata; Wińska, Katarzyna; Woźniak, Edyta; Anioł, Mirosław

    2015-06-01

    Isoxanthohumol (IXN), apart from xanthohumol (XN) and 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN), is one of the most important prenylflavonoids found in hops. Another natural source of this compound is a shrub Sophora flavescens, used in traditional Chinese medicine. Main dietary source of IXN is beer, and the compound is produced from XN during wort boiling. In the human body, the compound is O-demethylated to 8PN, the strongest known phytoestrogen. This process takes place in the liver and in the intestine, where it is mediated by local microflora. It has been reported in some studies that even though beer contains small amounts of hops and its preparations, these compounds may affect the functioning of the human body. IXN exhibits an antiproliferative activity against human cell lines typical for breast cancer (MCF-7), ovarian cancer (A-2780), prostate cancer (DU145 and PC-3), and colon cancer (HT-29 and SW620) cells. It strongly inhibits the activation of the following carcinogens: 2-amino-3-methylimidazol-[4,5-f]quinoline and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) via human cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2). It also inhibits the production of prostate specific antigen (PSA). IXN significantly reduces the expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in the case of invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It interferes with JAK/STAT signaling pathway and inhibits the expression of pro1inflammatory genes in the monoblastic leukemia cell line (MonoMac6). It activates apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). In addition, IXN shows an antiviral activity towards herpes viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). PMID:25771121

  5. Synthesis and biological activity of 5-fluorotubercidin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Seth, Punit P; Ranken, Ray; Swayze, Eric E; Migawa, Michael T

    2004-01-01

    The electrophilic fluorination of 4-chloropyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine (1) was studied culminating a 59% conversion of compound 1 to 4-chloro-5-fluoropyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine (2) using Selectfluor. This transformation proceeded via the 4-chloro-5,6-dihydro-5-fluoro-6-hydroxypyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine (3) in a 9:1 trans:cis ratio. The trans isomer of compound 3 was studied by 1H NMR and 19F NMR, and the 5-H tautomer (4) was observed as another intermediate. A modified Vorbruggen procedure of compound 2 and tetra-O-acetylribose gave 4-chloro-5-fluoro-7-(2,3,5,-tri-O-benzoyl-beta-D-ribofuranosyl)pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine (6) in a 65% yield. Treatment of compound 6 with ammonia (l) in dioxane gave 5-fluorotubercidin (7). No antibacterial activity was observed. An MTT assay (Promega) against Huh-7 liver cells, normal mouse spleen cells stimulated with Con A (a T-cell mitogen), and normal mouse spleen stimulated with LPS (a B-cell mitogen) showed no significant toxicity. Increased activity of 7 over tubercidin was observed against L-1210 cells and toxicity in fibroblast cells was reduced. PMID:15043144

  6. Biologically active insulin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Janet

    2014-06-01

    Insulin has many actions within cells many of which are dependent on the cell type. For example, insulin stimulates glucose uptake in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle but not in liver. In liver glucose influx will increase as insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of glucose and eventual storage in the form of glycogen. Insulin also increases glucose oxidation, decreases glucose production, decreases lipolysis, increases protein synthesis and inhibits protein degradation in addition to others. Many actions have been related to insulin binding to its receptor and subsequent phosphorylation cascades, but insulin action on protein degradation has been shown to be linked to insulin degradation, specifically insulin degradation by the insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE). This activity has been shown to be due to an interaction of IDE with the proteasome, which is responsible for degradation of ubiquitin-tagged proteins. Smaller fragments of insulin that are produced by the action of IDE that do not bind to the insulin receptor show a small effect on protein degradation and a modest effect on mitogenesis. These small fragments do however inhibit lipolysis in a similar manner to insulin. If fragments are larger and can bind to the receptor they have been shown to increase glucose oxidation. Studies show that fragments of the insulin molecule have cellular activity, and that the varied actions of insulin are not completely controlled by insulin binding to the insulin receptor, even though the mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive. PMID:24559166

  7. Biased and unbiased strategies to identify biologically active small molecules.

    PubMed

    Abet, Valentina; Mariani, Angelica; Truscott, Fiona R; Britton, Sébastien; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2014-08-15

    Small molecules are central players in chemical biology studies. They promote the perturbation of cellular processes underlying diseases and enable the identification of biological targets that can be validated for therapeutic intervention. Small molecules have been shown to accurately tune a single function of pluripotent proteins in a reversible manner with exceptional temporal resolution. The identification of molecular probes and drugs remains a worthy challenge that can be addressed by the use of biased and unbiased strategies. Hypothesis-driven methodologies employs a known biological target to synthesize complementary hits while discovery-driven strategies offer the additional means of identifying previously unanticipated biological targets. This review article provides a general overview of recent synthetic frameworks that gave rise to an impressive arsenal of biologically active small molecules with unprecedented cellular mechanisms. PMID:24811300

  8. Biologically active indole and bisindole alkaloids from Tabernaemontana divaricata.

    PubMed

    Kam, Toh-Seok; Pang, Huey-Shen; Lim, Tuck-Meng

    2003-04-21

    The ethanol extract of the leaves of Tabernaemontana divaricata (double flower variety) provided a total of 23 alkaloids, including the new aspidosperma alkaloids, taberhanine, voafinine, N-methylvoafinine, voafinidine, voalenine and the new bisindole alkaloid, conophyllinine in addition to the previously known, biologically active bisindole, conophylline and its congener, conofoline. The structures of the new alkaloids were established by spectroscopic methods. The preparation and characterization of the corresponding quinones of the biologically active bisindoles are also described in relation to a structure-activity study of these compounds with respect to their action in stimulating insulin expression. PMID:12929658

  9. Biologically active extracts with kidney affections applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu (Neagu), Mihaela; Pascu, Daniela-Elena; Cozea, Andreea; Bunaciu, Andrei A.; Miron, Alexandra Raluca; Nechifor, Cristina Aurelia

    2015-12-01

    This paper is aimed to select plant materials rich in bioflavonoid compounds, made from herbs known for their application performances in the prevention and therapy of renal diseases, namely kidney stones and urinary infections (renal lithiasis, nephritis, urethritis, cystitis, etc.). This paper presents a comparative study of the medicinal plant extracts composition belonging to Ericaceae-Cranberry (fruit and leaves) - Vaccinium vitis-idaea L. and Bilberry (fruit) - Vaccinium myrtillus L. Concentrated extracts obtained from medicinal plants used in this work were analyzed from structural, morphological and compositional points of view using different techniques: chromatographic methods (HPLC), scanning electronic microscopy, infrared, and UV spectrophotometry, also by using kinetic model. Liquid chromatography was able to identify the specific compounds of the Ericaceae family, present in all three extracts, arbutosid, as well as specific components of each species, mostly from the class of polyphenols. The identification and quantitative determination of the active ingredients from these extracts can give information related to their therapeutic effects.

  10. Liposomal packaging generates Wnt protein with in vivo biological activity.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Nathan T; Leucht, Philipp; Zhao, Ludan; Kim, Jae-Beom; ten Berge, Derk; Ponnusamy, Karthik; Carre, A Lyonel; Dudek, Henryk; Zachlederova, Marie; McElhaney, Michael; Brunton, Shirley; Gunzner, Janet; Callow, Marinella; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike; Zhang, Xiaoyan M; Helms, Jill A; Nusse, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signals exercise strong cell-biological and regenerative effects of considerable therapeutic value. There are, however, no specific Wnt agonists and no method for in vivo delivery of purified Wnt proteins. Wnts contain lipid adducts that are required for activity and we exploited this lipophilicity by packaging purified Wnt3a protein into lipid vesicles. Rather than being encapsulated, Wnts are tethered to the liposomal surface, where they enhance and sustain Wnt signaling in vitro. Molecules that effectively antagonize soluble Wnt3a protein but are ineffective against the Wnt3a signal presented by a cell in a paracrine or autocrine manner are also unable to block liposomal Wnt3a activity, suggesting that liposomal packaging mimics the biological state of active Wnts. When delivered subcutaneously, Wnt3a liposomes induce hair follicle neogenesis, demonstrating their robust biological activity in a regenerative context. PMID:18698373

  11. Models Role within Active Learning in Biology. A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pop-Pacurar, Irina; Tirla, Felicia-Doina

    2009-01-01

    In order to integrate ideas and information creatively, to motivate students and activate their thinking, we have used in Biology classes a series of active methods, among which the methods of critical thinking, which had very good results. Still, in the case of some intuitive, abstract, more difficult topics, such as the cell structure,…

  12. Should soil testing services measure soil biological activity?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Health of agricultural soils depends largely on conservation management to promote soil organic C accumulation. Total soil organic C changes slowly, but active fractions are more dynamic. A key indicator of healthy soil is potential biological activity, which could be measured rapidly with soil te...

  13. Biological activities of derivatized D-glucans: a review.

    PubMed

    Kagimura, Francini Yumi; da Cunha, Mário Antônio A; Barbosa, Aneli M; Dekker, Robert F H; Malfatti, Carlos Ricardo Maneck

    2015-01-01

    D-Glucans have triggered increasing interest in commercial applications in the chemical and pharmaceutical sectors because of their technological properties and biological activities. The glucans are foremost among the polysaccharide groups produced by microorganisms with demonstrated activity in stimulating the immune system, and have potential in treating human disease conditions. Chemical alterations in the structure of D-glucans through derivatization (sulfonylation, carboxymethylation, phosphorylation, acetylation) contributes to their increased solubility that, in turn, can alter their biological activities such as antioxidation and anticoagulation. This review surveys and cites the latest advances on the biological and technological potential of D-glucans following chemical modifications through sulfonylation, carboxymethylation, phosphorylation or acetylation, and discusses the findings of their activities. Several studies suggest that chemically modified d-glucans have potentiated biological activity as anticoagulants, antitumors, antioxidants, and antivirals. This review shows that in-depth future studies on chemically modified glucans with amplified biological effects will be relevant in the biotechnological field because of their potential to prevent and treat numerous human disease conditions and their clinical complications. PMID:25239192

  14. Phytochemistry and biological activities of Phlomis species.

    PubMed

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sgaier, Mohamed; Skandrani, Ines; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Kilani, Soumaya; Bouhlel, Ines; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-09-01

    The genus Phlomis L. belongs to the Lamiaceae family and encompasses 100 species native to Turkey, North Africa, Europe and Asia. It is a popular herbal tea enjoyed for its taste and aroma. Phlomis species are used to treat various conditions such as diabetes, gastric ulcer, hemorrhoids, inflammation, and wounds. This review aims to summarize recent research on the phytochemistry and pharmacological properties of the genus Phlomis, with particular emphasis on its ethnobotanical uses. The essential oil of Phomis is composed of four chemotypes dominated by monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, limonene and linalool), sesquiterpenes (germacrene D and beta-caryophyllene), aliphalic compounds (9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid methyl ester), fatty acids (hexadecanoic acid) and other components (trans-phytol, 9,12,15-octadecatrien-1-ol). Flavonoids, iridoids and phenylethyl alcohol constitute the main compounds isolated from Phlomis extracts. The pharmacological activities of some Phlomis species have been investigated. They are described according to antidiabetic, antinociceptive, antiulcerogenic, protection of the vascular system, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. PMID:19563875

  15. [Oregano: properties, composition and biological activity].

    PubMed

    Arcila-Lozano, Cynthia Cristina; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Lecona-Uribe, Salvador; González de Mejía, Elvira

    2004-03-01

    The oregano spice includes various plant species. The most common are the genus Origanum, native of Europe, and the Lippia, native of Mexico. Among the species of Origanum. their most important components are the limonene, gamma-cariofilene, rho-cymenene, canfor, linalol, alpha-pinene, carvacrol and thymol. In the genus Lippia, the same compounds can be found. The oregano composition depends on the specie, climate, altitude, time of recollection and the stage of growth. Some of the properties of this plant's extracts are being currently studied due to the growing interest for substituting synthetic additives commonly found in foods. Oregano has a good antioxidant capacity and also presents antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms like Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, among others. These are all characteristics of interest for the food industry because they may enhance the safety and stability of foods. There are also some reports regarding the antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effect of oregano; representing an alternative for the potential treatment and/or prevention of certain chronic ailments, like cancer. PMID:15332363

  16. Azaglycomimetics: Natural Occurrence, Biological Activity, and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Naoki

    A large number of alkaloids mimicking the structures of monosaccharides or oligosaccharides have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. The sugar mimicking alkaloids with a nitrogen in the ring are called azasugars or iminosugars. Naturally occurring azasugars are classified into five structural classes: polyhydroxylated piperidines, pyrrolidines, indolizidines, pyrrolizidines, and nortropanes. They are easily soluble in water because of their polyhydroxylated structures and inhibit glycosidases because of a structural resemblance to the sugar moiety of the natural substrate. Glycosidases are involved in a wide range of anabolic and catabolic processes, such as digestion, lysosomal catabolism of glycoconjugates, biosynthesis of glycoproteins, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control and ER-associated degradation of glycoproteins. Hence, modifying or blocking these processes in vivo by inhibitors is of great interest from a therapeutic point of view. Azasugars are an important class of glycosidase inhibitors and are arousing great interest for instance as antidiabetics, antiobesity drugs, antivirals, and therapeutic agents for some genetic disorders. This review describes the recent studies on isolation, characterization, glycosidase inhibitory activity, and therapeutic application of azaglycomimetics.

  17. [The Biological Activity of the Sevanol and Its Analogues].

    PubMed

    Osmakov, D I; Koshelev, S G; Belozerova, O A; Kublitski, V S; Andreev, Ya A; Grishin, E V; Kozlov, S A

    2015-01-01

    Previously, from the plant Thymus armeniacus a new lignan sevanol was isolated, it's structure was elucidated and was shown that it effectively inhibits the acid-sensing channel ASIC3 and also exhibits a pronounced analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect. In this work biological activity of the sevanol analog obtained by chemical synthesis from simple precursors, the stereoisomer of sevanol and a precursor molecule represents a half of sevanol was measured in electrophysiological experiments on human ASIC3 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Measured inhibitory activity of a synthetic analogue coincided with the activity ofthe natural molecule. Stereoisomer showed inhibitory activity drop by about a third part, and the precursor molecule showed much less significant activity. In result the significance of functional groups and a spatial configuration of sevanol in order to biological activity was shown that is important to take into account for the optimal synthesis design as well as for new drugs development on its base. PMID:26762099

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of optically active Ki16425.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takanao; Sugimoto, Kenji; Inoue, Asuka; Okudaira, Shinichi; Aoki, Junken; Tokuyama, Hidetoshi

    2012-07-01

    An enantionselective synthesis of both enantiomers of Ki16425, which possesses selective LPA antagonistic activity, was achieved. The isoxazole core was constructed by a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile oxide with alkyne and condensation with the optically active α-phenethyl alcohol segment, which was prepared by an enantioselective reduction of arylmethylketone. Biological evaluation of both enantiomers of Ki16425 revealed that the (R)-isomer showed much higher antagonistic activity for LPA(1) and LPA(3) receptors. PMID:22658556

  19. Binuclear complexes of Ni(I) from 4-terphenyldithiophenol.

    PubMed

    Koch, Felix; Schubert, Hartmut; Sirsch, Peter; Berkefeld, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Binuclear complexes of Ni(i) have been prepared from a 4-terphenyldithiophenol ligand. Steric effects were found to determine the formation of coordination isomeric structures that differ in the nature of metal-to-ligand bonding. Coordination of spatially demanding phosphine ligands PR3, R = C6H6, C6H11, at nickel sites results in a butterfly shaped thiolate-bridged Ni2(μ-S)2 motif. For smaller PMe3, the central π-system of the 4-terphenyl backbone adopts a bis-allyl like μ-syn-η(3):η(3)-C6H4 structure due to significant d-π* Ni(i)-to-ligand charge transfer. Delocalisation indices δ(Ni-Ni) derived from DFT calculations provide a metric to assess the strength of electronic coupling of the Ni sites based on solid state structural data, and indicated less strong electronic coupling for the bis-allyl like structure with δ(Ni-Ni) = 0.225 as compared to 0.548 for the Ni2(μ-S)2 structural motif. A qualitative reactivity study toward CNCH3 as an auxiliary ligand has provided the first insight into the chemical properties of the bimetallic complexes presented. PMID:26130424

  20. Biological Activity of Aminophosphonic Acids and Their Short Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejczak, Barbara; Kafarski, Pawel

    The biological activity and natural occurrence of the aminophosphonic acids were described half a century ago. Since then the chemistry and biology of this class of compounds have developed into the separate field of phosphorus chemistry. Today it is well acknowledged that these compounds possess a wide variety of promising, and in some cases commercially useful, physiological activities. Thus, they have found applications ranging from agrochemical (with the herbicides glyphosate and bialaphos being the most prominent examples) to medicinal (with the potent antihypertensive fosinopril and antiosteoporetic bisphosphonates being examples).

  1. Teaching Systems Biology: An Active-learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    With genomics well established in modern molecular biology, recent studies have sought to further the discipline by integrating complementary methodologies into a holistic depiction of the molecular mechanisms underpinning cell function. This genomic subdiscipline, loosely termed “systems biology,” presents the biology educator with both opportunities and obstacles: The benefit of exposing students to this cutting-edge scientific methodology is manifest, yet how does one convey the breadth and advantage of systems biology while still engaging the student? Here, I describe an active-learning approach to the presentation of systems biology. In graduate classes at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, I divided students into small groups and asked each group to interpret a sample data set (e.g., microarray data, two-hybrid data, homology-search results) describing a hypothetical signaling pathway. Mimicking realistic experimental results, each data set revealed a portion of this pathway; however, students were only able to reconstruct the full pathway by integrating all data sets, thereby exemplifying the utility in a systems biology approach. Student response to this cooperative exercise was extremely positive. In total, this approach provides an effective introduction to systems biology appropriate for students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. PMID:16341259

  2. The biological activity of structurally defined inositol glycans

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Meenakshi; Azev, Viatcheslav N; d’Alarcao, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Background The inositol glycans (IGs) are glycolipid-derived carbohydrates produced by insulin-sensitive cells in response to insulin treatment. IGs exhibit an array of insulin-like activities including stimulation of lipogenesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis, suggesting that they may be involved in insulin signal transduction. However, because the natural IGs are structurally heterogeneous and difficult to purify to homogeneity, an understanding of the relationship between structure and biological activity has relied principally on synthetic IGs of defined structure. Discussion This article briefly describes what is known about the role of IGs in signal transduction and reviews the specific biological activities of the structurally defined IGs synthesized and tested to date. Conclusion A pharmacophore for IG activity begins to emerge from the reviewed data and the structural elements necessary for activity are summarized. PMID:20390053

  3. Reactivity of Binuclear Tantalum Clusters on Silica: Characterization by Transient Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nemana, Sailendra; Sun, Junming; Gates, Bruce C.

    2008-05-08

    Binuclear tantalum clusters were synthesized from Ta(CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 5} (Ph is phenyl) on the surface of nonporous SiO{sub 2} (Aerosil), and their reactions with H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and ethylene were characterized by time-resolved infrared (IR), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopies. The EXAFS data indicate the formation in H{sub 2} of clusters with a Ta-Ta coordination number of approximately 1 and a bonding distance of 2.74 {angstrom}. Reactions of the supported clusters with D{sub 2} and H{sub 2} facilitate the interconversion of O-H and O-D groups on the SiO{sub 2} surface. Reaction of these clusters with ethylene led to their rapid fragmentation to give mononuclear tantalum complexes, as the tantalum was oxidized and new ligands formed, suggested by IR spectra to be ethyl. The results demonstrate a rough analogy between the chemistry of tantalum clusters on the SiO{sub 2} surface and their chemistry in solution. Because alkenes are suggested intermediates in the catalytic disproportionation of alkanes on supported tantalum, our results indicate how these intermediates might influence the nature of the catalytically active species.

  4. Pyrolyzed binuclear-cobalt-phthalocyanine as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Baitao; Wang, Mian; Zhou, Xiuxiu; Wang, Xiujun; Liu, Bingchuan; Li, Baikun

    2015-10-01

    A novel platinum (Pt)-free cathodic materials binuclear-cobalt-phthalocyanine (Bi-CoPc) pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300-1000 °C) were examined as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts, and compared with unpyrolyzed Bi-CoPc/C and Pt cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs). The results showed that the pyrolysis process increased the nitrogen abundance on Bi-CoPc and changed the nitrogen types. The Bi-CoPc pyrolyzed at 800 °C contained a significant amount of pyrrolic-N, and exhibited a high electrochemical catalytic activity. The power density and current density increased with temperature: Bi-CoPc/C-800 > Bi-CoPc/C-1000 > Bi-CoPc/C-600 > Bi-CoPc/C-300 > Bi-CoPc/C. The SCMFC with Bi-CoPc/C-800 cathode had a maximum power density of 604 mW m(-2). The low cost Bi-CoPc compounds developed in this study showed a potential in air-breathing MFC systems, with the proper pyrolysis temperature being chosen. PMID:26142820

  5. Synthesis and biological activity of tetralone abscisic acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Nyangulu, James M; Nelson, Ken M; Rose, Patricia A; Gai, Yuanzhu; Loewen, Mary; Lougheed, Brenda; Quail, J Wilson; Cutler, Adrian J; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2006-04-01

    Bicyclic analogues of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) were designed to incorporate the structural elements and functional groups of the parent molecule that are required for biological activity. The resulting tetralone analogues were predicted to have enhanced biological activity in plants, in part because oxidized products would not cyclize to forms corresponding to the inactive catabolite phaseic acid. The tetralone analogues were synthesized in seven steps from 1-tetralone and a range of analogues were accessible through a second route starting with 2-methyl-1-naphthol. Tetralone ABA 8 was found to have greater activity than ABA in two bioassays. The absolute configuration of (+)-8 was established by X-ray crystallography of a RAMP hydrazone derivative. The hydroxymethyl compounds 10 and 11, analogues for studying the roles of 8- and 9-hydroxy ABA 3 and 6, were also synthesized and found to be active. PMID:16557330

  6. BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED OXYGEN TRANSFER IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS (JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically enhanced oxgyen transfer has been a hypothesis to explain observed oxygen transfer rates in activated sludge systems that were well above that predicted from aerator clean-water testing. The enhanced oxygen transfer rates were based on tests using BOD bottle oxygen ...

  7. Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

  8. On the biological activity of drug molecules: Busulfan and nabumetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2010-10-01

    The electronic structures of drug molecules busulfan (BSU) and nabumetone (NAB) have been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and virtual docking studies. Their biological activities are discussed in the framework of their electronic and molecular structures, reactivity and drug-enzyme binding.

  9. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    An instructional aid for teachers is presented that will allow biology students the opportunity to learn about renewable energy sources. Some of the school activities include using leaves as collectors of solar energy, solar energy stored in wood, and a fuel value test for green and dry woods. A study of organic wastes as a source of fuel is included. (BCS)

  10. BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY AND POTENTIAL REMEDIATION INVOLVING GEOTEXTILE LANDFILL LEACHATE FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results of a biological growth study in geotextile filters used in landfill leachate collection systems. fter reviewing the first year's activity, a completely new experimental approach has been taken. sing 100 mm diameter columns for the experimental incu...

  11. Students' Learning Activities While Studying Biological Process Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kragten, Marco; Admiraal, Wilfried; Rijlaarsdam, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Process diagrams describe how a system functions (e.g. photosynthesis) and are an important type of representation in Biology education. In the present study, we examined students' learning activities while studying process diagrams, related to their resulting comprehension of these diagrams. Each student completed three learning tasks. Verbal…

  12. Synthesis and biological activity of enantiomeric pairs of phosphosulfonate herbicides.

    PubMed

    Spangler, L A; Mikolajczyk, M; Burdge, E L; Kielbasiński, P; Smith, H C; Lyzwa, P; Fisher, J D; Omelańczuk, J

    1999-01-01

    The phosphosulfonates are a new class of soil-active herbicides which control a variety of annual grass and broadleaf weeds. Chirality at the phosphorus atom afforded the opportunity to explore stereospecific requirements for herbicidal activity. Chiral (hydroxymethyl)phosphinate intermediates were enzymatically resolved (Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase) from the racemic mixtures and then used to prepare two pairs of enantiomeric phosphosulfonates. Biological testing of the enantiomeric phosphosulfonate herbicides demonstrated that, in each case, the herbicidal activity was attributed to the (+) enantiomer and that the (+) enantiomer is more active than the racemate. PMID:10563892

  13. Chemical and structural features influencing the biological activity of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenolic natural product, exhibits therapeutic activity against a number of diseases, attributed mainly to its chemical structure and unique physical, chemical, and biological properties. It is a diferuloyl methane molecule [1,7-bis (4-hydroxy-3- methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione)] containing two ferulic acid residues joined by a methylene bridge. It has three important functionalities: an aromatic o-methoxy phenolic group, α, β-unsaturated β-diketo moiety and a seven carbon linker. Extensive research in the last two decades has provided evidence for the role of these different functional groups in its crucial biological activities. A few highlights of chemical structural features associated with the biological activity of curcumin are: The o-methoxyphenol group and methylenic hydrogen are responsible for the antioxidant activity of curcumin, and curcumin donates an electron/ hydrogen atom to reactive oxygen species. Curcumin interacts with a number of biomolecules through non-covalent and covalent binding. The hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity of curcumin, arising from the aromatic and tautomeric structures along with the flexibility of the linker group are responsible for the non-covalent interactions. The α, β-unsaturated β-diketone moiety covalently interacts with protein thiols, through Michael reaction. The β-diketo group forms chelates with transition metals, there by reducing the metal induced toxicity and some of the metal complexes exhibit improved antioxidant activity as enzyme mimics. New analogues with improved activity are being developed with modifications on specific functional groups of curcumin. The physico-chemical and structural features associated with some of the biological activities of curcumin and important analogues are summarized in this article. PMID:23116315

  14. Using ILP to Identify Pathway Activation Patterns in Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Neaves, Samuel R; Millard, Louise A C; Tsoka, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    We show a logical aggregation method that, combined with propositionalization methods, can construct novel structured biological features from gene expression data. We do this to gain understanding of pathway mechanisms, for instance, those associated with a particular disease. We illustrate this method on the task of distinguishing between two types of lung cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and Adenocarcinoma (AC). We identify pathway activation patterns in pathways previously implicated in the development of cancers. Our method identified a model with comparable predictive performance to the winning algorithm of a recent challenge, while providing biologically relevant explanations that may be useful to a biologist. PMID:27478883

  15. Stereochemical Assignment of Strigolactone Analogues Confirms Their Selective Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Artuso, Emma; Ghibaudi, Elena; Lace, Beatrice; Marabello, Domenica; Vinciguerra, Daniele; Lombardi, Chiara; Koltai, Hinanit; Kapulnik, Yoram; Novero, Mara; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Scarpi, Dina; Parisotto, Stefano; Deagostino, Annamaria; Venturello, Paolo; Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Bier, Ariel; Prandi, Cristina

    2015-11-25

    Strigolactones (SLs) are new plant hormones with various developmental functions. They are also soil signaling chemicals that are required for establishing beneficial mycorrhizal plant/fungus symbiosis. In addition, SLs play an essential role in inducing seed germination in root-parasitic weeds, which are one of the seven most serious biological threats to food security. There are around 20 natural SLs that are produced by plants in very low quantities. Therefore, most of the knowledge on SL signal transduction and associated molecular events is based on the application of synthetic analogues. Stereochemistry plays a crucial role in the structure-activity relationship of SLs, as compounds with an unnatural D-ring configuration may induce biological effects that are unrelated to SLs. We have synthesized a series of strigolactone analogues, whose absolute configuration has been elucidated and related with their biological activity, thus confirming the high specificity of the response. Analogues bearing the R-configured butenolide moiety showed enhanced biological activity, which highlights the importance of this stereochemical motif. PMID:26502774

  16. Similar Biological Activities of Two Isostructural Ruthenium and Osmium Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimoska,J.; Williams, D.; Atilla-Gokcumen, G.; Smalley, K.; Carroll, P.; Webster, R.; Filippakopoulos, P.; Knapp, S.; Herlyn, M.; Meggers, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we probe and verify the concept of designing unreactive bioactive metal complexes, in which the metal possesses a purely structural function, by investigating the consequences of replacing ruthenium in a bioactive half-sandwich kinase inhibitor scaffold by its heavier congener osmium. The two isostructural complexes are compared with respect to their anticancer properties in 1205?Lu melanoma cells, activation of the Wnt signaling pathway, IC50 values against the protein kinases GSK-3? and Pim-1, and binding modes to the protein kinase Pim-1 by protein crystallography. It was found that the two congeners display almost indistinguishable biological activities, which can be explained by their nearly identical three-dimensional structures and their identical mode of action as protein kinase inhibitors. This is a unique example in which the replacement of a metal in an anticancer scaffold by its heavier homologue does not alter its biological activity.

  17. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds Present in Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Cicerale, Sara; Lucas, Lisa; Keast, Russell

    2010-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially ascribed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Much research has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils to aid in explaining reduced mortality and morbidity experienced by people consuming a traditional Mediterranean diet. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro) have demonstrated that olive oil phenolic compounds have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, antimicrobial activity and bone health. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the bioavailability and biological activities of olive oil phenolic compounds. PMID:20386648

  18. Humic substances biological activity at the plant-soil interface

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Sara; Francioso, Ornella; Nardi, Serenella

    2010-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) represent the organic material mainly widespread in nature. HS have positive effects on plant physiology by improving soil structure and fertility and by influencing nutrient uptake and root architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these events are only partially known. HS have been shown to contain auxin and an “auxin-like” activity of humic substances has been proposed, but support to this hypothesis is fragmentary. In this review article, we are giving an overview of available data concerning molecular structures and biological activities of humic substances, with special emphasis on their hormone-like activities. PMID:20495384

  19. Synthesis and Biological Activities of Oxadiazole Derivatives: A Review.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Ankur; Jain, Shweta; Jain, Priyanka; Jain, Prachi; Tiwari, Nidhi; Jain, Roshni; Jain, Rashi; Jain, Abhishek K; Agrawal, Ram K

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been wide interest in compounds containing the oxadiazole scaffold because of their unique chemical structure and their broad spectrum of biological properties. This review provides readers with an overview of the main synthetic methodologies for oxadiazoles and of their broad spectrum of pharmacological activities such as, anti-microbial, anti-fungal activity, antiviral, anti-tubercular, anti-inflammatory, anti-convulsant, anti-angiogenic, anti-proliferative, analgesic, anti-oedema and in alzheimer activity, which were reported over the past years. PMID:26864552

  20. Biological Ice Nucleation Activity in Cloud Water (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delort, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ice nucleation active (INA) biological particles, in particular microorganisms, were studied in cloud water. Twelve cloud samples were collected over a period of 16 months from the puy de Dôme summit (1465 m, France) using sterile cloud droplet impactors. The samples were characterized through biological (cultures, cell counts) and physico-chemical measurements (pH, ion concentrations, carbon content...), and biological ice nuclei were investigated by droplet-freezing assays from -3°C to -13°C. The concentration of total INA particles within this temperature range typically varied from ~1 to ~100 per mL of cloud water; the concentrations of biological IN were several orders of magnitude higher than the values previously reported for precipitations. At -12°C, at least 76% of the IN were biological in origin, i.e. they were inactivated by heating at 95°C, and at temperatures above -8°C only biological material could induce ice. By culture, 44 Pseudomonas-like strains of bacteria were isolated from cloud water samples; 16% of them were found INA at the temperature of -8°C and they were identified as Pseudomonas syringae, Xanthomonas sp. and Pseudoxanthomonas sp.. Two strains induced freezing at as warm as -2°C, positioning them among the most active ice nucleators described so far. We estimated that, in average, 0.18% and more than 1%.of the bacterial cells present in clouds (~104 mL-1) are INA at the temperatures of -8°C and -12°C, respectively.

  1. Models to support active sensing of biological aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Chaudhry, Zahra; Boggs, Nathan T.; Brown, David M.; Thomas, Michael E.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic backscatter LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) is a promising approach for stand-off detection of biological aerosol clouds. Comprehensive models that explain the scattering behavior from the aerosol cloud are needed to understand and predict the scattering signatures of biological aerosols under varying atmospheric conditions and against different aerosol backgrounds. Elastic signatures are dependent on many parameters of the aerosol cloud, with two major components being the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosols. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has been in a unique position to measure the size distributions of released biological simulant clouds using a wide assortment of aerosol characterization systems that are available on the commercial market. In conjunction with the size distribution measurements, JHU/APL has also been making a dedicated effort to properly measure the refractive indices of the released materials using a thin-film absorption technique and laboratory characterization of the released materials. Intimate knowledge of the size distributions and refractive indices of the biological aerosols provides JHU/APL with powerful tools to build elastic scattering models, with the purpose of understanding, and ultimately, predicting the active signatures of biological clouds.

  2. Point-light biological motion perception activates human premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Saygin, Ayse Pinar; Wilson, Stephen M; Hagler, Donald J; Bates, Elizabeth; Sereno, Martin I

    2004-07-01

    Motion cues can be surprisingly powerful in defining objects and events. Specifically, a handful of point-lights attached to the joints of a human actor will evoke a vivid percept of action when the body is in motion. The perception of point-light biological motion activates posterior cortical areas of the brain. On the other hand, observation of others' actions is known to also evoke activity in motor and premotor areas in frontal cortex. In the present study, we investigated whether point-light biological motion animations would lead to activity in frontal cortex as well. We performed a human functional magnetic resonance imaging study on a high-field-strength magnet and used a number of methods to increase signal, as well as cortical surface-based analysis methods. Areas that responded selectively to point-light biological motion were found in lateral and inferior temporal cortex and in inferior frontal cortex. The robust responses we observed in frontal areas indicate that these stimuli can also recruit action observation networks, although they are very simplified and characterize actions by motion cues alone. The finding that even point-light animations evoke activity in frontal regions suggests that the motor system of the observer may be recruited to "fill in" these simplified displays. PMID:15240810

  3. Biological markers of macrophage activation: applications for fish phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Enane, N A; Frenkel, K; O'Connor, J M; Squibb, K S; Zelikoff, J T

    1993-01-01

    The immune defence mechanisms of fish seem to be related and similarly competent to those of mammals. Because of this, there is an increased interest in the immune responses of fish as models for higher vertebrates in immunological/immunotoxicological studies. Macrophages (M phi), phagocytic cells of the mammalian and teleost immune system which reside in tissues, represent a quiescent population of cells. However, upon stimulation, alterations in the physiology of these resident M phi occur which can be defined in terms of activation. This study was undertaken to determine whether biological markers used to assess mammalian M phi activation are applicable for use with fish M phi. Cells were recovered from the peritoneal cavity of non-injected and Aeromonas salmonicida-injected fish, and differences between resident and elicited M phi were evaluated with respect to protein content, phagocytic competence, enzyme activities and hydrogen peroxide production. Results demonstrate that biological markers used to assess mammalian M phi activation, with the exception of acid phosphatase activity, can be used to characterize the activation state of trout M phi, and that the activation process in both fish and mammals may occur by similar mechanism(s). PMID:8244466

  4. Biological activities of xanthatin from Xanthium strumarium leaves.

    PubMed

    Nibret, Endalkachew; Youns, Mahamoud; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Wink, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the biological activities of the major bioactive compound, xanthatin, and other compounds from Xanthium strumarium (Asteraceae) leaves. Inhibition of bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei brucei and leukaemia HL-60 cell proliferation was assessed using resazurin as a vital stain. Xanthatin was found to be the major and most active compound against T. b. brucei with an IC(50) value of 2.63 µg/mL and a selectivity index of 20. The possible mode of action of xanthatin was further evaluated. Xanthatin showed antiinflammatory activity by inhibiting both PGE(2) synthesis (24% inhibition) and 5-lipoxygenase activity (92% inhibition) at concentrations of 100 µg/mL and 97 µg/mL, respectively. Xanthatin exhibited weak irreversible inhibition of parasite specific trypanothione reductase. Unlike xanthatin, diminazene aceturate and ethidium bromide showed strong DNA intercalation with IC(50) values of 26.04 µg/mL and 44.70 µg/mL, respectively. Substantial induction of caspase 3/7 activity in MIA PaCa-2 cells was observed after 6 h of treatment with 100 µg/mL of xanthatin. All these data taken together suggest that xanthatin exerts its biological activity by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting both PGE(2) synthesis and 5-lipoxygenase activity thereby avoiding unwanted inflammation commonly observed in diseases such as trypanosomiasis. PMID:21953905

  5. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp.

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Mishra, Pragya; Sachan, Neetu; Ghosh, Ashoke K.

    2011-01-01

    Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp. (Sanskrit: Adhaki, Hindi: Arhar, English: Pigeon pea, Bengali: Tur) (family: Fabaceae) is the most important grain legume crop of rain-fed agriculture in semi-arid tropics. It is both a food crop and a cover/forage crop with high levels of proteins and important amino acids like methionine, lysine and tryptophan. During the last few decades extensive studies have been carried out regarding the chemistry of C. cajan and considerable progress has been achieved regarding its biological activities and medicinal applications. This review article gives an overview on the biological activities of the compounds isolated, pharmacological actions and clinical studies of C. cajan extracts apart from its general details. PMID:22247887

  6. Marine Omega-3 Phospholipids: Metabolism and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Lena; Hoem, Nils; Banni, Sebastiano; Berge, Kjetil

    2012-01-01

    The biological activities of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) have been under extensive study for several decades. However, not much attention has been paid to differences of dietary forms, such as triglycerides (TGs) versus ethyl esters or phospholipids (PLs). New innovative marine raw materials, like krill and fish by-products, present n-3 FAs mainly in the PL form. With their increasing availability, new evidence has emerged on n-3 PL biological activities and differences to n-3 TGs. In this review, we describe the recently discovered nutritional properties of n-3 PLs on different parameters of metabolic syndrome and highlight their different metabolic bioavailability in comparison to other dietary forms of n-3 FAs. PMID:23203133

  7. Recent insight into the biological activities of synthetic xanthone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shagufta; Ahmad, Irshad

    2016-06-30

    Xanthones are a class of oxygen containing heterocyclic compounds with a broad range of biological activities, and they have prominent significance in the field of medicinal chemistry. Xanthone is an attractive scaffold for the design and development of new drugs due to its promising biological activities, primarily as anticancer, antimalarial, antimicrobial, anti-HIV, anticonvulsant, anticholinesterase, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and as inhibitors of several enzymes like α-glycosidase, topoisomerase, protein kinase, aromatase, etc. In this review, we have compiled and discussed recent developments on the pharmacological profile of synthetic xanthone derivatives for different therapeutic targets. The review highlights the therapeutic significance of xanthones and offers support in the development of new xanthone derivatives as therapeutic agents. PMID:27111599

  8. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, V; Rao, E Upender; P, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Bada Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.) is perhaps the most useful traditional medicinal plant in India. Each part of the neem tree has some medicinal property and is thus commercially exploitable. During the last five decades, apart from the chemistry of the Pedalium murex compounds, considerable progress has been achieved regarding the biological activity and medicinal applications of this plant. It is now considered as a valuable source of unique natural products for development of medicines against various diseases and also for the development of industrial products. This review gives a bird's eye view mainly on the biological activities of some of this compounds isolated, pharmacological actions of the extracts, clinical studies and plausible medicinal applications of gokharu along with their safety evaluation. PMID:23569975

  9. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Maria R.; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P. S.; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R.; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance. PMID:26579086

  10. Removal of Biologically Active Organic Contaminants using Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Banks, Michael A. (Inventor); Banks, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical devices that are to come into contact with living tissue, such as prosthetic and other implants for the human body and the containers used to store and transport them, are together cleaned of non-living, but biologically active organic materials, including endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides, and assembled into a hermetically sealed package without recontamination. This is achieved by cleaning both the device and package components together in an apparatus, which includes a hermetically sealed chamber, in which they are contacted with atomic oxygen which biocleans them, by oxidizing the biologically active organic materials. The apparatus also includes means for manipulating the device and container and hermetically sealing the cleaned device into the cleaned container to form the package. A calibrated witness coupon visually indicates whether or not the device and container have received enough exposure to the atomic oxygen to have removed the organic materials from their surfaces. Gamma radiation is then used to sterilize the device in the sealed container.

  11. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Mishra, Pragya; Sachan, Neetu; Ghosh, Ashoke K

    2011-10-01

    Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp. (Sanskrit: Adhaki, Hindi: Arhar, English: Pigeon pea, Bengali: Tur) (family: Fabaceae) is the most important grain legume crop of rain-fed agriculture in semi-arid tropics. It is both a food crop and a cover/forage crop with high levels of proteins and important amino acids like methionine, lysine and tryptophan. During the last few decades extensive studies have been carried out regarding the chemistry of C. cajan and considerable progress has been achieved regarding its biological activities and medicinal applications. This review article gives an overview on the biological activities of the compounds isolated, pharmacological actions and clinical studies of C. cajan extracts apart from its general details. PMID:22247887

  12. Current status of pyrazole and its biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Naim, Mohd Javed; Alam, Ozair; Nawaz, Farah; Alam, Md. Jahangir; Alam, Perwaiz

    2016-01-01

    Pyrazole are potent medicinal scaffolds and exhibit a full spectrum of biological activities. This review throws light on the detailed synthetic approaches which have been applied for the synthesis of pyrazole. This has been followed by an in depth analysis of the pyrazole with respect to their medical significance. This follow-up may help the medicinal chemists to generate new leads possessing pyrazole nucleus with high efficacy. PMID:26957862

  13. Oxyresveratrol: Structural Modification and Evaluation of Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Chatsumpun, Nutputsorn; Chuanasa, Taksina; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Lipipun, Vimolmas; Jongbunprasert, Vichien; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Ploypradith, Poonsakdi; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Oxyresveratrol (2,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxystilbene, 1), a phytoalexin present in large amounts in the heartwood of Artocarpus lacucha Buch.-Ham., has been reported to possess a wide variety of biological activities. As part of our continuing studies on the structural modification of oxyresveratrol, a library of twenty-six compounds was prepared via O-alkylation, aromatic halogenation, and electrophilic aromatic substitution. The two aromatic rings of the stilbene system of 1 can be chemically modulated by exploiting different protecting groups. Such a strategy allows for selective and exclusive modifications on either ring A or ring B. All compounds were evaluated in vitro for a panel of biological activities, including free radical scavenging activity, DNA protective properties, antiherpetic activity, inhibition of α-glucosidase and neuraminidase, and cytotoxicity against some cancer cell lines. Several derivatives were comparably active or even more potent than the parent oxyresveratrol and/or the appropriate positive controls. The partially etherified analogs 5'-hydroxy-2,3',4-trimethoxystilbene and 3',5'-dihydroxy-2,4-dimethoxystilbene demonstrated promising anti-herpetic and DNA protective activities, offering new leads for neuropreventive agent research, whereas 5'-hydroxy-2,3',4,-triisopropoxystilbene displayed anti-α-glucosidase effects, providing a new lead molecule for anti-diabetic drug development. 3',5'-Diacetoxy-2,4-diisopropoxystilbene showed potent and selective cytotoxicity against HeLa cancer cells, but the compound still needs further in vivo investigation to verify its anticancer potential. PMID:27104505

  14. Biological activities and phytochemicals of Swietenia macrophylla King.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Goh, Bey Hing; Chan, Chim Kei; Shabab, Tara; Kadir, Habsah Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Swietenia macrophylla King (Meliaceae) is an endangered and medicinally important plant indigenous to tropical and subtropical regions of the World. S. macrophylla has been widely used in folk medicine to treat various diseases. The review reveals that limonoids and its derivatives are the major constituents of S. macrophylla. There are several data in the literature indicating a great variety of pharmacological activities of S. macrophylla, which exhibits antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant effects, antimutagenic, anticancer, antitumor and antidiabetic activities. Various other activities like anti-nociceptive, hypolipidemic, antidiarrhoeal, anti-infective, antiviral, antimalarial, acaricidal, antifeedant and heavy metal phytoremediation activity have also been reported. In view of the immense medicinal importance of S. macrophylla, this review aimed at compiling all currently available information on its ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry and biological activities of S. macrophylla, showing its importance. PMID:23999722

  15. Myricetin: A Dietary Molecule with Diverse Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni; Combrinck, Sandra; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2016-02-01

    Myricetin is a common plant-derived flavonoid and is well recognised for its nutraceuticals value. It is one of the key ingredients of various foods and beverages. The compound exhibits a wide range of activities that include strong anti-oxidant, anticancer, antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities. It displays several activities that are related to the central nervous system and numerous studies have suggested that the compound may be beneficial to protect against diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. The use of myricetin as a preserving agent to extend the shelf life of foods containing oils and fats is attributed to the compound's ability to protect lipids against oxidation. A detailed search of existing literature revealed that there is currently no comprehensive review available on this important molecule. Hence, the present work includes the history, synthesis, pharmaceutical applications and toxicity studies of myricetin. This report also highlights structure-activity relationships and mechanisms of action for various biological activities. PMID:26891321

  16. Integrity and Biological Activity of DNA after UV Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Delina Y.; Monier, Jean-Michel; Dupraz, Sébastien; Freissinet, Caroline; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2010-04-01

    The field of astrobiology lacks a universal marker with which to indicate the presence of life. This study supports the proposal to use nucleic acids, specifically DNA, as a signature of life (biosignature). In addition to its specificity to living organisms, DNA is a functional molecule that can confer new activities and characteristics to other organisms, following the molecular biology dogma, that is, DNA is transcribed to RNA, which is translated into proteins. Previous criticisms of the use of DNA as a biosignature have asserted that DNA molecules would be destroyed by UV radiation in space. To address this concern, DNA in plasmid form was deposited onto different surfaces and exposed to UVC radiation. The surviving DNA was quantified via the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results demonstrate increased survivability of DNA attached to surfaces versus non-adsorbed DNA. The DNA was also tested for biological activity via transformation into the bacterium Acinetobacter sp. and assaying for antibiotic resistance conferred by genes encoded by the plasmid. The success of these methods to detect DNA and its gene products after UV exposure (254 nm, 3.5 J/m2s) not only supports the use of the DNA molecule as a biosignature on mineral surfaces but also demonstrates that the DNA retained biological activity.

  17. Integrity and biological activity of DNA after UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Delina Y; Monier, Jean-Michel; Dupraz, Sébastien; Freissinet, Caroline; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M

    2010-04-01

    The field of astrobiology lacks a universal marker with which to indicate the presence of life. This study supports the proposal to use nucleic acids, specifically DNA, as a signature of life (biosignature). In addition to its specificity to living organisms, DNA is a functional molecule that can confer new activities and characteristics to other organisms, following the molecular biology dogma, that is, DNA is transcribed to RNA, which is translated into proteins. Previous criticisms of the use of DNA as a biosignature have asserted that DNA molecules would be destroyed by UV radiation in space. To address this concern, DNA in plasmid form was deposited onto different surfaces and exposed to UVC radiation. The surviving DNA was quantified via the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results demonstrate increased survivability of DNA attached to surfaces versus non-adsorbed DNA. The DNA was also tested for biological activity via transformation into the bacterium Acinetobacter sp. and assaying for antibiotic resistance conferred by genes encoded by the plasmid. The success of these methods to detect DNA and its gene products after UV exposure (254 nm, 3.5 J/m(2)s) not only supports the use of the DNA molecule as a biosignature on mineral surfaces but also demonstrates that the DNA retained biological activity. PMID:20446869

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Arginase l Complexed with Thiosemicarbazide Reveals an Unusual Thiocarbonly u-Sulfide Ligand in the Binuclear Manganese Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Di Costanzo,L.; Pique, M.; Christianson, D.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human arginase I-thiosemicarbazide complex reveals an unusual thiocarbonyl {mu}-sulfide ligand in the binuclear manganese cluster. The CS moiety of thiosemicarbazide bridges Mn2+A and Mn2+B with coordination distances of 2.6 and 2.4 Angstroms, respectively. Otherwise, the binding of thiosemicarbazide to human arginase I does not cause any significant structural changes in the active site. The crystal structure of the unliganded enzyme reveals a hydrogen-bonded water molecule that could support proton transfer between a {mu}-water molecule and H141 to regenerate the nucleophilic {mu}-hydroxide ion in the final step of catalysis.

  19. Isolation of biologically active nanomaterial (inclusion bodies) from bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) were recognised as highly pure deposits of active proteins inside bacterial cells. Such active nanoparticles are very interesting for further downstream protein isolation, as well as for many other applications in nanomedicine, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry. To prepare large quantities of a high quality product, the whole bioprocess has to be optimised. This includes not only the cultivation of the bacterial culture, but also the isolation step itself, which can be of critical importance for the production process. To determine the most appropriate method for the isolation of biologically active nanoparticles, three methods for bacterial cell disruption were analyzed. Results In this study, enzymatic lysis and two mechanical methods, high-pressure homogenization and sonication, were compared. During enzymatic lysis the enzyme lysozyme was found to attach to the surface of IBs, and it could not be removed by simple washing. As this represents an additional impurity in the engineered nanoparticles, we concluded that enzymatic lysis is not the most suitable method for IBs isolation. During sonication proteins are released (lost) from the surface of IBs and thus the surface of IBs appears more porous when compared to the other two methods. We also found that the acoustic output power needed to isolate the IBs from bacterial cells actually damages proteins structures, thereby causing a reduction in biological activity. High-pressure homogenization also caused some damage to IBs, however the protein loss from the IBs was negligible. Furthermore, homogenization had no side-effects on protein biological activity. Conclusions The study shows that among the three methods tested, homogenization is the most appropriate method for the isolation of active nanoparticles from bacterial cells. PMID:20831775

  20. Isothiocyanate synthetic analogs: biological activities, structure-activity relationships and synthetic strategies.

    PubMed

    Milelli, Andrea; Fimognari, Carmela; Ticchi, Nicole; Neviani, Paolo; Minarini, Anna; Tumiatti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane is a natural product that is constantly under biological investigation for its unique biological properties. This naturally occurring isothiocyanate (ITC) and its analogs are the main components of cruciferous vegetables, such as cauliflower, watercress, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, widely used as chemopreventive agents. Due to their interesting biological profiles, natural ITCs have been exploited as starting point to develop new synthetic analogs. The present mini-review briefly highlights the most important biological actions of selected new synthetic ITCs focusing on their structure-activity relationships and related synthetic strategies. PMID:25373847

  1. Binuclear bromide complex of Bi(III): Thermally induced changes in optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adonin, Sergey A.; Sokolov, Maxim N.; Rakhmanova, Marianna E.; Smolentsev, Anton I.; Pishchur, Denis P.; Korolkov, Ilya V.; Kozlova, Svetlana G.; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2016-05-01

    Binuclear bromobismuthate complex (H2bipy)2[Bi2Br10] (1) displays the optical properties: 1) thermochromism, 2) disappearance/appearance of luminescence at 298/77 K. To investigate this feature, a combination of X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and quantum chemical calculations has been used.

  2. Distribution and biological activities of the flavonoid luteolin.

    PubMed

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that flavonoids may play an important role in the decreased risk of chronic diseases associated with a diet rich in plant-derived foods. Flavonoids are also common constituents of plants used in traditional medicine to treat a wide range of diseases. The purpose of this article is to summarize the distribution and biological activities of one of the most common flavonoids: luteolin. This flavonoid and its glycosides are widely distributed in the plant kingdom; they are present in many plant families and have been identified in Bryophyta, Pteridophyta, Pinophyta and Magnoliophyta. Dietary sources of luteolin include, for instance, carrots, peppers, celery, olive oil, peppermint, thyme, rosemary and oregano. Preclinical studies have shown that this flavone possesses a variety of pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The ability of luteolin to inhibit angiogenesis, to induce apoptosis, to prevent carcinogenesis in animal models, to reduce tumor growth in vivo and to sensitize tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of some anticancer drugs suggests that this flavonoid has cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Modulation of ROS levels, inhibition of topoisomerases I and II, reduction of NF-kappaB and AP-1 activity, stabilization of p53, and inhibition of PI3K, STAT3, IGF1R and HER2 are possible mechanisms involved in the biological activities of luteolin. PMID:19149659

  3. Chemistry, biological activity, and uses of formamidine pesticides.

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, R M

    1976-01-01

    The formamidines, a relatively new group of acaricide-insecticides, are novel both in their range of biological activities and in their mode of action, which is presently unknown. This paper is a review of the historical development, properties, structures, uses, and chemistry of this group of pesticides, with particular emphasis on chlordimeform (Galecron or Fundal), N'-4-chloro-o-tolyl-N,N-dimethylformamidine, and amitraz, 1,3=di-(2,4-dimethylphenylimino)-2-methyl-2-azapropane. Their biological activity and uses are defined by their toxicity to spider mites, ticks, and certain insects, and they are particularly effective against juvenile and resistant forms of these organisms. A significant, but poorly understood feature of their field effectiveness is their breadth of toxic action which includes direct lethality, excitant-repellant behavioral effects, and chemosterilization. They are generally of low hazard for nontarget species with the significant exception of predaceous mites. Several aspects of the chemistry of these compounds are considered, including structure--activity relations, synthetic pathways, isomerism and configuration, and their chemical and environmental stability. A significant feature of the metabolism and toxicity of these agents is the possible activation of chlordimeform by N-demethylation in vivo. Strong evidence for this has been presented with the cattle tick, but recent results discussed here suggest that in other species, i.e., mice, German cockroaches or black cutworm eggs, N-demethylation is neither a strong activation nor a detoxication reaction. PMID:789070

  4. On the mechanism of biological activation by tritium.

    PubMed

    Rozhko, T V; Badun, G A; Razzhivina, I A; Guseynov, O A; Guseynova, V E; Kudryasheva, N S

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism of biological activation by beta-emitting radionuclide tritium was studied. Luminous marine bacteria were used as a bioassay to monitor the biological effect of tritium with luminescence intensity as the physiological parameter tested. Two different types of tritium sources were used: HTO molecules distributed regularly in the surrounding aqueous medium, and a solid source with tritium atoms fixed on its surface (tritium-labeled films, 0.11, 0.28, 0.91, and 2.36 MBq/cm(2)). When using the tritium-labeled films, tritium penetration into the cells was prevented. The both types of tritium sources revealed similar changes in the bacterial luminescence kinetics: a delay period followed by bioluminescence activation. No monotonic dependences of bioluminescence activation efficiency on specific radioactivities of the films were found. A 15-day exposure to tritiated water (100 MBq/L) did not reveal mutations in bacterial DNA. The results obtained give preference to a "non-genomic" mechanism of bioluminescence activation by tritium. An activation of the intracellular bioluminescence process develops without penetration of tritium atoms into the cells and can be caused by intensification of trans-membrane cellular processes stimulated by ionization and radiolysis of aqueous media. PMID:27035890

  5. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

    PubMed

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Di Maio, Ilona; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life. PMID:26784660

  6. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Maio, Ilona Di; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life. PMID:26784660

  7. Controlled Release of Biologically Active Silver from Nanosilver Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Sonshine, David A.; Shervani, Saira; Hurt, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Major pathways in the antibacterial activity and eukaryotic toxicity of nano-silver involve the silver cation and its soluble complexes, which are well established thiol toxicants. Through these pathways, nano-silver behaves in analogy to a drug delivery system, in which the particle contains a concentrated inventory of an active species, the ion, which is transported to and released near biological target sites. Although the importance of silver ion in the biological response to nano-silver is widely recognized, the drug delivery paradigm has not been well developed for this system, and there is significant potential to improve nano-silver technologies through controlled release formulations. This article applies elements of the drug delivery paradigm to nano-silver dissolution and presents a systematic study of chemical concepts for controlled release. After presenting thermodynamic calculations of silver species partitioning in biological media, the rates of oxidative silver dissolution are measured for nanoparticles and macroscopic foils and used to derive unified area-based release kinetics. A variety of competing chemical approaches are demonstrated for controlling the ion release rate over four orders of magnitude. Release can be systematically slowed by thiol and citrate ligand binding, formation of sulfidic coatings, or the scavenging of peroxy-intermediates. Release can be accelerated by pre-oxidation or particle size reduction, while polymer coatings with complexation sites alter the release profile by storing and release inventories of surface-bound silver. Finally, the ability to tune biological activity is demonstrated through bacterial inhibition zone assay carried out on selected formulations of controlled release nano-silver. PMID:20968290

  8. Biological activities of water-soluble fullerene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, S.; Mashino, T.

    2009-04-01

    Three types of water-soluble fullerene derivatives were synthesized and their biological activities were investigated. C60-dimalonic acid, an anionic fullerene derivative, showed antioxidant activity such as quenching of superoxide and relief from growth inhibition of E. coli by paraquat. C60-bis(7V,7V-dimethylpyrrolidinium iodide), a cationic fullerene derivative, has antibacterial activity and antiproliferative effect on cancer cell lines. The mechanism is suggested to be respiratory chain inhibition by reactive oxygen species produced by the cationic fullerene derivative. Proline-type fullerene derivatives showed strong inhibition activities on HIV-reverse transcriptase. The IC50 values were remarkably lower than nevirapine, a clinically used anti-HIV drug. Fullerene derivatives have a big potential for a new type of lead compound to be used as medicine.

  9. Synthesis, properties and thermal studies of oxorhenium(V) complexes with 3-hydrazino-5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine, benzimidazolethione and 2-hydrazinobenzimidazole. Mixed ligand complexes, pyrolytical products and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashaly, M. M.; El-Shafiy, H. F.; El-Maraghy, S. B.; Habib, H. A.

    2005-06-01

    A series of biologically active complexes of oxorhenium(V), were prepared by using the organic ligands 3-hydrazino-5,6-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazine (HL 1), benzimidazolethione (H 2L 2) and 2-hydrazinobenzimidazole (H 2L 3). The mixed ligand complexes of oxorhenium(V) with the previous ligands and one of the following ligands: NH 4SCN, 1,10-phenanthroline (1,10-phen), 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-OHquin) or glycine (Gly), were isolated. All the binary and mixed ligand complexes have monomeric structures and exist in the octahedral configuration. Thermal studies on these complexes showed the possibility of structural transformation from mononuclear into binuclear ones. The structures of all complexes and the corresponding thermal products were elucidated by elemental analyses, IR, electronic absorption and 1H NMR spectra, magnetic moments, conductance and TG-DSC measurements. The antifungal activities of the metal complexes towards Alternaria alternata and Aspergilus niger were tested and showed comparable behaviour with some well known antibiotics.

  10. Natural products as a resource for biologically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate various sources of biologically active natural products in an effort to identify the active pesticidal compounds involved. The study is divided into several parts. Chapter 1 contains a discussion of several new compounds from plant and animal sources. Chapter 2 introduces a new NMR technique. In section 2.1 a new technique for better utilizing the lanthanide relaxation agent Gd(fod)/sub 3/ is presented which allows the predictable removal of resonances without line broadening. Section 2.2 discusses a variation of this technique for use in an aqueous solvent by applying this technique towards identifying the binding sites of metals of biological interest. Section 2.3 presents an unambiguous /sup 13/C NMR assignment of melibiose. Chapter 3 deals with work relating to the molting hormone of most arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. Section 3.1 discusses the use of two-dimensional NMR (2D NMR) to assign the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of this biologically important compound. Section 3.2 presents a new application for Droplet countercurrent chromatography (DCCC). Chapter 4 presents a basic improvement to the commercial DCCC instrument that is currently being applied to future commercial instruments. Chapter 5 discusses a curious observation of the effects that two previously known compounds, nagilactone C and (-)-epicatechin, have on lettuce and rice and suggest a possible new role for the ubiquitous flavanol (-)-epicatechin in plants.

  11. Biologically Active Metabolites Produced by the Basidiomycete Quambalaria cyanescens

    PubMed Central

    Stodůlková, Eva; Císařová, Ivana; Kolařík, Miroslav; Chudíčková, Milada; Novák, Petr; Man, Petr; Kuzma, Marek; Pavlů, Barbora; Černý, Jan; Flieger, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Four strains of the fungus Quambalaria cyanescens (Basidiomycota: Microstromatales), were used for the determination of secondary metabolites production and their antimicrobial and biological activities. A new naphthoquinone named quambalarine A, (S)-(+)-3-(5-ethyl-tetrahydrofuran-2-yliden)-5,7,8-trihydroxy-2-oxo-1,4-naphthoquinone (1), together with two known naphthoquinones, 3-hexanoyl-2,5,7,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (named here as quambalarine B, 2) and mompain, 2,5,7,8-tetrahydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (3) were isolated. Their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction crystallography, NMR and MS spectrometry. Quambalarine A (1) had a broad antifungal and antibacterial activity and is able inhibit growth of human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and fungi co-occurring with Q. cyanescens in bark beetle galleries including insect pathogenic species Beauveria bassiana. Quambalarine B (2) was active against several fungi and mompain mainly against bacteria. The biological activity against human-derived cell lines was selective towards mitochondria (2 and 3); after long-term incubation with 2, mitochondria were undetectable using a mitochondrial probe. A similar effect on mitochondria was observed also for environmental competitors of Q. cyanescens from the genus Geosmithia. PMID:25723150

  12. Application of activation techniques to biological analysis. [813 references

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, H.J.M.

    1981-12-01

    Applications of activation analysis in the biological sciences are reviewed for the period of 1970 to 1979. The stages and characteristics of activation analysis are described, and its advantages and disadvantages enumerated. Most applications involve activation by thermal neutrons followed by either radiochemical or instrumental determination. Relatively little use has been made of activation by fast neutrons, photons, or charged particles. In vivo analyses are included, but those based on prompt gamma or x-ray emission are not. Major applications include studies of reference materials, and the elemental analysis of plants, marine biota, animal and human tissues, diets, and excreta. Relatively little use of it has been made in biochemistry, microbiology, and entomology, but it has become important in toxicology and environmental science. The elements most often determined are Ag, As, Au, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, K, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, and Zn, while few or no determinations of B, Be, Bi, Ga, Gd, Ge, H, In, Ir, Li, Nd, Os, Pd, Pr, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Te, Tl, or Y have been made in biological materials.

  13. Perceived causality influences brain activity evoked by biological motion.

    PubMed

    Morris, James P; Pelphrey, Kevin A; McCarthy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated brain activity in an observer who watched the hand and arm motions of an individual when that individual was, or was not, the cause of the motion. Subjects viewed a realistic animated 3D character who sat at a table containing four pistons. On Intended Motion trials, the character raised his hand and arm upwards. On Unintended Motion trials, the piston under one of the character's hands pushed the hand and arm upward with the same motion. Finally, during Non-Biological Motion control trials, a piston pushed a coffee mug upward in the same smooth motion. Hand and arm motions, regardless of intention, evoked significantly more activity than control trials in a bilateral region that extended ventrally from the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) region and which was more spatially extensive in the right hemisphere. The left pSTS near the temporal-parietal junction, robustly differentiated between the Intended Motion and Unintended Motion conditions. Here, strong activity was observed for Intended Motion trials, while Unintended Motion trials evoked similar activity as the coffee mug trials. Our results demonstrate a strong hemispheric bias in the role of the pSTS in the perception of causality of biological motion. PMID:18633843

  14. Structure dependence of biological activities for primate cathelicidins.

    PubMed

    Tomasinsig, Linda; Morgera, Francesca; Antcheva, Nikolinka; Pacor, Sabrina; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Zanetti, Margherita; Tossi, Alessandro

    2009-09-01

    We have analysed the effects of variations in orang-utan (ppy), rhesus macaque (mmu) and leaf eater (pob) monkey orthologues of the human cathelicidin LL-37, on a range of relevant biological activities. These host defence peptides range in cationicity from +4 to +10, and while the more cationic pob and mmuRL-37 are in a monomeric and unstructured form in bulk solution (F-form), the human and ppyLL-37 are in an aggregated/helical form (A-form). The in vitro antibacterial activity depended strongly on both the structural form and the charge. F-form peptides were more potent against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and less salt, medium or serum sensitive than A-form ones. CD studies suggested that A- and F-form peptides interact with LPS in different manners, but the ability to detoxify it did not correlate directly with either the charge or structure. Toxicity towards eukaryotic cells also showed a varied dependence on the peptides' physical characteristics. Haemolytic activity was similar for all the tested peptides while other cytotoxicity assays revealed the highly cationic, F-form pobRL-37 as the most toxic, followed by the A-form human LL-37. As shown with the human peptide, toxicity depended markedly on the nature and metabolic state of the target cell. Our results suggest that different evolutionary trajectories for each orthologue lead to distinct sets of physical characteristics, which significantly differentiates their biological activities. PMID:19472166

  15. Ion exchange defines the biological activity of titanate nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rónavári, Andrea; Kovács, Dávid; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Mónika; Pfeiffer, Ilona

    2016-05-01

    One-dimensional titanate nanotubes (TiONTs) were subjected to systematic ion exchange to determine the impact of these modifications on biological activities. Ion exchanged TiONTs (with Ag, Mg, Bi, Sb, Ca, K, Sr, Fe, and Cu ions) were successfully synthesized and the presence of the substituted ions was verified by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A complex screening was carried out to reveal differences in toxicity to human cells, as well as in antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities between the various modified nanotubes. Our results demonstrated that Ag ion exchanged TiONTs exerted potent antibacterial and antifungal effects against all examined microbial species but were ineffective on viruses. Surprisingly, the antibacterial activity of Cu/TiONTs was restricted to Micrococcus luteus. Most ion exchanged TiONTs did not show antimicrobial activity against the tested bacterial and fungal species. Incorporation of various ions into nanotube architectures lead to mild, moderate, or even to a massive loss of human cell viability; therefore, this type of biological effect exerted by TiONTs can be greatly modulated by ion exchange. These findings further emphasize the contribution of ion exchange in determining not only the physical and chemical characteristics but also the bioactivity of TiONT against different types of living cells. PMID:26972521

  16. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed. PMID:26618142

  17. Preparation and characterization of new biologically active polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Yuri; Veselov, Vitali; Markovskaya, Ludmila; Savelyeva, Olga; Akhranovich, Elena; Galatenko, Natalya; Robota, Ludmila; Travinskaya, Tamara

    2014-12-01

    Biologically active polyurethane foams are the fast-developed alternative to many applications of biomedical materials. Due to the polyurethane structure features and foam technology it is possible to incorporate into their structure the biologically active compounds of target purpose via structural-chemical modification of macromolecule. A series of new biologically active polyurethane foams (PUFs) was synthesized with polyethers (MM 2500-5000), polyesters MM (500-2200), 2,4(2,6) toluene diisocyanate, water as a foaming agent, catalysts, foam stabilizers and functional compounds. Different functional compounds: 1,4-di-N-oxy-2,3-bis-(oxymethyl)-quinoxaline (DOMQ), partial sodium salt of poly(acrylic acid) and 2,6-dimethyl-N,N-diethyl aminoacetatanilide hydrochloride were incorporated into the polymer structure/composition due to the chemical and/or physical bonding. Structural peculiarities of PUFs were studied by FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Self-adhesion properties of PUFs were estimated by measuring of tensile strength at break of adhesive junction. The optical microscopy method was performed for the PUF morphology studies. Toxicological estimation of the PUFs was carried out in vitro and in vivo. The antibacterial action towards the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATC 25922, E. coli ATC 2150, Klebsiella pneumoniae 6447, Staphylococcus aureus 180, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 8180, Proteus mirabilis F 403, P. mirabilis 6054, and Proteus vulgaris 8718) was studied by the disc method on the solid nutrient. Physic-chemical properties of the PUFs (density, tensile strength and elongation at break, water absorption and vapor permeability) showed that all studied PUFs are within the operational requirements for such materials and represent fine-cellular foams. Spectral studies confirmed the incorporation of DOMQ into the PUF's macrochain. PUFs are characterized by microheterogeneous structure. They are antibacterially active, non

  18. Soil biological activity at European scale - two calculation concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Janine; Rühlmann, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    The CATCH-C project aims to identify and improve the farm-compatibility of Soil Management Practices including to promote productivity, climate change mitigation and soil quality. The focus of this work concentrates on turnover conditions for soil organic matter (SOM). SOM is fundamental for the maintenance of quality and functions of soils while SOM storage is attributed a great importance in terms of climate change mitigation. The turnover conditions depend on soil biological activity characterized by climate and soil properties. To assess the turnover conditions two model concepts are applied: (I) Biological active time (BAT) regression approach derived from CANDY model (Franko & Oelschlägel 1995) expresses the variation of air temperature, precipitation and soil texture as a timescale and an indicator of biological activity for soil organic matter (SOM) turnover. (II) Re_clim parameter within the Introductory Carbon Balance Model (Andrén & Kätterer 1997) states the soil temperature and soil water to estimate soil biological activity. The modelling includes two strategies to cover the European scale and conditions. BAT was calculated on a 20x20 km grid basis. The European data sets of precipitation and air temperature (time period 1901-2000, monthly resolution), (Mitchell et al. 2004) were used to derive long-term averages. As we focus on agricultural areas we included CORINE data (2006) to extract arable land. The resulting BATs under co-consideration of the main soil textures (clay, silt, sand and loam) were investigated per environmental zone (ENZs, Metzger et al. 2005) that represents similar conditions for precipitation, temperature and relief to identify BAT ranges and hence turnover conditions for each ENZ. Re_clim was quantified by climatic time series of more than 250 weather stations across Europe presented by Klein Tank et al. (2002). Daily temperature, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (maximal thermal extent) were used to calculate

  19. Biological activities of aqueous extract from Cinnamomum porrectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, H. Siti; Nazlina, I.; Yaacob, W. A.

    2013-11-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate biological activities of an extract obtained from Cinnamomum porrectum under reflux using water. Aqueous extract of Cinnamomum porrectum was tested for antibacterial activity against six Gram-positive and eight Gram-negative bacteria as well as MRSA. The results confirmed that the aqueous extract of Cinnamomum porrectum was bactericidal. Cytotoxic tests on Vero cell culture revealed that Cinnamomum porrectum was non-toxic which IC50 value higher than 0.02 mg/mL. Antiviral activity was tested based on the above IC50 values together with the measured EC50 values to obtain Therapeutic Index. The result showed that Cinnamomum porrectum has the ability to inhibit viral replication of HSV-1 in Vero cells.

  20. Biological and therapeutic activities, and anticancer properties of curcumin

    PubMed Central

    PERRONE, DONATELLA; ARDITO, FATIMA; GIANNATEMPO, GIOVANNI; DIOGUARDI, MARIO; TROIANO, GIUSEPPE; LO RUSSO, LUCIO; DE LILLO, ALFREDO; LAINO, LUIGI; LO MUZIO, LORENZO

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine, as it is nontoxic and exhibits a variety of therapeutic properties, including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activities. Recently, certain studies have indicated that curcumin may exert anticancer effects in a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, cell cycle regulation and metastasis. The present study reviewed previous studies in the literature, which support the therapeutic activity of curcumin in cancer. In addition, the present study elucidated a number of the challenges concerning the use of curcumin as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent. All the studies reviewed herein suggest that curcumin is able to exert anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antioxidative, hepatoprotective and antitumor activities, particularly against cancers of the liver, skin, pancreas, prostate, ovary, lung and head neck, as well as having a positive effect in the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26640527

  1. CANTHARELLUS CIBARIUS - CULINARY-MEDICINAL MUSHROOM CONTENT AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY.

    PubMed

    Muszyńska, Bozena; Kała, Katarzyna; Firlej, Anna; Sułkowska-Ziaja, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    One of the most frequently harvested mushrooms in Polish forests is Yellow chanterelle (chanterelle) - Cantharellus cibarius Fr. from the Cantharellaceae family. Chanterelle is an ectomycorrhizal mushroom occurring in Poland. Chanterelle lives in symbiosis with pine, spruce, oak and hombeam. In cookery, chanterelle is appreciated because of the aroma, taste, firmness and crunchiness of its fruiting bodies. Wild edible mushrooms are widely consumed in Asia, Western Europe and Central America. Chanterelle contains a great number of carbohydrates and proteins and a low amount of fat. Actual review presents the main groups of physiologically active primary and secondary metabolites in the fruiting bodies of chanterelle such as indole and phenolic compounds, carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins, free amino acids, sterols, carotenoids, enzymes, vitamins and elements with biological activity. The presence of these compounds and elements conditions the nutrient and therapeutic activity of chanterelle, e.g., immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, antimicrobial and antigenotoxic properties. PMID:27476275

  2. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015)PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them. PMID:27627343

  3. Students' Learning Activities While Studying Biological Process Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragten, Marco; Admiraal, Wilfried; Rijlaarsdam, Gert

    2015-08-01

    Process diagrams describe how a system functions (e.g. photosynthesis) and are an important type of representation in Biology education. In the present study, we examined students' learning activities while studying process diagrams, related to their resulting comprehension of these diagrams. Each student completed three learning tasks. Verbal data and eye-tracking data were collected as indications of students' learning activities. For the verbal data, we applied a fine-grained coding scheme to optimally describe students' learning activities. For the eye-tracking data, we used fixation time and transitions between areas of interest in the process diagrams as indices of learning activities. Various learning activities while studying process diagrams were found that distinguished between more and less successful students. Results showed that between-student variance in comprehension score was highly predicted by meaning making of the process arrows (80%) and fixation time in the main area (65%). Students employed successful learning activities consistently across learning tasks. Furthermore, compared to unsuccessful students, successful students used a more coherent approach of interrelated learning activities for comprehending process diagrams.

  4. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression. PMID:27598154

  5. Gynura procumbens: An Overview of the Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui-Li; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2016-01-01

    Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr. (Family Asteraceae) is a medicinal plant commonly found in tropical Asia countries such as China, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Vietnam. Traditionally, it is widely used in many different countries for the treatment of a wide variety of health ailments such as kidney discomfort, rheumatism, diabetes mellitus, constipation, and hypertension. Based on the traditional uses of G. procumbens, it seems to possess high therapeutic potential for treatment of various diseases making it a target for pharmacological studies aiming to validate and provide scientific evidence for the traditional claims of its efficacy. Although there has been considerable progress in the research on G. procumbens, to date there is no review paper gathering the reported biological activities of G. procumbens. Hence, this review aims to provide an overview of the biological activities of G. procumbens based on reported in vitro and in vivo studies. In brief, G. procumbens has been reported to exhibit antihypertensive, cardioprotective, antihyperglycemic, fertility enhancement, anticancer, antimicrobial, antioxidant, organ protective, and antiinflammatory activity. The commercial applications of G. procumbens have also been summarized in this paper based on existing patents. The data compiled illustrate that G. procumbens is a potential natural source of compounds with various pharmacological actions which can be utilized for the development of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27014066

  6. Discovery and biological activity of new chondramides from Chondromyces sp.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Jennifer; Hüttel, Stephan; Müller, Rolf

    2013-09-01

    Myxobacteria have proven to be highly valuable sources of natural products, as they produce a variety of secondary metabolites with unique structures and often new modes of action. In this study, high-content screening is demonstrated to be a convenient tool for bioactivity-guided isolation of natural products from crude bacterial extracts. By the application of focused, image-based screens we were able to identify over 30 novel chondramide derivatives from Chondromyces sp. MSr9030, some of which were present in only minute amounts. These cyclic depsipeptides were shown to target actin filaments with a similar binding mode to that of the mushroom toxin phalloidin. Fermentations of the myxobacterial strain were carried out under improved cultivation conditions, and supplementation of the culture broth with potassium bromide afforded the production of brominated analogues that are superior (in terms of biological activity) to all chondramides described to date. Initial biological profiling of 11 new derivatives in comparison to the reference compounds (chondramides A-C) showed that bromo-chondramide C3 and propionyl-bromo-chondramide C3 are the most active in cell-based studies, with GI₅₀ values on human cancer cell lines in the low nanomolar range. Given that these brominated C3 analogues were also less potent on noncancerous human cells (by a factor of 2 to 4 in comparison to cancer cell lines), our results can aid further structure-activity relationship-guided development of chondramides, either as molecular probes or pharmaceutical agents. PMID:23959765

  7. Inclusion bodies and purification of proteins in biologically active forms.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, A

    1997-01-01

    Even though recombinant DNA technology has made possible the production of valuable therapeutic proteins, its accumulation in the host cell as inclusion body poses serious problems in the recovery of functionally active proteins. In the last twenty years, alternative techniques have been evolved to purify biologically active proteins from inclusion bodies. Most of these remain only as inventions and very few are commercially exploited. This review summarizes the developments in isolation, refolding and purification of proteins from inclusion bodies that could be used for vaccine and non-vaccine applications. The second section involves a discussion on inclusion bodies, how they are formed, and their physicochemical properties. In vivo protein folding in Escherichia coli and kinetics of in vitro protein folding are the subjects of the third and fourth sections respectively. The next section covers the recovery of bioactive protein from inclusion bodies: it includes isolation of inclusion body from host cell debris, purification in denatured state alternate refolding techniques, and final purification of active molecules. Since purity and safety are two important issues in therapeutic grade proteins, the following three sections are devoted to immunological and biological characterization of biomolecules, nature, and type of impurities normally encountered, and their detection. Lastly, two case studies are discussed to demonstrate the sequence of process steps involved. PMID:8939059

  8. Propolis volatile compounds: chemical diversity and biological activity: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a sticky material collected by bees from plants, and used in the hive as building material and defensive substance. It has been popular as a remedy in Europe since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis use in over-the-counter preparations, “bio”-cosmetics and functional foods, etc., increases. Volatile compounds are found in low concentrations in propolis, but their aroma and significant biological activity make them important for propolis characterisation. Propolis is a plant-derived product: its chemical composition depends on the local flora at the site of collection, thus it offers a significant chemical diversity. The role of propolis volatiles in identification of its plant origin is discussed. The available data about chemical composition of propolis volatiles from different geographic regions are reviewed, demonstrating significant chemical variability. The contribution of volatiles and their constituents to the biological activities of propolis is considered. Future perspectives in research on propolis volatiles are outlined, especially in studying activities other than antimicrobial. PMID:24812573

  9. Phytochemical concentrations and biological activities of Sorghum bicolor alcoholic extracts.

    PubMed

    Dia, Vermont P; Pangloli, Philipus; Jones, Lynsey; McClure, Angela; Patel, Anjali

    2016-08-10

    Sorghum is an important cereal with reported health benefits. The objectives of this study were to measure the biological activities of alcoholic extracts of ten sorghum varieties and to determine the association between the color of the extracts and their biological activities. Variation on concentrations of bioactives among sorghum varieties was observed with ethanolic extracts giving higher concentrations than methanolic extracts. The color of the extracts significantly correlated with the concentrations of bioactives and with nitric oxide scavenging activity. Freeze-dried ethanol extract is more potent than freeze-dried methanol extract and caused cytotoxicity to A27801AP and PTX-10 OVCA with ED50 values of 0.69 and 1.29 mg mL(-1), respectively. Pre-treatment of OVCA with ethanol extract led to chemosensitization to paclitaxel and the proliferation and colony formation of OVCA cells were reduced by 14.7 to 44.6% and 36.4 to 40.1%, respectively. Sorghum is a potential source of colorants with health promoting properties. This is the first report on the capability of sorghum alcoholic extracts to cause cytotoxicity and chemosensitize ovarian cancer cells in vitro. PMID:27406291

  10. Gynura procumbens: An Overview of the Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui-Li; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2016-01-01

    Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr. (Family Asteraceae) is a medicinal plant commonly found in tropical Asia countries such as China, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Vietnam. Traditionally, it is widely used in many different countries for the treatment of a wide variety of health ailments such as kidney discomfort, rheumatism, diabetes mellitus, constipation, and hypertension. Based on the traditional uses of G. procumbens, it seems to possess high therapeutic potential for treatment of various diseases making it a target for pharmacological studies aiming to validate and provide scientific evidence for the traditional claims of its efficacy. Although there has been considerable progress in the research on G. procumbens, to date there is no review paper gathering the reported biological activities of G. procumbens. Hence, this review aims to provide an overview of the biological activities of G. procumbens based on reported in vitro and in vivo studies. In brief, G. procumbens has been reported to exhibit antihypertensive, cardioprotective, antihyperglycemic, fertility enhancement, anticancer, antimicrobial, antioxidant, organ protective, and antiinflammatory activity. The commercial applications of G. procumbens have also been summarized in this paper based on existing patents. The data compiled illustrate that G. procumbens is a potential natural source of compounds with various pharmacological actions which can be utilized for the development of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27014066

  11. Synthesis and biological activity of novel deoxycholic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Popadyuk, Irina I; Markov, Andrey V; Salomatina, Oksana V; Logashenko, Evgeniya B; Shernyukov, Andrey V; Zenkova, Marina A; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis and biological activity of new semi-synthetic derivatives of naturally occurring deoxycholic acid (DCA) bearing 2-cyano-3-oxo-1-ene, 3-oxo-1(2)-ene or 3-oxo-4(5)-ene moieties in ring A and 12-oxo or 12-oxo-9(11)-ene moieties in ring C. Bioassays using murine macrophage-like cells and tumour cells show that the presence of the 9(11)-double bond associated with the increased polarity of ring A or with isoxazole ring joined to ring A, improves the ability of the compounds to inhibit cancer cell growth. PMID:26037611

  12. Nanodiamonds as Carriers for Address Delivery of Biologically Active Substances

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Surface of detonation nanodiamonds was functionalized for the covalent attachment of immunoglobulin, and simultaneously bovine serum albumin and Rabbit Anti-Mouse Antibody. The nanodiamond-IgGI125 and RAM-nanodiamond-BSAI125 complexes are stable in blood serum and the immobilized proteins retain their biological activity. It was shown that the RAM-nanodiamond-BSAI125 complex is able to bind to the target antigen immobilized on the Sepharose 6B matrix through antibody–antigen interaction. The idea can be extended to use nanodiamonds as carriers for delivery of bioactive substances (i.e., drugs) to various targets in vivo. PMID:20672079

  13. Nanodiamonds as Carriers for Address Delivery of Biologically Active Substances.

    PubMed

    Purtov, K V; Petunin, A I; Burov, A E; Puzyr, A P; Bondar, V S

    2010-01-01

    Surface of detonation nanodiamonds was functionalized for the covalent attachment of immunoglobulin, and simultaneously bovine serum albumin and Rabbit Anti-Mouse Antibody. The nanodiamond-IgG(I125) and RAM-nanodiamond-BSA(I125) complexes are stable in blood serum and the immobilized proteins retain their biological activity. It was shown that the RAM-nanodiamond-BSA(I125) complex is able to bind to the target antigen immobilized on the Sepharose 6B matrix through antibody-antigen interaction. The idea can be extended to use nanodiamonds as carriers for delivery of bioactive substances (i.e., drugs) to various targets in vivo. PMID:20672079

  14. Recent developments in biological activities of chalcones: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parvesh; Anand, Amit; Kumar, Vipan

    2014-10-01

    Chalcones represent key structural motif in the plethora of biologically active molecules including synthetic and natural products. Synthetic manipulations of chalcones or their isolation from natural sources are being investigated worldwide for the development of more potent and efficient drugs for the treatment of several dreadful diseases such as cancer, diabetes, HIV, tuberculosis, malaria etc. Over the past few years, a large volume of research papers and review articles highlighting the significance of chalcone derivatives has been compiled in the literature. The present review article focuses on the recent developments (2010-2014) on various pharmacological and medicinal aspects of chalcones and their analogues. PMID:25137491

  15. Local or distributed activation? The view from biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Mark

    2011-06-01

    There is considerable disagreement among connectionist modellers over whether to represent distinct properties by distinct nodes of a network or whether properties should be represented by patterns of activity across all nodes. This paper draws on the literature of neuroscience to say that a more subtle way of describing how different brain regions contribute to a behaviour, in terms of individual learning and in terms of degrees of importance, may render the current debate moot: both sides of the 'localist' versus 'distributed' debate emphasise different aspects of biology.

  16. Biochemistry of platelet-activating factor: A unique class of biologically active phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, F. )

    1989-01-01

    This brief overview describes the chemical features of this unique bioactive phospholipid that possesses biologic properties identical to platelet-activating factor (PAF) and an antihypertensive polar renal lipid (APRL). The current understanding of PAF metabolism and its regulation are emphasized, particularly in the context of explaining the enzymatic source of PAF in physiologic vs pharmacologic processes. Also included are brief accounts of the biologic properties, structural-functional relationships, antagonists, receptors and mode of action of PAF.

  17. Synthesis and biological activity of polyalthenol and pentacyclindole analogues.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Isidro S; Moro, Rosalina F; Costales, Isabel; Basabe, Pilar; Díez, David; Gil, Ana; Mollinedo, Faustino; Pérez-de la Rosa, Fátima; Pérez-Roth, Eduardo; Padrón, José M

    2014-02-12

    A series of indole sesquiterpenes analogues of polyalthenol and pentacyclindole have been synthesized starting from ent-halimic acid in order to test their biological activity. These analogues include diverse oxidation levels at the sesquiterpenyl moiety and different functionalization on the indole ring. All synthetic derivatives were tested against a representative panel of Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains, and the human solid tumour cell lines A549 (non-small cell lung), HBL-100 (breast), HeLa (cervix), SW1573 (non-small cell lung), T-47D (breast) and WiDr (colon). Overall, the compounds presented activity against the cancer cell lines. The resulting lead, displaying a polyalthenol scaffold, showed GI50 values in the range 1.2-5.7 μM against all cell lines tested. PMID:24412720

  18. Efficient total syntheses and biological activities of two teixobactin analogues.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Anish; Iyer, Abhishek; Vincent, Charlotte S; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Prior, Stephen H; Madder, Annemieke; Taylor, Edward J; Singh, Ishwar

    2016-04-26

    The discovery of the new antibiotic teixobactin has been timely in the race for unearthing novel antibiotics wherein the emergence of drug resistant bacteria poses a serious threat worldwide. Herein, we present the total syntheses and biological activities of two teixobactin analogues. This approach is simple, efficient and has several advantages: it uses commercially available building blocks (except AllocHN-d-Thr-OH), has a single purification step and a good recovery (22%). By using this approach we have synthesised two teixobactin analogues and established that the d-amino acids are critical for the antimicrobial activity of these analogues. With continuing high expectations from teixobactin, this work can be regarded as a stepping stone towards an in depth study of teixobactin, its analogues and the quest for synthesising similar molecules. PMID:26984316

  19. Frank Stinchfield Award. Titanium surface with biologic activity against infection.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Javad; Wickstrom, Eric; Zeiger, Allen R; Adams, Christopher S; Shapiro, Irving M; Purtill, James J; Sharkey, Peter F; Hozack, William J; Rothman, Richard H; Hickok, Noreen J

    2004-12-01

    Despite immense improvements, periprosthetic infection continues to compromise the result of otherwise successful joint arthroplasty. There are various limitations in the treatment of periprosthetic infection, the most important of which is the inability to deliver antibiotics to the local tissue without the need for intravenous administration. We have developed a novel route to covalently tether vancomycin to a metal (titanium) surface, which showed effective bactericidal activity because of a vancomycin coupling. The chemistry of tethering does not affect the biological activity of the biofactors that are attached to the metal surface. This technology holds great promise for the manufacturing of "smart" implants that can be self protective against periprosthetic infection, or can be used for the treatment of periprosthetic infections when they occur. PMID:15577462

  20. Metabolic clearance of biologically active luteinizing hormone in man.

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, J D; Fraioli, F; Rogol, A D; Dufau, M L

    1986-01-01

    The plasma metabolic clearance of biologically active luteinizing hormone (bioactive LH) was studied using the rat interstitial cell testosterone (RICT) bioassay in six hypogonadotropic men after single bolus injection of highly purified human LH and during continuous steady-state infusions of three graded doses of LH. The LH bolus disappearance curves provided estimates of metabolic clearance rates (MCR) of 24.1 +/- 4.7 (+/- SD) ml/min for bioactive LH vs. 56.2 +/- 12 ml/min for immunoactive LH in the same men (P = 0.03). A lower MCR of bioactive LH compared with immunoactive LH was also observed during continuous infusions of physiological doses of LH; for example, the mean steady-state MCRs for bioactive and immunoactive LH were, respectively, 26.1 +/- 3.1 and 34.2 +/- 3.2 ml/min (P = 0.02). Moreover, the stepped-dose infusion regimens permitted us to demonstrate that increasing doses of pure human LH resulted in progressive and parallel decreases in the apparent MCRs of both bioactive and immunoactive LH. Based on the respective steady-state MCRs calculated at physiological plasma concentrations of immunoactive and bioactive LH, we estimate a mean endogenous production rate for bioactive hormone of 1,937 IU/24 h, and for immunoactive LH of 589 IU/24 h in normal men. These results indicate that previous estimates of LH production rates from immunoassay data alone markedly underestimate the quantity of biologically active hormone secreted in man. PMID:3958184

  1. The biologically active conformations of ligand CCK B receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Kuznetsova, Nina B.; Schulgin, Sergey V.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Sinyakov, Valeriy V.; Kovtun, Viktor A.

    2006-07-01

    We analyzed literature data about structures of ligands of CCK B receptor. The structure of the binding site (fragments of the third extracellular loop and the seventh transmembrane helix of CCK B receptor) was determined recently by experiments. We were finding presumable biologically active conformations (BAC) of the ligands by two methods. One of them is based on the fact that the most stable conformations of the biologically active peptide on the phase interface "water-lipophilic medium" are often similar to the BAC. Another method is based on the formation of the stable ligand-receptor complex during the modeling procedure. We used Monte-Carlo method with the fixed geometry of the receptor and the optimized geometry of tetrapeptide cholecystokinin (CCK-4). It has been shown, that the first method should be used to find BAC of antagonists of CCK B receptor. The strategy of the formation of the stable ligand-receptor complex during the modeling procedure can be used for the designing of peptide agonists of CCK B receptor.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and biological activities of curcumin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Arunraj, T R; Sanoj Rejinold, N; Mangalathillam, Sabitha; Saroj, Soumya; Biswas, Raja; Jayakumar, R

    2014-02-01

    Curcumin is one of the most versatile compounds obtained from Curcuma longa. The major obstacle in the therapeutic use of curcumin is its aqueous solubility. To enhance its aqueous solubility and biological activities, we prepared curcumin nanospheres (CNSs) by wet milling-solvent evaporation technique without any surfactants. In this study, we have focused on the synthesis, characterization and biological effects of CNSs. DLS and SEM analyses showed 50-80 nm spherical shaped CNSs with a zeta potential of -31.65 mV. FTIR revealed that there were no structural changes to CNSs. Antibacterial and antifungal studies proved that CNSs were much more effective than curcumin against Escherichia coil, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Antioxidant activity of CNSs showed promising result for therapeutic applications. The in vitro anti-inflammatory studies proved that CNSs possessed enhanced anti-inflammatory effect against protein denaturation. Cytotoxicity and uptake of CNSs showed more toxicity on cancer cells (T47D, MG63, A375) sparing normal HDF and IEC cell lines. Skin permeation studies showed CNSs retained at different layers of pig skin. These results give clear evidence for their use against microbial and fungal skin infections as well as cancer treatment. PMID:24738332

  3. A biologically active peptide mimetic of N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Background Glycosylated proteins and lipids are important regulatory factors whose functions can be altered by addition or removal of sugars to the glycan structure. The glycans are recognized by sugar-binding lectins that serve as receptors on the surface of many cells and facilitate initiation of an intracellular signal that changes the properties of the cells. We identified a peptide that mimics the ligand of an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific lectin and asked whether the peptide would express specific biological activity. Findings A 12-mer phage display library was screened with a GalNAc-specific lectin to identify an amino acid sequence that binds to the lectin. Phage particles that were eluted from the lectin with free GalNAc were considered to have been bound to a GalNAc-binding site. Peptides were synthesized with the selected sequence as a quadravalent structure to facilitate receptor crosslinking. Treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for 24 h with the peptide stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) but not of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The secretion of IL-21 was stimulated as strongly with the peptide as with interferon-γ. Conclusion The data indicate that the quadravalent peptide has biological activity with a degree of specificity. These effects occurred at concentrations in the nanomolar range, in contrast to free sugars that generally bind to proteins in the micro- to millimolar range. PMID:19284521

  4. Inhalable DNase I microparticles engineered with biologically active excipients.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rihab; Al Jamal, Khuloud T; Kan, Pei-Lee; Awad, Gehanne; Mortada, Nahed; El-Shamy, Abd-Elhameed; Alpar, Oya

    2013-12-01

    Highly viscous mucus poses a big challenge for the delivery of particulates carrying therapeutics to patients with cystic fibrosis. In this study, surface modifying DNase I loaded particles using different excipients to achieve better lung deposition, higher enzyme stability or better biological activity had been exploited. For the purpose, controlled release microparticles (MP) were prepared by co-spray drying DNase I with the polymer poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and the biocompatible lipid surfactant 1,2-dipalmitoyl-Sn-phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) using various hydrophilic excipients. The effect of the included modifiers on the particle morphology, size, zeta potential as well as enzyme encapsulation efficiency, biological activity and release had been evaluated. Powder aerosolisation performance and particle phagocytosis by murine macrophages were also investigated. The results showed that more than 80% of enzyme activity was recovered after MP preparation and that selected surface modifiers greatly increased the enzyme encapsulation efficiency. The particle morphology was greatly modified altering in turn the powders inhalation indices where dextran, ovalbumin and chitosan hydrochloride increased considerably the respirable fraction compared to the normal hydrophilic carriers lactose and PVP. Despite of the improved aerosolisation caused by chitosan hydrochloride, yet retardation of chitosan coated particles in artificial mucus samples discouraged its application. On the other hand, dextran and polyanions enhanced DNase I effect in reducing cystic fibrosis mucus viscosity. DPPC proved good ability to reduce particles phagocytic uptake even in the presence of the selected adjuvants. The prepared MP systems were biocompatible with lung epithelial cells. To conclude, controlled release DNase I loaded PLGA-MP with high inhalation indices and enhanced mucolytic activity on CF sputum could be obtained by surface modifying the particles with PGA or dextran. PMID

  5. The in vitro biological activity of Lepidium meyenii extracts.

    PubMed

    Valentová, K; Buckiová, D; Kren, V; Peknicová, J; Ulrichová, J; Simánek, V

    2006-03-01

    The biological activity of methanolic and aqueous extracts from dehydrated hypocotyls of Lepidium meyenii (Brassicaceae, vernacular name "maca"), was studied on rat hepatocytes and human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The extracts did not exhibit cytotoxicity in hepatocyte primary cultures up to 10 mg/ml as measured by the MTT viability test, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) leakage. Moreover, after 72 h, extracts inhibited LDH and AST leakage from the hepatocytes. When hepatocytes were intoxicated by t-butyl hydroperoxide, neither extract prevented oxidative damage. Both extracts showed weak antioxidant activity in the DPPH radical scavenging test with IC(50) values of 3.46 +/- 0.16 and 0.71 +/- 0.10 mg/ml, for aqueous and methanolic extracts, respectively. Thus, the observed effect on spontaneous enzyme leakage is probably mediated through mechanisms other than antioxidant activity. Both methanolic and aqueous extracts have shown estrogenic activity comparable with that of silymarin in MCF-7 cell line. Maca estrogenicity was exhibited in the range from 100 to 200 mug of extract per ml. The findings in the present study show that maca does not display in vitro hepatotoxicity. In contrast, a slight cytoprotective effect, probably not mediated by antioxidant capacity, was noted. Maca extracts exhibited estrogenic activity comparably to the effect of silymarin in MCF-7 cells. PMID:16528448

  6. Myricetin: A Dietary Molecule with Diverse Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni; Combrinck, Sandra; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Myricetin is a common plant-derived flavonoid and is well recognised for its nutraceuticals value. It is one of the key ingredients of various foods and beverages. The compound exhibits a wide range of activities that include strong anti-oxidant, anticancer, antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory activities. It displays several activities that are related to the central nervous system and numerous studies have suggested that the compound may be beneficial to protect against diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The use of myricetin as a preserving agent to extend the shelf life of foods containing oils and fats is attributed to the compound’s ability to protect lipids against oxidation. A detailed search of existing literature revealed that there is currently no comprehensive review available on this important molecule. Hence, the present work includes the history, synthesis, pharmaceutical applications and toxicity studies of myricetin. This report also highlights structure-activity relationships and mechanisms of action for various biological activities. PMID:26891321

  7. A biologically active surface enzyme assembly that attenuates thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zheng; Muthukrishnan, Sharmila; Urlam, Murali K.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Marzec, Ulla M.; Elkasabi, Yaseen; Lahann, Joerg; Hanson, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of hemostatic pathways by blood-contacting materials remains a major hurdle in the development of clinically durable artificial organs and implantable devices. We postulate that surface-induced thrombosis may be attenuated by the reconstitution onto blood contacting surfaces of bioactive enzymes that regulate the production of thrombin, a central mediator of both clotting and platelet activation cascades. Thrombomodulin (TM), a transmembrane protein expressed by endothelial cells, is an established negative regulator of thrombin generation in the circulatory system. Traditional techniques to covalently immobilize enzymes on solid supports may modify residues contained within or near the catalytic site, thus reducing the bioactivity of surface enzyme assemblies. In this report, we present a molecular engineering and bioorthogonal chemistry approach to site-specifically immobilize a biologically active recombinant human TM fragment onto the luminal surface of small diameter prosthetic vascular grafts. Bioactivity and biostability of TM modified grafts is confirmed in vitro and the capacity of modified grafts to reduce platelet activation is demonstrated using a non-human primate model. These studies indicate that molecularly engineered interfaces that display TM actively limit surface-induced thrombus formation. PMID:23532366

  8. BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE NATURAL PRODUCTS OF THE GENUS CALLICARPA.

    PubMed

    Jones, William P; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2008-06-01

    About 20 species from Callicarpa have reported ethnobotanical and ethnomedical uses, and several members of this genus are well known in the traditional medical systems of China and South Asia. Ethnomedical reports indicate their use in the treatment of hepatitis, rheumatism, fever, headache, indigestion, and other ailments. Several species of Callicarpa have been reported to be used against cancer (e.g., Callicarpa americana root to treat skin cancer and Callicarpa rubella bark to treat tumors of the large intestine). Extracts from about 14 species in this genus have been evaluated for biological activity, including antibacterial, antifungal, anti-insect growth, cytotoxic, and phytotoxic activities. In addition to amino acids, benzenoids, simple carbohydrates, and lipids, numerous diterpenes, flavonoids, phenylpropanoids, phytosterols, sesquiterpenes, and triterpenes have been detected in or isolated from the genus Callicarpa. The essential oils of Callicarpa americana have recently been reported to have antialgal and phytotoxic activities, and several isolates from this species (and C. japonica) were identified as contributing to the mosquito bite-deterrent activity that was first indicated by folkloric usage. Recent bioassay-guided investigations of C. americana extracts have resulted in the isolation of several active compounds, mainly of the clerodane diterpene structural type. PMID:19830264

  9. Biological activities of an extract from Cleome viscosa L. (Capparaceae).

    PubMed

    Williams, L A D; Vasques, E; Reid, W; Porter, R; Kraus, W

    2003-10-01

    Electron micrograph examination of the leaf and stem surfaces of Cleome viscosa L (Family Capparaceae) revealed the presence of secretory glandular trichomes with club-cylinder and cylinder morphologies. In the present study, the leaves and stems of C. viscosa were extracted with hexane and the extract was evaluated for the following biological activities: anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, contact insecticidal and nematicidal. The extract was found to be a potent anti-bacterial agent according to the thin layer chromatography autobiographic assay. Activity-directed isolation studies of the anti-bacterially active compounds led to a 14-member ring cembranoid diterpene being identified as one of the effective agents. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values (microg/spot) of 5.0 microg/spot and 1.0 microg/spot were found for the diterpene on Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (Gram-negative), respectively. The diterpene did not inhibit the growth of the fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum. The extract demonstrated a pyrethroid type of contact insecticidal activity on adult Cylas formicarius elegantulus Summer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The extract also had high nematicidal activity with a percentage Abbott's value of 72.69 on the plant parasitic nematode Meloidogyne incognita Chitwood; however, the extract lost its potency upon subfractionation. PMID:14564407

  10. Biological activity of soil contaminated with cobalt, tin, and molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Zaborowska, Magdalena; Kucharski, Jan; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga

    2016-07-01

    In this age of intensive industrialization and urbanization, mankind's highest concern should be to analyze the effect of all metals accumulating in the environment, both those considered toxic and trace elements. With this aim in mind, a unique study was conducted to determine the potentially negative impact of Sn(2+), Co(2+), and Mo(5+) in optimal and increased doses on soil biological properties. These metals were applied in the form of aqueous solutions of Sn(2+) (SnCl2 (.)2H2O), Co(2+) (CoCl2 · 6H2O), and Mo(5+) (MoCl5), each in the doses of 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg kg(-1) soil DM. The activity of dehydrogenases, urease, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, arylsulfatase, and catalase and the counts of twelve microorganism groups were determined on the 25th and 50th day of experiment duration. Moreover, to present the studied problem comprehensively, changes in the biochemical activity and yield of spring barley were shown using soil and plant resistance indices-RS. The study shows that Sn(2+), Co(2+), and Mo(5+) disturb the state of soil homeostasis. Co(2+) and Mo(5+) proved the greatest soil biological activity inhibitors. The residence of these metals in soil, particularly Co(2+), also generated a drastic decrease in the value of spring barley resistance. Only Sn(2+) did not disrupt its yielding. The studied enzymes can be arranged as follows for their sensitivity to Sn(2+), Co(2+), Mo(5+): Deh > Ure > Aryl > Pal > Pac > Cat. Dehydrogenases and urease may be reliable soil health indicators. PMID:27277093

  11. Hydrolysis of the RNA model substrate catalyzed by a binuclear Zr(IV)-substituted Keggin polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Luong, Thi Kim Nga; Absillis, Gregory; Shestakova, Pavletta; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-09-21

    The reactivity and solution behaviour of the binuclear Zr(IV)-substituted Keggin polyoxometalate (Et2NH2)8[{α-PW11O39Zr(μ-OH)(H2O)}2]·7H2O (ZrK 2 : 2) towards phosphoester bond hydrolysis of the RNA model substrate 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) was investigated at different reaction conditions (pD, temperature, concentration, and ionic strength). The hydrolysis of the phosphoester bond of HPNP, followed by means of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, proceeded with an observed rate constant, kobs = 11.5(±0.42) × 10(-5) s(-1) at pD 6.4 and 50 °C, representing a 530-fold rate enhancement in comparison with the spontaneous hydrolysis of HPNP. (1)H and (31)P NMR spectra indicate that at these reaction conditions the only products of hydrolysis are p-nitrophenol and the corresponding cyclic phosphate ester. The pD dependence of kobs exhibits a bell-shaped profile, with the fastest rate observed at pD 6.4. The formation constant (Kf = 455 M(-1)) and catalytic rate constant (kc = 42 × 10(-5) s(-1)) for the HPNP-ZrK 2 : 2 complex, activation energy (Ea) of 63.35 ± 1.82 kJ mol(-1), enthalpy of activation (ΔH(‡)) of 60.60 ± 2.09 kJ mol(-1), entropy of activation (ΔS(‡)) of -133.70 ± 6.13 J mol(-1) K(-1), and Gibbs activation energy (ΔG(‡)) of 102.05 ± 0.13 kJ mol(-1) at 37 °C were calculated from kinetic experiments. Binding between ZrK 2 : 2 and the P-O bond of HPNP was evidenced by the change in the (31)P chemical shift and signal line-broadening of the (31)P atom in HPNP upon addition of ZrK 2 : 2. Based on (31)P NMR experiments and isotope effect studies, a mechanism for HPNP hydrolysis in the presence of ZrK 2 : 2 was proposed. PMID:26256057

  12. Biological Activities of the Essential Oil from Erigeron floribundus.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Sorci, Leonardo; Maggi, Filippo; Ranjbarian, Farahnaz; Biapa Nya, Prosper C; Petrelli, Dezemona; Vitali, Luca A; Lupidi, Giulio; Quassinti, Luana; Bramucci, Massimo; Hofer, Anders; Cappellacci, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Erigeron floribundus (Asteraceae) is an herbaceous plant widely used in Cameroonian traditional medicine to treat various diseases of microbial and non-microbial origin. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro biological activities displayed by the essential oil obtained from the aerial parts of E. floribundus, namely the antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities. Moreover, we investigated the inhibitory effects of E. floribundus essential oil on nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NadD), a promising new target for developing novel antibiotics, and Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for Human African trypanosomiasis. The essential oil composition was dominated by spathulenol (12.2%), caryophyllene oxide (12.4%) and limonene (8.8%). The E. floribundus oil showed a good activity against Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone diameter, IZD of 14 mm, minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC of 512 µg/mL). Interestingly, it inhibited the NadD enzyme from S. aureus (IC50 of 98 µg/mL), with no effects on mammalian orthologue enzymes. In addition, T. brucei proliferation was inhibited with IC50 values of 33.5 µg/mL with the essential oil and 5.6 µg/mL with the active component limonene. The essential oil exhibited strong cytotoxicity on HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with an IC50 value of 14.89 µg/mL, and remarkable ferric reducing antioxidant power (tocopherol-equivalent antioxidant capacity, TEAC = 411.9 μmol·TE/g). PMID:27529211

  13. Catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles synthesized using essential oil.

    PubMed

    Vilas, Vidya; Philip, Daizy; Mathew, Joseph

    2014-11-11

    There are numerous reports on phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and various phytochemicals are involved in the reduction and stabilization. Pure explicit phytosynthetic protocol for catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles is of importance as it is an environmentally benign green method. This paper reports the use of essential oil of Myristica fragrans enriched in terpenes and phenyl propenes in the reduction and stabilization. FTIR spectra of the essential oil and the synthesized biogenic silver nanoparticles are in accordance with the GC-MS spectral analysis reports. Nanosilver is initially characterized by an intense SPR band around 420 nm, followed by XRD and TEM analysis revealing the formation of 12-26 nm sized, highly pure, crystalline silver nanoparticles. Excellent catalytic and bioactive potential of the silver nanoparticles is due to the surface modification. The chemocatalytic potential of nanosilver is exhibited by the rapid reduction of the organic pollutant, para nitro phenol and by the degradation of the thiazine dye, methylene blue. Significant antibacterial activity of the silver colloid against Gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone--12 mm) and Gram negative, Escherichia coli (inhibition zone--14 mm) is demonstrated by Agar-well diffusion method. Strong antioxidant activity of the biogenic silver nanoparticles is depicted through NO scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, reducing power, DPPH and total antioxidant activity assays. PMID:24956490

  14. Biological and Nonbiological Antioxidant Activity of Some Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rosés, Renato; Risco, Ester; Vila, Roser; Peñalver, Pedro; Cañigueral, Salvador

    2016-06-15

    Fifteen essential oils, four essential oil fractions, and three pure compounds (thymol, carvacrol, and eugenol), characterized by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were investigated for biological and nonbiological antioxidant activity. Clove oil and eugenol showed strong DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free-radical scavenging activity (IC50 = 13.2 μg/mL and 11.7 μg/mL, respectively) and powerfully inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils stimulated by PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) (IC50 = 7.5 μg/mL and 1.6 μg/mL) or H2O2 (IC50 = 22.6 μg/mL and 27.1 μg/mL). Nutmeg, ginger, and palmarosa oils were also highly active on this test. Essential oils from clove and ginger, as well as eugenol, carvacrol, and bornyl acetate inhibited NO (nitric oxide) production (IC50 < 50.0 μg/mL). The oils of clove, red thyme, and Spanish oregano, together with eugenol, thymol, and carvacrol showed the highest myeloperoxidase inhibitory activity. Isomers carvacrol and thymol displayed a disparate behavior in some tests. All in all, clove oil and eugenol offered the best antioxidant profile. PMID:27214068

  15. Biological Activity and Phytochemical Study of Scutellaria platystegia

    PubMed Central

    Madani mousavi, Seyedeh Neda; Delazar, Abbas; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Khodaie, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine biological activity and phytochemical study of Scutellaria platystegia (family Labiatae). Methanolic (MeOH) extract of aerial parts of S. platystegia and SPE fractions of methanolic extract (specially 20% and 40% methanolic fractions), growing in East-Azarbaijan province of Iran were found to have radical scavenging activity by DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl -1- pycryl hydrazyl) assay. Dichloromethane (DCM) extract of this plant exhibited animalarial activity by cell free method providing IC50 at 1.1876 mg/mL. Crude extracts did not exhibit any toxicity assessed by brine shrimp lethality assay. Phytochemical study of methanolic extract by using reverse phase HPLC method and NMR instrument for isolation and identification of pure compounds respectively, yielded 2-(4- hydroxy phenyl) ethyl-O-β-D- glucopyranoside from 10% and apigenin 7-O-glucoside, verbascoside and martynoside from 40% SPE fraction. Occurance of verbascoside and martynoside as biochemical markers appeared to be widespread in this genus. Antioxidant and antimalarial activity of MeOH and DCM extracts, respectively, as well as no general toxicity of them could provide a basis for further in-vitro and in-vivo studies and clinical trials to develop new therapeutical alternatives. PMID:25561927

  16. [The biological activity of macrophages in health and disease].

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in immune response as phagocytes, antigen presenting cells and as effector cells of delayed-type hypersensitivity. Moreover, the activity of macrophages is associated with modulation of many biological processes during the whole life and depends on the actual macrophage phenotype induced under the influence of various microenvironmental stimuli. In pregnancy, placental macrophages induce the development of maternal tolerance to fetal antigens, while fetal macrophages are responsible for proper formation of tissues and organs. Residual macrophages play a very important role in tissue homeostasis, apoptotic cell clearance to prevent autoimmunization and first defense in infections. The inflammatory response of macrophages may be modulated by pathogens. Their suppressive activity is observed in immunologically privileged organs such as testes. In pathologies, macrophages are responsible for tissue damage in a case of nonspecific activation followed by overproduction of proinflammatory factors. Suppression of a specific immune response against tumors is mainly the effect of tumor associated macrophage (TAM) action. On the other hand, presentation of allergens or self-antigens by macrophages and their nonspecific activation by necrotic adipocytes leads to the induction of a chronic inflammatory response and impairment of immunity. Therefore, modulation of macrophage functions may be the key for improvement of therapy of cancer and allergic, autoimmune, metabolic, cardiovascular and Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:22922151

  17. Biological Activities of Oleanolic Acid Derivatives from Calendula officinalis Seeds.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Ahmed; Ashour, Ahmed; Mira, Amira; Kishikawa, Asuka; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Zhu, Qinchang; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Phytochemical examination of butanol fraction of Calendula officinalis seeds led to the isolation of two compounds identified as 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS1) and oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS2). Biological evaluation was carried out for these two compounds such as melanin biosynthesis inhibitory, hyaluronic acid production activities, anti obesity using lipase inhibition and adipocyte differentiation as well as evaluation of the protective effect against hydrogen peroxide induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells. The results showed that, compound CS2 has a melanin biosynthesis stimulatory activity; however, compound CS1 has a potent stimulatory effect for the production of hyaluronic acid on normal human dermal fibroblast from adult (NHDF-Ad). Both compounds did not show any inhibitory effect on both lipase and adipocyte differentiation. Compound CS2 could protect neuro-2A cells and increased cell viability against H2 O2 . These activities (melanin biosynthesis stimulatory and protective effect against H2 O2 of CS2 and hyaluronic acid productive activities of these triterpene derivatives) have been reported for the first time. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26887328

  18. Colloidal mesoporous silica nanoparticles enhance the biological activity of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Summerlin, Natalie; Qu, Zhi; Pujara, Naisarg; Sheng, Yong; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; McGuckin, Michael; Popat, Amirali

    2016-08-01

    The naturally occurring polyphenol resveratrol (RES) has attracted increasing attention in recent years due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activity. However, resveratrol's promising potential as a nutraceutical is hindered by its poor aqueous solubility, which limits its biological activity. Here we show that encapsulating resveratrol in colloidal mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MCM-48-RES) enhances its saturated solubility by ∼95% and increases its in vitro release kinetics compared to pure resveratrol. MCM-48-RES showed high loading capacity (20% w/w) and excellent encapsulation efficiency (100%). When tested against HT-29 and LS147T colon cancer cell lines, MCM-48-RES-mediated in vitro cell death was higher than that of pure resveratrol, mediated via the PARP and cIAP1 pathways. Finally, MCM-48-RES treatment also inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-κB activation in RAW264.7 cells, demonstrating improved anti-inflammatory activity. More broadly, our observations demonstrate the potential of colloidal mesoporous silica nanoparticles as next generation delivery carriers for hydrophobic nutraceuticals. PMID:27060664

  19. Processed Vietnamese ginseng: Preliminary results in chemistry and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thi Hong Van; Lee, Seo Young; Kim, Tae Ryong; Kim, Jae Young; Kwon, Sung Won; Nguyen, Ngoc Khoi; Park, Jeong Hill; Nguyen, Minh Duc

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to investigate the effect of the steaming process on chemical constituents, free radical scavenging activity, and antiproliferative effect of Vietnamese ginseng. Methods Samples of powdered Vietnamese ginseng were steamed at 120°C for various times and their extracts were subjected to chemical and biological studies. Results Upon steaming, contents of polar ginsenosides, such as Rb1, Rc, Rd, Re, and Rg1, were rapidly decreased, whereas less polar ginsenosides such as Rg3, Rg5, Rk1, Rk3, and Rh4 were increased as reported previously. However, ocotillol type saponins, which have no glycosyl moiety at the C-20 position, were relatively stable on steaming. The radical scavenging activity was increased continuously up to 20 h of steaming. Similarly, the antiproliferative activity against A549 lung cancer cells was also increased. Conclusion It seems that the antiproliferative activity is closely related to the contents of ginsenoside Rg3, Rg5, and Rk1. PMID:24748840

  20. Chemistry and Biological Activities of Flavonoids: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the research on flavonoids from plant sources because of their versatile health benefits reported in various epidemiological studies. Since flavonoids are directly associated with human dietary ingredients and health, there is need to evaluate structure and function relationship. The bioavailability, metabolism, and biological activity of flavonoids depend upon the configuration, total number of hydroxyl groups, and substitution of functional groups about their nuclear structure. Fruits and vegetables are the main dietary sources of flavonoids for humans, along with tea and wine. Most recent researches have focused on the health aspects of flavonoids for humans. Many flavonoids are shown to have antioxidative activity, free radical scavenging capacity, coronary heart disease prevention, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities, while some flavonoids exhibit potential antiviral activities. In plant systems, flavonoids help in combating oxidative stress and act as growth regulators. For pharmaceutical purposes cost-effective bulk production of different types of flavonoids has been made possible with the help of microbial biotechnology. This review highlights the structural features of flavonoids, their beneficial roles in human health, and significance in plants as well as their microbial production. PMID:24470791

  1. Catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles synthesized using essential oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, Vidya; Philip, Daizy; Mathew, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    There are numerous reports on phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and various phytochemicals are involved in the reduction and stabilization. Pure explicit phytosynthetic protocol for catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles is of importance as it is an environmentally benign green method. This paper reports the use of essential oil of Myristica fragrans enriched in terpenes and phenyl propenes in the reduction and stabilization. FTIR spectra of the essential oil and the synthesized biogenic silver nanoparticles are in accordance with the GC-MS spectral analysis reports. Nanosilver is initially characterized by an intense SPR band around 420 nm, followed by XRD and TEM analysis revealing the formation of 12-26 nm sized, highly pure, crystalline silver nanoparticles. Excellent catalytic and bioactive potential of the silver nanoparticles is due to the surface modification. The chemocatalytic potential of nanosilver is exhibited by the rapid reduction of the organic pollutant, para nitro phenol and by the degradation of the thiazine dye, methylene blue. Significant antibacterial activity of the silver colloid against Gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone - 12 mm) and Gram negative, Escherichia coli (inhibition zone - 14 mm) is demonstrated by Agar-well diffusion method. Strong antioxidant activity of the biogenic silver nanoparticles is depicted through NO scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, reducing power, DPPH and total antioxidant activity assays.

  2. In vitro biological activities of alkaloids from Cryptolepis sanguinolenta.

    PubMed

    Cimanga, K; De Bruyne, T; Lasure, A; Van Poel, B; Pieters, L; Claeys, M; Berghe, D V; Kambu, K; Tona, L; Vlietinck, A J

    1996-02-01

    In our biological screening of higher plants, an aqueous and an 80% EtOH extract from the root bark of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta showed potent antibacterial, anticomplementary, and moderate antiviral activities, but no antifungal effect could be detected. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the 80% EtOH extract led to the isolation of three alkaloids: quindoline (1), hydroxycryptolepine (2), cryptolepine.HCl (3), and the corresponding base cryptolepine (4). All compounds strongly inhibited the growth of Gram-positive bacteria (MIC < or = 100 micrograms/ml) and showed a moderate (MIC = 125 or 250 micrograms/ml), a weak (MIC = 500 micrograms/ml), or no activity (MIC > 500 micrograms/ml) against selected Gram-negative bacteria. They also possessed a bactericidal effect depending on the bacterial strain. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 displayed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the classical pathway of the complement system while compounds 2 and 3 activated the alternative pathway, except for compound 1. Compound 3 was found to possess an antiherpetic activity. Compounds 1 and 4 showed no antiviral effect, but were quite cytotoxic in the antiviral test system down to a concentration of 1 microgram/ml. PMID:8720383

  3. Synthesis and biological activities of new hydrazide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ahmet; Turan-Zitouni, Gulhan; Kaplancikli, Zafer Asim; Tunali, Yağmur

    2009-06-01

    The synthesis of a new series of imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid arylidene-hydrazides is described. The chemical structures of the compounds were elucidated by IR, (1)H-NMR, FAB(+)-MS spectral data. Their biological activity against various bacteria, fungi species, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was investigated. Antibacterial activity was measured against Escherichia coli (NRRL B-3704), Staphylococcus aureus (NRRL B-767), Salmonella typhimurium (NRRL B-4420), Proteus vulgaris (NRLL B-123), Enterococcus faecalis (isolated obtained from Faculty of Medicine Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NRRL B-23 27853), Klebsiella spp. (isolated obtained from Faculty of Medicine Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey), while antifungal activity was evaluated against Candida albicans (isolates obtained from Osmangazi Uni. Fac.of Medicine), Candida glabrata (isolates obtained from Osmangazi Uni. Fac.of Medicine). Compounds were also evaluated for antituberculosis activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv using the BACTEC 460 radiometric system and BACTEC 12B medium. The compounds showed moderate inhibitor effects against human pathogenic microorganisms., whereas the preliminary results indicated that all of the tested compounds were inactive against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv. PMID:18825530

  4. Phenoxy-bridged binuclear Zn(II) complex holding salen ligand: Synthesis and structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Al-Resayes, Saud I.

    2016-03-01

    A novel binuclear phenoxo-bridged zinc complex obtained from the interaction of ligand, 2,2-(1E,1E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-diyl)bis(azanylylidene) bis(methanylylidene)diphenol with zinc chloride is reported. The synthesized and isolated zinc complex has been characterized by FT-IR, 1H- and 13C- NMR, ESI-MS, TGA/DTA and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The phenoxo-bridge in this binuclear Zn(II) complex is due to the phenolic oxygen of the salen liagnd. The complex crystallizes in monoclinic P-1 space group, and different geometry has been assigned for both zinc ions in the complex.

  5. Diastereoselective Synthesis of Biologically Active Cyclopenta[b]indoles.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marilia S; Fernandes, Daniara C; Rodrigues, Manoel T; Regiani, Thais; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia T G; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; de Carvalho, João E; Eberlin, Marcos N; Coelho, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The cyclopenta[b]indole motif is present in several natural and synthetic biologically active compounds, being directly responsible for the biological effects some of them present. We described herein a three step sequence for the synthesis of cyclopenta[b]indoles with a great structural diversity. The method is based on an oxidative Michael addition of suitable indoles on the double bond of Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts mediated by a hypervalent iodine reagent (IBX) to form β-ketoesters, which were chemoselectively reduced with NaBH4 in THF to give the corresponding β-hydroxy-esters. The diastereoisomeric mixture was then treated with a catalytic amount of triflic acid (20 mol %) to give cyclopenta[b]indoles with overall yields ranging from 8 to 73% (for 2 steps). The acid-catalyzed cyclization step gave the required heterocycles, via an intramolecular Friedel-Crafts reaction, with high diastereoselectivity, where only the trans product was observed. A mechanistic study monitored by ESI-(+)-MS was also conducted to collect evidence about the mechanism of this reaction. The new molecules herein synthesized were also evaluated against a panel of human cancer cells demonstrating a promising antitumoral profile. PMID:27403650

  6. Biological surface-active compounds from marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dang, Nga Phuong; Landfald, Bjarne; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2016-01-01

    Surface-active compounds (SACs) are widely used in different industries as well as in many daily consumption products. However, with the increasing concern for their environmental acceptability, attention has turned towards biological SACs which are biodegradable, less toxic and more environmentally friendly. In this work, 176 marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial isolates from petroleum-contaminated sites along the Norwegian coastline were isolated and screened for their capacity to produce biological SACs. Among them, 18 isolates were capable of reducing the surface tension of the culture medium by at least 20 mN m(-1) and/or capable of maintaining more than 40% of the emulsion volume after 24 h when growing on glucose or kerosene as carbon and energy source. These isolates were members of the genera Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Rhodococcus, Catenovulum, Cobetia, Glaciecola, Serratia, Marinomonas and Psychromonas. Two isolates, Rhodococcus sp. LF-13 and Rhodococcus sp. LF-22, reduced surface tension of culture medium by more than 40 mN m(-1) when growing on kerosene, n-hexadecane or rapeseed oil. The biosurfactants were produced by resting cells of the two Rhodococcus strains suggesting the biosynthesis of the biosurfactants was not necessarily associated with their growth on hydrocarbons. PMID:26506920

  7. Residual matrix from different separation techniques impacts exosome biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Paolini, Lucia; Zendrini, Andrea; Noto, Giuseppe Di; Busatto, Sara; Lottini, Elisabetta; Radeghieri, Annalisa; Dossi, Alessandra; Caneschi, Andrea; Ricotta, Doris; Bergese, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are gaining a prominent role in research due to their intriguing biology and several therapeutic opportunities. However, their accurate purification from body fluids and detailed physicochemical characterization remain open issues. We isolated exosomes from serum of patients with Multiple Myeloma by four of the most popular purification methods and assessed the presence of residual contaminants in the preparations through an ad hoc combination of biochemical and biophysical techniques - including Western Blot, colloidal nanoplasmonics, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM). The preparations obtained by iodixanol and sucrose gradients were highly pure. To the contrary, those achieved with limited processing (serial centrifugation or one step precipitation kit) resulted contaminated by a residual matrix, embedding the exosomes. The contaminated preparations showed lower ability to induce NfkB nuclear translocation in endothelial cells with respect to the pure ones, probably because the matrix prevents the interaction and fusion of the exosomes with the cell membrane. These findings suggest that exosome preparation purity must be carefully assessed since it may interfere with exosome biological activity. Contaminants can be reliably probed only by an integrated characterization approach aimed at both the molecular and the colloidal length scales. PMID:27009329

  8. Experimental and theoretical studies of hydrolysis of nerve agent sarin by binuclear zinc biomimetic catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Nan; Zhong, Jin-Yi; Chen, Shi-Lu; Liu, Jing-Quan; Min, Qi; Shi, Rui-Xue

    2015-08-01

    A complex (ZnL1) of 2,2-(2-hydroxy-5-methyl-1,3-phenylene)bis(methylene)bis ((pyridin-2-ylmethyl)azanediyl)diethanol (this ligand is named by L1) functionalized with two Zn(II) centers, has been previously suggested to be a structural model for binuclear zinc phosphotriesterases (PTEs) and proven to be an effective catalyst for the hydrolysis of bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl)phosphate (BDNPP). In this paper, ZnL1 was further found to have a high catalytic activity for the hydrolysis of isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin, GB) with kcat/Km = 0.051 s-1 M-1 at 303 K, examined by on-site NMR analysis. The subsequent density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that a terminal alkoxide (Ot) bound by Zn may work as a general base to activate a water molecule and then a hydroxide derived from the latter performs the initial nucleophilic attack on the phosphor in GB. Inspired by this mechanism, a new biomimetic catalyst was designed and synthesized by replacing the two pyridines of ZnL1 by hydroxyls, i.e. a complex of two Zn(II) with 2,6-bis((bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino)methyl)-4-methylphenol (the ligand is named by L2). This replacement was expected to increase the Ot basicity, thereby facilitating the nucleophilic attack and the overall hydrolysis of GB. It was shown that ZnL2 had a very high catalytic efficiency for the hydrolysis of GB, with kcat/Km = 0.11 s-1 M-1 at 303 K and about 90% conversion in 30 min. The following DFT calculations proposed a detailed reaction mechanism of ZnL2 and gave an energy barrier (5.8 kcal M-1) very close to the experimental activation energy (5.6 kcal M-1). In this study, a mechanism-inspired design strategy has been demonstrated to be successful in developing biomimetic catalyst.

  9. Inactivation efficiencies of radical reactions with biologically active DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, M. V. M.; Retèl, J.; Loman, H.

    Dilute aqueous solutions of biologically active θX174 DNA may serve as a simplified model system of the cell. Damage to the DNA after irradiation with γ-rays, may be ascribed to reactions with .OH, .H and e -aq or secondary radicals, arising from reactions of water radicals with added scavengers. Conversion of primary (water) radicals into secondary (scavenger) radicals leads to a considerable protection of the DNA, which, however, would have been larger if these secondary radicals did not contribute to DNA inactivation. The inactivation yield due to isopropanol or formate (secondary) radicals depends on dose rate as well as DNA concentration. Furthermore the inactivation efficiencies of the reactions of both the primary and the secondary radicals with single-stranded DNA could be established.

  10. Fungal phytotoxins with potential herbicidal activity: chemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Alessio; Masi, Marco; Evidente, Marco; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-12-19

    Covering: 2007 to 2015 Fungal phytotoxins are secondary metabolites playing an important role in the induction of disease symptoms interfering with host plant physiological processes. Although fungal pathogens represent a heavy constraint for agrarian production and for forest and environmental heritage, they can also represent an ecofriendly alternative to manage weeds. Indeed, the phytotoxins produced by weed pathogenic fungi are an efficient tool to design natural, safe bioherbicides. Their use could avoid that of synthetic pesticides causing resistance in the host plants and the long term impact of residues in agricultural products with a risk to human and animal health. The isolation and structural and biological characterization of phytotoxins produced by pathogenic fungi for weeds, including parasitic plants, are described. Structure activity relationships and mode of action studies for some phytotoxins are also reported to elucidate the herbicide potential of these promising fungal metabolites. PMID:26443032