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1

Carbon Sequestration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this inquiry-based lesson, learners measure the biomass of trees, calculate the carbon stored by the trees, and use this information to create recommendations about using trees for carbon sequestration. This activity encourages learners to think critically about managing forests for carbon sequestration.

Science, New Y.

2012-01-01

2

Rapid Assessment of U.S. Forest and Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Forest Biomass Carbon-Sequestration Capacity  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides results of a rapid assessment of biological carbon stocks and forest biomass carbon sequestration capacity in the conterminous United States. Maps available from the U.S. Department of Agriculture are used to calculate estimates of current organic carbon storage in soils (73 petagrams of carbon, or PgC) and forest biomass (17 PgC). Of these totals, 3.5 PgC of soil organic carbon and 0.8 PgC of forest biomass carbon occur on lands managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). Maps of potential vegetation are used to estimate hypothetical forest biomass carbon sequestration capacities that are 3-7 PgC higher than current forest biomass carbon storage in the conterminous United States. Most of the estimated hypothetical additional forest biomass carbon sequestration capacity is accrued in areas currently occupied by agriculture and development. Hypothetical forest biomass carbon sequestration capacities calculated for existing forests and woodlands are within +or- 1 PgC of estimated current forest biomass carbon storage. Hypothetical forest biomass sequestration capacities on lands managed by the DOI in the conterminous United States are 0-0.4 PgC higher than existing forest biomass carbon storage. Implications for forest and other land management practices are not considered in this report. Uncertainties in the values reported here are large and difficult to quantify, particularly for hypothetical carbon sequestration capacities. Nevertheless, this rapid assessment helps to frame policy and management discussion by providing estimates that can be compared to amounts necessary to reduce predicted future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

Sundquist, Eric T.; Ackerman, Katherine V.; Bliss, Norman B.; Kellndorfer, Josef M.; Reeves, Matt C., Rollins, Matthew G.

2009-01-01

3

Global Supply of Biomass for Energy and Carbon Sequestration from Afforestation\\/Reforestation Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we provide an analytical framework to estimate the joint production of biomass and carbon sequestration from\\u000a afforestation and reforestation activities. The analysis is based on geographical explicit information on a half-degree resolution.\\u000a For each grid-cell the model estimates forest growth using a global vegetation model and chooses forest management rules.\\u000a Land prices, cost of forest production and

Michael Obersteiner; G. Alexandrov; Pablo C. Benítez; Ian McCallum; Florian Kraxner; Keywan Riahi; Dmitry Rokityanskiy; Yoshiki Yamagata

2006-01-01

4

Carbon sequestration.  

PubMed

Developing technologies to reduce the rate of increase of atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) from annual emissions of 8.6PgCyr-1 from energy, process industry, land-use conversion and soil cultivation is an important issue of the twenty-first century. Of the three options of reducing the global energy use, developing low or no-carbon fuel and sequestering emissions, this manuscript describes processes for carbon (CO2) sequestration and discusses abiotic and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric CO2 into other long-lived global pools including oceanic, pedologic, biotic and geological strata to reduce the net rate of increase in atmospheric CO2. Engineering techniques of CO2 injection in deep ocean, geological strata, old coal mines and oil wells, and saline aquifers along with mineral carbonation of CO2 constitute abiotic techniques. These techniques have a large potential of thousands of Pg, are expensive, have leakage risks and may be available for routine use by 2025 and beyond. In comparison, biotic techniques are natural and cost-effective processes, have numerous ancillary benefits, are immediately applicable but have finite sink capacity. Biotic and abiotic C sequestration options have specific nitches, are complementary, and have potential to mitigate the climate change risks. PMID:17761468

Lal, Rattan

2008-02-27

5

Rapid Assessment of U.S. Forest and Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Forest Biomass Carbon Sequestration Capacity.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides the results of a rapid assessment of biological carbon stocks and biological carbon sequestration capacity in the conterminous United States. The rapid assessment, which includes estimates of stora...

E. T. Sundquist J. M. Kellndorfer K. V. Ackerman M. C. Reeves N. B. Bliss

2009-01-01

6

Intro to Carbon Sequestration  

ScienceCinema

NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

None

2010-01-08

7

Intro to Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

2008-03-06

8

Carbon sequestration in soils  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this article is to examine (a) the magnitude of the potential for carbon sequestration in the soil as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere, (b) some of the measures that might be used to achieve this potential, (c) the methods available for estimating carbon sequestration on a farm or regional level, (d) what is needed to achieve international consensus, and (e) additional information needs. This article is not presented as a definitive document but rather as an overview of where scientific opinion converges and where more work is needed. In addition, it aims to provoke discussion of the measures that can increase soil carbon sequestration and the policies that might be used to implement those measures.

Bruce, J.P. [Soil and Water Conservation Society, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Frome, M. [Soil and Water Conservation Society, Washington, DC (United States); Haites, E. [Margaree Consultants, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Janzen, H. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, Alberta (Canada); Lal, R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). School of Natural Resources; Paustian, K. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Natural Resource Ecology Lab.

1999-01-01

9

Biomass and Carbon Sequestration in Community Mangrove Plantations and a Natural Regeneration Stand in the Ayeyarwady Delta, Myanmar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mangroves in the Ayeyarwady Delta is one of the most threatened ecosystems, and is rapidly disappearing as in many tropical countries. The deforestation and degradation of mangrove forest in the Ayeryarwady Delta results in the shortage of wood resources and declining of environmental services that have been provided by the mangrove ecosystem. Cyclone Nargis struck the Ayeyarwady Delta on 2 May 2008 with an intensity unprecedented in the history of Myanmar. The overexploitation of mangroves because of local demands for fuel wood and charcoal and the conversion of mangrove forest land into agricultural land or shrimp farms over the past decades have increased the loss of human life and the damage to settlements caused by the Cyclone.The biomass study was conducted in September of 2006 in Bogale Township in the Ayeyarwady Delta and continued monitoring in September of each year from 2007 to 2010. Above and below ground biomass was studied in six years old mangrove plantations of Avicenia marina (Am), Avicenia officinalis (Ao) and Sonneratia apetala (Sa) and a naturally regenerated stand under regeneration improving felling operation (NR: consists of Ceriops decandra, Bruguiera sexangula, and Aegicerus corniculatum) protected for seven years since 2000. These stands were established by small-scale Community Forestry scheme on abandoned paddy fields where natural mangroves once existed. Common allometric equations were developed for biomass estimation by performing regressions between dry weights of trees as dependent variables and biometric parameters such as stem diameter, height and wood density as independent variables. The above and below ground biomass in NR stand (70 Mg ha-1 and 104 Mg ha-1) was the greatest (P < 0.001), and followed by Sa plantation (69 Mg ha-1 and 32 Mg ha-1), Am plantation (25 Mg ha-1 and 27 Mg ha-1) and Ao plantation (21 Mg ha-1 and 26 Mg ha-1). The total carbon stock in biomass was 73 Mg C ha-1 in NR stand, 43 Mg C ha-1 in Sa plantation, 21 Mg C ha-1 in Am plantation and 18 Mg C ha-1 in Ao plantation respectively. The averaged total soil carbon stock up to 1 m soil depth in plantation site was estimated to be 167 ± 58 Mg C ha-1 which was nearly two times higher than that of current paddy fields 85 ± 17 Mg C ha-1. These facts suggest the feasibility of the mangrove plantation and induced natural regeneration as a carbon sequestration tool. The establishment of mangrove plantations appeared to be one measure for reducing the risk of cyclone damage after the Cyclone Nargis. This may reduce future human loss by cyclones and also improve the life of local people by increasing timber resources and environmental services.

Thant, Y. M.; Kanzaki, M.; nil

2011-12-01

10

Carbon sequestration potential of tropical homegardens  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter examines the premise that tropical homegardens have a special role in carbon (C) sequestration because of their ability for carbon storage in the standing biomass, soil, and t he wood products. In doing so, it analyzes the potential for C storage in homegardens and the role of homegardens in reducing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Lack of reliable

B. M. KUMAR

11

Soil carbon sequestration and changes in fungal and bacterial biomass following incorporation of forest residues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sequestering carbon (C) in forest soils can benefit site fertility and help offset greenhouse gas emissions. However, identifying soil conditions and forest management practices which best promote C accumulation remains a challenging task. We tested whether soil incorporation of masticated woody residues alters short-term C storage at forested sites in western and southeastern USA. Our hypothesis was that woody residues

Matt D. Busse; Felipe G. Sanchez; Alice W. Ratcliff; John R. Butnor; Emily A. Carter; Robert F. Powers

2009-01-01

12

Carbon Sequestration in Forest Soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon (C) sequestration in soils and forests is an important strategy of reducing the net increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration by fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, biomass burning, soil cultivation and accelerated erosion. Further, the so-called "missing or fugitive CO2" is also probably being absorbed in a terrestrial sink. Three of the 15 strategies proposed to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations by 2054, with each one to sequester 1 Pg Cyr-1, include: (i) biofuel plantations for bioethanol production, (ii) reforestation, afforestation and establishment of new plantations, and (iii) conversion of plow tillage to no-till farming. Enhancing soil organic carbon (SOC) pool is an important component in each of these three options, but especially so in conversion of degraded/marginal agricultural soils to short rotation woody perennials, and establishment of plantations for biofuel, fiber and timber production. Depending upon the prior SOC loss because of the historic land used and management-induced soil degradation, the rate of soil C sequestration in forest soils may be 0 to 3 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. Tropical forest ecosystems cover 1.8 billion hectares and have a SOC sequestration potential of 200 to 500 Tg C yr-1 over 59 years. However, increasing production of forest biomass may not always increase the SOC pool. Factors limiting the rate of SOC sequestration include C: N ratio, soil availability of N and other essential nutrients, concentration of recalcitrant macro-molecules (e.g., lignin, suberin), soil properties (e.g., clay content and mineralogy, aggregation), soil drainage, and climate (mean annual precipitation and temperature). The SOC pool can be enhanced by adopting recommended methods of forest harvesting and site preparation to minimize the "Covington effect," improving soil drainage, alleviating soil compaction, growing species with a high NPP, and improving soil fertility including the availability of micro-nutrients. Soil fertility enhancement and water management in the root zone are critical to exploiting the CO2 fertilization effect on forest growth. Fire is also a useful tool which can be judiciously managed to maximize NPP and the SOC pool, and increase the recalcitrant black C. The importance of SOC sequestration in forest soils can not be over-emphasized.

Lal, R.

2006-05-01

13

Chapter 4: Geological Carbon Sequestration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Carbon sequestration is the long term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. The largest potential reservoirs for storing carbon are the deep oceans and geological reservoirs in the...

J. Friedmann H. Herzog

2006-01-01

14

BIOMASS ENERGY WITH GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CO2: TWO FOR THE PRICE OF ONE?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We explore the technical feasibility and economic implications of combining biomass energy systems with carbon capture and sequestration technology, resulting in energy products with negative net atmospheric carbon emissions. This represents an efficient strategy for biomass-based carbon mitigation and a mechanism for offsetting emissions sources elsewhere in the economy, fundamentally changing the role of biomass in achieving deep emissions reductions.

James S. Rhodes; David W. Keith

15

Have ozone effects on carbon sequestration been over-estimated? A new biomass response function for wheat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Elevated levels of tropospheric ozone can significantly impair the growth of crops. The reduced removal of CO2 by plants leads to higher atmospheric concentrations of CO2, enhancing radiative forcing. Ozone effects on economic yield, e.g. the grain yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are currently used to model effects on radiative forcing. However, changes in grain yield do not necessarily reflect changes in total biomass. Based on analysis of 21 ozone exposure experiments with field-grown wheat, we investigated whether use of effects on grain yield as a~proxy for effects on biomass under- or over-estimates effects on biomass. First, we confirmed that effects on partitioning and biomass loss are both of significant importance for wheat yield loss. Then we derived ozone dose response functions for biomass loss and for harvest index (the proportion of above-ground biomass converted to grain) based on twelve experiments and recently developed ozone uptake modelling for wheat. Finally, we used a European scale chemical transport model (EMEP MSC-West) to assess the effect of ozone on biomass (-9%) and grain yield (-14%) loss over Europe. Based on yield data per grid square, we estimated above ground biomass losses due to ozone in 2000 in Europe totalling 22.2 million tonnes. Incorrectly applying the grain yield response function to model effects on biomass instead of the biomass response function of this paper would have indicated total above ground biomass losses totalling 38.1 million (i.e. overestimating effects by 15.9 million tonnes). A key conclusion from our study is that future assessments of ozone induced loss of agroecosystem carbon storage should use response functions for biomass, such as that provided in this paper, not grain yield, to avoid overestimation of the indirect radiative forcing from ozone effects on crop biomass accumulation.

Pleijel, H.; Danielsson, H.; Simpson, D.; Mills, G.

2014-04-01

16

Carbon sequestration and biomass energy offset: theoretical, potential and achievable capacities globally, in Europe and the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extensive literature on the capacity to offset fossil fuel carbon emissions by enhancing terrestrial carbon sinks or biomass energy substitution is confused by different interpretations of the word ‘potential’. This paper presents an overview of these capacities for the world, the EU15 countries and the UK over the next 50–100 years, divided into what are considered: (i) theoretical potential

Melvin G. R. Cannell

2003-01-01

17

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring,

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-01-01

18

Carbon Sequestration and Land Degradation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Storing carbon (C) in soil as organic matter is not only a viable strategy to sequester CO2 from the atmosphere, but is vital for improving the quality of soil. This presentation describes (1) C sequestration concepts\\u000a and rationale, (2) relevant management approaches to avoid land degradation and foster C sequestration, and (3) a summary\\u000a of research quantifying soil C sequestration.

Alan J. Franzluebbers; Paul C. Doraiswamy

19

Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals

W. J. J. Huijgen; R. N. J. Comans

2007-01-01

20

Accelerated Sequestration of Terrestrial Plant Biomass in the Deep Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most efficient uses of aboveground agricultural residues to reduce atmospheric CO2 is burial in sites removed from contact with the atmosphere and in which degradation of lignocellulose is inhibited (Strand and Benford 2009). Similarly by burying forest residues greater benefits for atmospheric carbon accrue compared to incineration or bioethanol production. Accessible planetary sites that are most removed from contact with the atmosphere are primarily the deep ocean sediments. Many deep ocean sediment ecologies are acclimated to massive inputs of terrestrial plant biomass. Nonetheless, marine degradation rates of lignocellulose are slower than terrestrial rates (Keil et al. 2010). Additionally, anaerobic conditions are easily achieved in many deep ocean sediments, inhibiting lignocellulose degradation further, while the dominance of sulfate in the water column as electron acceptor prevents the release of methane from methanogenesis to the atmosphere. The potential benefit of massive removal of excess terrestrial biomass to the deep ocean will be estimated and compared to other uses including biochar and BECS. The impact of the biomass on the marine environment will be discussed and potential sequestration sites in the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic compared. Keil, R. G., J. M. Nuwer, et al. (2010). "Burial of agricultural byproducts in the deep sea as a form of carbon sequestration: A preliminary experiment." Marine Chemistry (In Press, online 6 August 2010). Strand, S. E. and G. Benford (2009). "Ocean sequestration of crop residue carbon: recycling fossil fuel carbon back to deep sediments." Environ. Sci. Technol. 43(4): 1000-1007.

Strand, S. E.

2010-12-01

21

Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio, FY 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program continues to make progress toward its goals of lowering the cost of carbon dioxide (CO(sub 2)) capture and ensuring permanent and safe carbon storage. As sequestration technology ...

2005-01-01

22

Carbon Sequestration in Campus Trees  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students use a spreadsheet to calculate the net carbon sequestration in a set of trees; they will utilize an allometric approach based upon parameters measured on the individual trees. They determine the species of trees in the set, measure trunk diameter at a particular height, and use the spreadsheet to calculate carbon content of the tree using forestry research data.

Cole, Robert S.; Spreadsheets Across the Curruculum; Washington Center; Science Education Resource Center (SERC)

23

Carbon Sequestration Research and Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, res...

A. Palmisano A. Wolsky B. Kane D. Reichle G. Hendrey G. Jacobs H. Herzog J. Clarke J. Ekmann J. Houghton J. Hunter-Cevera J. Ogden J. Stringer M. York N. Woodward R. Dahlman R. Judkins R. Socolow S. Benson T. Surles

1999-01-01

24

Carbon Dioxide: Production and Sequestration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this problem set, learners will refer to a satellite image to calculate the rate of carbon sequestration in the areas of bare land and forested lawn shown to answer a series of questions. Answer key is provided. This is part of Earth Math: A Brief Mathematical Guide to Earth Science and Climate Change.

25

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Minesoils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Minesoils are drastically influenced by anthropogenic activities. They are characterized by low soil organic matter (SOM) content, low fertility, and poor physicochemical and biological properties, limiting their quality, capability, and functions. Reclamation of these soils has potential for resequestering some of the C lost and mitigating CO2 emissions. Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration rates in minesoils are high in the

David A. N. Ussiri; Rattan Lal

2005-01-01

26

Carbon Sequestration: State of the Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Energy has released this report (.pdf format) entitled Carbon Sequestration: State of the Science. Divided into nine sections, the report covers separation and capture of carbon dioxide, carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems, ocean sequestration, carbon sequestration in geological formations, and advanced chemical and biological approaches to sequestration. Heavy on high-tech solutions (and low on human restraint), the section entitled Detailed Descriptions of Ecosystems will be of particular interest to ecologists, as it describes how each ecosystem, with assistance from human technology (genetics, etc.), can reach its full potential as a carbon garbage can.

1999-01-01

27

Carbon sequestration in reclaimed minesoils  

SciTech Connect

Minesoils are drastically influenced by anthropogenic activities. They are characterized by low soil organic matter (SOM) content, low fertility, and poor physicochemical and biological properties, limiting their quality, capability, and functions. Reclamation of these soils has potential for resequestering some of the C lost and mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions. Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration rates in minesoils are high in the first 20 to 30 years after reclamation in the top 15 cm soil depth. In general, higher rates of SOC sequestration are observed for minesoils under pasture and grassland management than under forest land use. Observed rates of SOC sequestration are 0.3 to 1.85 Mg C ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} for pastures and rangelands, and 0.2 to 1.64 Mg C ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} for forest land use. Proper reclamation and postreclamation management may enhance SOC sequestration and add to the economic value of the mined sites. Management practices that may enhance SOC sequestration include increasing vegetative cover by deep-rooted perennial vegetation and afforestation, improving soil fertility, and alleviation of physical, chemical and biological limitations by fertilizers and soil amendments such as biosolids, manure, coal combustion by-products, and mulches. Soil and water conservation are important to SOC sequestration. The potential of SOC sequestration in minesoils of the US is estimated to be 1.28 Tg C yr{sup -1}, compared to the emissions from coal combustion of 506 Tg C yr{sup -1}.

Ussiri, D.A.N.; Lal, R. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). School of Natural Resources

2005-07-01

28

Carbon emissions and sequestration potential of Central African ecosystems.  

PubMed

Joint Implementation under the Climate Change Convention and Clean Development Mechanism of the Kyoto Protocol require a scientific understanding of current carbon stocks, fluxes, and sequestration potential, especially in tropical ecosystems where there are large carbon reservoirs, significant carbon emissions, and large land areas available for reforestation. Central Africa contains 10% of the world's remaining tropical moist forests and has received little attention in carbon studies. In 1980, above-ground carbon stocks in the central African ecosystem were 28.92 Pg and were reduced to 24.79 Pg by 1990. Improved forest management aimed at increasing biomass density could sequester 18.32 Pg of carbon, and over 500,000 km2 formerly forested land will be available by 2050 for reforestation with a capacity to offset 10 Pg carbon. Understanding the spatial distribution of biomass carbon and sequestration potential will be essential for carbon trading initiatives through Joint Implementation and Clean Development Mechanism. PMID:11757283

Zhang, Q; Justice, C O

2001-09-01

29

Carbon sequestration in European croplands.  

PubMed

The Marrakech Accords allow biospheric carbon sinks and sources to be included in attempts to meet emission reduction targets for the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. Forest management, cropland management, grazing land management, and re-vegetation are allowable activities under Article 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol. Soil carbon sinks (and sources) can, therefore, be included under these activities. Croplands are estimated to be the largest biospheric source of carbon lost to the atmosphere in Europe each year, but the cropland estimate is the most uncertain among all land-use types. It is estimated that European croplands (for Europe as far east as the Urals) lose 300 Tg (C) per year, with the mean figure for the European Union estimated to be 78 Tg (C) per year (with one SD=37). National estimates for EU countries are of a similar order of magnitude on a per-area basis. There is significant potential within Europe to decrease the flux of carbon to the atmosphere from cropland, and for cropland management to sequester soil carbon, relative to the amount of carbon stored in cropland soils at present. The biological potential for carbon storage in European (EU 15) cropland is of the order of 90-120 Tg (C) per year, with a range of options available that include reduced and zero tillage, set-aside, perennial crops, deep rooting crops, more efficient use of organic amendments (animal manure, sewage sludge, cereal straw, compost), improved rotations, irrigation, bioenergy crops, extensification, organic farming, and conversion of arable land to grassland or woodland. The sequestration potential, considering only constraints on land use, amounts of raw materials and available land, is up to 45 Tg (C) per year. The realistic potential and the conservative achievable potentials may be considerably lower than the biological potential because of socioeconomic and other constraints, with a realistically achievable potential estimated to be about 20% of the biological potential. As with other carbon sequestration options, potential impacts of non-CO, trace gases also need to be factored in. If carbon sequestration in croplands is to be used in helping to meet emission reduction targets for the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, the changes in soil carbon must be measurable and verifiable. Changes in soil carbon can be difficult to measure over a 5-year commitment period, and this has implications for Kyoto accounting and verification. Currently, most countries can hope to achieve only a low level of verifiability during the first commitment period, whereas those with the best-developed national carbon accounting systems will be able to deliver an intermediate level of verifiability. Very stringent definitions of verifiability would require verification that would be prohibitively expensive for any country. There is considerable potential in European croplands to reduce carbon fluxes to the atmosphere and to sequester carbon iri the soil, but carbon sequestration in soil has a finite potential and is non-permanent. Given that carbon sequestration may also be difficult to measure and verify, soil carbon sequestration is a riskier long-term strategy for climate mitigation than direct reduction of carbon emissions. However, improved agricultural management often has a range of other environmental and economic benefits in addition to climate mitigation potential, and this may make attempts to improve soil carbon storage attractive as part of integrated sustainability policies. PMID:17633030

Smith, Pete; Falloon, Pete

2005-01-01

30

Carbon Sequestration Potential in Mangrove Wetlands of Southern of India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mangrove forest and the soil on which it grows are major sinks of atmospheric carbon. We present the results of a study on the carbon sequestration in the ground biomass of Avicennia marina including the organic carbon deposition, degradation and preservation in wetland sediments of Muthupet mangrove forest (southeast coast of India) in order to evaluate the influence of forests in the global carbon cycle. The inventory for estimating the ground biomass of Avicennia marina was carried out using random sampling technique (10 m × 10 m plot) with allometric regression equation. The carbon content in different vegetal parts (leaves, stem and root) of mangrove species and associated marshy vegetations was estimated using the combustion method. We observe that the organic carbon was higher (ca. 54.8%) recorded in the stems of Aegiceras corniculatum and Salicornia brachiata and lower (ca. 30.3%) in the Sesuvium portulacastrum leaves. The ground biomass and carbon sequestration of Avicennia marina are 58.56±12.65 t/ ha and 27.52±5.95 mg C/ha, respectively. The depth integrated organic carbon model profiles indicate an average accumulation rate of 149.75gC/m2.yr and an average remineralization rate of 32.89gC/m2.yr. We estimate an oxidation of ca. 21.85% of organic carbon and preservation of ca. 78.15% of organic carbon in the wetland sediments. Keywords: Above ground biomass, organic carbon, sequestration, mangrove, wetland sediments, Muthupet.

Chokkalingam, L.; Ponnambalam, K.; Ponnaiah, J. M.; Roy, P.; Sankar, S.

2012-12-01

31

The future of carbon sequestration. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect

The report is an overview of the opportunities for carbon sequestration to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It provides a concise look at what is driving interest in carbon sequestration, the challenges faced in implementing carbon sequestration projects, and the current and future state of carbon sequestration. Topics covered in the report include: Overview of the climate change debate; Explanation of the global carbon cycle; Discussion of the concept of carbon sequestration; Review of current efforts to implement carbon sequestration; Analysis and comparison of carbon sequestration component technologies; Review of the economic drivers of carbon sequestration project success; and Discussion of the key government and industry initiatives supporting carbon sequestration.

NONE

2007-04-15

32

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-11-01

33

Biologically Enhanced Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are four trapping mechanisms proposed to play significant roles in the deep geologic sequestration of CO2: i) formation trapping, ii) capillary trapping, iii) solubility trapping, and iv) mineral trapping. Our research has shown that microbial biofilms are capable of enhancing formation trapping, solubility trapping, and mineral trapping under conditions found in brine aquifers targeted for geologic carbon sequestration. We have demonstrated that engineered microbial biofilms are capable of reducing the permeability of porous media (including sandstone cores) at pressures and temperatures, which would be found in the presence of supercritical CO2. The formed biofilms have been demonstrated by us to be resistant to supercritical CO2 exposure. Microbial biofilms have been shown by us to precipitate CO2 in the form of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), which resists dissolution by brine and supercritical CO2. We observed that microbial activity in brine can increase rate and extent of CO2 solubilization in brine. This presentation will summarize our activities, which are part of U.S. DOE sponsored research at Montana State University, focusing on the development of biologically-based concepts for enhanced carbon sequestration.

Gerlach, Robin; Mitchell, Andrew C.; Spangler, Lee H.; Cunningham, Al B.

2010-05-01

34

Carbon Sequestration via Wood Burial  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which forest dead wood or old trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It was estimated that the carbon sequestration potential of forest wood harvest and burial is 10GtC y-1 with an uncertainty range of 5-15 GtC y-1. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost was crudely estimated at $50/tC, significantly lower than the cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage, a carbon sequestration technique currently under most serious consideration. The low cost is largely because the CO2 capture is achieved at little cost by the natural process of photosynthesis. The technique is low tech, distributed, safe and can be stopped or reversed at any time. The relatively low cost may soon be competitive enough for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon trading market. In tropical regions with ongoing deforestation, wood burial instead of burning will immediately reduce that portion of the anthropogenic CO2 emission.

Zeng, N.

2007-12-01

35

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2006-08-30

36

A Sustainability Initiative to Quantify Carbon Sequestration by Campus Trees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over 3,900 trees on a university campus were inventoried by an instructor-led team of geography undergraduates in order to quantify the carbon sequestration associated with biomass growth. The setting of the project is described, together with its logistics, methodology, outcomes, and benefits. This hands-on project provided a team of students…

Cox, Helen M.

2012-01-01

37

Integrated estimates of global terrestrial carbon sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessing the contribution of terrestrial carbon sequestration to climate change mitigation requires integration across scientific and disciplinary boundaries. A comprehensive analysis incorporating ecologic, geographic and economic data was used to develop terrestrial carbon sequestration estimates for agricultural soil carbon, reforestation and pasture management. These estimates were applied in the MiniCAM integrated assessment model to evaluate mitigation strategies within policy and

Allison M. Thomson; R. César Izaurralde; Steven J. Smith; Leon E. Clarke

2008-01-01

38

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-06-30

39

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-10-31

40

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31

41

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-01-31

42

Enhancement of Carbon Sequestration in US Soils  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer-reviewed article from Bioscience journal is about the importance of improving land management to increase carbon sequestration in US soils. Improved practices in agriculture, forestry, and land management could be used to increase soil carbon and thereby significantly reduce the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Understanding biological and edaphic processes that increase and retain soil carbon can lead to specific manipulations that enhance soil carbon sequestration. These manipulations, however, will only be suitable for adoption if they are technically feasible over large areas, economically competitive with alternative measures to offset greenhouse gas emissions, and environmentally beneficial. Here we present the elements of an integrated evaluation of soil carbon sequestration methods.

WILFRED M. POST, R. CESAR IZAURRALDE, JULIE D. JASTROW, BRUCE A. McCARL, JAMES E. AMONETTE, VANESSA L. BAILEY, PHILIP M. JARDINE, TRISTRAM O. WEST, and JIZHONG ZHOU (;)

2004-10-01

43

Carbon sequestration and eruption hazards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to reduce the buildup of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, proposals have been made to sequestrate carbon in ocean, or in coal mines and other underground formations. High gas concentration in ocean or underground formations has to potential to power gas-driven eruptions. In this presentation, possible eruption hazards are explored. Whenever carbon dioxide is sequestrated in the form of carbon dioxide gas, or dissolved and/or absorbed carbon dioxide, it is necessary to exercise caution to avoid gas-driven eruption hazard. It is long known that explosive volcanic eruptions are driven by H2O gas in magma. Lake eruptions powered by dissolved CO2 in lake bottom water were discovered in the 1980's (Kling et al., 1987; Zhang, 1996). Gas-driven ocean eruptions with mechanism similar to lake eruptions have been hypothesized (Zhang, 2003; Zhang and Kling, 2006) although not confirmed. Mud volcanos are commonly thought to be driven by methane-rich fluids in sediment (Milkov, 2000). Recently, Zhang et al. (2007) have proposed that coal outbursts in underground coal mines are driven by dissolved high CO2 concentration in coal, causing coal fragmentation and outburst. That is, coal outbursts may be regarded as a new type of gas-driven eruptions. Therefore, high concentrations of free gas or dissolved/absorbed gas may power eruptions of magma, lake water, ocean water, sediment, and coal. Gas- driven volcanic, lake and ocean eruptions are due to volume expansion from bubble growth, whereas gas-driven coal and sediment eruptions are due to high gas-pressure, leading to fragmentation of coal and sediment. (In explosive volcanism, magma fragmentation is also a critical point.) The threshold conditions for many of these eruptions are not known yet. In planning large (industrial) scale injection of CO2 into a natural reservoir, it is important to know the eruption threshold and design the injection scheme accordingly. More safe sequestration in terms of eruption hazards would utilize chemical reactions to immobilize gaseous CO2 into carbonates. References Kling G.W. et al. (1987) Science 236, 169-175. Zhang Y. (1996) Nature 379, 57-59. Zhang Y. (2003) Geophys. Res. Lett. 30(7), (51-1)-(51-4), doi 10.1029/2002GL016658. Zhang Y., Kling G.W. (2006) Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 34, 293-324. Zhang Y., Guan P., Wang H. (2007) 6th IPACES meeting abstract, 26-29 June 2007, Wuhan, China.

Zhang, Y.

2007-12-01

44

Carbon sequestration via wood burial  

PubMed Central

To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1), followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1) and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1). Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

Zeng, Ning

2008-01-01

45

Carbon sequestration via wood burial.  

PubMed

To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink.It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 +/- 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1), followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1) and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1). Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized.Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market. PMID:18173850

Zeng, Ning

2008-01-01

46

Carbon sequestration research and development  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual'' energy scenario that future global emissions of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere will increase from 7.4 billion tonnes of carbon (GtC) per year in 1997 to approximately 26 GtC/year by 2100. IPCC also projects a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration by the middle of next century and growing rates of increase beyond. Although the effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on global climate are uncertain, many scientists agree that a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations could have a variety of serious environmental consequences. The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, researchers from universities, industry, other government agencies, and DOE national laboratories were brought together to develop the technical basis for conceiving a science and technology road map. That effort has resulted in this report, which develops much of the information needed for the road map.

Reichle, Dave; Houghton, John; Kane, Bob; Ekmann, Jim; and others

1999-12-31

47

Estimating Leakage from Forest Carbon Sequestration Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leakage from forest carbon sequestration—the amount of a program’s direct carbon benefits undermined by carbon releases elsewhere—depends critically on demanders’ ability to substitute non-reserved timber for timber targeted by the program. Analytic, econometric, and sector-level optimization models are combined to estimate leakage from different forest carbon sequestration activities. Empirical estimates for the U.S. show leakage ranges from minimal (<10 percent)

Brian C. Murray; Bruce A. McCarl; Heng-Chi Lee

2004-01-01

48

Carbon sequestration by young Norway spruce monoculture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many studies have been focused on allometry, wood-mass inventory, carbon (C) sequestration, and biomass expansion factors as the first step for the evaluation of C sinks of different plant ecosystems. To identify and quantify these terrestrial C sinks, and evaluate CO2 human-induced emissions on the other hand, information for C balance accounting (for impletion of commitment to Kyoto protocol) are currently highly needed. Temperate forest ecosystems have recently been identified as important C sink. Carbon sink might be associated with environmental changes (elevated [CO2], air temperature, N deposition etc.) and large areas of managed fast-growing young forests. Norway spruce (Pice abies L. Karst) is the dominant tree species (35%) in Central European forests. It covers 55 % of the total forested area in the Czech Republic, mostly at high altitudes. In this contribution we present C sequestration by young (30-35 year-old) Norway spruce monocultures in highland (650-700 m a.s.l., AT- mean annual temperature: 6.9 ° C; P- annual amount of precipitation: 700 mm; GL- growing season duration: 150 days) and mountain (850-900 m a.s.l.; AT of 5.5 ° C; P of 1300 mm; and GL of 120 days) areas and an effect of a different type of thinning. However, the similar stem diameter at the breast height and biomass proportions among above-ground tree organs were obtained in the both localities; the trees highly differ in their height, above-ground organ's biomass values and total above ground biomass, particularly in stem. On the total mean tree biomass needle, branch and stem biomass participated by 22 %, 24 % and 54 % in highland, and by 19 %, 23 % and 58 % in mountain area, respectively. Silvicultural management affects mainly structure, density, and tree species composition of the stand. Therefore, dendrometric parameters of a tree resulted from genotype, growth conditions and from management history as well. Low type of thinning (LT; common in highland) stimulates rather tree height increment comparing to stem thickness increment, whereas high type of thinning (HT; common in mountains) has an opposite effect. It leads to lower stem tapering under LT than HT management. HT stimulates more tree stability and biomass increment of all aboveground tree organs comparing to LT. Contrariwise, total aboveground biomass on the stand level was lower about 15 % in stand with HT management comparing to LT one in highland. Results from the tree ring analysis showed significant differences in early to late wood proportion; where early wood formed about 54 % and 79 % and late wood about 46 % and 21% in highland and mountain locality, respectively. High late wood proportion leads to higher wood density and C woody content in highland comparing to mountain areas. Acknowledgement The research under CzechGlobe (CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0073) and the National Infrastructure for Carbon Observation - CzeCOS/ICOS was supported by Ministry of Education CR (LM2010007).

Pokorny, R.; Rajsnerova, P.; Kubásek, J.

2012-04-01

49

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-06-01

50

Carbon sequestration in dryland ecosystems.  

PubMed

Drylands occupy 6.15 billion hectares (Bha) or 47.2% of the world's land area. Of this, 3.5 to 4.0 Bha (57%-65%) are either desertified or prone to desertification. Despite the low soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration, total SOC pool of soils of the drylands is 241 Pg (1 Pg = petagram = 10(15)g = 1 billion metric ton) or 15.5% of the world's total of 1550 Pg to 1-meter depth. Desertification has caused historic C loss of 20 to 30 Pg. Assuming that two-thirds of the historic loss can be resequestered, the total potential of SOC sequestration is 12 to 20 Pg C over a 50-year period. Land use and management practices to sequester SOC include afforestation with appropriate species, soil management on cropland, pasture management on grazing land, and restoration of degraded soils and ecosystems through afforestation and conversion to other restorative land uses. Tree species suitable for afforestation in dryland ecosystems include Mesquite, Acacia, Neem and others. Recommended soil management practices include application of biosolids (e.g., manure, sludge), which enhance activity of soil macrofauna (e.g., termites), use of vegetative mulches, water harvesting, and judicious irrigation systems. Recommended practices of managing grazing lands include controlled grazing at an optimal stocking rate, fire management, and growing improved species. The estimated potential of SOC sequestration is about 1 Pg C/y for the world and 50 Tg C/y for the U.S. This potential of dryland soils is relevant to both the Kyoto Protocol under UNFCCC and the U.S. Farm Bill 2002. PMID:15453406

Lal, Rattan

2004-04-01

51

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first 18-months of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (fifth and sixth project quarters) o...

K. J. Nemeth

2005-01-01

52

The leaky sink: persistent obstacles to a forest carbon sequestration program based on individual projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

One strategy for mitigating the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide is to expand the size of the terrestrial carbon sink, particularly forests, essentially using trees as biological scrubbers. Within relevant ranges of carbon abatement targets, augmenting carbon sequestration by protecting and expanding biomass sinks can potentially make large contributions at costs that are comparable or lower than for emission source

Kenneth Richards; Krister Andersson

2001-01-01

53

Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The potential for carbon sequestration at relatively shallow depths was investigated at four power plant sites in Missouri. Exploratory boreholes were cored through the Davis Shale confining layer into the St. Francois aquifer (Lamotte Sandstone and Bonneterre Formation). Precambrian basement contact ranged from 654.4 meters at the John Twitty Energy Center in Southwest Missouri to over 1100 meters near the Sioux Power Plant in St. Charles County. Investigations at the John Twitty Energy Center included 3D seismic reflection surveys, downhole geophysical logging and pressure testing, and laboratory analysis of rock core and water samples. Plans to perform injectivity tests at the John Twitty Energy Center, using food grade CO{sub 2}, had to be abandoned when the isolated aquifer was found to have very low dissolved solids content. Investigations at the Sioux Plant and Thomas Hill Energy Center in Randolph County found suitably saline conditions in the St. Francois. A fourth borehole in Platte County was discontinued before reaching the aquifer. Laboratory analyses of rock core and water samples indicate that the St. Charles and Randolph County sites could have storage potentials worthy of further study. The report suggests additional Missouri areas for further investigation as well.

Pendergrass, Gary; Fraley, David; Alter, William; Bodenhamer, Steven

2013-09-30

54

Promotion of ecosystem carbon sequestration by invasive predators.  

PubMed

Despite recent interest in understanding the effects of human-induced global change on carbon (C) storage in terrestrial ecosystems, most studies have overlooked the influence of a major element of global change, namely biological invasions. We quantified ecosystem C storage, both above- and below-ground, on each of 18 islands off the coast of New Zealand. Some islands support high densities of nesting seabirds, while others have been invaded by predatory rats and host few seabirds. Our results show that, by preying upon seabirds, rats have indirectly enhanced C sequestration in live plant biomass by 104%, reduced C sequestration in non-living pools by 26% and increased total ecosystem C storage by 37%. Given the current worldwide distribution of rats and other invasive predatory mammals, and the consequent disappearance of seabird colonies, these predators may be important determinants of ecosystem C sequestration. PMID:17650479

Wardle, David A; Bellingham, Peter J; Fukami, Tadashi; Mulder, Christa P H

2007-10-22

55

Making carbon sequestration a paying proposition.  

PubMed

Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) has increased from a preindustrial concentration of about 280 ppm to about 367 ppm at present. The increase has closely followed the increase in CO(2) emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Global warming caused by increasing amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is the major environmental challenge for the 21st century. Reducing worldwide emissions of CO(2) requires multiple mitigation pathways, including reductions in energy consumption, more efficient use of available energy, the application of renewable energy sources, and sequestration. Sequestration is a major tool for managing carbon emissions. In a majority of cases CO(2) is viewed as waste to be disposed; however, with advanced technology, carbon sequestration can become a value-added proposition. There are a number of potential opportunities that render sequestration economically viable. In this study, we review these most economically promising opportunities and pathways of carbon sequestration, including reforestation, best agricultural production, housing and furniture, enhanced oil recovery, coalbed methane (CBM), and CO(2) hydrates. Many of these terrestrial and geological sequestration opportunities are expected to provide a direct economic benefit over that obtained by merely reducing the atmospheric CO(2) loading. Sequestration opportunities in 11 states of the Southeast and South Central United States are discussed. Among the most promising methods for the region include reforestation and CBM. The annual forest carbon sink in this region is estimated to be 76 Tg C/year, which would amount to an expenditure of $11.1-13.9 billion/year. Best management practices could enhance carbon sequestration by 53.9 Tg C/year, accounting for 9.3% of current total annual regional greenhouse gas emission in the next 20 years. Annual carbon storage in housing, furniture, and other wood products in 1998 was estimated to be 13.9 Tg C in the region. Other sequestration options, including the direct injection of CO(2) in deep saline aquifers, mineralization, and biomineralization, are not expected to lead to direct economic gain. More detailed studies are needed for assessing the ultimate changes to the environment and the associated indirect cost savings for carbon sequestration. PMID:17103136

Han, Fengxiang X; Lindner, Jeff S; Wang, Chuji

2007-03-01

56

An Optimal Control Model of Forest Carbon Sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study develops an optimal control model of carbon sequestration and energy abatement to explore the potential role of forests in greenhouse gas mitigation. The article shows that if carbon accumulates in the atmosphere, the rental price for carbon sequestration should rise over time. From an empirical model, we find that carbon sequestration is costly, but that landowners can sequester

Brent Sohngen; Robert Mendelsohn

2003-01-01

57

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES TASK 4, BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Biomass derived energy currently accounts for about 3 quads of total primary energy use in the United States. Of this amount, about 0.8 quads are used for power generation. Several biomass energy production technologies exist today which contribute to this energy mix. Biomass combustion technologies have been the dominant source of biomass energy production, both historically and during the past two decades of expansion of modern biomass energy in the U. S. and Europe. As a research and development activity, biomass gasification has usually been the major emphasis as a method of more efficiently utilizing the energy potential of biomass, particularly wood. Numerous biomass gasification technologies exist today in various stages of development. Some are simple systems, while others employ a high degree of integration for maximum energy utilization. The purpose of this study is to conduct a technical and economic comparison of up to three biomass gasification technologies, including the carbon dioxide emissions reduction potential of each. To accomplish this, a literature search was first conducted to determine which technologies were most promising based on a specific set of criteria. The technical and economic performances of the selected processes were evaluated using computer models and available literature. Using these results, the carbon sequestration potential of the three technologies was then evaluated. The results of these evaluations are given in this final report.

Martha L. Rollins; Les Reardon; David Nichols; Patrick Lee; Millicent Moore; Mike Crim; Robert Luttrell; Evan Hughes

2002-06-01

58

DOE Ocean Carbon Sequestration Research Workshop 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this workshop was to bring together the principal investigators of all the projects that were being funded under the DOE ocean carbon sequestration research program. The primary goal of the workshop was to interchange research results, to d...

2006-01-01

59

Carbon dioxide sequestration in cement kiln dust through mineral carbonation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon sequestration through the formation of carbonates is a potential means to reduce CO emissions. Alkaline industrial solid wastes typically have high mass fractions of reactive oxides that may not require preprocessing, making them an attractive source material for mineral carbonation. The degree of mineral carbonation achievable in cement kiln dust (CKD) under ambient temperatures and pressures was examined through

Deborah N. Huntzinger; John S. Gierke; S. Komar Kawatra; Timothy C. Eisele; Lawrence L. Sutter

2009-01-01

60

Carbon sequestration and its role in the global carbon cycle  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For carbon sequestration the issues of monitoring, risk assessment, and verification of carbon content and storage efficacy are perhaps the most uncertain. Yet these issues are also the most critical challenges facing the broader context of carbon sequestration as a means for addressing climate change. In response to these challenges, Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle presents current perspectives and research that combine five major areas: • The global carbon cycle and verification and assessment of global carbon sources and sinks • Potential capacity and temporal/spatial scales of terrestrial, oceanic, and geologic carbon storage • Assessing risks and benefits associated with terrestrial, oceanic, and geologic carbon storage • Predicting, monitoring, and verifying effectiveness of different forms of carbon storage • Suggested new CO2 sequestration research and management paradigms for the future. The volume is based on a Chapman Conference and will appeal to the rapidly growing group of scientists and engineers examining methods for deliberate carbon sequestration through storage in plants, soils, the oceans, and geological repositories.

McPherson, Brian J.; Sundquist, Eric T.

2009-01-01

61

Review and model-based analysis of factors influencing soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. A simple, multi-compartment model was developed to predict soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) plantations in the southeastern United States. Soil carbon sequestration is an important component of sustainable switchgrass production for bioenergy because soil organic matter promotes water retention, nutrient supply, and soil properties that minimize erosion. A literature review was included for the purpose of model parameterization and five model-based experiments were conducted to predict how changes in environment (temperature) or crop management (cultivar, fertilization, and harvest efficiency) might affect soil carbon storage and nitrogen losses. Predictions of soil carbon sequestration were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the ratio of belowground to aboveground biomass production, and temperature. Predictions of ecosystem nitrogen loss were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the soil C/N ratio, and nitrogen remobilization efficiency (i.e., nitrogen cycling within the plant). Model-based experiments indicated that 1) soil carbon sequestration can be highly site specific depending on initial soil carbon stocks, temperature, and the amount of annual nitrogen fertilization, 2) response curves describing switchgrass yield as a function of annual nitrogen fertilization were important to model predictions, 3) plant improvements leading to greater belowground partitioning of biomass could increase soil carbon sequestration, 4) improvements in harvest efficiency have no indicated effects on soil carbon and nitrogen, but improve cumulative biomass yield, and 5) plant improvements that reduce organic matter decomposition rates could also increase soil carbon sequestration, even though the latter may not be consistent with desired improvements in plant tissue chemistry to maximize yields of cellulosic ethanol.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2012-01-01

62

Simulating the effects of forest managements on carbon sequestration: TREPLEX- Management model development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With common concern surrounding the impact of increased atmospheric CO2 on global climate change, the role of forest management (i.e. thinning) on carbon sequestration is growing as a hotspot in the post Kyoto period. However, the combination strategies between forest management and carbon management are less established. Jack pine is one of the most important commercial and reforestation species in lake states of the United States and Canada, and the specie was reported to show stronger response to forest management like thinning. Obviously, there is an urgent need for understanding how harvesting intensity (i.e., thinning) affects C sequestration in jack pine stands. The aim of this study is to quantify and predict the biomass and carbon sequestration in thinned jack pine stands in eastern Canada. TRIPLEX is a generic hybrid model for predicting forest growth and carbon and nitrogen dynamics. The TRIPLEX-Management concept model was developed. The following carbon components were considered: above ground live biomass carbon, standing dead biomass carbon, harvested wood product carbon and soil organic carbon. Thinning was linked with LAI (Leaf Area Index), stand density and soil conditions and included in NPP and biomass production and allocation models. The model was also integrated with DBH distribution models, biomass allometric models, and wood products C models as well as the established height-diameter models. It is expected to optimize thinning regimes for carbon and forest management in order to mitigate climate change impacts.

Wang, W.; Peng, C.; Lei, X.; Zhang, T.; Kneeshaw, D.; Larocque, G.

2009-05-01

63

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOM...

2005-01-01

64

Carbon sequestration research and development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (COâ) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual''

Dave Reichle; John Houghton; Bob Kane; Jim Ekmann

1999-01-01

65

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Partnership Region includes five states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah) and contiguous areas from three adjacent states (west Texas, south Wyoming, and west Kansas). This energy-rich region exhibits some of the largest growth rates in the nation, and it contains two major CO{sub 2} pipeline networks that presently tap natural subsurface CO{sub 2} reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery at a rate of 30 million tons per year. The ten largest coal-fired power plants in the region produce 50% (140 million tons CO{sub 2}/y) of the total CO{sub 2} from power-plant fossil fuel combustion, with power plant emissions close to half the total CO{sub 2} emissions. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, the five major electric utility industries, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs including the Western Governors Association, and data sharing agreements with four other surrounding states. The Partnership is developing action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region, as well as the non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. The establishment of a website network to facilitate data storage and information sharing, decision-making, and future management of carbon sequestration in the region is a priority. The Southwest Partnership's approach includes (1) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, (2) assessing and initiating public acceptance of possible sequestration approaches, and (3) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. The Partnership will also identify potential gaps in monitoring and verification approaches needed to validate long-term storage efforts.

Brian McPherson

2004-04-01

66

Modified Light Use Efficiency Model for Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Grasslands of Kazakhstan: Combining Ground Biomass Data and Remote-sensing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A modified light use efficiency (LUE) model was tested in the grasslands of central Kazakhstan in terms of its ability to characterize spatial patterns and interannual dynamics of net primary production (NPP) at a regional scale. In this model, the LUE of the grassland biome (en) was simulated from ground-based NPP measurements, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) and meteorological observations using a new empirical approach. Using coarse-resolution satellite data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), monthly NPP was calculated from 1998 to 2008 over a large grassland region in Kazakhstan. The modelling results were verified against scaled up plot-level observations of grassland biomass and another available NPP data set derived from a field study in a similar grassland biome. The results indicated the reliability of productivity estimates produced by the model for regional monitoring of grassland NPP. The method for simulation of en suggested in this study can be used in grassland regions where no carbon flux measurements are accessible.

Propastin, Pavel A.; Kappas, Martin W.; Herrmann, Stefanie M.; Tucker, Compton J.

2012-01-01

67

Conservation tillage for carbon sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

World soils represent the largest terrestrial pool of organic carbon (C), about 1550 Pg compared with about 700 Pg in the\\u000a atmosphere and 600 Pg in land biota. Agricultural activities (e.g., deforestation, burning, plowing, intensive grazing) contribute\\u000a considerably to the atmospheric pool. Expansion of agriculture may have contributed substantially to the atmospheric carbon\\u000a pool. However, the exact magnitude of carbon

R. Lal; J. M. Kimble

1997-01-01

68

Forest soils and carbon sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soils in equilibrium with a natural forest ecosystem have high carbon (C) density. The ratio of soil:vegetation C density increases with latitude. Land use change, particularly conversion to agricultural ecosystems, depletes the soil C stock. Thus, degraded agricultural soils have lower soil organic carbon (SOC) stock than their potential capacity. Consequently, afforestation of agricultural soils and management of forest plantations

R. Lal

2005-01-01

69

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (MRCSP)  

SciTech Connect

This is the first semiannual report for Phase I of the Midwest Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The project consists of nine tasks to be conducted over a two year period that started in October 2003. The makeup of the MRCSP and objectives are described. Progress on each of the active Tasks is also described and where possible, for those Tasks at some point of completion, a summary of results is presented.

David Ball; Judith Bradbury; Rattan Lal; Larry Wickstrom; Neeraj Gupta; Robert Burns; Bob Dahowski

2004-04-30

70

Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands  

SciTech Connect

During this quarter a general forest monitoring program was conducted to measure treatment effects on above ground and below ground carbon C and Nitrogen (N) pools for the tree planting areas. Detailed studies to address specific questions pertaining to Carbon cycling was initiated with the development of plots to examine the influence of mycorrhizae, spoil chemical and mineralogical properties, and use of amendment on forest establishment and carbon sequestration. Efforts continued during this period to examine decomposition and heterotrophic respiration on C cycling in the reforestation plots. Projected climate change resulting from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide has given rise to various strategies to sequester carbon in various terrestrial ecosystems. Reclaimed surface mine soils present one such potential carbon sink where traditional reclamation objectives can complement carbon sequestration. New plantings required the modification and design and installation on monitoring equipment. Maintenance and data monitoring on past and present installations are a continuing operation. The Department of Mining Engineering continued the collection of penetration resistance, penetration depth, and bulk density on both old and new treatment areas. Data processing and analysis is in process for these variables. Project scientists and graduate students continue to present results at scientific meetings, tours and field days presentations of the research areas are being conducted on a request basis.

Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

2005-10-02

71

Soil Carbon Sequestration: Perspectives from Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Australia is currently embarking upon an unparalleled program to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions by engaging farmers and landholders to reduce emissions and store carbon in the soil. Currently, the magnitude of a potential soil carbon sink in Australian agricultural soils is largely unknown. The oft repeated rubric that adoption of recommended management practices (RMP) can raise soil carbon levels to 50-66% of pre-clearing levels has lead many to conclude that soil carbon sequestration can offset a large portion of Australia's current greenhouse gas emissions. Is there evidence in Australia (and abroad) to support these sequestration rates? In this presentation, we will present findings from both a retrospective analysis of existing field trial data and preliminary results from a national scale assessment of current soil carbon stocks under different agricultural management practices. A comprehensive review of field-trial data in Australia suggests that most management shifts within a given agricultural system (i.e. tillage, stubble management, fertilizer application, etc...) result in modest relative gains of 0.1 to 0.3 tC ha-1 yr-1. Importantly, whenever time series data was available, we found that the relative improvement in soil carbon stocks under RMPs was due to a reduction in the rate of loss of soil carbon and not in an actual increase in soil carbon. This finding has important repercussions for both how we think about soil carbon sequestration and how we can account for it in an accounting framework. Current research within the National Soil Carbon Research Program looks to assess the potential for agricultural management to influence soil carbon content and its distribution within various measurable carbon pools (particulate, humus, charcoal-like). For example, 200 randomly selected farms have been sampled in two major agricultural regions in South Australia based on a soil-type by rainfall stratification. In addition to measuring carbon content and its distribution amongst fractions, detailed farm management data has been collected. Multivariate approaches have been used to identify the relative importance of management versus environmental factors in driving differences in soil carbon stocks and composition.

Sanderman, J.; Macdonald, L.; Baldock, J.

2011-12-01

72

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiatives review meeting. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

A total of 32 papers were presented at the review meeting in sessions entitled: updates on regional characterization activities; CO{sub 2} sequestration with EOR; CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline formations I and II; and terrestrial carbon sequestration field projects. In addition are five introductory papers. These are all available on the website in slide/overview/viewgraph form.

NONE

2006-07-01

73

Engineering economic analysis of biomass IGCC with carbon capture and storage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integration of biomass energy technologies with carbon capture and sequestration could yield useful energy products and negative net atmospheric carbon emissions. We survey the methods of integrating biomass technologies with carbon dioxide capture, and model an IGCC electric power system in detail. Our engineering process model, based on analysis and operational results of the Battelle\\/Future Energy Resources Corporation gasifier technology,

James S. Rhodes; David W. Keith

2005-01-01

74

Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

Van Oost, K.; Van Hemelryck, H.; Harden, J. W.

2009-01-01

75

WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is one of seven partnerships which have been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon dioxide capture, transport and sequestration (CT&S) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the North Slope of Alaska. Led by the California Energy Commission, the West Coast Partnership is a consortium of over thirty five organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national labs and universities; private companies working on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. In an eighteen month Phase I project, the Partnership will evaluate both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options. Work will focus on five major objectives: (1) Collect data to characterize major CO{sub 2} point sources, the transportation options, and the terrestrial and geologic sinks in the region, and compile and organize this data via a geographic information system (GIS) database; (2) Address key issues affecting deployment of CT&S technologies, including storage site permitting and monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks (3) Conduct public outreach and maintain an open dialogue with stakeholders in CT&S technologies through public meetings, joint research, and education work (4) Integrate and analyze data and information from the above tasks in order to develop supply curves and cost effective, environmentally acceptable sequestration options, both near- and long-term (5) Identify appropriate terrestrial and geologic demonstration projects consistent with the options defined above, and create action plans for their safe and effective implementation A kickoff meeting for the West Coast Partnership was held on Sept 30-Oct.1. Contracts were then put into place with twelve organizations which will carry out the technical work required to meet Partnership objectives.

Larry Myer; Terry Surles; Kelly Birkinshaw

2004-01-01

76

Carbon Sequestration and the Restoration of Land Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon sequestration, the conversion of greenhouse gas CO2 toorganic matter, offers a powerful tool with which to combat climate change. The enlargement of carbon sinks stored in soil and biota is an essential tool in buying time while mankind seeks means to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and to reduce the elevated levels of atmospheric CO2. Carbon sequestration within the

Andres Arnalds

2004-01-01

77

Research Challenges for Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Carbon sequestration is a growing research topic that addresses one important aspect of an overall strategy for carbon management to help mitigate the increasing emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. There are estimates that terrestrial e...

R. C. Dahlman G. K. Jacobs

2001-01-01

78

The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential to permanently store CO2 for literally 100s of years even if all the CO2 emissions from the region's large point sources were stored there, an unlikely scenario under any set of national carbon emission mitigation strategies. The terrestrial sequestration opportunities in the region have the biophysical potential to sequester up to 20% of annual emissions from the region's large point sources of CO2. This report describes the assumptions made and methods employed to arrive at the results leading to these conclusions. It also describes the results of analyses of regulatory issues in the region affecting the potential for deployment of sequestration technologies. Finally, it describes the public outreach and education efforts carried out in Phase I including the creation of a web site dedicated to the MRCSP at www.mrcsp.org.

James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

2005-12-01

79

Carbon dioxide sequestration by ex-situ mineral carbonation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The process developed for carbon dioxide sequestration utilizes a slurry of water mixed with olivine- forsterite end member (MgâSiOâ), which is reacted with supercritical COâ to produce magnesite (MgCOâ). Carbon dioxide is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid, which likely dissociates to H{sup +} and HCOâ⁻. The H{sup +} hydrolyzes the silicate mineral, freeing the cation (Mg{sup 2+}), which

W. K. OConnor; D. C. Dahlin; P. C. Turner

2000-01-01

80

Negative emissions from BioEnergy use, carbon capture and sequestration (BECS)—the case of biomass production by sustainable forest management from semi-natural temperate forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we show how nature oriented forestry measures in a typical temperate forest type in combination with bioenergy systems could lead to continuous and permanent removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. We employ a forest growth model suited for modeling uneven-aged mixed temperate stands and analyze the interaction with biomass energy systems that allow for CO2 removal and

Florian Kraxner; Sten Nilsson; Michael Obersteiner

2003-01-01

81

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHP (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first 18-months of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (fifth and sixth project quarters) of the project (October 1, 2004-March 31, 2005) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, no changes occurred during the fifth or sixth quarters of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, refinements have been made to the general mapping and screening of sources and sinks. Integration and geographical information systems (GIS) mapping is ongoing. Characterization during this period was focused on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB continues to expand upon its assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has used results of a survey and focus group meeting to refine approaches that are being taken to educate and involve the public. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB has evaluated findings from work performed during the first 18-months. The focus of the project team has shifted from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team is developing an integrated approach to implementing the most promising opportunities and in setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. Milestones completed during the fifth and sixth project quarters included: (1) Q1-FY05--Assess safety, regulatory and permitting issues; and (2) Q2-FY05--Finalize inventory of major sources/sinks and refine GIS algorithms.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2005-04-01

82

Carbon Stocks and Sequestration: How much do we know?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As anthropogenic CO¬¬2 emissions in America increase, both Washington D.C. and state governments look for ways to offset those carbon increases. Our forests provide an opportunity for carbon sequestration, assuming well-informed and deliberate management practices. Accurate spatial and temporal estimates of carbon stocks are integral to developing wise management practices. Spatial carbon stock estimates are often represented in carbon maps while temporal estimates are calculated using computer models. These maps and models come from a variety of sources such as the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Forest Service (FS), and independent researchers. Here we evaluate the Forest Service's Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) to determine its sensitivity to input changes as well as its predictive ability over time. We analyze field data collected from a site in the San Juan National Forest. This site was clearcut in 1920, allowing us to model a complete regrowth over 90 years. Using biomass-to-carbon equations, we compare present-day carbon storage to FVS model projections. Finally, we look at the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) database and a spatial carbon map developed by researchers at the University of Colorado to assess the validity of landscape-scale estimates. Results indicate that the four spatial carbon estimates we use vary by only 25% while the temporal carbon estimates diverge radically from field data. Knowledge of carbon uptake rates is one of the most pressing questions in atmospheric and ecological science. It is imperative that carbon models be improved to achieve this goal. Spatial and temporal comparisons such as the one conducted here are needed to provide the groundwork for model development. Carbon estimates for Shearer Creek in the San Juan National Forest based on four different methods: the Forest Vegetation Simulator, the USDA Forest Inventory and Analysis Database, a spatial carbon map from the University of Colorado, and my own field data taken in the summer of 2012.

Mathabane, N.; Kelsey, K.; Neff, J. C.

2012-12-01

83

Carbon sequestration in California agriculture, 1980-2000.  

PubMed

To better understand agricultural carbon fluxes in California, USA, we estimated changes in soil carbon and woody material between 1980 and 2000 on 3.6 x 10(6) ha of farmland in California. Combining the CASA (Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach) model with data on harvest indices and yields, we calculated net primary production, woody production in orchard and vineyard crops, and soil carbon. Over the 21-yr period, two trends resulted in carbon sequestration. Yields increased an average of 20%, corresponding to greater plant biomass and more carbon returned to the soils. Also, orchards and vineyards increased in area from 0.7 x 10(6) ha to 1.0 x 10(6) ha, displacing field crops and sequestering woody carbon. Our model estimates that California's agriculture sequestered an average of 19 g C x m(-2) x yr(-1). Sequestration was lowest in non-rice annual cropland, which sequestered 9 g C x m(-2) x yr(-1) of soil carbon, and highest on land that switched from annual cropland to perennial cropland. Land that switched from annual crops to vineyards sequestered 68 g C x m(-2) x yr(-1), and land that switched from annual crops to orchards sequestered 85 g C x m(-2) x yr(-1). Rice fields, because of a reduction in field burning, sequestered 55 g C x m(-2) x yr(-1) in the 1990s. Over the 21 years, California's 3.6 x 10(6) ha of agricultural land sequestered 11.0 Tg C within soils and 3.5 Tg C in woody biomass, for a total of 14.5 Tg C statewide. This is equal to 0.7% of the state's total fossil fuel emissions over the same time period. If California's agriculture adopted conservation tillage, changed management of almond and walnut prunings, and used all of its orchard and vineyard waste wood in the biomass power plants in the state, California's agriculture could offset up to 1.6% of the fossil fuel emissions in the state. PMID:17069388

Kroodsma, David A; Field, Christopher B

2006-10-01

84

Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon sequestration strategies highlight tree plantations without considering their full environmental consequences. We combined field research, synthesis of more than 600 observations, and climate and economic modeling to document substantial losses in stream flow, and increased soil salinization and acidification, with afforestation. Plantations decreased stream flow by 227 millimeters per year globally (52%), with 13% of streams drying completely for

Robert B. Jackson; Esteban G. Jobbagy; Roni Avissar; Somnath Baidya Roy; Damian J. Barrett; Charles W. Cook; Kathleen A. Farley; David C. le Maitre; Bruce A. McCarl; Brian C. Murray

2005-01-01

85

Agricultural Encroachment: Implications for Carbon Sequestration in Tropical African Wetlands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tropical wetlands have been shown to exhibit high rates of net primary productivity and may therefore play an important role in global climate change mitigation through carbon assimilation and sequestration. Many permanently flooded areas of tropical East Africa are dominated by the highly productive C4 emergent macrophyte sedge, Cyperus papyrus L. (papyrus). However, increasing population densities around wetland margins in East Africa are reducing the extent of papyrus coverage due to the planting of subsistence crops such as Cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta). We have assessed the impact of this land use change on the carbon cycle in theis wetland environment. Eddy covariance techniques were used, on a campaign basis, to measure fluxes of carbon dioxide over both papyrus and cocoyam dominated wetlands located on the Ugandan shore of Lake Victoria. The integration of flux data over the annual cycle shows that papyrus wetlands have the potential to act as a sink for significant amounts of carbon, in the region of 10 t C ha-1 yr-1. The cocoyam vegetation was found to assimilate ~7 t C ha-1 yr-1 but when carbon exports from crop biomass removal were taken into account these wetlands represent a significant net loss of carbon of similar magnitude. The development of sustainable wetland management strategies are therefore required in order to promote the dual wetland function of crop production and the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions especially under future climate change scenarios.

Jones, M. B.; Saunders, M.; Kansiime, F.

2013-12-01

86

Modeling carbon sequestration in afforestation, agroforestry and forest management projects: the CO2FIX V.2 approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes the Version 2 of the CO2FIX (CO2FIX V.2) model, a user-friendly tool for dynamically estimating the carbon sequestration potential of forest management, agroforesty and afforestation projects. CO2FIX V.2 is a multi-cohort ecosystem-level model based on carbon accounting of forest stands, including forest biomass, soils and products. Carbon stored in living biomass is estimated with a forest cohort

Omar R. Maseraa; J. F. Garza-Caligaris; M. Kanninen; T. Karjalainen; J. Liski; G. J. Nabuurs; A. Pussinen; B. H. J. de Jong; G. M. J. Mohren

2003-01-01

87

Leakage and Seepage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Geologic carbon sequestration involves the injection of large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) into geological formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brine formations. Pressure and buoyancy forces provide a driving force for stored CO2 t...

C. M. Oldenburg A. J. A. Unger R. P. Hepple P. D. Jordan

2002-01-01

88

HOW TO HARVEST TREES WHILE MAXIMIZING CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The expected result of this project is a methodology to increase carbon sequestration through forest management and policy analysis. The decision analysis model will demonstrate tradeoffs between carbon storage and net present value through a joint productions possibilities c...

89

Research Challenges for Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Carbon sequestration is a growing research topic that addresses one important aspect of an overall strategy for carbon management to help mitigate the increasing emissions of CO(sub 2) into the atmosphere. There are estimates that terrestrial ecosystems c...

R. C. Dahlman

2001-01-01

90

Investigations into Wetland Carbon Sequestration as Remediation for Global Warming  

SciTech Connect

Wetlands can potentially sequester vast amounts of carbon. However, over 50% of wetlands globally have been degraded or lost. Restoration of wetland systems may therefore result in increased sequestration of carbon. Preliminary results of our investigations into atmospheric carbon sequestration by restored coastal wetlands indicate that carbon can be sequestered in substantial quantities in the first 2-50 years after restoration of natural hydrology and sediment accretion processes.

Thom, Ronald M.; Blanton, Susan L.; Borde, Amy B.; Williams, Greg D.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Huesemann, Michael H.; KW Nehring and SE Brauning

2002-01-01

91

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first year of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (third and fourth quarter) of the project (April 1--September 30, 2004) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, Texas and Virginia were added during the second quarter of the project and no geographical changes occurred during the third or fourth quarter of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, general mapping and screening of sources and sinks has been completed, with integration and Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping ongoing. The first step focused on the macro level characterization of the region. Subsequent characterization will focus on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB has completed a preliminary assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has conducted a survey and focus group meeting to gain insight into approaches that will be taken to educate and involve the public. Task 5.0 and 6.0 will be implemented beginning October 1, 2004. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB will evaluate findings from work performed during the first year and shift the focus of the project team from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team will develop an integrated approach to implementing and setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. During this semiannual period special attention was provided to Texas and Virginia, which were added to the SECARB region, to ensure a smooth integration of activities with the other 9 states. Milestones completed and submitted during the third and fourth quarter included: Q3-FY04--Complete initial development of plans for GIS; and Q4-FYO4--Complete preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2004-09-01

92

Carbon Sequestration in San Francisco Bay Tidal Wetlands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many tidal wetlands accumulate soil carbon at relatively rapid rates, in large part because they build soil to counteract increases in sea-level rise. There is growing policy interest in carbon sequestration within tidal wetlands as California and other states consider incorporating tidal wetland restoration activities into carbon trading programs or other emission-reduction policies. Our research was designed to establish a baseline for carbon credits for tidal wetland restoration in the San Francisco Bay Estuary. We measured sediment accretion and carbon sequestration rates at six natural tidal wetlands representing the salinity and geographical range of the Estuary. These sites serve as potential analogs for long-term carbon sequestration in restored wetlands. We collected six cores at each natural wetland (two transects with three stations each). This approach allowed us to identify spatial variation both within and among wetlands in the Estuary. Cores from natural wetlands were dated using 137Cs and 210Pb. Although accretion rates could not be measured at restored wetlands, cores were also collected from two restored wetlands for comparison of soil organic matter and bulk density. Most sites accreted 0.3-0.5 cm/yr, with slightly higher rates of accretion at low marsh stations. Carbon sequestration rates averaged approximately 80 g/m2/yr over the 100-year time span of 210Pb and were slightly higher for 137Cs-based rates. Variation in long-term carbon sequestration rates across sites and stations was much smaller than the variation in mineral inputs, and there was little difference in sequestration rates among sites, or across stations within sites, indicating that a single carbon sequestration rate could be used for crediting tidal wetland restoration projects within the Estuary. Surface soil organic matter and bulk density values were similar across natural and restored wetlands, supporting the use of carbon sequestration data from natural wetlands as a surrogate for future carbon sequestration in restored tidal wetlands. Given the need for long-term carbon burial to receive credits within the carbon trading program, we recommend that carbon credit accounting be based on sequestration rates obtained from 210Pb or other long-term dating methods. Sequestration rates that are based on short-term accretion are likely to overestimate carbon sequestration over a century time-scale because much of the short-term accumulation will be eventually lost to belowground decomposition.

Callaway, J.; Borgnis, E.; Turner, R. E.; Milan, C.

2012-12-01

93

Exploring the Role of Plant Genetics to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration in Hybrid Poplar Plantations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased in recent decades and are projected to increase even further during the coming century. These projections have prompted scientists and policy-makers to consider how plants and soils can be used to stabilize CO2 concentrations. Although storing carbon in terrestrial ecosystems represents an attractive near-term option for mitigating rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, enhancing the sequestration potential of managed systems will require advancements in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that control rates of carbon transfer and turnover in plants and soils. To address this challenge, a mathematical model was constructed to evaluate how changes in particular plant traits and management practices could affect soil carbon storage beneath hybrid poplar (Populus) plantations. The model was built from four sub-models that describe aboveground biomass, root biomass, soil carbon dynamics, and soil nitrogen transformations for trees growing throughout a user-defined rotation. Simulations could be run over one or multiple rotations. A sensitivity analysis of the model indicated changes in soil carbon storage were affected by variables that could be linked to hybrid poplar traits like rates of aboveground production, partitioning of carbon to coarse and fine roots, and rates of root decomposition. A higher ratio of belowground to aboveground production was especially important and correlated directly with increased soil carbon storage. Faster decomposition rates for coarse and fine dead roots resulted in a greater loss of carbon to the atmosphere as CO2 and less residual organic carbon for transfer to the fast soil carbon pool. Hence, changes in root chemistry that prolonged dead root decomposition rates, a trait that is under potential genetic control, were predicted to increase soil carbon storage via higher soil carbon inputs. Nitrogen limitation of both aboveground biomass production and soil carbon sequestration was also predicted by the model and poplar genotypes with higher nitrogen use efficiency could be more beneficial to soil carbon sequestration at sites where there is a strong nitrogen limitation on poplar production. Site specific properties that were independent of plant traits, like initial soil carbon stocks and the turnover times of different soil carbon pools, were also important to predicted rates of soil carbon accrual and point to the importance of future model-based and empirical studies of genotype x site interactions in predictions of soil carbon sequestration under hybrid poplar plantations. Based on these simulations, we suggest that conventional plant breeding or marker-aided selection or advance genomic approaches could be used to enhance rates of soil carbon sequestration in managed hybrid poplar plantations.

Wullschleger, S. D.; Garten, C. T.; Classen, A. T.

2008-12-01

94

Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid  

SciTech Connect

The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce magnesite (MgCO3). The CO2 is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3), which dissociates to H+ and HCO3 -. The H+ reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg2+ cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO2 pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185?C and a partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction conditions, have achieved roughly 83% conversion of heat treated serpentine and 84% conversion of olivine to the carbonate in 6 hours. The results from the current studies suggest that reaction kinetics can be improved by pretreatment of the mineral, catalysis of the reaction, or some combination of the two. Future tests are intended to examine a broader pressure/temperature regime, various pretreatment options, as well as other mineral groups.

O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

2000-01-01

95

Carbon sequestration may adversely affect deep sea life  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The impact on surface water acidity and carbonate concentrations for various carbon dioxide-injection scenarios was assessed. Models simulated an increase, a decrease and unchanged quantities of carbon dioxide production. Results indicate that sequestration would be a useful method of mitigating carbon in the atmosphere only when paired with other carbon dioxide reduction methods, including major reductions in fossil fuel use.

Harvey, L. D.; Agu

96

Root biomass responses to elevated CO2 limit soil C sequestration in managed grasslands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels and increasing nitrogen deposition both stimulate plant production in terrestrial ecosystems. Moreover, nitrogen deposition could alleviate an increasing nitrogen limitation experienced by plants exposed to elevated CO2 concentrations. However, an increased rate of C flux through the soil compartment as a consequence of elevated CO2 concentrations has been suggested to limit C sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems, questioning the potential for terrestrial C uptake to mitigate the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Our study used data from 69 published studies to investigate whether CO2 elevation and/or nitrogen fertilization could induce an increased carbon storage in grasslands, and considered the influence of management practices involving biomass removal or irrigation on the elevated CO2 effects. Our results confirmed a positive effect of elevated CO2 levels and nitrogen fertilization on plant growth, but revealed that N availability is essential for the increased C influx under elevated CO2 to propagate into belowground C pools. However, moderate nutrient additions also promoted decomposition processes in elevated CO2, reducing the potential for increased soil C storage. An important role in the soil carbon response to elevated CO2 was attributed to the root response, since there was a lower potential for increases in soil C content when root biomass was more responsive to CO2 elevation. Future elevated CO2 concentrations and increasing N deposition might thus increase C storage in plant biomass, but the potential for increased soil C storage is limited.

Sillen, W. M. A.; Dieleman, W. I. J.

2012-01-01

97

The Fluid Mechanics of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Humans are faced with a potentially disastrous global problem owing to the current emission of 32 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) annually into the atmosphere. A possible way to mitigate the effects is to store CO2 in large porous reservoirs within the Earth. Fluid mechanics plays a key role in determining both the feasibility and risks involved in this geological sequestration. We review current research efforts looking at the propagation of CO2 within the subsurface, the possible rates of leakage, the mechanisms that act to stably trap CO2, and the geomechanical response of the crust to large-scale CO2 injection. We conclude with an outline for future research.

Huppert, Herbert E.; Neufeld, Jerome A.

2014-01-01

98

Ecosystem carbon budgeting and soil carbon sequestration in reclaimed mine soil.  

PubMed

Global warming risks from emissions of green house gases (GHGs) by anthropogenic activities, and possible mitigation strategies of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration have increased the need for the identification of ecosystems with high C sink capacity. Depleted soil organic C (SOC) pools of reclaimed mine soil (RMS) ecosystems can be restored through conversion to an appropriate land use and adoption of recommended management practices (RMPs). The objectives of this paper are to (1) synthesize available information on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from coal mining and combustion activities, (2) understand mechanisms of SOC sequestration and its protection, (3) identify factors affecting C sequestration potential in RMSs, (4) review available methods for the estimation of ecosystem C budget (ECB), and (5) identify knowledge gaps to enhance C sink capacity of RMS ecosystems and prioritize research issues. The drastic perturbations of soil by mining activities can accentuate CO2 emission through mineralization, erosion, leaching, changes in soil moisture and temperature regimes, and reduction in biomass returned to the soil. The reclamation of drastically disturbed soils leads to improvement in soil quality and development of soil pedogenic processes accruing the benefit of SOC sequestration and additional income from trading SOC credits. The SOC sequestration potential in RMS depends on amount of biomass production and return to soil, and mechanisms of C protection. The rate of SOC sequestration ranges from 0.1 to 3.1 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1) and 0.7 to 4 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1) in grass and forest RMS ecosystem, respectively. Proper land restoration alone could off-set 16 Tg CO2 in the U.S. annually. However, the factors affecting C sequestration and protection in RMS leading to increase in microbial activity, nutrient availability, soil aggregation, C build up, and soil profile development must be better understood in order to formulate guidelines for development of an holistic approach to sustainable management of these ecosystems. The ECBs of RMS ecosystems are not well understood. An ecosystem method of evaluating ECB of RMS ecosystems is proposed. PMID:16797072

Shrestha, Raj K; Lal, Rattan

2006-08-01

99

Comparison of Potential of Two High Spatial Resolution Optical Remote Sensing Data in Estimation of Carbon Sequestration of Vegetation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The estimation of biomass is one of the hot topics in the present scenario to unveil the quest that how much Carbon dioxide could be sequestrated by vegetation. Climate change modelling requires the rate of terrestrial carbon sequestration. The conventional methods of quantifying carbon sink in forest ecosystem are difficult and time consuming due to its topography and inaccessibility. Advances in Remote sensing and Image Processing have improvised the indirect estimation methods to estimate the amount of carbon stored in soil. The present study aims at the estimation of carbon sequestrated by the rubber plantation of Valiamala area, Thiruvananthapuram. Indirect method of estimating Leaf Area Index (LAI) from two high resolution satellite data, IKONOS and Geoeye-1 image is followed by correlating Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI) and field based LAI values measured by Plant Canopy Analyzer instrument from the study area. An allometric equation is derived to estimate LAI for the whole study area. The estimated LAI is highly correlated with NDVI map generated. Moreover, soil samples have been collected from equally distributed 15 sample points in the study area for the direct estimation of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) using elemental analysis. Carbon sequestration data for the 12 of the sample location data are used to derive the function of LAI for carbon estimation using multiple linear regression analysis. Remaining 3 sample location data are used to validate the equation derived. The results of the analysis of satellite data are compared for the carbon sequestration. Keywords: Carbon Sequestration, Leaf Area Index, Total Organic Carbon

Prasad, Arun; Singh Rana, Sumit; Lakshmanan, Gnanappazham

2012-07-01

100

Integrating science, economics and law into policy: The case of carbon sequestration in climate change policy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon sequestration, the extraction and storage of carbon from the atmosphere by biomass, could potentially provide a cost-effective means to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions. The claims on behalf of carbon sequestration may be inadvertently overstated, however. Several key observations emerge from this study. First, although carbon sequestration studies all report results in terms of dollars per ton, the definition of that term varies significantly, meaning that the results of various analyses can not be meaningfully compared. Second, when carbon sequestration is included in an energy-economy model of climate change policy, it appears that carbon sequestration could play a major, if not dominant role in a national carbon emission abatement program, reducing costs of emissions stabilization by as much as 80 percent, saving tens of billions of dollars per year. However, the results are very dependant upon landowners' perceived risk. Studies may also have overstated the potential for carbon sequestration because they have not considered the implementation process. This study demonstrates that three factors will reduce the cost-effectiveness of carbon sequestration. First, the implementation costs associated with measurement and governance of the government-private sector relation are higher than in the case of carbon source control. Second, legal constraints limit the range of instruments that the government can use to induce private landowners to expand their carbon sinks. The government will likely have to pay private parties to expand their sinks, or undertake direct government production. In either case, additional revenues will be required, introducing social costs associated with excess burden. Third, because of the very long time involved in developing carbon sinks (up to several decades) the government may not be able to make credible commitments against exactions of one type or another that would effectively reduce the value of private sector investments in carbon sinks. Consequently, the private sector will increase the rate of return required for participation, increasing the cost of this option. Carbon sequestration can still be a major factor in a national carbon emission abatement program. However, because of the interplay of science, economics and law, the most commonly prescribed environmental policy instruments--marketable allowance and taxes--have little or no direct role to play in the implementation process.

Richards, Kenneth

101

Carbon Dioxide Enrichment Enhances Carbon Sequestration of Dryland Soil Microbial Communities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs) are found in many terrestrial environments, forming substantial biomass in dryland areas of the Earth; they play a key role in carbon and nitrogen cycling in these drylands where vascular vegetation is sparse and soil nutrient content poor. Metabolic activity of BSC is principally dependent on moisture availability, but also on temperature and light conditions. Less understood is how these communities would respond to elevated levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. We will report on the results of elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 and wetting treatments on carbon fluxes (photosynthesis and respiration) of cyanobacterial BSC from Kalahari Sands, using several newly designed dynamic gas exchange chambers (DGECs), in which the internal atmosphere was controlled. CO2 flux was monitored during controlled laboratory experiments in two phases under simulated rainfall events (2 & 5 mm plus control with no wetting, with three replicates of each) each lasting 3 days with a dry period in between. In phase 1, crusts were subjected to an atmosphere of 392 ppm CO2 (representing ambient level) in dry air; in phase 2, the CO2 concentration was 801 ppm (approximately twice the ambient level). Results showed that in both phases, there was a significant efflux (respiration) of CO2 immediately after the wetting treatments, followed by a substantial influx (sequestration) of CO2. The total carbon sequestrated was significantly higher than the controls in higher wetting and CO2 levels. There was an order of magnitude increase in C sequestration with 2 mm wetting treatment, and a threefold increase of C sequestration with 5 mm wetting treatment, when comparing results from elevated CO2 levels with results from ambient CO2 levels. These results reinforce the importance of BSCs as they are capable of fixing carbon in changing environmental conditions (short, erratic simulated rainfall events and rising CO2 levels) without any additional nutrient inputs, and would therefore play even greater roles in future global carbon budgets.

Lane, Richard; Menon, Manoj; McQuaid, Jim; Dougill, Andy; Adams, David; Thomas, Andrew; Hoon, Steve

2013-04-01

102

Harvesting capacitive carbon by carbonization of waste biomass in molten salts.  

PubMed

Conversion of waste biomass to value-added carbon is an environmentally benign utilization of waste biomass to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution caused by open burning. In this study, various waste biomasses are converted to capacitive carbon by a single-step molten salt carbonization (MSC) process. The as-prepared carbon materials are amorphous with oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface. For the same type of waste biomass, the carbon materials obtained in Na2CO3-K2CO3 melt have the highest Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and specific capacitance. The carbon yield decreases with increasing reaction temperature, while the surface area increases with increasing carbonization temperature. A working temperature above 700 °C is required for producing capacitive carbon. The good dissolving ability of alkaline carbonate molten decreases the yield of carbon from waste biomasses, but helps to produce high surface area carbon. The specific capacitance data confirm that Na2CO3-K2CO3 melt is the best for producing capacitive carbon. The specific capacitance of carbon derived from peanut shell is as high as 160 F g(-1) and 40 ?F cm(-2), and retains 95% after 10?000 cycles at a rate of 1 A g(-1). MSC offers a simple and environmentally sound way for transforming waste biomass to highly capacitive carbon as well as an effective carbon sequestration method. PMID:24983414

Yin, Huayi; Lu, Beihu; Xu, Yin; Tang, Diyong; Mao, Xuhui; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Dihua; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

2014-07-15

103

The nuts and bolts of carbon sequestration in forests  

EPA Science Inventory

The nature of carbon in forests is discussed from the perspective of carbon trading as an incentive for conserving private forest lands. The presentation addresses carbon sequestration in forests and its significance for global warming. Carbon inventories, specifically in the are...

104

Carbon sequestration from boreal wildfires via Pyrogenic Carbon production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fire releases important quantities of carbon (C) to the atmosphere. Every year, an average of 460 Million ha burn around the globe, generating C emissions equivalent to a third of the current annual contribution from fossil fuel combustion. Over the longer-term wildfires are widely considered as 'net zero C emission events', because C emissions from fires, excluding those associated with deforestation and peatland fires, are balanced by C uptake by regenerating vegetation. This 'zero C emission' scenario, however, may be flawed, as it does not consider the production of pyrogenic C (PyC). During fire, part of the biomass C burnt is emitted to the atmosphere but part is transformed into PyC (i.e. charcoal). The enhanced resistance of PyC to environmental degradation compared to unburnt biomass gives it the potential to sequester C over the medium/long term. Therefore, after complete regeneration of the vegetation, the PyC generated may represent an additional C pool and, hence, recurring fire-regrowth cycles could represent net sinks of atmospheric C. To estimate the quantitative importance of PyC production, accurate data on PyC generation with respect to the fuel combusted are needed. Unfortunately, detailed quantification of fuel prior to fire is normally only available for prescribed and experimental fires, which are usually of low-intensity and therefore not representative of higher-intensity wildfires. Furthermore, what little data is available is usually based on only a specific fraction of the PyC present following burning rather than the whole range of PyC products and pools (i.e. PyC in soil, ash, downed wood and standing vegetation). To address this research gap, we utilized the globally unique FireSmart experimental forest fires in Northwest Canada. They are aimed to reproduce wildfire conditions typical for boreal forest and, at the same time, allow pre-fire fuel assessment, fire behaviour monitoring and immediate post-fire fuel and PyC inventory. This allowed, for the first time, quantifying the whole range of PyC components found in-situ immediately after a typical boreal forest fire. The fire examined had a fireline intensity of ~8000 kw/m, which is typical of boreal fires in NW Canada and we found that more than 18% of the fuel consumed was converted to PyC. This rate by far exceeds previous estimates (1-3%) and suggests that PyC production has indeed been substantially underestimated. As boreal forests are the world's largest terrestrial biome and contain half of the forest ecosystem C with a third its net primary productivity being consumed by fire every year, our findings could imply that PyC production from wildfires is a potential carbon sequestration mechanism of sufficient magnitude that warrants inclusion in boreal and perhaps global C budget estimations.

Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan; Preston, Caroline

2014-05-01

105

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed mine soils (RMS). Experimental sites characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoil were identified. These sites are owned ...

M. K. Shukla R. Lal

2004-01-01

106

Carbon Capture and Sequestration: A Regulatory Gap Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Though a potentially significant climate change mitigation strategy, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) remains mired in demonstration and development rather than proceeding to full-scale commercialization. Prior studies have suggested numerous reason...

H. Tanana J. Ruple K. Uchitel L. Davies

2012-01-01

107

NATIVE PLANTS FOR OPTIMIZING CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED LANDS  

SciTech Connect

Carbon emissions and atmospheric concentrations are expected to continue to increase through the next century unless major changes are made in the way carbon is managed. Managing carbon has emerged as a pressing national energy and environmental need that will drive national policies and treaties through the coming decades. Addressing carbon management is now a major priority for DOE and the nation. One way to manage carbon is to use energy more efficiently to reduce our need for major energy and carbon source-fossil fuel combustion. Another way is to increase our use of low-carbon and carbon free fuels and technologies. A third way, and the focus of this proposal, is carbon sequestration, in which carbon is captured and stored thereby mitigating carbon emissions. Sequestration of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere has emerged as the principle means by which the US will meet its near-term international and economic requirements for reducing net carbon emissions (DOE Carbon Sequestration: State of the Science. 1999; IGBP 1998). Terrestrial carbon sequestration provides three major advantages. First, terrestrial carbon pools and fluxes are of sufficient magnitude to effectively mitigate national and even global carbon emissions. The terrestrial biosphere stores {approximately}2060 GigaTons of carbon and transfers approximately 120 GigaTons of carbon per year between the atmosphere and the earth's surface, whereas the current global annual emissions are about 6 GigaTons. Second, we can rapidly and readily modify existing management practices to increase carbon sequestration in our extensive forest, range, and croplands. Third, increasing soil carbon is without negative environment consequences and indeed positively impacts land productivity. The terrestrial carbon cycle is dependent on several interrelationships between plants and soils. Because the soil carbon pool ({approximately}1500 Giga Tons) is approximately three times that in terrestrial vegetation ({approximately}560 GigaTons), the principal focus of terrestrial sequestration efforts is to increase soil carbon. But soil carbon ultimately derives from vegetation and therefore must be managed indirectly through aboveground management of vegetation and nutrients. Hence, the response of whole ecosystems must be considered in terrestrial carbon sequestration strategies.

P. UNKEFER; M. EBINGER; ET AL

2001-02-01

108

The role of carbon sequestration in a global energy future  

Microsoft Academic Search

Governmental policies and international treaties that aim at curbing the emissions of greenhouse gases and local pollutants can be expected. These regulations will increase the competitiveness of CO2-neutral energy sources, i.e., renewables, nuclear or decarbonisation of fossil fuels with CO2-sequestration. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the potential role carbon sequestration may play if stringent carbon constraints are

Christian Azar; Kristian Lindgren; Björn A. Andersson; Ingrid Råde

109

NATCARB Interactive Maps and the National Carbon Explorer: a National Look at Carbon Sequestration  

DOE Data Explorer

NATCARB is a national look at carbon sequestration. The NATCARB home page, National Carbon Explorer (http://www.natcarb.org/) provides access to information and interactive maps on a national scale about climate change, DOE's carbon sequestration program and its partnerships, CO2 emissions, and sinks. This portal provides access to interactive maps based on the Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada.

110

Final Report - "CO2 Sequestration in Cell Biomass of Chlorobium Thiosulfatophilum"  

SciTech Connect

World carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have increased at a rate of about 3 percent per year during the last 40 years to over 24 billion tons today. While a number of methods have been proposed and are under study for dealing with the carbon dioxide problem, all have advantages as well as disadvantages which limit their application. The anaerobic bacterium Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum uses hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide to produce elemental sulfur and cell biomass. The overall objective of this project is to develop a commercial process for the biological sequestration of carbon dioxide and simultaneous conversion of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur. The Phase I study successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of utilizing this bacterium for carbon dioxide sequestration and hydrogen sulfide conversion to elemental sulfur by utilizing the bacterium in continuous reactor studies. Phase II studies involved an advanced research and development to develop the engineering and scale-up parameters for commercialization of the technology. Tasks include culture isolation and optimization studies, further continuous reactor studies, light delivery systems, high pressure studies, process scale-up, a market analysis and economic projections. A number of anaerobic and aerobic microorgansims, both non-photosynthetic and photosynthetic, were examined to find those with the fastest rates for detailed study to continuous culture experiments. C. thiosulfatophilum was selected for study to anaerobically produce sulfur and Thiomicrospira crunogena waws selected for study to produce sulfate non-photosynthetically. Optimal conditions for growth, H2S and CO2 comparison, supplying light and separating sulfur were defined. The design and economic projections show that light supply for photosynthetic reactions is far too expensive, even when solar systems are considered. However, the aerobic non-photosynthetic reaction to produce sulfate with T. crunogena produces a reasonable return when treating a sour gas stream of 120 million SCFD containing 2.5 percent H2S. In this case, the primary source of revenue is from desulfurization of the gas stream. While the technology has significant application in sequestering carbon dioxide in cell biomass or single cell proten (SCP), perhaps the most immediate application is in desulfurizing LGNG or other gas streams. This biological approach is a viable economical alternative to existing hydrogen sulfide removal technology, and is not sensitive to the presence of hydrocarbons which act as catalyst poisons.

James L. Gaddy, PhD; Ching-Whan Ko, PhD

2009-05-04

111

The Deep Carbon Cycle and CO2 Sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increased understanding of the Earth's carbon cycle may provide insight for future carbon storage. Long term geologic sequestration of CO2 occurs in the earth via exothermic reactions between CO2 and silicate minerals to form carbonate minerals. It has been shown that while there is a large enough supply of ultra mafic igneous rock to sequester the CO2 [1], the kinetics

N. B. Filipovitch; W. L. Mao; I. Chou; K. Mu

2009-01-01

112

Sequestration and selective oxidation of carbon monoxide on graphene edges  

Microsoft Academic Search

The versatility of carbon nanostructures makes them attractive as possible catalytic materials, as they can be synthesized in various shapes and chemically modified by doping, functionalization, and the creation of defects in the nanostructure. In this work, we consider the carbon-mediated partial sequestration and selective oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO), an important problem in environmental chemistry and energy conversion. Using

Sujata Paul; Erik E. Santiso; Marco B. Nardelli

2008-01-01

113

Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urban turf  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undisturbed grasslands can sequester significant quantities of organic carbon (OC) in soils. Irrigation and fertilization enhance CO2 sequestration in managed turfgrass ecosystems but can also increase emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHGs). To better understand the GHG balance of urban turf, we measured OC sequestration rates and emission of N2O (a GHG ˜ 300 times more effective than CO2) in Southern California, USA. We also estimated CO2 emissions generated by fuel combustion, fertilizer production, and irrigation. We show that turf emits significant quantities of N2O (0.1-0.3 g N m-2 yr-1) associated with frequent fertilization. In ornamental lawns this is offset by OC sequestration (140 g C m-2 yr-1), while in athletic fields, there is no OC sequestration because of frequent surface restoration. Large indirect emissions of CO2 associated with turfgrass management make it clear that OC sequestration by turfgrass cannot mitigate GHG emissions in cities.

Townsend-Small, Amy; Czimczik, Claudia I.

2010-01-01

114

BIOMASS, BIOENERGY, AND CARBON MANAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomass is a significant contributor to the United States economy % agriculture, forest and paper products, food and related products account for 5% of our GDP. While the forest products industry self generates some of their energy, other sectors are importers. Bioenergy can contribute to economic development and to the environment. Examples of bioenergy routes suggest that atmospheric carbon can

Raymond Costello; Helena L. Chum

115

High resolution modeling of direct ocean carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This work has followed two themes: (1) Developing and using the adjoint of the MIT ocean biogeochemistry model to examine the efficiency of carbon sequestration in a global configuration. We have demonstrated the power of the adjoint method for systematic ocean model sensitivity studies. We have shown that the relative efficiency of carbon sequestration in the Atlantic and Pacific basins changes with the period of interest. For decadal to centennial scales, the Pacific is more efficient. On longer timescales the Atlantic is more efficient . (2) We have developed and applied a high-resolution, North Atlantic circulation and tracer model to investigate the role of the mesoscale in controlling sequestration efficiency. We show that the mesoscale eddy field, and its explicit representation, significantly affects the estimated sequestration efficiency for local sources on the Eastern US seaboard.

Michael Follows; John Marshall

2004-04-22

116

The ecological and economic potential of carbon sequestration in forests: examples from South America.  

PubMed

Costs of reforestation projects determine their competitiveness with alternative measures to mitigate rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We quantify carbon sequestration in above-ground biomass and soils of plantation forests and secondary forests in two countries in South America-Ecuador and Argentina-and calculate costs of temporary carbon sequestration. Costs per temporary certified emission reduction unit vary between 0.1 and 2.7 USD Mg(-1) CO2 and mainly depend on opportunity costs, site suitability, discount rates, and certification costs. In Ecuador, secondary forests are a feasible and cost-efficient alternative, whereas in Argentina reforestation on highly suitable land is relatively cheap. Our results can be used to design cost-effective sink projects and to negotiate fair carbon prices for landowners. PMID:16042281

de Koning, Free; Olschewski, Roland; Veldkamp, Edzo; Benítez, Pablo; López-Ulloa, Magdalena; Schlichter, Tomás; de Urquiza, Mercedes

2005-05-01

117

Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System  

Microsoft Academic Search

While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration with Mitsubishi Corporation, has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) focused on carbon capture and sequestration opportunities in the United States.

Robert T. Dahowski; James J. Dooley; Daryl R. Brown; Akiyoshi Mizoguchi; Mai Shiozaki

2001-01-01

118

Goodbye to carbon neutral: Getting biomass footprints right  

SciTech Connect

Most guidance for carbon footprinting, and most published carbon footprints or LCAs, presume that biomass heating fuels are carbon neutral. However, it is recognised increasingly that this is incorrect: biomass fuels are not always carbon neutral. Indeed, they can in some cases be far more carbon positive than fossil fuels. This flaw in carbon footprinting guidance and practice can be remedied. In carbon footprints (not just of biomass or heating fuels, but all carbon footprints), rather than applying sequestration credits and combustion debits, a 'carbon-stock change' line item could be applied instead. Not only would this make carbon footprints more accurate, it would make them consistent with UNFCCC reporting requirements and national reporting practice. There is a strong precedent for this change. This same flaw has already been recognised and partly remedied in standards for and studies of liquid biofuels (e.g. biodiesel and bioethanol), which now account for land-use change, i.e. deforestation. But it is partially or completely missing from other studies and from standards for footprinting and LCA of solid fuels. Carbon-stock changes can be estimated from currently available data. Accuracy of estimates will increase as Kyoto compliant countries report more land use, land use change and forestry (LULUCF) data.

Johnson, Eric [Atlantic Consulting, Obstgartenstrasse 14, CH-8136 Gattikon (Switzerland)], E-mail: ejohnson@ecosite.co.uk

2009-04-15

119

Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a study of the potential for carbon sequestration in degraded mine lands, we have found that based on laboratory and field experiments, fly ash and biosolid amendments can increase soil carbon. Although it appears that geochemistry plays a large part in this effect, it is not clear if there is also an effect on the microbial community

A. V. Palumbo; L. S. Fisher; J. R. Tarver; W. L. Daniels; Z. Yang; S. M. Tiquia; L. Wu; J. Z. Zhou; J. E. Amonette

120

Verification of Soil Carbon Sequestration—Sample Requirements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reliable and effective verification of soil carbon sequestration is required for quantification of project-based greenhouse gas mitigation. Direct soil sampling is necessary for measurements at field level. In this study, soil samples from a semiarid agroecosystem of the Sudan were statistically analyzed to evaluate if changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) over time or space were detectable or not, given

Jean-Nicolas Poussart; Jonas Ardö; Lennart Olsson

2004-01-01

121

Carbon dioxide sequestration by ex-situ mineral carbonation  

SciTech Connect

The process developed for carbon dioxide sequestration utilizes a slurry of water mixed with olivine- forsterite end member (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), which is reacted with supercritical CO{sub 2} to produce magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Carbon dioxide is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid, which likely dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. The H{sup +} hydrolyzes the silicate mineral, freeing the cation (Mg{sup 2+}), which reacts with the HCO{sub 3}{sup -} to form the solid carbonate. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural mineral, have demonstrated that the kinetics of the reaction are slow at ambient temperature (22 degrees C) and subcritical CO{sub 2} pressures (below 7.4 MPa). However, at elevated temperature and pressure, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant conversion to the carbonate occurs. Extent of reaction is roughly 90% within 24 h, at 185 degrees C and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) of 11.6 MPa. Current studies suggest that reaction kinetics can be improved by pretreatment of the mineral, catalysis of the reaction, and/or solution modification. Subsequent tests are intended to examine these options, as well as other mineral groups.

O'Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Turner, P.C.; and Walters, R.P.

2000-01-01

122

Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). Phase 1 Final Report (October 2003-September 2005).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the final report for Phase I of the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. The MRCSP is one of seven partnerships in the U. S. Department of Energys (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program being conducted in DOEs Nation...

2005-01-01

123

Nonsteady state carbon sequestration in forest ecosystems of China estimated by data assimilation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

sequestration occurs only when terrestrial ecosystems are at nonsteady states. Despite of their ubiquity in the real world, the nonsteady states of ecosystems have not been well quantified, especially at regional and global scales. In this study, we developed a two-step data assimilation scheme to estimate carbon sink strength in China's forest ecosystems. Specifically, the two-step scheme consists of a steady state step and a nonsteady state step. In the steady state step, we constrained a process-based model (Terrestrial Ecosystem Regional (TECO-R) model) against biometric data (net primary production NPP, biomass, litter, and soil organic carbon) in mature forests. With a subset of the parameter values estimated from the steady state data assimilation being fixed, the nonsteady state data assimilation was performed to estimate carbon sequestration in China's forest ecosystems. Our results indicated that 17 out of the 22 total parameters in the TECO-R model were well constrained by the biometric data with the steady state data assimilation. When observations from both mature and developing forests were used, all the 10 parameters related to carbon sequestration in vegetation and soil carbon pools were well constrained at the nonsteady state step. The estimated mean vegetation carbon sink in China's forests is 89.7 ± 16.8 gC m-2 yr-1, comparable with the values estimated from the forest inventory and other process-based regional models. The estimated mean soil and litter carbon sinks in China's forests are 14.1 ± 20.7 and 4.7 ± 6.5 gC m-2 yr-1. This study demonstrated that a two-step data assimilation scheme can be a potent tool to estimate regional carbon sequestration in nonsteady state ecosystems.

Zhou, Tao; Shi, Peijun; Jia, Gensuo; Luo, Yiqi

2013-12-01

124

Land-Use Change and Carbon Sinks: Econometric Estimation of the Carbon Sequestration Supply Function  

Microsoft Academic Search

When and if the United States chooses to implement a greenhouse gas reduction program, it will be necessary to decide whether carbon sequestration policies — such as those that promote forestation and discourage deforestation — should be part of the domestic portfolio of compliance activities. We investigate the cost of forest-based carbon sequestration. In contrast with previous approaches, we econometrically

Ruben N. Lubowski; Andrew J. Plantinga; Robert N. Stavins

2005-01-01

125

Woody encroachment reduces nutrient limitation and promotes soil carbon sequestration  

PubMed Central

During the past century, the biomass of woody species has increased in many grassland and savanna ecosystems. As many of these species fix nitrogen symbiotically, they may alter not only soil nitrogen (N) conditions but also those of phosphorus (P). We studied the N-fixing shrub Dichrostachys cinerea in a mesic savanna in Zambia, quantifying its effects upon pools of soil N, P, and carbon (C), and availabilities of N and P. We also evaluated whether these effects induced feedbacks upon the growth of understory vegetation and encroaching shrubs. Dichrostachys cinerea shrubs increased total N and P pools, as well as resin-adsorbed N and soil extractable P in the top 10-cm soil. Shrubs and understory grasses differed in their foliar N and P concentrations along gradients of increasing encroachment, suggesting that they obtained these nutrients in different ways. Thus, grasses probably obtained them mainly from the surface upper soil layers, whereas the shrubs may acquire N through symbiotic fixation and probably obtain some of their P from deeper soil layers. The storage of soil C increased significantly under D. cinerea and was apparently not limited by shortages of either N or P. We conclude that the shrub D. cinerea does not create a negative feedback loop by inducing P-limiting conditions, probably because it can obtain P from deeper soil layers. Furthermore, C sequestration is not limited by a shortage of N, so that mesic savanna encroached by this species could represent a C sink for several decades. We studied the effects of woody encroachment on soil N, P, and C pools, and availabilities of N and P to Dichrostachys cinerea shrubs and to the understory vegetation. Both N and P pools in the soil increased along gradients of shrub age and cover, suggesting that N fixation by D. cinerea did not reduce the P supply. This in turn suggests that continued growth and carbon sequestration in this mesic savanna ecosystems are unlikely to be constrained by nutrient limitation and could represent a C sink for several decades.

Blaser, Wilma J; Shanungu, Griffin K; Edwards, Peter J; Olde Venterink, Harry

2014-01-01

126

Woody encroachment reduces nutrient limitation and promotes soil carbon sequestration.  

PubMed

During the past century, the biomass of woody species has increased in many grassland and savanna ecosystems. As many of these species fix nitrogen symbiotically, they may alter not only soil nitrogen (N) conditions but also those of phosphorus (P). We studied the N-fixing shrub Dichrostachys cinerea in a mesic savanna in Zambia, quantifying its effects upon pools of soil N, P, and carbon (C), and availabilities of N and P. We also evaluated whether these effects induced feedbacks upon the growth of understory vegetation and encroaching shrubs. Dichrostachys cinerea shrubs increased total N and P pools, as well as resin-adsorbed N and soil extractable P in the top 10-cm soil. Shrubs and understory grasses differed in their foliar N and P concentrations along gradients of increasing encroachment, suggesting that they obtained these nutrients in different ways. Thus, grasses probably obtained them mainly from the surface upper soil layers, whereas the shrubs may acquire N through symbiotic fixation and probably obtain some of their P from deeper soil layers. The storage of soil C increased significantly under D. cinerea and was apparently not limited by shortages of either N or P. We conclude that the shrub D. cinerea does not create a negative feedback loop by inducing P-limiting conditions, probably because it can obtain P from deeper soil layers. Furthermore, C sequestration is not limited by a shortage of N, so that mesic savanna encroached by this species could represent a C sink for several decades. We studied the effects of woody encroachment on soil N, P, and C pools, and availabilities of N and P to Dichrostachys cinerea shrubs and to the understory vegetation. Both N and P pools in the soil increased along gradients of shrub age and cover, suggesting that N fixation by D. cinerea did not reduce the P supply. This in turn suggests that continued growth and carbon sequestration in this mesic savanna ecosystems are unlikely to be constrained by nutrient limitation and could represent a C sink for several decades. PMID:24834338

Blaser, Wilma J; Shanungu, Griffin K; Edwards, Peter J; Olde Venterink, Harry

2014-04-01

127

Simultaneous leaching and carbon sequestration in constrained aqueous solutions.  

PubMed

The behavior of metal ions' leaching and precipitated mineral phases of metal-rich fly ash (FA) was examined in order to evaluate microbial impacts on carbon sequestration and metal immobilization. The leaching solutions consisted of aerobic deionized water (DW) and artificial eutrophic water (AEW) that was anaerobic, organic- and mineral-rich, and higher salinity as is typical of bottom water in eutrophic algae ponds. The Fe- and Ca-rich FAs were predominantly composed of quartz, mullite, portlandite, calcite, hannebachite, maghemite, and hematite. After 86 days, only Fe and Ca contents exhibited a decrease in leaching solutions while other major and trace elements showed increasing or steady trends in preference to the type of FA and leaching solution. Ca-rich FA showed strong carbon sequestration efficiency ranging up to 32.3 g CO(2)/kg FA after 86 days, corresponding to almost 65% of biotic carbon sequestration potential under some conditions. Variations in the properties of FAs such as chemical compositions, mineral constituents as well as the type of leaching solution impacted CO(2) capture. Even though the relative amount of calcite increased sixfold in the AEW and the relative amount of mineral phase reached 37.3 wt% using Ca-rich FA for 86 days, chemical sequestration did not accomplish simultaneous precipitation and sequestration of several heavy metals. PMID:21246259

Moon, Ji-Won; Cho, Kyu-Seong; Moberly, James G; Roh, Yul; Phelps, Tommy J

2011-12-01

128

Carbon sequestration: An underexploited environmental benefit of agroforestry systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Agroforestry has importance as a carbon sequestration strategy because of carbon storage potential in its multiple plant species\\u000a and soil as well as its applicability in agricultural lands and in reforestation. The potential seems to be substantial; but\\u000a it has not been even adequately recognized, let alone exploited. Proper design and management of agroforestry practices can\\u000a make them effective carbon

F. Montagnini; P. K. R. Nair

2004-01-01

129

Carbon storage and sequestration by urban trees in the USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on field data from 10 USA cities and national urban tree cover data, it is estimated that urban trees in the coterminous USA currently store 700 million tonnes of carbon ($14,300 million value) with a gross carbon sequestration rate of 22.8 million tC\\/yr ($460 million\\/year). Carbon storage within cities ranges from 1.2 million tC in New York, NY, to

David J. Nowak; Daniel E. Crane

2002-01-01

130

Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct aqueous mineral carbonation  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide sequestration by an ex-situ, direct aqueous mineral carbonation process has been investigated over the past two years. This process was conceived to minimize the steps in the conversion of gaseous CO2 to a stable solid. This meant combining two separate reactions, mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation, into a single unit operation. It was recognized that the conditions favorable for one of these reactions could be detrimental to the other. However, the benefits for a combined aqueous process, in process efficiency and ultimately economics, justified the investigation. The process utilizes a slurry of water, dissolved CO2, and a magnesium silicate mineral, such as olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. These minerals were selected as the reactants of choice for two reasons: (1) significant abundance in nature; and (2) high molar ratio of the alkaline earth oxides (CaO, MgO) within the minerals. Because it is the alkaline earth oxide that combines with CO2 to form the solid carbonate, those minerals with the highest ratio of these oxides are most favored. Optimum results have been achieved using heat pretreated serpentine feed material, sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride additions to the solution, and high partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2). Specific conditions include: 155?C; PCO2=185 atm; 15% solids. Under these conditions, 78% conversion of the silicate to the carbonate was achieved in 30 minutes. Future studies are intended to investigate various mineral pretreatment options, the carbonation solution characteristics, alternative reactants, scale-up to a continuous process, geochemical modeling, and process economics.

O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

2000-01-01

131

A Review of Forest Carbon Sequestration Cost Studies: A Dozen Years of Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers have been analyzing the costs of carbon sequestration for approximately twelve years. The purpose of this paper is to critically review the carbon sequestration cost studies of the past dozen years that have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of the forestry option. Several conclusions emerge. While carbon sequestration cost studies all contain essentially the same components they are not comparable on

Kenneth R. Richards; Carrie Stokes

2004-01-01

132

Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration wi...

A. Mizoguchi D. Brown J. Dooley M. Shiozaki R. Dahowski

2005-01-01

133

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoil and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites are owned and maintained by Americal Electrical Power. These sites were reclaimed (1) with topsoil application,

M. K. Shukla; R. Lal

2004-01-01

134

CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION BY MECHANOCHEMICAL CARBONATION OF MINERAL SILICATES  

SciTech Connect

The University of Utah and the University of Idaho investigated the carbonation of silicate minerals by mechanochemical processing. This method uses intense grinding, and has the potential of being much less expensive than other methods of mineral sequestration. Tests were conducted in three types of grinding devices. In these tests, natural and synthetic silicate compounds were ground for varying times in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. A significant change takes place in the lizardite variety of serpentine after 15 to 20 minutes of intense grinding in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. The X-ray diffraction spectrum of lizardite thus treated was much different than that of the untreated mineral. This spectrum could not be identified as that of any natural or synthetic material. Laboratory analyses showed that small amounts of carbon are fixed by grinding lizardite, forsterite, and wollastonite (all naturally-occurring minerals), and synthetic magnesium silicate, in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. It was thus concluded that further investigation was warranted, and a follow-up proposal was submitted to the Department of Energy under solicitation number.

Michael G. Nelson

2004-04-01

135

Carbon Sequestration and Turnover in Semiarid Savannas and Dry Forest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on carbon and biomass budgets under different land use in tropical savannas and some dry forests are reviewed. Global data show wide ranges of biomass carbon stocks (20-150 Mg C ha-1), net primary production (2-15 Mg C ha-1y-1) and litter production (2-10 Mg C ha-1y-1) for the semiarid tropics. Although ranges for soil carbon are also wide, an average

H. Tiessen; C. Feller; E. V. S. B. Sampaio; P. Garin

1998-01-01

136

Carbon Monoxide from Biomass Burning  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This pair of images shows levels of carbon monoxide at the atmospheric pressure level of 700 millibars (roughly 12,000 feet in altitude) over the continent of South America, as observed by the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) sensor flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. Data for producing the image on the left were acquired on March 3, 2000, and for the image on the right on September 7, 2000. Blue pixels show low values, yellows show intermediate values, and the red to pink and then white pixels are progressively higher values. In the lefthand image (March 3), notice the fairly low levels of carbon monoxide over the entire continent. The slightly higher equatorial values are the result of burning emissions in sub-Saharan Africa that are convected at the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and spread by the trade winds. Also, notice the effect of the elevated surface topography across the Andes Mountains running north to south along the western coastline. (In this region, white pixels show no data.) In the righthand image (September 7), a large carbon monoxide plume is seen over Brazil, produced primarily by biomass burning across Amazonia and lofted into the atmosphere by strong cloud convection. The generally higher carbon monoxide levels as compared to March are both the result of South American fire emissions and the transport of carbon monoxide across the Atlantic Ocean from widespread biomass burning over Southern Africa. These images were produced using MOPITT data, which are currently being validated. These data were assimilated into an atmospheric chemical transport model using wind vectors provided by the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). Although there is good confidence in the relative seasonal values and geographic variation measured by MOPITT, that team anticipates their level of confidence will improve further with ongoing intensive validation campaigns and comparisons with in situ and ground-based spectroscopic measurements. Images courtesy David Edwards and John Gille, MOPITT Science Team, NCAR

2002-01-01

137

Carbon sequestration in the agricultural soils of Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this review, technical and economically viable potentials for carbon sequestration in the agricultural soils of Europe by 2008–2012 are analysed against a business-as-usual scenario. We provide a quantitative estimation of the carbon absorption potential per hectare and the surface of agricultural land that is available and suitable for the implementation of those measures, their environmental effects as well as

Annette Freibauer; Mark D. A Rounsevell; Pete Smith; Jan Verhagen

2004-01-01

138

[Carbon sequestration status of forest ecosystems in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region].  

PubMed

Based on the data of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region forest resources inventory, field investigation and laboratory analysis, this paper studied the carbon sequestration status of forest ecosystems in Ningxia region, estimated the carbon density and storage of forest ecosystems, and analyzed their spatial distribution characteristics. The results showed that the biomass of each forest vegetation component was in the order of arbor layer (46.64 Mg x hm(-2)) > litterfall layer (7.34 Mg x hm(-2)) > fine root layer (6.67 Mg x hm(-2)) > shrub-grass layer (0.73 Mg x hm(-2)). Spruce (115.43 Mg x hm(-2)) and Pinus tabuliformis (94.55 Mg x hm(-2)) had higher vegetation biomasses per unit area than other tree species. Over-mature forest had the highest arbor carbon density among the forests with different ages. However, the young forest had the highest arbor carbon storage (1.90 Tg C) due to its widest planted area. Overall, the average carbon density of forest ecosystems in Ningxia region was 265.74 Mg C x hm(-2), and the carbon storage was 43.54 Tg C. Carbon density and storage of vegetation were 27.24 Mg C x hm(-2) and 4.46 Tg C, respectively. Carbon storage in the soil was 8.76 times of that in the vegetation. In the southern part of Ningxia region, the forest carbon storage was higher than in the northern part, where the low C storage was mainly related to the small forest area and young forest age structure. With the improvement of forest age structure and the further implementation of forestry ecoengineering, the forest ecosystems in Ningxia region would achieve a huge carbon sequestration potential. PMID:24984478

Gao, Yang; Jin, Jing-Wei; Cheng, Ji-Min; Su, Ji-Shuai; Zhu, Ren-Bin; Ma, Zheng-Rui; Liu, Wei

2014-03-01

139

Rangeland Sequestration Potential Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in compari...

G. E. Schuman G. F. Vance J. D. Derner L. Spangler

2011-01-01

140

Land-use change and carbon sinks: Econometric estimation of the carbon sequestration supply function  

SciTech Connect

Increased attention by policy makers to the threat of global climate change has brought with it considerable interest in the possibility of encouraging the expansion of forest area as a means of sequestering carbon dioxide. The marginal costs of carbon sequestration or, equivalently, the carbon sequestration supply function will determine the ultimate effects and desirability of policies aimed at enhancing carbon uptake. In particular, marginal sequestration costs are the critical statistic for identifying a cost-effective policy mix to mitigate net carbon dioxide emissions. We develop a framework for conducting an econometric analysis of land use for the forty-eight contiguous United States and employing it to estimate the carbon sequestration supply function. By estimating the opportunity costs of land on the basis of econometric evidence of landowners' actual behavior, we aim to circumvent many of the shortcomings of previous sequestration cost assessments. By conducting the first nationwide econometric estimation of sequestration costs, endogenizing prices for land-based commodities, and estimating land-use transition probabilities in a framework that explicitly considers the range of land-use alternatives, we hope to provide better estimates eventually of the true costs of large-scale carbon sequestration efforts. In this way, we seek to add to understanding of the costs and potential of this strategy for addressing the threat of global climate change.

Lubowski, Ruben N.; Plantinga, Andrew J.; Stavins, Robert N.

2001-01-01

141

Impact of parameter uncertainty on carbon sequestration modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geologic carbon sequestration through injection of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) into the subsurface is one option to reduce anthropogenic CO¬2 emissions. Widespread industrial-scale deployment, on the order of giga-tonnes of CO2 injected per year, will be necessary for carbon sequestration to make a significant contribution to solving the CO2 problem. Deep saline formations are suitable targets for CO2 sequestration due to their large storage capacity, high injectivity, and favorable pressure and temperature regimes. Due to the large areal extent of saline formations, and the need to inject very large amounts of CO2, multiple sequestration operations are likely to be developed in the same formation. The injection-induced migration of both CO2 and resident formation fluids (brine) needs to be predicted to determine the feasibility of industrial-scale deployment of carbon sequestration. Due to the larger spatial scale of the domain, many of the modeling parameters (e.g., permeability) will be highly uncertain. In this presentation we discuss a sensitivity analysis of both pressure response and CO2 plume migration to variations of model parameters such as permeability, compressibility and temperature. The impact of uncertainty in the stratigraphic succession is also explored. The sensitivity analysis is conducted using a numerical vertically-integrated modeling approach. The Illinois Basin, USA is selected as the test site for this study, due to its large storage capacity and large number of stationary CO2 sources. As there is currently only one active CO2 injection operation in the Illinois Basin, a hypothetical injection scenario is used, where CO2 is injected at the locations of large CO2 emitters related to electricity generation, ethanol production and hydrocarbon refinement. The Area of Review (AoR) is chosen as the comparison metric, as it includes both the CO2 plume size and pressure response.

Bandilla, K.; Celia, M. A.

2013-12-01

142

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF AGRICULTURAL SOIL CARBON SEQUESTRATION: AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT APPROACH  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study develops an integrated assessment approach for analysis of the economic potential for carbon sequestration in agricultural soils. By linking a site-specific economic simulation model of agricultural production to a crop ecosystem model, the approach shows the economic efficiency of soil carbon (C) sequestration depends on site-specific opportunity costs of changing production practices and rates of soil C sequestration.

John M. Antle; Susan M. Capalbo; Sian Mooney; Edward T. Elliott; Keith H. Paustian

2001-01-01

143

The impact of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration in boreal forests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is proposed that increases in anthropogenic reactive nitrogen (Nr)-deposition may cause boreal forests to sequester a globally significant quantity of carbon (C); however, long-term data from boreal forests describing how C sequestration responds to realistic levels of chronic Nr-deposition are scarce. Using a long term (14-17 years) stand scale (0.1 ha) N-addition experiment (three levels: 0, 12.5, and 50 kg N ha-1yr-1) in the boreal zone of northern Sweden, we evaluated how chronic N additions altered N uptake and biomass of understory communities, and whether changes in understory communities explained N uptake and C sequestration by trees. We further explored whether N additions resulted in changes in soil C. Our data reveal that N additions resulted in increased C sequestration in both trees and soil (between 20-30 parts C per unit of N), with approximately 1/3 of this C sequestered in the humus layer, and 2/3 in plant biomass. The total quantity of C sequestered per unit N was far less than proposed by some modeling studies, and thus could account for only a very small portion of the unidentified terrestrial sink for anthropogenic CO2.

Gundale, Michael

2014-05-01

144

Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation,

William K. OConnor; David C. Dahlin; David N. Nilsen; Richard P. Walters; Paul C. Turner

2000-01-01

145

Ocean sequestration of crop residue carbon: recycling fossil fuel carbon back to deep sediments.  

PubMed

For significant impact any method to remove CO2 from the atmosphere must process large amounts of carbon efficiently, be repeatable, sequester carbon for thousands of years, be practical, economical and be implemented soon. The only method that meets these criteria is removal of crop residues and burial in the deep ocean. We show here that this method is 92% efficient in sequestration of crop residue carbon while cellulosic ethanol production is only 32% and soil sequestration is about 14% efficient. Deep ocean sequestration can potentially capture 15% of the current global CO2 annual increase, returning that carbon backto deep sediments, confining the carbon for millennia, while using existing capital infrastructure and technology. Because of these clear advantages, we recommend enhanced research into permanent sequestration of crop residues in the deep ocean. PMID:19320149

Strand, Stuart E; Benford, Gregory

2009-02-15

146

Optimal Global Carbon Management with Ocean Sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the socially optimal anthropogenic intervention into the global carbon cycle. The limiting factor for this intervention is the accumulation of carbon in the atmosphere, which causes global warming. We apply a simplified two-box model to incorporate aspects of the global carbon cycle in a more appropriate way than a simple proportional decay assumption does. Anthropogenic intervention into the

Wilfried Rickels; Thomas Lontzek

2008-01-01

147

Arsenic Dissolution from Arsenopyrite Under Carbon Dioxide Geologic Sequestration Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Possible leakage of CO2-saturated brine from saline, sedimentary rock formations used for CO2 sequestration may pose risks of environmental impacts to the overlying aquifers, including mobilization of metals from reservoir and overlying rocks. Preliminary U.S. DOE studies of metal mobilization from sedimentary reservoir materials upon contact with CO2 saturated brine have indicated potential for arsenic release in concentrations that may exceed the U.S. EPA maximum contaminant level of 10 ?g/L for drinking water. The mobilization of arsenic from reservoir and caprock formations under CO2 geologic sequestration conditions is the focus of this study. The most common naturally occurring source of arsenic in such formations is arsenopyrite (FeAsS) along with arsenian pyrite. Dissolution experiments conducted under ambient temperature and pressure conditions have indicated that arsenic, iron and sulfur released from arsenopyrite are non-stoichiometric. Also, the release of arsenic is further inhibited by mass transfer limitations. Experiments are in progress to determine the rate of release of arsenic from arsenopyrite under carbon dioxide sequestration conditions, considering high salinity brine, 25 to 160 °C and pressures up-to 300 bars. A flow through system was designed to induce maximum rates of dissolution through maintenance of low concentration of dissolved arsenic. These experiments allow the interpretation of arsenopyrite dissolution kinetics and lead to the determination of the rate of arsenic release under conditions that are relevant to carbon dioxide sequestration.

Parthasarathy, H.; Tasneem, K.; Dzombak, D. A.; Karamalidis, A.

2011-12-01

148

Carbon Dioxide Hydrate Particles for Ocean Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents strategies for producing negatively buoyant CO{sub 2} hydrate composite particles for ocean carbon sequestration. Our study is based on recent field observations showing that a continuous-jet hydrate reactor located at an ocean depth of 1500 m produced curved negatively buoyant cylindrical particles with diameters {approx} 2.5 cm and lengths up to {approx} 1 m. Accordingly we performed new laboratory experiments to determine the drag coefficient of such particles and, based on the measured drag coefficient and the initial settling velocity observed in the field, have concluded that the reactor efficiency (percentage of liquid CO{sub 2} converted to hydrate) in the field was {approx} 16%. Using the dissolution rates observed in the field, we conclude that such particles would ultimately sink to depth below discharge of {approx} 115 m. We have also predicted the sinking depth of particles potentially produced from various scaled-up reactors and have shown that, for example, a 10 cm diameter particle produced with a hydrate conversion of 50% could reach the ocean bottom before completely dissolving. In a real sequestration scenario, we are interested in following large groups of hydrate particles released continuously. We have previously shown that increasing particle size and hydrate conversion efficiency enhances the sinking of hydrate particle plumes produced by the continuous release of CO{sub 2} in a quiescent ambient, but that a sufficiently strong current will cause the entrained particles to separate from the plume and settle discretely. In the latter case, particles of different sizes and hydrate conversions (hence different settling velocities) will follow different settling trajectories as they dissolve. This particle fractionation, if employed deliberately, spreads the discharged CO{sub 2} in the down current and vertical directions, enhancing mixing, while turbulent diffusion helps spread the CO{sub 2} in the third direction. A numerical model that incorporates these processes is used to predict the downstream concentrations and changes in pH from such particle plumes in a 'strong' current. An extension of this model simulates hydrate particles that are released continuously from a moving ship. Because of the ship speed, such particles would never form a coherent plume, but the combination of particle fractionation and advection due to the ship motion produces excellent dilution of the discharged CO{sub 2}.

Chow, Aaron C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Adams, E. Eric [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Israelsson, P. H. [Quantitative Environmental Analysis; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2009-01-01

149

Effect of Rehabilitation on Carbon Sequestration in Estuarine Wetlands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If left undisturbed, carbon in estuarine wetlands can be stored for millennia, whereas terrestrial stores are typically transient. If subject to reduction in tidal flows, estuarine wetland soils typically experience increased soil aeration and decomposition of soil organic matter, whereas reintroduction of tidal flows can increase the rate of carbon sequestration by increasing vertical accretion of the soil profile. Research at a wetland in the Hunter estuary, southeast Australia compared carbon sequestration rates in a rehabilitated and a natural estuarine wetland, both comprised of mangrove and saltmarsh. At the rehabilitated site, total carbon concentration ranged from 1.4-7.4% and bulk density from 0.56-1.37 Mg.m-3. Approximately 97% of soil carbon was present as organic carbon (range 94-100%). At the natural site, total carbon concentration ranged from 8.0-11.6% and bulk density from 0.50 0.85 Mg.m-3. These data were significantly different to rehabilitated site in terms of both higher total carbon (F(1,22)=90.14, p<0.001) and lower bulk density (F(1,22)=11.39, p=0.003). The suppressed carbon stores and elevated bulk density at the rehabilitated site are related to the substantial reduction in tidal flows that occurred in the 1960s, whereas the estuarine communities at the natural site have existed in a relatively undisturbed state since at least the 1850s and there are no artificial constraints to tidal flow. Carbon sequestration at the rehabilitated site (1.05 Mg C.ha-1.y-1 for mangrove and 1.37 Mg C.ha-1.y-1 for saltmarsh), however, was substantially higher than that at the natural site (0.89 Mg C.ha-1.y-1 for mangrove and 0.64 Mg C.ha-1.y-1 for saltmarsh). These results are consistent with a soil carbon rehabilitation trajectory where high vertical accretion rates in rehabilitated sites drive an asymptotic increase in soil carbon stores, and support the potential for substantial gains in carbon sequestration associated with reinstatement of tidal flows to degraded estuarine wetlands.

Howe, A.; Rodriguez, J. F.; Saco, P. M.

2008-12-01

150

Soil carbon sequestration in semi-arid soil through the addition of fuel gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated a new strategy for increasing carbon retention in slightly alkaline soils through addition of fuel gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG, CaSO4•2H2O). FGDG is moderately soluble and thus the FGDG amendment may be effective to reduce microbial respiration, to accelerate calcite (CaCO3) precipitation, and to promote soil organic carbon (SOC) complexation on mineral surfaces, but rates of these processes need to be understood. The effects of FGDG addition were tested in laboratory soil columns with and without FGDG-amended layers, and in greenhouse soil columns planted with switchgrass, a biofuel crop. The results of laboratory column experiments demonstrated that additions of FGDG promote soil carbon sequestration through suppressing microbial respiration to the extent of ~200 g per m2 soil per m of supplied water, and promoting calcite precipitation at similar rates. The greenhouse experiments showed that the FGDG treatments did not adversely affect biomass yield (~600 g dry biomass/m2/harvest) at the higher irrigation rate (50 cm/year), but substantially reduced recoverable biomass under the more water-limited conditions (irrigation rate = 20 cm/year). The main achievements of this study are (1) the identification of conditions in which inorganic and organic carbon sequestration is practical in semi-arid and arid soils, (2) development of a method for measuring the total carbon balance in unsaturated soil columns, and (3) the quantification of different pathways for soil carbon sequestration in response to FGDG amendments. These findings provide information for evaluating land use practices for increased soil carbon sequestration under semi-arid region biofuel crop production.

Han, Young-Soo; Tokunaga, Tetsu; Oh, Chamteut

2014-05-01

151

Mineralization strategies for carbon dioxide sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in three primary research areas--each concerned with sequestering carbon dioxide into mineral matrices. Direct mineral carbonation was pioneered at Albany Research Center. The method treats the reactant, olivine or serpentine in aqueous media with carbon dioxide at high temperature and pressure to form stable mineral carbonates. Recent results are introduced for pretreatment by high-intensity grinding to improve carbonation efficiency. To prove feasibility of the carbonation process, a new reactor was designed and operated to progress from batch tests to continuous operation. The new reactor is a prototype high-temperature, high-pressure flow loop reactor that will furnish information on flow, energy consumption, and wear and corrosion resulting from slurry flow and the carbonation reaction. A promising alternative mineralization approach is also described. New data are presented for long-term exposure of carbon dioxide to Colombia River Basalt to determine the extent of conversion of carbon dioxide to permanent mineral carbonates. Batch autoclave tests were conducted using drill-core samples of basalt and reacted under conditions that simulate in situ injection into basalt-containing geological formations.

Penner, Larry R.; O'Connor, William K.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.

2003-01-01

152

Carbonic anhydrase mediated carbon dioxide sequestration: promises, challenges and future prospects.  

PubMed

Anthropogenic activities have substantially increased the level of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere and are contributing significantly to the global warming. Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is one of the major GHGs which plays a key role in the climate change. Various approaches and methodologies are under investigation to address CO2 capture and sequestration worldwide. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) mediated CO2 sequestration is one of the promising options. Therefore, the present review elaborates recent developments in CA, its immobilization and bioreactor methodologies towards CO2 sequestration using the CA enzyme. The promises and challenges associated with the efficient utilization of CA for CO2 sequestration and scale up from flask to lab-scale bioreactor are critically discussed. Finally, the current review also recommends the possible future needs and directions to utilize CA for CO2 sequestration. PMID:24740638

Yadav, Raju R; Krishnamurthi, Kannan; Mudliar, Sandeep N; Devi, S Saravana; Naoghare, Pravin K; Bafana, Amit; Chakrabarti, Tapan

2014-06-01

153

The value of carbon sequestration and storage in coastal habitats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coastal margin habitats are globally significant in terms of their capacity to sequester and store carbon, but their continuing decline, due to environmental change and human land use decisions, is reducing their capacity to provide this ecosystem service. In this paper the UK is used as a case study area to develop methodologies to quantify and value the ecosystem service of blue carbon sequestration and storage in coastal margin habitats. Changes in UK coastal habitat area between 1900 and 2060 are documented, the long term stocks of carbon stored by these habitats are calculated, and the capacity of these habitats to sequester CO2 is detailed. Changes in value of the carbon sequestration service of coastal habitats are then projected for 2000-2060 under two scenarios, the maintenance of the current state of the habitat and the continuation of current trends of habitat loss. If coastal habitats are maintained at their current extent, their sequestration capacity over the period 2000-2060 is valued to be in the region of £1 billion UK sterling (3.5% discount rate). However, if current trends of habitat loss continue, the capacity of the coastal habitats both to sequester and store CO2 will be significantly reduced, with a reduction in value of around £0.25 billion UK sterling (2000-2060; 3.5% discount rate). If loss-trends due to sea level rise or land reclamation worsen, this loss in value will be greater. This case study provides valuable site specific information, but also highlights global issues regarding the quantification and valuation of carbon sequestration and storage. Whilst our ability to value ecosystem services is improving, considerable uncertainty remains. If such ecosystem valuations are to be incorporated with confidence into national and global policy and legislative frameworks, it is necessary to address this uncertainty. Recommendations to achieve this are outlined.

Beaumont, N. J.; Jones, L.; Garbutt, A.; Hansom, J. D.; Toberman, M.

2014-01-01

154

Impacts of crop rotations on soil organic carbon sequestration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Agricultural land use and crop rotations can greatly affect the amount of carbon sequestered in the soil. We developed a framework for modelling the impacts of crop rotations on soil carbon sequestration at the field scale with test case Flanders. A crop rotation geo-database was constructed covering 10 years of crop rotation in Flanders using the IACS parcel registration (Integrated Administration and Control System) to elicit the most common crop rotation on major soil types in Flanders. In order to simulate the impact of crop cover on carbon sequestration, the Roth-C model was adapted to Flanders' environment and coupled to common crop rotations extracted from the IACS geodatabases and statistical databases on crop yield. Crop allometric models were used to calculate crop residues from common crops in Flanders and subsequently derive stable organic matter fluxes to the soil (REGSOM). The REGSOM model was coupled to Roth-C model was run for 30 years and for all combinations of seven main arable crops, two common catch crops and two common dosages of organic manure. The common crops are winter wheat, winter barley, sugar beet, potato, grain maize, silage maize and winter rapeseed; the catch crops are yellow mustard and Italian ryegrass; the manure dosages are 35 ton/ha cattle slurry and 22 ton/ha pig slurry. Four common soils were simulated: sand, loam, sandy loam and clay. In total more than 2.4 million simulations were made with monthly output of carbon content for 30 years. Results demonstrate that crop cover dynamics influence carbon sequestration for a very large percentage. For the same rotations carbon sequestration is highest on clay soils and lowest on sandy soils. Crop residues of grain maize and winter wheat followed by catch crops contribute largely to the total carbon sequestered. This implies that agricultural policies that impact on agricultural land management influence soil carbon sequestration for a large percentage. The framework is therefore suited for further scenario analysis and impact assessment in order to support agri-environmental policy decisions.

Gobin, Anne; Vos, Johan; Joris, Ingeborg; Van De Vreken, Philippe

2013-04-01

155

On carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recent reports of net ecosysytem production >100 g C m-2 yr-1 in deserts are incompatible with existing measurements of net primary production and carbon pools in deserts. The comparisions suggest that gas exchange measurements should be used with caution and better validation if they are expected to indicate the magnitude of carbon sink in these ecosysytems. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing.

Schlesinger, W. H.; Belnap, J.; Marion, G.

2009-01-01

156

Carbon cycle: Sequestration in buried soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rapid deposition of wind-borne silt after the end of the last glacial period buried a large reservoir of organic carbon in the deep soil. Geochemical analyses suggest that this sequestered soil carbon could be released to the atmosphere if exposed to decomposition.

Johnson, William C.

2014-06-01

157

Mineral CO2 sequestration by steel slag carbonation.  

PubMed

Mineral CO2 sequestration, i.e., carbonation of alkaline silicate Ca/Mg minerals, analogous to natural weathering processes, is a possible technology for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, alkaline Ca-rich industrial residues are presented as a possible feedstock for mineral CO2 sequestration. These materials are cheap, available near large point sources of CO2, and tend to react relatively rapidly with CO2 due to their chemical instability. Ground steel slag was carbonated in aqueous suspensions to study its reaction mechanisms. Process variables, such as particle size, temperature, carbon dioxide pressure, and reaction time, were systematically varied, and their influence on the carbonation rate was investigated. The maximum carbonation degree reached was 74% of the Ca content in 30 min at 19 bar CO2 pressure, 100 degrees C, and a particle size of <38 microm. The two most important factors determining the reaction rate are particle size (<2 mm to <38 microm) and reaction temperature (25-225 degrees C). The carbonation reaction was found to occur in two steps: (1) leaching of calcium from the steel slag particles into the solution; (2) precipitation of calcite on the surface of these particles. The first step and, more in particular, the diffusion of calcium through the solid matrix toward the surface appeared to be the rate-determining reaction step. The Ca diffusion was found to be hindered by the formation of a CaCO3-coating and a Ca-depleted silicate zone during the carbonation process. Research on further enhancement of the reaction rate, which would contribute to the development of a cost-effective CO2-sequestration process, should focus particularly on this mechanism. PMID:16475351

Huijgen, Wouter J J; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Comans, Rob N J

2005-12-15

158

NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB)  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a brief summary of the milestone for Quarter 1 of 2006 of the NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB) This milestone assigns consistent symbology to the ''National CO{sub 2} Facilities'' GIS layer on the NATCARB website. As a default, CO{sub 2} sources provided by the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships and the National Group are now all one symbol type. In addition for sinks such as oil and gas fields where data is drawn from multiple partnerships, the symbology is given a single color. All these modifications are accomplished as the layer is passed through the national portal (www.natcarb.org). This documentation is sent to National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as a Topical Report and will be included in the next Annual Report.

Timothy R. Carr

2006-01-09

159

Potential for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Flood Basalts  

SciTech Connect

Flood basalts are a potentially important host medium for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Most lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have enormous capacity for storage of CO2. Interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock overlying sequential flows may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Laboratory experiments confirm relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. Calculations suggest a sufficiently short time frame for onset of carbonate precipitation after CO2 injection that verification of in situ mineralization rates appears feasible in field pilot studies. If proven viable, major flood basalts in the U.S. and India would provide significant additional CO2 storage capacity and additional geologic sequestration options in certain regions where more conventional storage options are limited.

McGrail, B. PETER; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ho, Anita M.; Chien, Yi-Ju; Dooley, James J.; Davidson, Casie L.

2006-12-01

160

Optimizing carbon sequestration in commercial forests by integrating carbon management objectives in wood supply modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a methodology for generating forest management plans, which explicitly maximize carbon (C) sequestration at the forest-landscape level. This paper takes advantage of concepts first presented in a paper\\u000a by Meng et al. (2003; Mitigation Adaptation Strategies Global Change 8:371–403) by integrating C-sequestration objective functions in existing\\u000a wood supply models. Carbon-stock calculations performed in WoodstockTM (RemSoft Inc.) are based

Charles P.-A. Bourque; Eric T. Neilson; Chris Gruenwald; Samantha F. Perrin; Jason C. Hiltz; Yvon A. Blin; Geoffrey V. Horsman; Matthew S. Parker; Christie B. Thorburn; Michael M. Corey; Fan-rui Meng; D. Edwin Swift

2007-01-01

161

Land-use change and carbon sinks: Econometric estimation of the carbon sequestration supply function  

Microsoft Academic Search

If the United States chooses to implement a greenhouse gas reduction program, it would be necessary to decide whether to include carbon sequestration policies—such as those that promote forestation and discourage deforestation—as part of the domestic portfolio of compliance activities. We investigate the cost of forest-based carbon sequestration by analyzing econometrically micro-data on revealed landowner preferences, modeling six major private

Ruben N. Lubowski; Andrew J. Plantinga; Robert N. Stavins

2006-01-01

162

How strongly can forest management influence soil carbon sequestration?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reviewed the experimental evidence for long-term carbon (C) sequestration in soils as consequence of specific forest management strategies. Utilization of terrestrial C sinks alleviates the burden of countries which are committed to reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. Land-use changes such as those which result from afforestation and management of fast-growing tree species, have an immediate effect on the regional

Robert Jandl; Marcus Lindner; Lars Vesterdal; B. M. S. D. L. Bauwens; Rainer Baritz; Frank Hagedorn; Dale W. Johnson; Kari Minkkinen; Kenneth A. Byrne

2007-01-01

163

Molecular and Metabolic Mechanisms of Carbon Sequestration in Marine Thrombolites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The overall goal of my dissertation project has been to examine the molecular processes underlying carbon sequestration in lithifying microbial ecosystems, known as thrombolitic mats, and assess their feasibility for use in bioregenerative life support systems. The results of my research and education efforts funded by the Graduate Student Researchers Program can be summarized in four peer-reviewed research publication, one educational publication, two papers in preparation, and six research presentations at local and national science meetings (see below for specific details).

Mobberley, Jennifer

2013-01-01

164

Biochar for soil fertility and natural carbon sequestration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Biochar is charcoal (similar to chars generated by forest fires) that is made for incorporation into soils to increase soil fertility while providing natural carbon sequestration. The incorporation of biochar into soils can preserve and enrich soils and also slow the rate at which climate change is affecting our planet. Studies on biochar, such as those cited by this report, are applicable to both fire science and soil science.

Rostad, C.E.; Rutherford, D.W.

2011-01-01

165

Technological learning for carbon capture and sequestration technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes potentials of carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCT) in a set of long-term energy-economic-environmental scenarios based on alternative assumptions for technological progress of CCT. In order to get a reasonable guide to future technological progress in managing CO2 emissions, we review past experience in controlling sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from power plants. By doing so, we quantify

Keywan Riahi; Edward S. Rubin; Margaret R. Taylor; Leo Schrattenholzer; David Hounshell

2004-01-01

166

Simultaneous leaching and carbon sequestration in constrained aqueous solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The behavior of metal ions’ leaching and precipitated mineral phases of metal-rich fly ash (FA) was examined in order to evaluate\\u000a microbial impacts on carbon sequestration and metal immobilization. The leaching solutions consisted of aerobic deionized\\u000a water (DW) and artificial eutrophic water (AEW) that was anaerobic, organic- and mineral-rich, and higher salinity as is typical\\u000a of bottom water in eutrophic

Ji-Won Moon; Kyu-Seong Cho; James G. Moberly; Yul Roh; Tommy J. Phelps

2011-01-01

167

A brief overview of carbon sequestration economics and policy.  

PubMed

This article provides an overview of the issues and challenges involved in analyzing the costs and program design for carbon sequestration. The first section examines some of the pitfalls of comparing the results of carbon sequestration cost studies and suggests some simple ways in which analysts could make their results more useful. The pitfalls in comparing studies include different definitions for the summary statistic "dollars per ton," differences in the type of costs that are estimated, and differences in underlying assumptions regarding program design and implementation. Future cost studies will benefit from improved treatment of leakage, general equilibrium interactions, and public finance interactions. The second section reviews issues related to the implementation of a carbon sequestration program, including which policy tools are available and which have received the most attention, some of the challenges for using those policy tools, and one alternative that has received little attention, but may become necessary. The discussion also provides an overview and analysis of the bills introduced in the last two congresses and considers the general policy implications of those proposals. PMID:15453407

Richards, Kenneth R

2004-04-01

168

Permanence Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

One major concern regarding land-based carbon sequestration involves the issue of permanence. Sequestration may not last forever and may either be released in the future or require expenditure to maintain the practices that keep it sequestered. In this paper, we investigate the differential value of offsets in the face of impermanent characteristics by forming a price discount that equalizes the effective price per ton between a “perfect offsets” and one possessing some or all of these characteristics. We find this discount to be a function of the future needs to replace offsets (in the face of lease expiration quantity or volatilization upon activities such as timber harvest) and the magnitude of any needed maintenance costs. We investigate the magnitude of the discounts under alternative agricultural tillage and forest management cases. In those studies we find that permanence discounts in the range of 50% are not uncommon. This means that in the market place an impermanent sequestration offset may only receive payments amounting to 50% of the market carbon price. Furthermore we find that in the face of escalating carbon prices that offsets may prove to be worthless.

Kim, Man-Keun; McCarl, Bruce A.; Murray, Brian

2008-02-01

169

Implementation of Emission Trading in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Optimization Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As an effective mid- and long- term solution for large-scale mitigation of industrial CO2 emissions, CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) has been paid more and more attention in the past decades. A general CCS management system has complex characteristics of multiple emission sources, multiple mitigation technologies, multiple sequestration sites, and multiple project periods. Trade-off exists among numerous environmental, economic, political, and technical factors, leading to varied system features. Sound decision alternatives are thus desired for provide decision supports for decision makers or managers for managing such a CCS system from capture to the final geologic storage phases. Carbon emission trading has been developed as a cost-effective tool for reducing the global greenhouse gas emissions. In this study, a carbon capture and sequestration optimization management model is proposed to address the above issues. The carbon emission trading is integrated into the model, and its impacts on the resulting management decisions are analyzed. A multi-source multi-period case study is provided to justify the applicability of the modeling approach, where uncertainties in modeling parameters are also dealt with.

Zhang, X.; Duncan, I.

2013-12-01

170

Mesoscale carbon sequestration site screening and CCS infrastructure analysis.  

PubMed

We explore carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) at the meso-scale, a level of study between regional carbon accounting and highly detailed reservoir models for individual sites. We develop an approach to CO(2) sequestration site screening for industries or energy development policies that involves identification of appropriate sequestration basin, analysis of geologic formations, definition of surface sites, design of infrastructure, and analysis of CO(2) transport and storage costs. Our case study involves carbon management for potential oil shale development in the Piceance-Uinta Basin, CO and UT. This study uses new capabilities of the CO(2)-PENS model for site screening, including reservoir capacity, injectivity, and cost calculations for simple reservoirs at multiple sites. We couple this with a model of optimized source-sink-network infrastructure (SimCCS) to design pipeline networks and minimize CCS cost for a given industry or region. The CLEAR(uff) dynamical assessment model calculates the CO(2) source term for various oil production levels. Nine sites in a 13,300 km(2) area have the capacity to store 6.5 GtCO(2), corresponding to shale-oil production of 1.3 Mbbl/day for 50 years (about 1/4 of U.S. crude oil production). Our results highlight the complex, nonlinear relationship between the spatial deployment of CCS infrastructure and the oil-shale production rate. PMID:20698546

Keating, Gordon N; Middleton, Richard S; Stauffer, Philip H; Viswanathan, Hari S; Letellier, Bruce C; Pasqualini, Donatella; Pawar, Rajesh J; Wolfsberg, Andrew V

2011-01-01

171

CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

The terrestrial biosphere plays a prominent role in the global carbon (C) cycle. errestrial ecosystems are currently accumulating C and it appears feasible to manage existing terrestrial (forest, agronomic, desert) ecosystems to maintain or increase C storage. orest ecosystems ca...

172

Evaluating carbon sequestration efficiency in an ocean circulation model by adjoint sensitivity analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate the application of the adjoint method to develop three-dimensional maps of carbon sequestration efficiency and mean residence time in an ocean general circulation model. In contrast to perturbation sensitivity experiments, the adjoint approach provides a computationally efficient way to characterize both temporal and spatial variations of sequestration efficiency and residence time for a complete global model domain. Sequestration

Chris Hill; Véronique Bugnion; Mick Follows; John Marshall

2004-01-01

173

Science of Geological Carbon Sequestration: Integration of Experimentation and Simulation.  

SciTech Connect

This LDRD-DR will develop and enhance the science and technology needed to safely and effectively sequester carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) in geologic formations for the long term. There is consensus in the scientific community that increased levels of greenhouse gases such as CO[sub 2] are adversely affecting the global environment as evidenced by recent trends in global warming and dramatic changes in weather patterns. Geologic sequestration represents an immediately available, low-cost option for mitigating the global environmental impact of C0[sub 2] by removing large amounts of the gas from the atmosphere. The main limitation of this approach is the limited knowledge of the fundamental science that governs the physical and chemical behavior of (supercritical) CO[sub 2] during and after injection into the host geologic environment. Key scientific issues revolve around determination of the ultimate fate of injected CO[sub 2] which is governed by permeability/porosity relations in the multi-phase CO[sub 2]-brine(-oil) systems as well as the reactivity and integrity of the host rock. We propose a combined experimental and theoretical investigation to determine key parameters and incorporate them into coupled microscopic and macroscopic numerical CO[sub 2] flow and reaction models. This problem provides an excellent opportunity to utilize unique LANL resources including the Supercritical Fluids Facility (SCRUB) for dynamic (flow-through) studies of supercritical CO[sub 2] (scCO[sub 2]); LANSCE for microscale investigation of pore structure and reaction products; and hydrothermal reaction laboratories for long-term flow and reaction studies. These facilities will allow us to obtain crucial experimental data that could not be easily obtained at any other research facility in the world. The experimental data will be used to develop and validate coupled flow and reaction models that build on existing state-of-the-art modeling capabilities in EES, T and D Divisions. Carbon sequestration is an emerging research area in which federal funding has grown significantly over past years. Together with existing applied, small carbon sequestration projects funded by DOE, this proposed LDRD project, focusing on fundamental issues of long-term geological carbon sequestration, will put the laboratory at the forefront of carbon sequestration science/engineering and in a unique and advantageous position to develop future major programs in this area.

Zhang, D.; Hall, M. L.; Higdon, D.; Hollis, W. K.; Kaszuba, J.; Lichtner, P.; Pawar, R.; Zhao, Y.; Chen, S.; Grigg, R.

2003-08-04

174

Climate Controls on Carbon Sequestration in Eastern North America  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mid-latitude forest ecosystems have been proposed as a "missing sink" today. The role of soils (including wetlands) in this proposed sink is a very important unknown. In order to make estimates of future climate change effects on carbon storage, we can examine past wetland carbon sequestration. How did past climate change affect net wetland carbon storage? We present long-term data from existing wetland sites used for paleoclimate reconstruction to assess the net carbon storage in wetland over the last 15000 years. During times of colder and wetter climate, many mid-latitude sites show increases in carbon storage, while past warmer, drier climates produced decreases in storage. Comparison among bog, fen, swamp, and tidal marsh are demonstrated for the Hudson Valley region.

Peteet, D. M.; Renik, B.; Maenza-Gmeich, T.; Kurdyla, D.; Guilderson, T.

2002-01-01

175

Carbon sequestration in tropical agroforestry systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Removing atmospheric carbon (C) and storing it in the terrestrial biosphere is one of the options, which have been proposed to compensate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Agricultural lands are believed to be a major potential sink and could absorb large quantities of C if trees are reintroduced to these systems and judiciously managed together with crops and\\/or animals. Thus, the

Alain Albrecht; Serigne T Kandji

2003-01-01

176

Crop Management for Soil Carbon Sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) from agriculture is related to increasing and protecting soil organic matter (SOM) concentration. Agricultural soils can be a significant sink for atmospheric carbon (C) through increase of the SOM concentration. The natural ecosystems such as forests or prairies, where C gains are in equilibrium with losses, lose a large fraction of the antecedent C

Marek K. Jarecki; Rattan Lal

2003-01-01

177

Soil carbon sequestration: Quantifying this ecosystem service  

EPA Science Inventory

Soils have a crucial role in supplying many goods and services that society depends upon on a daily basis. These include food and fiber production, water cleansing and supply, nutrient cycling, waste isolation and degradation. Soils also provide a significant amount of carbon s...

178

Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Potential Environmental Impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last few years, understanding of the profound implications of anthropogenically driven climate change has grown. In turn, this has fuelled research into options to mitigate likely im- pacts. Approaches involving the capture of carbon dioxide and its storage in geological forma- tions, or in marine waters, have generated a raft of proposed solutions. The scale of some of

Paul Johnston; David Santillo

179

Global carbon sequestration in tidal, saline wetland soils  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Wetlands represent the largest component of the terrestrial biological carbon pool and thus play an important role in global carbon cycles. Most global carbon budgets, however, have focused on dry land ecosystems that extend over large areas and have not accounted for the many small, scattered carbon-storing ecosystems such as tidal saline wetlands. We compiled data for 154 sites in mangroves and salt marshes from the western and eastern Atlantic and Pacific coasts, as well as the Indian Ocean, Mediterranean Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico. The set of sites spans a latitudinal range from 22.4??S in the Indian Ocean to 55.5??N in the northeastern Atlantic. The average soil carbon density of mangrove swamps (0.055 ?? 0.004 g cm-3) is significantly higher than the salt marsh average (0.039 ?? 0.003 g cm-3). Soil carbon density in mangrove swamps and Spartina patens marshes declines with increasing average annual temperature, probably due to increased decay rates at higher temperatures. In contrast, carbon sequestration rates were not significantly different between mangrove swamps and salt marshes. Variability in sediment accumulation rates within marshes is a major control of carbon sequestration rates masking any relationship with climatic parameters. Globally, these combined wetlands store at least 44.6 Tg C yr-1 and probably more, as detailed areal inventories are not available for salt marshes in China and South America. Much attention has been given to the role of freshwater wetlands, particularly northern peatlands, as carbon sinks. In contrast to peatlands, salt marshes and mangroves release negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and store more carbon per unit area. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

Chmura, G. L.; Anisfeld, S. C.; Cahoon, D. R.; Lynch, J. C.

2003-01-01

180

Global carbon sequestration in tidal, saline wetland soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wetlands represent the largest component of the terrestrial biological carbon pool and thus play an important role in global carbon cycles. Most global carbon budgets, however, have focused on dry land ecosystems that extend over large areas and have not accounted for the many small, scattered carbon-storing ecosystems such as tidal saline wetlands. We compiled data for 154 sites in mangroves and salt marshes from the western and eastern Atlantic and Pacific coasts, as well as the Indian Ocean, Mediterranean Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico. The set of sites spans a latitudinal range from 22.4°S in the Indian Ocean to 55.5°N in the northeastern Atlantic. The average soil carbon density of mangrove swamps (0.055 ± 0.004 g cm-3) is significantly higher than the salt marsh average (0.039 ± 0.003 g cm-3). Soil carbon density in mangrove swamps and Spartina patens marshes declines with increasing average annual temperature, probably due to increased decay rates at higher temperatures. In contrast, carbon sequestration rates were not significantly different between mangrove swamps and salt marshes. Variability in sediment accumulation rates within marshes is a major control of carbon sequestration rates masking any relationship with climatic parameters. Globally, these combined wetlands store at least 44.6 Tg C yr-1 and probably more, as detailed areal inventories are not available for salt marshes in China and South America. Much attention has been given to the role of freshwater wetlands, particularly northern peatlands, as carbon sinks. In contrast to peatlands, salt marshes and mangroves release negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and store more carbon per unit area.

Chmura, Gail L.; Anisfeld, Shimon C.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Lynch, James C.

2003-12-01

181

Making carbon sequestration a paying proposition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has increased from a preindustrial concentration of about 280 ppm to about 367 ppm at present. The increase has closely\\u000a followed the increase in CO2 emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Global warming caused by increasing amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere\\u000a is the major environmental challenge for the 21st century. Reducing worldwide emissions of CO2

Fengxiang X. Han; Jeff S. Lindner; Chuji Wang

2007-01-01

182

Soil carbon sequestration to mitigate climate change  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increase in atmospheric concentration of CO2 by 31% since 1750 from fossil fuel combustion and land use change necessitates identification of strategies for mitigating the threat of the attendant global warming. Since the industrial revolution, global emissions of carbon (C) are estimated at 270±30 Pg (Pg=petagram=1015 g=1 billion ton) due to fossil fuel combustion and 136±55 Pg due to

R. Lal

2004-01-01

183

Carbon Sequestration in Rangelands Interseeded with Yellow-Flowering Alfalfa ( Medicago sativa ssp. falcata )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management practices can significantly influence carbon sequestration by rangeland ecosystems. Grazing, burning, and fertilization have been shown to increase soil carbon storage in rangeland soils of the Great Plains. Research was initiated in 2001 in northwestern South Dakota to evaluate the role of interseeding a legume, Medicago sativa ssp. falcata, in northern mixed-grass rangelands on carbon sequestration. Sampling was undertaken

Matthew C. Mortenson; Lachlan J. Ingram

2004-01-01

184

THE ROLE OF CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION IN A LONG-TERM TECHNOLOGY STRATEGY OF ATMOSPHERIC STABILIZATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we examine the potential of carbon capture and sequestration technologies to make a significant contribution to national and global efforts to control carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions. We examine the performance of these technologies under two alternative future energy-policy scenarios. We conclude that carbon capture and sequestration technologies could indeed play a significant role in reducing atmospheric

JJ DOOLEY; JA EDMONDS; MA WISE

185

Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) could become an instrumental part of a future carbon trading system in the US. If the US starts operating an emissions trading scheme (ETS) similar to that of the European Union's then limits on CO{sub 2} emissions will be conservative in the beginning stages. The government will most likely start by distributing most credits for free; these free credits are called allowances. The US may follow the model of the EU ETS, which during the first five-year phase distributed 95% of the credits for free, bringing that level down to 90% for the second five-year phase. As the number of free allowances declines, companies will be forced to purchase an increasing number of credits at government auction, or else obtain them from companies selling surplus credits. In addition to reducing the number of credits allocated for free, with each subsequent trading period the number of overall credits released into the market will decline in an effort to gradually reduce overall emissions. Companies may face financial difficulty as the value of credits continues to rise due to the reduction of the number of credits available in the market each trading period. Governments operating emissions trading systems face the challenge of achieving CO{sub 2} emissions targets without placing such a financial burden on their companies that the country's economy is markedly affected.

Hoversten, Shanna

2008-08-07

186

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-10-01

187

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan M. Capalbo

2006-01-01

188

Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO2 or CO2-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define to provide a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO2. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs byan order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

Karamalidis, Athanasios; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, Jacqueline A.; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2013-01-01

189

Trace metal source terms in carbon sequestration environments.  

PubMed

Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO(2) or CO(2)-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO(2). Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality. PMID:23215015

Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Torres, Sharon G; Hakala, J Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J; Carroll, Susan

2013-01-01

190

Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising, however, possible CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2}-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define trace metal source terms from the reaction of supercritical CO{sub 2}, storage reservoir brines, reservoir and cap rocks. Storage reservoir source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, basalts and cements from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin – Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution is tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g. pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments due to the presence of CO{sub 2}. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rock exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the reservoir and caprock source term to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

Karamalidis, Athanasios K.; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan

2013-01-01

191

Soil carbon sequestration via cover crops- A meta-analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Agricultural soils are depleted in soil organic carbon (SOC) and have thus a huge potential to sequester SOC. This can primarily be achieved by increasing carbon inputs into the soil. Replacing winter fallows by cover crop cultivation for green manure has many benefits for the soil and forms an additional carbon input. An increase in carbon concentration has been reported in several studies worldwide. However, the effect on SOC stocks, as well as the influence of environmental parameters and management on SOC dynamics is not known. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to investigate those issues. A total of 33 studies, comprising 47 sites and 147 plots were compiled. A pedotransfer function was used to estimate bulk densities and calculate SOC stocks. SOC stock change was found to be a linear function of time since introduction, with an annual sequestration rate of 0.32 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. Since no saturation was visible in the observations, we used the model RothC to estimate a new steady state level and the resulting total SOC stock change for an artificial "average cropland". The total average SOC stock change with an annual input of 1.87 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 was 16.76 Mg C ha-1 for the average soil depth of 22 cm. We estimated a potential global SOC sequestration of 0.12±0.03 Pg C yr-1, which would compensate for 8 % of the direct annual greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture.

Poeplau, Christopher; Don, Axel

2014-05-01

192

Phylogenetic variation of phytolith carbon sequestration in bamboos  

PubMed Central

Phytoliths, the amorphous silica deposited in plant tissues, can occlude organic carbon (phytolith-occluded carbon, PhytOC) during their formation and play a significant role in the global carbon balance. This study explored phylogenetic variation of phytolith carbon sequestration in bamboos. The phytolith content in bamboo varied substantially from 4.28% to 16.42%, with the highest content in Sasa and the lowest in Chimonobambusa, Indocalamus and Acidosasa. The mean PhytOC production flux and rate in China's bamboo forests were 62.83?kg CO2 ha?1 y?1 and 4.5 × 108?kg CO2 y?1, respectively. This implies that 1.4 × 109?kg CO2 would be sequestered in world's bamboo phytoliths because the global bamboo distribution area is about three to four times higher than China's bamboo. Therefore, both increasing the bamboo area and selecting high phytolith-content bamboo species would increase the sequestration of atmospheric CO2 within bamboo phytoliths.

Li, Beilei; Song, Zhaoliang; Li, Zimin; Wang, Hailong; Gui, Renyi; Song, Ruisheng

2014-01-01

193

Phylogenetic variation of phytolith carbon sequestration in bamboos.  

PubMed

Phytoliths, the amorphous silica deposited in plant tissues, can occlude organic carbon (phytolith-occluded carbon, PhytOC) during their formation and play a significant role in the global carbon balance. This study explored phylogenetic variation of phytolith carbon sequestration in bamboos. The phytolith content in bamboo varied substantially from 4.28% to 16.42%, with the highest content in Sasa and the lowest in Chimonobambusa, Indocalamus and Acidosasa. The mean PhytOC production flux and rate in China's bamboo forests were 62.83?kg CO2 ha(-1) y(-1) and 4.5 × 10(8?)kg CO2 y(-1), respectively. This implies that 1.4 × 10(9)?kg CO2 would be sequestered in world's bamboo phytoliths because the global bamboo distribution area is about three to four times higher than China's bamboo. Therefore, both increasing the bamboo area and selecting high phytolith-content bamboo species would increase the sequestration of atmospheric CO2 within bamboo phytoliths. PMID:24736571

Li, Beilei; Song, Zhaoliang; Li, Zimin; Wang, Hailong; Gui, Renyi; Song, Ruisheng

2014-01-01

194

A Holocene record of climate-driven shifts in coastal carbon sequestration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A sediment core collected in the mesohaline portion of Chesapeake Bay was found to contain periods of increased delivery of refractory black carbon (BC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The BC was most likely produced by biomass combustion during four centennialscale dry periods as indicated by the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), beginning in the late Medieval Warm Period of 1100 CE. In contrast, wetter periods were associated with increased non-BC organic matter influx into the bay, likely due to greater runoff and associated nutrient delivery. In addition, an overall increase in both BC and non-BC organic matter deposition during the past millennium may reflect a shift in climate regime. The finding that carbon sequestration in the coastal zone responds to climate fluctuations at both centennial and millennial scales through fire occurrence and nutrient delivery has implications for past and future climate predictions. Drought-induced fires may lead, on longer timescales, to greater carbon sequestration and, therefore, represent a negative climate feedback. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

Mitra, S.; Zimmerman, A. R.; Hunsinger, G. B.; Willard, D.; Dunn, J. C.

2009-01-01

195

Evaluating Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Options for Virginia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Changes in forest and agricultural land management practices have the potential to increase carbon (C) storage by terrestrial systems, thus offsetting C emissions to the atmosphere from energy production. This study assesses that potential for three terrestrial management practices within the state of Virginia, USA: afforestation of marginal agricultural lands; afforestation of riparian agricultural lands; and changing tillage practices for row crops; each was evaluated on a statewide basis and for seven regions within the state. Lands eligible for each practice were identified, and the C storage potential of each practice on those lands was estimated through a modeling procedure that utilized land-resource characteristics represented in Geographic Information System databases. Marginal agricultural lands’ afforestation was found to have the greatest potential (1.4 Tg C yr-1, on average, over the first 20 years) if applied on all eligible lands, followed by riparian afforestation (0.2 Tg C yr-1 over 20 years) and tillage conversion (0.1 Tg C yr-1 over 14 years). The regions with the largest potentials are the Ridge and Valley of western Virginia (due to extensive areas of steep, shallow soils) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain in eastern Virginia (wet soils). Although widespread and rapid implementation of the three modeled practices could be expected to offset only about 3.4% of Virginia’s energy-related CO2 emissions over the following 20 years (equivalent to about 8.5% of a Kyoto Treaty-based target), they could contribute to achievement of C-management goals if implemented along with other mitigation measures.

Galang, Jeffrey S.; Zipper, Carl E.; Prisley, Stephen P.; Galbraith, John M.; Donovan, Patricia F.

2007-02-01

196

Biogeologic Carbon Sequestration - a Cost-Effective Proposal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon sequestration has been proposed as a strategy for reducing the impact of carbon dioxide emissions from burning of fossil fuels. There are two main routes: 1) capture CO2 emissions from power plants or other large point sources followed by some form of "burial/sequestration", and 2) extraction of CO2 from the ambient atmosphere (involving substantial concentration relative to atmospheric levels) also followed by burial/sequestration. In either case the goal is to achieve significant long-term isolation of CO2 at an economically sustainable price, perhaps measured by some "market price" for CO2, such as the European carbon futures market, where the price is now (2/3/09) about 14-15/tonne of CO2. The second approach, removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, has the potential benefit of reversing the previous buildup of atmospheric CO2, and perhaps even providing a means to "adjust" terrestrial climate by regulating atmospheric CO2 concentrations. For the present, ideas of planetary "geo-engineering" are not as popular as reducing the impact of continued CO2 emissions. In fact, the energy and capital costs of extraction from a dilute atmosphere appear to make this approach uneconomical. Proposals to fertilize the open ocean suffer from concerns about long term ecosystem effects, to say nothing of a lack of verifiability. There is, however, an approach using biological systems that can not only extract significant amounts of CO2, but can do so cost-effectively. Lakes are known in which primary productivity approaches or exceeds 1gm C/cm2-yr. This equates to removal of 35,000 tonnes of CO2 per km2 per year, with a "market value" of about 500,000/yr. Such productivity only occurs under highly eutrophic conditions, and presumably requires significant nutrient additions. As such it would be unthinkable to pursue this technique on a large scale in extant lakes. If, however, it is possible to produce one or more large artificial lakes under acceptable conditions it is conceivable that this approach to carbon sequestration could prove invaluable in both the near and long term.

Shaw, G. H.; Kuhns, R.

2009-05-01

197

Carbon sequestration, biological diversity, and sustainable development: Integrated forest management  

SciTech Connect

Tropical deforestation provides a significant contribution to anthropogenic increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration that may lead to global warming. Forestation and other forest management options to sequester CO2 in the tropical latitudes may fail unless they address local economic, social, environmental, and political needs of people in the developing world. Forest management is discussed in terms of three objectives: carbon sequestration; sustainable development; and biodiversity conservation. An integrated forest management strategy of land-use planning is proposed to achieve these objectives, and is centered around: preservation of primary forests; intensified use of non-timber resources; agroforestry, and selective use of plantation forestry.

Cairns, M.A.; Meganck, R.A.

1994-01-01

198

Carbon sequestration, biological diversity, and sustainable development: Integrated forest management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tropical deforestation provides a significant contribution to anthropogenic increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration that may lead to global warming. Forestation and other forest management options to sequester CO2 in the tropical latitudes may fail unless they address local economic, social, environmental, and political needs of people in the developing world. Forest management is discussed in terms of three objectives: carbon sequestration, sustainable development, and biodiversity conservation. An integrated forest management strategy of land-use planning is proposed to achieve these objectives and is centered around: preservation of primary forest, intensified use of nontimber resources, agroforestry, and selective use of plantation forestry.

Cairns, Michael A.; Meganck, Richard A.

1994-01-01

199

Unstable Diffusion Layers: Laboratory Experiments on Carbon Sequestration Phenomena  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sequestration of carbon dioxide in aqueous porous media involves a process where the initial formation of diffusion layers subsequently becomes unstable with respect to fingering. We will present experimental examples of this transient growth process from mass diffusion to fingering instability using a pair of fluids that mimic the behavior of carbon dioxide and salt water (brine), namely water and propylene glycol. In this experiment, performed in a Hele-Shaw cell, the permeability is adjusted by the plate thickness, the porosity is unity, and the Rayleigh number depends on the cell height. The diffusion layer and the fingers are visualized using optical shadowgraph techniques. We obtain the time evolution of the selected pattern wavelength, the distribution and scaling of the plume velocities, and the mass transfer rates for Ra in the range 5000 to 90,000 and for permeabilities in the range 5-20 x10-5cm^2. Comparisons with linear stability calculations and implications for carbon sequestration are discussed.

Ecke, Robert; Backhaus, Scott; Turitsyn, Konstantin

2010-11-01

200

CO? sequestration through mineral carbonation of iron oxyhydroxides.  

PubMed

Carbon dioxide sequestration via the use of sulfide reductants and mineral carbonation of the iron oxyhydroxide polymorphs lepidocrocite, goethite, and akaganeite with supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) was investigated using in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The exposure of the different iron oxyhydroxides to aqueous sulfide in contact with scCO(2) at ?70-100 °C resulted in the partial transformation of the minerals to siderite (FeCO(3)) and sulfide phases such as pyrite (FeS(2)). The relative yield of siderite to iron sulfide bearing mineral product was a strong function of the initial sulfide concentration. The order of mineral reactivity with regard to the amount of siderite formation in the scCO(2)/sulfide environment for a specific reaction time was goethite < lepidocrocite ? akaganeite. Given the presence of goethite in sedimentary formations, this conversion reaction may have relevance to the subsurface sequestration and geologic storage of carbon dioxide. PMID:22066460

Lammers, Kristin; Murphy, Riley; Riendeau, Amber; Smirnov, Alexander; Schoonen, Martin A A; Strongin, Daniel R

2011-12-15

201

Biomineralization of Hydromagnesite and its Application in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A collection of highly alkaline wetlands, which exist as part of the hydromagnesite playas near Atlin, British Columbia, contain extensive microbial mats associated with carbonate deposition. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy has demonstrated that cyanobacteria catalyze the precipitation of hydromagnesite from magnesium-rich waters in this system. In addition, hydromagnesite was also precipitated in laboratory experiments using cyanobacterial enrichments from this field site and filter-sterilized natural waters. Within biofilms dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria, rosettes and flakey globular aggregates of hydromagnesite were precipitated while abiotic controls produced less carbonate in the form of nesquehonite. This precipitation experiment is analogous to the magnesium carbonates that precipitate within the hydromagnesite wetland. Carbonate crusts that form on the water surface are composed primarily of nesquehonite and form due to evaporation. In contrast, the microbial mats that cover the wetland floor are mostly composed of hydromagnesite. The experimental evidence conclusively demonstrates that cyanobacteria precipitate hydromagnesite and have played a significant role in the development of this natural environment. Consequently, Atlin provides a natural model for developing a passive carbon dioxide sequestration process by which ultramafic rock is weathered and re-precipitated as magnesium carbonates with the aid of cyanobacteria in a wetland environment. This biogeochemical process represents an important link between the biosphere and the inorganic carbon pool within the global carbon dioxide budget.

Power, I.; Wilson, S.; Dipple, G.; Southam, G.

2005-12-01

202

Comparison of Carbon Dioxide Solubility Models in Brine for Use in Carbon Sequestration Reservoir Estimates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon sequestration into deep geological formations, such as saline formations and oil and gas fields, is a promising method to mitigate global warming. Estimating carbon dioxide solubility (TPX) in brine under carbon sequestration conditions with high temperature, pressure and salinity is crucial in choosing suitable carbon sequestration reservoirs and determining the carbon dioxide storage capacity of each. Multiple mathematical models are available for predicting the solubility of CO2 in brine. Although comparisons of each model with a particular experimental data set collected under certain TPX conditions have been published by the model developers, few studies have been done to compare these models using a comprehensive experimental data set and rigorous statistical methods. In this study, available CO2 solubility experimental data and nine mathematical models for the prediction of CO2 solubility in brine were collected. Five of these predictive models are empirical or semi-empirical and the remainders are based on different equations of state. Statistical criteria, such as the AIC and BIC were employed to determine the goodness of fit of each mathematical model with the CO2 solubility experimental data set. Results of this analysis determine the best mathematical predictive model for the calculation of carbon dioxide solubility under carbon sequestration conditions. Preliminary analysis shows that simplified models with fewer variables perform equally well with those having more. The study also presents a quantitative approach to determine the best CO2 solubility predictive model through use of a regression tree.

Karamalidis, A.; Wang, Z.; Small, M.; Dilmore, R. M.; Goodman, A. L.

2011-12-01

203

Carbonization of biomass - an efficient tool to decrease the emission of CO2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper presents the results and analysis of biomass processing in order to provide the conditions for the most profitable use of the biomass in modern and efficient power generation systems with particular attention put on the decrease of the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) and no need to develop carbon capture and storage plants. The promising concept of CO2 storage via the production of biochar and the advantages of its application as a promising carbon sink is also presented and the results are supported by authors' own experimental data. The idea enables the production of electricity, as well as (optionally) heat and cold from the thermal treatment of biomass with simultaneous storage of the CO2 in a stable and environmentally-friendly way. The key part of the process is run in a specially-designed reactor where the biomass is heated up in the absence of oxygen. The evolved volatile matter is used to produce heat/cold and electricity while the remaining solid product (almost completely dry residue) is sequestrated in soil. The results indicate that in order to reduce the emission of CO2 the biomass should rather be `cut and char' than just `cut and burn', particularly that the charred biomass may also become a significant source of nutrients for the plants after sequestration in soil.

Koby?ecki, Rafa?; ?cis?owska, Mariola; Bis, Zbigniew

2013-09-01

204

Sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) using red mud.  

PubMed

Red mud, an aluminium industry hazardous waste, has been reported to be an inexpensive and effective adsorbent. In the present work applicability of red mud for the sequestration of green house gases with reference to carbon dioxide has been studied. Red mud sample was separated into three different size fractions (RM I, RM II, RM III) of varying densities (1.5-2.2 g cm(-3)). Carbonation of each fraction of red mud was carried out separately at room temperature using a stainless steel reaction chamber at a fixed pressure of 3.5 bar. Effects of reaction time (0.5-12 h) and liquid to solid ratio (0.2-0.6) were studied for carbonation of red mud. Different instrumental techniques such as X-ray diffraction, FTIR and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to ascertain the different mineral phases before and after carbonation of each fraction of red mud. Characterization studies revealed the presence of boehmite, cancrinite, chantalite, hematite, gibbsite, anatase, rutile and quartz. Calcium bearing mineral phases (cancrinite and chantalite) were found responsible for carbonation of red mud. Maximum carbonation was observed for the fraction RM II having higher concentration of cancrinite. The carbonation capacity is evaluated to be 5.3 g of CO(2)/100 g of RM II. PMID:20036053

Yadav, Vishwajeet S; Prasad, Murari; Khan, Jeeshan; Amritphale, S S; Singh, M; Raju, C B

2010-04-15

205

Maximum principle for a size-structured model of forest and carbon sequestration management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper analyzes nonlinear optimal control of integral-differential equations that describe the optimal management of a forest taking into account intra-species competition and carbon sequestration. The objective function includes the revenues from timber production, operational expenses, and the net benefits from carbon sequestration. A dual system is derived and a necessary extremum condition is established. c 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All

Natali Hritonenko; Yuri Yatsenko; Renan-Ulrich Goetz; Angels Xabadia

206

Carbon sequestration in the U.S. forest sector from 1990 to 2010  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forest inventory data supplemented with data from intensive research sites and models were used to estimate carbon stocks and sequestration rates in U.S. forests, including effects of land use change. Data on the production of wood products and emission from decomposition were used to estimate carbon stocks and sequestration rates in wood products and landfills. From 1990 through 2005, the

Peter B. Woodbury; James E. Smith; Linda S. Heath

2007-01-01

207

Policy Instruments in Integrating Biodiversity Cons ervation and Carbon Sequestration as a Part of Forest Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon sequestration and biodiversity conservation are both public goods that are under international governance. This paper outlines one p ossible policy instrument for the integration of carbon sequestration and biodiversity, which encour ages private forest owners to change their behaviour with respect to forest management. The id ea is that private forest owners are introduced by voluntary agreements on less

Anssi Ahtikoski; Eriika Melkas; Paula Horne; Kai Kokko

208

Development of a Carbon Sequestration Visualization Tool using Google Earth Pro  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership seeks to prepare organizations throughout the western United States for a possible carbon-constrained economy. Through the development of CO2 capture and subsurface sequestration technology, the Partnership is working to enable the region to cleanly utilize its abundant fossil energy resources. The intent of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Big Sky Visualization tool is to

G. N. Keating; M. K. Greene

2008-01-01

209

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES TASK 4, BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Biomass derived energy currently accounts for about 3 quads of total primary energy use in the United States. Of this amount, about 0.8 quads are used for power generation. Several biomass energy production technologies exist today which contribute to this energy mix. Biomass combustion technologies have been the dominant source of biomass energy production, both historically and during the past two decades of expansion of modern biomass energy in the U. S. and Europe. As a research and development activity, biomass gasification has usually been the major emphasis as a method of more efficiently utilizing the energy potential of biomass, particularly wood. Numerous biomass gasification technologies exist today in various stages of development. Some are simple systems, while others employ a high degree of integration for maximum energy utilization. The purpose of this study is to conduct a technical and economic comparison of up to three biomass gasification technologies, including the carbon dioxide emissions reduction potential of each. To accomplish this, a literature search was first conducted to determine which technologies were most promising based on a specific set of criteria. During this reporting period, the technical and economic performances of the selected processes were evaluated using computer models and available literature. The results of these evaluations are summarized in this report.

Martha L. Rollins; Les Reardon; David Nichols; Patrick Lee; Millicent Moore; Mike Crim; Robert Luttrell; Evan Hughes

2002-04-01

210

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

PubMed Central

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has been proposed as a means to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions with the continued use of fossil fuels. For geologic sequestration, the carbon dioxide is captured from large point sources (e.g., power plants or other industrial sources), transported to the injection site and injected into deep geological formations for storage. This will produce new water challenges, such as the amount of water used in energy resource development and utilization and the “capture penalty” for water use. At depth, brine displacement within formations, storage reservoir pressure increases resulting from injection, and leakage are potential concerns. Potential impacts range from increasing water demand for capture to contamination of groundwater through leakage or brine displacement. Understanding these potential impacts and the conditions under which they arise informs the design and implementation of appropriate monitoring and controls, important both for assurance of environmental safety and for accounting purposes. Potential benefits also exist, such as co-production and treatment of water to both offset reservoir pressure increase and to provide local water for beneficial use.

Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01

211

Lithological control on phytolith carbon sequestration in moso bamboo forests.  

PubMed

Phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) is a stable carbon (C) fraction that has effects on long-term global C balance. Here, we report the phytolith and PhytOC accumulation in moso bamboo leaves developed on four types of parent materials. The results show that PhytOC content of moso bamboo varies with parent material in the order of granodiorite (2.0 g kg(-1)) > granite (1.6 g kg(-1)) > basalt (1.3 g kg(-1)) > shale (0.7 g kg(-1)). PhytOC production flux of moso bamboo on four types of parent materials varies significantly from 1.0 to 64.8 kg CO? ha(-1) yr(-1), thus a net 4.7 × 10(6) -310.8 × 10(6) kg CO? yr(-1) would be sequestered by moso bamboo phytoliths in China. The phytolith C sequestration rate in moso bamboo of China will continue to increase in the following decades due to nationwide bamboo afforestation/reforestation, demonstrating the potential of bamboo in regulating terrestrial C balance. Management practices such as afforestation of bamboo in granodiorite area and granodiorite powder amendment may further enhance phytolith C sequestration through bamboo plants. PMID:24918576

Li, Beilei; Song, Zhaoliang; Wang, Hailong; Li, Zimin; Jiang, Peikun; Zhou, Guomo

2014-01-01

212

Predicting and Evaluating the Effectiveness of Ocean Carbon Sequestration by Direct Injection  

SciTech Connect

Direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the ocean is a potentially effective carbon sequestration strategy. Therefore, we want to understand the effectiveness of oceanic injection and develop the appropriate analytic framework to allow us to compare the effectiveness of this strategy with other carbon management options. Here, after a brief review of direct oceanic injection, we estimate the effectiveness of ocean carbon sequestration using one dimensional and three dimensional ocean models. We discuss a new measure of effectiveness of carbon sequestration in a leaky reservoir, which we denote sequestration potential. The sequestration potential is the fraction of global warning cost avoided by sequestration in a reservoir. We show how these measures apply to permanent sequestration and sequestration in leaky reservoirs, such as the oceans, terrestrial biosphere, and some geologic formations. Under the assumptions of a constant cost of carbon emission and a 4% discount rate, injecting 900 m deep in the ocean avoids {approx}90% of the global warming cost associated with atmospheric emission; an injection 1700 m deep would avoid > 99 % of the global warming cost. Hence, for discount rates in the range commonly used by commercial enterprises, oceanic direct injection may be nearly as economically effective as permanent sequestration at avoiding global warming costs.

Caldeira, K; Herzog, H J; Wickett, M E

2001-04-24

213

The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects  

SciTech Connect

Geologic carbon sequestration is the injection of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} into deep geologic formations where the CO{sub 2} is intended to remain indefinitely. If successfully implemented, geologic carbon sequestration will have little or no impact on terrestrial ecosystems aside from the mitigation of climate change. However, failure of a geologic carbon sequestration site, such as large-scale leakage of CO{sub 2} into a potable groundwater aquifer, could cause impacts that would require costly remediation measures. Governments are attempting to develop regulations for permitting geologic carbon sequestration sites to ensure their safety and effectiveness. At present, these regulations focus largely on decreasing the probability of failure. In this paper we propose that regulations for the siting of early geologic carbon sequestration projects should emphasize limiting the consequences of failure because consequences are easier to quantify than failure probability.

Price, P.N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

2009-02-23

214

Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery: Identifying Candidate Sites for Pilot Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Depleted natural gas reservoirs are promising targets for carbon dioxide sequestration. Although depleted, these reservoirs are not devoid of methane, and carbon dioxide injection may allow enhanced production of methane by reservoir repressurization or p...

C. M. Oldenburg S. M. Benson

2001-01-01

215

Comparing carbon sequestration potential of pyrogenic carbon from natural and anthropogenic sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The enhanced resistance to environmental degradation of Pyrogenic Carbon (PyC), both produced in wildfires (charcoal), and man-made (biochar), gives it the potential to sequester carbon by preventing it to be released into the atmosphere. Sustainable addition of biochar to soils is seen as a viable global approach for carbon sequestration and climate change mitigation. Also the role of its 'natural counterpart', i.e. wildfire charcoal, as a long-term carbon sink in soils is widely recognized. However, in spite of their fundamental similarities, research on the potential of 'man-made' biochar and wildfire charcoal for carbon sequestration has been carried out essentially in isolation as analogous materials for accurate comparison are not easily available. Here we assess the carbon sequestration potential of man-made biochar and wildfire charcoal generated from the same material under known production conditions: (i) charcoal from forest floor and down wood produced during an experimental boreal forest fire (FireSmart, June 2012, NWT- Canada) and (ii) biochar produced from the same feedstock by slow pyrolysis [three treatments: 2 h at 350, 500 and 650°C, respectively]. The carbon sequestration potential of these PyC materials is given by the recalcitrance index, R50, proposed by Harvey et al. (2012). R50 is based on the relative thermal stability of a given PyC material to that of graphite and is calculated using thermogravimetric analyses. Our results show highest R50 for PyC materials produced from down wood than from forest floor, which points to the importance of feedstock chemical composition in determining the C sequestration potential of PyC both from natural (charcoal) and anthropogenic (biochar) sources. Moreover, production temperature is also a major factor affecting the carbon sequestration potential of the studied PyC materials, with higher R50 for PyC produced at higher temperatures. Further investigation on the similarities and differences between man-made biochar and wildfire charcoal is needed to elucidate the potential of knowledge transferability of PyC characteristics between the biochar and the wildfire research communities. Reference: Harvey et al. (2012) An index-based approach to assessing recalcitrance and soil carbon sequestration potential of engineered Black Carbons (Biochars). Environmental Science & Technology 46:1415-1421.

Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan; Merino, Augustin

2014-05-01

216

Above ground woody community attributes, biomass and carbon stocks along a rainfall gradient in the savannas of the central lowveld, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enumeration of carbon stocks at benchmark sites is a necessary activity in assessing the potential carbon sequestration and possible generation of credits through restoration of intensively impacted sites. However, there is a lack of empirical studies throughout much of the savannas of sub-Saharan Africa, including South Africa. We report an estimation of species specific and site biomass and carbon stocks,

C. M. Shackleton; R. J. Scholes

2011-01-01

217

A National Disturbance Modeling System to Support Ecological Carbon Sequestration Assessments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is prototyping a methodology to fulfill requirements of Section 712 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. At the core of the EISA requirements is the development of a methodology to complete a two-year assessment of current carbon stocks and other greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes, and potential increases for ecological carbon sequestration under a range of future climate changes, land-use / land-cover configurations, and policy, economic and management scenarios. Disturbances, especially fire, affect vegetation dynamics and ecosystem processes, and can also introduce substantial uncertainty and risk to the efficacy of long-term carbon sequestration strategies. Thus, the potential impacts of disturbances need to be considered under different scenarios. As part of USGS efforts to meet EISA requirements, we developed the National Disturbance Modeling System (NDMS) using a series of statistical and process-based simulation models. NDMS produces spatially-explicit forecasts of future disturbance locations and severity, and the resulting effects on vegetation dynamics. NDMS is embedded within the Forecasting Scenarios of Future Land Cover (FORE-SCE) model and informs the General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS) for quantifying carbon stocks and GHG fluxes. For fires, NDMS relies on existing disturbance histories, such as the Landsat derived Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) and Vegetation Change Tracker (VCT) data being used to update LANDFIRE fuels data. The MTBS and VCT data are used to parameterize models predicting the number and size of fires in relation to climate, land-use/land-cover change, and socioeconomic variables. The locations of individual fire ignitions are determined by an ignition probability surface and then FARSITE is used to simulate fire spread in response to weather, fuels, and topography. Following the fire spread simulations, a burn severity model is used to determine annual changes in biomass pools. Vegetation succession among LANDFIRE vegetation types is initiated using burn perimeter and severity data at the end of each annual simulation. Results from NDMS are used to update land-use/land-cover layers used by FORE-SCE and also transferred to GEMS for quantifying and updating carbon stocks and greenhouse gas fluxes. In this presentation, we present: 1) an overview of NDMS and its role in USGS's national ecological carbon sequestration assessment; 2) validation of NDMS using historic data; and 3) initial forecasts of disturbances for the southeastern United States and their impacts on greenhouse gas emissions, and post-fire carbon stocks and fluxes.

Hawbaker, T. J.; Rollins, M. G.; Volegmann, J. E.; Shi, H.; Sohl, T. L.

2009-12-01

218

Air-sea disequilibrium of carbon dioxide enhances the biological carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sinking and subduction of organic material removes carbon from the surface ocean and stores it in inorganic form after remineralization. The wind-driven upwelling of deep waters, notably in the Southern Ocean, counteracts the biological carbon sequestration by returning excess carbon from the abyss, potentially releasing it back to the atmosphere. Numerical models have shown that significant fraction of the excess carbon in the Antarctic Surface Water is not degassed to the atmosphere but reenters into the deep ocean due to the incomplete air-sea equilibration, effectively increasing the efficiency of biological carbon storage in the deep ocean. We develop a simple theory to consider the controls on this effect. The theory predicts a strong coupling between biological carbon sequestration and air-sea disequilibrium expressed as a linear relationship between the biological carbon pump and the degree of supersaturation in the deep ocean. Sensitivity experiments with a three-dimensional ocean biogeochemistry model support this prediction and demonstrate that the disequilibrium pump almost doubles the efficiency of biological carbon sequestration, relative to the effect of nutrient utilization.

Ito, Takamitsu; Follows, Michael J.

2013-12-01

219

Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep-sea basalt  

PubMed Central

Developing a method for secure sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in geological formations is one of our most pressing global scientific problems. Injection into deep-sea basalt formations provides unique and significant advantages over other potential geological storage options, including (i) vast reservoir capacities sufficient to accommodate centuries-long U.S. production of fossil fuel CO2 at locations within pipeline distances to populated areas and CO2 sources along the U.S. west coast; (ii) sufficiently closed water-rock circulation pathways for the chemical reaction of CO2 with basalt to produce stable and nontoxic (Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+)CO3 infilling minerals, and (iii) significant risk reduction for post-injection leakage by geological, gravitational, and hydrate-trapping mechanisms. CO2 sequestration in established sediment-covered basalt aquifers on the Juan de Fuca plate offer promising locations to securely accommodate more than a century of future U.S. emissions, warranting energized scientific research, technological assessment, and economic evaluation to establish a viable pilot injection program in the future.

Goldberg, David S.; Takahashi, Taro; Slagle, Angela L.

2008-01-01

220

Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep-sea basalt.  

PubMed

Developing a method for secure sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in geological formations is one of our most pressing global scientific problems. Injection into deep-sea basalt formations provides unique and significant advantages over other potential geological storage options, including (i) vast reservoir capacities sufficient to accommodate centuries-long U.S. production of fossil fuel CO2 at locations within pipeline distances to populated areas and CO2 sources along the U.S. west coast; (ii) sufficiently closed water-rock circulation pathways for the chemical reaction of CO2 with basalt to produce stable and nontoxic (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+))CO(3) infilling minerals, and (iii) significant risk reduction for post-injection leakage by geological, gravitational, and hydrate-trapping mechanisms. CO2 sequestration in established sediment-covered basalt aquifers on the Juan de Fuca plate offer promising locations to securely accommodate more than a century of future U.S. emissions, warranting energized scientific research, technological assessment, and economic evaluation to establish a viable pilot injection program in the future. PMID:18626013

Goldberg, David S; Takahashi, Taro; Slagle, Angela L

2008-07-22

221

Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration with Biochar: A Preliminary Assessment of its Global Potential  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biochar technology involves the capture of CO2 from the atmosphere by photosynthesis and its ultimate conversion to biochar by pyrolysis. Energy is obtained during the pyrolysis process and the charcoal, or biochar, which is considerably more stable than biomass, may then be incorporated into agricultural lands where it serves to increase the nutrient- and water-holding capacity of soil. With an estimated half-life in soil on the order of centuries to millenia, biochar offers a way of safely storing C for long periods of time while enhancing the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. Moreover, biochar technology, like other biomass conversion approaches that include C sequestration options, offers a way to decrease the levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. That is, biochar technology is one of the few inherently "carbon-negative" sources of energy. These positive attributes are of little consequence, however, if the total contribution to sequestration is small compared to the need. In this paper, we provide a preliminary assessment of the potential contribution of biochar technology to the mitigation of climate change, and identify some research needs. Currently, the atmospheric C levels are increasing by about 4.1 Gt/yr, with 7.2 Gt/yr being put into the atmosphere by fossil fuel combustion and cement production, and 3.1 Gt/yr being removed from the atmosphere by the ocean (2.2 Gt/yr) and terrestrial processes (0.9 Gt/yr). The uptake by terrestrial processes can be increased significantly by management of the 60.6 Gt/yr of biomass C that is fixed by photosynthesis (i.e., net primary productivity), of which 59 Gt/yr is decomposed and 1.6 Gt/yr combusted. Biomass pyrolysis converts about 50% of the biomass C to char. Of the other 50% that is converted to bio-oil and bio-gas, the net energy production is about 62% efficient. Thus, pyrolysis of 1 Gt of biomass C would provide energy equivalent to about 0.3 Gt of fossil C and could be used to offset that amount of fossil C, while sequestering 0.5 Gt as biochar. Of the 60.6 Gt/yr of biomass that is fixed in usable form, we estimate that perhaps 10% of it (6.1 Gt/yr) could become available in one form or another (crop and forestry residues, and animal waste) for pyrolysis. This level of pyrolysis would offset 1.8 Gt/yr of fossil C, and sequester 3.0 Gt/yr as biochar, enough to halt the increase and actually decrease the level of atmospheric C by 0.7 Gt/yr. Even at half this level (i.e., 5% of annually fixed biomass), pyrolysis would be sufficient to decrease the global C cycle imbalance by 2.4 Gt/yr and in combination with other sequestration options help to achieve the minimum goal of C neutrality. Clearly, the potential contribution of biochar technology is large, perhaps large enough to mitigate climate change alone. However, this preliminary assessment is tempered by several unknowns. Research is needed to further define the impacts of biochar amendments on soil biota, productivity, and greenhouse gas production. For example, there is some evidence that N2O and CH4 production is decreased by biochar amendments, but the mechanisms responsible are unknown. The impact of different types of biochar and pyrolysis conditions also needs to be determined. Lastly, total accounting for greenhouse gas emissions coupled with economic analyses to determine the economic potential of the technology under various scenarios is essential.

Amonette, J.; Lehmann, J.; Joseph, S.

2007-12-01

222

Soil Carbon Sequestration Impacts on Global Climate Change and Food Security  

Microsoft Academic Search

The carbon sink capacity of the world's agricultural and degraded soils is 50 to 66% of the historic carbon loss of 42 to 78 gigatons of carbon. The rate of soil organic carbon sequestration with adoption of recommended technologies depends on soil texture and structure, rainfall, temperature, farming system, and soil management. Strategies to increase the soil carbon pool include

R. Lal

2004-01-01

223

Quantifying the Carbon Intensity of Biomass Energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Regulatory agencies at the national and regional level have recognized the importance of quantitative information about greenhouse gas emissions from biomass used in transportation fuels or in electricity generation. For example, in the recently enacted California Low-Carbon Fuel Standard, the California Air Resources Board conducted a comprehensive study to determine an appropriate methodology for setting carbon intensities for biomass-derived transportation fuels. Furthermore, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently conducting a multi-year review to develop a methodology for estimating biogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from stationary sources. Our study develops and explores a methodology to compute carbon emission intensities (CIs) per unit of biomass energy, which is a metric that could be used to inform future policy development exercises. To compute CIs for biomass, we use the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), which is an integrated assessment model that represents global energy, agriculture, land and physical climate systems with regional, sectoral, and technological detail. The GCAM land use and land cover component includes both managed and unmanaged land cover categories such as food crop production, forest products, and various non-commercial land uses, and it is subdivided into 151 global land regions (wiki.umd.edu/gcam), ten of which are located in the U.S. To illustrate a range of values for different biomass resources, we use GCAM to compute CIs for a variety of biomass crops grown in different land regions of the U.S. We investigate differences in emissions for biomass crops such as switchgrass, miscanthus and willow. Specifically, we use GCAM to compute global carbon emissions from the land use change caused by a marginal increase in the amount of biomass crop grown in a specific model region. Thus, we are able to explore how land use change emissions vary by the type and location of biomass crop grown in the U.S. Direct emissions occur when biomass production used for energy displaces land used for food crops, forest products, pasture, or other arable land in the same region. Indirect emissions occur when increased food crop production, compensating for displaced food crop production in the biomass production region, displaces land in regions outside of the region of biomass production. Initial results from this study suggest that indirect land use emissions, mainly from converting unmanaged forest land, are likely to be as important as direct land use emissions in determining the carbon intensity of biomass energy. Finally, we value the emissions of a marginal unit of biomass production for a given carbon price path and a range of assumed social discount rates. We also compare the cost of bioenergy emissions as valued by a hypothetical private actor to the relevant cost of emissions from conventional fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas.

Hodson, E. L.; Wise, M.; Clarke, L.; McJeon, H.; Mignone, B.

2012-12-01

224

Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema

Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

225

Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema

Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

DePaolo, Don [Director, LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2011-06-08

226

Testing carbon sequestration site monitor instruments using a controlled carbon dioxide release facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two laser-based instruments for carbon sequestration site monitoring have been developed and tested at a controlled carbon dioxide CO2 release facility. The first instrument uses a temperature tunable distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser capable of accessing the 2.0027-2.0042 m spectral region that contains three CO2 absorption lines and is used for aboveground atmospheric CO2 concentration mea- surements. The second instrument

Seth D. Humphries; Amin R. Nehrir; Charlie J. Keith; Kevin S. Repasky; Laura M. Dobeck; John L. Carlsten; Lee H. Spangler

2008-01-01

227

Stuffing Carbon Away: Mechanisms of Carbon Sequestration in Soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soils offer the potential to sequester large quantities of carbon from the atmosphere for decades to millennia and so may ameliorate the anthropogenic influence of fossil fuel release. However changes in climate can drastically affect the soil's ability to store carbon through changes mineralogy on time scales of human interest. It is essential to understand the major controls on soil

P J Reimer; C A Masiello; J R Southon; S E Trumbore; J W Harden; A F White; O A Chadwick; M S Torn

2003-01-01

228

Potential and cost of carbon sequestration in the Tanzanian forest sector  

SciTech Connect

The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $ 7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

Makundi, Willy R.

2001-01-01

229

Perceptions of Utah ranchers toward carbon sequestration: policy implications for US rangelands.  

PubMed

Enhanced carbon sequestration is one means to mitigate climate change. Rangelands are arid and semi-arid lands, typified by relatively low and variable levels of net primary productivity, where carbon sequestration might be increased via alterations in land management. Rangelands are vast in size and dominate the land area in the western US and worldwide. It has been estimated that privately owned rangelands in the US could sequester an additional 60 million tons of carbon annually, roughly equal to five percent of the US annual CO(2) emissions. Ranchers are the target population that could implement changes in rangeland management to promote carbon sequestration, but little is known about how they might receive such programs. Therefore, for Utah, we conducted a combined mail and telephone survey of 495 randomly selected ranchers to assess their knowledge of and attitude toward carbon sequestration, possible benefits of carbon sequestration as perceived by ranchers, and factors influencing their likelihood of participating in carbon sequestration programs. Overall, despite that 70 percent of respondents had little or no self-reported knowledge about carbon sequestration, 63 percent had negative views about it. Ranchers reporting the most knowledge also tended to have the most negative attitudes. The least important benefit that might accrue to ranchers from carbon sequestration was seen as climate change mitigation, while the most important benefit was improved land stewardship. Only four percent of respondents indicated an unconditional willingness to participate in carbon sequestration programs, but 71 percent could be interested depending on new information received. Before carbon sequestration programs are developed for rangelands, further research is needed to clarify why more knowledge of carbon sequestration can lead to greater skepticism of relevant programs. We respect this finding, as it may be based on well-founded rancher concerns such as technical or administrative efficacy. If such concerns can be overcome, extension efforts should be tailored to emphasize the ecological merits of carbon sequestration for rangeland management, which will facilitate the ability of ranchers to achieve their personal goals. PMID:22831793

Ma, Zhao; Coppock, D Layne

2012-11-30

230

Soil Carbon Storage in Christmas Tree Farms: Maximizing Ecosystem Management and Sustainability for Carbon Sequestration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Management of agroecosystems for the purpose of manipulating soil carbon stocks could be a viable approach for countering rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, while maximizing sustainability of the agroforestry industry. We investigated the carbon storage potential of Christmas tree farms in the southern Appalachian mountains as a potential model for the impacts of land management on soil carbon. We quantified soil carbon stocks across a gradient of cultivation duration and herbicide management. We compared soil carbon in farms to that in adjacent pastures and native forests that represent a control group to account for variability in other soil-forming factors. We partitioned tree farm soil carbon into fractions delineated by stability, an important determinant of long-term sequestration potential. Soil carbon stocks in the intermediate pool are significantly greater in the tree farms under cultivation for longer periods of time than in the younger tree farms. This pool can be quite large, yet has the ability to repond to biological environmental changes on the centennial time scale. Pasture soil carbon was significantly greater than both forest and tree farm soil carbon, which were not different from each other. These data can help inform land management and soil carbon sequestration strategies.

Chapman, S. K.; Shaw, R.; Langley, A.

2008-12-01

231

Potential and economics of forestry options for carbon sequestration in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a need to understand the carbon (C) sequestration potential of the forestry option and its financial implications for each country.In India the C emissions from deforestation are estimated to be nearly offset by C sequestration in forests under succession and tree plantations. India has nearly succeeded in stabilizing the area under forests and has adequate forest conservation strategies.

N. H. Ravindranath; B. S. Somashekhar

1995-01-01

232

Carbon sequestration potential of soils in southeast Germany derived from stable soil organic carbon saturation.  

PubMed

Sequestration of atmospheric carbon (C) in soils through improved management of forest and agricultural land is considered to have high potential for global CO2 mitigation. However, the potential of soils to sequester soil organic carbon (SOC) in a stable form, which is limited by the stabilization of SOC against microbial mineralization, is largely unknown. In this study, we estimated the C sequestration potential of soils in southeast Germany by calculating the potential SOC saturation of silt and clay particles according to Hassink [Plant and Soil 191 (1997) 77] on the basis of 516 soil profiles. The determination of the current SOC content of silt and clay fractions for major soil units and land uses allowed an estimation of the C saturation deficit corresponding to the long-term C sequestration potential. The results showed that cropland soils have a low level of C saturation of around 50% and could store considerable amounts of additional SOC. A relatively high C sequestration potential was also determined for grassland soils. In contrast, forest soils had a low C sequestration potential as they were almost C saturated. A high proportion of sites with a high degree of apparent oversaturation revealed that in acidic, coarse-textured soils the relation to silt and clay is not suitable to estimate the stable C saturation. A strong correlation of the C saturation deficit with temperature and precipitation allowed a spatial estimation of the C sequestration potential for Bavaria. In total, about 395 Mt CO2 -equivalents could theoretically be stored in A horizons of cultivated soils - four times the annual emission of greenhouse gases in Bavaria. Although achieving the entire estimated C storage capacity is unrealistic, improved management of cultivated land could contribute significantly to CO2 mitigation. Moreover, increasing SOC stocks have additional benefits with respect to enhanced soil fertility and agricultural productivity. PMID:24038905

Wiesmeier, Martin; Hübner, Rico; Spörlein, Peter; Geuß, Uwe; Hangen, Edzard; Reischl, Arthur; Schilling, Bernd; von Lützow, Margit; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

2014-02-01

233

RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of precipitation where sequestration begins to decrease.

Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

2012-03-31

234

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio. (Report for October 1, 2005-31 December 2005).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOC...

M. K. Shukla K. Lorenz R. Lal

2006-01-01

235

Carbon sequestration via aqueous olivine mineral carbonation: role of passivating layer formation.  

PubMed

CO2 sequestration via carbonation of widely available low-cost minerals, such as olivine, can permanently dispose of CO2 in an environmentally benign and a geologically stable form. We report the results of studies of the mechanisms that limit aqueous olivine carbonation reactivity under the optimum sequestration reaction conditions observed to date: 1 M NaCl + 0.64 M NaHCO3 at Te 185 degrees C and P(CO2) approximately equal to 135 bar. A reaction limiting silica-rich passivating layer (PL) forms on the feedstock grains, slowing carbonate formation and raising process cost. The morphology and composition of the passivating layers are investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and atomic level modeling. Postreaction analysis of feedstock particles, recovered from stirred autoclave experiments at 1500 rpm, provides unequivocal evidence of local mechanical removal (chipping) of PL material, suggesting particle abrasion. This is corroborated by our observation that carbonation increases dramatically with solid particle concentration in stirred experiments. Multiphase hydrodynamic calculations are combined with experimentto better understand the associated slurry-flow effects. Large-scale atomic-level simulations of the reaction zone suggest that the PL possesses a "glassy" but highly defective SiO2 structure that can permit diffusion of key reactants. Mitigating passivating layer effectiveness is critical to enhancing carbonation and lowering sequestration process cost. PMID:16913142

Béarat, Hamdallah; McKelvy, Michael J; Chizmeshya, Andrew V G; Gormley, Deirdre; Nunez, Ryan; Carpenter, R W; Squires, Kyle; Wolf, George H

2006-08-01

236

Crop residue and tillage effects on carbon sequestration in a Luvisol in central Ohio  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soils play a key role in the global carbon cycle. They can be a source or a sink of carbon and influence CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. In order to calculate the carbon budget of a region, the effect of soil management practices on carbon sequestration in soils needs to be quantified. Objectives of this experiment were to determine: (i)

S. W Duiker; R Lal

1999-01-01

237

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio  

SciTech Connect

Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOC in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed in 1994 (R94-F), in 1987 (R87-G), in 1982 (R82-F), in 1978 (R78-G), in 1969 (R69-F), in1956 (R56-G), and from the unmined control (UMS-G). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and three under forest cover since reclamation. The samples were air dried and fractionated using a wet sieving technique into macro (> 2.0 mm), meso (0.25-2.0 mm) and microaggregates (0.053-0.25 mm). The soil C and N concentrations were determined by the dry combustion method on these aggregate fractions. Soil C and N concentrations were higher at the forest sites compared to the grass sites in each aggregate fraction for both depths. Statistical analyses indicated that the number of random samples taken was probably not sufficient to properly consider distribution of SOC and TN concentrations in aggregate size fractions for both depths at each site. Erosional effects on SOC and TN concentrations were, however, small. With increasing time since reclamation, SOC and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations also increased. The higher C and N concentrations in each aggregate size fraction in older than the newly reclaimed sites demonstrated the C sink capacity of newer sites.

M.K. Shukla; K. Lorenz; R. Lal

2006-01-01

238

Soil carbon dynamics and potential carbon sequestration by rangelands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The USA has about 336 Mha of grazing lands of which rangelands account for 48%. Changes in rangeland soil C can occur in response to a wide range of management and environmental factors. Grazing, fire, and fertilization have been shown to affect soil C storage in rangelands, as has converting marginal croplands into grasslands. Carbon losses due to soil erosion

G. E Schuman; H. H Janzen; J. E Herrick

2002-01-01

239

Measurement of carbon for carbon sequestration and site monitoring  

SciTech Connect

A 2 to 6 degree C increase in global temperature by 2050 has been predicted due to the production of greenhouse gases that is directly linked to human activities. This has encouraged an increase in the international efforts on ways to reduce anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases particularly carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as evidence for the link between atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate change has been established. Suggestion that soils and vegetation could be managed to increase their uptake and storage of CO{sub 2}, and thus become 'land carbon sinks' is an incentive for scientists to undertake the ability to measure and quantify the carbon in soils and vegetation to establish base-line quantities present at this time. The verification of the permanence of these carbon sinks has raised some concern regarding the accuracy of their long-term existence. Out of the total percentage of carbon that is potentially sequestered in the terrestrial land mass, only 25% of that is sequestered above ground and almost 75% is hypothesized to be sequestered underground. Soil is composed of solids, liquids, and gases which is similar to a three-phase system. The gross chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) consists of 65% humic substances that are amorphous, dark-colored, complex, polyelectrolyte-like materials that range in molecular weight from a few hundred to several thousand Daltons. The very complex structure of humic and fulvic acid makes it difficult to obtain a spectral signature for all soils in general. The humic acids of different soils have been observed to have polymeric structure, appearing as rings, chains and clusters as seen in electron microscope observations. The humification processes of the soils will decide the sizes of their macromolecules that range from 60-500 angstroms. The percentage of the humus that occurs in the light brown soils is much lower than the humus present in dark brown soils. The humus of forest soils is characterized by a high content of fulvic acids while the humus of peat and grassland soils is high in humic acids. Similarly it is well known that the amount of carbon present in forest soils is lower than the amount present in grassland soils.

Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

2007-01-01

240

Carbon Capture and Sequestration: A Regulatory Gap Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Though a potentially significant climate change mitigation strategy, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) remains mired in demonstration and development rather than proceeding to full-scale commercialization. Prior studies have suggested numerous reasons for this stagnation. This Report seeks to empirically assess those claims. Using an anonymous opinion survey completed by over 200 individuals involved in CCS, it concludes that there are four primary barriers to CCS commercialization: (1) cost, (2) lack of a carbon price, (3) liability risks, and (4) lack of a comprehensive regulatory regime. These results largely confirm previous work. They also, however, expose a key barrier that prior studies have overlooked: the need for comprehensive, rather than piecemeal, CCS regulation. The survey data clearly show that the CCS community sees this as one of the most needed incentives for CCS deployment. The community also has a relatively clear idea of what that regulation should entail: a cooperative federalism approach that directly addresses liability concerns and that generally does not upset traditional lines of federal-state authority.

Lincoln Davies; Kirsten Uchitel; John Ruple; Heather Tanana

2012-04-30

241

Measuring and Monitoring Soil Carbon Sequestration at the Project Level  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the status of soil carbon sequestration (SCS) and discusses methods for measuring and monitoring carbon changes in agricultural and grassland soils. The topics reviewed include: soil sampling, analysis, models and remote sensing. Significant scientific and technological advances in the area of SCS have been achieved during the last 15 years. A number of feasibility or pilot projects are underway worldwide under a variety of environmental and socioeconomic situations. To further advance the field of SCS, more projects like these will have to be implemented in order to develop an internationally-accepted and adaptable framework that can guide landowner, energy, and government groups in the development of SCS projects. The formation of a collaborative network for this type of SCS projects can be very helpful to compare the methodologies in use across diverse environments and to exchange data for laboratory quality controls and verification of simulation models among other purposes. These projects will also be useful to advance new methodologies that integrate many of the novel concepts discussed in the previous sections as well as many yet to be discovered.

Izaurralde, R Cesar C.

2005-05-26

242

Predictable and efficient carbon sequestration in the North Pacific Ocean supported by symbiotic nitrogen fixation  

PubMed Central

The atmospheric and deep sea reservoirs of carbon dioxide are linked via physical, chemical, and biological processes. The last of these include photosynthesis, particle settling, and organic matter remineralization, and are collectively termed the “biological carbon pump.” Herein, we present results from a 13-y (1992–2004) sediment trap experiment conducted in the permanently oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre that document a large, rapid, and predictable summertime (July 15–August 15) pulse in particulate matter export to the deep sea (4,000 m). Peak daily fluxes of particulate matter during the summer export pulse (SEP) average 408, 283, 24.1, 1.1, and 67.5 ?mol·m?2·d?1 for total carbon, organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus (PP), and biogenic silica, respectively. The SEP is approximately threefold greater than mean wintertime particle fluxes and fuels more efficient carbon sequestration because of low remineralization during downward transit that leads to elevated total carbon/PP and organic carbon/PP particle stoichiometry (371:1 and 250:1, respectively). Our long-term observations suggest that seasonal changes in the microbial assemblage, namely, summertime increases in the biomass and productivity of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria in association with diatoms, are the main cause of the prominent SEP. The recurrent SEP is enigmatic because it is focused in time despite the absence of any obvious predictable stimulus or habitat condition. We hypothesize that changes in day length (photoperiodism) may be an important environmental cue to initiate aggregation and subsequent export of organic matter to the deep sea.

Karl, David M.; Church, Matthew J.; Dore, John E.; Letelier, Ricardo M.; Mahaffey, Claire

2012-01-01

243

Carbon Sequestration In Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio (Report for October 1, 2003-December 31. 2007).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research project was aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of RMS and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, ...

K. Lorenz R. Lal

2008-01-01

244

CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND LAND MANAGEMENT AT DOD INSTALLATIONS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

This report explores the influence of management practices such as tree harvesting, deforestation, and reforestation on carbon sequestration potential by DOD forests by performing a detailed analysis of a specific installation, Camp Shelby, Mississippi. amp Shelby was selected fo...

245

75 FR 33613 - Notice of the Carbon Sequestration-Geothermal Energy-Science Joint Workshop  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DOE Geothermal Technologies Program, Office of Science- Geosciences Program and Office of Fossil Energy-Carbon Sequestration...labs, and State and Federal geological surveys will discuss geosciences research needs for subsurface reservoir...

2010-06-14

246

Predicting and Evaluating the Effectiveness of Ocean Carbon Sequestration by Direct Injection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Direct injection of CO2, into the ocean is a potentially effective carbon sequestration strategy. Therefore, we want to understand the effectiveness of oceanic injection and develop the appropriate analytic framework to allow us to compare the effectivene...

K. Caldeira H. J. Herzog M. E. Wickett

2001-01-01

247

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership. (Quarterly Report, April 1, 2005-June 30, 2005).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under...

S. M. Capalbo

2005-01-01

248

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) (Semi-Annual Report, April 1, 2004-September 30, 2004.)  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first year of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (third and fourth quarter) of the project...

K. J. Nemeth

2004-01-01

249

The impact of logging on biodiversity and carbon sequestration in tropical forests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tropical deforestation is one of the most relevant environmental issues at planetary scale. Forest clearcutting has dramatic effect on local biodiversity, on the terrestrial carbon sink and atmospheric GHGs balance. In terms of protection of tropical forests selective logging is, instead, often regarded as a minor or even positive management practice for the ecosystem and it is supported by international certifications. However, few studies are available on changes in the structure, biodiversity and ecosystem services due to the selective logging of African forests. This paper presents the results of a survey on tropical forests of West and Central Africa, with a comparison of long-term dynamics, structure, biodiversity and ecosystem services (such as the carbon sequestration) of different types of forests, from virgin primary to selectively logged and secondary forest. Our study suggests that there is a persistent effect of selective logging on biodiversity and carbon stock losses in the long term (up to 30 years since logging) and after repeated logging. These effects, in terms of species richness and biomass, are greater than the expected losses from commercial harvesting, implying that selective logging in West and Central Africa is impairing long term (at least until 30 years) ecosystem structure and services. A longer selective logging cycle (>30 years) should be considered by logging companies although there is not yet enough information to consider this practice sustainable.

Cazzolla Gatti, R.

2012-04-01

250

Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System  

SciTech Connect

While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration with Mitsubishi Corporation, has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) focused on carbon capture and sequestration opportunities in the United States. The GIS system contains information (e.g., fuel type, location, vintage, ownership, rated capacity) on all fossil-fired generation capacity in the Untied States with a rated capacity of at least 100 MW. There are also data on other CO2 sources (i.e., natural domes, gas processing plants, etc.) and associated pipelines currently serving enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. Data on current and prospective CO2 EOR projects include location, operator, reservoir and oil characteristics, production, and CO2 source. The system also contains information on priority deep saline aquifers and coal bed methane basins with potential for sequestering CO2. The GIS application not only enables data storage, flexible map making, and visualization capabilities, but also facilitates the spatial analyses required to solve complex linking of CO2 sources with appropriate and cost-effective sinks. A variety of screening criteria (spatial, geophysical, and economic) can be employed to identify sources and sinks most likely amenable to deployment of carbon capture and sequestration systems. The system is easily updateable, allowing it to stay on the leading edge of capture and sequestration technology as well as the ever-changing business landscape. Our paper and presentation will describe the development of this GIS and demonstrate its uses for carbon management analysis.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; Brown, Daryl R.; Mizoguchi, Akiyoshi; Shiozaki, Mai

2001-04-03

251

Maximum principle for a size-structured model of forest and carbon sequestration management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The paper analyzes nonlinear optimal control of integral?differential equations that describe the optimal management,of a forest taking into account intra-species competition and carbon sequestration. The objective function includes the revenues from timber production, operational expenses, and the net benefits from carbon sequestration. A dual system is derived and a necessary extremum,condition is established. c 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

Natali Hritonenko; Yuri Yatsenko; Renan-ulrich Goetz; Angels Xabadia

2008-01-01

252

Development of a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rising levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Earth's atmosphere have been identified as a major contributor to climate change. Geologic carbon sequestration has the potential for mitigating CO2 emission into the atmosphere by capturing CO2 at power generation facilities and storing the CO2 in geologic formations. Several technological challenges need to be overcome for successful geologic sequestration of CO2

W. Johnson; A. Bares; A. R. Nehrir; K. S. Repasky; J. Carlsten

2010-01-01

253

The NatCarb geoportal: Linking distributed data from the Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships are generating the data for a "carbon atlas" of key geospatial data (carbon sources, potential sinks, etc.) required for rapid implementation of carbon sequestration on a broad scale. The NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb) provides Web-based, nation-wide data access. Distributed computing solutions link partnerships and other publicly accessible repositories of geological, geophysical, natural resource, infrastructure, and environmental data. Data are maintained and enhanced locally, but assembled and accessed through a single geoportal. NatCarb, as a first attempt at a national carbon cyberinfrastructure (NCCI), assembles the data required to address technical and policy challenges of carbon capture and storage. We present a path forward to design and implement a comprehensive and successful NCCI. ?? 2007 The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

Carr, T. R.; Rich, P. M.; Bartley, J. D.

2007-01-01

254

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED MINED SOILS OF OHIO  

SciTech Connect

This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed mine soils (RMS). Experimental sites characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoil were identified. These sites are owned by Americal Electrical Power and are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. The sites chosen were: (1) reclaimed without topsoil application (three under forest and three under continuous grass cover), (2) reclaimed with topsoil application (three under forest and three under continuous grass cover) and (3) unmined sites (one under forest and another grass cover). Soil samples were collected from 0 to 15 cm and 15 to 30 cm depths from each of the experimental site under continuous grass and SOC and, total nitrogen (TN) concentration, pH and electrical conductivity (EC) were determined. The results of the study for the quarter (30 September to 31 December, 2003) showed that soil pH was > 5.5 and EC < 4 dS m{sup -1} for all sites and depths and therefore favorable for grass growth. Among the three reclamation treatments, SOC concentration increased from 1.9 g kg{sup -1} for site reclaimed in 2003 (newly reclaimed and at baseline) to 11.64 g kg{sup -1} for site reclaimed in 1987 (a 5-fold increase) to 20.41 g kg{sup -1} for sites reclaimed in 1978 (a 10- fold increase). However, for sites reclaimed without topsoil application, soil pH, EC, SOC and TN concentrations were similar for both depths. The SOC concentrations in reclaimed sites with topsoil application in 0 to 15 cm depth increased from a base value of 0.7 g kg{sup -1} at the rate of 0.76 g kg{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The high SOC concentration for 0-15 cm layer for site reclaimed in 1978 showed the high carbon sequestration potential upon reclamation and establishment of the grass cover on minesoils.

M. K. Shukla; R. Lal

2004-01-01

255

Model Computations on Sequestration of Carbon in Managed Forests and Wood Products under Changing Climatic Conditions in Finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to assess the effects of forest management on carbon sequestration in forests and wood products by using a gap-type forest model interfaced with a wood product model. The assessment is based on total carbon sequestration, i.e. the amount of carbon left in vegetation, litter, soil organic matter and products when the flows of carbon

Timo Karjalainen

1996-01-01

256

A spatial resolution threshold of land cover in estimating terrestrial carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in carbon density (i.e., carbon stock per unit area) and land cover greatly affect carbon sequestration. Previous studies have shown that land cover change detection strongly depends on spatial scale. However, the influence of the spatial resolution of land cover change information on the estimated terrestrial carbon sequestration is not known. Here, we quantified and evaluated the impact of

S. Q. Zhao; S. Liu; Z. Li; T. L. Sohl

2010-01-01

257

Mineral sequestration of carbon dioxide in peridotitic and basaltic rocks using seawater for carbonation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In-situ mineral sequestration requires huge volumes of water for carbonation of CO2 which is injected as one fluid phase into the appropriate reactive subsurface for subsequent mineralization. The amount of water needed to dissolve one ton of CO2 is about 27 tons at 25 bar partial pressure and 25 ° C (Gislason et al., 2010). The CarbFix pilot injection project

Domenik Wolff-Boenisch; Stefan Wenau; Sigurdur Gislason

2010-01-01

258

Carbon sequestration in deep ploughed Luvisols and Podzols of Northern Germany  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on carbon sequestration in arable soils up to now has mainly focused on reduced and no-tillage systems even though the effects on soil carbon stocks are marginal. This study addresses the long-term effects of deep ploughing. We are sampling five Luvisols and five Podzols under agriculture as well as five Podzols under forest in Northern Germany, which were deep ploughed (50 to 90 cm depth) in the 1960s. Adjacent equally managed, but conventionally ploughed (approx. 30 cm depth) subplots are used as a reference respectively. At each site two subplots of 20 by 40 meters, we collect samples from different depths of a soil profile (down to 1.5 meter depth) after digging a pit. Additionally, five composite core samples down to 1 meter depth randomly distributed over the field subplot are collected. Soil bulk density, gravel fraction as well as organic and inorganic carbon content will be determined to calculate organic C stocks. First results from an arable loess soil (Haplic Luvisol) near Salzgitter, which was ploughed to 90 cm depth in 1966, show a mean C stock of 82,5 Mg ha-1 in the deep ploughed subplot compared to 65,9 Mg ha-1 in the reference subplot. This is equal to a long-term increase of 30% in soil organic carbon due to deep ploughing, which is several times higher than the effects of reduced ploughing or no-tillage. Moreover, we will conduct incubation experiments to determine soil respiration and microbial biomass via substrate induced respiration in order to elucidate the stability of the buried carbon. Further analysis will address the stabilization mechanisms of the buried soil organic matter including pH measurements, soil texture analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy to quantify pedogenic iron and aluminum oxides, cation-exchange capacity, C density fractionation and radiocarbon dating. We will present data from the first sampling campaigns and discuss their implications for our view on subsoil carbon stability.

Alcántara, Viridiana; Don, Axel; Nieder, Rolf; Well, Reinhard

2014-05-01

259

Can recent increases in forest biomass be translated into long-term carbon storage?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The biomass of forests across the globe is rapidly increasing in the past decades. The rates of biomass accumulations over years/decades are much higher than those derived from long-term chronosequences, which has been taken as the evidence of elevated carbon sink in responses to increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate change. But there is a gap between increases in forest biomass over a short-term and the biomass carbon sequestration for a long period of time in a stochastic dynamic system like forests characterized by 'slow in - fast out' processes, because the disturbances happened at century time scales may erase the accumulated biomass over decades. According to our mathematical analysis, in such a system, the short-term biomass accumulation rate should be always higher than that at long-term scale. It is unknown that how many short-term increases in biomass can be translated into long-term trends at given disturbance regimes. In this paper, we derived an analytical model linking the short-term biomass increase to long-term biomass accumulation at given disturbance regimes. And, based on the analytical solutions of this model, we analyzed the chronosequence and time series biomass data of the temperate forests of Northeastern America obtained from literature and forest inventory (FIA data). Our results show the current biomass increase rates cannot maintain statistically significant higher trends of biomass accumulation than those derived from chronosequences (i.e., historic long-term rates) at current disturbance regimes. And, the potential of carbon storage in live biomass doesn't increase over past decade due to increasing mortality rates in the forests with high biomass. If disturbances become more frequent and severe as predicted by other studies, forest carbon storage will be reduced in the future. This analysis suggests that the temperate forests in Northeastern America will not store so much carbon as expected based on the trends of increasing biomass in recent decades if the disturbances are not controlled at a very low frequency or severity.

Weng, E.; Pacala, S. W.

2013-12-01

260

Mobilization of Trace Metals in an Experimental Carbon Sequestration Scenario  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mobilizing trace metals with injection of supercritical CO2 into deep saline aquifers is a concern for geologic carbon sequestration. The potential for leakage from these systems requires an understanding of how injection reservoirs interact with the overlying potable aquifers. Hydrothermal experiments were performed to evaluate metal mobilization and mechanisms of release in a carbonate storage reservoir and at the caprock-reservoir boundary. Experiments react synthetic Desert Creek limestone and/or Gothic Shale, formations in the Paradox Basin, Utah, with brine that is close to equilibrium with these rocks. A reaction temperature of 1600C accelerates the reaction kinetics without changing in-situ water-rock reactions. The experiments were allowed to reach steady state before injecting CO2. Changes in major and trace element water chemistry, dissolved carbon and sulfide, and pH were tracked throughout the experiments. CO2 injection decreases the pH by 1 to 2 units; concomitant mineral dissolution produces elevated Ba, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn concentrations in the brine. Concentrations subsequently decrease to approximately steady state values after 120-330 hours, likely due to mineral precipitation as seen in SEM images and predicted by geochemical modeling. In experiments that emulate the caprock-reservoir boundary, final Fe (0.7ppb), an element of secondary concern for the EPA, and Pb (0.05ppb) concentrations exceed EPA limits, whereas Ba (0.140ppb), Cu (48ppb), and Zn (433ppb) values remain below EPA limits. In experiments that simulate deeper reservoir conditions, away from the caprock boundary, final Fe (3.5ppb) and Pb (0.017ppb) values indicate less mobilization than seen at the caprock-reservoir boundary, but values still exceed EPA limits. Barium concentrations always remain below the EPA limit of 2ppb, but are more readily mobilized in experiments replicating deeper reservoir conditions. In both systems, transition elements Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn behave in a similar manner, increasing in concentration with injection but continually decreasing after about 830 hours until termination of the experiment. SEM images and geochemical models indicate initial dissolution of all rocks and minerals, re-precipitation of Ca-Mg-Fe carbonates and Fe-sulfides, and precipitation of anhydrite in both systems. Calcite dissolves more readily than dolomite in these experiments, but re-precipitates in veins on dolomite. If brines leak from a storage reservoir and mix with a potable aquifer, the experimental results suggest that Ba, Cu, and Zn will not be contaminants of concern. Pb, Fe and As (still under consideration) initially exceed the EPA threshold and may require careful attention in a sequestration scenario. However, experimentally observed trends of decreasing trace metal concentration suggest that these metals could become less of a concern during the life of a carbon repository. Finally, the caprock plays an active role in trace metal mobilization in the system. The caprock provides a source of metals, although subsequent precipitation may remove metals from solution.

Marcon, V.; Kaszuba, J. P.

2012-12-01

261

Submicron structures provide preferential spots for carbon and nitrogen sequestration in soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sequestration of carbon and nitrogen by clay-sized particles in soils is well established, and clay content or mineral surface area has been used to estimate the sequestration potential of soils. Here, via incubation of a sieved (<2?mm) topsoil with labelled litter, we find that only some of the clay-sized surfaces bind organic matter (OM). Surprisingly, <19% of the visible mineral areas show an OM attachment. OM is preferentially associated with organo-mineral clusters with rough surfaces. By combining nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry and isotopic tracing, we distinguish between new labelled and pre-existing OM and show that new OM is preferentially attached to already present organo-mineral clusters. These results, which provide evidence that only a limited proportion of the clay-sized surfaces contribute to OM sequestration, revolutionize our view of carbon sequestration in soils and the widely used carbon saturation estimates.

Vogel, Cordula; Mueller, Carsten W.; Höschen, Carmen; Buegger, Franz; Heister, Katja; Schulz, Stefanie; Schloter, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

2014-01-01

262

Black Carbon Production in Open Biomass Combustion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reduction in the quantity of forest fuel accumulating in regions prone to wildfires by using fuel reduction burns not only reduces damage to natural resources and habitats (when wildfires subsequently occur), but also provides a mean to generate black carbon of various particle sizes. These include sizes capable of entering the soil matrix and/or undergoing erosion and subsequent deposition in sedimentary sinks. Black carbon represents a compact form of carbon capable of offsetting an equivalent quantity of contemporary fossil carbon released as CO2. Black carbon, provided it is not consumed as a fuel, may serve this purpose for a considerable period in relation to that of our consumption of fossil fuels. Little is presently known of the extent of natural black carbon production in such biomass combustion and it is clearly beneficial to acquire such knowledge and, where possible, to adjust land management practices to enhance this production. This contribution presents the outcomes of an exploratory experiment devised to enable, insofar as possible, (i) a material balance to estimate the yield of black carbon from a small-scale burning of typical forest litter, (ii) identify the primary factors controlling yield (iii) and develop an experimental programme to provide data contributing to the objective of improved model estimates of the black carbon component in the global carbon cycle.

Bryant, R.; Doerr, S. H.; Santin, C.

2012-04-01

263

Contribution of Do?ana Wetlands to Carbon Sequestration  

PubMed Central

Inland and transitional aquatic systems play an important role in global carbon (C) cycling. Yet, the C dynamics of wetlands and floodplains are poorly defined and field data is scarce. Air-water fluxes in the wetlands of Doñana Natural Area (SW Spain) were examined by measuring alkalinity, pH and other physiochemical parameters in a range of water bodies during 2010–2011. Areal fluxes were calculated and, using remote sensing, an estimate of the contribution of aquatic habitats to gaseous transport was derived. Semi-permanent ponds adjacent to the large Guadalquivir estuary acted as mild sinks, whilst temporal wetlands were strong sources of (?0.8 and 36.3 ). Fluxes in semi-permanent streams and ponds changed seasonally; acting as sources in spring-winter and mild sinks in autumn (16.7 and ?1.2 ). Overall, Doñana's water bodies were a net annual source of (5.2 ). Up–scaling clarified the overwhelming contribution of seasonal flooding and allochthonous organic matter inputs in determining regional air-water gaseous transport (13.1 ). Nevertheless, this estimate is about 6 times < local marsh net primary production, suggesting the system acts as an annual net sink. Initial indications suggest longer hydroperiods may favour autochthonous C capture by phytoplankton. Direct anthropogenic impacts have reduced the hydroperiod in Doñana and this maybe exacerbated by climate change (less rainfall and more evaporation), suggesting potential for the modification of C sequestration.

Morris, Edward P.; Flecha, Susana; Figuerola, Jordi; Costas, Eduardo; Navarro, Gabriel; Ruiz, Javier; Rodriguez, Pablo; Huertas, Emma

2013-01-01

264

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. Safety and effectiveness are achieved if CO{sub 2} and displaced brine have no significant impact on humans, other living things, resources, or the environment. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO{sub 2} leakage risk which takes into account both the impact and probability of leakage. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) compartments to represent environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage, (3) CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in the compartments as proxies for impact to vulnerable entities, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated plume movements, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO{sub 2} plume with the conduits and compartments. We demonstrate the approach on a hypothetical GCS site in a Texas Gulf Coast saline formation. Through its generality and flexibility, the CF can contribute to the assessment of risk of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage as part of the certification process for licensing and permitting of GCS sites around the world regardless of the specific regulations in place in any given country.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

2009-01-15

265

Carbon Sequestration in Wetland Soils of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coastal Region  

EPA Science Inventory

Coastal wetlands play an important but complex role in the global carbon cycle, contributing to the ecosystem service of greenhouse gas regulation through carbon sequestration. Although coastal wetlands occupy a small percent of the total US land area, their potential for carbon...

266

Estimates of Carbon Sequestration and Storage in Tidal Coastal Wetlands Along the US East Coast  

EPA Science Inventory

Globally, salt marshes are reported to sequester carbon (210 g C m-2 y -1), and along with mangroves in the US, they are reported to account for 1?2 % of the carbon sink for the conterminous US. Using the published salt marsh carbon sequestration rate and National Wetland Invent...

267

The United States Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program: A collaborative approach to carbon management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) concept, which is a first attempt to bring the U.S. Deparment of Energy's (DOE) carbon sequestration program activities into the “real world” by using a geographically-disposed-system type approach for the U.S. Each regional partnership is unique and covers a unique section of the U.S. and is tasked with determining how the

John T. Litynski; Scott M. Klara; Howard G. McIlvried; Rameshwar D. Srivastava

2006-01-01

268

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2001-07-01

269

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-04-05

270

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2001-09-10

271

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2003-04-15

272

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-09-30

273

Calcium Carbonate Produced by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO2 through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids - single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate - to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2007-06-30

274

Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J. Fabry

2006-06-30

275

Optimizing root system architecture in biofuel crops for sustainable energy production and soil carbon sequestration  

PubMed Central

Root system architecture (RSA) describes the dynamic spatial configuration of different types and ages of roots in a plant, which allows adaptation to different environments. Modifications in RSA enhance agronomic traits in crops and have been implicated in soil organic carbon content. Together, these fundamental properties of RSA contribute to the net carbon balance and overall sustainability of biofuels. In this article, we will review recent data supporting carbon sequestration by biofuel crops, highlight current progress in studying RSA, and discuss future opportunities for optimizing RSA for biofuel production and soil carbon sequestration.

To, Jennifer PC; Zhu, Jinming; Benfey, Philip N

2010-01-01

276

Mercury in terrestrial biomass and soils and factors determining atmospheric mercury sequestration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terrestrial carbon (C) pools play an important role in uptake, deposition, sequestration, and emission of atmospheric mercury (Hg). The objective of this study is to assess atmospheric Hg sequestration associated with vegetation and soil C pools in forest ecosystems. As part of an ongoing EPA STAR project, we are systematically evaluating Hg pools and fluxes associated with terrestrial C pools in all major ecosystem compartments (i.e., leaves, branches, bole, litter, soils) across selected US forest ecosystems. Results from the first five sites located in the remote western United States show that the dominant above-ground pool of mercury is associated with surface litter with smaller pools associated with leaves and branches. Mass concentrations greatly increase in the following order: green leaves, dry leaves, initial litter, partially decomposed litter, humus. Based on detailed comparison of stochiometric relationships (e.g., Hg/C and Hg/N ratios) we conclude that these concentration increases are dominated by additional atmospheric deposition retained in the decomposing plant material while exposed to the environment rather than by organic C losses during decomposition. The large majority of total ecosystem mercury, up to 98 percent, however, is sequestered belowground in the soils. Soil Hg accumulation across all sites is greatly determined by the availability of organic matter in these systems, with soil C and soil N explaining more than 90 percent of the variability in observed soil Hg stocks. Our results suggest that the availability of soil organic matter is the main determinant for retention of atmospheric inputs in soils and hence in terrestrial ecosystems. Ecosystem structure and soil organic accumulation hence determine the resilience of Hg in terrestrial ecosystems with important implication for the stability and runoff of atmospheric Hg deposition to surrounding waterbodies.

Obrist, D.; Johnson, D. W.; Lindberg, S.; Luo, Y.

2008-12-01

277

Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns  

SciTech Connect

A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

Gary D. Kronrad

2006-09-19

278

Dynamics and climate change mitigation potential of soil organic carbon sequestration.  

PubMed

When assessing soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration and its climate change (CC) mitigation potential at global scale, the dynamic nature of soil carbon storage and interventions to foster it should be taken into account. Firstly, adoption of SOC-sequestration measures will take time, and reasonably such schemes could only be implemented gradually at large-scale. Secondly, if soils are managed as carbon sinks, then SOC will increase only over a limited time, up to the point when a new SOC equilibrium is reached. This paper combines these two processes and predicts potential SOC sequestration dynamics in agricultural land at global scale and the corresponding CC mitigation potential. Assuming that global governments would agree on a worldwide effort to gradually change land use practices towards turning agricultural soils into carbon sinks starting 2014, the projected 87-year (2014-2100) global SOC sequestration potential of agricultural land ranged between 31 and 64 Gt. This is equal to 1.9-3.9% of the SRES-A2 projected 87-year anthropogenic emissions. SOC sequestration would peak 2032-33, at that time reaching 4.3-8.9% of the projected annual SRES-A2 emission. About 30 years later the sequestration rate would have reduced by half. Thus, SOC sequestration is not a C wedge that could contribute increasingly to mitigating CC. Rather, the mitigation potential is limited, contributing very little to solving the climate problem of the coming decades. However, we deliberately did not elaborate on the importance of maintaining or increasing SOC for sustaining soil health, agro-ecosystem functioning and productivity; an issue of global significance that deserves proper consideration irrespectively of any potential additional sequestration of SOC. PMID:24929498

Sommer, Rolf; Bossio, Deborah

2014-11-01

279

Mineral sequestration of CO2 by aqueous carbonation of coal combustion fly-ash  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has led to concerns about global warming. A technology that could possibly contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions is the in-situ mineral sequestration (long term geological storage) or the ex-situ min- eral sequestration (controlled industrial reactors) of CO2. In the present study, we propose to use

G. Montes-Hernandez

280

U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Carbon Sequestration Assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of potential geological storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2) in consultation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and State geological surveys. To conduct the assessment, the USGS developed a probability-based assessment methodology that was extensively reviewed by experts from industry, government and university organizations (Brennan et al., 2010, http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2010/1127). The methodology is intended to be used at regional to sub-basinal scales and it identifies storage assessment units (SAUs) that are based on two depth categories below the surface (1) 3,000 to 13,000 ft (914 to 3,962 m), and (2) 13,000 ft (3,962 m) and greater. In the first category, the 3,000 ft (914 m) minimum depth of the storage reservoir ensures that CO2 is in a supercritical state to minimize the storage volume. The depth of 13,000 ft (3,962 m) represents maximum depths that are accessible with average injection pressures. The second category represents areas where a reservoir formation has potential storage at depths below 13,000 ft (3,962 m), although they are not accessible with average injection pressures; these are assessed as a separate SAU. SAUs are restricted to formation intervals that contain saline waters (total dissolved solids greater than 10,000 parts per million) to prevent contamination of protected ground water. Carbon dioxide sequestration capacity is estimated for buoyant and residual storage traps within the basins. For buoyant traps, CO2 is held in place in porous formations by top and lateral seals. For residual traps, CO2 is contained in porous formations as individual droplets held within pores by capillary forces. Preliminary geologic models have been developed to estimate CO2 storage capacity in approximately 40 major sedimentary basins within the United States. More than 200 SAUs have been identified within these basins. The results of the assessment are estimates of the technically accessible storage resources based on present-day geological and engineering technology related to CO2 injection into geologic formations; therefore the assessment is not of total in-place resources. Summary geologic descriptions of the evaluated basins and SAUs will be prepared, along with the national assessment results. During the coming year, these results will be released as USGS publications available from http://energy.usgs.gov. In support of these assessment activities, CO2 sequestration related research science is being conducted by members of the project. Results of our research will contribute to current and future CO2 storage assessments conducted by the USGS and other organizations. Research topics include: (a) geochemistry of CO2 interactions with subsurface environments; (b) subsurface petrophysical rock properties in relation to CO2 injection; (c) enhanced oil recovery and the potential for CO2 storage; (d) storage of CO2 in unconventional reservoirs (coal, shale, and basalt); (e) statistical aggregation of assessment results; and (f) potential risks of induced seismicity.

Warwick, P. D.; Blondes, M. S.; Brennan, S.; Corum, M.; Merrill, M. D.

2012-12-01

281

Large rate of uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide by planted forest biomass in Korea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Republic of Korea, henceforth referred to as Korea, has successfully implemented intensive programs of reforestation and forest management over the last 30 years to restore its once-rich forests. This nationwide effort has resulted in a massive accumulation of less than 30-year-old tree biomass, which now accounts for about 72% of the total forest biomass in Korea. Here we use a forest tree inventory data set for Korea to calculate the effectiveness of these planted trees in absorbing excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during the period 1954-2000. The forest carbon density in Korea has increased from 5-7 megagrams of carbon per hectare (Mg C ha-1, Mg = 106 grams) in the period 1955-1973 to more than 30 Mg C ha-1 in the late 1990s. The calculated carbon uptake has increased from a mean rate of 0.001 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C yr-1, Pg = 1015 grams) in the period 1955-1973 to as high as 0.012 Pg C yr-1 in recent years, largely due to the 30-year implementation of reforestation and forest management projects. The contemporary rate of carbon uptake by the total Korean tree biomass is approximately one-half of the 1994-1998 mean rate of carbon uptake by the total Chinese forest biomass of 0.026 Pg C yr-1 [, 2001]; the Chinese forest biomass has recently been found to be a significant carbon sink in northern temperate regions. The observed uptake rate for Korea is remarkably high, considering the fact that the total area of Korean forests is approximately 16 times smaller than that of Chinese forests. Our results show that long-term rates of carbon sequestration by nationwide forests can be increased substantially through reforestation and forest management.

Choi, Sung-Deuk; Lee, Kitack; Chang, Yoon-Seok

2002-12-01

282

Sediment deposits and organic carbon sequestration along mangrove coasts of the Leizhou Peninsula, southern China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mangroves are an important affecter of atmospheric CO2 level via sequestrating carbon and trapping sediments. However, their sequestrating effectiveness varies with vegetation development and sedimentation processes under site-specific hydrogeomorphic settings. In order to detect the determinants of organic carbon sequestration, this study investigated four mangrove fringing locations along the coast of the Leizhou Peninsula. Surface and core sediment samples were collected from these sites and analyzed for grain-size distribution, sedimentary organic carbon content (SOCC) and stable isotope signature (?13Corg). It is found that a significantly higher concentration and density of organic carbon were preserved in the interior surface sediments regardless of location or surface grain size distribution. The sedimentary environments, as indicated by core sediment analysis, are controlled under low-to moderately low-energy conditions. Fluvial action on these sedimentary environments decreases from the river dominated site to the tide dominated site. The more stable energy condition favored both sediment and organic carbon accumulation in the mudflat subzone. However, as revealed by ?13C signature, sedimentary organic carbon of the core samples from the four sites was dominantly derived from suspended particulate matter except the tide-dominated offshore core. Whereby, we conclude that vegetation provided control on the surface sedimentary organic carbon distribution via its influence onmangrove debris input and fluid energy condition over the intertidal surface, while hydrogeomorphology determined the long-term organic carbon burial via its impact on the local sedimentation accretion rate and the proportion of autogenous organic carbon sequestration.

Yang, Juan; Gao, Jay; Liu, Baolin; Zhang, Wei

2014-01-01

283

The Role of Carbon Capture, Sequestration and Emissions Trading in Achieving Short-Term Carbon Emissions Reductions  

SciTech Connect

The near- to mid-term deployment of carbon capture and sequestration technologies can accelerate the process of significantly reducing emissions of carbon dioxide under a wide range of policy scenarios and reduce significantly the costs of complying with a climate change mitigation protocol -- by as much as$1 trillion over the period 2005-2050. These carbon capture and sequestration technologies also allow the continued use of fossil fuels, while reducing their carbon emissions and keeping the cost of electricity generated from fossil fuels competitive with other generation technologies.

Dooley, James J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Kim, Son H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Runci, Paul J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); D. Williams

2001-08-10

284

Re-evaluation of forest biomass carbon stocks and lessons from the world's most carbon-dense forests  

PubMed Central

From analysis of published global site biomass data (n = 136) from primary forests, we discovered (i) the world's highest known total biomass carbon density (living plus dead) of 1,867 tonnes carbon per ha (average value from 13 sites) occurs in Australian temperate moist Eucalyptus regnans forests, and (ii) average values of the global site biomass data were higher for sampled temperate moist forests (n = 44) than for sampled tropical (n = 36) and boreal (n = 52) forests (n is number of sites per forest biome). Spatially averaged Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change biome default values are lower than our average site values for temperate moist forests, because the temperate biome contains a diversity of forest ecosystem types that support a range of mature carbon stocks or have a long land-use history with reduced carbon stocks. We describe a framework for identifying forests important for carbon storage based on the factors that account for high biomass carbon densities, including (i) relatively cool temperatures and moderately high precipitation producing rates of fast growth but slow decomposition, and (ii) older forests that are often multiaged and multilayered and have experienced minimal human disturbance. Our results are relevant to negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change regarding forest conservation, management, and restoration. Conserving forests with large stocks of biomass from deforestation and degradation avoids significant carbon emissions to the atmosphere, irrespective of the source country, and should be among allowable mitigation activities. Similarly, management that allows restoration of a forest's carbon sequestration potential also should be recognized.

Keith, Heather; Mackey, Brendan G.; Lindenmayer, David B.

2009-01-01

285

Fungal bioremediation of chromates: conformational changes of biomass during sequestration, binding, and reduction of hexavalent chromium ions.  

PubMed

This paper highlights the mechanistic aspects of white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor as a complexing/reducing agent for chromium bioremediation. The chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) via the formation of Cr(VI) thio ester as an intermediate, is pH dependent and controls the overall chromium adsorption kinetics. The strong adsorption affinity of the biomass towards Cr(VI) anions was evaluated by the Freundlich and the Langmuir adsorption isotherms. The FTIR spectroscopic analysis suggested the involvement of amino, carboxylate, and thiol groups from fungal cell wall in chromium binding and reduction. The mechanism of the adsorption was preferential sequestration along with binding of the metal to the ligating groups present in the biomass followed by reduction to trivalent state. The results indicate step-wise progression of overall reaction dictated and modulated by structural and conformation effects in the biomass that lead to saturation, acceleration, and ultimate saturation kinetics effects. PMID:19467785

Sanghi, Rashmi; Sankararamakrishnan, Nalini; Dave, Bakul C

2009-09-30

286

Impact on bacterial activities of ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide into bathypelagic layers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2), direct injection of CO2 into bathypelagic layers, is one of the climate change mitigation options. It is essential to assess the potential environmental impacts on the marine ecosystem. In bathypelagic layers, bacteria are dominant organisms and play significant roles in oceanic carbon cycling through utilization and transformation of organic matter. We performed laboratory

N. Yamada; M. Suzumura; N. Tsurushima; K. Harada

2008-01-01

287

CONSERVATION AND SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON: THE POTENTIAL OF FOREST AND AGROFOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

EPA Science Inventory

Forests play a major role in the Earth's carbon cycle through assimilation, storage, and emission of CO2. stablishment and management of boreal, temperate, and tropical forest and agroforest systems could potentially enhance sequestration of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. i...

288

Tillage and soil carbon sequestration—What do we really know?  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is widely believed that soil disturbance by tillage was a primary cause of the historical loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) in North America, and that substantial SOC sequestration can be accomplished by changing from conventional plowing to less intensive methods known as conservation tillage. This is based on experiments where changes in carbon storage have been estimated through

John M. Baker; Tyson E. Ochsner; Rodney T. Venterea; Timothy J. Griffis

2007-01-01

289

Possibilities for Future Carbon Sequestration in Canadian Agriculture in Relation to Land Use Changes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing carbon sequestration in agricultural soils in Canada is examined as a possible strategy in slowing or stopping the current increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Estimates are provided on the amount of carbon that could be sequestered in soils in various regions in Canada by reducing summerfallow area, increased use of forage crops, improved erosion control, shifts from conventional to

J. Dumanski; R. L. Desjardins; C. Tarnocai; C. Monreal; E. G. Gregorich; V. Kirkwood; C. A. Campbell

1998-01-01

290

Quantifying the impacts on biodiversity of policies for carbon sequestration in forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is currently a great deal of interest in the use of afforestation (conversion of non-forest land to forest) to reduce atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide. To date, economic analyses have focused on the costs of forest carbon sequestration policies related to foregone profits from agricultural production. No studies have examined additional costs or benefits associated with impacts on biodiversity.

Stephen Matthews; Raymond O'Connor; Andrew J. Plantinga

2002-01-01

291

Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools

Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

2008-01-01

292

Coal energy conversion with carbon sequestration via combustion in supercritical saline aquifer water  

Microsoft Academic Search

The standard idea for deep saline aquifer sequestration is to separate carbon dioxide from a process stream, compress it, and inject it underground. However, since carbon dioxide is less dense than water, even at the high pressures found in aquifers, it is buoyant and will move towards the surface unless trapped by an impermeable seal. Also, significant energy expenditure is

J. R. Heberle; C. F. Edwards

2009-01-01

293

Predicting and Evaluating the Effectiveness of Ocean Carbon Sequestration by Direct Injection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Direct injection of CO into the ocean is a potentially effective carbon sequestration strategy. Therefore, we want to understand the effectiveness of oceanic injection and develop the appropriate analytic framework to allow us to compare the effectiveness of this strategy with other carbon management options. Here, after a brief review of direct oceanic injection, we estimate the effectiveness of ocean

Ken Caldeira; Howard J. Herzog; Michael E. Wickett

2001-01-01

294

Interactions between carbon sequestration and shade tree diversity in a smallholder coffee cooperative in El Salvador.  

PubMed

Agroforestry systems have substantial potential to conserve native biodiversity and provide ecosystem services. In particular, agroforestry systems have the potential to conserve native tree diversity and sequester carbon for climate change mitigation. However, little research has been conducted on the temporal stability of species diversity and aboveground carbon stocks in these systems or the relation between species diversity and aboveground carbon sequestration. We measured changes in shade-tree diversity and shade-tree carbon stocks in 14 plots of a 35-ha coffee cooperative over 9 years and analyzed relations between species diversity and carbon sequestration. Carbon sequestration was positively correlated with initial species richness of shade trees. Species diversity of shade trees did not change significantly over the study period, but carbon stocks increased due to tree growth. Our results show a potential for carbon sequestration and long-term biodiversity conservation in smallholder coffee agroforestry systems and illustrate the opportunity for synergies between biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation. PMID:24283921

Richards, Meryl Breton; Méndez, V Ernesto

2014-04-01

295

Moving beyond carbon bean counting: what information do we need to truly assess soil carbon sequestration?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measuring changes in bulk soil organic carbon alone will likely not give us an accurate picture of carbon sequestration in response to a land use or land management shift. For soil carbon sequestration to be an effective greenhouse gas mitigation measure, we must understand the decadal to century scale stability of newly sequestered soil carbon. This understanding will only come from studies that ask questions such as where and in what form is SOC accumulating. Here we present results from a study examining shifts in SOC when the subtropical C4 perennial grass, kikuyu (Pennisetum clandestinium), is sown into formerly C3 annual grass dominated pastures in contrasting soil types. The C3-C4 vegetation transition provided an excellent opportunity to trace changes in the stable carbon isotope composition of SOC and its fractions to better understand the dynamics of SOC in a system that is accumulating carbon. Using a paired-plot chronosequence approach spanning 33 years, we found that in the sandy soils of Western Australia, SOC accumulated at a rate of 0.90 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 over a 30 year period, but all of this increase was found to have occurred in the particulate organic carbon fraction. In finer textured soils in South Australia over a similar time span, sequestration rates were lower, averaging 0.26 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, but one third of the new SOC was found in a mineral-associated fraction. These findings raise some interesting questions that will be explored in this presentation. Why has there been so much accumulation of SOC in the sandy soil where protection mechanisms are minimal? Do these data fit with the our current understanding of SOC dynamics? Does the concept of carbon saturation hold in a soil with 2% clay? If there were a major perturbation (i.e. long-term drought or management shift away from pasture) to the system, would the newly sequestered SOC in the fine textured soil be more resistant to loss?

Sanderman, J.; Fillery, I.; Roper, M.; Murphy, D.; Wang, E.

2012-12-01

296

Assessment of carbon stores in tree biomass for two management scenarios in Russia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate quantification of terrestrial carbon storage and its change is of key importance to improved understanding of global carbon dynamics. Forest management influences carbon sequestration and release patterns, and gap models are well suited for evaluating carbon storage. An individual-based gap model of forest dynamics, FAREAST, is applied across Russia to estimate aboveground carbon storage under management scenarios. Current biomass from inventoried forests across Russia is compared to model-based estimates and potential levels of biomass are estimated for a set of simplified forestry practices. Current carbon storage in eastern Russia was lower than for the northwest and south, and lower than model estimates likely due to high rates of disturbance. Model-derived carbon storage in all regions was not significantly different between the simulated ‘current’ and hypothetical ‘even-aged’ management strategies using rotations of 150 and 210 years. Simulations allowing natural maturation and harvest after 150 years show a significant increase in aboveground carbon in all regions. However, it is unlikely that forests would be left unharvested to 150 years of age to attain this condition. These applications indicate the value of stand simulators, applied over broad regions such as Russia, as tools to evaluate the effect of management regimes on aboveground carbon storage.

Shuman, Jacquelyn K.; Shugart, Herman H.; Krankina, Olga N.

2013-12-01

297

Maintenance of a Living Understory Enhances Soil Carbon Sequestration in Subtropical Orchards  

PubMed Central

Orchard understory represents an important component of the orchards, performing numerous functions related to soil quality, water relations and microclimate, but little attention has been paid on its effect on soil C sequestration. In the face of global climate change, fruit producers also require techniques that increase carbon (C) sequestration in a cost-effective manner. Here we present a case study to compare the effects of understory management (sod culture vs. clean tillage) on soil C sequestration in four subtropical orchards. The results of a 10-year study indicated that the maintenance of sod significantly enhanced the soil C stock in the top 1 m of orchard soils. Relative to clean tillage, sod culture increased annual soil C sequestration by 2.85 t C ha-1, suggesting that understory management based on sod culture offers promising potential for soil carbon sequestration. Considering that China has the largest area of orchards in the world and that few of these orchards currently have sod understories, the establishment and maintenance of sod in orchards can help China increase C sequestration and greatly contribute to achieving CO2 reduction targets at a regional scale and potentially at a national scale.

Liu, Zhanfeng; Lin, Yongbiao; Lu, Hongfang; Ding, Mingmao; Tan, Yaowen; Xu, Shejin; Fu, Shenglei

2013-01-01

298

Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration - Science for Enhancement and Implementation  

SciTech Connect

It is time to re-evaluate all available options that might not be permanent yet have the potential to buy time, bridging to a future when new energy system technologies and a transformed energy infrastructure can fully address the climate challenge. Terrestrial sequestration is one option large enough to make a contribution in the coming decades using proven land management methods and with the possibility that new technologies could significantly enhance the opportunity. Here we review progress on key scientific, economic, and social issues; postulate the extent to which new technologies might significantly enhance terrestrial sequestration potential; and address remaining research needs.

Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Amonette, James [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Jastrow, Julie D [ORNL; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; McCarl, Bruce [Texas A& M University; Thomson, Dr. Allison [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Metting, F. Blaine [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2009-01-01

299

Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon Sequestration Systems  

SciTech Connect

A mutant ( 5) of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 constructed by inactivating five inorganic carbon sequestration systems did not take up CO2 or HCO3– and was unable to grow in air with or without glucose. The 4 mutant in which BicA is the only active inorganic carbon sequestration system showed low activity of HCO3– uptake and grew under these conditions but more slowly than the wild-type strain. The 5 mutant required 1.7% CO2 to attain half the maximal growth rate. Electron transport activity of the mutants was strongly inhibited under high light intensities, with the 5 mutant more susceptible to high light than the 4 mutant. The results implicated the significance of carbon sequestration in dissipating excess light energy.

Xu, Min; Bernat, Gabor; Singh, Abhay K.; Mi, Hualing; Rogner, Matthias; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ogawa, Teruo

2008-09-10

300

Strategies to increase forest carbon sequestration in the southeast United States  

SciTech Connect

Forest management to improve carbon (C) sequestration may offset increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. This study evaluated the influence that management has on C dynamics of forestland in the southeast United States. The approach used forest-stand inventories and C densities to calculate C pools and fluxes. Specific research objectives were to model C pools and fluxes for the years 1990-2039, to evaluate C sequestration rates, and to account for C benefits of off-site production of lumber or fuelwood. In comparison with nonaction management, tree harvesting for merchantable logs, fuelwood, or land-cover change decreased on-site C pools and sequestration rates, while reforestation increased on-site C pools and sequestration rates. The production of lumber or fuelwood contributed to off-site C benefits. However, only fuelwood produced C benefits adequate to offset the on-site C losses from harvesting trees.

Barker, J.R.; Lee, J.J. [ManTech Environmental Research Services Corp., Corvallis, OR (United States)]|[Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States)

1995-06-01

301

Technical Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Nature Conservancy participated in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project was 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration'. The objectives of the project were to:

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Zoe Kant; Patrick Gonzalez

2009-01-01

302

Bacterial and Fungal Contributions to Carbon Sequestration in Agroecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the current knowledge of microbial processes affecting C sequestration in agroecosystems. The microbial contri- bution to soil C storage is directly related to microbial community dynamics and the balance between formation and degradation of mi- crobial byproducts. Soil microbes also indirectly influence C cycling by improving soil aggregation, which physically protects soil organic matter (SOM). Consequently, the

S. D. Frey; R. K. Thiet; K. M. Batten

2006-01-01

303

Potential for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Flood Basalts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flood basalts are a potentially important host medium for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Most lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have enormous capacity for storage of CO2. Interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock overlying sequential flows may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Laboratory experiments confirm relatively rapid

B. PETER McGrail; Herbert T. Schaef; Anita M. Ho; Yi-Ju Chien; James J. Dooley; Casie L. Davidson

2006-01-01

304

Computational Modeling of the Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

EPA Science Inventory

Geologic sequestration of CO2 is a component of C capture and storage (CCS), an emerging technology for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, and involves injection of captured CO2 into deep subsurface formations. Similar to the injection of hazardous wastes, before injection...

305

Use of native species to improve carbon sequestration and contribute towards solving the environmental problems of the timberlands in Biscay, northern Spain.  

PubMed

The rapid transformation of natural forest areas into fast-growing exotic species plantations, where the main objective is timber and pulp production, has led to a neglect of other services forests provide in many parts of the world. One example of such a problem is the county of Biscay, where the management of these plantations has negative impacts on the environment, creating the necessity to evaluate alternative tree species for use in forestry. The actual crisis in the forest sector of the region could be an opportunity to change to native species plantations that could help restore ecosystem structure and function. However, forest managers of the region are using the current interest on carbon sequestration by forest to persist with the "pine and eucalyptus culture", arguing that these species provide a big C sequestration service. Moreover, they are promoting the expansion of eucalyptus plantations to obtain biomass for the pulp and paper industry and for bioenergy. The aim of this paper is to answer the following questions: Is this argument used by the foresters well-founded? or, could the use of native species in plantations improve the C sequestration service in Biscay while avoiding the environmental problems the actual plantations cause? To answer these questions we created three alternative future scenarios: a) the Services scenario, where there is a substitution of fast-growing exotic plantations by native broadleaf species plantations; b) the Biomass scenario, where there is a bet on eucalyptus plantations; and c) the Business as usual scenario. The changes in the C stock in living biomass in these scenarios have been simulated by a hybrid approach utilising inventories and models, and the period considered was 150 years. Our results show that the substitution of existing exotic plantations by plantations of native species has the greatest potential for increasing C sequestration. Although short- and mid-term outcomes may differ, when the long-term (more than 50 years) is considered, the C stock in the living biomass in the Services scenario is the greatest, accumulating 38% more C than the Business as usual scenario and 70% more C than the Biomass scenario at the end of the study period. Thus, changing pine and eucalyptus by native species in plantations, while solving some of the environmental problems of the actual plantations, sequesters more C in the long-term. As C sequestration initiatives only make sense if there is a good chance of long-term persistence of the C stocks created, there is no C sequestration argument for the foresters to continue with the actual policy of the use of fast-growing exotic species. PMID:23500105

Rodríguez-Loinaz, Gloria; Amezaga, Ibone; Onaindia, Miren

2013-05-15

306

Olivine reactivity with CO 2 and H 2O on a microscale: Implications for carbon sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The silicate mineral olivine, (Mg,Fe)2SiO4, reacts exothermally with CO2 and forms secondary minerals, including carbonates. Therefore olivine reaction is a promising process for carbon sequestration, to convert carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to mineral form. The purpose of this study was: 1) to explore the composition, structure and reactivity of olivine surfaces during exposure to air and to water at

J. Olsson; N. Bovet; E. Makovicky; K. Bechgaard; Z. Balogh; S. L. S. Stipp

307

Carbon sequestration in a long-term conventional versus conservation tillage experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of conservation tillage practices on carbon sequestration has been of great interest in recent years. Changes in the soil organic carbon (SOC) as influenced by tillage, is more noticeable under long-term rather than short-term tillage practices. This experiment analyzed the organic carbon status of soils sampled at depth increments from 0 to 60cm after 25 years of five

W Deen; P. K Kataki

2003-01-01

308

An Improved Strategy to Detect Carbon Dioxide Leakage for Verification of Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One strategy to mitigate potential climate change associated with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations is the sequestration or storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations. While the purpose of geologic carbon sequestration is to trap CO2 underground, the potential exists for CO2 to migrate away from the intended storage site along permeable pathways such as well bores or faults and pass from the subsurface to the atmosphere. Therefore, to ensure the success of geologic carbon sequestration projects, the long-term storage of CO2 must be verified. Although numerous technologies are available to measure near-surface CO2 concentrations and fluxes, storage verification may be challenging due to the large variation in natural background CO2 fluxes and concentrations, within which a potentially small CO2 anomaly will have to be detected. To detect and quantify subtle CO2 leakage signals, we present a strategy that integrates near-surface measurements of CO2 fluxes or concentrations with an algorithm that enhances temporally- and spatially-correlated leakage signals while suppressing random background noise. The algorithm consists of a filter that highlights spatial coherence, and temporal stacking (averaging) that reduces noise from temporally uncorrelated background fluxes. We assess the performance of our strategy using synthetic data sets in which the surface leakage signal is either specified directly or calculated using flow and transport simulations of a variety of leakage source geometries one might expect to be present at sequestration sites. These simulations provide a means of estimating the number of measurements required to detect a potential CO2 leakage signal of given magnitude and area. Our results show that given a rigorous and well-planned field sampling program, subtle CO2 leakage may be detected using the statistical algorithm; however, leakage of very limited spatial extent or exceedingly small magnitude may be difficult to detect with a reasonable set of monitoring resources. This work was supported in part by the Ernest Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, managed for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.; Oldenburg, C. M.

2005-12-01

309

Carbon dioxide sequestration by urban vegetation at neighbourhood scale in tropical cities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO2. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO2 emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is extensive and/or evergreen. A direct and accurate estimation of carbon uptake by urban vegetation is difficult to achieve due to the particular characteristics of the urban ecosystem and high variability in tree distribution and species. Here, we investigate the role of urban vegetation in the carbon exchange using as reference recent long-term sets of CO2 flux data from two residential neighborhoods in Singapore and Mexico City. CO2 fluxes measured directly by eddy covariance are compared with emissions estimated from emissions factors and activity data. The latter includes contributions from vehicular traffic, household combustion, soil respiration and human breathing. The difference between estimated emissions and measured fluxes should approximate the aboveground biomass flux. In addition, tree surveys were conducted to estimate the annual CO2 sequestration using allometric equations. The annual biomass growth for Singapore's trees was estimated using an alternative model of the metabolic theory of ecology for tropical forests. For Mexico City, growth prediction equations for urban trees from California were used. Palm trees, banana plants, yuccas and turfgrass were also included in the surveys with their annual CO2 uptake obtained from published growth rates. For the case of Singapore, both approaches agree within 2% and suggest that aboveground vegetation sequesters 8% of the total emitted CO2 in the residential neighbourhood studied. An uptake of 1.4 ton km-2 day-1 (510 ton km-2 yr-1) was estimated from the difference between the daily CO2 uptake by photosynthesis (3.95 ton km-2) and release by plant respiration at night (2.55 ton km-2). However, when soil respiration is added to photosynthesis and nocturnal plant respiration, the biogenic component amounts to 4% of the total CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. For the neighbourhood studied in Mexico City an uptake of 1.6 ton km-2 day-1 (568 ton km-2 yr-1) was estimated by allometry and represents 2% of the observed flux by eddy covariance. Due to the large extension of impervious surfaces, soil respiration contributes only 0.6%, resulting in a net offset of 1.4% by the biogenic component to the total CO2 flux. Surprisingly, the estimated aboveground CO2 sequestration was similar for both neighbourhoods, even though the differences in the number of trees, species and size. The available surface for soil respiration in Singapore's neighbourhood (15%) is three times the surface in Mexico City's neighbourhood (5%), and explains why the biogenic component acts as an emission source for the former and as a sink for the latter. The relevance of urban vegetation in the carbon flux at neighbourhood scale depends on the characteristics of trees, extension of green areas and intensity of the anthropogenic sources.

Velasco, E.; Roth, M.; Tan, S.; Quak, M.; Perrusquia, R.; Molina, L. T.; Norford, L.

2013-12-01

310

GENETIC MODIFICATION OF GIBBERELLIC ACID SIGNALING TO PROMOTE CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN TREE ROOTS AND STEMS  

SciTech Connect

Semidwarfism has been used extensively in row crops and horticulture to promote yield, reduce lodging, and improve harvest index, and it might have similar benefits for trees for short-rotation forestry or energy plantations, reclamation, phytoremediation, or other applications. We studied the effects of the dominant semidwarfism transgenes GA Insensitive (GAI) and Repressor of GAI-Like, which affect gibberellin (GA) action, and the GA catabolic gene, GA 2-oxidase, in nursery beds and in 2-year-old high-density stands of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula ? Populus alba). Twenty-nine traits were analyzed, including measures of growth, morphology, and physiology. Endogenous GA levels were modified in most transgenic events; GA(20) and GA(8), in particular, had strong inverse associations with tree height. Nearly all measured traits varied significantly among genotypes, and several traits interacted with planting density, including aboveground biomass, root-shoot ratio, root fraction, branch angle, and crown depth. Semidwarfism promoted biomass allocation to roots over shoots and substantially increased rooting efficiency with most genes tested. The increased root proportion and increased leaf chlorophyll levels were associated with changes in leaf carbon isotope discrimination, indicating altered water use efficiency. Semidwarf trees had dramatically reduced growth when in direct competition with wild-type trees, supporting the hypothesis that semidwarfism genes could be effective tools to mitigate the spread of exotic, hybrid, and transgenic plants in wild and feral populations. We modified gibberellin (GA) metabolism and signaling in transgenic poplars using dominant transgenes and studied their effects for 3 years under field conditions. The transgenes that we employed either reduced the bioactive GAs, or attenuated their signaling. The majority of transgenic trees had significant and in many cases dramatic changes in height, crown architecture, foliage morphology, flowering onset, floral structure, and vegetative phenology. Most transgenes elicited various levels of height reduction consistent with the roles of GA in elongation growth. Several other growth traits were proportionally reduced, including branch length, internode distance, and leaf length. In contrast to elongation growth, stem diameter growth was much less affected, suggesting that semi-dwarf trees in dense stands might provide high levels of biomass production and carbon sequestration. The severity of phenotypic effects was strongly correlated with transgene expression among independent transgenic events, but often in a non-linear manner, the form of which varied widely among constructs. The majority of semi-dwarfed, transgenic plants showed delayed bud flush and early bud set, and expression of a native GAI transgene accelerated first time flowering in the field. All of the phenotypic changes observed in multiple years were stable over the 3 years of field study. Our results suggest that transgenic modification of GA action may be useful for producing semi-dwarf trees with modified growth and morphology for horticulture and other uses. We studied the poplar C(19) gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2ox) gene subfamily. We show that a set of paralogous gene pairs differentially regulate shoot and root development. ? PtGA2ox4 and its paralogous gene PtGA2ox5 are primarily expressed in aerial organs, and overexpression of PtGA2ox5 produced a strong dwarfing phenotype characteristic of GA deficiency. Suppression of PtGA2ox4 and PtGA2ox5 led to increased biomass growth, but had no effect on root development. By contrast, the PtGA2ox2 and PtGA2ox7 paralogous pair was predominantly expressed in roots, and when these two genes were RNAi-suppressed it led to a decrease of root biomass. ? The morphological changes in the transgenic plants were underpinned by tissue-specific increases in bioactive GAs that corresponded to the predominant native expression of the targeted paralogous gene pair. Although RNAi suppression of both paralogous pairs led to changes in wood developmen

Busov, Victor

2013-03-05

311

Carbon sequestration in soybean crop soils: the role of hydrogen-coupled CO2 fixation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conversion of native vegetation to agricultural land in order to support the world's growing population is a key factor contributing to global climate change. However, the extent to which agricultural activities contribute to greenhouse gas emissions compared to carbon storage is difficult to ascertain, especially for legume crops, such as soybeans. Soybean establishment often leads to an increase in N2O emissions because N-fixation leads to increased soil available N during decomposition of the low C:N legume biomass. However, soybean establishment may also reduce net greenhouse gas emissions by increasing soil fertility, plant growth, and soil carbon storage. The mechanism behind increased carbon storage, however, remains unclear. One explanation points to hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation; the process by which nitrogen fixation releases H2 into the soil system, thereby promoting chemoautotrophic carbon fixation by soil microbes. We used 13CO2 as a tracer to track the amount and fate of carbon fixed by hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation during one-year field and laboratory incubations. The objectives of the research are to 1) quantify rates of 13CO2 fixation in soil collected from a field used for long-term soybean production 2) examine the impact of H2 gas concentration on rates of 13CO2 fixation, and 3) measure changes in ?13C signature over time in 3 soil fractions: microbial biomass, light fraction, and acid stable fraction. If this newly-fixed carbon is incorporated into the acid-stable soil C fraction, it has a good chance of contributing to long-term soil C sequestration under soybean production. Soil was collected in the field both adjacent to root nodules (nodule soil) and >3cm away (root soil) and labelled with 13CO2 (1% v/v) in the presence and absence of H2 gas. After a two week labelling period, ?13C signatures already revealed differences in the four treatments of bulk soil: -17.1 for root, -17.6 for nodule, -14.2 for root + H2, and -6.1 for nodule + H2. Labelled soil was then placed in nylon mesh bags and buried in the field at a depth of 15cm in a soybean field at the Central Experiment Farm in Ottawa, Ontario. Samples will be removed at intervals of 1,2,3,6,9,12, and 15 months, and the ?13C of three soil fractions will be examined to reveal changes in carbon storage over time. Our results will provide insights into the fate of carbon fixed during hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation, and demonstrate whether this CO2 fixation can contribute to the long-term greenhouse gas balance of soybean production systems.

Graham, A.; Layzell, D. B.; Scott, N. A.; Cen, Y.; Kyser, T. K.

2011-12-01

312

Development of an assessment methodology for hydrocarbon recovery potential using carbon dioxide and associated carbon sequestration-Workshop findings  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140) authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2) and requested that the USGS estimate the "potential volumes of oil and gas recoverable by injection and sequestration of industrial carbon dioxide in potential sequestration formations" (121 Stat. 1711). The USGS developed a noneconomic, probability-based methodology to assess the Nation's technically assessable geologic storage resources available for sequestration of CO2 (Brennan and others, 2010) and is currently using the methodology to assess the Nation's CO2 geologic storage resources. Because the USGS has not developed a methodology to assess the potential volumes of technically recoverable hydrocarbons that could be produced by injection and sequestration of CO2, the Geologic Carbon Sequestration project initiated an effort in 2010 to develop a methodology for the assessment of the technically recoverable hydrocarbon potential in the sedimentary basins of the United States using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques with CO2 (CO2-EOR). In collaboration with Stanford University, the USGS hosted a 2-day CO2-EOR workshop in May 2011, attended by 28 experts from academia, natural resource agencies and laboratories of the Federal Government, State and international geologic surveys, and representatives from the oil and gas industry. The geologic and the reservoir engineering and operations working groups formed during the workshop discussed various aspects of geology, reservoir engineering, and operations to make recommendations for the methodology.

Verma, Mahendra K.; Warwick, Peter D.

2011-01-01

313

Reduced effectiveness of terrestrial carbon sequestration due to an antagonistic response of ocean productivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biological productivity in a number of ocean regions appears to be at least partly limited by the availability of iron. Any reduction in the present-day aeolian iron supply to the open ocean is therefore likely to result in further limitation of productivity. The stabilization of soils for the purpose of carbon sequestration could give rise to such an effect. With

Andy J. Ridgwell; Mark A. Maslin; Andrew J. Watson

2002-01-01

314

Use and Performance of Cover Crops for Enhanced Carbon Sequestration and GHG Mitigation in Croplands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditionally cover crops have been used to reduce nitrogen leaching from croplands, although there is an increased realisation that they could contribute to an enhanced annual sequestration of carbon by providing vegetation cover during fallow periods. This will depend to a certain extent on the ability of the cover crop to photosynthesise during autumn\\/winter periods and, in turn, on the

B. Osborne; M. Saunders; M. Helmy; G. Lanigan; M. Jones; M. Nagy; D. Walmsley

2009-01-01

315

A REGULATORY FRAMEWORK FOR CARBON CAPTURING AND SEQUESTRATION WITHIN THE POST-KYOTO PROCESS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The option of capturing CO2 at large power stations and storing it in geological formations allows for the use of fossil energy resources without further destabilization of the climate system. From an economic point of view, the efficiency of Carbon Capturing and Sequestration (CCS) depends mainly on leakage rates, marginal costs of CCS (including the energy penalty) and the volume

Ottmar Edenhofer; Hermann Held; Nico Bauer

316

Carbon dioxide sequestration through novel use of ion exchange fibers (IX-fibers)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electrical power generation and metal removal processes are practiced globally and share two common attributes that make them ideal candidates to be incorporated in a novel carbon dioxide sequestration scheme using ion exchange fibers (IX-fibers). First, the softening of boiler feed water used in power generation and the removal of metals from finishing wastewaters often employs the use of ion

S. Padungthon; J. E. Greenleaf; A. K. Sengupta

2011-01-01

317

Fertilization Increases Below-Ground Carbon Sequestration of Loblolly Pine Plantations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The extent of fertilization of southern pine forests is increasing rapidly; industrial fertilization increased from 16,200 ha per year in 1988, to 344,250 ha in 1998. Fertilization increases stand productivity and can increase carbon (C) sequestration by:...

K. H. Johnsen J. R. Butnor C. Maier R. Pangle L. Samuelson J. Seiler S. E. McKeand H. L. Allen

2001-01-01

318

The impact of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration in European forests and forest soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

An estimate of net carbon (C) pool changes and long-term C sequestration in trees and soils was made at more than 100 intensively monitored forest plots (level II plots) and scaled up to Europe based on data for more than 6000 forested plots in a systematic 16 km x 16 km grid (level I plots). C pool changes in trees

WIM DE VRIES; GERT JAN REINDS; PER GUNDERSEN; HUBERT STERBA

2006-01-01

319

Spatial heterogeneity, contract design, and the efficiency of carbon sequestration policies for agriculture  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we develop methods to investigate the efficiency of alternative contracts for Carbon (C) sequestration in cropland soils, taking into account the spatial heterogeneity of agricultural production systems and the costs of implementing more efficient contracts. We describe contracts being proposed for implementation in the United States and other countries that would pay farmers for adoption of specified

John Antle; Susan Capalbo; Siân Mooney; Edward Elliott; Keith Paustian

2003-01-01

320

Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a framework for assessing the leakage risk of geologic carbon sequestration sites. This framework, known as the Certification Framework (CF), emphasizes wells and faults as the primary potential leakage conduits. Vulnerable resources are grouped into compartments, and impacts due to leakage are quantified by the leakage flux or concentrations that could potentially occur in compartments under various

Curtis M. Oldenburg; Steven L. Bryant; Jean-Philippe Nicot; Navanit Kumar; Yingqi Zhang; Preston Jordan; Lehua Pan; Patrick Granvold; Fotini K. Chow

2009-01-01

321

An updated assessment of the acute impacts of ocean carbon sequestration by direct injection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper evaluates the expected environmental impact of several promising schemes for ocean carbon sequestration by direct injection of CO2, and serves as a major update to the assessment by Auerbach et al. (1997) and Caulfield et al. (1997) of water quality impacts and the induced mortality to zooplankton. Three discharge approaches are considered, each designed to maximize dilution over

Peter H. Israelsson; Aaron C. Chow; E. Eric Adams

2010-01-01

322

An updated assessment of the acute impacts of ocean carbon sequestration by direct injection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper evaluates the expected environmental impact of several promising schemes for ocean carbon sequestration by direct injection of CO2, and serves as a major update to the assessment by Auerbach et al. (1997) and Caulfield et al. (1997) of water quality impacts and the induced mortality to zooplankton. The impact assessment methodology from the earlier studies has been updated

Peter H. Israelsson; Aaron C. Chow; E. Eric Adams

2009-01-01

323

Carbon sequestration in Southeast Asian tropical peatlands over the Holocene period: large-scale hydrological controls  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tropical peatlands are recognized as a significant sink of carbon dioxide and an important source of methane. Low latitude peatlands contain an estimated pool of 90 Pg C, of which ca. 70 Pg C is stored in Southeast Asian peatlands. However, the Holocene development of this carbon reservoir is poorly established. Here we provide a synthesis of carbon uptake rates by tropical peatlands in Southeast Asia across millennial timescales for the past 11,000 years. Our reconstruction of the carbon accumulation history for Borneo, Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia is based on a synthesis of radiocarbon dated peat profiles, modeling of peatland extent, and a new carbon accumulation record from Brunei (NW-Borneo). During the early Holocene the first peatlands formed in southern Borneo under the influence of a strong monsoon and rapid rise in sea-level. The carbon accumulation rate (CAR) in these peatlands was on average 60 g C m-2 yr-1 at this time. Peatlands started to spread across the coastal lowlands of Borneo, Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia after 8000 cal BP only when the rate of rising sea-level decreased. The major phase of coastal peatland initiation lasted from 7000 to 4000 cal BP. This period was marked by a Holocene precipitation maximum, suppressed El Niño activity, and the Holocene maximum in sea-level on the Sunda Shelf. The mean CAR of coastal peatlands at this time was 80 g C m-2 yr-1, with a Holocene peak of ~100 g C m-2 yr-1 from 4900 to 4500 cal BP. Significantly, atmospheric CO2 concentrations measured in the Taylor Dome Antarctic ice core indicate a plateau during this period of otherwise rising CO2 concentrations. During the Late Holocene CAR declined both in coastal peatlands (ca. 70 g C m-2 yr-1) and in southern Borneo (ca. 20 g C m-2 yr-1) in response to falling sea-levels and increased El Niño frequency and intensity. In fact, several peatlands in southern Borneo have stopped accumulating peat-carbon under higher El Niño activity. These results support the hypothesis that the water table elevation and not temperature is the primary control of the carbon balance of tropical peatlands. The period of fastest peatland expansion and highest CAR was the wettest period in the Holocene with the lowest hydraulic gradient imposed by the highstand in sea-level. The period with the lowest and nearly quiescent CAR was associated with higher drought stress and a steeper hydraulic gradient, implying lower water tables. The remarkably high carbon sequestration rates of Southeast Asian peatlands can be explained by the high production of woody biomass throughout the year under waterlogged conditions. Woody organic matter is principally resistant to decomposition in an anaerobic setting causing rapid rates of carbon accumulation as long as the water table remains high. Increased drought severity, possibly in association with changes in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation under a warmer future climate could potentially switch Southeast Asian carbon sequestering peatlands to carbon sources.

Dommain, R.; Couwenberg, J.; Cobb, A.; Gandois, L.; Kai, F.; Su'ut, N.; Abu Salim, K.; Harvey, C. F.; Glaser, P. H.; Joosten, H.

2012-12-01

324

Silicate Carbonation Processes in Water-Bearing Supercritical CO2 Fluids: Implications for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global climate change is viewed by many as an anthropogenic phenomenon that could be mitigated through a combination of conservation efforts, alternative energy sources, and the development of technologies capable of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Continued increases of atmospheric CO2 concentrations are projected over the next decade, due to developing nations and growing populations. One economically favorable option for managing CO2 involves subsurface storage in deep basalt formations. The silicate minerals and glassy mesostasis basalt components act as metal cation sources, reacting with the CO2 to form carbonate minerals. Most prior work on mineral reactivity in geologic carbon sequestration settings involves only aqueous dominated reactions. However, in most sequestration scenarios, injected CO2 will reside as a buoyant fluid in contact with the sealing formation (caprock) and slowly become water bearing. Comparatively little laboratory research has been conducted on reactions occurring between minerals in the host rock and the wet scCO2. In this work, we studied the carbonation of wollastonite [CaSiO3] exposed to variably wet supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at a range of temperatures (50, 55 and 70 °C) and pressures (90,120 and 160 bar) in order to gain insight into reaction processes. Mineral transformation reactions were followed by two novel in situ high pressure techniques, including x-ray diffraction that tracked the rate and extents of wollastonite conversion to calcite. Increased dissolved water concentrations in the scCO2 resulted in increased carbonation approaching ~50 wt. %. Development of thin water films on the mineral surface were directly observed with infrared (IR) spectroscopy and indirectly with 18O isotopic labeling techniques (Raman spectroscopy). The thin water films were determined to be critical for facilitating carbonation processes in wet scCO2. Even in extreme low water conditions, the IR technique detected the formation of amorphous silica. Unlike the thick (<10 ?m) passivating silica layers observed in the reacted samples from fully water saturated scCO2 experiments, images obtained from a focused ion beam sectioned sample indicted these coatings were chemically wollastonite but structurally amorphous. In addition, evidence of an intermediate hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate forming under these conditions further emphasize the importance of understanding geochemical processes occurring in water-bearing scCO2 fluids.

Miller, Q. R.; Schaef, T.; Thompson, C.; Loring, J. S.; Windisch, C. F.; Bowden, M. E.; Arey, B. W.; McGrail, P.

2012-12-01

325

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-02-15

326

A disconnect between O horizon and mineral soil carbon - Implications for soil C sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Changing inputs of carbon to soil is one means of potentially increasing carbon sequestration in soils for the purpose of mitigating projected increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The effect of manipulations of aboveground carbon input on soil carbon storage was tested in a temperate, deciduous forest in east Tennessee, USA. A 4.5-year experiment included exclusion of aboveground litterfall and supplemental litter additions (three times ambient) in an upland and a valley that differed in soil nitrogen availability. The estimated decomposition rate of the carbon stock in the O horizon was greater in the valley than in the upland due to higher litter quality (i.e., lower C/N ratios). Short-term litter exclusion or addition had no effect on carbon stock in the mineral soil, measured to a depth of 30 cm, or the partitioning of carbon in the mineral soil between particulate- and mineral-associated organic matter. A two-compartment model was used to interpret results from the field experiments. Field data and a sensitivity analysis of the model were consistent with little carbon transfer between the O horizon and the mineral soil. Increasing aboveground carbon input does not appear to be an effective means of promoting carbon sequestration in forest soil at the location of the present study because a disconnect exists in carbon dynamics between O horizon and mineral soil. Factors that directly increase inputs to belowground soil carbon, via roots, or reduce decomposition rates of organic matter are more likely to benefit efforts to increase carbon sequestration in forests where carbon dynamics in the O horizon are uncoupled from the mineral soil.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2009-01-01

327

Surface evolution and carbon sequestration in disturbed and undisturbed wetland soils of the Hunter estuary, southeast Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this work was to quantify the soil carbon storage and sequestration rates of undisturbed natural wetlands and disturbed wetlands subject to restriction of tidal flow and subsequent rehabilitation in an Australian estuary. Disturbed and undisturbed estuarine wetlands of the Hunter estuary, New South Wales, Australia were selected as the study sites for this research. Vertical accretion rates of estuarine substrates were combined with soil carbon concentrations and bulk densities to determine the carbon store and carbon sequestration rates of the substrates tested. Relationships between estuary water level, soil evolution and vertical accretion were also examined. The carbon sequestration rate of undisturbed wetlands was lower (15% for mangrove and 55% for saltmarsh) than disturbed wetlands, but the carbon store was higher (65% for mangrove and 60% for saltmarsh). The increased carbon sequestration rate of the disturbed wetlands was driven by substantially higher rates of vertical accretion (95% for mangrove and 345% for saltmarsh). Estuarine wetland carbon stores were estimated at 700-1000 Gg C for the Hunter estuary and 3900-5600 Gg C for New South Wales. Vertical accretion and carbon sequestration rates of estuarine wetlands in the Hunter are at the lower end of the range reported in the literature. The comparatively high carbon sequestration rates reported for the disturbed wetlands in this study indicate that wetland rehabilitation has positive benefits for regulation of atmospheric carbon concentrations, in addition to more broadly accepted ecosystem services.

Howe, A. J.; Rodríguez, J. F.; Saco, P. M.

2009-08-01

328

Mapping the Mineral Resource Base for Mineral Carbon-Dioxide Sequestration in the Conterminous United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This database provides information on the occurrence of ultramafic rocks in the conterminous United States that are suitable for sequestering captured carbon dioxide in mineral form, also known as mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration. Mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration is a proposed greenhouse gas mitigation technology whereby carbon dioxide (CO2) is disposed of by reacting it with calcium or magnesium silicate minerals to form a solid magnesium or calcium carbonate product. The technology offers a large capacity to permanently store CO2 in an environmentally benign form via a process that takes little effort to verify or monitor after disposal. These characteristics are unique among its peers in greenhouse gas disposal technologies. The 2005 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage suggested that a major gap in mineral CO2 sequestration is locating the magnesium-silicate bedrock available to sequester the carbon dioxide. It is generally known that silicate minerals with high concentrations of magnesium are suitable for mineral carbonation. However, no assessment has been made in the United States that details their geographical distribution and extent, nor has anyone evaluated their potential for use in mineral carbonation. Researchers at Columbia University and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a digital geologic database of ultramafic rocks in the conterminous United States. Data were compiled from varied-scale geologic maps of magnesium-silicate ultramafic rocks. The focus of our national-scale map is entirely on ultramafic rock types, which typically consist primarily of olivine- and serpentine-rich rocks. These rock types are potentially suitable as source material for mineral CO2 sequestration.

Krevor, S. C.; Graves, C. R.; Van Gosen, B. S.; McCafferty, A. E.

2009-01-01

329

Genome-Enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes in Poplar.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Plants utilize carbon by partitioning the reduced carbon obtained through photosynthesis into different compartments and into different chemistries within a cell and subsequently allocating such carbon to sink tissues throughout the plant. Since the phyto...

J. M. Davis

2007-01-01

330

Changes in soil carbon sequestration in Pinus massoniana forests along an urban-to-rural gradient of southern China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urbanization is accelerating globally, causing a variety of environmental changes such as increases in air temperature, precipitation, atmospheric CO2, and nitrogen (N) deposition. However, the effects of these changes on forest soil carbon (C) sequestration remain largely unclear. Here, we used urban-to-rural environmental gradients in Guangdong Province, southern China, to address the potential effects of these environmental changes on soil C sequestration in Pinus massoniana forests. In contrast to our expectations and earlier observations, soil C content in urban sites was significantly lower than that in suburban and rural sites. Lower soil C pools in urban sites were correlated with a significant decrease in fine root biomass and a potential increase in soil organic C decomposition. Variation of soil C pools was also a function of change in soil C fractions. Heavy fraction C content in urban sites was significantly lower than that in suburban and rural sites. By contrast, light fraction C content did not vary significantly along the urban-to-rural gradient. Our results suggest that urbanization-induced environmental changes may have a negative effect on forest soil C in the studied region.

Chen, H.; Zhang, W.; Gilliam, F.; Liu, L.; Huang, J.; Zhang, T.; Wang, W.; Mo, J.

2013-10-01

331

Importance of biomass in the global carbon cycle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our knowledge of the distribution and amount of terrestrial biomass is based almost entirely on ground measurements over an extremely small, and possibly biased sample, with many regions still unmeasured. Our understanding of changes in terrestrial biomass is even more rudimentary, although changes in land use, largely tropical deforestation, are estimated to have reduced biomass, globally. At the same time, however, the global carbon balance requires that terrestrial carbon storage has increased, albeit the exact magnitude, location, and causes of this residual terrestrial sink are still not well quantified. A satellite mission capable of measuring aboveground woody biomass could help reduce these uncertainties by delivering three products. First, a global map of aboveground woody biomass density would halve the uncertainty of estimated carbon emissions from land use change. Second, an annual, global map of natural disturbances could define the unknown but potentially large proportion of the residual terrestrial sink attributable to biomass recovery from such disturbances. Third, direct measurement of changes in aboveground biomass density (without classification of land cover or carbon modeling) would indicate the magnitude and distribution of at least the largest carbon sources (from deforestation and degradation) and sinks (from woody growth). The information would increase our understanding of the carbon cycle, including better information on the magnitude, location, and mechanisms responsible for terrestrial sources and sinks of carbon. This paper lays out the accuracy, spatial resolution, and coverage required for a satellite mission that would generate these products.

Houghton, R. A.; Hall, Forrest; Goetz, Scott J.

2009-06-01

332

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground  

SciTech Connect

July 21, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg

2009-07-30

333

Glaciation, aridification, and carbon sequestration in the Permo-Carboniferous: The isotopic record from low latitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the isotopic record of climate change and carbon sequestration in the Late Paleozoic, we have compiled new and published oxygen and carbon isotopic measurements of more than 2000 brachiopod shells from Carboniferous through Middle Permian (359–260 Ma) strata. We focus on the isotopic records from the U.S. Midcontinent and the Russian Platform because these two regions provide well-preserved marine

Ethan L. Grossman; Thomas E. Yancey; Thomas E. Jones; Peter Bruckschen; Boris Chuvashov; S. J. Mazzullo; Horng-sheng Mii

2008-01-01

334

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground  

ScienceCinema

July 21, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

335

Potential for Soil Carbon Sequestration in Cotton Production Systems of the Southeastern USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past agricultural management practices have contributed to the loss of soil organic carbon (C) and emission of greenhouse gases (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O)). Fortunately however, conservation-oriented agricultural management systems can be, and have been, developed to sequester soil organic C, improve soil quality, and increase crop productivity. Soil organic C sequestration is intimately associated with agronomic

Hector J. Causarano; Alan J. Franzluebbers; D. Wayne Reeves; Joey N. Shaw; M. Lee Norfleet

336

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2011-04-28

337

Material Resource Considerations for Ex Situ Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this report are: (1) There are enough ultramafic resources to sequester all the CO{sub 2} produced by coal-fired powerplants in the US; (2) Sequestering all the CO{sub 2} would require a significant increase in the mining of ultramafic minerals; (3) The increased mining will have an environmental cost; (4) Some man made by product minerals could contribute to CO{sub 2} sequestration although many of these resources are small; and (5) It may be possible in some cases to sequester CO{sub 2} and eliminate hazardous waste in the same ex situ process.

Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.; Rush, Gilbert E.

2005-05-01

338

Terrestrial sequestration  

ScienceCinema

Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

Charlie Byrer

2010-01-08

339

Amazon River enhances diazotrophy and carbon sequestration in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean  

PubMed Central

The fresh water discharged by large rivers such as the Amazon is transported hundreds to thousands of kilometers away from the coast by surface plumes. The nutrients delivered by these river plumes contribute to enhanced primary production in the ocean, and the sinking flux of this new production results in carbon sequestration. Here, we report that the Amazon River plume supports N2 fixation far from the mouth and provides important pathways for sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in the western tropical North Atlantic (WTNA). We calculate that the sinking of carbon fixed by diazotrophs in the plume sequesters 1.7 Tmol of C annually, in addition to the sequestration of 0.6 Tmol of C yr?1 of the new production supported by NO3 delivered by the river. These processes revise our current understanding that the tropical North Atlantic is a source of 2.5 Tmol of C to the atmosphere [Mikaloff-Fletcher SE, et al. (2007) Inverse estimates of the oceanic sources and sinks of natural CO2 and the implied oceanic carbon transport. Global Biogeochem Cycles 21, doi:10.1029/2006GB002751]. The enhancement of N2 fixation and consequent C sequestration by tropical rivers appears to be a global phenomenon that is likely to be influenced by anthropogenic activity and climate change.

Subramaniam, A.; Yager, P. L.; Carpenter, E. J.; Mahaffey, C.; Bjorkman, K.; Cooley, S.; Kustka, A. B.; Montoya, J. P.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Shipe, R.; Capone, D. G.

2008-01-01

340

Carbon Sequestration: is Science Leading Policy or Will Policy Direct Science?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate-related policy is in its infancy on capital hill, as policy makers only recently started to converge on the acceptance that climate change is a credible, scientific reality. Until recently much of the debate and policy decisions have been related to whether or not climate change, or more specifically global warming, is occurring. The climate debate has shifted from discussing the science behind climate change to addressing how we can reduce carbon dioxide emissions. In the 110th Congress, policy makers have come to realize and accept that we, as a nation, are one of the largest global emitters of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Geologic carbon sequestration has gained significant congressional attention and is considered to be one of the most promising carbon mitigation tools. In the present Congress, scientific experts have testified before numerous committees about the various caveats of geologic carbon sequestration. As a result, policy has been and is currently being drafted to address the challenges facing large-scale commercial demonstration of geologic sequestration facilities. Policy has been passed through both the House and Senate that is aimed at increasing funding for basic and advanced research, development, and demonstration of small- to large-scale carbon dioxide injection projects. This legislation is only the beginning of a series of legislation that is under development. In the next year, policy will be introduced that will likely address issues related to pore space and mineral rights ownership, regulatory framework for carbon dioxide transport and injection, long-term injection site monitoring protocol, personal and environmental safety, and liability issues, to name a few. Policy is not limited to the technical aspects of carbon capture, transport, and storage, but is also being developed to help stimulate a market that will be operating under climate constraints. Financial incentives have been proposed that will assist industrial carbon dioxide emitters in making the transition into a carbon-constrained economy. Science has driven the initial policy that has been proposed to date; however, the topic of carbon sequestration has been advanced through Congress at a near record-breaking pace. As such, there is an increased need to hear from scientists in academia and industry alike to continue to make good policy decisions related to carbon sequestration based on sound scientific advice.

Anderson, A. K.

2007-12-01

341

Carbon sequestration via utilization: Atom-economical catalytic routes to hydrogenation of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Though still controversial, global warming from increasing atmospheric trace gases is now generally accepted. The role of CO{sub 2}, a greenhouse gas resulting from natural phenomenon and burning of fossil fuels, is particularly important. Several options to sequester CO{sub 2} are described in a technology roadmap that was recently released by the US Department of Energy. These options can be divided into two broad categories. These are: (1) CO{sub 2} burial and (2) CO{sub 2} utilization. The CO{sub 2} burial category includes sequestration in oceans, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, abandoned coal mines, and deep geological formations. Of these, recovery of stranded CH{sub 4} (by displacement with injected CO{sub 2}) from coal mines has the benefit of offsetting some of the overall cost of carbon sequestration. The second category involves utilization of CO{sub 2} as a feedstock for making end use products. This remediation option is attractive for its potential commercial value. One such approach involves recycling carbon in CO{sub 2} by converting it into H{sub 2}-rich synthetic fuels. Various aspects of catalytic hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} by metal complexes have been studied by various groups and are a subject of several recent reviews. Both thermal and photochemical activation of CO{sub 2} by metal complexes is addressed in these reviews. With metal catalysts in heterogeneous mode, a significant amount of work has been carried out with variations of Fe catalysts for synthesis of hydrocarbons via the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) route, modified Cu-ZnO catalysts for methanol synthesis or further conversion of methanol to gasoline (MTG). These energy intensive transformations utilize heterogeneous catalysts that operate between 250 C to 400 C although co-production of water makes the overall reactions exothermic.

Mahajan, D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Bose, A.C.

1999-07-01

342

Proposed roadmap for overcoming legal and financial obstacles to carbon capture and sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Many existing proposals either lack sufficient concreteness to make carbon capture and geological sequestration (CCGS) operational or fail to focus on a comprehensive, long term framework for its regulation, thus failing to account adequately for the urgency of the issue, the need to develop immediate experience with large scale demonstration projects, or the financial and other incentives required to launch early demonstration projects. We aim to help fill this void by proposing a roadmap to commercial deployment of CCGS in the United States.This roadmap focuses on the legal and financial incentives necessary for rapid demonstration of geological sequestration in the absence of national restrictions on CO2 emissions. It weaves together existing federal programs and financing opportunities into a set of recommendations for achieving commercial viability of geological sequestration.

Jacobs, Wendy (Harvard Environmental Law and Policy, Cambridge, MA (US)); Chohen, Leah; Kostakidis-Lianos, Leah; Rundell, Sara (Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA (US))

2009-03-01

343

Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the results of developing the rock physics theory of the effects of CO{sub 2} injection and storage in a host reservoir on the rock?s elastic properties and the resulting seismic signatures (reflections) observed during sequestration and storage. Specific topics addressed are: (a) how the elastic properties and attenuation vary versus CO{sub 2} saturation in the reservoir during injection and subsequent distribution of CO{sub 2} in the reservoir; (b) what are the combined effects of saturation and pore pressure on the elastic properties; and (c) what are the combined effects of saturation and rock fabric alteration on the elastic properties. The main new results are (a) development and application of the capillary pressure equilibrium theory to forecasting the elastic properties as a function of CO{sub 2} saturation; (b) a new method of applying this theory to well data; and (c) combining this theory with other effects of CO{sub 2} injection on the rock frame, including the effects of pore pressure and rock fabric alteration. An important result is translating these elastic changes into synthetic seismic responses, specifically, the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) response depending on saturation as well as reservoir and seal type. As planned, three graduate students participated in this work and, as a result, received scientific and technical training required should they choose to work in the area of monitoring and quantifying CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary

2013-05-31

344

Effects of vegetation restoration on soil organic carbon sequestration at multiple scales in semi-arid Loess Plateau, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration by vegetation restoration is the theme of much current research. Since 1999, the program of “Grain for Green”has been implemented in the semi-arid Loess Plateau, China. Its scope represents the largest vegetation restoration activity in China. However, it is still unclear for the SOC sequestration effects of vegetation cover change or natural succession promoted by

Yafeng Wang; Bojie Fu; Yihe Lü; Liding Chen

2011-01-01

345

Conservation and sequestration of carbon: The potential of forest and agroforest management practices  

SciTech Connect

Forests play a major role in the Earth's carbon cycle through assimilation, storage, and emission of CO2. Establishment and management of boreal, temperate, and tropical forest and agroforest systems could potentially enhance sequestration of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. A biologic and economic analysis of forest establishment and management options from 94 nations revealed that forestation, agroforestry, and silviculture could be employed to conserve and sequester one gigaton (Gt) of carbon annually over a 50 year period. The marginal cost of implementing these options to sequester 55 Gt of carbon would be approximately $10/ton.

Dixon, R.K.; Winjum, J.K.; Schroeder, P.E.

1993-01-01

346

Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

Dr. Atul Jain

2005-04-17

347

A spatial resolution threshold of land cover in estimating terrestrial carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Changes in carbon density (i.e., carbon stock per unit area) and land cover greatly affect carbon sequestration. Previous studies have shown that land cover change detection strongly depends on spatial scale. However, the influence of the spatial resolution of land cover change information on the estimated terrestrial carbon sequestration is not known. Here, we quantified and evaluated the impact of land cover change databases at various spatial resolutions (250 m, 500 m, 1 km, 2 km, and 4 km) on the magnitude and spatial patterns of regional carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama using the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS). Results indicated a threshold of 1 km in the land cover change databases and in the estimated regional terrestrial carbon sequestration. Beyond this threshold, significant biases occurred in the estimation of terrestrial carbon sequestration, its interannual variability, and spatial patterns. In addition, the overriding impact of interannual climate variability on the temporal change of regional carbon sequestration was unrealistically overshadowed by the impact of land cover change beyond the threshold. The implications of these findings directly challenge current continental- to global-scale carbon modeling efforts relying on information at coarse spatial resolution without incorporating fine-scale land cover dynamics.

Zhao, S. Q.; Liu, S.; Li, Z.; Sohl, T. L.

2010-01-01

348

Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil  

DOEpatents

In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

2012-12-18

349

A Risk-Based System Analysis Framework for Geological Carbon Sequestration.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to characterize existing carbon capture and sequestration technologies at a high level, develop an analytical framework to help assess the technologies, and implement the framework in a system dynamics model. The first year of this project succeeded in characterizing existing technologies to help focus the analysis on power plants. The assessment also helped determine which technologies are largely accepted by the carbon capture research community as relatively proven technologies, discuss the salient performance metrics, and assess the associated economics. With this information, an analytical framework was developed to assess the technologies from a systems view perspective. With this framework, the Carbon Sequestration and Risk Model (CSR) was developed to assess performance and economic risk issues as they relate to global atmospheric CO2 concentration goals and single plant scale projects to characterize the economics of these systems.

Kobos, Peter H.; Klotz, Richard

2006-10-01

350

Carbon sequestration in European soils through straw incorporation: limitations and alternatives.  

PubMed

We compared alternate uses of cereal straw (4.25t dry matter ha(-1) containing 1.7t carbon (C)) for their effectiveness in relation to climate change mitigation. The scenarios were (1) incorporation into soil to increase soil organic carbon (SOC) content ("carbon sequestration") and (2) combustion to generate electricity. The Rothamsted Carbon Model was used to estimate SOC accumulation in a silty clay loam soil under the climatic conditions of north-west Europe. Using straw for electricity generation saved seven times more CO2 than from SOC accumulation. This comparison assumed that electricity from straw combustion displaced that generated from coal and used the mean annual accumulation of SOC over 100yr. SOC increased most rapidly in the early years, but then more slowly as a new equilibrium value was approached. We suggest that increased SOC from straw incorporation does not represent genuine climate change mitigation through carbon sequestration. In Europe, most straw not already incorporated in the field where it is grown is subsequently returned elsewhere, e.g., after use for animal bedding and production of manure. Only additional retention of C in soil compared to the alternative use represents sequestration. Maintenance of SOC for soil functioning is a more appropriate rationale for returning straw to soil than climate change mitigation. This analysis shows that considerably greater climate change mitigation is achieved through saved CO2 emissions by burning straw for electricity generation, replacing some use of fossil fuel. PMID:18061434

Powlson, D S; Riche, A B; Coleman, K; Glendining, M J; Whitmore, A P

2008-01-01

351

Delineation of Magnesium-rich Ultramafic Rocks Available for Mineral Carbon Sequestration in the United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 2005 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage suggested that a major gap in mineral carbon sequestration is locating the magnesium-silicate bedrock available to sequester CO2. It is generally known that silicate minerals with high concentrations of magnesium are suitable for mineral carbonation. However, no assessment has been made covering the entire United States detailing their geographical distribution and extent, or evaluating their potential for use in mineral carbonation. Researchers at Columbia University and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a digital geologic database of ultramafic rocks in the continental United States. Data were compiled from varied-scale geologic maps of magnesium-silicate ultramafic rocks. These rock types are potentially suitable as source material for mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration. The focus of the national-scale map is entirely on suitable ultramafic rock types, which typically consist primarily of olivine and serpentine minerals. By combining the map with digital datasets that show non-mineable lands (such as urban areas and National Parks), estimates on potential depth of a surface mine, and the predicted reactivities of the mineral deposits, one can begin to estimate the capacity for CO2 mineral sequestration within the United States. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Krevor, S. C.; Graves, C. R.; Van Gosen, B. S.; McCafferty, A. E.

2009-01-01

352

Engineered Escherichia coli with Periplasmic Carbonic Anhydrase as a Biocatalyst for CO2 Sequestration  

PubMed Central

Carbonic anhydrase is an enzyme that reversibly catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide (CO2). It has been suggested recently that this remarkably fast enzyme can be used for sequestration of CO2, a major greenhouse gas, making this a promising alternative for chemical CO2 mitigation. To promote the economical use of enzymes, we engineered the carbonic anhydrase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngCA) in the periplasm of Escherichia coli, thereby creating a bacterial whole-cell catalyst. We then investigated the application of this system to CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation, a process with the potential to store large quantities of CO2. ngCA was highly expressed in the periplasm of E. coli in a soluble form, and the recombinant bacterial cell displayed the distinct ability to hydrate CO2 compared with its cytoplasmic ngCA counterpart and previously reported whole-cell CA systems. The expression of ngCA in the periplasm of E. coli greatly accelerated the rate of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation and exerted a striking impact on the maximal amount of CaCO3 produced under conditions of relatively low pH. It was also shown that the thermal stability of the periplasmic enzyme was significantly improved. These results demonstrate that the engineered bacterial cell with periplasmic ngCA can successfully serve as an efficient biocatalyst for CO2 sequestration.

Jo, Byung Hoon; Kim, Im Gyu; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kang, Dong Gyun

2013-01-01

353

Engineered Escherichia coli with periplasmic carbonic anhydrase as a biocatalyst for CO2 sequestration.  

PubMed

Carbonic anhydrase is an enzyme that reversibly catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide (CO2). It has been suggested recently that this remarkably fast enzyme can be used for sequestration of CO2, a major greenhouse gas, making this a promising alternative for chemical CO2 mitigation. To promote the economical use of enzymes, we engineered the carbonic anhydrase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngCA) in the periplasm of Escherichia coli, thereby creating a bacterial whole-cell catalyst. We then investigated the application of this system to CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation, a process with the potential to store large quantities of CO2. ngCA was highly expressed in the periplasm of E. coli in a soluble form, and the recombinant bacterial cell displayed the distinct ability to hydrate CO2 compared with its cytoplasmic ngCA counterpart and previously reported whole-cell CA systems. The expression of ngCA in the periplasm of E. coli greatly accelerated the rate of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation and exerted a striking impact on the maximal amount of CaCO3 produced under conditions of relatively low pH. It was also shown that the thermal stability of the periplasmic enzyme was significantly improved. These results demonstrate that the engineered bacterial cell with periplasmic ngCA can successfully serve as an efficient biocatalyst for CO2 sequestration. PMID:23974145

Jo, Byung Hoon; Kim, Im Gyu; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kang, Dong Gyun; Cha, Hyung Joon

2013-11-01

354

Carbon Storage and Sequestration in Ecosystems of the Western United States: Finings of a Recent Resource Assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new assessment was conducted covering 2.66 million km2 in the Western United States extending from the Rockies to the Pacific coastal waters, in two time periods: baseline (the first half of the 2000s) and future (projections from baseline to 2050), using in-situ and remotely sensed data together with statistical methods and simulation models. The total carbon storage in the ecosystems of the Western United States in 2005 was approximately 13,920 TgC; distributed in live biomass (38%), soil organic carbon (39%), and woody debris and other surface carbon pools (23%). Estimated mean values of major flux terms included net ecosystem production (-127.2 TgC/yr), inland lateral flux (7.2 TgC/yr) from rivers/streams to coastal areas, emissions from inland water surfaces to the atmosphere (28.2 TgC/yr), and emissions form the wildland fires (10.0 TgC/yr). Average C sequestration rates for the region were estimated: -86.6 TgC/yr in net flux for all terrestrial ecosystems, -2.4 and -2.0 TgC/yr in net burial rates in lakes and reservoirs and in the Pacific coastal waters respectively, for a total sequestration rate of -90.9 TgC/yr across all of the major ecosystems. A negative sign denotes uptake, sequestration, or a carbon sink. Most of the net carbon flux is in forests (62.2%, -72.1 gC/m2/yr), followed by grasslands/shrublands (29.6%, -16.4 gC/m2/yr), agricultural lands (7.1%, -38.3 gC/m2/yr), and wetlands (0.96%, -82.1 gC/m2/yr). Projected on the basis of future land-use and land-cover scenarios and climate projections, the total amount of carbon that potentially could be stored in the ecosystems of the Western United States in 2050 was estimated to range from 13,743 to 19,407 TgC, an increase of 1,325-3,947 TgC (or 10.7 to 25.5 %) from baseline conditions of 2005. The potential mean (averaged between 2006 and 2050) annual net carbon flux in terrestrial ecosystems was projected to range from -113.9 TgC/yr to 2.9 TgC/yr. When compared to the baseline net carbon flux estimates, the projected future carbon-sequestration rates in the Western United States represent a potential decline by 16.5 to 49 TgC/yr. The projected decline is largely associated with grasslands/shrublands and forests in the Rockies. Under future projections of climate change, the GHG combustion emissions from wildfires were projected to increase by 28 to 56 percent, relative to baseline conditions.

Zhu, Z.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Hawbaker, T. J.; Liu, S.; Sleeter, B. M.; Sohl, T. L.; Stackpoole, S. M.

2012-12-01

355

Forest Carbon Sequestration: Some Issues for Forest Investments  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major problem being faced by human society is that the global temperature is believed to be rising due to human activity that releases carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, i.e., global warming. The major culprit is thought to be fossil fuel burning, which is releasing increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The problem of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide

Roger A. Sedjo

2001-01-01

356

Global carbon sequestration in tidal, saline wetland soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wetlands represent the largest component of the terrestrial biological carbon pool and thus play an important role in global carbon cycles. Most global carbon budgets, however, have focused on dry land ecosystems that extend over large areas and have not accounted for the many small, scattered carbonstoring ecosystems such as tidal saline wetlands. We compiled data for 154 sites in

Gail L. Chmura; Shimon C. Anisfeld; Donald R. Cahoon; James C. Lynch

2003-01-01

357

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN SOILS AND GLOBAL CLIMATIC CHANGE  

EPA Science Inventory

The storage of carbon in soils is a very complex phenomenon. lthough it is not fully characterized or understood, steps can be taken to use soils as a reservoir of carbon. he role of soils in the carbon cycle must be more fully understood to develop strategies to mitigate increas...

358

Is mineral motion the ultimate control on critical zone carbon sequestration?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last decade, modeling and mechanistic studies of organic carbon (OC) turnover in soils and sediments have converged on one key finding - that organic matter (OM) complexation to fine minerals is a critical factor to stabilizing and sequestering carbon. However, OC production and mineral production are typically spatially separated (Fig. 1). Biological primary production primarily occurs where there is light - above the soil surface or in the low-turbidity euphotic zone of lakes and oceans. Mineral surface area (SA) is produced in the sapprolite, or bedrock-soil interface, where primary minerals are chemically weathered to secondary silicate clays and Fe and Al hydroxides. This physical separation between fresh OC and fine minerals results in rapid turnover of most photosynthesized carbon in soil litter layers, and most fresh clay minerals remain carbon-free due to limited contact. Likewise, OC mobilized into river corridors is in significant excess of the system’s capacity to stabilize it, with most OC being rapidly metabolized and returned to the atmosphere as CO2. We therefore hypothesize that the rate at which fresh minerals are delivered to and mix with fresh OC determines the rate of carbon preservation at a watershed scale. Although many studies have examined the role of erosion in carbon balances, none consider that fresh carbon and fresh minerals interact. Here we present the implications for our hypothesis, and show supporting data from a number of our own studies, including: Andean-Amazon carbon sequestration due to erosion-deposition events; preliminary evidence for net carbon sequestration in “legacy” sediments deposited in Eastern Piedmont streams following colonial deforestation; and increased carbon storage with increased earthworm abundance and mixing along an earthworm invasion chronosequence. Our hypothesis - that the rate of mixing fresh carbon with fresh minerals is a primary control on watershed-scale carbon sequestration - is central to our recently funded Critical Zone Observatory project for the Christina River Basin in Pennsylvania and Delaware, entitled: “Spatial and temporal integration of carbon and mineral fluxes: a whole watershed approach to quantifying anthropogenic modification of critical zone carbon sequestration

Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Yoo, K.; Aalto, R. E.; Chen, C.; Fernandez, C.

2009-12-01

359

Successful implementation of biochar carbon sequestration in European soils requires additional benefits and close collaboration with the bioenergy sector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biochar soil application has been proposed as a measure to mitigate climate change and on the same time improve soil fertility by increased soil carbon sequestration. However, while on tropical soils the beneficial effects of biochar application on crop growth often become immediately apparent, it has been shown to be more difficult to demonstrate these effects on the more fertile soils in temperate regions. Therefore and because of the lack of carbon credits for farmers, it is necessary to link biochar application to additional benefits, both related to agricultural as well as to bioenergy production. Thermal gasification of biomass is an efficient (95% energy efficiency) and flexible way (able to cope with many different and otherwise difficult-to-handle biomass fuels) to generate bioenergy, while producing a valuable by-product - gasification biochar, containing recalcitrant carbon and essential crop nutrients. The use of the residual char product in agricultural soils will add value to the technology as well as result in additional soil benefits such as providing plant nutrients and improving soil water-holding capacity while reducing leaching risks. From a soil column (30 x 130 cm) experiment with gasification straw biochar amendment to coarse sandy subsoil increased root density of barley at critical depths in the soil profile reducing the mechanical resistance was shown, increasing yields, and the soil's capacity to store plant available water. Incorporation of residuals from a bioenergy technology like gasification show great potentials to reduce subsoil constraints increasing yield potentials on poor soils. Another advantage currently not appropriately utilized is recovery of phosphorus (P). In a recent pot experiments char products originating from low-temperature gasification of various biofuels were evaluated for their suitability as P fertilizers. Wheat straw gasification biochar generally had a low P content but a high P plant availability. To improve the fertilizer value while keeping a high carbon content in the char, the gasification of a combination of sewage sludge and wheat straw was implemented, resulting in a char product with a promising performance as a fertilizer and soil amendment. To implement gasification-biochar as a promising soil improver on the marked, independently of potential carbon market developments and CO2 certificates, stakeholder involvement is strongly required. In a newly established project consortium Bregentved Estate (one of Europe's largest agriculture companies) and the DONG Energy company (one of the leading energy groups in Northern Europe) are in a joint effort trying to integrate the economic matrix of i) biomass needed for bioenergy, ii) profit from energy generation and iii) soil advantages gained from biochar application. Experiments are conducted with a 6MW biomass gasification demonstration plant producing straw biochar used in field plots (12 m x 250 m).

Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Müller-Stöver, Dorette; Bruun, Esben W.; Petersen, Carsten T.

2014-05-01

360

CO2 hydrate composite for ocean carbon sequestration.  

PubMed

Rapid CO2 hydrate formation was investigated with the objective of producing a negatively buoyant CO2-seawater mixture under high-pressure and low-temperature conditions, simulating direct CO2 injection at intermediate ocean depths of 1.0-1.3 km. A coflow reactor was developed to maximize CO2 hydrate production by injecting water droplets (e.g., approximately 267 microm average diameter) from a capillary tube into liquid CO2. The droplets were injected in the mixing zone of the reactor where CO2 hydrate formed at the surface of the water droplets. The water-encased hydrate particles aggregated in the liquid CO2, producing a paste-like composite containing CO2 hydrate, liquid CO2, and water phases. This composite was extruded into ambient water from the coflow reactor as a coherent cylindrical mass, approximately 6 mm in diameter, which broke into pieces 5-10 cm long. Both modeling and experiments demonstrated that conversion from liquid CO2 to CO2 hydrate increased with water flow rate, ambient pressure, and residence time and decreased with CO2 flow rate. Increased mixing intensity, as expressed by the Reynolds number, enhanced the mass transfer and increased the conversion of liquid CO2 into CO2 hydrate. Using a plume model, we show that hydrate composite particles (for a CO2 loading of 1000 kg/s and 0.25 hydrate conversion) will dissolve and sink through a total depth of 350 m. This suggests significantly better CO2 dispersal and potentially reduced environmental impacts than would be possible by simply discharging positively buoyant liquid CO2 droplets. Further studies are needed to address hydrate conversion efficiency, scale-up criteria, sequestration longevity, and impact on the ocean biota before in-situ production of sinking CO2 hydrate composite can be applied to oceanic CO2 storage and sequestration. PMID:12953884

Lee, Sangyong; Liang, Liyuan; Riestenberg, David; West, Olivia R; Tsouris, Costas; Adams, Eric

2003-08-15

361

Carbon Sequestration and Energy Balance of Turf in the Denver Urban Ecosystem and Adjacent Tallgrass Prairie  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urban ecosystems are currently characterized by rapid growth and are expected to continually expand. They represent an important driver of land use change. A significant component of urban ecosystems is lawns, potentially the single largest irrigated "crop" in the U.S. Between March and October of 2011 and 2012, eddy covariance measurements of net carbon dioxide exchange and evapotranspiration along with energy balance fluxes were conducted for an irrigated, fertilized lawn (rye-bluegrass-mix) in metropolitan Denver and for a nearby tallgrass prairie (big bluestem, switchgrass, cheatgrass, blue grama). Due to the semi-arid climate conditions of the Denver region, differences in management (i.e., irrigation and fertilization) are expected to have a discernible impact on ecosystem productivity and thus on carbon sequestration rates, evapotranspiration, and the partitioning of sensible and latent heat. Data for the 2011 season showed that cumulative evapotranspiration was approximately 600 mm for the urban lawn and 305 mm for the tallgrass prairie; cumulative carbon sequestration was calculated to be 172 and 85 g C/m2, respectively. Also, patterns of carbon exchange differed between the grasslands. In 2011, both sites showed daily net uptake of carbon starting in late May, but the urban lawn displayed greater diurnal variability as well as greater uptake rates in general, especially following fertilization in mid-June. In contrast, the trend of carbon uptake at the prairie site was occasionally reversed following strong convective precipitation events, resulting in a temporary net release of carbon. Preliminary data for the 2012 season (up to early July) indicated an earlier start of net carbon uptake and higher cumulative evapotranspiration for both locations, likely due to a warm spring. The continuing acquisition of data and investigation of these relations will help assess the potential impact of urban growth on regional carbon sequestration.

Thienelt, T.; Anderson, D. E.; Powell, K. M.

2012-12-01

362

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2003-12-18

363

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase 1. Deliverable 28: Quarterly Report 9, September 26, 2003-December 25, 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under...

S. M. Capalbo

2006-01-01

364

Technical Progress Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biod...

B. Stanley S. Brown E. Hawes Z. Kant M. Calmon G. Tiepolo

2002-01-01

365

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration and Other Ecosystem Services. Quarterly Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration pro...

J. A. Burger

2005-01-01

366

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Phase 1. Deliverable 27: Quarterly Report 8, September 26, 2003-September 25, 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under...

S. M. Capalbo

2005-01-01

367

Using marine macroalgae for carbon sequestration: a critical appraisal  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been a good deal of interest in the potential of marine vegetation as a sink for anthropogenic C emissions (“Blue\\u000a Carbon”). Marine primary producers contribute at least 50% of the world’s carbon fixation and may account for as much as 71%\\u000a of all carbon storage. In this paper, we analyse the current rate of harvesting of both commercially

Ik Kyo Chung; John Beardall; Smita Mehta; Dinabandhu Sahoo; Slobodanka Stojkovic

368

Biochar carbon sequestration and downward translocation in contrasting soils under field conditions in Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon (C) sequestration potential of biochar depends on its stability and stabilisation of native or added organic C in soil. However, the processes of biochar degradation, fate in soil organic matter pools, and downward translocation in the soil profile, and the influence of biochar on emissions or stabilisation of native organic C sources are poorly understood under field conditions. An Eucalyptus saligna green-waste biochar (?13C -36.6o; total C 66.8%) produced by slow pyrolysis at 450° C was applied at 29.2 t ha-1 to 10-cm depth in circular (0.66-m diameter) micro-plots, encompassing three soils [Tenosol, Dermosol and Ferrosol (Australian Soil Classification); Arenosol, Planosol, Ferralsol (approximate WRB Classification] under contrasting pasture systems across New South Wales and Tasmania (Australia). The aims of this study were to (i) monitor the fate of biochar C in respired CO2 and quantify biochar stability and stabilisation under field conditions, (ii) determine the influence of biochar on native soil C emissions, and (iii) track downward migration of the surface (0-10 cm) applied biochar over a 1-year period. We also periodically monitored the impact of biochar on microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and aboveground biomass production. The soils were separated into light and heavy C fractions and the C recovery of applied biochar C was calculated at 0-8, 8-12, 12-20 and 20-30 cm depths. Biochar C mineralisation rates were generally higher, albeit fluctuated widely, in the first 3 to 4 months. Over the first 7 months, the proportion of added biochar C mineralised in soils ranged between 1.4 and 5.5% and followed the sequence: Tenosol < Dermosol < Ferrosol. The mean residence time (MRT) of biochar ranged from 29 and 70 years. These values of MRT should be treated as highly conservative values, as they mainly reflect the MRT of relatively labile C components in biochar. The cumulative CO2-C emission over the 7-month period from native soil and plant sources was larger in the biochar-amended Tenosol, whereas lower in the biochar-amended Dermosol and Ferrosol, relative to the corresponding controls. As the aboveground biomass production was similar between the biochar-amended and control micro-plots during the first 7 months, the higher cumulative CO2-C emission in the biochar versus control Tenosol may be related to positive priming of native SOC mineralisation by biochar, and/or greater belowground allocation of plant-assimilated C, or possibly alternative effects (i.e. negative priming or lower belowground plant C allocation) in the Dermosol and Ferrosol. At 4 months, most of the applied biochar was recovered in the top 12 cm depth, with the total recovery of 72.1% in the Tenosol, 103.7% in the Dermosol and 79.2% in the Ferrosol. Biochar C was clearly migrated downward from the application depth (0-10 cm) within 4 months, particularly in Tenosol and Ferrosol, with the recovery of 4.8%, 2.7% and 12.7% in the 12-20 cm profile, and 6.0%, 1.1% and 9.1% at the 20-30 cm profile, across the Tenosol, Dermosol and Ferrosol, respectively. At 4 months, MBC was higher in the biochar-amended Tenosol and Dermosol than the corresponding controls, whereas, biochar had no effect on MBC in the Ferrosol, possibly due to its higher native organic C content cf. the other soil types. The updated results will be presented at the conference.

Pal Singh, Bhupinder; Fang, Yunying; Boersma, Mark; Matta, Pushpinder; Van Zwieten, Lukas; Macdonald, Lynne

2014-05-01

369

Relative permeability experiments of carbon dioxide displacing brine and their implications for carbon sequestration.  

PubMed

To mitigate anthropogenically induced climate change and ocean acidification, net carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere must be reduced. One proposed option is underground CO2 disposal. Large-scale injection of CO2 into the Earth's crust requires an understanding of the multiphase flow properties of high-pressure CO2 displacing brine. We present laboratory-scale core flooding experiments designed to measure CO2 endpoint relative permeability for CO2 displacing brine at in situ pressures, salinities, and temperatures. Endpoint drainage CO2 relative permeabilities for liquid and supercritical CO2 were found to be clustered around 0.4 for both the synthetic and natural media studied. These values indicate that relative to CO2, water may not be strongly wetting the solid surface. Based on these results, CO2 injectivity will be reduced and pressure-limited reservoirs will have reduced disposal capacity, though area-limited reservoirs may have increased capacity. Future reservoir-scale modeling efforts should incorporate sensitivity to relative permeability. Assuming applicability of the experimental results to other lithologies and that the majority of reservoirs are pressure limited, geologic carbon sequestration would require approximately twice the number of wells for the same injectivity. PMID:24274391

Levine, Jonathan S; Goldberg, David S; Lackner, Klaus S; Matter, Juerg M; Supp, Michael G; Ramakrishnan, T S

2014-01-01

370

Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application for enhancing carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Two major mechanisms, (bio)chemical alteration and physicochemical protection, stabilize soil organic carbon (SOC) and thereby control soil carbon turnover. With (bio)chemical alteration, SOC is transformed by biotic and abiotic processes to chemical forms that are more resistant to decomposition and, in some cases, more easily retained by sorption to soil solids. With physicochemical protection, biochemical attack of SOC is inhibited by organomineral interactions at molecular to millimeter scales. Stabilization of otherwise decomposable SOM can occur via sorption to soil surfaces, complexation with soil minerals, occlusion within aggregates, and deposition in pores inaccessible to decomposers and extracellular enzymes. Soil structure (i.e., the arrangement of solids and pores in the soil) is a master integrating variable that both controls and indicates the SOC stabilization status of a soil. To enhance SOC sequestration, the best option is to modify the soil physicochemical environment to favor the activities of fungi. Specific practices that accomplish this include minimizing tillage, maintaining a near-neutral soil pH and an adequate base cation exchange capacity (particularly Ca), ensuring adequate drainage, and minimizing erosion by water and wind. In some soils, amendments with various high-specific-surface micro- and mesoporous sorbents such as fly ash or charcoal can be beneficial.

Jastrow, Julie D.; Amonette, James E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.

2007-01-01

371

Soil carbon sequestration impacts on global climate change and food security.  

PubMed

The carbon sink capacity of the world's agricultural and degraded soils is 50 to 66% of the historic carbon loss of 42 to 78 gigatons of carbon. The rate of soil organic carbon sequestration with adoption of recommended technologies depends on soil texture and structure, rainfall, temperature, farming system, and soil management. Strategies to increase the soil carbon pool include soil restoration and woodland regeneration, no-till farming, cover crops, nutrient management, manuring and sludge application, improved grazing, water conservation and harvesting, efficient irrigation, agroforestry practices, and growing energy crops on spare lands. An increase of 1 ton of soil carbon pool of degraded cropland soils may increase crop yield by 20 to 40 kilograms per hectare (kg/ha) for wheat, 10 to 20 kg/ha for maize, and 0.5 to 1 kg/ha for cowpeas. As well as enhancing food security, carbon sequestration has the potential to offset fossil fuel emissions by 0.4 to 1.2 gigatons of carbon per year, or 5 to 15% of the global fossil-fuel emissions. PMID:15192216

Lal, R

2004-06-11

372

Soil Carbon Sequestration Impacts on Global Climate Change and Food Security  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The carbon sink capacity of the world's agricultural and degraded soils is 50 to 66% of the historic carbon loss of 42 to 78 gigatons of carbon. The rate of soil organic carbon sequestration with adoption of recommended technologies depends on soil texture and structure, rainfall, temperature, farming system, and soil management. Strategies to increase the soil carbon pool include soil restoration and woodland regeneration, no-till farming, cover crops, nutrient management, manuring and sludge application, improved grazing, water conservation and harvesting, efficient irrigation, agroforestry practices, and growing energy crops on spare lands. An increase of 1 ton of soil carbon pool of degraded cropland soils may increase crop yield by 20 to 40 kilograms per hectare (kg/ha) for wheat, 10 to 20 kg/ha for maize, and 0.5 to 1 kg/ha for cowpeas. As well as enhancing food security, carbon sequestration has the potential to offset fossil-fuel emissions by 0.4 to 1.2 gigatons of carbon per year, or 5 to 15% of the global fossil-fuel emissions.

Lal, R.

2004-06-01

373

Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50°C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore integrity because cement alteration by all phases of CO2 is dominated by carbonation reaction. This is consistent with previous field studies of wellbore cement with extensive carbonation after exposure to CO2 for 3 decades. However, XMT imaging indicates that preferential cement alteration by supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated groundwater can occur along the cement-steel or cement-rock interfaces. This highlights the importance of further investigation of cement degradation along the interfaces of wellbore materials to ensure permanent geologic carbon storage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2013-08-16

374

Agricultural induced impacts on soil carbon cycling and sequestration in a seasonally saturated wetland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fate of organic carbon (C) lost by erosion is not well understood in agricultural settings. Recent models suggest that wetlands and other small water bodies may serve as important long-term sinks of eroded C, receiving ~30 % of all eroded material in the US. To better understand the role of seasonally-saturated wetlands in sequestering eroded C, we examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of C and sediment accumulation in a 13-yr-old constructed wetland used to treat agricultural runoff. The fate of C sequestered within deposited sediment was modeled using point-sampling, remote sensing, and geostatistics. Using a spatially-explicit sampling design, annual net rates of sedimentation and above ground biomass were measured during two contrasting years (vegetated, 2004 vs. non-vegetated, 2005), followed by collection of sediment cores to the antecedent soil layer, representing 13 yr of sediment and C accumulation. We documented high annual variation in the relative contribution of endogenous and exogenous C sources, as well as absolute rates of sediment and C deposition. This annual variation, however, was muted in the long-term (13-yr) sediment record, which showed consistent vertical patterns of uniform C distribution (~14 g kg-1) and ?13C signatures in high depositional environments. This was in contrast to low depositional environments which had high levels of surface C enrichment (20-35 g kg-1) underlain by C depleted (5-10 g kg-1) sediments and an increasing ?13C signature with depth indicating increasing decomposition. These results highlight the importance of sedimentation in physically protecting soil organic carbon and its role in controlling the long-term C concentration of seasonally-saturated wetland soils. While significant enrichment of surface sediments with endogenous C occurred in newly deposited sediment (i.e., 125 kg m2 in 2004), fluctuating cycles of flooding and drying maintained the long-term C concentration at the same level as inflowing sediment (i.e., 14 g kg-1), indicating no additional long-term storage of endogenous C. These results demonstrate that constructed flow-through wetlands can serve as important sinks for eroded C and sediment in agricultural landscapes, however, additional C sequestration via enrichment from endogenous sources may be limited in seasonally-saturated wetlands due to rapid decomposition during drying cycles.

Maynard, J. J.; O'Geen, A. T.; Dahlgren, R. A.

2011-06-01

375

Soil carbon cycling and sequestration in a seasonally saturated wetland receiving agricultural runoff  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fate of organic carbon (C) lost by erosion is not well understood in agricultural settings. Recent models suggest that wetlands and other small water bodies may serve as important long-term sinks of eroded C, receiving ~30 % of all eroded material in the US. To better understand the role of seasonally-saturated wetlands in sequestering eroded C, we examined the spatial and temporal dynamics of C and sediment accumulation in a 13-year-old constructed wetland used to treat agricultural runoff. The fate of C sequestered within deposited sediment was modeled using point-sampling, remote sensing, and geostatistics. Using a spatially-explicit sampling design, annual net rates of sedimentation and above-ground biomass were measured during two contrasting years (vegetated (2004) vs. non-vegetated (2005)), followed by collection of sediment cores to the antecedent soil layer, representing 13 years of sediment and C accumulation. We documented high annual variation in the relative contribution of endogenous and exogenous C sources, as well as absolute rates of sediment and C deposition. This annual variation, however, was muted in the long-term (13 yr) sediment record, which showed consistent vertical patterns of uniform C distribution (~14 g kg-1) and ?13C signatures in high depositional environments. This was in contrast to low depositional environments which had high levels of surface C enrichment (20-35 g kg-1) underlain by C depleted (5-10 g kg-1) sediments and an increasing ?13C signature with depth indicating increased decomposition. These results highlight the importance of sedimentation in physically protecting soil organic carbon and its role in controlling the long-term C concentration of seasonally-saturated wetland soils. While significant enrichment of surface sediments with endogenous C occurred in newly deposited sediment (i.e., 125 kg m2 in 2004), fluctuating cycles of flooding and drying maintained the long-term C concentration at the same level as inflowing sediment (i.e., 14 g kg-1), indicating no additional long-term storage of endogenous C. These results demonstrate that constructed flow-through wetlands can serve as important sinks for eroded C and sediment in agricultural landscapes, however, additional C sequestration via enrichment from endogenous sources may be limited in seasonally-saturated wetlands due to rapid decomposition during drying cycles.

Maynard, J. J.; Dahlgren, R. A.; O'Geen, A. T.

2011-11-01

376

GENOME-ENABLED DISCOVERY OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION GENES IN POPLAR  

SciTech Connect

Plants utilize carbon by partitioning the reduced carbon obtained through photosynthesis into different compartments and into different chemistries within a cell and subsequently allocating such carbon to sink tissues throughout the plant. Since the phytohormones auxin and cytokinin are known to influence sink strength in tissues such as roots (Skoog & Miller 1957, Nordstrom et al. 2004), we hypothesized that altering the expression of genes that regulate auxin-mediated (e.g., AUX/IAA or ARF transcription factors) or cytokinin-mediated (e.g., RR transcription factors) control of root growth and development would impact carbon allocation and partitioning belowground (Fig. 1 - Renewal Proposal). Specifically, the ARF, AUX/IAA and RR transcription factor gene families mediate the effects of the growth regulators auxin and cytokinin on cell expansion, cell division and differentiation into root primordia. Invertases (IVR), whose transcript abundance is enhanced by both auxin and cytokinin, are critical components of carbon movement and therefore of carbon allocation. Thus, we initiated comparative genomic studies to identify the AUX/IAA, ARF, RR and IVR gene families in the Populus genome that could impact carbon allocation and partitioning. Bioinformatics searches using Arabidopsis gene sequences as queries identified regions with high degrees of sequence similarities in the Populus genome. These Populus sequences formed the basis of our transgenic experiments. Transgenic modification of gene expression involving members of these gene families was hypothesized to have profound effects on carbon allocation and partitioning.

DAVIS J M

2007-10-11

377

The carbon-sequestration potential of a global afforestation program  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed the changes in the carbon cycle that could be achieved with a global, largescale afforestation program that is economically, politically, and technically feasible. We estimated that of the areas regarded as suitable for large-scale plantations, only about 345 million ha would actually be available for plantations and agroforestry for the sole purpose of sequestering carbon. The maximum annual

Sten Nilsson; Wolfgang Schopfhauser

1995-01-01

378

Mechanisms of microbial carbon sequestration in the ocean - future research directions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reviews progress on understanding biological carbon sequestration in the ocean with special reference to the microbial formation and transformation of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (RDOC), the microbial carbon pump (MCP). We propose that RDOC is a relative concept with a wide continuum of recalcitrance. Most RDOC compounds maintain their levels of recalcitrance only in a specific environmental context (RDOCt). The ocean RDOC pool also contains compounds that may be inaccessible to microbes due to their extremely low concentration (RDOCc). This differentiation allows us to appreciate the linkage between microbial source and RDOC composition on a range of temporal and spatial scales. Analyses of biomarkers and isotopic records show intensive MCP processes in the anoxic Proterozoic oceans when the MCP could have played a significant role in regulating climate. Understanding the dynamics of the MCP in conjunction with the better constrained biological pump (BP) over geological timescales could help to predict future climate trends. Integration of the MCP and the BP will require new research approaches and opportunities. Major goals include understanding the interactions between particulate organic carbon (POC) and RDOC that contribute to sequestration efficiency, and the concurrent determination of the chemical composition of organic carbon, microbial community composition and enzymatic activity. Molecular biomarkers and isotopic tracers should be employed to link water column processes to sediment records, as well as to link present-day observations to paleo-evolution. Ecosystem models need to be developed based on empirical relationships derived from bioassay experiments and field investigations in order to predict the dynamics of carbon cycling along the stability continuum of POC and RDOC under potential global change scenarios. We propose that inorganic nutrient input to coastal waters may reduce the capacity for carbon sequestration as RDOC. The nutrient regime enabling maximum carbon storage from combined POC flux and RDOC formation should therefore be sought.

Jiao, N.; Robinson, C.; Azam, F.; Thomas, H.; Baltar, F.; Dang, H.; Hardman-Mountford, N. J.; Johnson, M.; Kirchman, D. L.; Koch, B. P.; Legendre, L.; Li, C.; Liu, J.; Luo, T.; Luo, Y.-W.; Mitra, A.; Romanou, A.; Tang, K.; Wang, X.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, R.

2014-06-01

379

Calculation of hydrocarbon-in-place in gas and gas-condensate reservoirs - Carbon dioxide sequestration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140) authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2), requiring estimation of hydrocarbon