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Sample records for biology division progress

  1. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Cook, J.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report.

  2. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1995. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report. Attention is focused on the following research activities: molecular, cellular, and cancer biology; mammalian genetics and development; genome mapping program; and educational activities.

  3. Biology Division. Progress report, August 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The Biology Division is the component of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that investigates the potential adverse health effects of energy-related substances. The body of this report provides summaries of the aims, scope and progress of the research of groups of investigators in the Division during the period of August 1, 1982, through September 30, 1983. At the end of each summary is a list of publications covering the same period (published or accepted for publication). For convenience, the summaries are assembled under Sections in accordance with the current organizational structure of the Biology Division; each Section begins with an overview. It will be apparent, however, that currents run throughout the Division and that the various programs support and interact with each other.

  4. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The body of this report provides summaries of the aims, scope and progress of the research by groups of investigators in the Division during the period of October 1, 1984, through September 30, 1985. At the end of each summary is a list of publications covering the same period. For convenience, the summaries are assembled under Sections in accordance with the current organizational structure of the Biology Division; each Section begins with an overview. It will be apparent, however, tha crosscurrents run throughout the Division and that the various programs support and interact with each other. In addition, this report includes information on the Division's educational activities, Advisory Committee, seminar program, and international interactions, as well as extramural activities of staff members, abstracts for technical meetings, and funding and personnel levels.

  5. Biology Division progress report, June 1, 1980-July 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Highlights of progress for the period June 1980 through July 1982 are summarized. Discussions of projects are presented under the following headings: molecular and cellular sciences; cellular and comparative mutagenesis; mammalian genetics and teratology; toxicology; and carcinogenesis. In addition this report includes an outline of educational activities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual technical reports for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  6. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1978-May 31, 1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the four sections into which this progress report has been divided. The report also contains sections related to interdivision activities and educational activities. (ERB)

  7. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  8. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    This book briefly describes the activities of the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. During the past year the Donner Pavilion program on the treatment of arteriovenous malformations in the brain has chalked up very significant successes. The disease control rate has been high and objective measures of success using cerebral angiography have been established. The new high resolution positron emitting tomographic imager has been demonstrated to operate successfully. In the Radiation Biophysics program, the availability of higher mass ions up to uranium has allowed us cell and tissue studies in a radiation domain that is entirely new. Using uranium beams, investigators have already made new and exciting findings that are described in the body of the report.

  9. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, M.; Bacon, D.S.; Aine, C.J.; Bartsch, R.R.

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations.

  10. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1984-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, W.E.

    1987-10-01

    This report provides brief accounts of significant progress in development activities and research results achieved by Physics Division personnel during the period January 1, 1984, through September 31, 1986. These efforts are representative of the three main areas of experimental research and development in which the Physics Division serves Los Alamos National Laboratory's and the Nation's needs in defense and basic sciences: (1) defense physics, including the development of diagnostic methods for weapons tests, weapon-related high-energy-density physics, and programs supporting the Strategic Defense Initiative; (2) laser physics and applications, especially to high-density plasmas; and (3) fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics, condensed-matter physics, and biophysics. Throughout the report, emphasis is placed on the design, construction, and application of a variety of advanced, often unique, instruments and instrument systems that maintain the Division's position at the leading edge of research and development in the specific fields germane to its mission. A sampling of experimental systems of particular interest would include the relativistic electron-beam accelerator and its applications to high-energy-density plasmas; pulsed-power facilities; directed energy weapon devices such as free-electron lasers and neutral-particle-beam accelerators; high-intensity ultraviolet and x-ray beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (at Brookhaven National Laboratory); the Aurora KrF ultraviolet laser system for projected use as an inertial fusion driver; antiproton physics facility at CERN; and several beam developments at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility for studying nuclear, condensed-matter, and biological physics, highlighted by progress in establishing the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center.

  11. Life Sciences Division progress report for CYs 1997-1998 [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Reinhold C.

    1999-06-01

    This is the first formal progress report issued by the ORNL Life Sciences Division. It covers the period from February 1997 through December 1998, which has been critical in the formation of our new division. The legacy of 50 years of excellence in biological research at ORNL has been an important driver for everyone in the division to do their part so that this new research division can realize the potential it has to make seminal contributions to the life sciences for years to come. This reporting period is characterized by intense assessment and planning efforts. They included thorough scrutiny of our strengths and weaknesses, analyses of our situation with respect to comparative research organizations, and identification of major thrust areas leading to core research efforts that take advantage of our special facilities and expertise. Our goal is to develop significant research and development (R&D) programs in selected important areas to which we can make significant contributions by combining our distinctive expertise and resources in the biological sciences with those in the physical, engineering, and computational sciences. Significant facilities in mouse genomics, mass spectrometry, neutron science, bioanalytical technologies, and high performance computing are critical to the success of our programs. Research and development efforts in the division are organized in six sections. These cluster into two broad areas of R&D: systems biology and technology applications. The systems biology part of the division encompasses our core biological research programs. It includes the Mammalian Genetics and Development Section, the Biochemistry and Biophysics Section, and the Computational Biosciences Section. The technology applications part of the division encompasses the Assessment Technology Section, the Environmental Technology Section, and the Toxicology and Risk Analysis Section. These sections are the stewards of the division's core competencies. The common

  12. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berven, B.A.

    1993-09-01

    This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration.

  13. Energy Division progress report, fiscal years 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, C.I.

    1996-06-01

    At ORNL, the Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this progress report for FY 1994 and FY 1995. The Division`s expenditures in FY 1995 totaled 44.9 million. Sixty percent of the divisions work was supported by the US DOE. Other significant sponsors include the US DOT, the US DOD, other federal agencies, and some private organizations. The Division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation systems, and (3) energy use and delivery technologies. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and transportation analysis. Transportation systems research seeks to improve the quality of both civilian and military transportation efforts. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on building equipment, building envelopes, (walls, roofs, attics, and materials), improvement of energy efficiency in buildings, and electric power systems.

  14. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    Modern biology is characterized by rapid change. The development of new tools and the results derived from their application to various biological systems require significant shifts in our concepts and the strategies that are adopted to analyze and elucidate mechanisms. In parallel with exciting new scientific developments our organizational structure and programmatic emphases have altered. These changes and developments have enabled the life sciences at LBL to be better positioned to create and respond to new opportunities. The work summarized in this annual report reflects a vital multifaceted research program that is in the vanguard of the areas represented. We are committed to justifying the confidence expressed by LBL through the new mission statement and reorganizational changes designed to give greater prominence to the life sciences.

  15. Environmental Research Division technical progress report, January 1984-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    Technical progress in the various research and assessment activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1984 to 1985. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Environmental Impacts, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Waste Management Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter.

  16. Experimental Facilities Division progress report 1996--97

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the activities of the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD) in support of the users of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), primarily focusing on the past year of operations. In September 1996, the APS began operations as a national user facility serving the US community of x-ray researchers from private industry, academic institutions, and other research organizations. The start of operations was about three months ahead of the baseline date established in 1988. This report is divided into the following sections: (1) overview; (2) user operations; (3) user administration and technical support; (4) R and D in support of view operations; (5) collaborative research; and (6) long-term strategic plans for XFD.

  17. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.V.

    1992-03-01

    This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

  18. Geospatial Technology Applications and Infrastructure in the Biological Resources Division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Erchia, Frank; Getter, James; D'Erchia, Terry D.; Root, Ralph; Stitt, Susan; White, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Executive Summary -- Automated spatial processing technology such as geographic information systems (GIS), telemetry, and satellite-based remote sensing are some of the more recent developments in the long history of geographic inquiry. For millennia, humankind has endeavored to map the Earth's surface and identify spatial relationships. But the precision with which we can locate geographic features has increased exponentially with satellite positioning systems. Remote sensing, GIS, thematic mapping, telemetry, and satellite positioning systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) are tools that greatly enhance the quality and rapidity of analysis of biological resources. These technologies allow researchers, planners, and managers to more quickly and accurately determine appropriate strategies and actions. Researchers and managers can view information from new and varying perspectives using GIS and remote sensing, and GPS receivers allow the researcher or manager to identify the exact location of interest. These geospatial technologies support the mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biological Resources Division (BRD) and the Strategic Science Plan (BRD 1996) by providing a cost-effective and efficient method for collection, analysis, and display of information. The BRD mission is 'to work with others to provide the scientific understanding and technologies needed to support the sound management and conservation of our Nation's biological resources.' A major responsibility of the BRD is to develop and employ advanced technologies needed to synthesize, analyze, and disseminate biological and ecological information. As the Strategic Science Plan (BRD 1996) states, 'fulfilling this mission depends on effectively balancing the immediate need for information to guide management of biological resources with the need for technical assistance and long-range, strategic information to understand and predict emerging patterns and trends in ecological systems

  19. Chemical Technology Division progress report, January 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This progress report presents a summary of the missions and activities of the various sections and administrative groups in this Division for this period. Specific projects in areas such as energy research, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing are highlighted, and special programmatic activities conducted by the Division are identified and described. The administrative summary portion features information about publications and presentations of Chemical Technology Division staff, as well as a listing of patents awarded to Division personnel during this period.

  20. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  1. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.W.

    1982-06-01

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  2. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.W.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  3. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  4. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL`s research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division.

  5. Environmental Research Division technical progress report: January 1986--October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Technical process in the various research activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1986-1987. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Organic Geochemistry and Environmental Instrumentation Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter. Individual projects under each division are processed separately for the data bases.

  6. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1997-12-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1995, through March 31, 1997. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities.

  7. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  8. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1990. During this period, division research programs were significantly enhanced by the restart of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and by new initiatives in processing and characterization of materials.

  9. Physics division. Progress report for period ending September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1995 and 1996 fiscal years, beginning October 1, 1994, and ending September 30, 1996. The activities of the Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. In addition, there are smaller programs in plasma diagnostics and data compilation and evaluation. During the period of this report, there has been considerable success in bringing the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) into routine operation. The budgets of the nuclear physics portion of the Division have increased each year in nearly all areas, and several new members have been added to the Division research and development staff. On August 30, 1996, the HRIBF successfully accelerated its first radioactive ion beams, {sup 69}As and {sup 70}As. Prior to this, the heart of the facility, the RIB injector system, was completed, including installation of a remote handling system for the target/ion source assembly. Target and ion source development is likely to be the technical key to success of the HRIBF. We have expanded our efforts in those development areas. Of special note is the development of highly permeable composite targets which have now been shown to allow release of difficult-to-produce radioactive ions such as {sup 17,18}F. A summary of the HRIBF work is provided in Chapter 1, along with supporting activities of the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research.

  10. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.B.

    1989-03-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1988 fiscal year, beginning October 1, 1987, and ending September 30, 1988. The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. Operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility continues to represent the single largest activity within the Division. This year saw the completion of the acceleration tube upgrade of the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator and the achievement of record terminal potentials, operation for an experiment with 25 million volts on terminal, and successful tests with beam at 25.5 MV. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen significant growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies and especially ultrarelativistic beams. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as ''User Resources.'' The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program. The concentration of this program on optical and laser technology is marked by the change in designation to the Laser and Electro-Optics Lab. A small, continuing effort in elementary particle physics, carried out in collaboration with the University of Tennessee, is reported.

  11. Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

  12. Health and Safety Research Division: Progress report, October 1, 1985-March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress in our programs for the period October 1, 1985, through March 31, 1987. The division's presentations and publications represented important contributions on the forefronts of many fields. Eleven invention disclosures were filed, two patent applications submitted, and one patent issued. The company's transfers new technologies to the private sector more efficiently than in the past. The division's responsibilities to DOE under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) program includes inclusion recommendations for 3100 properties. The nuclear medicine program developed new radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclide generators through clinical trials with some of our medical cooperatives. Two major collaborative indoor air quality studies and a large epidemiological study of drinking water quality and human health were completed. ORNL's first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has achieved single atom resolution and has produced some of the world's best images of single atoms on the surface of a silicon crystal. The Biological and Radiation Physics Section, designed and constructed a soft x-ray spectrometer which has exhibited a measuring efficiency that is 10,000 times higher than other equipment. 1164 refs.

  13. The Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment: A Concept Assessment for Upper-Division Molecular Biology Students

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Brian A.; Wood, William B.; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring students’ conceptual understandings has become increasingly important to biology faculty members involved in evaluating and improving departmental programs. We developed the Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment (MBCA) to gauge comprehension of fundamental concepts in molecular and cell biology and the ability to apply these concepts in novel scenarios. Targeted at graduating students, the MBCA consists of 18 multiple-true/false (T/F) questions. Each question consists of a narrative stem followed by four T/F statements, which allows a more detailed assessment of student understanding than the traditional multiple-choice format. Questions were iteratively developed with extensive faculty and student feedback, including validation through faculty reviews and response validation through student interviews. The final assessment was taken online by 504 students in upper-division courses at seven institutions. Data from this administration indicate that the MBCA has acceptable levels of internal reliability (α = 0.80) and test–retest stability (r = 0.93). Students achieved a wide range of scores with a 67% overall average. Performance results suggest that students have an incomplete understanding of many molecular biology concepts and continue to hold incorrect conceptions previously documented among introductory-level students. By pinpointing areas of conceptual difficulty, the MBCA can provide faculty members with guidance for improving undergraduate biology programs. PMID:25713098

  14. Health, Safety, and Environment Division: Annual progress report 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.A.

    1988-04-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environment protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Many disciplines are required to meet the responsibilities, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health and safety problems arise occasionally from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory. Research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed to study specific problems for the Department of Energy and to help develop better occupational health and safety practices.

  15. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.B.

    1988-03-01

    The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. A major activity within the Division is operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. Highlights for this year, which include a record number of beam hours provided for research, are summarized. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies (GANIL) and ultrarelativistic beams (CERN). The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. The experimental nuclear structure research of this consortium is included. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division also operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as /open quotes/User Resources/close quotes/. The tandem continues a long history of supporting research in accelerator-based atomic physics. During this past year, new beam lines have been added to the ECR ion source to create user opportunities for atomic physics experiments with this unique device. These two facilities and the experimental programs in atomic physics are discussed. The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. Also included is the theory effort in support of the UNISOR structure program. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program and operation of an atomic physics data center. The nuclear physics program also operates a compilation and evaluation effort; this work is also described.

  16. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.B.

    1991-03-01

    The activities of this Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and its operation as a national user facility continued as the single largest activity within the Division. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to emphasize heavy ion studies, with much of the activity centered at the Holifield Facility. The work with heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies continues at the CERN SPS. Studies at the Brookhaven AGS, particularly in preparation of future experiments at RHIC, have seen an increased emphasis. A major consortium has been formed to propose the design and construction of a dimuon detector as the basis for one the principal experiments for RHIC. Also included are results from the increasing effort in particle physics, including participation in the L* proposal for the SSC. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been associated intimately with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. A major area of experimental research for the Division is atomic physics. This activity comprises two groups: one on accelerator-based atomic physics, centered primarily at the EN-tandem and the Holifield Facility, but extending this year to an experiment at ultrarelativistic energies at the CERN SPS; and one on atomic physics in support of fusion energy, based primarily at the ECR ion source facility. Included in this section is also a description of a new effort in multicharged ion-surface interactions, and details of a planned upgrade of the ECR source.

  17. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-07-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant`s essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  18. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

    1980-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  19. Conceptual Barriers to Progress Within Evolutionary Biology

    PubMed Central

    Laland, Kevin N.; Odling-Smee, John; Feldman, Marcus W.; Kendal, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    In spite of its success, Neo-Darwinism is faced with major conceptual barriers to further progress, deriving directly from its metaphysical foundations. Most importantly, neo-Darwinism fails to recognize a fundamental cause of evolutionary change, “niche construction”. This failure restricts the generality of evolutionary theory, and introduces inaccuracies. It also hinders the integration of evolutionary biology with neighbouring disciplines, including ecosystem ecology, developmental biology, and the human sciences. Ecology is forced to become a divided discipline, developmental biology is stubbornly difficult to reconcile with evolutionary theory, and the majority of biologists and social scientists are still unhappy with evolutionary accounts of human behaviour. The incorporation of niche construction as both a cause and a product of evolution removes these disciplinary boundaries while greatly generalizing the explanatory power of evolutionary theory. PMID:21572912

  20. Fearful symmetry: Subversion of asymmetric division in cancer development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jeevisha; Zimdahl, Bryan; Reya, Tannishtha

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric division is an evolutionarily conserved process that generates daughter cells with different fates through the unequal partitioning of fate determinants. While asymmetric division is particularly important in generating diversity during development, its dysregulation can also promote oncogenesis. In particular, signals that shift the normal balance of symmetric and asymmetric division can lead to a differentiation arrest and trigger cancer progression. Here we discuss the studies that have provided increasing support for this idea: beginning with original work carried out in Drosophila, we trace more recent data in mammalian systems that suggest that the subversion of asymmetric division can contribute significantly to the development and progression of both hematologic malignancies and solid cancers. PMID:25681272

  1. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to provide an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period September 1, 1989 through March 31, 1991. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research on the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the division. As in previous reports, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations. Summary lists of publications and presentations, staff additions and departures, scientific and professional activities of division staff, and technical conferences organized and sponsored by the division are included as appendices. The report is organized following the division of our research among four sections and information centers. These research areas are: Mathematical Sciences; Nuclear Data Measurement and Evaluations; Intelligent Systems; Nuclear Analysis and Shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center.

  2. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, W.D.

    1986-05-01

    Progress reports are presented for the four major sections of the division: analytical spectroscopy, radioactive materials laboratories, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry. A brief discussion of the division's role in the Laboratory's Environmental Restoration and Facilities Upgrade is given. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited.

  3. Physics Division annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Trela, W.J.

    1984-12-01

    The Physics Division is organized into three major research areas: Weapons Physics, Inertial Fusion Physics, and Basic Research. In Weapons Physics, new strategic defensive research initiatives were developed in response to President Reagan's speech in May 1983. Significant advances have been made in high-speed diagnostics including electro-optic technique, fiber-optic systems, and imaging. In Inertial Fusion, the 40-kJ Antares CO/sub 2/ laser facility was completed, and the 1- by 1- by 2-m-long large-aperture module amplifier (LAM) was constructed and operated. In Basic Research, our main emphasis was on development of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility as a world-class pulsed neutron research facility

  4. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.B.

    1986-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1985 fiscal year. The research activities were centered on experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The experimental nuclear physics program is dominated by heavy ion research. A major part of this effort is the responsibility for operating the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. A major new activity described is the preparation for participation in an ultrarelativistic heavy ion experiment to be performed at CERN in 1986. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. Theory efforts associated with the UNISOR program are described, as well as smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics. (LEW)

  5. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    The research activities of the Division are centered primarily in three areas: experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The largest of these efforts, experimental nuclear physics, is dominated by the heavy ion research program. A major responsibility under this program is the operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. During the period of this report, the facility has begun routine operation for the experimental program. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. The theoretical physics program, both nuclear and atomic, is covered. This program has benefited this year from the success of the VAX-AP computer system and from the increase in manpower provided by the ORNL/University of Tennessee Distinguished Scientist Program. Smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics are summarized. During the period of this report, we continued to explore possible future extensions of the Holifield Facility. We retain a strong interest in a relativistic heavy-ion collider in the 10 x 10 GeV/nuclear energy range. The ideas for such a facility, described in last year's report, have been modified to utilize the HHIRF 25 MV tandem accelerator as the first stage. Finally, the report concludes with some general information on publications, Division activities, and personnel changes.

  6. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Klobe, L.E.

    1990-12-01

    The format of this Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report is a major departure from previous reports. This report has been published in two volumes instead of one, and the description of individual activities have been shortened considerably to make it easier document to scan and to read. Volume 1 of this report presents brief descriptions of a few highly significant programmatic and technological efforts representative of Instrumentation and Controls Division activities over the past two years. This volume contains information concerning the publications, presentations, and other professional activities and achievements of I C Division staff members.

  7. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  8. Physics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    Progress is reported in detail in the following areas: Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, neutron physics, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, atomic and plasma physics, and high energy physics. Publications are listed. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers. (WHK)

  9. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, G.Y.; Schappert, G.T.

    1994-07-01

    This report discusses its following topics: Recent Weapons-Physics Experiments on the Pegasus II Pulsed Power Facility; Operation of a Large-Scale Plasma Source Ion Implantation Experiment; Production of Charm and Beauty Mesons at Fermilab Sudbury Neutrino Observatory; P-Division`s Essential Role in the Redirected Inertial Confinement Fusion Program; Trident Target Physics Program; Comparative Studies of Brain Activation with Magnetocephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Cellular Communication, Interaction of G-Proteins, and Single-Photon Detection; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Oxygen-doped La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+{delta}} Thermoacoustic Engines; A Shipborne Raman Water-Vapor Lidar for the Central Pacific Experiment; Angara-5 Pinch Temperature Verification with Time-resolved Spectroscopy; Russian Collaborations on Megagauss Magnetic Fields and Pulsed-Power Applications; Studies of Energy Coupling from Underground Explosions; Trapping and Cooling Large Numbers of Antiprotons: A First Step Toward the Measurement of Gravity on Antimatter; and Nuclear-Energy Production Without a Long-Term High-Level Waste Stream.

  10. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Brogden, I.

    1984-09-01

    This progress report covers the research and development activities of the Metals and Ceramics Division from January 1, 1983, through June 30, 1984. The format of the report follows the organizational structure of the division. Short summaries of technical work in progress in the various experimental groups are presented in six parts. Chapter 1 deals with the research and development activities of the Engineering Materials Section, Chapter 2 with the Processing Science and Technology Section, Chapter 3 with the Materials Science Section, Chapter 4 with Project Activities, Chapter 5 with Specialized Research Facilities and Equipment, and Chapter 6 with Miscellaneous Activities.

  11. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  12. Solid State Division progress report, September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    Progress made during the 19 months from March 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981, is reported in the following areas: theoretical solid state physics (surfaces, electronic and magnetic properties, particle-solid interactions, and laser annealing); surface and near-surface properties of solids (plasma materials interactions, ion-solid interactions, pulsed laser annealing, and semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion); defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, and defects and impurities in insulating crystals); transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, and physical properties of insulating materials); neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, and magnetic properties); crystal growth and characterization (nuclear waste forms, ferroelectric mateirals, high-temperature materials, and special materials); and isotope research materials. Publications and papers are listed. (WHK)

  13. Engineering Physics Division progress report period ending May 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    Progress is described in the following areas: nuclear cross sections and related quantities; methods for generating and validating multigroup cross-section libraries; methods for reactor and shield analysis; methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis; integral experiments and nuclear analyses (integral experiments supporting fusion reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting fusion reactor designs, high-energy particle transport calculations, integral experiments supporting gas-cooled fast breeder reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting gas-cooled reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting utilization of light-water reactors, and integral experiment analyses supporting surveillance dosimetry improvement program); energy economics modeling and analysis; safety and reliability assessments for nuclear power reactors; and information analysis and distribution. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

  14. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  15. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  16. Progress in nemertean biology: development and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Turbeville, J M

    2002-07-01

    This paper reviews progress in developmental biology and phylogeny of the Nemertea, a common but poorly studied spiralian taxon of considerable ecological and evolutionary significance. Analyses of reproductive biology (including calcium dynamics during fertilization and oocyte maturation), larval morphology and development and developmental genetics have significantly extended our knowledge of spiralian developmental biology. Developmental genetics studies have in addition provided characters useful for reconstructing metazoan phylogeny. Reinvestigation of the cell lineage of Cerebratulus lacteus using fluorescent tracers revealed that endomesoderm forms from the 4d cell as in other spiralians and that ectomesoderm is derived from the 3a and 3b cells as in annelids, echiurans and molluscs. Studies examining blastomere specification show that cell fates are established precociously in direct developers and later in indirect developers. Morphological characters used to estimate the phylogenetic position of nemerteans are critically re-evaluated, and cladistic analyses of morphology reveal that conflicting hypotheses of nemertean relationships result because of different provisional homology statements. Analyses that include disputed homology statements (1, gliointerstitial cell system 2, coelomic circulatory system) suggest that nemerteans form the sister taxon to the coelomate spiralian taxa rather than the sister taxon to Platyhelminthes. Analyses of small subunit rRNA (18S rDNA) sequences alone or in combination with morphological characters support the inclusion of the nemerteans in a spiralian coelomate clade nested within a more inclusive lophotrochozoan clade. Ongoing evaluation of nemertean relationships with mitochondrial gene rearrangements and other molecular characters is discussed. PMID:21708766

  17. Building Cognitive Support for the Learning of Long Division Skills Using Progressive Schematization: Design and Empirical Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurts, Karel

    2008-01-01

    The design and empirical validation of a computer-based learning environment for acquiring long division skills, called the long division machine (LDM), are described. The construction of the LDM is primarily based on the didactic method of progressive schematisation. It offers the student a game-like environment for solving division problems by…

  18. Water Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-06-01

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evaluation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  19. Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Abuaf, N.; Levine, M.M.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-08-01

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evlauation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  20. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K.

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  1. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to maintain an outstanding program of basic and applied research displaying a high level of creativity and achievement as documented by awards, publications, professional service, and successful completion of variety of projects. Our focus is on human health and the scientific basis for measurement and assessment of health-related impacts of energy technologies. It is our custom to publish a division progress report every 18 months that summarizes our programmatic progress and other measures of achievement over the reporting period. Since it is not feasible to summarize in detail all of our work over the period covered by this report (October 1, 1988, to March 30, 1990), we intend this document to point the way to the expensive open literature that documents our findings. During the reporting period the Division continued to maintain strong programs in its traditional areas of R D, but also achieved noteworthy progress in other areas. Much of the Division's work on site characterization, development of new field instruments, compilation of data bases, and methodology development fits into this initiative. Other new work in tunneling microscopy in support of DOE's Human Genome Program and the comprehensive R D work related to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy have attained new and exciting results. These examples of our progress and numerous other activities are highlighted in this report.

  2. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual research summary, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.H.

    1984-08-01

    This research summary contains brief descriptions of research in the following areas: (1) mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis; (2) role of metals in cocarcinogenesis and the use of liposomes for metal mobilization; (3) control of mutagenesis and cell differentiation in cultured cells by tumor promoters; (4) radiation effects in mammalian cells; (5) radiation carcinogenesis and radioprotectors; (6) life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations; (7) mammalian genetics and biostatistics; (8) radiation toxicity studies; (9) hematopoiesis in chronic toxicity; (10) molecular biology studies; (11) chemical toxicology; (12) carcinogen identification and metabolism; (13) metal metabolism and toxicity; and (14) neurobehavioral chronobiology. (ACR)

  3. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  4. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division`s total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division`s programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  5. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1999 Progress Report, Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Hoffman

    2000-12-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($500K) in FY99 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Five are new projects for this year; seven projects have been completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published thirty-four papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division.

  6. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 2001 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect

    L.G. Hoffman; K. Alvar; T. Buhl; E. Foltyn; W. Hansen; B. Erdal; P. Fresquez; D. Lee; B. Reinert

    2002-05-01

    This progress report presents the results of 11 projects funded ($500K) in FY01 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division (ESH). Five projects fit into the Health Physics discipline, 5 projects are environmental science and one is industrial hygiene/safety. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published sixteen papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplement funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and workspace, were also provided to TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Divisions.

  7. Chemical Technology Division progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Genung, R.K.; Hightower, J.R.; Bell, J.T.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period July 1, 1991, through December 31, 1992. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Special programmatic activities conducted by the division are identified and described. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  8. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Counce, D.M.; Wolff, P.P.

    1993-04-01

    Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related Issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1992. Energy Division`s total expenditures in FY 1992 were $42.8 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 116.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, technology transfer, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and civilian transportation analysis. Energy conservation technologies focus on electric power systems, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems conduct research for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. Much of Energy Division`s research is valuable to other organizations as well as to sponsors. This information is disseminated by the staff`s involvement in professional and trade organizations and workshops; joint research with universities and private-sector firms; collaboration with state and local governments; presentation of work at conferences; and publication of research results in journals, reports, and conference proceedings.

  9. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, P.P.

    1994-07-01

    One of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY1993. Energy Division is committed to (1) understanding the mechanisms by which societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society`s understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy-efficient technologies; (4) improving transportation policy and planning; (5) enhancing basic knowledge in the social sciences as related to energy and associated issues. Energy Division`s expenditures in FY1993 totaled $42 million. The work was supported by the US DOE, DOD, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 126.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and computer sciences and data systems. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy use and delivery technologies, and (3) transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, transportation analysis, and analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on electric power systems, building equipment, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Transportation systems research is conducted both to improve the quality of civilian transportation and for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  10. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1981-1982. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 61 research reports in the 1981-1982 annual report for the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Programs reviewed include research medicine, Donner Pavilion, environmental physiology, radiation biophysics and structural biophysics. (KRM)

  11. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, July 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes progress made for the period July 1984 through September 1985. Sections describe research in health studies, dosimetry and biophysical transport, biological and radiation physics, chemical physics, and risk analysis. (ACR)

  12. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, R.H.

    1991-06-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division are described in this annual progress report for FY 1990. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of how societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy efficient technologies; and (4) developing improved transportation planning and policy. Disciplines of the 129 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building enveloped (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), retrofits for existing buildings, and electric power systems. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. 48 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Division serves a national laboratory, and as such has an expansive domain: science, industry, and national defense. The core mission is to support the scientific apparatus of the Laboratory and all of the systems that protect the safety and health of people and the environment. Progress is reported for the five sections: photonics and measurements systems, electronic systems, signal processing, controls and systems integration, and technical support.

  14. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1988: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described in this annual progress report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1988. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of the way society makes choices in energy use and energy-using technologies, (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental implications of changes in energy technology, and (3) improving and developing new energy-efficient technologies. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on four major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation and decision systems research, (3) technology research and development for improving the efficiency of energy and end-use technologies, and (4) electric power systems. The Division's total expenditures in FY 1988 were $44.3 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 139 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics.

  15. Fusion Energy Division progress report, 1 January 1990--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1994-03-01

    The Fusion Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, encompasses nearly all areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an economical and environmentally attractive energy source for the future. The program involves staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the US and abroad. Achievements resulting from this collaboration are documented in this report, which is issued as the progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division; it also contains information from components for the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling; development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments; assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas; development and testing of materials for fusion devices; and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas (about 15% of the Division`s activities). Highlights from program activities during 1990 and 1991 are presented.

  16. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  17. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division's total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  18. The Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment: A Concept Assessment for Upper-Division Molecular Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Brian A.; Wood, William B.; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring students' conceptual understandings has become increasingly important to biology faculty members involved in evaluating and improving departmental programs. We developed the Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment (MBCA) to gauge comprehension of fundamental concepts in molecular and cell biology and the ability to apply these concepts in…

  19. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1998 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Hoffman; Kenneth Alvar; Thomas Buhl; Bruce Erdal; Philip Fresquez; Elizabeth Foltyn; Wayne Hansen; Bruce Reinert

    1999-06-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($504K) in FY98 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Nine projects are new for this year; two projects were completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published 19 papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space were also provided to the TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division. Products generated from the projects funded in FY98 included a new extremity dosimeter that replaced the previously used finger-ring dosimeters, a light and easy-to-use detector to measure energy deposited by neutron interactions, and a device that will allow workers to determine the severity of a hazard.

  20. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W. S.

    1982-04-01

    The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period.

  1. Chemical Technology Division: Progress report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period January 1, 1987, to June 30, 1988. The following major areas are covered: waste management and environmental programs, radiochemical and reactor engineering programs, basic science and technology, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, and administrative resources and facilities. The Administrative Summary, an appendix, presents a comprehensive listing of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this period. A staffing level and financial summary and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included.

  2. Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, R.R.

    1982-05-01

    This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  3. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech`s energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  4. Chemical Technology Division progress report, October 1, 1989--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report reviews the mission of the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) and presents a summary of organizational structure, programmatic sponsors, and funding levels for the period October 1, 1988, through June 30, 1991. The report also summarizes the missions and activities of organizations within Chem Tech for the reporting period. Specific projects performed within Chem Tech's energy research programs, waste and environmental programs, and radiochemical processing programs are highlighted. Other information regarding publications, patents, awards, and conferences organized by Chem Tech staff is also included.

  5. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.V.

    1989-03-01

    The mission of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) is to provide a sound scientific basis for the measurement and assessment of human health impacts of radiological and chemical substances. Our approach to fulfilling this mission is to conduct a broad program of experimental, theoretical, and field research based on a strong foundation of fundamental physical studies that blend into well-established programs in life sciences. Topics include biomedical screening techniques, biological and chemical sensors, risk assessment, health hazards, dosimetry, nuclear medicine, environmental pollution monitoring, electron-molecule interactions, interphase physics, surface physics, data base management, environmental mutagens, carcinogens, and tetratogens.

  6. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: Analytical Research, Development and Implementation; Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization; and Technical Support. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1989. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 69 articles, 41 proceedings, and 31 reports were published, and 151 oral presentations were given during this reporting period. Some 308,981 determinations were performed.

  7. Health and Safety Research Division. Progress report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Research progress for the period October 1, 1979 through March 31, 1981 is reported. Research conducted by the Office of Integrated Assessments and Policy Analysis, Health Studies Section, Technology Assessments Section, Biological and Radiation Physics Section, and Chemical Physics Section is summarized. (ACR)

  8. Health and Safety Research Division progress report, April 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    Research progress for the reporting period is briefly summarized for the following sections: (1) health studies, (2) technology assessments, (3) biological and radiation physics, (4) chemical physics, (5) Office of Risk Analysis, and (6) health and environmental risk and analysis. (ACR)

  9. Division of Biological and Medical Research research summary 1984-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.H.

    1985-08-01

    The Division of Biological and Medical Research at Argonne National Laboratory conducts multidisciplinary research aimed at defining the biological and medical hazards to man from energy technologies and new energy options. These technically oriented studies have a strong base in fundamental research in a variety of scientific disciplines, including molecular and cellular biology, biophysics, genetics, radiobiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, chemistry, environmental toxicology, and epidemiology. This research summary is organized into six parts. The first five parts reflect the Divisional structure and contain the scientific program chapters, which summarize the activities of the individual groups during the calendar year 1984 and the first half of 1985. To provide better continuity and perspective, previous work is sometimes briefly described. Although the summaries are short, efforts have been made to indicate the range of research activities for each group.

  10. Progress in focus: recent advances in histochemistry and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Asan, Esther

    2002-12-01

    Advances in histochemical and cell biological techniques enable increasingly refined investigations into the cellular and subcellular distribution of specific molecules and into their role in dynamic processes; thus progress in these fields complements the growing knowledge in genomics and proteomics. The present review summarizes recent technical progress and novel applications. PMID:12483316

  11. CDC-25.2, a C. elegans ortholog of cdc25, is essential for the progression of intestinal divisions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Uk; Son, Miseol; Kim, Jiyoung; Shim, Yhong-Hee; Kawasaki, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal divisions in Caenorhabditis elegans take place in 3 stages: (1) cell divisions during embryogenesis, (2) binucleations at the L1 stage, and (3) endoreduplications at the end of each larval stage. Here, we report that CDC-25.2, a C. elegans ortholog of Cdc25, is required for these specialized division cycles between the 16E cell stage and the onset of endoreduplication. Results of our genetic analyses suggest that CDC-25.2 regulates intestinal cell divisions and binucleations by counteracting WEE-1.3 and by activating the CDK-1/CYB-1 complex. CDC-25.2 activity is then repressed by LIN-23 E3 ubiquitin ligase before the onset of intestinal endoreduplication, and this repression is maintained by LIN-35, the C. elegans ortholog of Retinoblastoma (Rb). These findings indicate that timely regulation of CDC-25.2 activity is essential for the progression of specialized division cycles and development of the C. elegans intestine. PMID:27104746

  12. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1990. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Klobe, L.E.

    1990-12-01

    The format of this Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report is a major departure from previous reports. This report has been published in two volumes instead of one, and the description of individual activities have been shortened considerably to make it easier document to scan and to read. Volume 1 of this report presents brief descriptions of a few highly significant programmatic and technological efforts representative of Instrumentation and Controls Division activities over the past two years. This volume contains information concerning the publications, presentations, and other professional activities and achievements of I&C Division staff members.

  13. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  14. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  15. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs.

  16. Recent progress in exobiology and planetary biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    Recent work in the fields of exobiology, the study of the possible characteristics of extraterrestrial life, and planetary biology, the study of life forms as a function of planetary conditions, is reviewed. Searches conducted for life on Mars by the Viking Landers and on Titan by Voyager 1 are considered, and the origin of life on earth is considered in relation to the question of the inorganic trace elements in living systems that are required for life. The question of the origin of terrestrial life from spores carried through the interstellar medium is examined, and the unlikelihood of the survival of such spores except within meteorites or dust particles is pointed out. Studies of organic molecules present in the interstellar medium are indicated as evidence that the conditions necessary for the formation of life can exist in various locations throughout the universe. Investigations of the molecular evolution of life on earth and of life under extreme conditions of heat, cold, drought and ultraviolet radiation, and of the organic compounds found in meteorites and comets are also discussed. The importance of a mechanism of heredity, such as terrestrial DNA, to the evolution of terrestrial and possible extraterrestrial life is pointed out.

  17. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the following information from the Instrumentation and Controls Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory: supplementary activities; seminars; publications and presentations; scientific and professional activities, achievements, and awards; and division organization charts.

  18. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1992. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the following information from the Instrumentation and Controls Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory: supplementary activities; seminars; publications and presentations; scientific and professional activities, achievements, and awards; and division organization charts.

  19. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Newsletter Number 56, Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, George M., Ed.

    This newsletter presents a progress report for the 1973-74 year for the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). The program for the Educable Mentally Handicapped is reviewed and a new series of Animal Behavior films is described. Other articles in the newsletter include information on the Human Sciences Program with emphasis on the…

  20. AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  1. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1983-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Dvision of Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development, and utilization; and (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections, each of which may carry out any type of work falling in the three categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections (analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials, bio/organic analysis, and general and environmental analysis) during the period January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1982. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 61 articles, 32 proceedings publications and 37 reports have been published, and 107 oral presentations were given during this reporting period.

  2. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  3. Development of biological movement recognition by interaction between active basis model and fuzzy optical flow division.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Bardia; Loo, Chu Kiong

    2014-01-01

    Following the study on computational neuroscience through functional magnetic resonance imaging claimed that human action recognition in the brain of mammalian pursues two separated streams, that is, dorsal and ventral streams. It follows up by two pathways in the bioinspired model, which are specialized for motion and form information analysis (Giese and Poggio 2003). Active basis model is used to form information which is different from orientations and scales of Gabor wavelets to form a dictionary regarding object recognition (human). Also biologically movement optic-flow patterns utilized. As motion information guides share sketch algorithm in form pathway for adjustment plus it helps to prevent wrong recognition. A synergetic neural network is utilized to generate prototype templates, representing general characteristic form of every class. Having predefined templates, classifying performs based on multitemplate matching. As every human action has one action prototype, there are some overlapping and consistency among these templates. Using fuzzy optical flow division scoring can prevent motivation for misrecognition. We successfully apply proposed model on the human action video obtained from KTH human action database. Proposed approach follows the interaction between dorsal and ventral processing streams in the original model of the biological movement recognition. The attained results indicate promising outcome and improvement in robustness using proposed approach. PMID:24883361

  4. Development of Biological Movement Recognition by Interaction between Active Basis Model and Fuzzy Optical Flow Division

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Chu Kiong

    2014-01-01

    Following the study on computational neuroscience through functional magnetic resonance imaging claimed that human action recognition in the brain of mammalian pursues two separated streams, that is, dorsal and ventral streams. It follows up by two pathways in the bioinspired model, which are specialized for motion and form information analysis (Giese and Poggio 2003). Active basis model is used to form information which is different from orientations and scales of Gabor wavelets to form a dictionary regarding object recognition (human). Also biologically movement optic-flow patterns utilized. As motion information guides share sketch algorithm in form pathway for adjustment plus it helps to prevent wrong recognition. A synergetic neural network is utilized to generate prototype templates, representing general characteristic form of every class. Having predefined templates, classifying performs based on multitemplate matching. As every human action has one action prototype, there are some overlapping and consistency among these templates. Using fuzzy optical flow division scoring can prevent motivation for misrecognition. We successfully apply proposed model on the human action video obtained from KTH human action database. Proposed approach follows the interaction between dorsal and ventral processing streams in the original model of the biological movement recognition. The attained results indicate promising outcome and improvement in robustness using proposed approach. PMID:24883361

  5. Instrumentation and Controls Division biennial progress report, September 1, 1978-September 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, G.S.

    1981-06-01

    Brief summaries of research work are presented in the following section: overview of the ORNL Instrumentation and Controls Division activities; new developments and methods; reactor instrumentation and controls; measurement and control engineering; electronic engineering; maintenance; studies; services; and development; and division achievements.

  6. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

  7. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    The following sentences highlight some of the technical activities carried out during 1991. They illustrate the diversity of programs and technical work performed within the Analytical Chemistry Division. Our neutron activation analysis laboratory at HFIR was placed into operation during 1991. We have combined inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) with a preparation procedure developed at the Argonne National Laboratory to measure ultra-trace levels of U, Pu, Np, and Am in body fluids, primarily urine. Much progress has been made over the last year in the interfacing of an rf-powered glow discharge source to a double-focusing mass spectrometer. Preliminary experiments using electrospray ionization combined with ion trap mass spectrometry show much promise for the analysis of metals in solution. A secondary ion microprobe has been constructed that permits determination of the distribution of organic compounds less than a monolayer thick on samples as large as 1 cm diameter. Fourier transform mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be a highly effective tool for the detailed characterization of biopolymers, especially normal and modified oligonucleotides. Much has been accomplished in understanding the fundamentals of quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Work with ITMS instrumentation has led to the development of rapid methods for the detection of trace organics in environmental and physiological samples. A new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed for use with our positron ionization experiments. Fundamental research on chromatography at high concentrations and on gas-solid adsorption has continued. The preparation of a monograph on the chemistry of environmental tobacco smoke was completed this year.

  8. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects.

  9. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1985-03-01

    During the reporting period, relatively minor changes have occurred in the research areas of interest to the Division. Nearly all the research of the Division can be classified broadly as mission-oriented basic research. Topics covered include: theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; and preparation and characterization of research materials. (GHT)

  10. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

  11. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Klobe, L.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls (IandC) Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performs basic and applied instrumentation and controls research, development and design engineering, specialized instrument design and fabrication, and maintenance services for instruments, electronics, and computers. The IandC Division is one of the largest RandD organizations of its type among government laboratories, and it exists as the result of an organizational strategy to integrate ORNL's instrumentation and controls-related disciplines into one dedicated functional organization to increase the Laboratory's expertise and capabilities in these rapidly expanding, innovative areas of technology. The Division participates in the programs and projects of ORNL by applying its expertise and capabilities in concert with other divisions to perform basic research and mission-oriented technology development. Many of the Division's RandD tasks that are a part of a larger ORNL program are of sufficient scope that the IandC effort constitutes a separate program element with direct funding and management responsibility within the Division. The activities of IandC include performance of an RandD task in IandC facilities, the participation of from one of many IandC engineers and scientists in a multidisciplinary team working in a specific research area or development project, design and fabrication of a special instrument or instrumentation system, or a few hours of maintenance service. In its support and maintenance work, the role of the IandC Division is to provide a level of expertise appropriate to complete a job successfully at minimum overall cost and time schedule---a role which involves IandC in almost all ORNL activities.

  12. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M&C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  13. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  14. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

  15. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report describes work done by staff of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 1986. The work of the Division is quite diversified, but it can be divided into four research themes: (1) technology for improving the productivity of energy use; (2) technology for electric power systems; (3) analysis and assessment of energy and environmental issues, policies, and technologies; and (4) data systems research and development (R and D). The research is supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), numerous other federal agencies, and some private organizations. 190 refs., 60 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending August 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This paper contains abstracts on research performed at the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The areas covered are: mathematical science; nuclear-data measurement and evaluation; intelligent systems; nuclear analysis and shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center. (LSP)

  17. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1992-09-01

    During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, superconductivity, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. The High Flux Isotope Reactor was returned to full operation.

  18. Solid State Division: Progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1988-03-01

    This paper contains a collection of articles on research done at the Solid State Division of ORNL. General topics covered are: theoretical solid state physics; neutron scattering; physical properties of superconductors and ceramics; synthesis and characterization of solids; ion beam and laser processing; and surface and defect studies. (LSP)

  19. Metal finishing and vacuum processes groups, Materials Fabrication Division progress report, March-May 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Romo, J.G.; Jones, L.M.

    1984-07-11

    Progress is reported in fabrication and coating activities being conducted for the weapons program, nuclear test program, nuclear design program, magnetic fusion program, and miscellaneous applications. (DLC)

  20. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Shults, W.D.; Lyon, W.S.

    1980-05-01

    The progress is reported in the following sections: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, technical support, bio-organic analysis, nuclear and radiochemical analysis, and quality assurance. (DLC)

  1. Engineering Physics Division progress report for period ending November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Separate abstracts are included for sections concerning measurement of nuclear cross sections and related quantities; nuclear cross-section evaluations and theory; nuclear cross-section processing, testing, and sensitivity analysis; engineering physics division integral experiments and their analyses; development of methods for shield and reactor analysis; analyses for specific systems or applications; energy model validation; systems reliability and operations research; and information analysis and distribution.

  2. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.C.

    1993-05-01

    In this report, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations organized into sections following the five major operating units in the division: Mathematical Sciences, Intelligent Systems, Nuclear Data and Measurement Analysis, Nuclear Analysis and Shielding, and the Engineering Physics Information Centers. Each section begins with an introduction highlighting honors, awards, and significant research accomplishments in that unit during the reporting period.

  3. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report covers work done during FY 1983 by the staff of the Energy Division and its subcontractors and by colleagues in other Oak Ridge National Laboratory divisions working on Energy Division projects. The work can be divided into four areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) models and data systems, (3) research to improve the efficiency of energy use and to improve electric power transmission and distribution, and (4) research utilization. Support came principally from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Defense, but also from a number of other agencies and organizations. Analysis and assessment included work on (a) environmental issues, including those deriving from the preparation of environmental impact statements; (b) energy and resource analysis; and (c) emergency preparedness. The models and data systems area involved research on evaluating and developing energy, environment, and engineering simulation models and on devising large data management systems, evaluating user data requirements, and compiling data bases. Research on improving the efficiency of energy use was focused primarily on the buildings and electricity sectors. A major effort on heat pump technology, which includes both heat-activated and electrically driven systems, continues. An important aspect of all the work was research utilization. Since the Energy Division is doing applied research, results are, by definition, intended to solve problems or answer questions of DOE and other sponsors. However, there are other users, and research utilization activities include technology transfer, commercialization efforts, outreach to state and regional organizations, and, of course, information dissemination.

  4. Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, R.R.

    1981-05-01

    This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

  5. [Progress in molecular biology study of DNA computer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Zhou; Zhao, Jian; He, Lin

    2003-09-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleotide acids) computer is an emerging new study area that basically combines molecular biology study of DNA molecules and computational study on how to employ these specific molecules to calculate. In 1994 Adleman described his pioneering research on DNA computing in Science. This is the first experimental report on DNA computer study. In 2001 Benenson et al published a paper in Nature regarding a programmable and autonomous DNA computing device. Because of its Turing-like functions, the device is regarded as another milestone progress for DNA computer study. The main features of DNA computer are massively parallel computing ability and potential enormous data storage capacity. Comparing with conventional electronic computers, DNA molecules provide conceptually a revolution in computing, and more and more implications have been found in various disciplines. DNA computer studies have brought great progress not only in its own computing mechanisms, but also in DNA manipulation technologies especially nano-technology. This article presents the basic principles of DNA computer, its applications, its important relationship with genomic research and our comments on all above issues. PMID:14577383

  6. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Shults, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This report is divided into: Analytical spectroscopy (optical spectroscopy, organic mass spectrometry, inorganic mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry), inorganic and radiochemistry (transuranium and activation analysis, low-level radiochemical analysis, inorganic analysis, radioactive materials analysis, special projects), organic chemistry (organic spectroscopy, separations and synthesis, special projects, organic analysis, ORNL/UT research program), operations (quality assurance/quality control, environmental protection, safety, analytical improvement, training, radiation control), education programs, supplementary activities, and presentation of research results. Tables are included for articles reviewed or refereed for periodicals, analytical service work, division manpower and financial summary, and organization chart; a glossary is also included.

  7. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

  8. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1995 progress report - Environmental, Safety, and Health (ESH) division

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, L.L.

    1996-09-01

    This report covers six months of effort, including startup time. Five projects were supported by the division: Pilot Program for the Risk-Based Surveillance of Lung Cancer in Los Alamos National Laboratory Workers, Optimization of Placement of Workplace Continuous Air Monitoring Instrumentation, A Polymeric Barrier Monitor to Protect Workers, Evaluation of a Real-Time Beryllium Detection Instrument and the Implications of Its Use, and High-Energy Dosimetry. A project summary for each is provided. An appendix to the report includes the 1995 Request for Proposals, Committee Members, Priority Technical Areas of Interest for FY95, Relative Prioritization and Weighting Factors, Format for Proposals, and Charter.

  9. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers. (DLC)

  10. Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, October 1979-January 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-31

    Progress is summarized concerning magnetic fusion energy materials, laser fusion energy, aluminium-air battery and vehicle, geothermal research, oil-shale research, nuclear waste management, office of basic energy sciences research, and materials research notes. (FS)

  11. Learning Cell Biology as a Team: A Project-Based Approach to Upper-Division Cell Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Robin; Boggs, James

    2002-01-01

    To help students develop successful strategies for learning how to learn and communicate complex information in cell biology, we developed a quarter-long cell biology class based on team projects. Each team researches a particular human disease and presents information about the cellular structure or process affected by the disease, the cellular…

  12. Student Perspectives on Curricular Change: Lessons from an Undergraduate Lower-Division Biology Core

    PubMed Central

    Casem, Merri Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Inquiry-based laboratories are acknowledged as the preferred method of instruction for development of research skills. Much has been written about changes in student performance associated with inquiry, but less is known about how students view the inquiry-based format or whether they perceive a benefit from this type of instruction. The Student Assessment of Learning Gains (SALG) survey was used to evaluate and compare student reactions to the new, inquiry-based laboratories of a lower-division undergraduate curriculum, from implementation to the present (an interval of 3 yr). Initial student response to the format and value of the inquiry labs improved over time. The quality of the graduate teaching assistants and the clarity of the laboratory manual were important variables influencing student perception. A student's perception of his/her retention of lab-related skills was strongly associated with perceptions of gains in those skills. Student responses reflect their most current laboratory experience and not a cumulative effect of participation in the core series of courses. Student success in the inquiry format was not associated with gender or status as a transfer student. The majority of students believe that their experiences in the lower-division inquiry labs have prepared them for upper-division course work. PMID:17012192

  13. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This report provides an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period June 30, 1985 through September 30, 1987. Work in Mathematical Sciences continues to include applied mathematics research, statistics research, and computer science. Nuclear-data measurements and evaluations continue for fusion reactors, fission reactors, and other nuclear systems. Also discussed are long-standing studies of fission-reactor shields through experiments and related analysis, of accelerator shielding, and of fusion-reactor neutronics. Work in Machine Intelligence continues to feature the development of an autonomous robot. The last descriptive part of this report reflects the work in our Engineering Physics Information Center, which again concentrates primarily upon radiation-shielding methods and related data.

  14. Y-12 Development Division technical progress report, period ending October 1, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Kosinski, F.E.

    1990-08-30

    Shallow land burial in Bear Creek Burial Ground (BCBG) of depleted uranium and uranium alloy chips was discontinued. These materials are now being processed at the Uranium Chip Oxidation Facility (UCOF). Some of the depleted uranium chips, formerly taken to BCBG, were oxidized in 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-lb batches to determine the optimal processing weight that would reduce the overall flameout frequency to one that complies with UCOF safety documentation. The goal of the Y-12 Plant Development Division was to reduce the flameout frequency to 1%. Batches of uranium-titanium alloy mill, mixed, and suspect chips were also processed at UCOF using modified operating procedures. Most of the depleted uranium and uranium alloy chips, except for the sawfines, were safely oxidized at UCOF with a minimum number of flameouts. 1 fig., 14 tabs.

  15. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report, September 1, 1980-July 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Klobe, L.E.E.

    1982-12-01

    Activities are reported by the Reactor Systems Section, Research Instrument Section, and the Measurement and Controls Engineering Section. Reactor system activities include dynamic analysis, survillanc and diagnostic methods, design and evaluation, detectors, facilities support, process instrumentation development, and special assignments. Activities in the Research Instrument Section include the Navy-ORNL RADIAC development program, advanced ..gamma.. and x ray detector systems, neutron detection and subcriticality measurements, circuit development, position-sensitive detectors, stand-alone computers, environmental monitoring-detectors and systems, plant security, engineering support for fusion energy division, engineering support for accelerator physics, and communications: radio, closed-circuit tv, and computer. Activities in the Measurement and Controls Engineering Section include the AVLIS program; gas centrifuge enrichment technology support; Advanced Instrumentation for Reflood Studies (AIDRS) program; instrumentation development support for fuel reprocessing; in-core experiments and reactor systems; energy, conservation, and electric power systems; computer systems; measurements research; and fossil energy studies Publications are listed. (WHK)

  16. Fusion energy division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The ORNL Program encompasses most aspects of magnetic fusion research including research on two magnetic confinement programs (tokamaks and ELMO bumpy tori); the development of the essential technologies for plasma heating, fueling, superconducting magnets, and materials; the development of diagnostics; the development of atomic physics and radiation effect data bases; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; the physics and engineering of present-generation devices; and the design of future devices. The integration of all of these activities into one program is a major factor in the success of each activity. An excellent example of this integration is the extremely successful application of neutral injection heating systems developed at ORNL to tokamaks both in the Fusion Energy Division and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The goal of the ORNL Fusion Program is to maintain this balance between plasma confinement, technology, and engineering activities.

  17. Stem cells - biological update and cell therapy progress

    PubMed Central

    GIRLOVANU, MIHAI; SUSMAN, SERGIU; SORITAU, OLGA; RUS-CIUCA, DAN; MELINCOVICI, CARMEN; CONSTANTIN, ANNE-MARIE; MIHU, CARMEN MIHAELA

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the advances in stem cell research have suggested that the human body may have a higher plasticity than it was originally expected. Until now, four categories of stem cells were isolated and cultured in vivo: embryonic stem cells, fetal stem cells, adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Although multiple studies were published, several issues concerning the stem cells are still debated, such as: the molecular mechanisms of differentiation, the methods to prevent teratoma formation or the ethical and religious issues regarding especially the embryonic stem cell research. The direct differentiation of stem cells into specialized cells: cardiac myocytes, neural cells, pancreatic islets cells, may represent an option in treating incurable diseases such as: neurodegenerative diseases, type I diabetes, hematologic or cardiac diseases. Nevertheless, stem cell-based therapies, based on stem cell transplantation, remain mainly at the experimental stages and their major limitation is the development of teratoma and cancer after transplantation. The induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represent a prime candidate for future cell therapy research because of their significant self-renewal and differentiation potential and the lack of ethical issues. This article presents an overview of the biological advances in the study of stem cells and the current progress made in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:26609255

  18. Stem cells - biological update and cell therapy progress.

    PubMed

    Girlovanu, Mihai; Susman, Sergiu; Soritau, Olga; Rus-Ciuca, Dan; Melincovici, Carmen; Constantin, Anne-Marie; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the advances in stem cell research have suggested that the human body may have a higher plasticity than it was originally expected. Until now, four categories of stem cells were isolated and cultured in vivo: embryonic stem cells, fetal stem cells, adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Although multiple studies were published, several issues concerning the stem cells are still debated, such as: the molecular mechanisms of differentiation, the methods to prevent teratoma formation or the ethical and religious issues regarding especially the embryonic stem cell research. The direct differentiation of stem cells into specialized cells: cardiac myocytes, neural cells, pancreatic islets cells, may represent an option in treating incurable diseases such as: neurodegenerative diseases, type I diabetes, hematologic or cardiac diseases. Nevertheless, stem cell-based therapies, based on stem cell transplantation, remain mainly at the experimental stages and their major limitation is the development of teratoma and cancer after transplantation. The induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represent a prime candidate for future cell therapy research because of their significant self-renewal and differentiation potential and the lack of ethical issues. This article presents an overview of the biological advances in the study of stem cells and the current progress made in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:26609255

  19. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1984-05-01

    Progress and activities are reported in: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials analysis, bio/organic analysis, general and environmental analysis, and quality assurance and safety. Supplementary activities are also discussed, and a bibliography of publications is also included. (DLC)

  20. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

  1. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  2. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1985-04-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following sections: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; bio/organic analysis; and general and environmental analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation analyses. In addition a list of publications and oral presentations and supplemental activities are included.

  3. Learning Cell Biology as a Team: A Project-Based Approach to Upper-Division Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Robin; Boggs, James

    2002-01-01

    To help students develop successful strategies for learning how to learn and communicate complex information in cell biology, we developed a quarter-long cell biology class based on team projects. Each team researches a particular human disease and presents information about the cellular structure or process affected by the disease, the cellular and molecular biology of the disease, and recent research focused on understanding the cellular mechanisms of the disease process. To support effective teamwork and to help students develop collaboration skills useful for their future careers, we provide training in working in small groups. A final poster presentation, held in a public forum, summarizes what students have learned throughout the quarter. Although student satisfaction with the course is similar to that of standard lecture-based classes, a project-based class offers unique benefits to both the student and the instructor. PMID:12669105

  4. Chemical Engineering Division Fuel Cycle Programs. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M.J.; Bates, J.K.; Cannon, T.F.

    1982-05-01

    Methods of measuring rates of leaching from simulated waste glasses using neutron activation analysis and radiotracers have been developed. Laboratory-scale impact tests of solid alternative waste forms are being performed to obtain a size analysis of the fragments. Logging techniques are being developed to measure the relative amount of residual oil in a depleted oil reservoir by injecting gamma-active solution into it. Work to test the behavior of radionuclides leached from proposed nuclear-waste repositories using laboratory-analog experiments is in progress. High potassium levels in crushed granite from a Northern Illinois drill hole are probably derived by the leaching of potassium feldspar. Testing and development of equipment for the destructive analysis of full-length irradiated fuel rods from the LWBR are in progress. 19 figures, 13 tables.

  5. Y-12 Development Division technical progress report, period ending January 1, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kosinsik, F.E.

    1990-09-28

    This report contains highlights on activities conducted at Y-12 Development Division for the period ending January 1, 1990. Ozone treatment removes trace amounts of organics and chloride ions from recycled acid. Heating significantly reduces this reaction time for removing these impurities. A new heater design was reinstalled on the recycle system, reducing the ozonation time from 70 to 100 hours to 30 to 40 hours. This reduction in ozonation time resulted in increased acid recovery and reduced acid wastes that had to be discarded. Shallow land burial in Bear Creek Burial Ground (BCBG) of depleted uranium and uranium alloy chips has been discontinued, and these materials will now be processed at the Uranium Chip Oxidation Facility (UCOF). A series of chip burns was made to reduce the overall flameout frequency to 1% to comply with UCOF safety documentation. This testing phase reduced the flameout frequency to 2 per 2,959 burns (<0.1%), which is a 92% decrease of flameouts over last quarter. This work successfully demonstrated that all of the uranium and uranium alloy chips (except sawfines) can be safely oxidized at UCOF with a flameout frequency of 1% or less. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Voelz, G.L.

    1985-05-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly.

  7. Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

    1995-09-01

    The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

  8. Solid-State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    Progress and activities are reported on: theoretical solid-state physics (surfaces; electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties; particle-solid interactions; laser annealing), surface and near-surface properties of solids (surface, plasma-material interactions, ion implantation and ion-beam mixing, pulsed-laser and thermal processing), defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, impurities and defects, semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion), transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, mass and charge transport in materials), neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, magnetic properties, structure and instrumentation), and preparation and characterization of research materials (growth and preparative methods, nuclear waste forms, special materials). (DLC)

  9. Occupational health, waste management, and environmental research program of the Health Division 1981. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Voelz, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide effective programs in health, safety, waste processing, and environmental protection for the Laboratory. During 1981, evaluations of respiratory protective equipment included 3 special DOE contractor supplied-air suits or hoods and 10 commercial supplied-air devices. Preliminary results of chemical permeation tests of different protective garment materials are reported. Industrial hygiene field studies of oil shale work were conducted at the Geokinetics true in situ facility and the Rio Blanco modified in situ facility. An occupational medical survey of workers at the Geokinetics, Inc., facility was completed. Research on the generation and characterization of aerosols was continued for inhalation studies of man-made mineral fibers and oil shale aerosols. The distribution of /sup 241/Am in a whole body was determined by tissue analyses. Preliminary results of mortality in workers formerly employed at the Rocky Flats plant were reported. A simplified method for the analysis of plutonium in urine has been developed. Instrumentation development resulted in a portable computer system for field data analysis and a small, computerized, wristwatch-style radiation dosimeter. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1981 showed the highest estimated radiation dose due to Laboratory operations is about 4% of the dose due to the natural radioactivity here. A study was completed on alternative strategies for long-term management of Los Alamos transuranic wastes. A successful 10-day test burn of pentachlorophenol-contaminated wastes was conducted in the Controlled Air Incinerator. Decontamination factors for five fission products in the off-gas handling system of the incinerator were measured.

  10. Factors Influencing Academic Performance of Students Enrolled in a Lower Division Cell Biology Core Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Julio G.; Anand, Sulekha

    2009-01-01

    Students' performance in two semesters of our Cell Biology course was examined for this study. Teaching strategies, behaviors, and pre-course variables were analyzed with respect to students' performance. Pre-semester and post-semester surveys were administered to ascertain students' perceptions about class difficulty, amount of study and effort…

  11. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Special Libraries Division. Section: Biological and Medical Sciences Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Four papers on biological and medical sciences libraries were presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. "Activities and Services of Medical Libraries in Japan--Past, Present, and Future" (Kazuo Urata and Toshinobu Suga, Japan) discusses the inauguration of the Japan Medical Library Association…

  12. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Biological and Medical Science Libraries. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on biological and medical science libraries which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "The International Programs of the National Library of Medicine" (Lois Ann Colaianni, United States); (2) "Information Needs for International Health. A CDC (Centers for Disease…

  13. EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS ON BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Authors, Various

    1980-10-01

    Planning a rational energy future requires anticipating the environmental consequences of various technologies. This is difficult to do with precision as the effects of pollutants are often determined by interactions between and among complex physical (abiotic) and biological (biotic) systems. A given pollutant may affect human beings through direct exposure or indirectly through inducing changes to biological systems which humans need to utilize. The concentration of a toxin in the food chain or the destruction of organisms necessary for the maintenance of high quality water are examples of indirect effects. Pollutants can be transformed and/or degraded as they establish residence in various components of an ecosystem. Anticipation and amelioration of pollutant effects involves the integration of a vast range of data. This data includes: (1) physical and chemical characterization cf the pollutant as it enters the environment; (2) determining effects on the various components (biotic and abiotic) within the context of the functioning ecosystem of interest; (3) transformation in movements and/or degradation of the pollutant within that ecosystem and within specific organisms and physical components; and (4) determining a detailed biochemical and biological picture of the interactions of pollutants with particular organisms and/or their cellular components judged salient for various processes. The major programs described below are designed to answer parts of the above fundamental questions relevant to pollutants generated by energy related technologies. Their emphasis is on anticipating consequences to the biological components of various ecosystems. The work ranges from studies involving parts of a single cell (the membranes) to studies involving the whole ecosystem (in the pelagic zone of a lake). The programs take advantage of expertise and technical abilities present at LBL. Two small exploratory projects which were of brief duration and not related to

  14. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel cycle work included hydraulic performance and extraction efficiency of eight-stage centrifugal contactors, flowsheet for the Aralex process, Ru and Zr extraction in a miniature centrifugal contactor, study of Zr aging in the organic phase and its effect on Zr extraction and hydraulic testing of the 9-cm-ID contactor. Work for predicting accident consequences in LWR fuel processing covered the relation between energy input (to subdivide a solid) and the modes of particle size frequency distribution. In the pyrochemical and dry processing program corrosion-testing materials for containment vessels and equipment for studying carbide reactions in bismuth is under way. Analytical studies have been made of salt-transport processes; efforts to spin tungsten crucibles 13 cm dia continue, and other information on tungsten fabrication is being assembled; the process steps of the chloride volatility process have been demonstrated and the thoria powder product used to produce oxide pellets; solubility of UO/sub 2/, PuO/sub 2/, and fission products in molten alkali nitrates is being investigated; work was continued on reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting the actinides into ammonium chloroaluminate from bismuth; the preparation of thorium-uranium carbide from the oxide is being studied as a means of improving the oxide reactivity; studies are in progress on producing uranium metal and decontaminated ThO/sub 2/ by the reaction of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in molten salts containing ThCl/sub 4/ and thorium metal chips. In the molten tin process, no basic thermodynamic or kinetic factors have been found that may limit process development.

  15. Biological therapies for rheumatoid arthritis: progress to date.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Gaurav; Salemi, Simonetta; Laganà, Bruno; Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; D'Amelio, Raffaele; Signore, Alberto

    2013-08-01

    Biologic drugs for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have revolutionized the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies, which include murine, chimeric, humanized, fully human antibodies and fusion proteins. These biologics bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity. Since 1998, nine different biologics have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the treatment of RA, and several others are in different stages of clinical trials. This field is in continuous evolution and new biologics are tested every year. Therefore a precise analysis is required in order to have a detailed and updated state of the art of this field. In this review, our main aim is to analyse all available biological therapies that are FDA and EMA approved for the treatment of RA and also those that are in clinical trials for the management of RA patients. PMID:23558378

  16. Culturally Relevant Inquiry-Based Laboratory Module Implementations in Upper-Division Genetics and Cell Biology Teaching Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Montero-Rojas, María; Carrero, Katherine; Toro, Gladys; Vélez, Ana; Carrero-Martínez, Franklin A.

    2011-01-01

    Today, more minority students are entering undergraduate programs than ever before, but they earn only 6% of all science or engineering PhDs awarded in the United States. Many studies suggest that hands-on research activities enhance students’ interest in pursuing a research career. In this paper, we present a model for the implementation of laboratory research in the undergraduate teaching laboratory using a culturally relevant approach to engage students. Laboratory modules were implemented in upper-division genetics and cell biology courses using cassava as the central theme. Students were asked to bring cassava samples from their respective towns, which allowed them to compare their field-collected samples against known lineages from agricultural stations at the end of the implementation. Assessment of content and learning perceptions revealed that our novel approach allowed students to learn while engaged in characterizing Puerto Rican cassava. In two semesters, based on the percentage of students who answered correctly in the premodule assessment for content knowledge, there was an overall improvement of 66% and 55% at the end in the genetics course and 24% and 15% in the cell biology course. Our proposed pedagogical model enhances students’ professional competitiveness by providing students with valuable research skills as they work on a problem to which they can relate. PMID:21885825

  17. Culturally relevant inquiry-based laboratory module implementations in upper-division genetics and cell biology teaching laboratories.

    PubMed

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Montero-Rojas, María; Carrero, Katherine; Toro, Gladys; Vélez, Ana; Carrero-Martínez, Franklin A

    2011-01-01

    Today, more minority students are entering undergraduate programs than ever before, but they earn only 6% of all science or engineering PhDs awarded in the United States. Many studies suggest that hands-on research activities enhance students' interest in pursuing a research career. In this paper, we present a model for the implementation of laboratory research in the undergraduate teaching laboratory using a culturally relevant approach to engage students. Laboratory modules were implemented in upper-division genetics and cell biology courses using cassava as the central theme. Students were asked to bring cassava samples from their respective towns, which allowed them to compare their field-collected samples against known lineages from agricultural stations at the end of the implementation. Assessment of content and learning perceptions revealed that our novel approach allowed students to learn while engaged in characterizing Puerto Rican cassava. In two semesters, based on the percentage of students who answered correctly in the premodule assessment for content knowledge, there was an overall improvement of 66% and 55% at the end in the genetics course and 24% and 15% in the cell biology course. Our proposed pedagogical model enhances students' professional competitiveness by providing students with valuable research skills as they work on a problem to which they can relate. PMID:21885825

  18. Annual report and summaries of FY 1983 activities supported by the Division of Biological Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Rabson, R.

    1983-10-01

    Summaries of research performed in FY 1983 are presented. Representative research areas include: (1) progress was made in modifying the Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid as a vector in the transfer of DNA in higher plants. The plasmid was disarmed by genetically altering that information which is responsible for unwanted tumor formation in recipient plants. In addition it was demonstrated that antibiotic resistance as a representative genetic character may be transferred by the Ti plasmid to a recipient plant culture; (2) by using appropriately constituted genetic lines of maize it has been possible by following male sterility restorer function to measure for the first time the frequency and character of genetic transposition events in a higher organism; (3) the gene coding for susceptibility to the herbicide atrazine in higher plants has been identified, cloned, and sequenced. A mutant gene which is responsible for resistance to the herbicide has likewise been studied. The difference between the two is one nucleotide in the DNA sequence; and (4) amino acid sequences of a number of proteins of the smallest functional photosynthetic particle, known as the reaction center, of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata have been determined by cloning and sequencing the corresponding DNA. This information has led to new insights concerning the structural and functional nature of the proteins in photosynthesis.

  19. Pacing the Heart with Genes: Recent Progress in Biological Pacing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Cheol

    2015-08-01

    The heartbeat originates within the sinoatrial node (SA node or SAN), a small highly specialized structure containing <10,000 genuine pacemaker cells. The ~5 billion working cardiomyocytes downstream of the SAN remain quiescent when it fails, leading to circulatory collapse and fueling a $6B/year electronic pacemaker industry. The electronic pacemaker devices work quite well. But, device-related problems persist. These include lead failure/repositioning, finite battery life, and infection. For pediatric patients, the children outgrow the length of the leads, necessitating replacement with longer leads. These pitfalls have motivated creation of biological pacing. that are free from all hardware. Toward this goal, we and others have tested the concept of biological pacemakers. Combined with efforts to create clinically relevant, large animal models of biological pacing, the field is moving beyond a conceptual novelty toward a future with clinical reality. PMID:26116393

  20. THE ORGANIZATION OF A BIOLOGY COURSE FOR INDIVIDUAL PROGRESS AT THEODORE HIGH SCHOOL--DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRATTEN, JACK E.

    SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND COMPUTER SIMULATION TECHNIQUES WERE APPLIED IN DESCRIBING THE BIOLOGY COURSE AT THE THEODORE HIGH SCHOOL, THEODORE, ALABAMA, WHICH WAS SELECTED AS THE UNIT OF STUDY BECAUSE OF ITS ORGANIZATION OF COURSES FOR INDIVIDUAL PROGRESS. A DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE BIOLOGY COURSE WAS PRESENTED IN TERMS OF THE (1) INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA,…

  1. [Progression of tumors: etiologic, morphologic and molecular-biological aspects].

    PubMed

    Turosov, V S

    1992-01-01

    Two aspects can be distinguished in multistage carcinogenesis: etiological one (every stage is induced by a specific for this stage agent) and morphobiological aspect (every stage is characterized by specific morphological, genetic and other properties). The schema of the multistage carcinogenesis is presented in which morphological stages (diffuse and focal hyperplasia, benign tumours, dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, various phases of malignant tumour progression) are placed against genetic alterations. L. Foulds concept of tumour progression is discussed with special emphasis on precancerous stages, possibilities of cancer development de novo, and independent progression of different tumour characters. The following types of carcinogenesis are listed on the basis of interrelationship between etiological and genetic factors: 1) carcinogenesis induced by genotoxic agents; a) one agent is acting at high dose and for a long time thus ensuring the activation of protooncogenes and all stages of tumour progression (initiation, promotion, various phases of malignant tumour); b) those acting during a very short time, however sufficient for developing the genetic program working automatically without further exposure to known carcinogens (irradiation in case of the atomic bomb explosion or effect of short-living alkylating agents): in this case there is no stage of promotion; 2) carcinogenesis by non-genotoxic carcinogens (their mode of action is still unclear, the only human example is carcinogenesis by hormones); 3) development of tumours in frane of the two (or three) stage carcinogenesis when every stage is provoked by its own etiological factor, no human examples are known as yet; 4) development of tumours due to the genetic mechanism making the organism highly susceptible to the minimal doses of carcinogens as is the case with skin cancer by ultraviolet light in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, the genetic damage in itself has nothing to do with tumour formation; 5

  2. Modelling biological evolution: recent progress, current challenges and future direction

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modelling is widely recognized as a powerful and convenient theoretical tool for investigating various aspects of biological evolution and explaining the existing genetic complexity of the real world. It is increasingly apparent that understanding the key mechanisms involved in the processes of species biodiversity, natural selection and inheritance, patterns of animal behaviour and coevolution of species in complex ecological systems is simply impossible by means of laboratory experiments and field observations alone. Mathematical models are so important because they provide wide-ranging exploration of the problem without a need for experiments with biological systems—which are usually expensive, often require long time and can be potentially dangerous. However, as the number of theoretical works on modelling biological evolution is constantly accelerating each year as different mathematical frameworks and various aspects of evolutionary problems are considered, it is often hard to avoid getting lost in such an immense flux of publications. The aim of this issue of Interface Focus is to provide a useful guide to important recent findings in some key areas in modelling biological evolution, to refine the existing challenges and to outline possible future directions. In particular, the following topics are addressed here by world-leading experts in the modelling of evolution: (i) the origins of biodiversity observed in ecosystems and communities; (ii) evolution of decision-making by animals and the optimal strategy of populations; (iii) links between evolutionary and ecological processes across different time scales; (iv) quantification of biological information in evolutionary models; and (v) linking theoretical models with empirical data. Most of the works presented here are in fact contributed papers from the international conference ‘Modelling Biological Evolution’ (MBE 2013), which took place in Leicester, UK, in May 2013 and brought together

  3. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities. Semi-annual progress report, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Bajt, D.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1995 - December 31, 1995. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  4. Understanding Essential Tremor: Progress on the Biological Front

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, little was written about the underlying biology of ET, despite its high prevalence. Discussions of disease mechanisms were dominated by a focus on tremor physiology. The traditional model of ET, the olivary model, was proposed in the 1970s. The model suffers from several critical problems and its relevance to ET has been questioned. Recent mechanistic research has focused on the cerebellum. Clinical and neuroimaging studies strongly implicate the importance of this brain region in ET. Recent mechanistic research has been grounded more in tissue-based changes (i.e., postmortem studies of the brain). These studies have collectively and systematically identified a sizable number of changes in the ET cerebellum, and have led to a new model of ET, referred to as the cerebellar degenerative model. Hence, there is a renewed interest in the science behind the biology of ET. How the new understanding of ET will translate into treatment changes is an open question. PMID:24740806

  5. Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period of July 1, 1994 to December 31, 1997: Publications, Presentations, Activities, and Awards

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1998-04-01

    This report contains a record of publishing and other activities in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Division for the period of July 1, 1994, to December31, 1997. It is a companion volume to Working Together on New Horizons: Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period of July 1, 1994, to December 31, 1997 (OR.NLA4-6530). Working Together on New Horizons contains illustrated summaries of some of the projects under way in I&C Division. Both books can be obtained by contacting C. R. Brittain (brittain@ornl. gov), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6005. l&C Division Mission and Vision I&C Division develops and maintains techniques, instruments, and systems that lead to a better understanding of nature and harnessing of natural phenomena for the benefit of humankind. We have dedicated ourselves to accelerating the advancement of science and the transfer of those advancements into products and processes that benefit U.S. industry and enhance the security of our citizens.

  6. Enzymology and molecular biology of cell wall biosynthesis. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P.M.

    1993-03-20

    In order to be able to explore the control of cell wall polysaccharide synthesis at the molecular level, which inter alia might eventually lead to means for useful modification of plant biomass polysaccharide production, the immediate goals of this project are to identify polypeptides responsible for wall polysaccharide synthase activities and to obtain clones of the genes that encode them. We are concentrating on plasma membraneassociated (1,3)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-II or GS-II) and Golgi-associated (1,4)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-I or GS-I), of growing pea stem tissue. Our progress has been much more rapid with respect to GS-II than regarding GS-I.

  7. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  8. Progress in Small Molecule and Biologic Therapeutics Targeting Ghrelin Signaling.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Kayleigh R; Darling, Joseph E; Hougland, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating peptide hormone involved in regulation of a wide array of physiological processes. As an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a), ghrelin is responsible for signaling involved in energy homeostasis, including appetite stimulation, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, and adiposity. Ghrelin has also been implicated in modulation of several neurological processes. Dysregulation of ghrelin signaling is implicated in diseases related to these pathways, including obesity, type II diabetes, and regulation of appetite and body weight in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. Multiple steps in the ghrelin signaling pathway are available for targeting in the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Agonists and antagonists of GHS-R1a have been widely studied and have shown varying levels of effectiveness within ghrelin-related physiological pathways. Agents targeting ghrelin directly, either through depletion of ghrelin levels in circulation or inhibitors of ghrelin O-acyltransferase whose action is required for ghrelin to become biologically active, are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic options. We discuss the approaches utilized to target ghrelin signaling and highlight the current challenges toward developing small-molecule agents as potential therapeutics for ghrelin-related diseases. PMID:26202202

  9. Development and applications of photosensitive device systems to studies of biological and organic materials. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The purpose was to develop and improve appropriate experimental techniques to the point where they could be applied to specific classes of biological problems. Progress is reported in the following areas: (1) area detectors; (2) x-ray diffraction studies of membranes; (3) electron transfer in loosely coupled systems; (4) bioluminescence and fluorescence; and (5) sonoluminescence. (ACR)

  10. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  11. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  12. The human small glutamine-rich TPR-containing protein is required for progress through cell division.

    PubMed

    Winnefeld, Marc; Rommelaere, Jean; Cziepluch, Celina

    2004-02-01

    Eukaryotic organisms from yeast to human harbor genes encoding the small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing (SGT) protein. Work presented here demonstrated the presence of human SGT (hSGT) protein in a panel of human cell lines and throughout the cell cycle. To identify cellular processes in which hSGT is involved, knock down populations were analyzed which were generated through transfection of hsgt-specific small interfering RNA. Most strikingly, depletion of hSGT led to reduced proliferation of the affected cell populations while the mitotic index was increased. Time-lapse video microscopy revealed that cells from hSGT-depleted populations were unable to complete cell division due to mitotic arrest which was frequently followed by cell death. Further evidence for a role in cell division was given by the accumulation of hSGT in the midzone and the midbody, and by a mitosis-specific migration pattern of hSGT as detected by Western blotting after SDS-PAGE or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In conclusion, results obtained in this study demonstrate that hSGT protein is a constitutive component of all human cell lines tested and that this protein is essential for successful completion of cell division. PMID:14729056

  13. Annual progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Research progress is reported for the year 1979-1980. The report is divided into sections dealing individually with the divisions of Biomolecular and Cellular Science, Environmental Biology, and Nuclear Medicine. The sections have been individually entered into EDB. (ACR)

  14. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January-March 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies.

  15. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  16. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1997. Created in March 1997 when the CTD Chemical Development and Energy Research sections were combined, the Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within seven major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, and Biotechnology Research. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described in the report, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  17. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Division of Special Libraries. Biological and Medical Science Libraries Section. Social Science Libraries Section. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Six of the nine papers in this collection focus on biological and medical science libraries; the remaining three are concerned with social science libraries. The papers on biological and medical science libraries appear first in this list: (1) "Standards for Medical and Health Care Libraries: Canada" (Jan Greenwood, Canada); (2) "Standards for…

  18. An Examination of the Influence of Institutional Context on Academic Progress Rates at Division I Institutions: A Multilevel Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline Elaine

    2012-01-01

    The growing attention given to intercollegiate athletics in recent years amid ongoing controversies highlights the importance of closely examining the implementation and impact of sports policy on college campuses. In an attempt to improve the academic performance and retention of student-athletes, the Academic Progress Rate (APR) was implemented…

  19. A Longitudinal Study of Academic Progress Rate as a Result of Team and Institutional Variables at NCAA Division I Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Jimmie Edwin

    2014-01-01

    This study explained Academic Progress Rate (APR) levels and differences in APR (DAPR) with team and institutional variables. Team variables included team gender, sport profile, and squad size. Institutional variables included individual variables aggregated to the institutional level. The data analyzed in this study was derived from the National…

  20. The Impact of the Academic Progress Rating on the Retention and Recruiting Strategies of NCAA Division I Football Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) adopted legislation that it hoped would help increase the graduation rates of student athletes. The Academic Progress Rating (APR), was designed to hold each individual athletic program accountable for keeping student athletes eligible and at the institution until the student athlete…

  1. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-02-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

  2. Quarterly progress report for the chemical development section of the Chemical Technology Division: October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1996-03-01

    This quarterly report is intended to provide a timely summary of the major activities being conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period September-December 1995. The report summarizes ten major tasks conducted within five major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area-Chemical Processes for Waste Management-includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Compounds by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, and Sludge Washing and Dissolution of ORNL Waste: Data for Modeling Sludge Science. The Comprehensive Supernate task is currently evaluating several sorbents in batch tests for removing strontium, technetium, and cesium from ORNL Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernatant solutions. Nine sorbents have been evaluated for removing strontium from MVST W-29 supernatant, and seven have been tested for technetium removal. All planned batch testing of cesium sorbents has been completed; however, additional cesium tests may be made as new sorbents become available. At the request of Hanford personnel, some batch tests were made to evaluate the effect on cesium distribution of selected sorbents which had been treated with an organic such as tributyl phosphate.

  3. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1996-06-01

    This report provides a timely summary of the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1996. The report summarizes ten major tasks conducted with five major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area--Chemical Processes for Waste Management--includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Compounds by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT{asterisk}DE{asterisk}CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, and Sludge Washing and Dissolution of ORNL Waste: Data for Modeling Sludge Science. The other four tasks are: Reactor fuel chemistry--Technical assistance in review of advanced reactors; Thermodynamics and kinetics of energy-related materials; Processes for waste management--Ion-exchange process for heavy metals removal; and US Army field artillery liquid propellant stability program.

  4. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1997-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1996. The report describes 12 tasks conducted in 4 major areas of research and development within the section. The name of a contact is included with each task in the report, and readers are encouraged to consult these individuals if they need additional information. The first major research area--Chemical Processes for Waste Management-- includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Sludge Treatment Studies, and Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents. Within the third research area--Thermodynamics--efforts continued in the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Energy-Related Materials task. The fourth major research area--Processes for Waste Management--includes work on these tasks: Ion-Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Hot Cell Cross-Flow Filtration Studies of Gunite Tank Sludges, and Chemical Conversion of Nitrate Directly to Nitrogen Gas: A Feasibility Study.

  5. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period April--June 1996. The report describes 12 tasks conducted in 4 major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area--Chemical Processes for Waste Management--includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Sludge Treatment Studies, and Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents. Within the second research area--Reactor Fuel Chemistry--a new scope of work for the Technical Assistance in Review of Advanced Reactors task has been established to include assessments of iodine behavior nd pH control in operating nuclear reactor containments as well as in advanced reactor systems. This task is on hold, awaiting finalization of the revised proposal and receipt of the necessary information from Westinghouse to permit the start of the study. Within the third research area--Thermodynamics--the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Energy-Related Materials task has used a differential thermal analysis (DTA)/thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to study the phase transitions of phase-pure YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (123). The fourth major research area--Processes for Waste Management--includes work on these tasks: Ion Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Hot Cell Cross-Flow Filtration Studies of Gunite Tank Sludges, and Chemical Conversion of Nitrate Directly to Nitrogen Gas: A Feasibility Study.

  6. [Research progress on biology and ecology of Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Su; Zhang, Run-Zhi; Zhang, Fan

    2007-09-01

    Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) with its native in Asia is one of the most important predatory ladybird beetles, and used worldwide as a biological control agent. This paper summarized the recent decades research progress at home and abroad on its life history, reproductive strategies, and predatory and cannibalism behaviors, and analysed the prospects of its utilization. Based on the review of its artificial reproduction, insecticide interaction, and impact as an invasive species, some useful measures were suggested to prevent the beetle from its potential risk to ecological banlance. PMID:18062323

  7. Recent progress in revealing the biological and medical significance of the non-neuronal cholinergic system.

    PubMed

    Grando, Sergei A; Kawashima, Koichiro; Kirkpatrick, Charles J; Kummer, Wolfgang; Wessler, Ignaz

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of International Immunopharmacology is the proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on Non-neuronal Acetylcholine that was held on August 28-30, 2014 at the Justus Liebig University of Giessen in Germany. It contains original contributions of meeting participants covering the significant progress in understanding of the biological and medical significance of the non-neuronal cholinergic system extending from exciting insights into molecular mechanisms regulating this system via miRNAs over the discovery of novel cholinergic cellular signaling circuitries to clinical implications in cancer, wound healing, immunity and inflammation, cardiovascular, respiratory and other diseases. PMID:26362206

  8. Building Capacity in Understanding Foundational Biology Concepts: A K-12 Learning Progression in Genetics Informed by Research on Children's Thinking and Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmesky, Rowhea

    2013-06-01

    This article describes the substance, structure, and rationale of a learning progression in genetics spanning kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12). The learning progression is designed to build a foundation towards understanding protein structure and activity and should be viewed as one possible pathway to understanding concepts of genetics and ultimately protein expression, based on the existing research. The kindergarten through fifth grade segment reflects findings that show children have a rich knowledge base and sophisticated cognitive abilities, and therefore, is designed so that elementary-aged children can learn content in deep and abstract manners, as well as apply scientific explanations appropriate to their knowledge level. The article also details the LP segment facilitating secondary students' understanding by outlining the overlapping conceptual frames which guide student learning from cell structures and functions to cell splitting (both cell division and gamete formation) to genetics as trait transmission, culminating in genetics as protein expression. The learning progression product avoids the use of technical language, which has been identified as a prominent source of student misconceptions in learning cellular biology, and explicit connections between cellular and macroscopic phenomena are encouraged.

  9. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    2001-04-16

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within ten major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Physical Properties Research, Biochemical Engineering, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structures and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of the Cell Operations involved the testing of two continuously stirred tank reactors in series to evaluate the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium and transuranics from supernatant. Within the area of Process Chemistry, various topics related to solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge were addressed. Saltcake dissolution efforts continued, including the development of a predictive algorithm. New initiatives for the section included modeling activities centered on detection of hydrogen in {sup 233}U storage wells and wax formation in petroleum mixtures, as well as support for the Spallation Neutron Source (investigation of transmutation products formed during operation). Other activities involved in situ grouting and evaluation of options for use (i.e., as castable shapes) of depleted uranium. In a continuation of activities of the preceding

  10. Gene family analysis of the Arabidopsis pollen transcriptome reveals biological implications for cell growth, division control, and gene expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Pina, Cristina; Pinto, Francisco; Feijó, José A; Becker, Jörg D

    2005-06-01

    Upon germination, pollen forms a tube that elongates dramatically through female tissues to reach and fertilize ovules. While essential for the life cycle of higher plants, the genetic basis underlying most of the process is not well understood. We previously used a combination of flow cytometry sorting of viable hydrated pollen grains and GeneChip array analysis of one-third of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome to define a first overview of the pollen transcriptome. We now extend that study to approximately 80% of the genome of Arabidopsis by using Affymetrix Arabidopsis ATH1 arrays and perform comparative analysis of gene family and gene ontology representation in the transcriptome of pollen and vegetative tissues. Pollen grains have a smaller and overall unique transcriptome (6,587 genes expressed) with greater proportions of selectively expressed (11%) and enriched (26%) genes than any vegetative tissue. Relative gene ontology category representations in pollen and vegetative tissues reveal a functional skew of the pollen transcriptome toward signaling, vesicle transport, and the cytoskeleton, suggestive of a commitment to germination and tube growth. Cell cycle analysis reveals an accumulation of G2/M-associated factors that may play a role in the first mitotic division of the zygote. Despite the relative underrepresentation of transcription-associated transcripts, nonclassical MADS box genes emerge as a class with putative unique roles in pollen. The singularity of gene expression control in mature pollen grains is further highlighted by the apparent absence of small RNA pathway components. PMID:15908605

  11. Regular college preparatory students' perceptions of the student teams achievement divisions approach in an academic college preparatory biology class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Aarti P.

    Cooperative learning allows individuals with varying abilities to work alongside their peers. Students are placed into achievement levels based on placement test scores. The Regular College Preparatory (RCP) level is a score of 59% or lower and Academic College Preparatory (ACP) level is a score of 60-92% on the placement test. The purpose of this study was to obtain 9th grade RCP students' perceptions of the student teams achievement divisions (STAD) approach which allows each member of a team to have a defined role in group work. The research questions addressed 9 th grade RCP students' perceptions of integrated STAD teams. Qualitative data from 6 RCP participants were collected from interviews and observations. Data were analyzed using typological analysis by creating codes and categories. Findings indicated that RCP students retained more content and enhanced their skills in communication, critical thinking, and problem solving. Teachers need to serve as guides to monitor motivation and enhance peer interaction. School administrators are advised to provide professional development opportunities allowing educators to learn how to incorporate cooperation for optimal student learning communication, negotiation, and problem solving.

  12. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    This reports summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within eight major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included column loading of cesium from Melton Valley Storage Tank supematants using an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate. A second task was to design and construct a continuously stirred tank reactor system to test the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium, and transuranics from supematant. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed, including issues such as pipeline plugging and viscosity measurements. Investigation of solution conditions required to dissolve Hanford saltcake was also continued. MSRE Remediation Studies focused on recovery of {sup 233}U and its transformation into a stable oxide and radiolysis experiments to permit remediation of MSRE fuel salt. In the area of Chemistry Research, activities included studies relative to molecular imprinting for

  13. Research by ESS Division for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Progress report, January-June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.

    1987-10-01

    Petrographic research for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations focused on xenolithic variability in the Topopah Spring Member and on variations of clinoptilolite composition at Yucca Mountain. Zeolite and smectite occurrences were considered in terms of their relation to a disturbed zone beneath the potential repository, and mineral stability experiments have produced a new clinoptilolite structure as a result of prolonged heating at low temperature. Limitations were defined on the abundance of erionite and of sulfur. X-ray diffraction studies lead to improved analytical methods. Progress was made in the comparative study of mineralogy in sand ramps and in faults. Geological modeling considered the differences of the diffusion of nonsorbing tracers in vertically and in horizontally fractured rock. Modeling also treated the diffusion of a nonsorbing tracer in devitrified and in zeolitized rock. The results of these experiments in all cases show relatively symmetrical two-dimensional diffusion patterns. Preliminary calculations compare the dispersion/diffusion of nonsorbing Tc with the dispersion/diffusion/sorption of U. 27 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Recent Progress on Systems and Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer Fungi As Microbial Cell Factories.

    PubMed

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Arruda, Letícia Magalhães; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Filamentous fungi are remarkable organisms naturally specialized in deconstructing plant biomass and this feature has a tremendous potential for biofuel production from renewable sources. The past decades have been marked by a remarkable progress in the genetic engineering of fungi to generate industry-compatible strains needed for some biotech applications. In this sense, progress in this field has been marked by the utilization of high-throughput techniques to gain deep understanding of the molecular machinery controlling the physiology of these organisms, starting thus the Systems Biology era of fungi. Additionally, genetic engineering has been extensively applied to modify wellcharacterized promoters in order to construct new expression systems with enhanced performance under the conditions of interest. In this review, we discuss some aspects related to significant progress in the understating and engineering of fungi for biotechnological applications, with special focus on the construction of synthetic promoters and circuits in organisms relevant for industry. Different engineering approaches are shown, and their potential and limitations for the construction of complex synthetic circuits in these organisms are examined. Finally, we discuss the impact of engineered promoter architecture in the single-cell behavior of the system, an often-neglected relationship with a tremendous impact in the final performance of the process of interest. We expect to provide here some new directions to drive future research directed to the construction of high-performance, engineered fungal strains working as microbial cell factories. PMID:27226765

  15. Biology and mechano-response of tendon cells: progress overview and perspectives†

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui B.; Schaniel, Christoph; Leong, Daniel J.; Wang, James H-C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the group discussions on Cell Biology & Mechanics from the 2014 ORS/ISMMS New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. The major discussion topics included: 1) the biology of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) and the potential of stem cell-based tendon therapy using TSPCs and other types of stem cells, namely, embryonic and/or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), 2) the biological concept and potential impact of cellular senescence on tendon aging, tendon injury repair and the development of degenerative disease, and 3) the effects of tendon cells’ mechano-response on tendon cell fate and metabolism. For each topic, a brief overview is presented which summarizes the major points discussed by the group participants. The focus of the discussions ranged from current research progress, challenges and opportunities, to future directions on these topics. In the preparation of this manuscript, authors consulted relevant references as a part of their efforts to present an accurate view on the topics discussed. PMID:25728946

  16. Investigative cases and student outcomes in an upper-division cell and molecular biology laboratory course at a minority-serving institution.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jonathan D; Fulop, Rebecca M; Márquez-Magaña, Leticia; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2008-01-01

    Active-learning strategies are increasingly being integrated into college-level science courses to make material more accessible to all students and to improve learning outcomes. One active-learning pedagogy, case-based learning (CBL), was developed as a way to both enhance engagement in the material and to accommodate diverse learning styles. Yet, adoption of CBL approaches in undergraduate biology courses has been piecemeal, in part because of the perceived investment of time required. Furthermore, few CBL lesson plans have been developed specifically for upper-division laboratory courses. Here, we describe four cases that we developed and implemented for a senior cell and molecular biology laboratory course at San Francisco State University, a minority-serving institution. To evaluate the effectiveness of these modules, we used both written and verbal assessments to gauge learning outcomes and attitudinal responses of students over two semesters. Students responded positively to the new approach and seemed to meet the learning goals for the course. Most said they would take a course using CBL again. These case modules are readily adaptable to a variety of classroom settings. PMID:19047425

  17. Investigative Cases and Student Outcomes in an Upper-Division Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory Course at a Minority-serving Institution

    PubMed Central

    Fulop, Rebecca M.; Márquez-Magaña, Leticia; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2008-01-01

    Active-learning strategies are increasingly being integrated into college-level science courses to make material more accessible to all students and to improve learning outcomes. One active-learning pedagogy, case-based learning (CBL), was developed as a way to both enhance engagement in the material and to accommodate diverse learning styles. Yet, adoption of CBL approaches in undergraduate biology courses has been piecemeal, in part because of the perceived investment of time required. Furthermore, few CBL lesson plans have been developed specifically for upper-division laboratory courses. Here, we describe four cases that we developed and implemented for a senior cell and molecular biology laboratory course at San Francisco State University, a minority-serving institution. To evaluate the effectiveness of these modules, we used both written and verbal assessments to gauge learning outcomes and attitudinal responses of students over two semesters. Students responded positively to the new approach and seemed to meet the learning goals for the course. Most said they would take a course using CBL again. These case modules are readily adaptable to a variety of classroom settings. PMID:19047425

  18. Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. How to integrate biological research into society and exclude errors in biomedical publications? Progress in theoretical and systems biology releases pressure on experimental research

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    This brief opinion proposes measures to increase efficiency and exclude errors in biomedical research under the existing dynamic situation. Rapid changes in biology began with the description of the three dimensional structure of DNA 60 years ago; today biology has progressed by interacting with computer science and nanoscience together with the introduction of robotic stations for the acquisition of large-scale arrays of data. These changes have had an increasing influence on the entire research and scientific community. Future advance demands short-term measures to ensure error-proof and efficient development. They can include the fast publishing of negative results, publishing detailed methodical papers and excluding a strict connection between career progression and publication activity, especially for younger researchers. Further development of theoretical and systems biology together with the use of multiple experimental methods for biological experiments could also be helpful in the context of years and decades. With regards to the links between science and society, it is reasonable to compare both these systems, to find and describe specific features for biology and to integrate it into the existing stream of social life and financial fluxes. It will increase the level of scientific research and have mutual positive effects for both biology and society. Several examples are given for further discussion. PMID:24748913

  1. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  2. [Progress in down-stream processing of biologically produced 1,3-propanediol].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruchun; Xu, Yunzhen; Liu, Dehua

    2011-03-01

    1,3-propanediol is an important raw material in chemical industry. Microbial conversion of glycerol or glucose into 1,3-propanediol has been given much attention due to its renewable resource, mild reaction conditions, and other advantages. It is a challenge to efficiently separate 1,3-propanediol from a mixture of multiple components, such as 1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol, water, residual glycerol, ethanol, macromolecules and salts, for the reason that 1,3-propanediol, glycerol and 2,3-butanediol are all very hydrophilic and have intense polarity. The conventional evaporation and distillation techniques used in the purification of 1,3-propanediol suffer from the problem of high energy consumption and low recovery. It makes the recovery of 1,3-propanediol from a fermentation broth become a bottleneck in industrial production. The down-stream processing of biologically produced 1,3-propanediol mainly includes the removal of protein, salts, water and other impurities. This paper analyze the research progress of these separation technologies and point out the developing direction worth further investigation. PMID:21650033

  3. DIVISIBILITY TESTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOLEY, JACK L.

    THIS BOOKLET, ONE OF A SERIES, HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE PROJECT, A PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICALLY UNDERDEVELOPED PUPILS. A PROJECT TEAM, INCLUDING INSERVICE TEACHERS, IS BEING USED TO WRITE AND DEVELOP THE MATERIALS FOR THIS PROGRAM. THE MATERIALS DEVELOPED IN THIS BOOKLET INCLUDE SUCH CONCEPTS AS (1) DIVISIBILITY TESTS, (2) CHECKING THE FUNDAMENTAL…

  4. Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of BETRNet is to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma by answering key questions related to the progression of the disease, especially in the premalignant stage. In partnership with NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology, multidisciplinary translational research centers collaborate to better understand the biology of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma to improve risk stratification and develop prevention strategies.  | Multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration to enhance understanding of Barrett's esophagus and to prevent esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  5. Asymmetric segregation of the double-stranded RNA binding protein Staufen2 during mammalian neural stem cell divisions promotes lineage progression.

    PubMed

    Kusek, Gretchen; Campbell, Melissa; Doyle, Frank; Tenenbaum, Scott A; Kiebler, Michael; Temple, Sally

    2012-10-01

    Asymmetric cell divisions are a fundamental feature of neural development, and misregulation can lead to brain abnormalities or tumor formation. During an asymmetric cell division, molecular determinants are segregated preferentially into one daughter cell to specify its fate. An important goal is to identify the asymmetric determinants in neural progenitor cells, which could be tumor suppressors or inducers of specific neural fates. Here, we show that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein Stau2 is distributed asymmetrically during progenitor divisions in the developing mouse cortex, preferentially segregating into the Tbr2(+) neuroblast daughter, taking with it a subset of RNAs. Knockdown of Stau2 stimulates differentiation and overexpression produces periventricular neuronal masses, demonstrating its functional importance for normal cortical development. We immunoprecipitated Stau2 to examine its cargo mRNAs, and found enrichment for known asymmetric and basal cell determinants, such as Trim32, and identified candidates, including a subset involved in primary cilium function. PMID:22902295

  6. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  7. Recent progress in development of synthetic biology platforms and metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Woo, Han Min; Park, Jin-Byung

    2014-06-20

    The paradigm of synthetic biology has been evolving, along with relevant engineering, to achieve designed bio-systems. Synthetic biology has reached the point where it is possible to develop microbial strains to produce desired chemicals. Recent advances in this field have promoted metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum as an amino-acid producer for use in intelligent microbial-cell factories. Here, we review recent advances that address C. glutamicum as a potential model organism for synthetic biology, and evaluate their industrial applications. Finally, we highlight the perspective of developing C. glutamicum as a step toward advanced microbial-cell factories that could produce valuable chemicals from renewable resources. PMID:24632177

  8. The Natural Divisions of Arkansas: A Three Week Unit. Classroom Guide. Recommended for High School Level Social Studies, Earth Science and Biological Science Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foti, Thomas L.

    This unit is designed to (1) acquaint the student with Arkansas, (2) provide information on what an environment (natural system) is, and (3) provide information on how people relate to the environment as a whole. Natural systems and natural divisions (geographical areas) of Arkansas are described. Included in several sections are questions to…

  9. Structures Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center Structures Division is an international leader and pioneer in developing new structural analysis, life prediction, and failure analysis related to rotating machinery and more specifically to hot section components in air-breathing aircraft engines and spacecraft propulsion systems. The research consists of both deterministic and probabilistic methodology. Studies include, but are not limited to, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue as well as material creep. Studies of structural failure are at both the micro- and macrolevels. Nondestructive evaluation methods related to structural reliability are developed, applied, and evaluated. Materials from which structural components are made, studied, and tested are monolithics and metal-matrix, polymer-matrix, and ceramic-matrix composites. Aeroelastic models are developed and used to determine the cyclic loading and life of fan and turbine blades. Life models are developed and tested for bearings, seals, and other mechanical components, such as magnetic suspensions. Results of these studies are published in NASA technical papers and reference publication as well as in technical society journal articles. The results of the work of the Structures Division and the bibliography of its publications for calendar year 1995 are presented.

  10. Recent Progress of Propolis for Its Biological and Chemical Compositions and Its Botanical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Toreti, Viviane Cristina; Sato, Helia Harumi; Pastore, Glaucia Maria; Park, Yong Kun

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is the generic name given to the product obtained from resinous substances, which is gummy and balsamic and which is collected by bees from flowers, buds, and exudates of plants. It is a popular folk medicine possessing a broad spectrum of biological activities. These biological properties are related to its chemical composition and more specifically to the phenolic compounds that vary in their structure and concentration depending on the region of production, availability of sources to collect plant resins, genetic variability of the queen bee, the technique used for production, and the season in which propolis is produced. Many scientific articles are published every year in different international journal, and several groups of researchers have focused their attention on the chemical compounds and biological activity of propolis. This paper presents a review on the publications on propolis and patents of applications and biological constituents of propolis. PMID:23737843

  11. Functionalization of carbon nanotube and nanofiber electrodes with biological macromolecules: Progress toward a nanoscale biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Sarah E.

    The integration of nanoscale carbon-based electrodes with biological recognition and electrical detection promises unparalleled biological detection systems. First, biologically modified carbon-based materials have been shown to have superior long-term chemical stability when compared to other commonly used materials for biological detection such as silicon, gold, and glass surfaces. Functionalizing carbon electrodes for biological recognition and using electrochemical methods to transduce biological binding information will enable real-time, hand-held, lower cost and stable biosensing devices. Nanoscale carbon-based electrodes allow the additional capability of fabricating devices with high densities of sensing elements, enabling multi-analyte detection on a single chip. We have worked toward the integration of these sensor components by first focusing on developing and characterizing the chemistry required to functionalize single-walled carbon nanotubes and vertically aligned carbon nanofibers with oligonucleotides and proteins for specific biological recognition. Chemical, photochemical and electrochemical methods for functionalizing these materials with biological molecules were developed. We determined, using fluorescence and colorimetric techniques, that these biologically modified nanoscale carbon electrodes are biologically active, selective, and stable. A photochemical functionalization method enabled facile functionalization of dense arrays vertically aligned carbon nanofiber forests. We found that much of the vertically aligned carbon nanofiber sidewalls were functionalized and biologically accessible by this method---the absolute number of DNA molecules hybridized to DNA-functionalized nanofiber electrodes was ˜8 times higher than the number of DNA molecules hybridized to flat glassy carbon electrodes and implies that nanofiber forest sensors may facilitate higher sensitivity to target DNA sequences per unit area. We also used the photochemical method

  12. Signaling to stomatal initiation and cell division

    PubMed Central

    Le, Jie; Zou, Junjie; Yang, Kezhen; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Stomata are two-celled valves that control epidermal pores whose opening and spacing optimizes shoot-atmosphere gas exchange. Arabidopsis stomatal formation involves at least one asymmetric division and one symmetric division. Stomatal formation and patterning are regulated by the frequency and placement of asymmetric divisions. This model system has already led to significant advances in developmental biology, such as the regulation of cell fate, division, differentiation, and patterning. Over the last 30 years, stomatal development has been found to be controlled by numerous intrinsic genetic and environmental factors. This mini review focuses on the signaling involved in stomatal initiation and in divisions in the cell lineage. PMID:25002867

  13. Signaling to stomatal initiation and cell division.

    PubMed

    Le, Jie; Zou, Junjie; Yang, Kezhen; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Stomata are two-celled valves that control epidermal pores whose opening and spacing optimizes shoot-atmosphere gas exchange. Arabidopsis stomatal formation involves at least one asymmetric division and one symmetric division. Stomatal formation and patterning are regulated by the frequency and placement of asymmetric divisions. This model system has already led to significant advances in developmental biology, such as the regulation of cell fate, division, differentiation, and patterning. Over the last 30 years, stomatal development has been found to be controlled by numerous intrinsic genetic and environmental factors. This mini review focuses on the signaling involved in stomatal initiation and in divisions in the cell lineage. PMID:25002867

  14. Progress in the understanding and utilization of biologic response modifiers in the treatment of uveitis.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Arash; Meese, Halea; Sahawneh, Haitham; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Uveitis is the third most common cause of blindness in developed countries. Considering the systemic and local complications of long-term corticosteroid therapy and the intolerance due to side effects and ineffectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, use of biologic response modifiers is a reasonable alternative in the treatment of non-infectious uveitis and persistent uveitic macular edema. The majority of the evidence presented here comes from open uncontrolled analyses. Based on these studies, tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors, especially infliximab and adalimumab, have been shown to be effective in the treatment of non-infectious uveitis in numerous studies. More research is necessary, particularly multi-center randomized clinical trials, to address the choice of biologic response modifier agent and the length of treatment as we employ biologic response modifiers in different types of uveitis and persistent uveitic macular edema. PMID:26972783

  15. Recent progress in synthetic biology for microbial production of C3–C10 alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Lamsen, Edna N.; Atsumi, Shota

    2012-01-01

    The growing need to address current energy and environmental problems has sparked an interest in developing improved biological methods to produce liquid fuels from renewable sources. While microbial ethanol production is well established, higher-chain alcohols possess chemical properties that are more similar to gasoline. Unfortunately, these alcohols (except 1-butanol) are not produced efficiently in natural microorganisms, and thus economical production in industrial volumes remains a challenge. Synthetic biology, however, offers additional tools to engineer synthetic pathways in user-friendly hosts to help increase titers and productivity of these advanced biofuels. This review concentrates on recent developments in synthetic biology to produce higher-chain alcohols as viable renewable replacements for traditional fuel. PMID:22701113

  16. Revisiting the cell biology of the acyl-ACP:phosphate transacylase PlsX suggests that the phospholipid synthesis and cell division machineries are not coupled in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Diego Emiliano; Bisson-Filho, Alexandre; de Mendoza, Diego; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J

    2016-05-01

    PlsX is a central enzyme of phospholipid synthesis in bacteria, converting acyl-ACP to acyl-phosphate on the pathway to phosphatidic acid formation. PlsX has received attention because it plays a key role in the coordination of fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis. Recently, PlsX was also suggested to coordinate membrane synthesis with cell division in Bacillus subtilis. Here, we have re-investigated the cell biology of PlsX and determined that the enzyme is uniformly distributed on the membrane of most cells, but occasionally appears as membrane foci as well. Foci and homogenous patterns seem freely interconvertible but the prevalence of the uniform staining suggests that PlsX does not need to localize to specific sites to function correctly. We also investigated the relationship between PlsX and the divisome. In contrast to previous observations, PlsX's foci showed no obvious periodicity of localization and did not colocalize with the divisome. Furthermore, depletion of PlsX did not affect cell division if phospholipid synthesis is maintained by an alternative enzyme. These results suggest that coordination between division and membrane synthesis may not require physical or functional interactions between the divisome and phospholipid synthesis enzymes. PMID:26816052

  17. Quarterly Progress Report on the Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cicerone, D.S.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hill, W.R.; Kszos, L.A.

    1996-12-30

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program ( BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  18. Recent progress in a classical biological control program for olive fruit fly in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae), causes severe damage to olive production worldwide. Control of olive fruit fly typically relies on pesticides, and under such conditions the impact of natural enemies is relatively low. About 15 years ago, the USDA-ARS European Biologic...

  19. The search for life's origins: Progress and future directions in planetary biology and chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The current state is reviewed of the study of chemical evolution and planetary biology and the probable future is discussed of the field, at least for the near term. To this end, the report lists the goals and objectives of future research and makes detailed, comprehensive recommendations for accomplishing them, emphasizing those issues that were inadequately discussed in earlier Space Studies Board reports.

  20. Biological Control of Old World climbing fern, Lygodium microphyllum - Recent progress with the brown lygodium moth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Old World climbing fern, Lygodium microphyllum is one of the most serious invasive weeds impacting natural areas in southern and central Florida. Management of this weed using traditional methods has proved difficult and expensive, and has prompted efforts to develop biological control options for t...

  1. The search for life's origins: Progress and future directions in planetary biology and chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The current state is reviewed of the study of chemical evolution and planetary biology and the probable future is discussed of the field, at least for the near term. To this end, the report lists the goals and objectives of future research and makes detailed, comprehensive recommendations for accomplishing them, emphasizing those issues that were inadequately discussed in earlier Space Studies Board reports.

  2. The Materials Division: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Lowell, Carl E.

    1989-01-01

    The Materials Division at NASA's Lewis Research Center has been engaged in a program to improve the quality of its output. The division, its work, and its customers are described as well as the methodologies developed to assess and improve the quality of the Division's staff and output. Examples of these methodologies are presented and evaluated. An assessment of current progress is also presented along with a summary of future plans.

  3. Home | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Our Research The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into cancer. |

  4. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division, 1991 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Ed.

    This report documents research and development performed under the sponsorship of the Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research in fiscal year 1991. It provides abstracts (title, principal investigator, project code, objective, approach, progress, and related reports) of projects of three program divisions (cognitive…

  5. [Research progress in biological basis of cold and heat essence of Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Yin, Yu-Ting; Li, Xiao-Wan; Dong, Yang; Shi, Jian-Rong

    2012-12-01

    Cold-heat problem is one core of traditional Chinese medicine theory. This paper summarizes the experimental research related to the biological basis of cold-heat essence in cold-heat syndrome, cold-heat body constitution and cold-heat property of Chinese herbs. In view of the classical physiological and biochemical indices, gene expression, protein expression and metabolic differences, differences in cold-heat syndrome or cold-heat constitution are mainly based on neurotransmitter, thyroid function, sex hormone, cyclic nucleotide system, and energy metabolism relating to the corresponding gene and protein expression. Furthermore, this paper analyses the change of correlation indices that accompany with a dynamic development process of "constitution-syndrome-herbal intervention", implying that the research of biological basis of cold-heat essence has turned from single index to multiple indices, and from dispersion research to system research. PMID:23257124

  6. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  7. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ``biological fingerprint`` of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  8. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Phytoplankton response. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, P.G.; Yoder, J.A.

    1992-03-10

    This study addressed shelf-wide processes and nearshore (coastal boundary zone) processes occurring in the southeastern. Coastal boundary zone (CBZ) US continental shelf dynamics involve studies of circulation and of biological and chemical transformations. Continental shelf processes affect the removal of material from the coastal boundary zone into areas where the material no longer interacts with or influences concentrations in the CBZ. The two arbitrarily separate components are, in fact, unified. The CBZ typically extends about 300 km along-shore and about 20 km offshore from its center off Savannah, Georgia, where most runoff occurs. The rates of biological and chemical transformations are controlled by proximity to the bottom and the amounts of fine suspended organic matter originating from rivers and salt marshes. Once material is removed from this zone, either by a long-shelf or cross-shelf advection to regions where the materials are no longer in contact with the bottom, the suite of factors governing the rates of chemical and biological transformations changes. The determination of contrasting rates in these two environments was one of the central focuses of the South Atlantic Bight program.

  9. Both Physical Exercise and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Reduce the Facing-the-Viewer Bias in Biological Motion Perception

    PubMed Central

    Heenan, Adam; Troje, Nikolaus F.

    2014-01-01

    Biological motion stimuli, such as orthographically projected stick figure walkers, are ambiguous about their orientation in depth. The projection of a stick figure walker oriented towards the viewer, therefore, is the same as its projection when oriented away. Even though such figures are depth-ambiguous, however, observers tend to interpret them as facing towards them more often than facing away. Some have speculated that this facing-the-viewer bias may exist for sociobiological reasons: Mistaking another human as retreating when they are actually approaching could have more severe consequences than the opposite error. Implied in this hypothesis is that the facing-towards percept of biological motion stimuli is potentially more threatening. Measures of anxiety and the facing-the-viewer bias should therefore be related, as researchers have consistently found that anxious individuals display an attentional bias towards more threatening stimuli. The goal of this study was to assess whether physical exercise (Experiment 1) or an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2) would significantly affect facing-the-viewer biases. We hypothesized that both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation would decrease facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers, but not for bottom- or top-half-only human stimuli, as these carry less sociobiological relevance. On the other hand, we expected that the anxiety induction task (Experiment 2) would increase facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. In both experiments, participants completed anxiety questionnaires, exercised on a treadmill (Experiment 1) or performed an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2), and then immediately completed a perceptual task that allowed us to assess their facing-the-viewer bias. As hypothesized, we found that physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduced facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. Our results provide

  10. Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period July 1, 1994, to December 31, 1997: Working Together on New Horizons

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1998-04-01

    The ORNL I&C Division was created to support DOE-funded research. We have since broadened our mission to include other sponsors as the need for our services has grown. This report summarizes some of the work we have been conducting on behalf of DOE, other federal agencies, and the private sector during the past three and a half years. Because we take on nearly 750 individual projects every year, much of our work cannot be reported in detail. We hope that these summaries are of interest and demonstrate that our work, rooted in DOE scientific and technological programs, can also benefit the nation, its industry, and its citizens in direct and tangible ways.

  11. Sequential chemical-biological processes for the treatment of industrial wastewaters: review of recent progresses and critical assessment.

    PubMed

    Guieysse, Benoit; Norvill, Zane N

    2014-02-28

    When direct wastewater biological treatment is unfeasible, a cost- and resource-efficient alternative to direct chemical treatment consists of combining biological treatment with a chemical pre-treatment aiming to convert the hazardous pollutants into more biodegradable compounds. Whereas the principles and advantages of sequential treatment have been demonstrated for a broad range of pollutants and process configurations, recent progresses (2011-present) in the field provide the basis for refining assessment of feasibility, costs, and environmental impacts. This paper thus reviews recent real wastewater demonstrations at pilot and full scale as well as new process configurations. It also discusses new insights on the potential impacts of microbial community dynamics on process feasibility, design and operation. Finally, it sheds light on a critical issue that has not yet been properly addressed in the field: integration requires complex and tailored optimization and, of paramount importance to full-scale application, is sensitive to uncertainty and variability in the inputs used for process design and operation. Future research is therefore critically needed to improve process control and better assess the real potential of sequential chemical-biological processes for industrial wastewater treatment. PMID:24440651

  12. Development and applications of photosensitive device systems to biological studies. Three year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The major developments of the project have been in the area of low light level detection. Although the instrumentation is designed for biological applications, the parallel interests of astronomers serve as a good source for information and interchange of experience and ideas. Also, it is increasingly evident that the instrumentation developed is applicable to other areas where low light level detection capability is essential. Two such areas are sonoluminescence and thermoluminescence. The research has been primarily directed to the two areas of x-ray diffraction and bioluminescence, with emphasis in the area of x-ray detection. Interest in x-ray image intensification techniques for biological and medical applications is long standing, and more and more utilized each year. During the past three years the demonstrated advantages of our system over fast scan TV systems and multiwire chambers has become recognized. This is particularly true for use as the synchrotron x-ray sources. Although in recent years less effort has been spent in bioluminescence studies, results have been numerous, both in instrumentation development and experimental results. Bioluminescence is not only of interest in itself, but is a powerful tool for non-destructive study of other biological processes. Bioluminescence has also become increasingly of interest because of its relation to communication with, and detection of, submarines. Instrumentation for in situ observations is under active consideration. The techniques for data acquisition and retrieval in the two areas are closely related, so that much of the development in one area is transferable to the other. (ERB)

  13. Progress and problems in the biology, diagnostics, and therapeutics of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Adriano; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Miele, Gino

    2004-07-01

    The term "prion" was introduced by Stanley Prusiner in 1982 to describe the atypical infectious agent that causes transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, a group of infectious neurodegenerative diseases that include scrapie in sheep, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, chronic wasting disease in cervids, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle. Over the past twenty years, the word "prion" has been taken to signify various subtly different concepts. In this article, we refer to the prion as the transmissible principle underlying prion diseases, without necessarily implying any specific biochemical or structural identity. When Prusiner started his seminal work, the study of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies was undertaken by only a handful of scientists. Since that time, the "mad cow" crisis has put prion diseases on the agenda of both politicians and the media. Significant progress has been made in prion disease research, and many aspects of prion pathogenesis are now understood. And yet the diagnostic procedures available for prion diseases are not nearly as sensitive as they ought to be, and no therapeutic intervention has been shown to reliably affect the course of the diseases. This article reviews recent progress in the areas of pathogenesis of, diagnostics of, and therapy for prion diseases and highlights some conspicuous problems that remain to be addressed in each of these fields. PMID:15254579

  14. Progress and problems in the biology, diagnostics, and therapeutics of prion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Adriano; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Miele, Gino

    2004-01-01

    The term “prion” was introduced by Stanley Prusiner in 1982 to describe the atypical infectious agent that causes transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, a group of infectious neurodegenerative diseases that include scrapie in sheep, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, chronic wasting disease in cervids, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle. Over the past twenty years, the word “prion” has been taken to signify various subtly different concepts. In this article, we refer to the prion as the transmissible principle underlying prion diseases, without necessarily implying any specific biochemical or structural identity. When Prusiner started his seminal work, the study of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies was undertaken by only a handful of scientists. Since that time, the “mad cow” crisis has put prion diseases on the agenda of both politicians and the media. Significant progress has been made in prion disease research, and many aspects of prion pathogenesis are now understood. And yet the diagnostic procedures available for prion diseases are not nearly as sensitive as they ought to be, and no therapeutic intervention has been shown to reliably affect the course of the diseases. This article reviews recent progress in the areas of pathogenesis of, diagnostics of, and therapy for prion diseases and highlights some conspicuous problems that remain to be addressed in each of these fields. PMID:15254579

  15. Recent Progress on Tissue-Resident Adult Stem Cell Biology and Their Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of the stem cell research has given new hopes to treat and even cure diverse degenerative disorders and incurable diseases in human. Particularly, the identification of a rare population of adult stem cells in the most tissues/organs in human has emerged as an attractive source of multipotent stem/progenitor cells for cell replacement-based therapies and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine. The tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells offer the possibility to stimulate their in vivo differentiation or to use their ex vivo expanded progenies for cell replacement-based therapies with multiple applications in human. Among the human diseases that could be treated by the stem cell-based therapies, there are hematopoietic and immune disorders, multiple degenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s and Alzeimeher’s diseases, type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus as well as eye, liver, lung, skin and cardiovascular disorders and aggressive and metastatic cancers. In addition, the genetically-modified adult stem/progenitor cells could also be used as delivery system for expressing the therapeutic molecules in specific damaged areas of different tissues. Recent advances in cancer stem/progenitor cell research also offer the possibility to targeting these undifferentiated and malignant cells that provide critical functions in cancer initiation and progression and disease relapse for treating the patients diagnosed with the advanced and metastatic cancers which remain incurable in the clinics with the current therapies. PMID:18288619

  16. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-07-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  17. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-10-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  18. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-04-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  19. Molecular biology of coal bio-desulfurization; Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D.; Gallagher, J.R.

    1991-01-25

    The aim of this project is to use the techniques of molecular genetics to identify, clone, sequence, and enhance the expression of proteins which remove sulfur covalently bound to coal. This includes the movement and expression of these proteins into bacterial species which may be more useful in the industrial application of a biological desulfurization process. This quarter we finalized the initial cloning and sequencing of the dibenzothiophene (DBT) metabolic (``dox``) genes from strain C18. In addition, we constructed several mutations in single dox genes and have begun to dissect the contribution of each gene product in the DBT degradation pathway. Using a probe derived from DNA adjacent to a transposon which inactivated DBT metabolism, the DBT active genes from A15 have been cloned and identified on cosmids. We have also electroporated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans with a plasmid containing a chloramphenicol resistant transposon. Colonies of T. ferrooxidans resistant to chloramphenicol were obtained.

  20. Second generation biological signal processor. Final progress report, February 15, 1993--February 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Biological Information Signal Processor (BISP) is a VLSI ASIC implementation of the dynamic programming methods favored for direct sequence-to-sequence comparison in order to discover local as well as global similarities. These methods, based on the local algorithm of Smith and Waterman provide the most mathematically robust solution to the problem of sequence alignment (determination of the optimal character-to-character registration between the two sequence, including relative insertions and deletions, indels). BISP provides a complete implementation of the standard Smith and Waterman algorithm in a systolic array that allows full parameterization and several novel extensions to the algorithm. BISP operates at supercomputer speeds from a VME board on a Sun workstation. Each VME array provides a complete systolic pipeline for comparison and multiple arrays can be combined linearly in order to increase the pipeline length. Overall performance is a function of the IO speed of the pipelined disk-resident data and the length of the array.

  1. Enhancing biological production of ammonia from atmospheric nitrogen and soil nitrate. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.M.; Valentine, R.C.; Phillips, D.A.; Rains, D.W.; Huffaker, R.C.

    1980-12-01

    This report focuses on the genetic engineering of improved strains of root nodule bacteria--Rhizobium japonicum--which form effective nitrogen fixing associations with soybeans. Methodology is presented for the molecular cloning of nitrogen fixing (nif) genes of soybean Rhizobium and the hydrogen uptake (Hup) system in R. japonicum. The latter includes strategies for genetic engineering of Hup genes to enhance energy efficiency of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Also described are the function of osmotic tolerance (osm) plasmids and stages of genetic engineering to protect the bacteria against drought and salinity stresses. Strains of Rhizobium leguminosorium were examined to determine how their plasmid content affects symbiosis and host plant function. Other studies include the enhancement of biological nitrogen fixation in rice paddies, conservation of fixed nitrogen, and integrative physiology of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants. Extensive references and future research plans are included.

  2. Recent progress in stimuli-induced polydiacetylenes for sensing temperature, chemical and biological targets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Songyi; Kim, Ji-Yeong; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Yoon, Juyoung

    2016-07-28

    Polydiacetylenes (PDAs) have received increasing attention as smart materials owing to their unique properties. Upon addition of various stimuli, blue PDAs can undergo a colorimetric transition from blue to red along with a change from non-fluorescent to fluorescent. The optical changes can be readily detected by the naked eye and by using absorption and fluorescence spectrometers. These properties make PDAs excellent materials for use in platforms for sensing chemical or biological targets. In recent years, a number of biosensors and chemosensors based on the optical responses of polydiacetylenes have been reported. In this review, recent advances made in this area were discussed following a format based on different cognizing targets, including temperature, metal ions, anions, surfactants, amines, water, gas, sugars, hydrocarbons, neomycin, heparin, virus, enzymes, bacteria, and cancers. Emphasis is given to the methods used to prepare PDA sensing systems as well as their sensing performance. PMID:27314281

  3. Computational enzyme design approaches with significant biological outcomes: progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoman; Zhang, Ziding; Song, Jiangning

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes are powerful biocatalysts, however, so far there is still a large gap between the number of enzyme-based practical applications and that of naturally occurring enzymes. Multiple experimental approaches have been applied to generate nearly all possible mutations of target enzymes, allowing the identification of desirable variants with improved properties to meet the practical needs. Meanwhile, an increasing number of computational methods have been developed to assist in the modification of enzymes during the past few decades. With the development of bioinformatic algorithms, computational approaches are now able to provide more precise guidance for enzyme engineering and make it more efficient and less laborious. In this review, we summarize the recent advances of method development with significant biological outcomes to provide important insights into successful computational protein designs. We also discuss the limitations and challenges of existing methods and the future directions that should improve them. PMID:24688648

  4. Yucca Mountain Biological Resources Monitoring Program; Progress report, October 1992--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (as amended in 1987) to study and characterize the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. During site characterization, the DOE will conduct a variety of geotechnical, geochemical, geological, and hydrological studies to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository. To ensure that site characterization activities do not adversely affect the environment at Yucca Mountain, a program has been implemented to monitor and mitigate potential impacts and ensure activities comply with applicable environmental regulations. This report describes the activities and accomplishments of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG&G/EM) from October 1992 through December 1993 for six program areas within the Terrestrial Ecosystem component of the environmental program for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP): Site Characterization Effects, Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), Habitat Reclamation, Monitoring and Mitigation, Radiological Monitoring, and Biological Support.

  5. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S. M.; Christensen, S. W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; McCracken, M.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth G. R.; Stewart, A. J.

    2001-01-19

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant). As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Complex on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the

  6. Functional and Biological Role of Endothelial Precursor Cells in Tumour Progression: A New Potential Therapeutic Target in Haematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Reale, Antonia; Melaccio, Assunta; Lamanuzzi, Aurelia; Saltarella, Ilaria; Dammacco, Franco; Vacca, Angelo; Ria, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    It was believed that vasculogenesis occurred only during embryo life and that postnatal formation of vessels arose from angiogenesis. Recent findings demonstrate the existence of Endothelial Precursor Cells (EPCs), which take partin postnatal vasculogenesis. EPCs are recruited from the bone marrow under the stimulation of growth factors and cytokines and reach the sites of neovascularization in both physiological and pathological conditions such as malignancies where they contribute to the "angiogenic switch" and tumor progression. An implementation of circulating EPCs in the bloodstream of patients with haematological malignancies has been demonstrated. This increase is strictly related to the bone marrow microvessel density and correlated with a poor prognosis. The EPCs characterization is a very complex process and still under investigation. This literature review aims to provide an overview of the functional and biological role of EPCs in haematological malignancies and to investigate their potential as a new cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26788072

  7. Molecular Profiling Reveals Biologically Discrete Subsets and Pathways of Progression in Diffuse Glioma.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Michele; Barthel, Floris P; Malta, Tathiane M; Sabedot, Thais S; Salama, Sofie R; Murray, Bradley A; Morozova, Olena; Newton, Yulia; Radenbaugh, Amie; Pagnotta, Stefano M; Anjum, Samreen; Wang, Jiguang; Manyam, Ganiraju; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ling, Shiyun; Rao, Arjun A; Grifford, Mia; Cherniack, Andrew D; Zhang, Hailei; Poisson, Laila; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Tirapelli, Daniela Pretti da Cunha; Rao, Arvind; Mikkelsen, Tom; Lau, Ching C; Yung, W K Alfred; Rabadan, Raul; Huse, Jason; Brat, Daniel J; Lehman, Norman L; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Zheng, Siyuan; Hess, Kenneth; Rao, Ganesh; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Cooper, Lee; Akbani, Rehan; Wrensch, Margaret; Haussler, David; Aldape, Kenneth D; Laird, Peter W; Gutmann, David H; Noushmehr, Houtan; Iavarone, Antonio; Verhaak, Roel G W

    2016-01-28

    Therapy development for adult diffuse glioma is hindered by incomplete knowledge of somatic glioma driving alterations and suboptimal disease classification. We defined the complete set of genes associated with 1,122 diffuse grade II-III-IV gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas and used molecular profiles to improve disease classification, identify molecular correlations, and provide insights into the progression from low- to high-grade disease. Whole-genome sequencing data analysis determined that ATRX but not TERT promoter mutations are associated with increased telomere length. Recent advances in glioma classification based on IDH mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion status were recapitulated through analysis of DNA methylation profiles, which identified clinically relevant molecular subsets. A subtype of IDH mutant glioma was associated with DNA demethylation and poor outcome; a group of IDH-wild-type diffuse glioma showed molecular similarity to pilocytic astrocytoma and relatively favorable survival. Understanding of cohesive disease groups may aid improved clinical outcomes. PMID:26824661

  8. Pathogenesis and molecular biology of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, the JC virus-induced demyelinating disease of the human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Major, E O; Amemiya, K; Tornatore, C S; Houff, S A; Berger, J R

    1992-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis and molecular biology of JC virus infection over the last two decades have significantly changed our understanding of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, which can be described as a subacute viral infection of neuroglial cells that probably follows reactivation of latent infection rather than being the consequence of prolonged JC virus replication in the brain. There is now sufficient evidence to suggest that JC virus latency occurs in kidney and B cells. However, JC virus isolates from brain or kidney differ in the regulatory regions of their viral genomes which are controlled by host cell factors for viral gene expression and replication. DNA sequences of noncoding regions of the viral genome display a certain heterogeneity among isolates from brain and kidney. These data suggest that an archetypal strain of JC virus exists whose sequence is altered during replication in different cell types. The JC virus regulatory region likely plays a significant role in establishing viral latency and must be acted upon for reactivation of the virus. A developing hypothesis is that reactivation takes place from latently infected B lymphocytes that are activated as a result of immune suppression. JC virus enters the brain in the activated B cell. Evidence for this mechanism is the detection of JC virus DNA in peripheral blood lymphocytes and infected B cells in the brains of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Once virus enters the brain, astrocytes as well as oligodendrocytes support JC virus multiplication. Therefore, JC virus infection of neuroglial cells may impair other neuroglial functions besides the production and maintenance of myelin. Consequently our increased understanding of the pathogenesis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy suggests new ways to intervene in JC virus infection with immunomodulation therapies. Perhaps along with trials of nucleoside analogs or interferon administration, this fatal

  9. Advances in Wilms Tumor Treatment and Biology: Progress Through International Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Dome, Jeffrey S; Graf, Norbert; Geller, James I; Fernandez, Conrad V; Mullen, Elizabeth A; Spreafico, Filippo; Van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2015-09-20

    Clinical trials in Wilms tumor (WT) have resulted in overall survival rates of greater than 90%. This achievement is especially remarkable because improvements in disease-specific survival have occurred concurrently with a reduction of therapy for large patient subgroups. However, the outcomes for certain patient subgroups, including those with unfavorable histologic and molecular features, bilateral disease, and recurrent disease, remain well below the benchmark survival rate of 90%. Therapy for WT has been advanced in part by an increasingly complex risk-stratification system based on patient age; tumor stage, histology, and volume; response to chemotherapy; and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 1p and 16q. A consequence of this system has been the apportionment of patients into such small subgroups that only collaboration between large international WT study groups will support clinical trials that are sufficiently powered to answer challenging questions that move the field forward. This article gives an overview of the Children's Oncology Group and International Society of Pediatric Oncology approaches to WT and focuses on four subgroups (stage IV, initially inoperable, bilateral, and relapsed WT) for which international collaboration is pressing. In addition, biologic insights resulting from collaborative laboratory research are discussed. A coordinated expansion of international collaboration in both clinical trials and laboratory science will provide real opportunity to improve the treatment and outcomes for children with renal tumors on a global level. PMID:26304882

  10. Emerging Understanding of Bcl-2 Biology: Implications for Neoplastic Progression and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Cristina; Lee, Sun-Hee; Meng, X. Wei; Vincelette, Nicole D.; Knorr, Katherine L.B.; Ding, Husheng; Nowakowski, Grzegorz S.; Dai, Haiming; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Bcl-2, the founding member of a family of apoptotic regulators, was initially identified as the protein product of a gene that is translocated and overexpressed in greater than 85% of follicular lymphomas (FLs). Thirty years later we now understand that Bcl-2 modulates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway by binding and neutralizing the mitochondrial permeabilizers Bax and Bak as well as a variety of pro-apoptotic proteins, including the cellular stress sensors Bim, Bid, Puma, Bad, Bmf and, under some conditions, Noxa. Despite extensive investigation of all of these proteins, important questions remain. For example, how Bax and Bak breach the outer mitochondrial membrane remains poorly understood. Likewise, how the functions of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members such as eponymous Bcl-2 are affected by phosphorylation or cancer-associated mutations has been incompletely defined. Finally, whether Bcl-2 family members can be successfully targeted for therapeutic advantage is only now being investigated in the clinic. Here we review recent advances in understanding Bcl-2 family biology and biochemistry that begin to address these questions. PMID:25827952