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Sample records for biomechanics clinical aspects

  1. Structural and biomechanical aspects of equine sacroiliac joint function and their relationship to clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Goff, L M; Jeffcott, L B; Jasiewicz, J; McGowan, C M

    2008-06-01

    Pain originating from the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) in horses has long been associated with poor performance, yet specific diagnosis of sacroiliac dysfunction (SID) has been difficult to achieve. Clinical presentation of SID appears to fall into two categories. The first, presenting as pain and poor performance, is responsive to local analgesia of periarticular structures with poorly defined pathology. The second presents primarily as poor performance with bony pathological changes as a result of chronic instability. Diagnostic tests based on biomechanics as well as manual provocation for SIJ pain have formed the basis of tests currently used to diagnose SIJ dysfunction in humans. This review summarises the anatomy and biomechanics of the equine SIJ and current biomechanical, innervation and motor control concepts in human SID. The relationship between abnormal SIJ motion and altered neuromotor control with clinical disease of the equine SIJ are discussed. Future utilisation of these principles to develop new diagnostic and management tools for the equine SID is promising. PMID:17493851

  2. Clinical applications of biomechanics cinematography.

    PubMed

    Woodle, A S

    1986-10-01

    Biomechanics cinematography is the analysis of movement of living organisms through the use of cameras, image projection systems, electronic digitizers, and computers. This article is a comparison of cinematographic systems and details practical uses of the modality in research and education. PMID:2946390

  3. Musculoskeletal demands on flamenco dancers: a clinical and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Bejjani, F J; Halpern, N; Pio, A; Dominguez, R; Voloshin, A; Frankel, V H

    1988-04-01

    The flamenco dancer acts on the floor like a drummer. The percussive footwork and vibration patterns created during dancing impose unusual demands on the musculoskeletal system. This study investigated the clinical and biomechanical aspects of this task. Using the electrodynogram and skin-mounted accelerometers, foot pressures as well as hip and knee vibrations were recorded in 10 female dancers after a thorough clinical evaluation. A health questionnaire was also distributed to 29 dancers. Foot pressures and acceleration data reveal the percussive nature of the dance. Some clinical findings, like calluses, are related to pressure distribution. Urogenital disorders, as well as back and neck pain, may be related to the vibrations generated by the flamenco dance form. The hip joint seems to absorb most of the impacts. "Vibration-pressure" diagrams are suggested as a useful tool for evaluating a dancer's biomechanical behavior, as well as the effect of floors and footwear on this behavior. PMID:3366430

  4. Using Clinical Gait Case Studies to Enhance Learning in Biomechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Clinical case studies facilitate the development of clinical reasoning strategies through knowledge and integration of the basic sciences. Case studies have been shown to be more effective in developing problem-solving abilities than the traditional lecture format. To enhance the learning experiences of students in biomechanics, clinical case…

  5. Contribution of biomechanics to clinical practice in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Savio L-Y

    2004-01-01

    Biomechanics is a field that has a very long history. It was described in ancient Chinese and Greek literature as early as 400-500 BC. The foundation of biomechanics, however, was laid during a period between the 1500's to 1700's by renowned personalities, da Vinci, Galileo, Borelli, Hooke, Newton, and so (Fung, Y.C., Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, 2nd Ed. Springer Verlag, Chapter 1, 1993). Beginning in the 1950's, Muybridge, Steindler, Inman, Lissner, and Hirsch performed the pioneering work on musculoskeletal biomechanics and the foundation of orthopaedic biomechanics was formed. For the following two decades, the field has blossomed and significant contributions in the biomechanics of bone, articular cartilage, soft tissues, upper and lower extremities, spine and so on has been made. More sophisticated equipment, coupled with mathematical modeling and better engineering design, has enabled us to make great strides. Bioengineers, in collaboration with orthopaedic surgeons, have translated many laboratory discoveries into clinical practice, leading to improved patient treatment and outcome. In the past 30 years, my colleagues and I have focused our research on the biomechanics of musculoskeletal soft tissues, ligaments and tendons, in particular. Therefore, in this lecture, the function of knee ligaments, the associated homeostatic responses secondary to immobilization and exercise, and healing of the ligaments will be reviewed. Examples of scientific findings that help to guide the surgical management of injury to ligaments will be given. New ideas on functional tissue engineering to improve the healing of knee ligaments and tendons will be presented. We have learned that tendons and ligaments are indeed complex biological tissues. To fully understand their behavior, healing and remodelling processes, this author advocates major efforts be made to bring molecular biologists, morphologists, biochemists, bioengineers, physical therapists and

  6. Applications of artificial neural nets in clinical biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Schöllhorn, W I

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of current applications of artificial neural networks in the area of clinical biomechanics. The body of literature on artificial neural networks grew intractably vast during the last 15 years. Conventional statistical models may present certain limitations that can be overcome by neural networks. Artificial neural networks in general are introduced, some limitations, and some proven benefits are discussed. PMID:15475120

  7. Biomechanical Aspects of the Muscle-Bone Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Avin, Keith G.; Bloomfield, Susan A.; Gross, Ted S.; Warden, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in the interaction between skeletal muscle and bone, particularly at the genetic and molecular levels. However, the genetic and molecular linkages between muscle and bone are achieved only within the context of the essential mechanical coupling of the tissues. This biomechanical and physiological linkage is readily evident as muscles attach to bone and induce exposure to varied mechanical stimuli via functional activity. The responsiveness of bone cells to mechanical stimuli, or their absence, is well established. However, questions remain regarding how muscle forces applied to bone serve to modulate bone homeostasis and adaptation. Similarly, the contributions of varied, but unique, stimuli generated by muscle to bone (such as low-magnitude, high-frequency stimuli) remains to be established. The current article focuses upon the mechanical relationship between muscle and bone. In doing so, we explore the stimuli that muscle imparts upon bone, models that enable investigation of this relationship, and recent data generated by these models. PMID:25515697

  8. [Sacrum fractures and lumbopelvic instabilities in pelvic ring injuries: classification and biomechanical aspects].

    PubMed

    Dudda, M; Hoffmann, M; Schildhauer, T A

    2013-11-01

    Multiplanar posterior pelvic ring instabilities are severe injuries and typically occur in the os ilium, the sacroiliac joint, the sacrum and/or in a combination of these sites. They pose challenges to the orthopedic trauma surgeon during reconstruction, particularly when these injuries are associated with multiplanar sacral fractures and involvement of the lumbosacral junction. Due to the multidirectional forces affecting the pelvic ring, one has to have basic knowledge about the mechanism of injury, its biomechanics, and the various treatment options. In the following we give an overview on injury classifications, biomechanical aspects of the injuries and various types of operative treatments and osteosynthesis techniques. PMID:24233081

  9. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF VETERINARY LISTERIOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This invited presentation updates the clinical aspects of Listeria monocytogenes in food animals. It summarizes the epidemiology and diagnostic methods. Virtually all domesticated animal species are susceptible to listeric infection, with a large proportion of healthy asymptomatic animals shedding...

  10. Clinical aspects of telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrell, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    Communication among physicians is an essential in order to combine our experiences for the elucidation and application of new knowledge and for the accurate and uniform application of established medical practice. This communication requires an adequate understanding of the culture of the patient and the social context of disease and indeed the culture of the physician. Malnutrition in Bangladesh means caloric insufficiency, and a program to lower cholesterol would be impertinent, while a program to enhance the nutrition of patients in Texas by an international effort to import more grain would be ludicrous. In the same vein a public health effort to combat alcoholic cirrhosis in Mecca would be as silly as a program to increase fiber in the diet of the Bantu. Clinical communication must acknowledge the culture of the issue at hand and the differences in the experiential base of the physicians. Not only do geography and culture affect the potential differences in the experiential bases, but the world utilizes very different traditions of education and science in training physicians. We are influenced by the diseases we treat, and learn to look for the expected at least as much as we are attentive to the unexpected. A physician in Siberia would be much more likely to recognize frostbite than one from Buenos Aires, and the Argentine doctor would much more likely consider Chaga's Disease to explain abdominal pain than a colleague in Zurich. Beyond these obvious issues in communication among physicians we must deal with the many languages and idioms used in the world. An overview of using Telemedicine SpaceBridge after the earthquake in the Republic of Armenia in 1988 is presented.

  11. Biomechanical factors in atherosclerosis: mechanisms and clinical implications†

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Brenda R.; Bäck, Magnus; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Daemen, Mat J.A.P.; Davies, Peter F.; Hoefer, Imo E.; Holvoet, Paul; Jo, Hanjoong; Krams, Rob; Lehoux, Stephanie; Monaco, Claudia; Steffens, Sabine; Virmani, Renu; Weber, Christian; Wentzel, Jolanda J.; Evans, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Blood vessels are exposed to multiple mechanical forces that are exerted on the vessel wall (radial, circumferential and longitudinal forces) or on the endothelial surface (shear stress). The stresses and strains experienced by arteries influence the initiation of atherosclerotic lesions, which develop at regions of arteries that are exposed to complex blood flow. In addition, plaque progression and eventually plaque rupture is influenced by a complex interaction between biological and mechanical factors—mechanical forces regulate the cellular and molecular composition of plaques and, conversely, the composition of plaques determines their ability to withstand mechanical load. A deeper understanding of these interactions is essential for designing new therapeutic strategies to prevent lesion development and promote plaque stabilization. Moreover, integrating clinical imaging techniques with finite element modelling techniques allows for detailed examination of local morphological and biomechanical characteristics of atherosclerotic lesions that may be of help in prediction of future events. In this ESC Position Paper on biomechanical factors in atherosclerosis, we summarize the current ‘state of the art’ on the interface between mechanical forces and atherosclerotic plaque biology and identify potential clinical applications and key questions for future research. PMID:25230814

  12. Biomechanical aspects of two different implant-prosthetic concepts for edentulous maxillae.

    PubMed

    Benzing, U R; Gall, H; Weber, H

    1995-01-01

    Two essentially different implant-prosthetic concepts are known for the treatment of edentulous maxillae. One concept propagates a "concentrated" arrangement of four to six implants in the premolar and anterior regions with a fixed cantilever superstructure. An alternative is a "spread-out" implant arrangement of six implants placed in the tuberosity, premolar, and anterior regions. The prosthetic rehabilitation consists of a fixed horseshoe-shaped bar and a removable prosthesis. A cantilever situation is avoided. The biomechanical aspects of these implant-prosthetic concepts were studied with clinical strain-gauge measurements and theoretical three-dimensional analysis using the finite element method. Results revealed that the distribution of bone stresses is more favorable with a spread-out implant arrangement than with a concentrated implant arrangement and cantilever restoration. The resistance to bending of a superstructure has an influence on bone stress concentration that should not be ignored. Stresses are controlled not only by the number or distribution of implants, but also by the material and design of the superstructure. PMID:7744438

  13. Soldier load carriage: historical, physiological, biomechanical, and medical aspects.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Reynolds, Katy L; Harman, Everett

    2004-01-01

    This study reviews historical and biomedical aspects of soldier load carriage. Before the 18th century, foot soldiers seldom carried more than 15 kg while on the march, but loads have progressively risen since then. This load increase is presumably due to the weight of weapons and equipment that incorporate new technologies to increase protection, firepower, communications, and mobility. Research shows that locating the load center of mass as close as possible to the body center of mass results in the lowest energy cost and tends to keep the body in an upright position similar to unloaded walking. Loads carried on other parts of the body result in higher energy expenditures: each kilogram added to the foot increases energy expenditure 7% to 10%; each kilogram added to the thigh increases energy expenditure 4%. Hip belts on rucksacks should be used whenever possible as they reduce pressure on the shoulders and increase comfort. Low or mid-back load placement might be preferable on uneven terrain but high load placement may be best for even terrain. In some tactical situations, combat load carts can be used, and these can considerably reduce energy expenditure and improve performance. Physical training that includes aerobic exercise, resistance training targeted at specific muscle groups, and regular road marching can considerably improve road marching speed and efficiency. The energy cost of walking with backpack loads increases progressively with increases in weight carried, body mass, walking speed, or grade; type of terrain also influences energy cost. Predictive equations have been developed, but these may not be accurate for prolonged load carriage. Common injuries associated with prolonged load carriage include foot blisters, stress fractures, back strains, metatarsalgia, rucksack palsy, and knee pain. Load carriage can be facilitated by lightening loads, improving load distribution, optimizing load-carriage equipment, and taking preventive action to reduce

  14. [Clinical aspects of trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Laurent, B; Keravel, Y; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Primary trigeminal neuralgia, termed "classical" in the international nomenclature, is an epilepsy-like disease. Diagnosis is easy when the disorder typical in presentation, based on clinical features and responsiveness to anticonvulsants. However, diagnosis can be difficult when atypical and/or in the long-duration forms. Furthermore, trigeminal neuralgia - even if typical in its clinical aspects - may be caused by a specific lesion and reveal a pathology. In other words, it may be symptomatic (secondary). Imaging, especially MRI, is of prime importance in identifying the cause and guiding the appropriate treatment. PMID:19328503

  15. Biomechanics of oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure-pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  16. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  17. Biomechanical aspects of the optimal number of implants to carry a cross-arch full restoration.

    PubMed

    Brunski, John B

    2014-01-01

    A proper definition of the 'optimal' number of implants to support a full arch prosthesis should go beyond solely a listing of the number of implants used in a treatment plan; it should be based upon a biomechanical analysis that takes into account several factors: the locations of the implants in the jaw; the quality and quantity of bone into which they are placed; the loads (forces and moments) that develop on the implants; the magnitudes of stress and strain that develop in the interfacial bone as well as in the implants and prosthesis; and the relationship of the stresses and strains to limits for the materials involved. Overall, determining an 'optimal' number of implants to use in a patient is a biomechanical design problem. This paper discusses some of the approaches that are already available to aid biomechanically focused clinical treatment planning. A number of examples are presented to illustrate how relatively simple biomechanical analyses - e.g. the Skalak model - as well as more complex analyses (e.g. finite element modelling) can be used to assess the pros and cons of various arrangements of implants to support fullarch prostheses. Some of the examples considered include the use of 4 rather than 6 implants to span the same arc-length in a jaw, and the pros and cons of using tilted implants as in the 'all-on-4' approach. In evaluating the accuracy of the various biomechanical analyses, it is clear that our current prediction methods are not always perfectly accurate in vivo, although they can provide a reasonably approximate analysis of a treatment plan in many situations. In the current era of cone beam computerised tomography (CT) scans of patients in the dental office, there is significant promise for finite element analyses (FEA) based on anatomically-accurate input data. However, at the same time it has to be recognised that effective use of FEA software requires a reasonable engineering background, especially insofar as interpretations of the

  18. Biomechanical aspects of bone microstructure in vertebrates: potential approach to palaeontological investigations.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S

    2009-11-01

    Biomechanical or biophysical principles can be applied to study biological structures in their modern or fossil form. Bone is an important tissue in paleontological studies as it is a commonly preserved element in most fossil vertebrates, and can often allow its microstructures such as lacuna and canaliculi to be studied in detail. In this context, the principles of Fluid Mechanics and Scaling Laws have been previously applied to enhance the understanding of bone microarchitecture and their implications for the evolution of hydraulic structures to transport fluid. It has been shown that the microstructure of bone has evolved to maintain efficient transport between the nutrient supply and cells, the living components of the tissue. Application of the principle of minimal expenditure of energy to this analysis shows that the path distance comprising five or six lamellar regions represents an effective limit for fluid and solute transport between the nutrient supply and cells; beyond this threshold, hydraulic resistance in the network increases and additional energy expenditure is necessary for further transportation. This suggests an optimization of the size of the bone's building blocks (such as osteon or trabecular thickness) to meet the metabolic demand concomitant to minimal expenditure of energy. This biomechanical aspect of bone microstructure is corroborated from the ratio of osteon to Haversian canal diameters and scaling constants of several mammals considered in this study. This aspect of vertebrate bone microstructure and physiology may provide a basis of understanding of the form and function relationship in both extinct and extant taxa. PMID:20009272

  19. Biomechanical Modeling to Improve Coronary Artery Bifurcation Stenting: Expert Review Document on Techniques and Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, Antonios P; Mortier, Peter; Kassab, Ghassan; Dubini, Gabriele; Foin, Nicolas; Murasato, Yoshinobu; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Tu, Shengxian; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Hikichi, Yutaka; Migliavacca, Francesco; Chiastra, Claudio; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank; Reiber, Johan H C; Barlis, Peter; Serruys, Patrick W; Bhatt, Deepak L; Stankovic, Goran; Edelman, Elazer R; Giannoglou, George D; Louvard, Yves; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S

    2015-08-24

    Treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions remains an ongoing challenge for interventional cardiologists. Stenting of coronary bifurcations carries higher risk for in-stent restenosis, stent thrombosis, and recurrent clinical events. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding application and use of biomechanical modeling in the study of stent properties, local flow dynamics, and outcomes after percutaneous coronary interventions in bifurcation lesions. Biomechanical modeling of bifurcation stenting involves computational simulations and in vitro bench testing using subject-specific arterial geometries obtained from in vivo imaging. Biomechanical modeling has the potential to optimize stenting strategies and stent design, thereby reducing adverse outcomes. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish the translation of pre-clinical findings to the clinical arena. PMID:26315731

  20. Regulatory aspects of clinical xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Henk-Jan

    2015-11-01

    Xenotransplantation attracted interest from regulatory authorities, particularly after the demonstration of pig-to-human transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (1996). This added to the risk of a product, resulting in a Guidance of the US Food and Drug Administration (2003). This addresses the full flow chart in product manufacturing, starting with the designated pathogen-free status of the source animal; and special aspects regarding the recipient like informed consent and monitoring for infectious pathogens. Also archiving of records from the donor and recipient, as well as storage of samples is described. The European Medicines Agency issued a Guideline on xenogeneic cell therapy products (2009). Cell-based medicinal products are subject to specific regulations and directives, which apply also to xenogeneic products: the xenotransplant guidances/guidelines are an addition to these regulations. Noteworthy, acellular products like heart valves and decellularized cornea are not considered a cell therapy product, but rather a medical device with its own regulation. WHO issued relevant documents, especially about safety, and the International Xenotransplantation Association published consensus documents, a.o., addressing preclinical efficacy requirements before entering clinical trials. This manuscript presents an overview of the regulatory framework, with special focus on cell therapy products necause these are expected to reach the market first (i.e., pancreatic islets, hepatocytes and cellularized cornea); major illustrations are from the European situation. Albeit being complex, the regulation of xenotransplant products does not form a block in product development, but rather supports the introduction of efficacious and safe products to meet the medical need. PMID:26408947

  1. Translating Ocular Biomechanics into Clinical Practice: Current State and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Michaël J.A.; Dupps, William J.; Baskaran, Mani; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok H.; Quigley, Harry A.; Sigal, Ian A.; Strouthidis, Nicholas G.

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanics – the study of the relationship between forces and function in living organisms – is thought to play a critical role in a significant number of ophthalmic disorders. This is not surprising, as the eye is a pressure vessel that requires a delicate balance of forces to maintain its homeostasis. Over the past few decades, basic science research in ophthalmology mostly confirmed that ocular biomechanics could explain in part the mechanisms involved in almost all major ophthalmic disorders such as optic nerve head neuropathies, angle closure, ametropia, presbyopia, cataract, corneal pathologies, retinal detachment, and macular degeneration. Translational biomechanics in ophthalmology, however, is still in its infancy. It is believed that its use could make significant advances in diagnosis and treatment. Several translational biomechanics strategies are already emerging, such as corneal stiffening for the treatment of keratoconus, and more are likely to follow. This review aims to cultivate the idea that biomechanics plays a major role in ophthalmology and that its clinical translation, lead by collaborative teams of clinicians and biomedical engineers, will benefit our patients. Specifically, recent advances and future prospects in corneal, iris, trabecular meshwork, crystalline lens, scleral and lamina cribrosa biomechanics are discussed. PMID:24832392

  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE.

  3. Biomechanical properties of the spinal cord: implications for tissue engineering and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Richard D; Choi, David; Phillips, James B

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury is a severely debilitating condition which can leave individuals paralyzed and suffering from autonomic dysfunction. Regenerative medicine may offer a promising solution to this problem. Previous research has focused primarily on exploring the cellular and biological aspects of the spinal cord, yet relatively little remains known about the biomechanical properties of spinal cord tissue. Given that a number of regenerative strategies aim to deliver cells and materials in the form of tissue-engineered therapies, understanding the biomechanical properties of host spinal cord tissue is important. We review the relevant biomechanical properties of spinal cord tissue and provide the baseline knowledge required to apply these important physical concepts to spinal cord tissue engineering. PMID:27592549

  4. Clinical aspects of crew health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, W. R.; Zieglschmid, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Medical procedures and findings for Apollo astronauts in the preflight, inflight, and postflight phases of the Apollo missions are described in detail. Preflight medical examinations, inflight monitoring and medications, crew illnesses, and clinical findings are summarized.

  5. Social aspects of clinical errors.

    PubMed

    Richman, Joel; Mason, Tom; Mason-Whitehead, Elizabeth; McIntosh, Annette; Mercer, Dave

    2009-08-01

    Clinical errors, whether committed by doctors, nurses or other professions allied to healthcare, remain a sensitive issue requiring open debate and policy formulation in order to reduce them. The literature suggests that the issues underpinning errors made by healthcare professionals involve concerns about patient safety, professional disclosure, apology, litigation, compensation, processes of recording and policy development to enhance quality service. Anecdotally, we are aware of narratives of minor errors, which may well have been covered up and remain officially undisclosed whilst the major errors resulting in damage and death to patients alarm both professionals and public with resultant litigation and compensation. This paper attempts to unravel some of these issues by highlighting the historical nature of clinical errors and drawing parallels to contemporary times by outlining the 'compensation culture'. We then provide an overview of what constitutes a clinical error and review the healthcare professional strategies for managing such errors. PMID:19201405

  6. Clinical anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle in dance.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jeffrey A; McEwan, Islay M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2008-01-01

    The ankle is an important joint to understand in the context of dance because it is the connection between the leg and the foot that establishes lower extremity stability. Its function coordinates with the leg and foot and, thus, it is crucial to the dancer's ability to perform. Furthermore, the ankle is one of the most commonly injured body regions in dance. An understanding of ankle anatomy and biomechanics is not only important for healthcare providers working with dancers, but for dance scientists, dance instructors, and dancers themselves. The bony architecture, the soft tissue restraints, and the locomotive structures all integrate to allow the athletic artistry of dance. Yet, there is still much research to be carried out in order to more completely understand the ankle of the dancer. PMID:19618582

  7. Clinical aspects of myasthenia explained.

    PubMed

    Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Palace, Jackie; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2010-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis and myasthenic syndromes are diseases of the neuromuscular junction. Autoantibodies and toxins to or mutations in one of the synaptic proteins are the main causes of dysfunction. Myasthenic phenotypes can be classified according to the basic aetiological mechanisms or divided depending on the clinical phenotype. PMID:20380587

  8. [CLINICAL ASPECTS OF SEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY].

    PubMed

    Fesenko, O V; Sinopal'nikov, A I; Filatov, V V; Danishevsky, S V; Styrt, E A

    2016-01-01

    Septic encephalopathy is a form of general cerebral dysfunction caused by a systemic inflammatory reaction. Its investigation encounters enormous difficulties for the lack of reliable biological markers of neuronal lesions and methods for the evaluation of consciousness in severely ill patients. Hence, the importance of correct clinical interpretation of the character and magnitude of CNS activity. Examples are presented demonstrating the difficulty of interpreting disorders in CNS activity associated with evere community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:27172727

  9. Multiple sclerosis: Experimental and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, L.; Raine, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the experimental and clinical aspects of multiple sclerosis. Specifically discussed are - Association of Epstein Barr Virus with pathology of central nervous system; immunology of viruses; and immunosuppression.

  10. Thrombophilia: clinical-practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Moll, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    No consensus exists as to who should be tested for thrombophilia, mainly due to the lack of good quality clinical outcome data in relationship to presence or absence of a given thrombophilia. Testing may be considered if (a) finding a thrombophilia predicts recurrent thrombosis and, thus, influences length of anticoagulation treatment decisions; (b) identifying a thrombophilia has implications on management of asymptomatic family members who are carriers of the detected thrombophilia; (c) a patient wishes to better understand why a thrombotic event occurred. Testing may be helpful in patients with venous thromboembolism at intermediate risk of recurrence in whom the finding of a strong thrombophilia can be one of the arguments for long-term anticoagulation--the "risk-of-recurrence-triangle" may be a useful aid in this decision process. Patients whose venous thromboembolism was provoked by a major transient risk factor should not be tested for thrombophilia. Thrombophilia tests should only be ordered by health care professionals who can provide the "4P": (a) appropriately select which patient to test, (b) provide pre-test counseling, (c) properly interpret the test results, and (d) provide education and advice to the patient. If testing is embarked on in patients with venous thromboembolism, it is advisable to be done at the time of decision making whether to stop or continue anticoagulation, i.e. typically after 3 months of anticoagulant therapy. Thrombophilia testing is best not done at the time of an acute thrombotic event and while a patient is on an anticoagulant. PMID:25724822

  11. [Somnambulism: clinical and eletrophysiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Szúcs, Anna; Halász, Péter

    2005-06-01

    The authors review the literature on the epidemiology, the clinical and electrophysiological symptoms of somnambulism. The disorder specified as "nREM parasomnia with awakening disorder" belongs to the nREM sleep (awakening) parasomnias. In most of the cases its occurence is familial with the highest prevalence at age 12 year. Above age 12 year most cases recover whereas 6% of prevalence is reported in adults. It is probable that most patients seek medical help only in severe cases associated with injuries, accidents or violence. Its etiology is unknown; in essence it is a sleep regulation disorder characterised by a dissociated state of partial awakening from nREM sleep: the motor system becomes awake while consciousness remains clouded. There are several medicines inducing somnambulism in patients otherwise free from this disorder. In somnambule patients the most important provoking factors are sleep deprivation as well as pathological states and circumstances evoking sleep loss. Somnambulism should be differentiated from complex partial epileptic seizures and REM behaviour disorder. As there is no specific treatment at the moment it is important to assure safe sleeping circumstances - ground flour, closed windows, and no fragile furniture. Clonazepam and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors prove sometimes effective, but the most effective methods in decreasing the frequency of somnambule episodes are the regular sleep-wakefulness schedule and the avoidance of sleep deprivation. PMID:15988917

  12. The application of biomechanical motion analysis to aspects of green monkey (Cercopithecus a. sabaeus) locomotion.

    PubMed

    Wells, J P; Wood, G A

    1975-09-01

    A cinematographic method of biomechanical motion analysis is presented which permits the determination of body segment forces and joint moments of force, and thereby dominant muscle action. An analysis of the horizontal leap of Cercopithecus is used as an example of the utility of this approach in the area of functional morphology. Kinematic and kinetic data are presented and discussed in terms of the biomechanical requirements of this form of locomotion. The importance of a consideration of inertial as well as gravitational forces in an analysis of positional behavior involving body motion is stressed. PMID:810035

  13. Biomechanical Analysis of Simulated Clinical Testing and Reconstruction of the Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Luke; Burkhart, Timothy A.; Tran, Michael N.; Rezansoff, Alex James; Deo, Shaneel; Caterine, Scott; Getgood, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anatomic anterolateral ligament (ALL) reconstruction has been proposed to assist anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in controlling anterolateral rotational laxity of the knee. However, the biomechanical effects have not been reported. Purpose: (1) To investigate the effect of ALL transection on rotational knee kinematics and (2) to determine the effect on knee biomechanics of ALL reconstruction procedures compared with lateral extra-articular tenodesis (LET). Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 12 cadaveric knee specimens were tested in the following sequence: (1) ACLintact, (2) anteromedial bundle of ACL sectioned (ACLamb), (3) complete ACL sectioned (ACLfull), (4) ALL sectioned (ALLsec), (5) anatomic ALL reconstruction (ALLanat), and (6) LET. Biomechanical anterior drawer and Lachman tests were performed in which a 90-N load was applied to the posterior tibia, and anterior translation was measured. A combined load to simulate the early phase of the pivot-shift test was executed in which a 5-N·m internal rotation moment was applied to a fully extended knee; anterior translation and internal rotation were measured. Results: Anterior translation increased across conditions for the biomechanical tests. Internal rotation during the simulated early-phase pivot-shift test was significantly different between ACLfull and ALLsec. Anatomic ALL reconstruction did not significantly reduce internal rotation or anterior translation during the simulated early-phase pivot-shift test. After LET, a significant decrease in anterior translation was found. There was no evidence of over-constraint of the knee with either anatomic ALL reconstruction or LET. Conclusion: The ALL demonstrated a role in controlling anterolateral laxity. LET had a composite effect in governing both anterior and rotational laxity. Anatomic ALL reconstruction did not reduce anterolateral rotational laxity. Clinical Relevance: Profiling the biomechanical

  14. Coronaviridae, pathogenetic and clinical aspects: an update.

    PubMed

    Möstl, K

    1990-01-01

    A review is given about pathogenetic and clinical aspects of the well-known as well as of recently detected members of the family Coronaviridae. Special attention is paid to coronavirus infections of domestic cattle and pets, whereas avian, murine, rat and human coronaviruses are summarized briefly. PMID:1963836

  15. Clinical, Biomechanical, and Physiological Translational Interpretations of Human Resting Myofascial Tone or Tension

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Nair, Kalyani; Evans, Tyler; Ghandour, Yousef

    2010-01-01

    Background Myofascial tissues generate integrated webs and networks of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and that control movement in the body. Passive [central nervous system (CNS)–independent] resting myofascial tension is present in the body and provides a low-level stabilizing component to help maintain balanced postures. This property was recently called “human resting myofascial tone” (HRMT). The HRMT model evolved from electromyography (EMG) research in the 1950s that showed lumbar muscles usually to be EMG-silent in relaxed gravity-neutral upright postures. Methods Biomechanical, clinical, and physiological studies were reviewed to interpret the passive stiffness properties of HRMT that help to stabilize various relaxed functions such as quiet balanced standing. Biomechanical analyses and experimental studies of the lumbar multifidus were reviewed to interpret its passive stiffness properties. The lumbar multifidus was illustrated as the major core stabilizing muscle of the spine, serving an important passive biomechanical role in the body. Results Research into muscle physiology suggests that passive resting tension (CNS-independent) is generated in sarcomeres by the molecular elasticity of low-level cycling cross-bridges between the actomyosin filaments. In turn, tension is complexly transmitted to intimately enveloping fascial matrix fibrils and other molecular elements in connective tissue, which, collectively, constitute the myofascial unit. Postural myofascial tonus varies with age and sex. Also, individuals in the population are proposed to vary in a polymorphism of postural HRMT. A few people are expected to have outlier degrees of innate postural hypotonicity or hypertonicity. Such biomechanical variations likely predispose to greater risk of related musculoskeletal disorders, a situation that deserves greater attention in clinical practice and research. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized to

  16. Clinical and Biomechanical Evaluation of an All-Arthroscopic Suprapectoral Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A.; Patel, Ronak M.; Nair, Rueben; Deshmane, Prashant P.; Harnden, Galen; Terry, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology of the long head of the biceps (LHB) is a well-recognized cause of shoulder pain in the adult population and can be managed surgically with tenotomy or tenodesis. Purpose: To compare the biomechanical strength of an all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique that places the LHB distal to the bicipital groove in the suprapectoral region with a more traditional mini-open subpectoral tenodesis. This study also evaluates the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent biceps tenodesis using the all-arthroscopic technique. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study and case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: For the biomechanical evaluation of the all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique, in which the biceps tendon is secured to the suprapectoral region distal to the bicipital groove with an interference screw, 14 fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders (7 matched pairs) were used to compare load to failure and displacement at peak load with a traditional open subpectoral location. For the clinical evaluation, 49 consecutive patients (51 shoulders) with a mean follow-up of 2.4 years who underwent an all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis were evaluated using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score preoperatively and at last follow-up, as well as the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Score at last follow-up. Results: On biomechanical evaluation, there was no significant difference in peak failure load, displacement at peak load, or displacement after cyclic testing between the arthroscopic suprapectoral and mini-open subpectoral groups. In the clinical evaluation, the mean preoperative ASES score was 65.4, compared with 87.1 at last follow-up. The mean UCLA score at last follow-up was 30.2. Forty-eight (94.1%) patients reported satisfaction with the surgery. In subgroup analysis comparing patients who had a rotator cuff repair or labral repair at time of tenodesis with patients who did not have either of these

  17. Biomechanical and biological aspects of defect treatment in fractures using helical plates.

    PubMed

    Perren, S M; Regazzoni, P; Fernandez, A A D

    2014-01-01

    The clinical case of figure 1 through figure 11 shows a series of impressive failures of plate fixation. The plates were repeatedly applied bridging a comminuted bone segment in a heavy patient. The biomechanical analysis elaborates why this happened and proposes an unconventional procedure to prevent this failure with a minimally invasive procedure. A plate bridging an open gap or a defect in a long bone diaphysis is exposed to full functional load. According to clinical observations such plate application often fails even without external load such as weight bearing. The plate risks to break through fatigue when exposed during a long time to cyclic loading. This type of failure has been observed even with broad plates as well in femoral as in tibiae. The first option to avoid such failure consists in protecting the plate by installing load sharing between plate and either bone or an additional implant. This reduces the load carried by the plate to a safe level. Load sharing with bone may be installed at surgery by establishing solid mechanical bridge between the two main fragments of the fractured bone. The optimal load sharing relies on a solid compressed contact between the main fragments. It can be established because the bone is able to take a large load which results in optimal protection of the plate. In the case of an extended comminuted bone segment it may be very difficult, traumatizing and inefficient to reconstruct the bone. In the present case it was impossible to establish load sharing through the bone. The second option protecting the plate is provided by callus bridging of the gap or defect. The formation of a solid callus bridge takes time but the fatigue failure of the plate also takes time. Therefore, the callus bridge may prevent a late fatigue failure. The surgeon may select one of several options: - Replacing the lack of bone support using a second plate which immediately alleviates plate loading. The drawback of application of a second

  18. Selenium. Nutritional, toxicologic, and clinical aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, A. M.; Kizer, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    Despite the recent findings of environmental contamination, selenium toxicosis in humans is exceedingly rare in the United States, with the few known cases resulting from industrial accidents and an episode involving the ingestion of superpotent selenium supplements. Chronic selenosis is essentially unheard of in this country because of the typical diversity of the American diet. Nonetheless, because of the growing public interest in selenium as a dietary supplement and the occurrence of environmental selenium contamination, medical practitioners should be familiar with the nutritional, toxicologic, and clinical aspects of this trace element. PMID:2219873

  19. [Clinical aspects of congenital maxillofacial deformities].

    PubMed

    Sólya, Kitti; Dézsi, Csilla; Vanya, Melinda; Szabó, János; Sikovanyecz, János; Kozinszky, Zoltán; Szili, Károly

    2015-09-13

    The cleft lip and palate deformity is one of the most common type of congenital abnormalities. The aim of this paper is to summarise the literature knowledge about cleft lip and/or palate. The authors review and discuss international literature data on the prevention, genetic and environmental predisposing factors, anatomical and embryological features, as well as pre- and post-natal diagnosis and treatment of these deformities. The aetiology is multifactorial, driven by both genetic and environmental factors which lead to multifaceted phenotypes and clinical features of these malformations. The lack of the multidisciplinary knowledge about prenatal diagnosis, prevention, genetic aspects and treatment strategy could result in serious diagnostic errors, hence clinical teamwork is critically important to solve the problems of this pathology. Only the professional teamwork and multidisciplinary cooperation can guarantee the optimal level of health care and better quality of life for these patients and their families. PMID:26552024

  20. Postmenopausal osteoporosis - clinical, biological and histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Oana Roxana; Popescu, Mihaela; Novac, Liliana; Mogoantă, LaurenŢiu; Pavel, LaurenŢiu Petrişor; Vicaş, Răzvan Marius; Trăistaru, Magdalena Rodica

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common disorders in postmenopausal women, affecting the quality of life and increasing the risk for fractures in minor traumas. Changes in the bone microarchitecture causes static changes in the body and affects motility. In this study, we analyzed two groups of women, one with physiological menopause and one with surgically induced menopause. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was suspected based on the clinical symptoms and confirmed by assessing bone mineral density by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Comparing some clinical and biological aspects there was noted that a much higher percentage of women with surgically induced menopause exhibited increases in body mass index, changes in serum lipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, blood glucose, serum calcium, magnesemia and osteocalcin. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in the histopathological aspects of bone tissue examined from these two groups. In all patients, there was identified a significant reduction in the number of osteocytes and osteoblasts, the expansion of haversian channels, reducing the number of trabecular bone in the cancellous bone with wide areola cavities often full of adipose tissue, non-homogenous demineralization of both the compact bone and the cancellous bone, atrophy and even absence of the endosteal, and the presence of multiple microfractures. Our study showed that early surgically induced menopause more intensely alters the lipid, carbohydrate and mineral metabolism, thus favoring the onset of osteoporosis. PMID:27151697

  1. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: Clinical and molecular aspects

    PubMed Central

    Tavazzi, Eleonora; White, Martyn K.; Khalili, Kamel

    2011-01-01

    The fatal CNS demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), is rare and appears to occur almost always as a consequence of immune dysfunction. Thus it is associated with HIV/AIDS and also as a side-effect of certain immunomodulatory monoclonal antibody therapies. In contrast to the rarity of PML, the etiological agent of the disease, the polyomavirus JC (JCV) is widespread in populations worldwide. In the forty years since JCV was first isolated, much has been learned about the virus and the disease from laboratory and clinical observations. However, there are many aspects of the viral life cycle and the pathogenesis of the disease that still remain unclear and our understanding is constantly evolving. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of the clinical features of PML and molecular characteristics of JCV and how they relate to each other. Clinical observations can inform molecular studies of the virus and likewise molecular findings concerning the life cycle of the virus can guide the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21936015

  2. Clinical aspects of Marburg hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mehedi, Masfique; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Marburg virus belongs to the genus Marburgvirus in the family Filoviridae and causes a severe hemorrhagic fever, known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), in both humans and nonhuman primates. Similar to the more widely known Ebola hemorrhagic fever, MHF is characterized by systemic viral replication, immunosuppression and abnormal inflammatory responses. These pathological features of the disease contribute to a number of systemic dysfunctions including hemorrhages, edema, coagulation abnormalities and, ultimately, multiorgan failure and shock, often resulting in death. A detailed understanding of the pathological processes that lead to this devastating disease remains elusive, a fact that contributes to the lack of licensed vaccines or effective therapeutics. This article will review the clinical aspects of MHF and discuss the pathogenesis and possible options for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:22046196

  3. [Sharp's syndrome. Clinical, immunological and nosographic aspects].

    PubMed

    Scagliusi, P; Muratore, M; Martiradonna, A; Berlingerio, G; Carrozzo, M

    1980-12-15

    LE cells, ds-DNA antibodies (radioimmunoassay), antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence (IFI) and anti-ENA antibodies have been sought in 150 clinical cases observed over a 5-year period in the Rheumatology Division of Bari University. For the latter, three parallel techniques were adopted on each serum, each completed by RNA-sensitivity assay for the demonstration of anti-RNP, i.e. IFI, passive haemoagglutination (PHA) and controimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE). The series included systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE), 30 cases; rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 30 cases; progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 12 cases; unclassified connective tissue disease (UCTD), 8 cases; mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 7 cases; Sjögren's syndrome (SS), 4 cases; dermatomyositis (DM), 3 cases; overlap syndromes (PSS-SLE, SS-SLE), 2 cases; rheumatological and internal miscellanea, 54 cases, LE cells and ds-DNA antibodies were found exclusively in SLE; the anti-ENA were found in various groups of diseases, while the anti-RNP were only demonstrated in the 7 MCTD and in some SLE. Of the three techniques for demonstrating anti-ENA, the PHA proved most sensitive and CIE most specific, whereas IFI was considered most suitable for clinical screening. The clinical aspects of the 7 MCTD faithfully followed the disease picture described by Sharp, but some overlap-syndromes and the unclassified connective tissue diseases did not present anti-RNP. It is also pointed out that nephropathy is not rare in MCTD and that the clinical course of the disease is not always benign. To conclude, it is considered that MCTD merits nosographic autonomy, but further investigations are recommended for more exact nosographical typing of connective tissue diseases. PMID:6161325

  4. Uromodulin storage diseases: clinical aspects and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Caridi, Gianluca; Rampoldi, Luca; Tardanico, Regina; Izzi, Claudia; Pirulli, Doroti; Amoroso, Antonio; Casari, Giorgio; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2004-12-01

    The recent discovery of mutations in the uromodulin gene ( UMOD ) in patients with medullary cystic kidney disease type 2 (MCKD2), familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy (FJHN), and glomerulocystic kidney disease (GCKD) provides the opportunity for a revision of pathogenic aspects and puts forth the basis for a renewed classification. This review focuses on clinical, pathological, and cell biology advances in UMOD -related pathological states, including a review of the associated clinical conditions described to date in the literature. Overall, 31 UMOD mutations associated with MCKD2 and FJHN (205 patients) and 1 mutation associated with GCKD (3 patients) have been described, with a cluster at exons 4 and 5. Most are missense mutations causing a cysteine change in uromodulin sequence. No differences in clinical symptoms between carriers of cysteine versus polar residue changes have been observed; clinical phenotypes invariably are linked to classic MCKD2/FJHN. A common motif among all reports is that many overlapping symptoms between MCKD2 and FJHN are present, and a separation between these 2 entities seems unwarranted or redundant. Cell experiments with mutant variants indicated a delay in intracellular maturation and export dynamics, with consequent uromodulin storage within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Patchy uromodulin deposits in tubule cells were found by means of immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy showed dense fibrillar material in the ER. Mass spectrometry showed only unmodified uromodulin in urine of patients with UMOD mutations. Lack of uromodulin function(s) is associated with impairments in tubular function, particularly the urine-concentrating process, determining water depletion and hyperuricemia. Intracellular uromodulin trapping within the ER probably has a major role in determining tubulointerstitial fibrosis and renal failure. We propose the definition of uromodulin storage diseases for conditions with proven UMOD mutations

  5. [Epidemiology and clinical aspects of cold urticaria].

    PubMed

    Möller, A; Henning, M; Zuberbier, T; Czarnetzki-Henz, B M

    1996-07-01

    To study the frequency and clinical aspects of cold urticaria in Central Europe, patient data from a university dermatology clinic and a private dermatology office between 1984-94 were analysed and the patients re-examined if possible. The incidence of cold urticaria was found to be 0.05%. Of the 56 patients with cold urticaria (31 women, 25 men), 49 had idiopathic cold urticaria. The mean age was 41.0 +/- 15.6 year, the mean duration of disease 7.9 +/- 5.8 years. Atopy was found in 46.5% of patients, and 23.2% of the patients suffered from other types of urticaria (cholinergic, chronic idiopathic, dermographic, aquagenic and heat-induced). Laboratory examinations were only rarely abnormal. 44 patients were treated with antihistamines, with generally only moderate symptomatic improvement. Treatment with antibiotics (penicillin, 1-2 mil IU/d over 2-4 weeks, n = 18, or tetracyclines, 2 g/d over 2 weeks, n = 10) induced full remission in 13 patients and symptomatic improvement in 8. During an average of 6.5 year-follow-up, 20 of 43 symptomatic patients went into spontaneous remission. The good therapeutic response to antibiotics in this study underlines the need for a better elucidation of the cause of cold urticaria, in view of possible infectious causes. PMID:8926165

  6. Ricin Toxicity: Clinical and Molecular Aspects.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Hamid, Fatemeh; Etemad, Leila

    2016-04-01

    Seeds of the castor bean plant Ricinuscommunis L (CB) contain ricin toxin (RT), one of the most poisonous naturally-occurring substances known. Ricin toxin, a water-soluble glycoprotein that does not partition into the oil extract, is a ribosome-inactivating toxin composed of two chains, labeled A and B. Severity of the toxicity varies depending on the route of exposure to the toxin. Inhalational is the most toxic route, followed by oral ingestion. Orally-ingested RT accumulates in the liver and spleen but other cells are also affected. The main clinical manifestations are also related to the administration route. Oral ingestion of CB or RT results in abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and various types of gastrointestinal bleeding that leading to volume depletion, hypovolemic shock, and renal failure. Inhalation of the toxin presents with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, diffuse necrotizing pneumonia, interstitial and alveolar inflammation, and edema. Local injection of RT induces indurations at the injection site, swelling of regional lymph nodes, hypotension, and death. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to detect RT in animal tissues and fluids. Ricinine, an alkaloid of CB, can be detected in rat urine within 48 h of RT exposure. Supportive care is the basic treatment and standard biowarfare decontamination protocols are used for RT intoxication. Dexamethasone and difluoromethylornithine might be effective treatments. This review examines the clinical and molecular aspects of ricin toxicity. PMID:27536698

  7. Ricin Toxicity: Clinical and Molecular Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Hamid, Fatemeh; Etemad, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Seeds of the castor bean plant Ricinuscommunis L (CB) contain ricin toxin (RT), one of the most poisonous naturally-occurring substances known. Ricin toxin, a water-soluble glycoprotein that does not partition into the oil extract, is a ribosome-inactivating toxin composed of two chains, labeled A and B. Severity of the toxicity varies depending on the route of exposure to the toxin. Inhalational is the most toxic route, followed by oral ingestion. Orally-ingested RT accumulates in the liver and spleen but other cells are also affected. The main clinical manifestations are also related to the administration route. Oral ingestion of CB or RT results in abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and various types of gastrointestinal bleeding that leading to volume depletion, hypovolemic shock, and renal failure. Inhalation of the toxin presents with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, diffuse necrotizing pneumonia, interstitial and alveolar inflammation, and edema. Local injection of RT induces indurations at the injection site, swelling of regional lymph nodes, hypotension, and death. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to detect RT in animal tissues and fluids. Ricinine, an alkaloid of CB, can be detected in rat urine within 48 h of RT exposure. Supportive care is the basic treatment and standard biowarfare decontamination protocols are used for RT intoxication. Dexamethasone and difluoromethylornithine might be effective treatments. This review examines the clinical and molecular aspects of ricin toxicity. PMID:27536698

  8. [Negative symptoms: clinical and psychometric aspects].

    PubMed

    Adida, M; Azorin, J-M; Belzeaux, R; Fakra, E

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations performing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis have suggested that negative symptoms are multidimensional, including evidence for at least two distinct negative symptom subdomains: diminished expression and amotivation. Guidance for selection of instruments for measurement of negative symptoms is rapidly evolving. As there are continuing advances in the description of negative symptoms, new instruments are under development, and new data on the performance of instruments emerge from clinical trials. The Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment-16 (NSA-16) are considered to be reliable and valid measures for negative symptom trials but differ with respect to their domain coverage, use of informants, integration of global scores, administration time and comprehensiveness of their structured interviews. In response to the 2005 NIMH - MATRICS consensus statement, work groups are field testing and refining two new measures, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) and the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS). Both address the five currently recognized domains of negative symptoms, differentiate appetitive from consummatory aspects of anhedonia and address desire for social relationships. Thus far, both have exhibited promising psychometric properties. PMID:26776385

  9. Traumatic Extensor Tendon Injuries to the Hand: Clinical Anatomy, Biomechanics, and Surgical Procedure Review.

    PubMed

    Colzani, Giulia; Tos, Pierluigi; Battiston, Bruno; Merolla, Giovanni; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Artiaco, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The extensor apparatus is a complex muscle-tendon system that requires integrity or optimal reconstruction to preserve hand function. Anatomical knowledge and the understanding of physiopathology of extensor tendons are essential for an accurate diagnosis of extensor tendon injuries (ETIs) of the hand and wrist, because these lesions are complex and commonly observed in clinical practice. A careful clinical history and assessment still remain the first step for the diagnosis, followed by US and MR to confirm the suspect of ETI or to investigate some doubtful conditions and rule out associate lesions. During last decades the evolution of surgical techniques and rehabilitative treatment protocol led to gradual improvement in clinical results of ETI treatment and surgical repair. Injury classification into anatomical zones and the evaluation of the characteristics of the lesions are considered key points to select the appropriate treatment for ETI. Both conservative and surgical management can be indicated in ETI, depending on the anatomical zone and on the characteristics of the injuries. As a general rule, an attempt of conservative treatment should be performed when the lesion is expected to have favorable result with nonoperative procedure. Many surgical techniques have been proposed over the time and with favorable results if the tendon injury is not underestimated and adequately treated. Despite recent research findings, a lack of evidence-based knowledge is still observed in surgical treatment and postoperative management of ETI. Further clinical and biomechanical investigations would be advisable to clarify this complex issue. PMID:27616821

  10. LDL-Apheresis: Technical and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bambauer, Rolf; Bambauer, Carolin; Lehmann, Boris; Latza, Reinhard; Schiel, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The prognosis of patients suffering from severe hyperlipidemia, sometimes combined with elevated lipoprotein (a) levels, and coronary heart disease refractory to diet and lipid-lowering drugs is poor. For such patients, regular treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis is the therapeutic option. Today, there are five different LDL-apheresis systems available: cascade filtration or lipid filtration, immunoadsorption, heparin-induced LDL precipitation, dextran sulfate LDL adsorption, and the LDL hemoperfusion. There is a strong correlation between hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Besides the elimination of other risk factors, in severe hyperlipidemia therapeutic strategies should focus on a drastic reduction of serum lipoproteins. Despite maximum conventional therapy with a combination of different kinds of lipid-lowering drugs, sometimes the goal of therapy cannot be reached. Hence, in such patients, treatment with LDL-apheresis is indicated. Technical and clinical aspects of these five different LDL-apheresis methods are shown here. There were no significant differences with respect to or concerning all cholesterols, or triglycerides observed. With respect to elevated lipoprotein (a) levels, however, the immunoadsorption method seems to be most effective. The different published data clearly demonstrate that treatment with LDL-apheresis in patients suffering from severe hyperlipidemia refractory to maximum conservative therapy is effective and safe in long-term application. PMID:22654591

  11. Clinical and Neurobiological Aspects of Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy and/or other dissociated manifestations of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis). Narcolepsy is currently treated with amphetamine-like central nervous system (CNS) stimulants (for EDS) and antidepressants (for cataplexy). Some other classes of compounds such as modafinil (a non-amphetamine wake-promoting compound for EDS) and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB, a short-acting sedative for EDS/fragmented nighttime sleep and cataplexy) given at night are also employed. The major pathophysiology of human narcolepsy has been recently elucidated based on the discovery of narcolepsy genes in animals. Using forward (i.e., positional cloning in canine narcolepsy) and reverse (i.e., mouse gene knockout) genetics, the genes involved in the pathogenesis of narcolepsy (hypocretin/orexin ligand and its receptor) in animals have been identified. Hypocretins/orexins are novel hypothalamic neuropeptides also involved in various hypothalamic functions such as energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine functions. Mutations in hypocretin-related genes are rare in humans, but hypocretin-ligand deficiency is found in many narcolepsy-cataplexy cases. In this review, the clinical, pathophysiological and pharmacological aspects of narcolepsy are discussed. PMID:17470414

  12. Biomechanical Role of Bone Anisotropy Estimated on Clinical CT Scans by Image Registration.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Elham; Reyes, Mauricio; Zysset, Philippe; Latypova, Adeliya; Terrier, Alexandre; Büchler, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Image-based modeling is a popular approach to perform patient-specific biomechanical simulations. Accurate modeling is critical for orthopedic application to evaluate implant design and surgical planning. It has been shown that bone strength can be estimated from the bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone architecture. However, these findings cannot be directly and fully transferred to patient-specific modeling since only BMD can be derived from clinical CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to propose a method to predict the trabecular bone structure using a µCT atlas and an image registration technique. The approach has been evaluated on femurs and patellae under physiological loading. The displacement and ultimate force for femurs loaded in stance position were predicted with an error of 2.5% and 3.7%, respectively, while predictions obtained with an isotropic material resulted in errors of 7.3% and 6.9%. Similar results were obtained for the patella, where the strain predicted using the registration approach resulted in an improved mean squared error compared to the isotropic model. We conclude that the registration of anisotropic information from of a single template bone enables more accurate patient-specific simulations from clinical image datasets than isotropic model. PMID:26790866

  13. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling & Simulation to Enable Scientific Discovery and Clinical Care in Knee Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical function of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. The interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and for clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures, their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next generation knee models are noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  14. Biomechanical aspects of oral implants. Consensus report of Working Group 1.

    PubMed

    Hobkirk, J A; Wiskott, H W A

    2006-10-01

    The method used by the working group was an iterative process based upon a structured review of the relevant literature by a group of reporters. The review papers were circulated to the members of the group before the conference and formed the basis for subsequent discussions. Each paper was subject to detailed collective analysis and subsequently modified on the basis of the panel's discussions and referenced to additional relevant literature where appropriate. The group assessed the levels of evidence for the statements made in the supporting documentation and recognized that it was necessary to adopt a compromise between acceptance of the lowest level, resulting in the largest body of material, and the highest level, which, in some cases, produced little evidence. While this approach does not represent endorsement of lower evidence levels per se, it was designed to provide conclusions of clinical utility within the existing knowledge base. The consensus statements were prepared after a detailed consideration of the papers submitted to the workshop by the working group. The papers were scrutinized, amended and approved by the group. The basis of each paper is described in the section on 'search strategy' and defines the parameters within which the consensus statements were prepared. PMID:16968381

  15. Biomechanics of the Ascending Thoracic Aorta: A Clinical Perspective on Engineering Data.

    PubMed

    Emmott, Alexander; Garcia, Justine; Chung, Jennifer; Lachapelle, Kevin; El-Hamamsy, Ismaïl; Mongrain, Rosaire; Cartier, Raymond; Leask, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the ascending thoracic aorta often require prophylactic surgical intervention to resect and replace the aortic wall with a synthetic graft to avoid the risk of dissection or rupture. The main criterion for surgical intervention is the size of the aneurysm, with elective surgery recommended with a maximal aortic diameter of 4.2-5.5 cm depending on valve type and other patient risk factors. Although the risk of dissection and rupture increases with the size of aneurysm, different pathologies, including aortic valve phenotype and connective tissue disorders uniquely influence the mechanical dysfunction of the aortic wall. Dissection and rupture are mechanical modes of failure caused by an inability of the tissue to withstand local tissue stresses. Tensile testing of aortic tissues, therefore, has been used to reveal the mechanical parameters of diseased and healthy tissues to better characterize the mechanical function of aortic tissues in different patient groups. In this review, we highlight the principles and methods of ex vivo tensile analysis as well as the composition and structural properties that contribute to the mechanical behaviour of the ascending aorta. We also present a clinically oriented description of mechanical testing along with insight into the characterization of aneurysm. Finally, we highlight recent advances in echocardiography, computer tomographic angiography, and magnetic resonance angiography that have the potential to measure biomechanical properties noninvasively and therefore help select aortas at risk. PMID:26724509

  16. Clinical and Biomechanical Evaluations of Staged Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients with Two Different Implant Designs

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Alexandre; Fuentes, Alexandre; Hagemeister, Nicola; Lavigne, Martin; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various implants of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are used in clinical practice and each presents specific design characteristics. No implant managed this day to reproduce perfectly the biomechanics of the natural knee during gait. Objectives: We therefore asked whether (1) differences in tridimensional (3D) kinematic data during gait could be observed in two different designs of TKA on the same patients, (2) if those gait kinematic data are comparable with those of asymptomatic knees and (3) if difference in clinical subjective scores can be observed between the two TKA designs on the same patient. Methods: We performed knee kinematic analysis on 15 patients (30 TKAs) with two different TKA implant designs (Nexgen, Zimmer and Triathlon, Stryker) on each knee and on 25 asymptomatic subjects (35 knees). Clinical evaluation included range of motion, weight bearing radiographs, questionnaire of joint perception, KOOS, WOMAC and SF-12. Results: Comparison between TKAs and asymptomatic knees revealed that asymptomatic knees had significantly less knee flexion at initial contact (p < 0.04) and more flexion for most of the swing phase (p between 0.004 and 0.04). Asymptomatic knees also had less varus at loading response, during stance phase and during most of the swing phase (p between 0.001 - 0.05). Transverse plane analysis showed a tendency for asymptomatic knees to be more in internal rotation during stance phase (p 0.02 - 0.04). Comparing both TKA designs, NexgenTM implant had significantly more flexion at the end of swing phase (p = 0.04) compared to knees with the TriathlonTM implant. In frontal plane, from initial contact to maximum mid stance angle and between the mean mid stance angle and initial contact NexgenTM TKA had significantly more adduction (varus, p =0.02 – 0.03). Clinical scores of both TKAs did not have significant difference. Conclusions: TKA with the tested implants did not reproduce natural knee kinematics during gait. In our cohort

  17. [Social aspect of clinical research in Poland].

    PubMed

    Masełbas, Wojciech; Czarkowski, Marek

    2007-12-01

    Each year more than 400 new clinical studies are registered in Poland. They gather above 50.000 of study participants. Social opinion on clinical trials is an important factor. The paper presents the review of actual opinions on clinical research in Poland. It provides the description of standards of protection of study participants, benefits and risks related to the participation in clinical research and the role of media in creating and influencing of the social perception of clinical trials. Results of conducted questionnaire studies imply that Poles correctly identify and assess the risk of participation in clinical experiments. The primary reason for the participation seams to be the possibility to help other patients, contribution to the progress of science and standards of medical care and potential benefits for other sufferers. The need of testing the safety and efficacy of the new medication in man is generally well recognized. At the same time a substantial part of the society is concerned with the possible corruption of investigators and unethical behaviour of sponsors. The social perception of clinical research in Poland is in majority of analyzed parameters not substantially different from opinions in other member states of EU. However, the medical society should be more active in influencing and changing some negative impressions. PMID:18432135

  18. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation.

  19. Regulatory aspects of clinical trials in children.

    PubMed

    Mentzer, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Since introduction of the EU Paediatric Regulation in January 2007 the development and the life cycle of a drug in pre- and post-authorisation period has changed significantly. Pharmacovigilance science has traditionally been a discipline focussed on the post-marketing or post-authorisation period, with due attention directed towards pre-clinical safety data, clinical trials and adverse events. As the biological sciences have evolved, pharmacovigilance has slowly shifted toward earlier, proactive consideration of risks and potential benefits of drugs in the pre- and post-approval stages of drug development, leading to a maturing of drug safety risk management. The development of drugs for the paediatric population has changed the awareness that not only the safety issues need to be thoroughly investigated for a safe treatment of the children. In conjunction with the knowledge about efficacy, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and the age appropriate formulation for the concerned drug, the impact on the aim to apply safe medicines for children will steadily increase. Therefore, a proposal for a joint effort performing clinical research and appropriate drug development and clinical trials in children needs a strong support from a number of stakeholders like Clinical Trial Network, Paediatric Society, pharmaceutical industry and authorities. PMID:20799462

  20. [Clinical aspects of endotheliotropic (hemolytic) nephroangiopathy].

    PubMed

    Renner, E; Cohen, S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical syndromes as hemolytic-uremic-syndrome, thrombotic-thrombocytopenic-pupura and primary-malignant-hypertension not only present multiple clinical but also etiological and pathogenetical common characteristics. Thoenes and John developed in 1980 the unifying concept of endotheliotropic (hemolytic) nephroangiopathy for these diseases which are characterised by pathologic interaction between damaged endothelial cells and erythrocytes. This concept was increasingly discussed and accepted in the literature during the course of the last years. We describe the clinical manifestation of the subgroupes which were defined by Thoenes and John according to the vascular pattern of pathomorphologic intrarenal lesions. It can be shown that the classification based on pathomorphologic findings is very useful for the differentialdiagnostic characterisation and the prognostic evaluation in a given single case. PMID:2482603

  1. Lumbar spine endplate fractures: Biomechanical evaluation and clinical considerations through experimental induction of injury.

    PubMed

    Curry, William H; Pintar, Frank A; Doan, Ninh B; Nguyen, Ha Son; Eckardt, Gerald; Baisden, Jamie L; Maiman, Dennis J; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S; Stemper, Brian D

    2016-06-01

    Lumbar endplate fractures were investigated in different experimental scenarios, however the biomechanical effect of segmental alignment was not outlined. The objectives of this study were to quantify effects of spinal orientation on lumbar spine injuries during single-cycle compressive loads and understand lumbar spine endplate injury tolerance. Twenty lumbar motion segments were compressed to failure. Two methods were used in the preparation of the lumbar motion segments. Group 1 (n = 7) preparation maintained pre-test sagittal lordosis, whereas Group 2 (n = 13) specimens had a free-rotational end condition for the cranial vertebra, allowing sagittal rotation of the cranial vertebra to create parallel endplates. Five Group 1 specimens experienced posterior vertebral body fracture prior to endplate fracture, whereas two sustained endplate fracture only. Group 2 specimens sustained isolated endplate fractures. Group 2 fractures occurred at approximately 41% of the axial force required for Group 1 fracture (p < 0.05). Imaging and specimen dissection indicate endplate injury consistently took place within the confines of the endplate boundaries, away from the vertebral periphery. These findings indicate that spinal alignment during compressive loading influences the resulting injury pattern. This investigation identified the specific mechanical conditions under which an endplate breach will take place. Development of endplate injuries has significant clinical implication as previous research identified internal disc disruption (IDD) and degenerative disc disease (DDD) as long-term consequences of the axial load-shift that occurs following a breach of the endplate. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1084-1091, 2016. PMID:26610067

  2. Anatomical and clinical aspects of Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bird, Rebecca J; Hurren, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Klinefelter's syndrome, the most common sex disorder associated with chromosomal aberrations, is characterized by a plethora of clinical features. Parameters for diagnosis of the syndrome are constantly expanding as new anatomical and hormonal abnormalities are noted, yet Klinefelter's remains underdiagnosed and underreported. This review outlines the key anatomical characteristics associated with the syndrome, which are currently used for clinical diagnosis, or may provide means for improving diagnosis in the future. Clin. Anat. 29:606-619, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26823086

  3. Palmoplantar keratodermas: clinical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina; Technau-Hafsi, Kristin

    2016-02-01

    Palmoplantar keratodermas comprise a diverse group of acquired and hereditary disorders marked by excessive thickening of the epidermis of palms and soles. Early onset and positive family history suggest a genetic cause. While hereditary forms of palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) may represent the sole or dominant clinical feature, they may also be associated with other ectodermal defects or extracutaneous manifestations. In recent years, much progress has been made in deciphering the genetic basis of PPK, which has led to the emergence of new disorders and syndromes. The elucidation of disease mechanisms has opened new avenues for specific therapies, increasingly sparking interest in this field. Given the high heterogeneity with respect to clinical features, genetic defects, and disease mechanisms, the classification of PPK is based on various criteria. These include extent of disease manifestations, morphology of palmoplantar skin involvement, inheritance patterns, and molecular pathogenesis. Though not always feasible, the clinical distinction of various PPK entities is based on fine-tuned criteria or clues. Remarkably, apparently distinct disorders have been shown to be allelic, as they are caused by mutations in the same gene. By contrast, similar clinical pictures may result from mutations in different genes. Because of this complexity, mutation analysis is required to determine the precise type of PPK. The best-defined entities are described in this review. PMID:26819106

  4. Clinical Aspects of Feline Retroviruses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia), and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less commonly diagnosed than in the previous 20 years; prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. However, FeLV importance may be underestimated as it has been shown that regressively infected cats (that are negative in routinely used FeLV tests) also can develop clinical signs. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. This article provides a review of clinical syndromes in progressively and regressively FeLV-infected cats as well as in FIV-infected cats. PMID:23202500

  5. Acting Out; Theoretical and Clinical Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt, Lawrence Edwin, Ed.; Weissman, Stuart L.

    The beneficial and harmful effects of acting out are studied in a series of short essays by numerous authors. Included are four articles on the theoretical and dynamic considerations of acting out, along with five clinical manifestations of acting out involving suicide and criminality in adolescents and adults. Special forms of harmful acting out…

  6. Reticulated platelets: analytical aspects and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Johannes J M L

    2014-08-01

    Reticulated platelets are immature platelets circulating in blood; they reflect the activity of megakaryopoiesis in the bone marrow. Therefore, they can be used as a non-invasive test in patients with thrombocytopenia in various clinical conditions. The preferred method of analysis is by flow cytometry. However, there is an evident lack of analytical standardization, making it difficult to compare results obtained in different laboratories. Currently, two types of hematology analyzers are on the market offering fully automated measurement of reticulated or immature platelets: the high end analyzers manufactured by Sysmex (XE- and XN-series) and Abbott (CELL-DYN Sapphire). Although the methods are essentially different and cannot be used interchangeably, both have been proven to have clinical utility. Reticulated or immature platelet assays are useful for the differential diagnosis of thrombocytopenia and for monitoring bone marrow recovery after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. These assays may aid clinicians in platelet transfusion decisions when recovery from thrombocytopenia is imminent. In addition, preliminary findings indicate that there is a rationale for reticulated or immature platelets for risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes and for monitoring the effect of treatment with antiplatelet drugs in patients with coronary artery diseases. The aim of this paper is to present the present technology available for measuring reticulated platelets as well as an overview of the current status of clinical application. This overview also indicates that more research is needed before reticulated or immature platelet assays can be applied in other clinical conditions than thrombocytopenia and after transplantation. PMID:24807169

  7. Past and future aspects of clinical electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Lüderitz, Berndt

    2008-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of clinical electrophysiology has a long and fascinating history. From the earliest time, no clinical symptom impressed the patient (and the physician) more than an irregular heart beat. Although ancient Chinese pulse theory laid the foundation for the study of arrhythmias and clinical electrophysiology in the 5th century BC, the most significant breakthrough in the identification and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias first occurred in this century. In the last decades, our knowledge of electrophysiology and pharmacology has increased exponentially. The enormous clinical significance of cardiac rhythm disturbances has favoured these advances. On the one hand, patients live longer and thus are more likely to experience arrhythmias. On the other hand, circulatory problems of the cardiac vessels have increased enormously, and this has been identified as the primary cause of cardiac rhythm disorders. Coronary heart disease has become not just the most significant disease of all, based on the statistics for cause of death. Arrhythmias are the main complication of ischemic heart disease, and they have been directly linked to the frequent arrhythmogenic sudden death syndrome, which is now presumed to be an avoidable "electrical accident" of the heart. A retrospective look--often charming in its own right--may not only make it easier to sort through the copious details of this field and so become oriented in this universe of important and less important facts; it may also assist the observer in a chronological vantage point of the subject. The study of clinical electrophysiology is no dry compendium of facts and figures, but rather a dynamic field of study evolving out of the competition between various ideas, intentions and theories. PMID:18651426

  8. Rosmarinic Acid--Pharmaceutical and Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Amoah, Solomon K S; Sandjo, Louis P; Kratz, Jadel M; Biavatti, Maique W

    2016-03-01

    The biosynthesis and biotechnological production of Rosmarinic acid, a phenolic ester that is widespread in the plant kingdom, has been widely investigated. This compound has shown many remarkable biological and pharmacological activities, which have led to its pharmaceutical and analytical development, as well as clinical studies, which are summarized and analyzed here for the first time. This review compiles data from the Pubmed, Scopus, Scifinder, Web Of Science, and Science Direct databases published between 1990 and 2015, restricting the search to works with the keywords "Rosmarinic acid" in the title. The initial search identified more than 800 articles; after an initial screening and removal of duplicate works, the search was further refined, resulting in approximately 300 articles that were scrutinized and comprise this review. The articles were organized to describe extraction and isolation, analytical methods, pharmaceutical development, and biological and pharmacological activities [divided into nonclinical (in vitro, in vivo) and clinical studies], pharmacokinetic studies, and stability studies. PMID:26845712

  9. [Glucotransporters: clinical, molecular and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Muñiz, Roberto de Jesús; Vargas-Guerrero, Belinda; Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Gurrola-Díaz, Carmen Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of glucose is the major source of obtaining cell energy, this process requires glucose transport into the cell. However, cell membranes are not permeable to polar molecules such as glucose; therefore its internalization is accomplished by transporter proteins coupled to the cell membrane. In eukaryotic cells, there are two types of carriers coupled to the membrane: 1) cotransporter Na+-glucose (SGLT) where Na+ ion provides motive power for the glucose´s internalization, and 2) the glucotransporters (GLUT) act by facilitated diffusion. This review will focus on the 14 GLUT so far described. Despite the structural homology of GLUT, different genetic alterations of each GLUT cause specific clinical entities. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the molecular and biochemical available information of each GLUT as well as the particular syndromes and pathologies related with GLUT´s alterations and their clinical approaches. PMID:27595260

  10. International regulatory aspects of clinical periodontal research.

    PubMed

    Cooley, W E; Castellion, A W

    1997-03-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was the pioneer regulatory agency to set standards for clinical studies aimed at approval of new drugs. For years the FDA's rules represented the most thorough, stringent, and consistent policy. Now most other developed countries have comparable requirements for the conduct of clinical trials. The European Community (EC). Canadian, and Japanese regulations are most important for United States (US) scientists attempting to globalize their research. Regulations in Eastern Europe, some Asian countries, and Latin America are of growing importance. The Pacific-Rim appears to be the fastest growing pharmaceutical market in the next decade. Currently, the EC and Japan's Good Clinical Practice (GCP) regulations are more detailed than those of the US. Moreover, the World Health Organization recently published GCP recommendations similar to the EC requirements. Well-designed and well-controlled studies done in the EC, US, and other developed countries are generally accepted throughout the world. Japan and some other countries require studies in local patients. American scientists cannot expect to conduct studies in other countries as principal investigators, but many are associated with national clinicians. Mutual recognition of marketing approvals is the ultimate goal for the globalization of drug research. While it is the objective of the Scheme for the Mutual Recognition of Evaluation Reports on Pharmaceutical Products and the EC Decentralized Procedure, it is not apparent when the FDA will totally accept another regulatory body's approval decision. The International Conference on Harmonization involves the EC, Japan, and the US. This most important series of meetings will finally align the major countries more closely in regulating clinical studies and the production of safe, effective, and quality products, especially in these times of worldwide economic considerations and health care reform. It is imperative that US dental

  11. [Clinical aspects and genetics of pseudoxanthoma elasticum].

    PubMed

    Stutz, S B; Schnyder, U W; Vogel, A

    1985-05-01

    Eighteen cases of Pseudoxantoma elasticum (PXE) were analysed using clinical and genetic criteria. We observed great intra- and interfamiliar variations in the manifestations of the disease as well as mono-, bi- and trisymptomatic cases (skin + eyes + vessels). We lack reliable indications for the existence of more than one recessive type of PXE and hence for heterogeneity. In family 9, PXE was inherited in an autosomal-dominant mode, and the discrete symptoms were restricted to the skin. PMID:4008253

  12. NASAL cytology: practical aspects and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M; Iannuzzi, L; Quaranta, N; Landi, M; Passalacqua, G

    2016-06-01

    Nasal cytology is a simple and safe diagnostic procedure that allows to assess the normal and pathological aspects of the nasal mucosa, by identifying and counting the cell types and their morphology. It can be easily performed by a nasal scraping followed by May-Grunwald-Giemsa staining and optical microscopy reading. This procedure allows to identify the normal cells (ciliated and mucinous), the inflammatory cells (lymphocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells), bacteria, or fungal hyphae/spores. Apart from the normal cell population, some specific cytological patterns can be of help in discriminating among various diseases. Viral infections, allergic rhinitis, vasomotor rhinitis and overlapping forms can be easily identified. According to the predominant cell type, various entities can be defined (named as NARES, NARESMA, NARMA). This implies a more detailed knowledge and assessment of the disease that can integrate the standard diagnostic procedures. Nasal cytology also represents a useful research tool for diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27009397

  13. Clinical Aspects of Uncomplicated and Severe Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bartoloni, Alessandro; Zammarchi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The first symptoms of malaria, common to all the different malaria species, are nonspecific and mimic a flu-like syndrome. Although fever represents the cardinal feature, clinical findings in malaria are extremely diverse and may range in severity from mild headache to serious complications leading to death, particularly in falciparum malaria. As the progression to these complications can be rapid, any malaria patient must be assessed and treated rapidly, and frequent observations are needed to look for early signs of systemic complications. In fact, severe malaria is a life threatening but treatable disease. The protean and nonspecific clinical findings occurring in malaria (fever, malaise, headache, myalgias, jaundice and sometimes gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea) may lead physicians who see malaria infrequently to a wrong diagnosis, such as influenza (particularly during the seasonal epidemic flu), dengue, gastroenteritis, typhoid fever, viral hepatitis, encephalitis. Physicians should be aware that malaria is not a clinical diagnosis but must be diagnosed, or excluded, by performing microscopic examination of blood films. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are then crucial to prevent morbidity and fatal outcomes. Although Plasmodium falciparum malaria is the major cause of severe malaria and death, increasing evidence has recently emerged that Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi can also be severe and even fatal. PMID:22708041

  14. Clinical aspects of infection with Trichinella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Capó, V; Despommier, D D

    1996-01-01

    Isolated cases and outbreaks of infection with Trichinella spp. occur frequently throughout the world, sometimes resulting in fatalities. The clinical presentations of signs and symptoms are remarkably constant for most of the species of Trichinella, but in infections with Trichinella nativa and Trichinella britovi, classical symptoms of trichinellosis may be absent. It is important to be able to correlate the clinical presentation of trichinellosis with the life cycle of these helminths in order to make an accurate diagnosis. Knowledge of the epidemiology of the disease enables the physician to identify other potential cases, since most epidemics can be traced back to a common source of raw or undercooked meat. A comprehensive summary relating the most important clinical variables is presented graphically for easy reference to the text. Symptoms and signs are considered in relation to severity of infection. Laboratory findings and diagnostic techniques, including new modalities (e.g., DNA and antigen detection), are discussed. A discussion of treatment and preventive measures concludes our review. PMID:8665476

  15. Molecular and Clinical Aspects of Angelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dagli, A.; Buiting, K.; Williams, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The Angelman syndrome is caused by disruption of the UBE3A gene and is clinically delineated by the combination of severe mental disability, seizures, absent speech, hypermotoric and ataxic movements, and certain remarkable behaviors. Those with the syndrome have a predisposition toward apparent happiness and paroxysms of laughter, and this finding helps distinguish Angelman syndrome from other conditions involving severe developmental handicap. Accurate diagnosis rests on a combination of clinical criteria and molecular and/or cytogenetic testing. Analysis of parent-specific DNA methylation imprints in the critical 15q11.2–q13 genomic region identifies 75–80% of all individuals with the syndrome, including those with cytogenetic deletions, imprinting center defects and paternal uniparental disomy. In the remaining group, UBE3A sequence analysis identifies an additional percentage of patients, but 5–10% will remain who appear to have the major clinical phenotypic features but do not have any identifiable genetic abnormalities. Genetic counseling for recurrence risk is complicated because multiple genetic mechanisms can disrupt the UBE3A gene, and there is also a unique inheritance pattern associated with UBE3A imprinting. Angelman syndrome is a prototypical developmental syndrome due to its remarkable behavioral phenotype and because UBE3A is so crucial to normal synaptic function and neural plasticity. PMID:22670133

  16. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of methylmercury poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Bakir, F.; Rustam, H.; Tikriti, S.; Al-Damluji, S. F.; Shihristani, H.

    1980-01-01

    An opportunity to study the effects of methylmercury poisoning in humans was provided by the large outbreak in Iraq in 1971-2. In adults, poisoning resulted from the ingestion of home-made bread prepared from methylmercury-treated seed grain and there was a highly significant correlation between the amount of bread ingested and blood mercury levels. Poisoning in infants resulted either from prior exposure in utero or from suckling or both. Blood mercury levels were higher in infants and children than in adults. There was no increased incidence of congenital defects. Symptoms and signs of poisoning and histopathological changes were mainly confined to the CNS. Symptoms developed, on average, 1-2 months after exposure. In children there was mental retardation with delayed onset of speech and impaired motor, sensory and autonomic function. Severely affected children were blind and deaf. In adults, the clinical picture could be classified as 1, mild (mainly of sensory symptoms) 2, moderate (sensory symptoms accompanied by cerebellar signs) and 3, severe (gross ataxia with marked visual and hearing loss which, in some cases, progressed to akinetic mutism followed by coma). Grades 1 and 2 carried a better prognosis thant grade 3. Interference with transmission at the myoneural junction was found in 14% of patients studied. There was no evidence of peripheral nerve involvement per se and sensory symptoms may be of central origin. The clinical differences between the Iraqi and Japanese outbreaks may be a result, in part at least, of the severe, prolonged and continuous exposure which occurred in the latter outbreak. Improvement was observed among the mild and moderate group. Treatment with chelating agents, thiol resin, haemodialysis and exchange transfusion lowered blood mercury concentrations but produced no convincing clinical benefit. To be effective, treatment may need to be instituted soon after exposure. PMID:7383945

  17. [Clinical aspects and diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Vince, Adriana

    2003-01-01

    Viral hepatitides are common diseases of modern man in both industrialized and developing countries, with a varying prevalence of particular types and mode of transmission. In current medicine, viral hepatitides are classified in the A-E nomenclature, differentiating viruses that can be etiologically defined with certainty on the basis of serum markers and hepatitides exhibiting all clinical and laboratory characteristics of viral hepatitis but of as yet nondemonstrable causative agents, classified in the non-A, non-E hepatitis group. Two issues are of high relevance in the pathogenesis of viral hepatitides: route of transmission (fecal-oral or parenteral) and basic mechanism of hepatocyte lesion. Although all hepatitis viruses replicate within the hepatocyte, the exact mechanism of hepatocyte necrosis has not yet been fully elucidated, i.e. direct cytotoxicity or hepatoprogressive immune response mediated primarily by the specific cytotoxic CD8 lymphocytes. Depending on the site of entry, the virus replicates in the adjacent lymphatic tissue for some time, followed by primary viremia, virus replication in the lymphoreticular organs (lymph nodes, liver, spleen), and eventual entry in the target cells--hepatocytes, accompanied by a varying grade of necrosis and inflammatory reaction. The clinical and laboratory signs of the disease correspond to the degree of liver necrosis and are not specific for particular types of viral hepatitis. The most frequent symptoms common to all types of viral hepatitis of moderate severity include elevated body temperature persisting for days, fatigue, gradual loss of appetite, nausea, dull pain and discomfort on DRL, vomiting, multiple loose stools, dark urine, jaundice of the skin and mucosa, and light stools. Generally, the ultimate outcome of the disease is elimination of the virus and complete recovery, however, a fulminant course with lethal outcome or transition to chronic disease may also occur, making viral hepatitides a major

  18. Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis, the Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Dugum, Mohannad F; McCullough, Arthur J

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis is an acute form of alcoholic liver disease with variable severity that develops in patients who usually have a history of prolonged and recent alcohol abuse. The diagnosis is clinical and depends on history, physical examination, and laboratory derangements. Liver biopsy is diagnostic but not universally performed, and noninvasive diagnostic modalities are under development. Scoring systems are used to assess severity of disease, predict mortality, and guide decisions for initiation of specific therapies. The natural history and long-term outcomes of alcoholic hepatitis, including recurrence, progression to cirrhosis, and mortality, vary and depend partly on abstinence from alcohol use. PMID:27373612

  19. Inherited epidermolysis bullosa: clinical and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Boeira, Vanessa Lys Simas Yamakawa; Souza, Erica Sales; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rêgo, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida; Follador, Ivonise

    2013-01-01

    Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that present with skin and, in some cases, mucosal fragility, predisposing patients to the development of blisters and/or erosions after minimal trauma or friction. Children with a recurrent history of these kinds of lesions or neonates that present them in the absence of another reasonable explanation should be investigated. Diagnosis must be based on clinical and histopathological findings. To date, management of inherited EB basically consists in avoiding traumas that trigger lesions, as well as preventing infection and facilitating healing of the wounds with the systematic use of bandages. PMID:23739692

  20. [Hydatidosis: epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Armiñanzas, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Cuadra, Manuel; Fariñas, Maria Carmen

    2015-06-01

    Hydatidosis or cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a parasitic zoonosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Its life cycle involves dogs, sheep and sometimes other animals. CE has a worldwide distribution, with greater prevalence in temperate zones. In Spain, Castile and León, La Rioja, Navarre, Aragón, and the Mediterranean coast are the areas where it is most commonly diagnosed, although there have also been published cases in other regions, such as Cantabria. Clinical signs and symptoms of EC may be related to the mass effect of the cyst, its superinfection or anaphylactic reactions secondary to its rupture. Because of its slow growth, diagnosis is usually made in adulthood by combining clinical symptoms with imaging and serological tests. There is no universal consensus on the management of CE. Treatment is based mainly on three pillars: medical treatment (mainly albendazole), surgery, and percutaneous drainage. The choice of the most appropriate approach is based on the patient's symptoms and the characteristics of the cysts. PMID:26032995

  1. Nutritional aspects of detoxification in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Cline, John C

    2015-01-01

    Detoxification is a vital cellular task that, if lacking, can lead to early morbidity and mortality. The process of detoxification involves the mobilization, biotransformation, and elimination of toxicants of exogenous and endogenous origin. This article discusses the phase I and phase II detoxification and biotransformation pathways and promotes using food to support these highly complex processes. The author identifies the comprehensive elimination diet as a useful therapeutic tool for clinicians and patients to use to achieve detoxification. Using this diet, the patient removes the most common allergenic foods and beverages from the diet and replaces them with nonallergenic choices for a period of 4 wk, gradually adding back the eliminated foods and observing their effects. Another effective clinical tool that the author discusses is the detox-focused core food plan, which identifies the variety of foods required to supply key nutrients that can maximize the effectiveness of detoxification. Finally, the author provides a case study in which these tools were used to help a patient suffering from major, debilitating illnesses that resulted from exposure to malathion, including severe vomiting and diarrhea, headaches, night sweats, severe arthralgias and myalgias, episcleritis, and shortness of breath. The article details the interventions used and the clinical results (ie, successful resolution of most issues after 3 mo). PMID:26026145

  2. Clinical aspects of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Genton, Pierre; Thomas, Pierre; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothee G A; Medina, Marco Tulio; Salas-Puig, Javier

    2013-07-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a recognizable, frequent epileptic syndrome. The most typical ictal phenomenon is bilateral myoclonia without loss of consciousness (M), with most patients also presenting with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) and some with absence seizures (ASs). The most striking features of JME are its onset around the time of puberty and the fact that seizure episodes occur after awakening from a sleep period or in the evening relaxation period and are facilitated by sleep deprivation and sudden arousal. Photic sensitivity is common in the EEG laboratory but uncommon or unrecognized in daily life. The clinical features of JME make it easy to diagnose. In recent years, awareness of JME has increased, and patients are often accurately diagnosed clinically before confirmation by EEG. The typical circumstance at diagnosis is a first GTCS episode, and one learns during the interview that the patient has had M in the morning for some time before the GTCS episode. There are only few differential diagnoses: the adolescent-onset progressive myoclonus epilepsies, or other forms of idiopathic generalized epilepsies of adolescence. With JME being so common, we propose that a first GTCS episode in a teenager should be considered as revealing JME until proven otherwise. PMID:23756488

  3. Vitamin D and cancer: Clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    There are substantial preclinical and epidemiologic data that suggest that vitamin D plays a role in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Numerous observational studies have shown that low blood levels of 25(OH) vitamin D (cholecalciferol), estimated by geographical location, diet and activity assessment or measured serum levels are associated with a higher risk of cancer and worse cancer-specific survival as well as numerous morbidities to e.g. cardiovascular disease, stroke, infection, autoimmune disease, and neuromuscular dysfunction among large populations. A considerable number of in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the most active metabolite of vitamin D – 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or calcitriol – has anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, pro-differentiating, and anti-angiogenic properties. Combined treatment of calcitriol and many types of cytotoxic agents has synergistic or at least additive effects. However, clinical trials testing these hypotheses have been less encouraging, though a number of methodological, pharmacological, and pharmaceutical issues confound all trials ever conducted. In order to properly assess the clinical value of vitamin D, its metabolites and analogs in cancer prevention and treatment, more studies are needed. PMID:21872802

  4. [Clinical aspects of the Niigata Minamata disease].

    PubMed

    Shimohata, Takayoshi; Hirota, Koichi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2015-01-01

    The Minamata disease was discovered in the Minamata region, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan, in 1956. Symptoms of this disease included cerebellar ataxia, sensory disturbance, narrowing of the visual field, and hearing and speech disturbances. In 1965, similar conditions were identified in persons living around the Agano River area, Niigata Prefecture, Japan and accordingly termed as the Niigata Minamata disease or the second Minamata disease. Both the diseases have been attributed to poisoning with methyl mercury that was generated during the production of acetaldehyde using mercury as a catalyst. The discharged methyl mercury accumulated in fishes and shellfishes and caused poisoning on consumption. This review discusses the history, clinical presentation including atypical forms, and autopsy findings of the Niigata Minamata disease. In addition, it highlights the problems about criteria for official recognition and the therapeutic trial for this disease. PMID:25585433

  5. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Grechi; Bruna, Cammarata; Benedetta, Mariani; Stefania, Di Candia; Giuseppe, Chiumello

    2012-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a complex multisystem genetic disorder that shows great variability, with changing clinical features during a patient's life. The syndrome is due to the loss of expression of several genes encoded on the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 (15q11.2–q13). The complex phenotype is most probably caused by a hypothalamic dysfunction that is responsible for hormonal dysfunctions and for absence of the sense of satiety. For this reason a Prader-Willi (PW) child develops hyperphagia during the initial stage of infancy that can lead to obesity and its complications. During infancy many PW child display a range of behavioural problems that become more noticeable in adolescence and adulthood and interfere mostly with quality of life. Early diagnosis of PWS is important for effective long-term management, and a precocious multidisciplinary approach is fundamental to improve quality of life, prevent complications, and prolong life expectancy. PMID:23133744

  6. Towards clinical management of traumatic brain injury: a review of models and mechanisms from a biomechanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R.; Good, Craig; Cheng, Wai Hang; Panenka, William; Richards, Darrin; Cripton, Peter A.; Wellington, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major worldwide healthcare problem. Despite promising outcomes from many preclinical studies, the failure of several clinical studies to identify effective therapeutic and pharmacological approaches for TBI suggests that methods to improve the translational potential of preclinical studies are highly desirable. Rodent models of TBI are increasingly in demand for preclinical research, particularly for closed head injury (CHI), which mimics the most common type of TBI observed clinically. Although seemingly simple to establish, CHI models are particularly prone to experimental variability. Promisingly, bioengineering-oriented research has advanced our understanding of the nature of the mechanical forces and resulting head and brain motion during TBI. However, many neuroscience-oriented laboratories lack guidance with respect to fundamental biomechanical principles of TBI. Here, we review key historical and current literature that is relevant to the investigation of TBI from clinical, physiological and biomechanical perspectives, and comment on how the current challenges associated with rodent TBI models, particularly those involving CHI, could be improved. PMID:24046354

  7. Pedicle-Screw-Based Dynamic Systems and Degenerative Lumbar Diseases: Biomechanical and Clinical Experiences of Dynamic Fusion with Isobar TTL

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Cédric; Perrin, Gilles; Champain, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic systems in the lumbar spine are believed to reduce main fusion drawbacks such as pseudarthrosis, bone rarefaction, and mechanical failure. Compared to fusion achieved with rigid constructs, biomechanical studies underlined some advantages of dynamic instrumentation including increased load sharing between the instrumentation and interbody bone graft and stresses reduction at bone-to-screw interface. These advantages may result in increased fusion rates, limitation of bone rarefaction, and reduction of mechanical complications with the ultimate objective to reduce reoperations rates. However published clinical evidence for dynamic systems remains limited. In addition to providing biomechanical evaluation of a pedicle-screw-based dynamic system, the present study offers a long-term (average 10.2 years) insight view of the clinical outcomes of 18 patients treated by fusion with dynamic systems for degenerative lumbar spine diseases. The findings outline significant and stable symptoms relief, absence of implant-related complications, no revision surgery, and few adjacent segment degenerative changes. In spite of sample limitations, this is the first long-term report of outcomes of dynamic fusion that opens an interesting perspective for clinical outcomes of dynamic systems that need to be explored at larger scale. PMID:25031874

  8. Biomechanics and tennis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, B

    2006-01-01

    Success in tennis requires a mix of player talent, good coaching, appropriate equipment, and an understanding of those aspects of sport science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development because all strokes have a fundamental mechanical structure and sports injuries primarily have a mechanical cause. PMID:16632567

  9. Pain following hysterectomy: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Brandsborg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that different surgical procedures like amputation, thoracotomy, inguinal herniotomy, and mastectomy are associated with a risk of developing chronic postsurgical pain. Hysterectomy is the most frequent gynecological procedure with an annual frequency of 5000 hysterectomies for a benign indication in Denmark, but is has not previously been documented in detail to what extent this procedure leads to chronic pain. The aim of this PhD thesis was therefore to describe the epidemiology, type of pain, risk factors, and predictive factors associated with chronic pain after hysterectomy for a benign indication. The thesis includes four papers, of which one is based on a questionnaire study, two are based on a prospective clinical study, and one is a review of chronic pain after hysterectomy. The questionnaire paper included 1135 women one year after hysterectomy. A postal questionnaire about pain before and after hysterectomy was combined with data from the Danish Hysterectomy Database. Chronic postoperative pain was described by 32%, and the identified risk factors were preoperative pelvic pain, previous cesarean section, other pain problems and pain as an indication for hysterectomy. Spinal anesthesia was associated with a decreased risk of having pain after one year. The type of surgery (i.e. abdominal or vaginal hysterectomy) did not influence chronic pain. The prospective paper included 90 women referred for a hysterectomy on benign indication. The tests were performed before, on day 1, and 4 months after surgery and included questionnaires about pain, coping, and quality of life together with quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds. Seventeen percent had pain after 4 months, and the risk factors were preoperative pain problems elsewhere and a high intensity of acute postoperative pain. Type of surgery was not a risk factor. Preoperative brush-evoked allodynia, pinprick hyperalgesia, and vaginal pain threshold were associated with a high

  10. Functional and biomechanic aspects of the scapular girdle and forelimbs of Unaysaurus tolentinoiLeal et al., 2004 (Saurischia: Sauropodomorpha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Peixoto, Dilson; Da-Rosa, Átila Augusto Stock; Gallo de França, Marco Aurélio

    2015-08-01

    This study presents evidence about the biomechanics and forelimbs functionality of the basal sauropodomorph Unaysaurus tolentinoi (upper portion of the SM2 sequence, Santa Maria Supersequence, Upper Triassic from southern Brazil). Maximum and minimum motion angles were inferred in the joints, disregarding the presence and/or thickness of cartilage. Furthermore, processes and external structures of the bones were analyzed in attributing the functionality of forelimbs. Unaysaurus tolentinoi had well-developed grapple ability. However, the preserved elements and their osteological features are not conclusive about strictly bipedalism or quadrupedalism in U. tolentinoi.

  11. Basilar Invagination, Basilar Impression, and Platybasia: Clinical and Imaging Aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; McVige, Jennifer; Mechtler, Laszlo

    2016-08-01

    The congenital and acquired deformities of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ), such as basilar invagination, basilar impression, or platybasia, can present in the form of slowly progressive or acute neurologic deterioration. In many cases, an insidious headache is the only symptom and can be a diagnostic challenge for the neurologist. Proper imaging studies as well as recognizing often associated neurologic or systemic conditions are required for early diagnosis and effective therapy. In the current report, the primary focus will be on clinical aspects of these CVJ abnormalities; the pathologic and radiologic aspects, such as developmental and pathophysiologic background or radiographic analysis, will be discussed briefly, confined to clinically relevant data. PMID:27344347

  12. Epilepsy in Down Syndrome: Clinical Aspects and Possible Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafstrom, Carl E.

    1993-01-01

    This review examines clinical aspects of seizures among individuals with Down's syndrome and explores possible mechanisms by which the trisomy 21 brain may generate seizures. Evidence suggests an interplay between pathologically hyperexcitable membrane properties, altered neuronal structure, and abnormal inhibitory neurotransmission. (Author/JDD)

  13. Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis: classification and clinical and therapeutic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Gerald S; Horster, Sophia; Wagner, Katrin S; Ihrler, Stephan; Schmid, Holger

    2007-01-01

    Cryoglobulinaemia may cause cutaneous vasculitis and glomerulonephritis, potentially leading to end stage renal failure. An important proportion of cryoglobulinaemias are secondary to hepatitis C virus infection. Emerging antiviral treatment options offer a chance for causal therapy of these cases of cryoglobulinaemia. This review summarises the classification and clinical and therapeutic aspects of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. PMID:17308210

  14. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions – Changes in Accuracy over Time

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interest in 3D inertial motion tracking devices (AHRS) has been growing rapidly among the biomechanical community. Although the convenience of such tracking devices seems to open a whole new world of possibilities for evaluation in clinical biomechanics, its limitations haven’t been extensively documented. The objectives of this study are: 1) to assess the change in absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of 3 commercially available AHRS over time; and 2) to identify different sources of errors affecting AHRS accuracy and to document how they may affect the measurements over time. Methods This study used an instrumented Gimbal table on which AHRS modules were carefully attached and put through a series of velocity-controlled sustained motions including 2 minutes motion trials (2MT) and 12 minutes multiple dynamic phases motion trials (12MDP). Absolute accuracy was assessed by comparison of the AHRS orientation measurements to those of an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was evaluated using the variation in relative orientation between modules during the trials. Findings Both absolute and relative accuracy decreased over time during 2MT. 12MDP trials showed a significant decrease in accuracy over multiple phases, but accuracy could be enhanced significantly by resetting the reference point and/or compensating for initial Inertial frame estimation reference for each phase. Interpretation The variation in AHRS accuracy observed between the different systems and with time can be attributed in part to the dynamic estimation error, but also and foremost, to the ability of AHRS units to locate the same Inertial frame. Conclusions Mean accuracies obtained under the Gimbal table sustained conditions of motion suggest that AHRS are promising tools for clinical mobility assessment under constrained conditions of use. However, improvement in magnetic compensation and alignment between AHRS modules are desirable in order for AHRS to reach their

  15. Biomechanics of occlusion--implications for oral rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Peck, C C

    2016-03-01

    The dental occlusion is an important aspect of clinical dentistry; there are diverse functional demands ranging from highly precise tooth contacts to large crushing forces. Further, there are dogmatic, passionate and often diverging views on the relationship between the dental occlusion and various diseases and disorders including temporomandibular disorders, non-carious cervical lesions and tooth movement. This study provides an overview of the biomechanics of the masticatory system in the context of the dental occlusion's role in function. It explores the adaptation and precision of dental occlusion, its role in bite force, jaw movement, masticatory performance and its influence on the oro-facial musculoskeletal system. Biomechanics helps us better understand the structure and function of biological systems and consequently an understanding of the forces on, and displacements of, the dental occlusion. Biomechanics provides insight into the relationships between the dentition, jaws, temporomandibular joints, and muscles. Direct measurements of tooth contacts and forces are difficult, and biomechanical models have been developed to better understand the relationship between the occlusion and function. Importantly, biomechanical research will provide knowledge to help correct clinical misperceptions and inform better patient care. The masticatory system demonstrates a remarkable ability to adapt to a changing biomechanical environment and changes to the dental occlusion or other components of the musculoskeletal system tend to be well tolerated. PMID:26371622

  16. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions - Effect of Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Inertial measurement of motion with Attitude and Heading Reference Systems (AHRS) is emerging as an alternative to 3D motion capture systems in biomechanics. The objectives of this study are: 1) to describe the absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of commercially available AHRS under various types of motion; and 2) to evaluate the effect of motion velocity on the accuracy of these measurements. Methods The criterion validity of accuracy was established under controlled conditions using an instrumented Gimbal table. AHRS modules were carefully attached to the center plate of the Gimbal table and put through experimental static and dynamic conditions. Static and absolute accuracy was assessed by comparing the AHRS orientation measurement to those obtained using an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was assessed by measuring the variation in relative orientation between modules during trials. Findings Evaluated AHRS systems demonstrated good absolute static accuracy (mean error < 0.5o) and clinically acceptable absolute accuracy under condition of slow motions (mean error between 0.5o and 3.1o). In slow motions, relative accuracy varied from 2o to 7o depending on the type of AHRS and the type of rotation. Absolute and relative accuracy were significantly affected (p<0.05) by velocity during sustained motions. The extent of that effect varied across AHRS. Interpretation Absolute and relative accuracy of AHRS are affected by environmental magnetic perturbations and conditions of motions. Relative accuracy of AHRS is mostly affected by the ability of all modules to locate the same global reference coordinate system at all time. Conclusions Existing AHRS systems can be considered for use in clinical biomechanics under constrained conditions of use. While their individual capacity to track absolute motion is relatively consistent, the use of multiple AHRS modules to compute relative motion between rigid bodies needs to be optimized according to

  17. Psoas Major: a case report and review of its anatomy, biomechanics, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Sajko, Sandy; Stuber, Kent

    2009-01-01

    A 25-year-old male professional hockey player with right sided hip pain was diagnosed with myofascopathy of the right psoas major and rectus femoris. The patient maintained a conservative treatment regimen and was prescribed a four week active strengthening program. The program progressed from resisted concentric exercise to eccentric abduction/adduction exercises along with balance training, core stabilizing and endurance exercises in the first two weeks. In the final two weeks the program progressed to include sport specific exercises. At three weeks the patient was able to participate in non-contact practice and was clear for full contact at five weeks. The anatomy, biomechanics, and function of the psoas major muscle are discussed as is its influence on lumbar spine stability. Evidence-based evaluation and management strategies for psoas dysfunction are presented. PMID:20037696

  18. Biomechanical and clinical evaluation of a newly designed polycentric knee of transfemoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Yokogushi, Kazutoshi; Narita, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Eiichi; Chiba, Susumu; Nosaka, Toshiya; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2004-09-01

    We have designed a new polycentric knee adopting a hydraulic unit and an intelligent mechanism. The biomechanical parameters of this prototype, such as the stance duration, peak knee flexion angle in stance and swing, peak hip flexion angle, and peak hip extension moments were analyzed at three different cadences (88, 96, 104 steps/min) in three amputees, and then compared to those of polycentric hydraulic knees currently in use. The same parameters were also measured for 10 healthy volunteers and subsequently analyzed. In the prototype, almost all the values of the parameters showed no significant variety in individuals at the different cadences. The situation was the same with the healthy volunteers. However, the values of the parameter for the conventional knee varied significantly with the individual at the different cadences. The prototype may be of practical use, contributing to a stable walk even at different cadences. PMID:15558397

  19. Fungal infections of the immunocompromised host: clinical and laboratory aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Musial, C E; Cockerill, F R; Roberts, G D

    1988-01-01

    Fungal infections of the immunocompromised host are being seen with greater frequency than ever before. In addition, a growing list of unusual and unexpected etiologic agents presents a unique and difficult challenge to the clinician and microbiologist. The clinical manifestations of opportunistic fungal infections are often not characteristic and, in many instances, may prevent a rapid diagnosis from being made. Clinical microbiology laboratories should consider any organism as a potential etiologic agent. This requires that all fungi recovered from immunocompromised patients be thoroughly identified and reported so that their clinical significance may be assessed. This review presents a brief discussion of the clinical and laboratory aspects of some fungal infections seen in this important group of patients. PMID:3069198

  20. Arthrogryposis: an update on clinical aspects, etiology, and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Feluś, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Arthrogryposes – multiple joint contractures – are a clinically and etiologically heterogeneous class of diseases, where accurate diagnosis, recognition of the underlying pathology and classification are of key importance for the prognosis as well as for selection of appropriate management. This treatment remains challenging and optimally in arthrogrypotic patients should be carried out by a team of specialists familiar with all aspects of arthrogryposis pathology and treatment modalities: rehabilitation, orthotics and surgery. In this comprehensive review article, based on literature and clinical experience, the authors present an update on current knowledge on etiology, classifications and treatment options for skeletal deformations possible in arthrogryposis. PMID:26925114

  1. Using anxiolytics in epilepsy: neurobiological, neuropharmacological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety disorders represent a common psychiatric comorbidity in patients with epilepsy, affecting prognosis and quality of life. However, they are still underdiagnosed and undertreated. In clinical practice, a number of compounds are currently used as anxiolytics, with benzodiazepines being the most popular. Other drug classes, especially antiepileptic drugs, are increasingly prescribed for the treatment of anxiety. This article discusses the neurobiological targets and basic neuropharmacological aspects of anxiolytics in order to give the reader clear insight into their activity and mechanism of action. Clinical data regarding the treatment of anxiety in both adults and children with epilepsy are also summarised, emphasising the need for further studies. PMID:27435111

  2. Chronic Mountain Sickness: Clinical Aspects, Etiology, Management, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Corante, Noemí

    2016-06-01

    Villafuerte, Francisco C., and Noemí Corante. Chronic mountain sickness: clinical aspects, etiology, management, and treatment. High Alt Med Biol. 17:61-69, 2016.-Millions of people worldwide live at a high altitude, and a significant number are at risk of developing Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a progressive incapacitating syndrome caused by lifelong exposure to hypoxia. CMS is characterized by severe symptomatic excessive erythrocytosis (EE; Hb ≥19 g/dL for women and Hb ≥21 g/dL for men) and accentuated hypoxemia, which are frequently associated with pulmonary hypertension. In advanced cases, the condition may evolve to cor pulmonale and congestive heart failure. Current knowledge indicates a genetic predisposition to develop CMS. However, there are important risk factors and comorbidities that may trigger and aggravate the condition. Thus, appropriate medical information on CMS is necessary to provide adequate diagnosis and healthcare to high-altitude inhabitants. After reviewing basic clinical aspects of CMS, including its definition, diagnosis, and common clinical findings, we discuss aspects of its etiology, and address its epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment. PMID:27218284

  3. Chronic Mountain Sickness: Clinical Aspects, Etiology, Management, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Corante, Noemí

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Villafuerte, Francisco C., and Noemí Corante. Chronic mountain sickness: clinical aspects, etiology, management, and treatment. High Alt Med Biol. 17:61–69, 2016.—Millions of people worldwide live at a high altitude, and a significant number are at risk of developing Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS), a progressive incapacitating syndrome caused by lifelong exposure to hypoxia. CMS is characterized by severe symptomatic excessive erythrocytosis (EE; Hb ≥19 g/dL for women and Hb ≥21 g/dL for men) and accentuated hypoxemia, which are frequently associated with pulmonary hypertension. In advanced cases, the condition may evolve to cor pulmonale and congestive heart failure. Current knowledge indicates a genetic predisposition to develop CMS. However, there are important risk factors and comorbidities that may trigger and aggravate the condition. Thus, appropriate medical information on CMS is necessary to provide adequate diagnosis and healthcare to high-altitude inhabitants. After reviewing basic clinical aspects of CMS, including its definition, diagnosis, and common clinical findings, we discuss aspects of its etiology, and address its epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment. PMID:27218284

  4. [Repetitive reoperation of the DHS failure: clinical and biomechanical analysis - a case report].

    PubMed

    Hrubina, M

    2013-07-01

    The author describes a rare case of repetitive reoperation of Dynamic Hip Screw failure due to the pull-out of the plate. An 86-year-old female patient suffered an injury - a pertrochanteric fracture of the left femur which was treated by DHS. After 14 weeks a new fall occurred and caused the DHS to fail - the plate pulled out and all cortical screws were broken. The first reoperation using a six-hole plate was performed. After a year and the patients new fall, a femoral fracture occurred in the area of the distal cortical screw underneath the plate. The DHS was removed, plate osteosynthesis of the femur was performed and the trochanteric fracture healed. No further complications were found, the patient died almost two years after the second reoperation. The biomechanical analysis of this case revealed a stress concentration close to the implant yield limit in the area of the distal cortical screw. Femoral neck screw placement was suitable with regard to the stress distribution. Key words: dynamic hip screw - proximal femoral fractures - osteosynthetic material breakage. PMID:24003879

  5. Interstitial Lung Disease in Childhood: Clinical and Genetic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Hiroshi; Kure, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in childhood is a heterogeneous group of rare pulmonary conditions presenting chronic respiratory disorders. Many clinical features of ILD still remain unclear, making the treatment strategies mainly investigative. Guidelines may provide physicians with an overview on the diagnosis and therapeutic directions. However, the criteria used in different clinical studies for the classification and diagnosis of ILDs are not always the same, making the development of guidelines difficult. Advances in genetic testing have thrown light on some etiologies of ILD, which were formerly classified as ILDs of unknown origins. The need of genetic testing for unexplained ILD is growing, and new classification criteria based on the etiology should be adopted to better understand the disease. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the clinical and genetic aspects of ILD in children. PMID:26512209

  6. Interstitial Lung Disease in Childhood: Clinical and Genetic Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Hiroshi; Kure, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in childhood is a heterogeneous group of rare pulmonary conditions presenting chronic respiratory disorders. Many clinical features of ILD still remain unclear, making the treatment strategies mainly investigative. Guidelines may provide physicians with an overview on the diagnosis and therapeutic directions. However, the criteria used in different clinical studies for the classification and diagnosis of ILDs are not always the same, making the development of guidelines difficult. Advances in genetic testing have thrown light on some etiologies of ILD, which were formerly classified as ILDs of unknown origins. The need of genetic testing for unexplained ILD is growing, and new classification criteria based on the etiology should be adopted to better understand the disease. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the clinical and genetic aspects of ILD in children. PMID:26512209

  7. The biomechanical aspects of reconstruction for segmental defects of the mandible: a finite element study to assess the optimisation of plate and screw factors.

    PubMed

    Bujtár, Péter; Simonovics, János; Váradi, Károly; Sándor, George K B; Avery, C M E

    2014-09-01

    A bone plate is required to restore the load-bearing capacity of the mandible following a segmental resection. A good understanding of the underlying principles is crucial for developing a reliable reconstruction. A finite element analysis (FEA) technique has been developed to study the biomechanics of the clinical scenarios managed after surgical resection of a tumour or severe trauma to assist in choosing the optimal hardware elements. A computer aided design (CAD) model of an edentulous human mandible was created. Then 4 common segmental defects were simulated. A single reconstruction plate was designed to span the defects. The hardware variations studied were: monocortical or bicortical screw fixation and non-locking or locking plate design. A standardized load was applied to mimic the human bite. The von Mises stress and strain, spatial changes at the screw-bone interfaces were analysed. In general, the locking plate and monocortical screw fixation systems were most effective. Non-locking plating systems produced larger screw "pull-out" displacements, especially at the hemimandible (up to 5% strain). Three screws on either side of the defect were adequate for all scenarios except extensive unilateral defects when additional screws and an increased screw diameter are recommended. The simplification of screw geometry may underestimate stress levels and factors such as poor adaptation of the plate or reduced bone quality are likely to be indications for bicortical locking screw fixation. The current model provides a good basis for understanding the complex biomechanics and developing future refinements in plate or scaffold design. PMID:24467871

  8. Biomechanical Perspectives on Concussion in Sport.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Steven; Bland, Megan L; Campolettano, Eamon T; Press, Jaclyn N; Rowson, Bethany; Smith, Jake A; Sproule, David W; Tyson, Abigail M; Duma, Stefan M

    2016-09-01

    Concussions can occur in any sport. Often, clinical and biomechanical research efforts are disconnected. This review paper analyzes current concussion issues in sports from a biomechanical perspective and is geared toward Sports Med professionals. Overarching themes of this review include the biomechanics of the brain during head impact, role of protective equipment, potential population-based differences in concussion tolerance, potential intervention strategies to reduce the incidence of injury, and common biomechanical misconceptions. PMID:27482775

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Biomechanics During Robotic and Mechanical Simulations of Physiologic and Clinical Motion Tasks: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Myer, Gregory D.; Shearn, Jason T.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Investigators use in vitro joint simulations to invasively study the biomechanical behaviors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The aims of these simulations are to replicate physiologic conditions, but multiple mechanisms can be used to drive in vitro motions, which may influence biomechanical outcomes. The objective of this review was to examine, summarize, and compare biomechanical evidence related to anterior cruciate ligament function from in vitro simulations of knee motion. A systematic review was conducted (2004 to 2013) in Scopus, PubMed/Medline, and SPORTDiscus to identify peer-reviewed studies that reported kinematic and kinetic outcomes from in vitro simulations of physiologic or clinical tasks at the knee. Inclusion criteria for relevant studies were articles published in English that reported on whole-ligament anterior cruciate ligament mechanics during the in vitro simulation of physiologic or clinical motions on cadaveric knees that were unaltered outside of the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact, -deficient, and -reconstructed conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to synthesize biomechanical differences between the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact and reconstructed conditions. 77 studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed. Combined joint rotations have the greatest impact on anterior cruciate ligament loads, but the magnitude by which individual kinematic degrees of freedom contribute to ligament loading during in vitro simulations is technique-dependent. Biomechanical data collected in prospective, longitudinal studies corresponds better with robotic-manipulator simulations than mechanical-impact simulations. Robotic simulation indicated that the ability to restore intact anterior cruciate ligament mechanics with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions was dependent on loading condition and degree of freedom examined. PMID:25547070

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament biomechanics during robotic and mechanical simulations of physiologic and clinical motion tasks: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Myer, Gregory D; Shearn, Jason T; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Investigators use in vitro joint simulations to invasively study the biomechanical behaviors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The aims of these simulations are to replicate physiologic conditions, but multiple mechanisms can be used to drive in vitro motions, which may influence biomechanical outcomes. The objective of this review was to examine, summarize, and compare biomechanical evidence related to anterior cruciate ligament function from in vitro simulations of knee motion. A systematic review was conducted (2004 to 2013) in Scopus, PubMed/Medline, and SPORTDiscus to identify peer-reviewed studies that reported kinematic and kinetic outcomes from in vitro simulations of physiologic or clinical tasks at the knee. Inclusion criteria for relevant studies were articles published in English that reported on whole-ligament anterior cruciate ligament mechanics during the in vitro simulation of physiologic or clinical motions on cadaveric knees that were unaltered outside of the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact, -deficient, and -reconstructed conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to synthesize biomechanical differences between the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact and reconstructed conditions. 77 studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed. Combined joint rotations have the greatest impact on anterior cruciate ligament loads, but the magnitude by which individual kinematic degrees of freedom contribute to ligament loading during in vitro simulations is technique-dependent. Biomechanical data collected in prospective, longitudinal studies corresponds better with robotic-manipulator simulations than mechanical-impact simulations. Robotic simulation indicated that the ability to restore intact anterior cruciate ligament mechanics with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions was dependent on loading condition and degree of freedom examined. PMID:25547070

  11. Clinical aspects of chronic ENT inflammation in children.

    PubMed

    Mansbach, A L; Brihaye, P; Casimir, G; Dhooghe, I; Gordts, F; Halewyck, S; Hanssens, L; Lemkens, N; Lemkens, P; Leupe, P; Mulier, S; Van Crombrugge, L; Van Der Veken, P; Van Hoecke, H

    2012-01-01

    In children, all ENT cavities are particularly prone to the development of chronic inflammation. This is due to many predisposing factors, of which the most common are unfavourable anatomy, absence of nasal blowing, day care attendance, allergy, immature immunity, gastro-oesophageal reflux and tobacco smoke exposure. The aim of this paper is to outline the most specific paediatric clinical aspects of chronic pharyngo-tonsillitis, rhinosinusitis, otitis media, adenoiditis and laryngotracheitis and the important influence that some of these pathologies exert on the others. PMID:23431613

  12. Clinical aspects of congenital syphilis with Hutchinson’s triad

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa, Larissa; Galvão, Virgilio

    2011-01-01

    Congenital syphilis is an infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum transmitted by infected mother to her baby during pregnancy. Late congenital syphilis is recognised with 2 or more years after birth. One of the main aspects is observed with the triad of Hutchinson, characterised by the presence of interstitial keratitis, eighth nerve deafness and Hutchinson’s teeth. This manuscript reports a case of late congenital syphilis presenting with Hutchinson’s triad at an age of 7 years. These clinical features are related to syphilis present during pregnancy and at birth, however they commonly become apparent after 5-years of age. PMID:22670010

  13. Eosinophilic cardiac disease: Molecular, clinical and imaging aspects.

    PubMed

    Séguéla, Pierre-Emmanuel; Iriart, Xavier; Acar, Philippe; Montaudon, Michel; Roudaut, Raymond; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2015-04-01

    Eosinophilia may be responsible for cardiac injuries of widely varying severity, from acute myocarditis to endomyocardial fibrosis. In this review, we present both the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these lesions and their clinical and paraclinical aspects. Numerous aetiologies can lead to severe eosinophilia, but these are mainly represented by hypersensitivity reactions, rheumatological diseases and hypereosinophilic syndrome. Because cardiac involvement may be extremely severe, echocardiography should be always performed in the context of eosinophilia and appropriate therapeutics should be started rapidly in order to limit the progression of the disease. PMID:25858537

  14. Blepharospasm: Update on Epidemiology, Clinical Aspects, and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Valls-Sole, Josep; Defazio, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Blepharospasm (BSP) is a rather distressing form of focal dystonia. Although many aspects of its pathophysiological mechanisms are already known, we lack fundamental evidence on etiology, prevention, and treatment. To advance in our knowledge, we need to review what is already known in various aspects of the disorder and use these bases to find future lines of interest. Some of the signs observed in BSP are cause, while others are consequence of the disorder. Non-motor symptoms and signs may be a cue for understanding better the disease. Various cerebral sites have been shown to be functionally abnormal in BSP, including the basal ganglia, the cortex, and the cerebellum. However, we still do not know if the dysfunction or structural change affecting these brain regions is cause or consequence of BSP. Further advances in neurophysiology and neuroimaging may eventually clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms implicated. In this manuscript, we aim to update what is known regarding epidemiology, clinical aspects, and pathophysiology of the disorder and speculate on the directions of research worth pursuing in the near future. PMID:27064462

  15. Blepharospasm: Update on Epidemiology, Clinical Aspects, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Valls-Sole, Josep; Defazio, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Blepharospasm (BSP) is a rather distressing form of focal dystonia. Although many aspects of its pathophysiological mechanisms are already known, we lack fundamental evidence on etiology, prevention, and treatment. To advance in our knowledge, we need to review what is already known in various aspects of the disorder and use these bases to find future lines of interest. Some of the signs observed in BSP are cause, while others are consequence of the disorder. Non-motor symptoms and signs may be a cue for understanding better the disease. Various cerebral sites have been shown to be functionally abnormal in BSP, including the basal ganglia, the cortex, and the cerebellum. However, we still do not know if the dysfunction or structural change affecting these brain regions is cause or consequence of BSP. Further advances in neurophysiology and neuroimaging may eventually clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms implicated. In this manuscript, we aim to update what is known regarding epidemiology, clinical aspects, and pathophysiology of the disorder and speculate on the directions of research worth pursuing in the near future. PMID:27064462

  16. OPTICAL PRINCIPLES, BIOMECHANICS, AND INITIAL CLINICAL PERFORMANCE OF A DUAL-OPTIC ACCOMMODATING INTRAOCULAR LENS (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To design and develop an accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for endocapsular fixation with extended accommodative range that can be adapted to current standard extracapsular phacoemulsification technique. Methods Ray tracing analysis and lens design; finite element modeling of biomechanical properties; cadaver eye implantation; initial clinical evaluation. Results Ray tracing analysis indicated that a dual-optic design with a high plus-power front optic coupled to an optically compensatory minus posterior optic produced greater change in conjugation power of the eye compared to that produced by axial movement of a single-optic IOL, and that magnification effects were unlikely to account for improved near vision. Finite element modeling indicated that the two optics can be linked by spring-loaded haptics that allow anterior and posterior axial displacement of the front optic in response to changes in ciliary body tone and capsular tension. A dual-optic single-piece foldable silicone lens was constructed based on these principles. Subsequent initial clinical evaluation in 24 human eyes after phacoemulsification for cataract indicated mean 3.22 diopters of accommodation (range, 1 to 5 D) based on defocus curve measurement. Accommodative amplitude evaluation at 1- and 6-month follow-up in all eyes indicated that the accommodative range was maintained and that the lens was well tolerated. Conclusions A dual-optic design increases the accommodative effect of axial optic displacement, with minimal magnification effect. Initial clinical trials suggest that IOLs designed on this principle might provide true pseudophakic accommodation following cataract extraction and lens implantation. PMID:17471355

  17. Evidence-based protocol for structural rehabilitation of the spine and posture: review of clinical biomechanics of posture (CBP®) publications

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Paul A.; Harrison, Donald D.; Harrison, Deed E.; Haas, Jason W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although practice protocols exist for SMT and functional rehabilitation, no practice protocols exist for structural rehabilitation. Traditional chiropractic practice guidelines have been limited to acute and chronic pain treatment, with limited inclusion of functional and exclusion of structural rehabilitation procedures. OBJECTIVE (1) To derive an evidence-based practice protocol for structural rehabilitation from publications on Clinical Biomechanics of Posture (CBP®) methods, and (2) to compare the evidence for Diversified, SMT, and CBP®. METHODS Clinical control trials utilizing CBP® methods and spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) were obtained from searches in Mantis, CINAHL, and Index Medicus. Using data from SMT review articles, evidence for Diversified Technique (as taught in chiropractic colleges), SMT, and CBP® were rated and compared. RESULTS From the evidence from Clinical Control Trials on SMT and CBP®, there is very little evidence support for Diversified (our rating = 18), as taught in chiropractic colleges, for the treatment of pain subjects, while CBP® (our rating = 46) and SMT for neck pain (rating = 58) and low back pain (our rating = 202) have evidence-based support. CONCLUSIONS While CBP® Technique has approximately as much evidence-based support as SMT for neck pain, CBP® has more evidence to support its methods than the Diversified technique taught in chiropractic colleges, but not as much as SMT for low back pain. The evolution of chiropractic specialization has occurred, and doctors providing structural-based chiropractic care require protocol guidelines for patient quality assurance and standardization. A structural rehabilitation protocol was developed based on evidence from CBP® publications. PMID:17549209

  18. Sex Influences the Biomechanical Outcomes of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in a Pre-Clinical Large Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kiapour, Ata M.; Fleming, Braden C.; Proffen, Benedikt L.; Murray, Martha M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is 2-10 times greater in women than men. While the role of sex on injury risk is well established, its effects on surgical outcomes remain controversial. Purpose To investigate whether the biomechanical outcomes of ACL reconstruction are affected by sex using an established porcine model that displays similar sex-specific differences in knee anatomy and ligament structural properties to humans. We hypothesized there are sex differences in ACL reconstruction outcomes with regards to the graft structural properties, knee laxity and cartilage damage. Study Design Controlled Laboratory Study. Methods A total of 41 (23 M, 18 F) adolescent Yucatan minipigs underwent unilateral ACL transection and ACL reconstruction using sex-matched bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts (with or without additional bio-enhancement). Graft biomechanical and histological properties, knee laxity and cartilage damage were assessed after 15 weeks. A two-factor ANOVA was used to investigate the effect of sex on all the measured outcomes after adjusting for the treatment effect. Results After 15 weeks of healing, female pigs had a significantly lower mean normalized graft yield load (by 18.5±7.7%; p=0.023) and linear stiffness (by 11.9±5.6%; p=0.043), compared to males. Female pigs had a significantly greater side-to-side differences in AP knee laxity at 30° (by 1.4±0.6 mm; p=0.028) and 90° (by 1.8±0.8 mm; p=0.032). Female pigs had a lower graft vascular density (by 0.8±0.3 [analog scoring];p=0.021) with similar cellular and collagen-based histologic scores in both sexes (p>0.6). Female pigs also had a significantly larger area of cartilage damage (by 43.3±14.8 mm2; p=0.014) after conventional ACL reconstruction than their male counterparts. Conclusion Female pigs had significantly worse outcomes (i.e., graft structural properties, knee laxity and cartilage damage) compared to males in this translational model after 15 weeks

  19. Atraumatic extractions: a biomechanical rationale.

    PubMed

    Misch, Carl E; Perez, Helena M

    2008-08-01

    Biomechanical aspects of force have been applied to tooth extraction for centuries. However, the mechanical advantages available to extract the teeth were primarily applied to hold the crown of the tooth, rather than help extract it. An extraction device (Physics Forceps) has been developed to apply a biomechanical rationale to the extraction process of a tooth using a class 1 lever, creep, and shear components of force. PMID:18717405

  20. Cutaneous field cancerization: clinical, histopathological and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Torezan, Luís Antônio Ribeiro; Festa-Neto, Cyro

    2013-01-01

    The concept of "field cancerization" was first introduced by Slaughter in 1953 when studying the presence of histologically abnormal tissue surrounding oral squamous cell carcinoma. It was proposed to explain the development of multiple primary tumors and locally recurrent cancer. Organ systems in which field cancerization has been described since then are: head and neck (oral cavity, oropharynx, and larynx), lung, vulva, esophagus, cervix, breast, skin, colon, and bladder. Recent molecular studies support the carcinogenesis model in which the development of a field with genetically altered cells plays a central role. An important clinical implication is that fields often remain after the surgery for the primary tumor and may lead to new cancers, designated presently as "a second primary tumor" or "local recurrence," depending on the exact site and time interval. In conclusion, the development of an expanding pre-neoplastic field appears to be a critical step in epithelial carcinogenesis with important clinical consequences. Diagnosis and treatment of epithelial cancers should not only be focused on the tumor but also on the field from which it developed. The most important etiopathogenetic, clinical, histopathological and therapeutic aspects of field cancerization are reviewed in this article. PMID:24173184

  1. Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy: Clinical Aspects of Assessment and Management.

    PubMed

    Goom, Thomas S H; Malliaras, Peter; Reiman, Michael P; Purdam, Craig R

    2016-06-01

    Synopsis Proximal hamstring tendinopathy (PHT) typically manifests as deep buttock pain at the hamstring common origin. Both athletic and nonathletic populations are affected by PHT. Pain and dysfunction are often long-standing and limit sporting and daily functions. There is limited evidence regarding diagnosis, assessment, and management; for example, there are no randomized controlled trials investigating rehabilitation of PHT. Some of the principles of management established in, for example, Achilles and patellar tendinopathy would appear to apply to PHT but are not as well documented. This narrative review and commentary will highlight clinical aspects of assessment and management of PHT, drawing on the available evidence and current principles of managing painful tendinopathy. The management outline presented aims to guide clinicians as well as future research. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):483-493. Epub 15 Apr 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.5986. PMID:27084841

  2. Clinical aspects of indirect immunofluorescence for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ghanadan, Alireza; Saghazadeh, Amene; Jahanzad, Issa; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-05-01

    Because the most common term used in conversations considering autoimmunity is autoantibodies, it is well-expected that the indirect immunofluorescence assay, which detects antibodies directed against various antigens, is one of our most impressive techniques for investigating autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Roughly speaking, the current literature corroborates that this immunopathologic investigation means that autoantibodies detection makes a considerable contribution to both diagnostic and prognostic aspects of AIDs in the clinical setting. However, it varies between different AIDs, autoantibodies, ethnicities or detection methodologies. Directly focusing on the indirect immunofluorescence assay, we present evidence to support this multidimensional variation regarding the subject via reviewing briefly the best-investigated autoantibodies in the well-documented AIDs, including vasculitis, inflammatory bowel disease, scleroderma, autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:25786676

  3. Conformal piezoelectric systems for clinical and experimental characterization of soft tissue biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Shi, Yan; Joe, Pauline; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Balooch, Guive; Usgaonkar, Karan; Gur, Onur; Tran, Phat L; Crosby, Jessi R; Meyer, Marcin; Su, Yewang; Chad Webb, R; Tedesco, Andrew S; Slepian, Marvin J; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical assessment of soft biological tissues and organs has broad relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment of disease. Existing characterization methods are invasive, lack microscale spatial resolution, and are tailored only for specific regions of the body under quasi-static conditions. Here, we develop conformal and piezoelectric devices that enable in vivo measurements of soft tissue viscoelasticity in the near-surface regions of the epidermis. These systems achieve conformal contact with the underlying complex topography and texture of the targeted skin, as well as other organ surfaces, under both quasi-static and dynamic conditions. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the responses of piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs laminated on a variety of soft biological tissues and organ systems in animal models provide information on the operation of the devices. Studies on human subjects establish the clinical significance of these devices for rapid and non-invasive characterization of skin mechanical properties. PMID:25985458

  4. Conformal piezoelectric systems for clinical and experimental characterization of soft tissue biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Shi, Yan; Joe, Pauline; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Balooch, Guive; Usgaonkar, Karan; Gur, Onur; Tran, Phat L.; Crosby, Jessi R.; Meyer, Marcin; Su, Yewang; Chad Webb, R.; Tedesco, Andrew S.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical assessment of soft biological tissues and organs has broad relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment of disease. Existing characterization methods are invasive, lack microscale spatial resolution, and are tailored only for specific regions of the body under quasi-static conditions. Here, we develop conformal and piezoelectric devices that enable in vivo measurements of soft tissue viscoelasticity in the near-surface regions of the epidermis. These systems achieve conformal contact with the underlying complex topography and texture of the targeted skin, as well as other organ surfaces, under both quasi-static and dynamic conditions. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the responses of piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs laminated on a variety of soft biological tissues and organ systems in animal models provide information on the operation of the devices. Studies on human subjects establish the clinical significance of these devices for rapid and non-invasive characterization of skin mechanical properties.

  5. [Autism in females: clinical, neurobiological and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, V L; Arberas, C L

    2016-02-21

    Autism spectrum disorders are more prevalent in males than in females, and the proportion can range from 1.4 to 1, depending on the samples that are analysed. The smaller difference has been related to those who also manifest an associated intellectual disability, and it is accepted that in those cases females are far more seriously affected. There is likely to be a subregister of females with autism spectrum disorder, especially in those who have high cognitive performance, that is possibly related with the assessment techniques that are used and even with the lack of suitable levels of arousal in girls. In general, females with autism have better early language development, better social skills and their playing can even develop in the expected way. Their interests can be similar to those of their peer group, although they usually vary in intensity and quality. It is accepted as a fact that the difference in the social skills becomes more apparent in adolescence. The extreme male brain theory, the female-specific protective factor, variants in brain plasticity (lower threshold in males with greater susceptibility) and genetic and epigenetic factors, among others, are put forward as possible hypotheses to justify this lower prevalence and the clinical variants in females. This work aims to analyse the clinical and developmental aspects, the variability of expression in females with respect to males, and some of the possible neurobiological and genetic bases that account for the higher prevalence and the differences in expression. PMID:26922954

  6. Clinical and cytopathological aspects in phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, Anca; Popescu, Carmen Florina; Pleşea, I E; Bădulescu, Adriana; Tănase, Florentina; Mateescu, Garofiţa

    2009-01-01

    The frequency of mesenchymal breast tumors is very low, being represented mostly by tumors with biphasic proliferation (phyllodes tumors) and less by other types of non-epithelial tumors. From clinical point of view, phyllodes tumors (PT) can mimic a breast carcinoma. Therefore, the preoperative diagnosis by cytological examination on material obtained by fine needle aspiration (FNA) is very important for adequate treatment of these tumors. In current study, we assessed clinical aspects of 79 phyllodes tumors regarding patient's age and localization of the tumors. In 17 out of 79 cases, it has been performed FNA within the tumors with further cytological examination on the smears obtained. The median age of the patients was 46.07-year-old, being progressively higher with grade of the tumors with significant values between benign and borderline tumors (p=0.04954) and between benign and malignant ones (p=0.02890). The distinguish on the smears of stromal fragments and naked stromal nuclei with variable grade of atypia regarding the tumoral type, in detriment of epithelial elements have been conclusive for fibroepithelial lesion as cytopathological diagnosis. The preoperative differentiation between a breast phyllodes tumor and a breast carcinoma is extremely important for avoiding of a useless radical surgery for the patient. If the fine needle aspiration was correctly performed, the accuracy of the cytodiagnosis has been 82% in current study. PMID:19942954

  7. Forensic psychiatric nursing: skills and competencies: II clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mason, T; Coyle, D; Lovell, A

    2008-03-01

    This study reports on research undertaken to identify the skills and competencies of forensic psychiatric nurses working in secure psychiatric services in the UK. The rationale for this research is the lack of clarity in the role definition of nurses working in these environments and the specific content that may underscore the curriculum for training forensic nurses. Over 3300 questionnaires were distributed to forensic psychiatric nurses, non-forensic psychiatric nurses and other disciplines and information obtained on (1) the perceived clinical problems that give forensic nurses the most difficulty; (2) the skills best suited to overcome those problems; and (3) the priority aspects of clinical nursing care that needs to be developed. A 35% response rate was obtained with 1019 forensic psychiatric nurses, 110 non-forensic psychiatric nurses and 43 other disciplines. The results highlighted a 'top ten' list of main problems with possible solutions and main areas for development. The conclusions drawn include a focus on skills and competencies regarding the management of personality disorders and the management of violence and aggression. PMID:18211560

  8. Clinical evolutional aspects of chronic subdural haematomas – literature review

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, IA; Constantinescu, AI

    2015-01-01

    Apparently trivial, one of the most frequent pathologies in neurosurgical practice, chronic subdural haematoma, continues to be a challenge for the neurosurgeons both from the therapeutic and postoperatory complications point of view, taking into account that it is frequently met in elders, who usually present a complex pathology. The fact that, by definition, there is a latent period between the moment the brain injury, usually minor, occurs and the appearance of clinical symptomatology, frequently makes the trauma be ignored, this complicating the diagnosis and most of the times delaying the application of the adequate treatment. Developing slowly in time, in weeks or months, the aspect that chronic subdural haematoma usually occurs in elders should not be neglected, its clinical symptomatology often debuting with memory and attention disorders, so that the patient is usually referred to psychiatrists or neurologists, only a paraclinical investigation (CT scan or MRI) being able to establish the diagnosis. Even the appearance of the lateral signs is subjected to many diagnosis confusions because patients deny the existence of a trauma in over 50% of the cases. Abbreviations: CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, CSDH = chronic subdural haematoma, HMW = high molecular weight, F = frontal, T = temporal, P = parietal PMID:26361507

  9. Tourette syndrome: clinical and psychological aspects of 250 cases.

    PubMed

    Comings, D E; Comings, B G

    1985-05-01

    Tourette syndrome is a common hereditary neuropsychiatric disorder consisting of multiple tics and vocal noises. We summarize here clinical aspects of 250 consecutive cases seen over a period of 3 years. The sex ratio was four males to one female, and the mean age of onset was 6.9 years. Only 10% were Jewish, indicating that it is not more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews. Only 33% had compulsive swearing (coprolalia), indicating that this is not necessary for the diagnosis. The most frequent initial symptoms were rapid eye-blinking, facial grimacing, and throat-clearing. In this series, it was clear that Tourette syndrome is a psychiatric as well as a neurological disorder. Significant discipline problems and/or problems with anger and violence occurred in 61%, and 54% had attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity. Some degree of exhibitionism was present in 15.9% of males and 6.1% of females. Obsessive-compulsive behavior was seen in 32%. Other than tics and vocal noises, the most common parental complaints were of short temper and everything being a confrontation. There were no significant clinical differences between familial and sporadic cases. Whenever a child presents with a learning disorder, attention-deficit disorder, or significant discipline or emotional problems, the parents should be questioned about the presence of tics or vocal noises in the patient and other family members. PMID:3859204

  10. Biomechanical analysis and clinical effects of bridge combined fixation system for femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-xing; Xiong, Ying; Deng, Hong; Jia, Fu; Gu, Shao; Liu, Bai-lian; Li, Qun-hui; Pu, Qi; Zhang, Zhong-Zi

    2014-09-01

    This work aimed to compare the stress distribution and mechanical properties of our bridge combined fixation system and commonly used metal locking plate screw system by finite element analysis and by using the Zwick/Z100 testing machine. In addition, we also investigated the clinical outcome of our bridge combined fixation system for femoral fractures in 59 patients from June 2005 to January 2013. As a result, the stress distribution in the bone plate and screws of metal locking plate screw system during walking and climbing stairs was significantly lower than that of metal locking plate screw system. No significant difference in the displacement was observed between two systems. The equivalent bending stiffness of bridge combined fixation system was significantly lower than that of metal locking plate screw system. There were no significant differences in the bending strength, yield load, and maximum force between two systems. All the cases were followed up for 12-24 months (average 18 months). The X-ray showed bone callus was formed in most patients after 3 months, and the fracture line was faint and disappeared at 6-9 months postoperatively. No serious complications, such as implant breakage and wound infection, occurred postoperatively. According to self-developed standard for bone healing, clinical outcomes were rated as excellent or good in 55 out of 59 patients (success rate: 93.2%). Therefore, our findings suggest that our bridge combined fixation system may be a promising approach for treatment of long-bone fractures. PMID:25201264

  11. [Biomechanical-clinical interpretation of firearm wounds. General problems. IX. Propedeutic ABC of terminal ballistics].

    PubMed

    Marini, F; Radin, S; Dagradi, V; Carolo, F; Mangiante, G; Tenci, A; Dalla Giacoma, C; Giarolli, M; Massari, S; Prati, G

    1993-01-01

    In this chapter, the leading role is played by the mechanical-thermal-ballistic device, issued as a long-barrelled regulation firearm to modern armies. The most accurate description of this type of firearm and its present and possible future development seeks to be in line with the objective comparison between the biological matter and the mechanical material, which constitutes the essential basis for any optimal nosological, aetiological, or pathogenetic classification of bullet wounds. We should not forget that the advent of the M 16 A 1 has aroused great technical interest, particularly--though not only--as regards the hydroshock aspect, and that the technological developments in future can hardly fail to increasingly confirm the singular nature of bullet wounds, which refuse to be encompassed merely within the somewhat limited sphere of their strictly local effects, but carry a broader significance in a critical context open to further verification in the future. There can be no denying that this unique nature of modern bullet wounds makes them ideal candidates bearing witness to a new interpretation of traumatism, which at present is only in its infancy. PMID:7923488

  12. Analytical Aspects of the Implementation of Biomarkers in Clinical Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shipkova, Maria; López, Olga Millán; Picard, Nicolas; Noceti, Ofelia; Sommerer, Claudia; Christians, Uwe; Wieland, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    In response to the urgent need for new reliable biomarkers to complement the guidance of the immunosuppressive therapy, a huge number of biomarker candidates to be implemented in clinical practice have been introduced to the transplant community. This includes a diverse range of molecules with very different molecular weights, chemical and physical properties, ex vivo stabilities, in vivo kinetic behaviors, and levels of similarity to other molecules, etc. In addition, a large body of different analytical techniques and assay protocols can be used to measure biomarkers. Sometimes, a complex software-based data evaluation is a prerequisite for appropriate interpretation of the results and for their reporting. Although some analytical procedures are of great value for research purposes, they may be too complex for implementation in a clinical setting. Whereas the proof of "fitness for purpose" is appropriate for validation of biomarker assays used in exploratory drug development studies, a higher level of analytical validation must be achieved and eventually advanced analytical performance might be necessary before diagnostic application in transplantation medicine. A high level of consistency of results between laboratories and between methods (if applicable) should be obtained and maintained to make biomarkers effective instruments in support of therapeutic decisions. This overview focuses on preanalytical and analytical aspects to be considered for the implementation of new biomarkers for adjusting immunosuppression in a clinical setting and highlights critical points to be addressed on the way to make them suitable as diagnostic tools. These include but are not limited to appropriate method validation, standardization, education, automation, and commercialization. PMID:26418704

  13. Primordial dwarfism: overview of clinical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Preeti; Das, Satrupa; Panigrahi, Inusha; Munshi, Anjana

    2016-02-01

    Primordial dwarfism is a group of genetic disorders which include Seckel Syndrome, Silver-Russell Syndrome, Microcephalic Osteodysplastic Primordial Dwarfism types I/III, II and Meier-Gorlin Syndrome. This genetic disorder group is characterized by intra-uterine growth retardation and post-natal growth abnormalities which occur as a result of disorganized molecular and genomic changes in embryonic stage and, thus, it represents a unique area to study growth and developmental abnormalities. Lot of research has been carried out on different aspects; however, a consolidated review that discusses an overall spectrum of this disorder is not accessible. Recent research in this area points toward important molecular and cellular mechanisms in human body that regulate the complexity of growth process. Studies have emerged that have clearly associated with a number of abnormal chromosomal, genetic and epigenetic alterations that can predispose an embryo to develop PD-associated developmental defects. Finding and associating such fundamental changes to its subtypes will help in re-examination of alleged functions at both cellular and developmental levels and thus reveal the intrinsic mechanism that leads to a balanced growth. Although such findings have unraveled a subtle understanding of growth process, we further require active research in terms of identification of reliable biomarkers for different subtypes as an immediate requirement for clinical utilization. It is hoped that further study will advance the understanding of basic mechanisms regulating growth relevant to human health. Therefore, this review has been written with an aim to present an overview of chromosomal, molecular and epigenetic modifications reported to be associated with different subtypes of this heterogenous disorder. Further, latest findings with respect to clinical and molecular genetics research have been summarized to aid the medical fraternity in their clinical utility, for diagnosing disorders

  14. [Stabilizing the pelvic ring with the external fixator. Biomechanical studies and clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Egbers, H J; Draijer, F; Havemann, D; Zenker, W

    1992-11-01

    Experimental studies were performed on anatomic pelvis specimens. In different series of experiments the positioning of the screws and the assembly of the external fixator were changed. We tried fixing the external fixator to the screws at varying distances from the body surface. For stabilisation of the fractured pelvic girdle a self-constructed "bow fixator", fixed to supra-acetabular screws with proximal compression and distal traction showed the best results. Homogeneous distribution of the pressure could be achieved on the unstable dorsal pelvic ring structures. In clinical routine we used the triangular external fixator, which in the experimental situation yielded results close to those of the bow fixator. External fixation of the pelvic girdle has been performed 128 times since 1977, in January 1991 a prospective study was started. For Tile type B injuries the external fixator itself represents an effective, minimally invasive system, but type C fractures often require an additional internal fixation of the dorsal lesion. PMID:1475122

  15. Biomechanical assessment and clinical analysis of different intramedullary nailing systems for oblique fractures.

    PubMed

    Alierta, J A; Pérez, M A; Seral, B; García-Aznar, J M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the fracture union or non-union for a specific patient that presented oblique fractures in tibia and fibula, using a mechanistic-based bone healing model. Normally, this kind of fractures can be treated through an intramedullary nail using two possible configurations that depends on the mechanical stabilisation: static and dynamic. Both cases are simulated under different fracture geometries in order to understand the effect of the mechanical stabilisation on the fracture healing outcome. The results of both simulations are in good agreement with previous clinical experience. From the results, it is demonstrated that the dynamization of the fracture improves healing in comparison with a static or rigid fixation of the fracture. This work shows the versatility and potential of a mechanistic-based bone healing model to predict the final outcome (union, non-union, delayed union) of realistic 3D fractures where even more than one bone is involved. PMID:26712100

  16. Ankle syndesmosis injuries: anatomy, biomechanics, mechanism of injury, and clinical guidelines for diagnosis and intervention.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Gross, Michael L; Weinhold, Paul

    2006-06-01

    Syndesmosis injuries are rare, but very debilitating and frequently misdiagnosed. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the mechanisms of syndesmotic injuries, clinical examination methods, diagnosis, and management of the injuries. Cadaveric studies of the syndesmosis and deltoid ligaments are also reviewed for further understanding of stress transmission and the roles of different structures in stabilizing the distal syndesmosis. External rotation and excessive dorsiflexion of the foot on the leg have been reported as the most common mechanisms of injury. The injury is most often incurred by individuals who participate in skiing, football, soccer, and other sport activities played on turf. The external rotation and squeeze tests are reliable tests to detect this injury. The ability of imaging studies to assist in an accurate diagnosis may depend on the severity of the injury. The results of cadaveric studies indicate the importance of the deltoid ligament in maintaining stability of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis and the congruency of the ankle mortise. Intervention programs with early rigid immobilization and pain relief strategies, followed by strengthening and balance training are recommended. Heel lift and posterior splint intervention can be used to avoid separation of the distal syndesmosis induced by excessive dorsiflexion of the ankle joint. Application of a rigid external device should be used with caution to prevent medial-lateral compression of the leg superior to the ankle mortise, thereby inducing separation of the distal syndesmosis articulation. Surgical intervention is an option when a complete tear of the syndesmotic ligaments is present or when fractures are observed. PMID:16776487

  17. BIOMECHANICS OF ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM

    PubMed Central

    Vorp, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a condition whereby the terminal aorta permanently dilates to dangerous proportions, risking rupture. The biomechanics of AAA has been studied with great interest since aneurysm rupture is a mechanical failure of the degenerated aortic wall and is a significant cause of death in developed countries. In this review article, the importance of considering the biomechanics of AAA is discussed, and then the history and the state-of-the-art of this field is reviewed - including investigations into the biomechanical behavior of AAA tissues, modeling AAA wall stress and factors which influence it, and the potential clinical utility of these estimates in predicting AAA rupture. PMID:17254589

  18. Atopic dermatitis: molecular mechanisms, clinical aspects and new therapeutical approaches.

    PubMed

    Galli, E; Cicconi, R; Rossi, P; Casati, A; Brunetti, E; Mancino, G

    2003-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a genetically determinated, chronic inflammatory skin disorder associated with cutaneous erythema and severe pruritus, affecting 10-15% of children with increasing incidence and socio-economical relevance. Frequently, AD is associated with development of allergic rhinitis and/or asthma later in childhood. In most of patients AD is associated with a sensitization to food and/or environmental allergens and increased serum-IgE, while only a fewer percentage missed links to the classical atopic diathesis. Currently investigated pathogenetic aspects of AD include imbalanced Th1/Th2 responses, altered prostaglandin metabolism, intrinsic defects in the keratinocyte function, delayed eosinophil apoptosis, and IgE-mediated facilitated antigen presentation by epidermal dendritic cells. An inflammatory response of the two-phase-type and the effects of staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs) are also reported. At present a standardized cure of AD and a consensus on therapeutical approach of the severe form of the disease have not been established. Current management of AD is directed to the reduction of cutaneous inflammation and infection, mainly by S. aureus, and to the elimination of exacerbating factors (irritants, allergens, emotional stresses). Since patient with AD show abnormalities in immunoregulation, therapy directed to adjustment of their immune function could represent an alternative approach, particularly in the severe form of the disease. In this review, we analyse the clinical and genetic aspects of AD, the related molecular mechanisms, and the immunobiology of the disease, focusing our attention on current treatments and future perspectives on this topic. PMID:12630559

  19. [The unilateral axial dynamic fixator study of its biomechanical property and clinical application].

    PubMed

    Chen, Z B

    1990-06-01

    The home made UADF after Bastiani's pattern was mechanically tested in our lab on fracture of cadaveric femurs. For comparison, the same test was also carried out with conventional semicircular external fixator. The results showed that the rigidity and stability of fixation closely related with the diameter of the bone-pin used. The diameter of the treated pins used in UADF was one time larger than that of the round pin used in conventional semicircular external fixator. The compression rigidity of the former frame was 3.5 times stronger than that of the latter one; the extent of displacement of the fragments happened in the former frame was much less than that occurred in the latter one. Clinical Application of UADF. on fracture of tibia and fibula in 31, of femur in 8, knee arthrodesis and osteotomy of tibia and fibula one in each, brought bony healing on successfully. It is apparent that the UADF is multifunctional, universal and adaptable in use, leading to success. PMID:2096059

  20. Cataplexy--clinical aspects, pathophysiology and management strategy.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Siegel, Jerry M; Lopez, Regis; Torontali, Zoltan A; Peever, John H

    2014-07-01

    Cataplexy is the pathognomonic symptom of narcolepsy, and is the sudden uncontrollable onset of skeletal muscle paralysis or weakness during wakefulness. Cataplexy is incapacitating because it leaves the individual awake but temporarily either fully or partially paralyzed. Occurring spontaneously, cataplexy is typically triggered by strong positive emotions such as laughter and is often underdiagnosed owing to a variable disease course in terms of age of onset, presenting symptoms, triggers, frequency and intensity of attacks. This disorder occurs almost exclusively in patients with depletion of hypothalamic orexin neurons. One pathogenetic mechanism that has been hypothesized for cataplexy is the activation, during wakefulness, of brainstem circuitry that normally induces muscle tone suppression in rapid eye movement sleep. Muscle weakness during cataplexy is caused by decreased excitation of noradrenergic neurons and increased inhibition of skeletal motor neurons by γ-aminobutyric acid-releasing or glycinergic neurons. The amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex contain neural pathways through which positive emotions probably trigger cataplectic attacks. Despite major advances in understanding disease mechanisms in cataplexy, therapeutic management is largely symptomatic, with antidepressants and γ-hydroxybutyrate being the most effective treatments. This Review describes the clinical and pathophysiological aspects of cataplexy, and outlines optimal therapeutic management strategies. PMID:24890646

  1. Epidermoids involving the temporal bone: clinical, radiological and pathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Nager, G T

    1975-12-01

    Epidermoids or congenital cholesteatomas arise from aberrant epithelial remnants and are, therefore, considerd blastomatous malformations. Their predilective sites are the intracranial cavity, the diploe of the skull and the spinal canal. In the base of the skull the temporal bone is the most frequent site. Epidermoids account for about 0.2-1.5 percent of all intracranial tumors. The majority originate in the cerebello-pontine angle where they account for 6-7 percent of all tumors. Their age incidence reveals a great scatter from birth to 80 years. The majority are recognized during the third and fourth decades with the onset of clinical symptoms occurring much earlier. They affect males more frequently than females. Their delicate capsule with a whitish mother-of-pearl sheen lends them a typical appearance. Epidermoids are generally slow growing lesions which may remain asymptomatic for years. The irritative effect of their content, however, can produce symptoms of dysfunction and intense inflammation. Malignant changes occur infrequently. Diploic epidermoids are easily recognized, whereas, intradural epidermoids are more difficult to identify. Epidermoids may arise in the vicinity, on the outer aspect or within the temporal bone. Epidermoids originating in any of these locations have certain characteristic features which may arouse suspicion of their presence. Examples of an epidermoid with origin in the typical locations within the temporal bone and cerebello-pontine angle are discussed to portray their individual characteristics. PMID:1207346

  2. Mathematical foundations of biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of biomechanics is the analysis of the structure and function of humans, animals, and plants by means of the methods of mechanics. Its foundations are in particular embedded in mathematics, physics, and informatics. Due to the inherent multidisciplinary character deriving from its aim, biomechanics has numerous connections and overlapping areas with biology, biochemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology, along with clinical medicine, so its range is enormously wide. This treatise is mainly meant to serve as an introduction and overview for readers and students who intend to acquire a basic understanding of the mathematical principles and mechanics that constitute the foundation of biomechanics; accordingly, its contents are limited to basic theoretical principles of general validity and long-range significance. Selected examples are included that are representative for the problems treated in biomechanics. Although ultimate mathematical generality is not in the foreground, an attempt is made to derive the theory from basic principles. A concise and systematic formulation is thereby intended with the aim that the reader is provided with a working knowledge. It is assumed that he or she is familiar with the principles of calculus, vector analysis, and linear algebra. PMID:21303323

  3. Clinical Biomechanics of Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, James G.; Matheson, Gordon O.

    1988-01-01

    Abnormalities of lower-leg alignment may lead to a number of skiing problems. Tibia vara may cause difficulties in turning and riding a flat ski unless the boot cuff is properly adjusted to the lower leg. Varus deformities in the foot may lead to boot-fitting difficulties, foot and knee pain, and the inability to edge a ski turn properly. Compensation for these problems with an appropriately posted, corrective, orthotic device may allow skiing participation with greater comfort and better performance. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:21264027

  4. Biomechanics studies in dentistry: bioengineering applied in oral implantology.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Gomes, Erica Alves; Delben, Juliana Aparecida; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique

    2009-07-01

    The application of engineering knowledge in dentistry has helped the understanding of biomechanics aspects related to osseointegrated implants. Several techniques have been used to evaluate the biomechanical load on implants comprising the use of photoelastic stress analysis, finite element stress analysis, and strain-gauge analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe engineering methods used in dentistry to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of osseointegrated implants. Photoelasticity provides good qualitative information on the overall location and concentration of stresses but produces limited quantitative information. The method serves as an important tool for determining the critical stress points in a material and is often used for determining stress concentration factors in irregular geometries. The application of strain-gauge method on dental implants is based on the use of electrical resistance strain gauges and its associated equipment and provides both in vitro and vivo measurements strains under static and dynamic loads. However, strain-gauge method provides only the data regarding strain at the gauge. Finite element analysis can simulate stress using a computer-created model to calculate stress, strain, and displacement. Such analysis has the advantage of allowing several conditions to be changed easily and allows measurement of stress distribution around implants at optional points that are difficult to examine clinically. All the 3 methodologies can be useful to evaluate biomechanical implant behavior close to the clinical condition but the researcher should have enough knowledge in model fabrication (experimental delineation) and results analysis. PMID:19568186

  5. [Regulatory aspects and medicolegal considerations regarding clinical drug trials].

    PubMed

    Cammarano, Andrea; De Dominicis, Enrico; Marella, Gian Luca; Maurici, Massimo; Arcudi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to explore the regulatory and medicolegal aspects of experimental drug trials. Firstly, the authors provide definitions of drug according to WHO, the European Community and our official Pharmacopoeia, and that of experimental studies. They then explain the distinction between pure or basic research and drug trials and explain the various phases of the latter. Besides providing definitions, and exploring doctrinal, theoretical but also practical aspects of drug trials, the authors also discuss and analyze legislative aspects, with particular reference to the Italian legislative framework, and medicolegal issues, including informed consent, effects on humans, and professional responsibility. PMID:27336959

  6. Biomechanics of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, V.; Kodigudla, M.; Goel, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Disc degeneration and associated disorders are among the most debated topics in the orthopedic literature over the past few decades. These may be attributed to interrelated mechanical, biochemical, and environmental factors. The treatment options vary from conservative approaches to surgery, depending on the severity of degeneration and response to conservative therapies. Spinal fusion is considered to be the “gold standard” in surgical methods till date. However, the association of adjacent level degeneration has led to the evolution of motion preservation technologies like spinal arthroplasty and posterior dynamic stabilization systems. These new technologies are aimed to address pain and preserve motion while maintaining a proper load sharing among various spinal elements. This paper provides an elaborative biomechanical review of the technologies aimed to address the disc degeneration and reiterates the point that biomechanical efficacy followed by long-term clinical success will allow these nonfusion technologies as alternatives to fusion, at least in certain patient population. PMID:22745914

  7. Qualitative biomechanical principles for application in coaching.

    PubMed

    Knudson, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aspects of human movements in sport can be readily understood by Newtonian rigid-body mechanics. Many of these laws and biomechanical principles, however, are counterintuitive to a lot of people. There are also several problems in the application of biomechanics to sports, so the application of biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of sport skills by many coaches has been limited. Biomechanics scholars have long been interested in developing principles that facilitate the qualitative application of biomechanics to improve movement performance and reduce the risk of injury. This paper summarizes the major North American efforts to establish a set of general biomechanical principles of movement, and illustrates how principles can be used to improve the application of biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of sport technique. A coach helping a player with a tennis serve is presented as an example. The standardization of terminology for biomechanical principles is proposed as an important first step in improving the application ofbiomechanics in sport. There is also a need for international cooperation and research on the effectiveness of applying biomechanical principles in the coaching of sport techniques. PMID:17542182

  8. Porcelain veneering of titanium--clinical and technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Haag, Per

    2011-01-01

    Gold and other alloys have long been used for the production of crowns and bridges as replacements for damaged or lost teeth. However, doubts have arisen on the suitability of using these materials for dental restorations, as gold has also shown a capacity to cause side-effects such as allergic reactions. This is especially valid for alloys, which during the last decades have been used as porcelain-fused-to metal restorations. This fact has led to an interest in using titanium instead of these alloys. Trials to use titanium for this purpose were initiated in Japan in the early 1980s. Titanium as an unalloyed metal differs in two aspects from the above named alloys: it has a phase transformation at 882 degrees C, which changes its outer and inner properties, and it has an expansion that lies between that of the porcelain types available on the market at the time. In Japan a technique for casting titanium was developed, where the after-treatment of the casting was elaborate, to re-establish the original properties of titanium. The porcelain developed for veneering had shortcomings as the rendering produced a rough surface and non satisfactory esthetics. In Sweden a new concept was introduced in 1989. Here the processing of titanium was performed by industrial methods such as milling, spark erosion and laser welding. The idea behind this was to avoid phase transformation. During the 1990s a number of porcelain products were launched and a vast number of both laboratory and clinical studies were performed and published, with varying results. In the first study of this thesis a prospective clinical trial was performed at a public dental health clinic in Sweden. Twenty-five patients were provided with 40 copings of pure titanium, which were veneered with porcelain. After 2 years 36 of these crowns were evaluated and the patients were also interviewed regarding problems such as shooting pains or difficulties in cleaning around the teeth that were crowned. This evaluation

  9. [Urticaria pigmentosa: clinical and therapeutic aspects for the paediatrician].

    PubMed

    Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Araos-Baeriswyl, Esteban; Downey, Camila; Dossi, María T

    2016-08-01

    Urticaria pigmentosa, also known as maculopapular mastocytosis, is the most common type of paediatric mastocytosis. It presents with yellow to brown macules or papules, usually located on trunk and extremities. Regarding its diagnostic and therapeutic implications, the objective of this article is to serve as an update for the paediatrician on the most relevant aspects of this pathology. PMID:27399017

  10. Different morphologic aspects and clinical features in massive hepatic amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Melato, M; Manconi, R; Magris, D; Morassi, P; Benussi, D G; Tiribelli, C

    1984-01-01

    4 cases of massive hepatic amyloidosis are reported with special reference to their clinical profiles and histologic features. On the basis of these data, two different clinical and histologic courses of the disease can be distinguished. 2 patients showed marked hepatomegaly without cholestasis, whereas in the other 2 the clinical picture was characterized by much less pronounced hepatomegaly, but by severe and progressive intrahepatic cholestasis. The time course of the disease seems to be different in the two forms, the cholestatic form being more rapidly fatal than the other. PMID:6745505

  11. Renal findings in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical aspects of 132 necropsies.

    PubMed

    Boers, M; Croonen, A M; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C; Eulderink, F; Cats, A; Weening, J J

    1987-09-01

    Renal abnormalities in 132 necropsied patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. Clinical findings before death included extra-articular manifestations of the disease (86% of patients), systemic vasculitis (6%), and uraemia (23%). Necropsy findings included nephrosclerosis (90%), systemic vasculitis (14%) with kidney involvement in 8%, amyloidosis (11%), membranous glomerulopathy (8%), and focal glomerular disease (8%). Association with clinical data suggests that both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid disease may play a part in the cause of these abnormalities. PMID:3675007

  12. Nutritional aspect of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: its clinical importance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease mainly affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The incidence of the disease is rapidly increasing worldwide, and a number of patients are diagnosed during their childhood or adolescence. Aside from controlling the gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional aspects such as growth, bone mineral density, anemia, micronutrient deficiency, hair loss, and diet should also be closely monitored and managed by the pediatric IBD team especially since the patients are in the development phase. PMID:26576179

  13. Aspects of vulnerable patients and informed consent in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kuthning, Maria; Hundt, Ferdinand

    2013-01-01

    Scope: To discuss the rationale behind informed consent in clinical trials focusing on vulnerable patients from a European and German viewpoint. Methods: Scientific literature search via PubMed, Medline, Google. Results: Voluntary informed consent is the cornerstone of policies regulating clinical trials. To enroll a patient into a clinical trial without having obtained written and signed consent is to be considered as a serious issue in the conduct of a clinical trial. Development of ethical guidance for physicians started before Christ Era with the Hippocratic Oath. Main function of consent, as articulated in all guidelines developed for clinical research, is to facilitate an individual’s freedom of choice, respect autonomy, and thus to ensure welfare of the participants in clinical trials. Minors are unable to provide legally binding informed consent, this issue is addressed through a combination of parental permission and minor’s assent. Illiteracy is a critical problem that affects all corners of our earth; it has no boundaries and exists among every race and ethnicity, age group, and economic class. New strategies to improve communication with patients including the use of videotapes or animated cartoon illustrations could be taught. Finally the time with the potential participant seems to be the best way to improve understanding. Conclusion: Discovery of life saving and life enhancing new treatments requires partnership that is based on good communication and trust between patients and researchers, sponsors, ethics committees, authorities, lawyers and politicians so that vulnerable patients can benefit from the results of well controlled clinical trials. PMID:23346043

  14. Clinical and neuroradiological diagnostic aspects of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses disorders.

    PubMed

    Santavuori, P; Vanhanen, S L; Autti, T

    2001-01-01

    Early diagnosis is mandatory for avoiding further cases in families with hereditary metabolic brain disorders. This review lists the most important clinical symptoms and neuroradiological findings at the early stage of the seven most common childhood neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) types. In the infantile type the typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings can be seen even before the clinical signs. In the classic late infantile type (CLN2), MRI is less informative but in this and in the variant late infantile type CLN6 the characteristic neurophysiological findings are present at an early stage, although not in the Finnish variant CLN5. In the latter, the clinical diagnosis depends on ophthalmological and MRI findings. The combination of ophthalmological deficits and vacuolated lymphocytes is highly characteristic of the juvenile type (CLN3). A new NCL type, Northern epilepsy (CLN8), is also briefly reviewed. PMID:11588989

  15. [Geriatric particularities of Parkinson's disease: Clinical and therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Belin, J; Houéto, J L; Constans, T; Hommet, C; de Toffol, B; Mondon, K

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent and complex progressive neurological disorder that increases in incidence with age. Although historically PD has been characterized by the presence of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss of the substantia nigra, the disease process also involves neurotransmitters other that dopamine and regions of the nervous system outside the basal ganglia. Its clinical presentation in elderly subjects differs from that in younger subjects, with more rapid progression, less frequent tremor, more pronounced axial signs, more frequent non-motor signs linked to concomitant degeneration of non-dopaminergic systems, and more frequent associated lesions. Despite the high prevalence of PD in elderly subjects, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in geriatric patients. Nevertheless, to improve functional disability while ensuring drug tolerance, the principles of optimized and multidisciplinary clinical management have to be known. The aim of this review is to provide an update on clinical and therapeutic features of PD specifically observed in elderly subjects. PMID:26573332

  16. Clinical aspects of leishmaniasis with special reference to the USSR*

    PubMed Central

    Moškovskij, Š. D.; Southgate, B. A.

    1971-01-01

    The wide variety of clinical syndromes produced in man by infection with members of the genus Leishmania has caused a great deal of confusion for many years, and has proved a serious obstacle to the rational classification of the leishmaniases. The situation has been complicated still further by the morphological identity of many species of Leishmania and by the behavioural similarities in vitro and in laboratory animals of species and strains producing distinct clinical or epidemiological patterns in humans. There has been a general failure to use standardized, comparable, and reproducible techniques in experimental studies of the various species of Leishmania; in particular, with one or two notable exceptions, there has been failure to adopt quantitative methods when studying Leishmania and the leishmaniases. This paper therefore attempts to classify the leishmaniases from clinical and epidemiological standpoints, and illustrates the provisional classification adopted with special reference to the situation in the USSR. PMID:5316251

  17. Immunoregulation by Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Biological Aspects and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Manrreza, Marta E.; Montesinos, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiation into mesenchymal lineages and that can be isolated from various tissues and easily cultivated in vitro. Currently, MSCs are of considerable interest because of the biological characteristics that confer high potential applicability in the clinical treatment of many diseases. Specifically, because of their high immunoregulatory capacity, MSCs are used as tools in cellular therapies for clinical protocols involving immune system alterations. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge about the capacity of MSCs for the immunoregulation of immunocompetent cells and emphasize the effects of MSCs on T cells, principal effectors of the immune response, and the immunosuppressive effects mediated by the secretion of soluble factors and membrane molecules. We also describe the mechanisms of MSC immunoregulatory modulation and the participation of MSCs as immune response regulators in several autoimmune diseases, and we emphasize the clinical application in graft versus host disease (GVHD). PMID:25961059

  18. The Pathophysiology and Clinical Aspects of Hypercalcemic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David B. N.; Zawada, Edward T.; Kleeman, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    For the purposes of this review, the vast and increasingly complex subject of hypercalcemic disorders can be broken down into the following categories: (1) Physiochemical state of calcium in circulation. (2) Pathophysiological basis of hypercalcemia. (3) Causes of hypercalcemia encountered in clinical practice: causes indicated by experience at the University of California, Los Angeles; neoplasia; hyperparathyroidism; nonparathyroid endocrinopathies; pharmacological agents; possible increased sensitivity to vitamin D; miscellaneous causes. (4) Clinical manifestations and diagnostic considerations of hypercalcemic disorders. (5) The management of hypercalcemic disorders: general measures; measures for lowering serum calcium concentration; measures for correcting primary causes—the management of asymptomatic hyperparathyroidism. PMID:362722

  19. [EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia: clinical aspects and laboratory tests].

    PubMed

    Saigo, Katsuyasu; Sakota, Yasuyuki; Masuda, Yukako

    2005-07-01

    EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (EDTA-PTCP) is a phenomenon caused by EDTA-dependent anti-platelet antibody. This antibody induces platelet agglutination in vitro, resulting in a decrease in platelet counts. It is necessary for clinicians to consider the possible presence of PTCP in cases of patients having low platelet counts without any hemorrhagic tendency. In this article, we describe some aspects of EDTA-PTCP including, (1) characteristics of platelet agglutination, (2)possible mechanisms for antibody production, (3) several methods to determine the true platelet number, and also (4) a few similar phenomena induced by antibodies independent of EDTA. PMID:16104534

  20. Research and clinical aspects of the late effects of poliomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Halstead, L.S.; Wiechers, D.O.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 32 selections. Some of the titles are: Late effects of Polio: Historical Perspectives; Sleep-Disordered Breathing as a Late Effect of Poliomyelitis; Clinical Subtypes, DNA Repair Efficiency, and Therapeutic Trials in the Post-Polio Syndromes; and Post-Polio Muscle Function.

  1. Companion diagnostics for targeted cancer drugs - clinical and regulatory aspects.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Dana; Jørgensen, Jan Trøst

    2014-01-01

    Companion diagnostics (CDx) holds the promise of improving the predictability of the oncology drug development process and become an important tool for the oncologist in relation to the choice of treatment for the individual patient. A number of drug-diagnostic co-development programs have already been completed successfully, and in the clinic, the use of several targeted cancer drugs is now guided by a CDx. This central role of the CDx assays has attracted the attention of the regulators, and especially the US Food and Drug Administration has been at the forefront in relation to developing regulatory strategies for CDx and the drug-diagnostic co-development project. For an increasing number of cancer patients the treatment selection will depend on the result generated by a CDx assay, and consequently this type of assay has become critical for the care and safety of the patients. In order to secure that the CDx assays have a high degree of analytical and clinical validity, they must undergo an extensive non-clinical and clinical testing before release for routine patient management. This review will give a brief introduction to some of the scientific and medical challenges related to the CDx development with specific emphasis on the regulatory requirements in different regions of the world. PMID:24904822

  2. [Clinical and psychopathological aspects of endogenous apathetic depressions].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, S A

    2011-01-01

    The study included 45 patients with endogenous apathetic depressions differing in clinical picture and psychopathological structure. Typological classification of these depressions into 3 variants dominated by decreased interests, initiative or will is proposed. The problem of nosological identification of apathetic depressions is discussed. Dynamics of these conditions in the structure of endogenous affective diseases and paroxysmal progredient schizophrenia is described. PMID:21674919

  3. Fruit biomechanics based on anatomy: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiguo; Yang, Hongling; Li, Pingping; Liu, Jizhan; Wang, Jizhang; Xu, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Fruit biomechanics is needed for quality determination, multiscale modelling and engineering design of fruit processes and equipments. However, these determined fruit biomechanics data often have obvious differences for the same fruit or tissue. In order to investigate it, the fruit biomechanics based on anatomy was reviewed in this paper. First, the anatomical characteristics of fruit biomaterials were described at the macroscopic `tissue' level and microscopic `cellular' level. Subsequently, the factors affecting fruit biomechanics based on anatomy and the relationships between fruit biomechanics, texture and mechanical damage were summarised according to the published literature. Fruit biomechanics is mainly affected by size, number and arrangement of cells, quantity and volume of intracellular spaces, structure, thickness, chemical composition and permeability of cell walls, and pectin degradation level and turgor pressure within cells based on microanatomy. Four test methods and partial determined results of fruit biomechanics were listed and reviewed. The determined mechanical properties data of fruit are only approximate values by using the existing four test methods, owing to the fruit biomaterials being non-homogeneous and living. Lastly, further aspects for research on fruit biomechanics were proposed for the future.

  4. Alternative strategies in drug development: clinical pharmacological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J

    1999-12-01

    Due to the continuous increase in time and cost of drug development and the considerable amount of resources required by the traditional approach, companies can no longer afford to continue to late phase 3 with drugs which are unlikely to be therapeutically effective. The future challenge must be for the pharmaceutical industry to slash its research and development costs by achieving a significant cut in the attrition rate for drugs entering preclinical and clinical development, and to reduce the development time and to increase the probability of success in later clinical trials by streamlining the development processes. In the 100 years to 1995, the pharmaceutical industry worked on about 500 targets with a limited number of compounds, whereas now, using new technologies like genomics, high throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry, drug companies will see an explosion in the number of targets and leads it can explore. Therefore, a tough selection process for picking candidate compounds out of research and a quick kill process for the candidate, which does not measure up in advanced trials, is mandatory to avoid wasting time, energy and money. To improve the transition from research to development it is necessary to validate new targets, define success criteria for research, integrate bioinformation at every stage in drug discovery, define prerequisites for development, identify the "losers" and select the "winners" early and concentrate efforts on them, and to automate the research and development (R&D) process to optimize resource requirements versus time lines and to ensure effective flow of information from drug discovery to late phase of development. In drug development a deeper understanding of a drugs' action is necessary from animal models and phase I, IIa studies prior to taking the drug further in development. Instead of moving from discovery thorough development phases in sequential steps, drug development should be streamlined combining

  5. Clinical aspects of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis: a contrast with cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rebouças, G.

    1975-01-01

    The clinical picture of liver disease in endemic areas of Schistosomiasis mansoni differs in many ways from that observed in alcoholic and other types of cirrhosis. In hepatosplenic schistosomiasis there is predominance of the clinical manifestations of portal hypertension, e.g., bleeding esophageal varices, while ascites, jaundice, and hepatic precoma or coma are much less common. Ammonia tolerance is usually normal and helps explain the low mortality rate during bleeding. Of special interest is the observation of a high incidence of persistent hepatitis B surface antigenemia among patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis, suggesting increased susceptibility of such patients to the development of virus-induced chronic active hepatitis. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:128911

  6. Severe scorpion envenomation in Brazil. Clinical, laboratory and anatomopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Cupo, P; Jurca, M; Azeedo-Marques, M M; Oliveira, J S; Hering, S E

    1994-01-01

    Scorpion stings in Brazil are important not only because of their incidence but also for their potential ability to induce severe, and often fatal, clinical situations, especially among children. In this report we present the clinical and laboratory data of 4 patients victims of scorpion stings by T. serrulatus, who developed heart failure and pulmonary edema, with 3 of them dying within 24 hours of the sting. Anatomopathologic study of these patients revealed diffuse areas of myocardiocytolysis in addition to pulmonary edema. The surviving child presented enzymatic, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic changes compatible with severe cardiac involvement, which were reversed within 5 days. These findings reinforce the need for continuous monitoring of patients with severe scorpion envenoming during the hours immediately following the sting. PMID:7997776

  7. Coryneform bacteria in infectious diseases: clinical and laboratory aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, M B; Lipsky, B A

    1990-01-01

    Coryneform isolates from clinical specimens frequently cannot be identified by either reference laboratories or research laboratories. Many of these organisms are skin flora that belong to a large number of taxonomic groups, only 40% of which are in the genus Corynebacterium. This review provides an update on clinical presentations, microbiological features, and pathogenic mechanisms of infections with nondiphtheria Corynebacterium species and other pleomorphic gram-positive rods. The early literature is also reviewed for a few coryneforms, especially those whose roles as pathogens are controversial. Recognition of newly emerging opportunistic coryneforms is dependent on sound identification schemes which cannot be developed until cell wall analyses and nucleic acid studies have defined the taxonomic groups and all of the reference strains within each taxon have been shown by molecular methods to be authentic members. Only then can reliable batteries of biochemical tests be selected for distinguishing each taxon. PMID:2116939

  8. [Sudeck disease--pathology, clinical aspects and therapy].

    PubMed

    Schulz, R H; Buch, K

    1998-06-01

    In our opinion the etiology of Sudeck's disease (acute reflex bone atrophy) plays a decisive role in therapeutic planning. The therapy is based on clinical and radiological findings. Physiotherapy addresses the symptom complex of pain, hyperemia, edema formation, and limitations of movement which act in a vicious circle and its intensity is modified according to the prevailing clinical and possibly also radiological findings. A strict coupling of the therapy to a classification according to stage is not recommended. Pharmacological therapy is merely a supporting element and focuses on the sympathetic overexcitability. The best therapy for Sudeck's disease is prophylaxis. Interventions collected under the general term early functional mobilization are, especially after surgical measures, a major factor in the avoidance of neurovegetative dysregulation in the sense of sympathetic reflex dystrophy. PMID:9738286

  9. Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of Bothrops asper bites.

    PubMed

    Otero-Patiño, Rafael

    2009-12-01

    Bothrops asper inflicts the majority of snakebites in Central America and in the northern regions of South America, mostly affecting young agricultural workers in rural settings. This species is capable of provoking severe envenomings associated with local and systemic manifestations. The main clinical features are: local edema, ecchymoses, blisters, dermonecrosis, myonecrosis, defibrinogenation, thrombocytopenia, systemic bleeding, hypotension and renal alterations. In addition, soft-tissue infection, acute renal failure, compartmental syndrome, central nervous system hemorrhage and, in pregnant women, abortion, fetal wastage and abruptio placentae have been described as complications. Intravenous administration of antivenom constitutes the mainstay in the therapy. Antivenoms composed of either whole IgG or F(ab')(2) fragments, manufactured in Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica and Mexico, have been tested in controlled clinical trials, and rational protocols for antivenom administration have been developed. In addition to antivenom therapy, a number of ancillary interventions are recommended in the treatment of B. asper bites. PMID:19591857

  10. Epidemiological, clinical and immunological aspects of neuromyelitis optica (NMO).

    PubMed

    Asgari, Nasrin

    2013-10-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease (IDD) of the central nervous system (CNS) and probably the most common non-multiple sclerosis (MS) CNS IDD. Serum immunoglobulin G autoantibodies have been identified in the majority of NMO patients with the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) as their main target autoantigen. Previous studies have suggested ethnicity-based prevalence differences of NMO. The genetic background for these putative differences is not known. An HLA-association with NMO has been identified, but the association is not very pronounced. Human and experimental studies support that anti-AQP4 antibodies/NMO-IgG are involved in the pathogenesis of NMO. Previous experimental animal models have reported induction of NMO-like histopathology in animals by transfer of human anti-AQP4 antibodies/NMO-IgG. A main goal of this PhD thesis was to perform a population-based study in a predominantly Caucasian population (in the Region of Southern Denmark) to estimate the incidence and prevalence of NMO and describe the clinical phenotypes in this population. Furthermore the aims were to investigate whether autoimmunity underlies or contributes to the pathogenesis of NMO with specific clinical, immunogenetic and experimental perspectives. The yearly incidence rate of NMO in the population was estimated to be 0.4 per 105 person-years (95% CI 0.30-0.54) and the prevalence was 4.4 per 105 (95% CI 3.1-5.7). The results indicated that NMO is more common in a Caucasian population than earlier believed. Clinical, radiologic and serological data were reviewed in order to establish the diagnostic accuracy of anti-AQP4 antibodies/NMO-IgG for specific syndromes in NMO. We observed assay characteristics with a sensitivity of 62% and a specificity of 100%. The diagnosis of NMO based on either the Wingerchuk 2006 criteria or the United States National Multiple Sclerosis Society 2008 criteria could be made purely on clinical grounds in a high proportion (64

  11. [Compatibility of science and clinical aspects. Between realism and utopia].

    PubMed

    Stange, R; Perl, M; Münzberg, M; Histing, T

    2013-01-01

    The working environment for young residents in orthopedic surgery has changed tremendously over the past 10 years. Due to cumulative clinical requirements and increasing demands on work-life balance research activity has become less attractive. Successful incorporation of research into the career of residents is a challenging project for the future. The young forum of the German Association for Orthopedics and Traumatology (DGOU) provides different approaches to enhance the quality of research and to help young orthopedists and trauma surgeons. PMID:23325157

  12. Digitalis: new aspects of pharmacokinetics and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Ambrosioni, E; Malini, P L; Strocchi, E

    1984-09-01

    Any evaluation of the efficacy of digoxin therapy must rely upon a precise index of the digitalization status. As the plasma concentrations bear a rather poor relationship with clinical effects of treatment, the occupied fraction of digoxin receptors (Na-K ATPase) on the erythrocytes membranes is proposed as a new index of digitalization status; preliminary data on the value of this approach are discussed. PMID:6096194

  13. [Current clinical aspects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Sauza-Sosa, Julio César; Cuéllar-Álvarez, José; Villegas-Herrera, Karla Montserrat; Sierra-Galán, Lilia Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension is the prevalentest disease worldwide that significantly increases cardiovascular risk. An early diagnosis together to achieve goals decreases the risk of complications significatly. Recently have been updated the diagnostic criteria for hypertension and the introduction of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The introduction into clinical practice of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was to assist the diagnosis of «white coat hypertension» and «masked hypertension». Today has also shown that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is better than the traditional method of recording blood pressure in the office, to the diagnosis and to adequate control and adjustment of drug treatment. Also there have been introduced important new concepts such as isloted nocturnal hypertension, morning blood pressure elevation altered and altered patterns of nocturnal dip in blood pressure; which have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Several studies have shown significant prognostic value in some stocks. There are still other concepts on which further study is needed to properly establish their introduction to clinical practice as hypertensive load variability, pulse pressure and arterial stiffness. In addition to setting values according to further clinical studies in populations such as elderly and children. PMID:26794338

  14. Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies: preclinical and clinical development aspects.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, João; Araújo, Filipe; Cutolo, Maurizio; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-01-01

    Biological drugs and their originated biosimilars are large, highly complex molecules derived from living cells or organisms. Traditional medicines, by contrast, are usually simple molecules of low molecular weight, synthesised by chemical means. The distinct complexities and methods of manufacture create an important difference between biosimilars and conventional generic drugs: while chemical generics can be fully characterised as identical to the originator product, biosimilars cannot. In addition, biological therapies are inherently variable, creating unavoidable differences between even subsequent batches of the same product. An expiring patent does not necessarily mean that the manufacturing process of the originator product becomes available to the biosimilar developers (for instance, the relevant cell line clone and growth medium). Therefore, it cannot be guaranteed that biosimilar products are identical to their reference product on a molecular level. This difference has important implications for the regulation and licensing of biosimilars. While conventional generic drugs require only a limited comparison and demonstration of identical chemical structure to the reference product, biosimilars require far more rigorous testing. In general, there must be a thorough comparison of structural and functional characteristics between biosimilar and originator drug. Stepwise nonclinical in vitro and in vivo approaches are recommended to evaluate the similarity of both drugs and any identified micro-heterogeneities must then be assessed for their impact on safety and clinical performance. Subsequently, clinical pharmacokinetic (PK) studies need to be performed in order to demonstrate a similar PK profile, prior to conducting clinical efficacy trials. PMID:27383278

  15. Lupus erythematosus: considerations about clinical, cutaneous and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Moura Filho, Jucélio Pereira; Peixoto, Raiza Luna; Martins, Lívia Gomes; de Melo, Sillas Duarte; de Carvalho, Ligiana Leite; Pereira, Ana Karine F. da Trindade C.; Freire, Eutilia Andrade Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory disease with multifactorial etiology. Although clinical manifestations are varied, the skin is an important target-organ, which contributes to the inclusion of skin lesions in 4 out of the 17 new criteria for the diagnosis of the disease, according to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics. The cutaneous manifestations of lupus are pleomorphic. Depending on their clinical characteristics, they can be classified into Acute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus and Intermittent Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus. Treatment is based on preventive measures, reversal of inflammation, prevention of damage to target organs and relief of adverse events due to pharmacological therapy. The most commonly used treatment options are topical, systemic and surgical treatment, as well as phototherapy. The correct handling of the cases depends on a careful evaluation of the morphology of the lesions and the patient's general status, always taking into consideration not only the benefits but also the side effects of each therapeutic proposal. PMID:24626656

  16. Clinical aspects on Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Andersson, J P

    1991-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus infection (EBV) was discovered 25 years ago in tumour cells from Burkitt's lymphoma. Extensive virological studies have relieved that EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and contributes to the pathogenesis of Burkitt's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal cancer. Atypical courses of the primary infection may induce meningoencephalitis or hepatitis and are attracting increasing attention. Antiviral treatment with acyclovir has been administered for 7 days, intravenously or orally, in the early stages of infectious mononucleosis, in 2 placebo controlled trials. An inhibition of oropharyngeal EBV replication was verified but minimal effects on clinical symptoms was observed. A combination of intravenous acyclovir and prednisolone treatment for 10 days was therefore tried in 15 patients with fulminant mononucleosis in a pilot study. A transient cessation of virus shedding was noticed in all patients, and a substantial clinical effect on pharyngeal symptoms and on fever was seen in 12/15 patients within 3 days. Treatment with chemotherapy or irradiation is recommended in EBV-associated B-cell lymphomas seen in immunosuppressed, transplanted, or human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients. No effect of acyclovir has been reported, but such therapy may be considered in the early stage when EBV induces a polyclonal B cell activation. Acyclovir treatment is effective in the EBV-genome positive hairy leukoplakia noticed in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients. However, no effect of any antiviral therapy has been reported in the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome affecting in particular 2-7 year old boys. Prophylactic use of immunoglobulin or acyclovir has been suggested in susceptible children. These results indicate that the variety of clinical manifestations induced by EBV at least partly depend on the immune response elicited in the host and not of virus replication per se. Therefore, treatment of these various disorders cannot be

  17. Nonmotor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease in 2012: Relevant Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Anne Marie; Jutras, Marie France; Czernecki, Virginie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Vidailhet, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of Parkinson's disease (PD) are common, but they are often underrecognized in clinical practice, because of the lack of spontaneous complaints by the patients, and partly because of the absence of systematic questioning by the consulting physician. However, valid specific instruments for identification and assessment of these symptoms are available in 2012. The administration of the self-completed screening tool, NMSQuest, associated with questioning during the consultation, improves the diagnosis of NMSs. NMSs play a large role in degradation of quality of life. More relevant NMSs are described in this review, mood disorders, impulse control disorders, cognitive deficits, hallucinations, pain, sleep disorders, and dysautonomia. PMID:22888466

  18. [Clinical aspects and diagnosis of lumbosacral perineural cysts].

    PubMed

    Prestar, F J

    1989-01-01

    Perineurial cysts are sometimes space-occupying cystic dilatations of the lumbo-sacral nerve roots at or distal to the junction of the posterior root and the dorsal ganglion. The wall is composed of perineurium and neural tissue. We report on 2 cases of upper sacral perineurial cysts with their computed tomography and myelography findings. Indication for operation is discussed: perineurial cysts should only be operated on if their clinical symptoms are clearly attributable to them and other causes like degeneration of the lumbar spine can be excluded. PMID:2922094

  19. Gout: update on some pathogenic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Lioté, Frédéric; Ea, Hang-Korng

    2006-05-01

    Pathogenesis of gout inflammation remains unknown, but recent advances have been made with respect to initiation, amplification, and self-limitation. Direct crystal-cell membrane contact leads to cell activation, involving membrane-associated molecules. Resolution of acute gout inflammation is a mechanism that is controlled by monocyte-macrophage switch, which results in the loss of cytokine production capability and, conversely, the ability to produce anti-inflammatory molecules. MRI and ultrasound findings provide preliminary data that are not yet used in clinical trials. Diagnosis and management recommendations are missing, but this gap will be filled soon with the upcoming European League Against Rheumatism Task Force's recommendations on gout. PMID:16716881

  20. Clinical aspects of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham

    2002-01-01

    The tightly conformal doses produced by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the existence of many critical structures in close proximity to the target, and the lack of internal organ motion in the head and neck, provide the potential for organ sparing and improved tumor irradiation. Many studies of treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer have demonstrated the dosimetric superiority of IMRT over conventional techniques in these respects. The initial results of clinical studies demonstrate reduced xerostomia. They suggest an improvement in tumor control, which needs to be verified in larger studies and longer follow-up. PMID:12074474

  1. Clinical aspects of accidents resulting in acute total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    That the management of whole body radiation injury involves: (1) watchful waiting, (2) observation of the hematologic parameters, (3) use of antibiotics, platelet red cell and possibly granulocyte transfusions, (4) administration of hemopoietic molecular regulators of granulopoiesis, and (5) bone marrow transplantation as the last line of defense. The clinical indication for the preceding will not be discussed, since this will be a subject of later speakers in this conference. Certainly, if a radiation casualty is fortunate enough to have an identical twin, a marrow transplant may be lifesaving and certainly can do no harm to the patient, and there is little risk to the donor.

  2. Alcoholic liver disease: pathologic, pathogenetic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Ishak, K G; Zimmerman, H J; Ray, M B

    1991-02-01

    Alcoholic liver disease includes steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Other liver diseases of genetic origin, but with a curious association with alcohol intake, are hemochromatosis and porphyria cutanea tarda. The attribution of chronic hepatitis to alcohol intake remains speculative, and the association may reflect hepatitis C infection. Hepatic injury attributed to alcohol includes the changes reported in the fetal alcohol syndrome. Steatosis, the characteristic consequence of excess alcohol intake, is usually macrovesicular and rarely microvesicular. Acute intrahepatic cholestasis, which in rare instances accompanies steatosis, must be distinguished from other causes of intrahepatic cholestasis (e.g., drug-induced) and from mechanical obstruction of the intrahepatic bile ducts (e.g., pancreatitis, choledocholithiasis) before being accepted. Alcoholic hepatitis (steatonecrosis) is characterized by a constellation of lesions: steatosis, Mallory bodies (with or without a neutrophilic inflammatory response), megamitochondria, occlusive lesions of terminal hepatic venules, and a lattice-like pattern of pericellular fibrosis. All these lesions mainly affect zone 3 of the hepatic acinus. Other changes, observed at the ultrastructural level, are of importance in progression of the disease. They include widespread cytoplasmic shedding, and capillarization and defenestration of sinusoids. Progressive fibrosis complicating alcoholic hepatitis eventually leads to cirrhosis that is typically micronodular but can evolve to a mixed or macronodular pattern. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurs in 5 to 15% of patients with alcoholic liver disease. The clinical syndrome of alcoholic liver disease is the result of three factors--parenchymal insufficiency, portal hypertension and the clinical consequences of extrahepatic damage produced by alcohol. At the several phases of the life history of alcoholic liver disease, the individual factors play a different role. The clinical

  3. Clinical and biochemical aspects of primary and secondary hyperammonemic disorders.

    PubMed

    Häberle, Johannes

    2013-08-15

    An increased concentration of ammonia is a non-specific laboratory sign indicating the presence of potentially toxic free ammonia that is not normally removed. This does occur in many different conditions for which hyperammonemia is a surrogate marker. Hyperammonemia can occur due to increased production or impaired detoxification of ammonia and should, if associated with clinical symptoms, be regarded as an emergency. The conditions can be classified into primary or secondary hyperammonemias depending on the underlying pathophysiology. If the urea cycle is directly affected by a defect of any of the involved enzymes or transporters, this results in primary hyperammonemia. If however the function of the urea cycle is inhibited by toxic metabolites or by substrate deficiencies, the situation is described as secondary hyperammonemia. For removal of ammonia, mammals require the action of glutamine synthetase in addition to the urea cycle, in order to ensure lowering of plasma ammonia concentrations to the normal range. Independent of its etiology, hyperammonemia may result in irreversible brain damage if not treated early and thoroughly. Thus, early recognition of a hyperammonemic state and immediate initiation of the specific management are of utmost importance. The main prognostic factors are, irrespective of the underlying cause, the duration of the hyperammonemic coma and the extent of ammonia accumulation. This paper will discuss the biochemical background of primary and secondary hyperammonemia and will give an overview of the various underlying conditions including a brief clinical outline and information on the genetic backgrounds. PMID:23628343

  4. Gaucher disease in Iraqi children (Clinical, diagnostic & therapeutic aspects)

    PubMed Central

    Thejeal, Rabab Farhan; Kadhum, Ausama Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Gaucher disease is the most common inherited lysosomal storage disorder. It is a multi organ disease affecting bone marrow, liver, spleen, lungs, and other organs contributes to pancytopenia and massive hepatosplenomegaly. This study aimed to spotlight on clinical and laboratory characteristics of children with Gaucher disease to raise awareness among physicians about the disease and to evaluate the outcome of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Methods: Clinical courses were reviewed in 30 patients with age (2-22 years) with Gaucher disease. After starting (ERT), assessment of response included serial measurements of hematological parameters, spleen and liver sizes, symptoms and signs of bone disease, growth and severity scores were also evaluated. Results: The most presenting age group was (1 – 5) years (60%). Abdominal distension was the most common presenting symptom, Splenomegaly presented in all of the patients. A significant response to ERT was observed, weight and height increased, both liver and spleen sizes decreased. Hemoglobin level normalizedin (67%) of the anemic patients, platelet count normalized in (53.8%)after 6 months from (ERT), the mean of severity scoring index decreased with ERT from (10.2±5.8) to (7.8±5.7) after one year of treatment. Conclusion: Using ERT was safe and effective in the reversal of hematological complications and organomegaly in most of the patients. PMID:27182231

  5. Cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes: clinical aspects, treatment and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Stockler, Sylvia; Schutz, Peter W; Salomons, Gajja S

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes (CCDSs) are a group of inborn errors of creatine metabolism comprising two autosomal recessive disorders that affect the biosynthesis of creatine--i.e. arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency (AGAT; MIM 602360) and guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (GAMT; MIM 601240)--and an X-linked defect that affects the creatine transporter, SLC6A8 deficiency (SLC6A8; MIM 300036). The biochemical hallmarks of these disorders include cerebral creatine deficiency as detected in vivo by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain, and specific disturbances in metabolites of creatine metabolism in body fluids. In urine and plasma, abnormal guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) levels are found in AGAT deficiency (reduced GAA) and in GAMT deficiency (increased GAA). In urine of males with SLC6A8 deficiency, an increased creatine/creatinine ratio is detected. The common clinical presentation in CCDS includes mental retardation, expressive speech and language delay, autistic like behaviour and epilepsy. Treatment of the creatine biosynthesis defects has yielded clinical improvement, while for creatine transporter deficiency, successful treatment strategies still need to be discovered. CCDSs may be responsible for a considerable fraction of children and adults affected with mental retardation of unknown etiology. Thus, screening for this group of disorders should be included in the differential diagnosis of this population. In this review, also the importance of CCDSs for the unravelling of the (patho)physiology of cerebral creatine metabolism is discussed. PMID:18652076

  6. [Paraquat poisoning; clinical toxicological aspects and a case description].

    PubMed

    Soldani, G; Del Tacca, M; Salesi, M; Caione, R; Manisco, G

    1980-04-01

    The clinical course of a young woman following the ingestion of the herbicide Paraquat in a suicide attempts is reported. Clinical signs of intoxication consisted at first in alterations of hepatic and renal functions, and later in progressive pulmonary failure. The patient died in severe respiratory distress on the 8th day due to cardiac arrest, probably anoxic. Treatment was initially on standard lines, with cathartics with the aim to prevent the absorption of Paraquat in the plasma and its accumulation in the lungs. In addition, high doses of steroids, immunosuppressive agents, prophylactic antibiotics and cardiotonics were given. Peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis were concomitantly assured. The Authors suggest that in Paraquat poisoning an adequate therapeutic treatment could consist in specific sorbents such as Fuller's earth and bentonite, haemoperfusion over a coated charcoal system or cation exchange resins. Administration of drugs such as corticosteroids, immunosuppressants (bleomycine) and the enzyme superoxide dismutase may be also indicated. On the contrary, oxygen therapy should be carefully monitored: in fact hyperoxic atmospheres, by increasing the rate of generation of superoxide radicals, enhance cellular toxicity of Paraquat. PMID:7454016

  7. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  8. Taxonomy, biology, and clinical aspects of Fusarium species.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, P E; Dignani, M C; Anaissie, E J

    1994-01-01

    There are several taxonomic systems available for identifying Fusarium species. The philosophy used in each taxonomic system is discussed as well as problems encountered in working with Fusarium species in culture. Fusarium species are toxigenic, and the mycotoxins produced by these organisms are often associated with animal and human diseases. The implications for the association of the carcinogens, fumonisins, produced by Fusarium moniliforme and other Fusarium species with human diseases are discussed. Foreign-body-associated fusarial infection such as keratitis in contact lens wearers, onychomycosis, skin infections, and disseminated multiorgan infections are discussed. Disseminated fusarial hyalohyphomycosis has emerged as a significant, usually fatal infection in the immunocompromised host. Successful outcome is determined by the degree of immunosuppression, the extent of the infection, and the presence of a removable focus such as an indwelling central venous catheter. These infections may be clinically suspected on the basis of a constellation of clinical and laboratory findings, which should lead to prompt therapy, probably with one of the newer antifungal agents. Perhaps the use of such agents or the use of colony-stimulating factors may improve the outcome of this devastating infection. However, until new approaches for treatment develop, effective preventive measures are urgently needed. Images PMID:7834602

  9. [MELAS syndrome. Clinical aspects, MRI, biochemistry and molecular genetics].

    PubMed

    Damian, M S; Reichmann, H; Seibel, P; Bachmann, G; Schachenmayr, W; Dorndorf, W

    1994-04-01

    MELAS is a mitochondrial cytopathy characterized by encephalopathy with stroke-like episodes and lactic acidosis. Most patients exhibit an A-G transition mutation at np 3243 of mitochondrial DNA (tRNA(Leu)(UUR)). We present a family of four in which the mutation was discovered in blood and in muscle mt DNA. Two patients had the classic MELAS syndrome with multiple stroke-like episodes. Some episodes were precipitated by metabolic stress. The remaining two patients had an oligosymptomatic disease with mild chronic encephalopathy, small stature and hearing loss. MRI was followed over a period of 4-8 years, during which the MELAS patients showed progression from nonspecific multifocal signal change to typical extensive cortico-subcortical parieto-occipital lesions and progressive cerebral atrophy. MRI in the oligosymptomatic cases was normal, or showed non-progressive cerebellar atrophy. Biochemical findings were non-specific, indicating increased mitochondrial volume in all cases, and a relatively complex IV defect in one case. All patients were treated with coenzyme Q with varying clinical response. The percentage of mutant mt DNA in blood and muscle did not correlate with clinical severity. Pathogenetic theories based on molecular genetics, and the therapeutic regimen in terms of the underlying biochemical concepts are discussed. PMID:8015633

  10. Molecular and Clinical Aspects of Drug-induced Gingival Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Kantarci, A.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is a tissue-specific condition and is estimated to affect approximately one million North Americans. Lesions occur principally as side-effects from phenytoin, nifedipine, or ciclosporin therapy in approximately half of the people who take these agents. Due to new indications for these drugs, their use continues to grow. Here, we review the molecular and cellular characteristics of human gingival overgrowth lesions and highlight how they differ considerably as a function of the causative drug. Analyses of molecular signaling pathways in cultured human gingival fibroblasts have provided evidence for their unique aspects compared with fibroblasts from the lung and kidney. These findings provide insights into both the basis for tissue specificity and into possible therapeutic opportunities which are reviewed here. Although ciclosporin-induced gingival overgrowth lesions exhibit principally the presence of inflammation and little fibrosis, nifedipine- and especially phenytoin-induced lesions are highly fibrotic. The increased expression of markers of gingival fibrosis, particularly CCN2 [also known as connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)], markers of epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and more recently periostin and members of the lysyl oxidase family of enzymes have been documented in phenytoin or nifedipine lesions. Some oral fibrotic conditions such as leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis, after subsequent additional genetic damage, can develop into oral cancer. Since many pathways are shared, the study of gingival fibrosis and comparisons with characteristics and molecular drivers of oral cancer would likely enhance understandings and functional roles of molecular drivers of these oral pathologies. PMID:25680368

  11. Dinosaur biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R. McNeill

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imposed on its skull; and to work out the remarkable chewing mechanism of hadrosaurs. It has shown us how some dinosaurs may have produced sounds. It has enabled us to estimate the effectiveness of weapons such as the tail spines of Stegosaurus. In recent years, techniques such as computational tomography and finite element analysis, and advances in computer modelling, have brought new opportunities. Biomechanists should, however, be especially cautious in their work on animals known only as fossils. The lack of living specimens and even soft tissues oblige us to make many assumptions. It is important to be aware of the often wide ranges of uncertainty that result. PMID:16822743

  12. Dinosaur biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R McNeill

    2006-08-01

    Biomechanics has made large contributions to dinosaur biology. It has enabled us to estimate both the speeds at which dinosaurs generally moved and the maximum speeds of which they may have been capable. It has told us about the range of postures they could have adopted, for locomotion and for feeding, and about the problems of blood circulation in sauropods with very long necks. It has made it possible to calculate the bite forces of predators such as Tyrannosaurus, and the stresses they imposed on its skull; and to work out the remarkable chewing mechanism of hadrosaurs. It has shown us how some dinosaurs may have produced sounds. It has enabled us to estimate the effectiveness of weapons such as the tail spines of Stegosaurus. In recent years, techniques such as computational tomography and finite element analysis, and advances in computer modelling, have brought new opportunities. Biomechanists should, however, be especially cautious in their work on animals known only as fossils. The lack of living specimens and even soft tissues oblige us to make many assumptions. It is important to be aware of the often wide ranges of uncertainty that result. PMID:16822743

  13. Herpes genitalis without frontiers: from clinical aspects to viral identification.

    PubMed

    Papini, M

    2012-10-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus infection is a recurrent, lifelong disease with no cure. The strongest predictor for infection is a person's number of lifetime sex partners. HSV-2 is the commonest responsible, although infections caused by HSV-1 are rapidly increasing, particularly in adolescents, women and men who have sex with men. The natural history includes first-episode of mucocutaneous infection, establishment of latency in the dorsal root ganglion, and subsequent reactivation. Most infections are transmitted via asymptomatic viral shedding. Atypical manifestations are common. Genital HSV-2 recurs six times more frequently than type 1. Laboratory confirmation of the clinical diagnosis is recommended in all patients in order to guide a correct counselling and management. Real-time PCR and viral culture represent the gold standard for diagnosis. Serologic testing can be useful in persons with a questionable history. Counselling patients about the risk of transmission is crucial and helps prevent the spread of disease and neonatal complications. PMID:23007253

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been well established. With the exception of unexplained iron deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, H. pylori infection has no proven role in extraintestinal diseases. On the other hand, there is data showing that H. pylori infection could be beneficial for some human diseases. The unpredictability of the long-term consequences of H. pylori infection and the economic challenge in eradicating it is why identification of high-risk individuals is crucial. PMID:24914360

  15. [Paraquat poisoning: clinical and anatomopathologic aspects in 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Pazos, M R; Reig, R; Sanz, P; Nogue, S; Boix, D; Palomar, M; Tenorio, L; Corbella, J

    1989-03-01

    3 cases of suicide due to ingestion of 150, 200 and 4 gr. of paraquat, respectively, are presented. Two of them were brothers and agricultural industrialists, the other one was a farmer. The first two cases died 16 and 10 hours after intake. The farmer died 21 days after ingestion. All of them had progressive hypoxemia and renal failure the two brothers had heart conduction system glycemia (23 mg/dl) a few hours after ingestion. The postmortem study showed edema, hemorrhage and congestion of the lungs, alveolitis, fibrosis and lobar atelectasia; renal tubular necrosis adrenal necrosis; colestasia; hepatic steatosis focal miocarditis. The clinical evolution, particularly short in the first two patients, is commented on, as well as the post-mortem findings, comparing them with those described in the literature. Finally, due to the high toxicity of this herbicide, we insist in prompt transport to herbicide, we insist in prompt transport to the hospital in order to apply early treatment. PMID:2491192

  16. Clinical effects and lethal and forensic aspects of propofol.

    PubMed

    Levy, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Propofol is a potent intravenous anesthetic agent that rapidly induces sedation and unconsciousness. The potential for propofol dependency, recreational use, and abuse has only recently been recognized, and several cases of accidental overdose and suicide have emerged. In addition, the first documented case of murder using propofol was reported a few months ago, and a high profile case of suspected homicide with propofol is currently under investigation. A number of analytical methods have been employed to detect and quantify propofol concentrations in biological specimens. The reported propofol-related deaths and postmortem blood and tissue levels are reviewed. Importantly, limitations of propofol detection are discussed, and future considerations are presented. Because propofol has the potential for diversion with lethal consequences, the forensic scientist must have a basic understanding of its clinical indications and uses, pharmacologic properties, and detection methods. In addition, medical institutions should develop systems to prevent and detect diversion of this potential drug of abuse. PMID:20950316

  17. Lyme borreliosis: reviewing potential vaccines, clinical aspects and health economics.

    PubMed

    Šmit, Renata; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a multisystem infectious disease with a growing burden in many parts of North America, Asia and Europe. Persistent infection of LB can usually be treated effectively with antibiotic therapy, but it may be followed by post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. Therefore, it is important to begin with treatment in the early phase of the disease. Vaccination shows potential as the most effective way of preventing LB and reducing its burden in these continents. It is concluded that there is a need for continuous effort in research from all perspectives on LB, especially regarding prevention with novel vaccines, their development, clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. This review may help to further develop (cost-) effective strategies for prevention and control of the disease to reduce its burden and achieve population-wide health benefits. PMID:26414102

  18. [Familial Mediterranean fever--from gene test to clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Sudeck, H

    2000-10-26

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a genetically defined disease affecting mostly families of jewish, turkish or armenian origin whose ancestors originate from the mediterranean basin. The first officially acknowledged description was given by SIEGAL in 1945 but previous cases were reported since 1908. The main clinical signs which are very varying in intensity and appearance are periodic attacks of fever with peritonitis, pleurisy and arthritis. The classical but not always found complication is amyloidosis with renal failure which is preventable by lifelong colchicine therapy. By using a novel genetest it is now possible to definitely diagnose FMF instead of relying on a diagnosis made merely by exclusion. This will emphasize the use of colchicine and should bring us nearer to the pathophysiology of this interesting disease. PMID:11103618

  19. Some business and tax aspects of clinical practice plans.

    PubMed

    Mancino, D

    1978-10-01

    Medical schools throughout the country have developed diverse organizational forms through which their faculty members provide clinical services. In this article the author reviews several of the reasons frequently offered to support involvement of a medical school in a faculty practice plan and suggests many business and tax considerations which should be taken into account by a medical school in developing a plan to meet its objectives. He also reviews many of the considerations involved in establishing and operating specific types of group practice plans. The author concludes that, with conscientious planning and implementation, faculty members can receive professional satisfaction, medical schools can obtain many benefits, and the public will benefit from improved health care. PMID:712767

  20. Clinical and molecular genetic aspects of hereditary multiple cutaneous leiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Badeloe, Sadhanna; Frank, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomatosis syndrome (MCUL; OMIM 150800) is an autosomal dominantly inherited tumor predisposition disorder, characterized by leiomyomas of the skin and uterus. When associated with kidney cancer, this syndrome is known as hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC; OMIM 605839). All disease variants result from heterozygous mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Cutaneous leiomyoma can easily be recognized and confirmed by histological examination. Recognition of these benign skin tumors can lead to the diagnosis of MCUL or HLRCC. Timely diagnosis is crucial for offering affected individuals and families potentially life-saving regular prophylactic screening examinations for renal tumors. Here we provide an overview of clinical and genetic features of this complex tumor syndrome and discuss patient management and current therapeutic strategies. PMID:19939761

  1. Methyltin intoxication in six men; toxicologic and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, C.; Reinecke, H.J.; Besser, R.

    1984-04-01

    Neurologic and psychiatric symptoms such as headache, tinnitus, defective hearing, changing desorientation and aggressiveness are initial symptoms of methyltin chloride intoxication. Some patients also developed epileptic equivalents, such as dreamy attacks and central ventilation transaminases. Laboratory findings included low levels of serum potassium, leucocytosis and elevated transaminases. The excretion rate of tin in the urine correlated with the severity of the intoxication. There was no measurable effect of plasma separation or d-penicillamine therapy on tin excretion in the urine or on the clinical picture. The long-term prognosis of severely intoxicated persons is poor. To prevent such events workers need to be warned of the risk and dangers of working with organo-metallic compounds. The effectiveness of protective clothes and gas masks should be checked. In exposed workers regular testing is advised of tin concentrations in the urine.

  2. Involvement and Clinical Aspects of MicroRNA in Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ram Kumar, Ram Mohan; Boro, Aleksandar; Fuchs, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone cancer in children and adolescents, but its pathogenesis has been difficult to establish because of its well-known heterogeneous nature. OS has been associated with genetic and cytogenetic abnormalities, which include function-impairing mutations in tumor suppressors and the activation of oncogenes. OS tumorigenesis has been linked to alterations of several genes characterized by a high level of genetic instability and recurrent DNA amplifications and deletions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), 18-25-nucleotide noncoding RNAs, are critical for various biological processes like differentiation, cell growth and cell death. Dysregulation of miRNA expression leads to phenotypic and genotypic changes in cells, which leads to cancer. Studies on miRNAs have initiated a significant effect in both diagnosis and treatment of cancer. This review focuses on the current knowledge of clinical applications of miRNAs for the better diagnosis and management of OS. PMID:27271607

  3. Involvement and Clinical Aspects of MicroRNA in Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ram Kumar, Ram Mohan; Boro, Aleksandar; Fuchs, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone cancer in children and adolescents, but its pathogenesis has been difficult to establish because of its well-known heterogeneous nature. OS has been associated with genetic and cytogenetic abnormalities, which include function-impairing mutations in tumor suppressors and the activation of oncogenes. OS tumorigenesis has been linked to alterations of several genes characterized by a high level of genetic instability and recurrent DNA amplifications and deletions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), 18–25-nucleotide noncoding RNAs, are critical for various biological processes like differentiation, cell growth and cell death. Dysregulation of miRNA expression leads to phenotypic and genotypic changes in cells, which leads to cancer. Studies on miRNAs have initiated a significant effect in both diagnosis and treatment of cancer. This review focuses on the current knowledge of clinical applications of miRNAs for the better diagnosis and management of OS. PMID:27271607

  4. Clinical Effects and Lethal and Forensic Aspects of Propofol*

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Propofol is a potent intravenous anesthetic agent that rapidly induces sedation and unconsciousness. The potential for propofol dependency, recreational use and abuse has only recently been recognized and several cases of accidental overdose and suicide have emerged. In addition, the first documented case of murder using propofol was reported a few months ago and a high profile case of suspected homicide with propofol is currently under investigation. A number of analytical methods have been employed to detect and quantify propofol concentrations in biological specimens. The reported propofol related deaths and post-mortem blood and tissue levels are reviewed. Importantly, limitations of propofol detection are discussed and future considerations are presented. Because propofol has the potential for diversion with lethal consequences, the forensic scientist must have a basic understanding of its clinical indications and uses, pharmacologic properties, and detection methods. In addition, medical institutions should develop systems to prevent and detect diversion of this potential drug of abuse. PMID:20950316

  5. Methylmalonic acidaemia and nonketotic hyperglycinaemia. Clinical and biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Corbeel, L; Tada, K; Colombo, J P; Eeckels, R; Eggermont, E; Jaeken, J; Den Tandt, W; Harvengt, L; Delhaye, J; Deloecker, W

    1975-02-01

    The clinical and metabolic data of 2 cases of methylmalonic acidaemia with propionic acidaemia are reported together with those of 3 other patients with nonketotic hyperglycinaemia. Liver enzymatic studies showed decreased activity in vitro of the glycine cleavage enzyme in one patient with methylmalonic acidaemia as well as in 2 unrelated patients with nonketotic hyperglycinaemia, while the activity of the serine hydroxymethylase enzyme was normal. Hyperammonaemia was substantiated in one patient with methylmalonic acidaemia and also in one child with nonketotic hyperglycinaemia. The activity of the enzymes of the urea cycle, determined in the liver of this nonketotic child, was normal except for a decrease of the carbamyl phosphate synthetase enzyme to 15% of normal. PMID:236734

  6. [The lumbar disc herniation - management, clinical aspects and current recommendations].

    PubMed

    Stienen, M N; Cadosch, D; Hildebrandt, G; Gautschi, O P

    2011-11-30

    Lumbar disc herniation has a high prevalence and strong social-medical impact. Patients suffer from lower back pain that radiates from the spine. Loss of sensation or paresis adds to the clinical picture. The diagnosis should be confirmed by imaging in patients considered for surgery. High remission rates initially warrant conservative treatment (adequate analgesia and physiotherapy) in many patients. If this treatment does not lead to significant alleviation within 5-8 weeks, surgery should be performed to reduce the risk of chronic nerve affection. Posterior interlaminar fenestration is the intervention primarily conducted for this diagnosis. A relapse in the same region occurs in up to 10% of patients after months through years, which sometimes necessitates a reoperation if symptoms are pertinent. PMID:22124958

  7. [Coronary microvascular dysfunction : Clinical aspects, diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Ong, P; Sechtem, U

    2016-06-01

    Just as in epicardial coronary stenosis, coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) also leads to an imbalance of myocardial oxygen supply and demand. The dysfunction is located at the level of the coronary microcirculation with vessel diameters < 500 µm and structural as well as functional alterations have been described. The underlying mechanisms are diverse, frequently overlap and are still incompletely understood. Among others, conditions such as chronic inflammation, estrogen deficiency and a genetic familial predisposition have been reported. A common and often underdiagnosed clinical manifestation of CMD is found in patients who have symptoms of angina pectoris but no obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease or myocardial disease. The CMD can be diagnosed using non-invasive procedures, such as the combination of coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography and cardiac stress magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or coronary CT and positron emission tomography (PET). In addition, invasive coronary vasomotor assessment is also suitable. Very little evidence is available regarding the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment of CMD. The current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease from 2013 recommend using acetylsalicylic acid (ASS) and a statin as well as beta blockers and/or calcium channel blockers. Patients with CMD have an elevated risk for coronary events and death of approximately 1.7 % per year. Moreover, there is an increased morbidity with frequent presentations in practices and emergency admissions. Clinical research efforts should aim at a better characterization of the underlying mechanisms of CMD in order to develop targeted treatment approaches. PMID:27255117

  8. Newer endovascular tools: a review of experimental and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, Thomas; Brinjikji, Waleed; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The history of treatment of intracranial aneurysms dates back to the late 18th century. These early physicians largely based their crude techniques around "wire insertion alone, galvanopuncture (electrothrombosis), and fili-galvanopuncture (wire insertion together with electrothrombosis)," albeit with overwhelmingly unfavorable outcomes. By the end of the 20th century, treatment options progressed to include two highly effective, and safe, procedures: surgical clipping and endovascular coiling. These methods have been found to be effective treatments for a large portion of aneurysms, but there still exists a subset of patients that do not respond well to these therapies. While much progress has been made in stent-assisted coiling including the development of newer stents aimed at keep the coil ball from protruding into the parent vessel, the introduction of flow diverters has characterized a new phase in the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. This treatment paradigm is rapidly becoming the treatment of choice for large and complex aneurysms internal carotid artery. Intrasaccular flow diverters such as the Woven EndoBridge device (WEB) and Luna device are showing promise in the treatment of wide neck bifurcation aneurysms. Other newer devices including the pCONus Bifurcating Aneurysm Implant and Endovascular Clip Systems (eCLIPs) are showing promise in small clinical and preclinical studies. As technology improves, newer devices with ingenious designs are constantly being introduced into the clinical arena. Most of these devices try to address the limitations of traditional endovascular methods in regard to providing a safe and effective treatment of wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms. Several large prospective studies are underway and once completed, the role of these newer devices will be better defined. It is easy to anticipate that with advances in 3D techniques and printing, a future in which customized devices are designed based on the individual

  9. Clinical care of adult Turner syndrome--new aspects.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Hjerrild, Britta E; Cleemann, Line; Gravholt, Claus H

    2012-05-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is characterized by numerous medical challenges during adolescence and adulthood. Puberty has to be induced in most cases, and female sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) should continue during adult years. These issues are normally dealt with by the paediatrician, but once a TS female enters adulthood it is less clear who should be the primary care giver. Morbidity and mortality is increased, especially due to the risk of dissection of the aorta and other cardiovascular diseases, as well as the risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, thyroid disease and other diseases. The proper dose of HRT with female sex steroids has not been established, and, likewise, benefits and/or drawbacks from HRT have not been thoroughly evaluated. The transition period from paediatric to adult care seems to be especially vulnerable and the proper framework for transition has not yet been established. Likewise, no framework is in place for continuous follow-up during adult years in many countries. Today, most treatment recommendations are based on expert opinion and are unfortunately not evidence based, although more areas, such as growth hormone and oxandrolone treatment for increasing height, are becoming well founded. Osteoporosis, diabetes, both type 1 and 2, hypothyroidism, obesity and a host of other endocrine diseases and conditions are seen more frequently in TS. Prevention, intervention and proper treatment is only just being recognized. Hypertension is frequent and can be a forerunner of cardiovascular disease. The description of adult life with TS has been broadened and medical, social and psychological aspects are being added at a compelling pace. Proper care during adulthood should be studied and a framework for care should be in place, since most morbidity potentially is amenable to intervention. In summary, TS is a condition associated with a number of diseases and conditions which need the attention of a multi-disciplinary team during

  10. Carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency, clinical, biochemical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Gozalbo, M E; Bakker, J A; Waterham, H R; Wanders, R J A

    2004-01-01

    The carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) is one of the components of the carnitine cycle. The carnitine cycle is necessary to shuttle long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the intramitochondrial space where mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids takes place. The oxidation of fatty acids yields acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) units, which may either be degraded to CO(2) and H(2)O in the citric acid cycle to produce ATP or converted into ketone bodies which occurs in liver and kidneys. Metabolic consequences of a defective CACT are hypoketotic hypoglycaemia under fasting conditions, hyperammonemia, elevated creatine kinase and transaminases, dicarboxylic aciduria, very low free carnitine and an abnormal acylcarnitine profile with marked elevation of the long-chain acylcarnitines. Clinical signs and symptoms in CACT deficient patients, are a combination of energy depletion and endogenous toxicity. The predominantly affected organs are brain, heart and skeletal muscle, and liver, leading to neurological abnormalities, cardiomyopathy and arrythmias, skeletal muscle damage and liver dysfunction. Most patients become symptomatic in the neonatal period with a rapidly progressive deterioration and a high mortality rate. However, presentations at a later age with a milder phenotype have also been reported. The therapeutic approach is the same as in other long-chain fatty acid disorders and includes intravenous glucose (+/- insulin) administration to maximally inhibit lipolysis and subsequent fatty acid oxidation during the acute deterioration, along with other measures such as ammonia detoxification, depending on the clinical features. Long-term strategy consists of avoidance of fasting with frequent meals and a special diet with restriction of long-chain fatty acids. Due to the extremely low free carnitine concentrations, carnitine supplementation is often needed. Acylcarnitine profiling in plasma is the assay of choice for the diagnosis at a metabolite level

  11. Biomechanics in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, J. F. V.

    1980-01-01

    Examines current usage of the term "biomechanics" and emphasizes the importance of differentiating between structure and material. Describes current prolects in biomechanics and lists four points about the educational significance of the field. (GS)

  12. Biomechanical Stability of Dental Implants in Augmented Maxillary Sites: Results of a Randomized Clinical Study with Four Different Biomaterials and PRF and a Biological View on Guided Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Troedhan; Marcel, Wainwright; Andreas, Kurrek; Izabela, Schlichting

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bone regenerates mainly by periosteal and endosteal humoral and cellular activity, which is given only little concern in surgical techniques and choice of bone grafts for guided bone regeneration. This study investigates on a clinical level the biomechanical stability of augmented sites in maxillary bone when a new class of moldable, self-hardening calcium-phosphate biomaterials (SHB) is used with and without the addition of Platelet Rich Fibrin (aPRF) in the Piezotome-enhanced subperiosteal tunnel-technique (PeSPTT). Material and Methods. 82 patients with horizontal atrophy of anterior maxillary crest were treated with PeSPTT and randomly assigned biphasic (60% HA/40% bTCP) or monophasic (100% bTCP) SHB without or with addition of aPRF. 109 implants were inserted into the augmented sites after 8.3 months and the insertion-torque-value (ITV) measured as clinical expression of the (bio)mechanical stability of the augmented bone and compared to ITVs of a prior study in sinus lifting. Results. Significant better results of (bio)mechanical stability almost by two-fold, expressed by higher ITVs compared to native bone, were achieved with the used biomaterials and more constant results with the addition of aPRF. Conclusion. The use of SHB alone or combined with aPRF seems to be favourable to achieve a superior (bio)mechanical stable restored alveolar bone. PMID:25954758

  13. Future aspects of cellular and molecular research in clinical voice treatment aspects of optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mette; Mahmood, Sanila

    2015-02-01

    Focus is upon our clinical experience in a prospective cohort study on cure of dystonia where the mode of treatment was fexofenadine tablets and local budesonide inhaler in the larynx, and in a randomized controlled trial of lifestyle change related to acid provocation of food and habits in laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). The advanced high-speed films is one new tool, another being optical coherence tomography (OCT), which should be used in the future in randomized controlled trials. We are focusing on OCT of the swallowing process in the oesophagaus and larynx as well as the vocal fold function. It can be shown on OCT how the layer of the vocal folds develop, possibly corresponding to hormonal and paediatric development. The arytenoid area in the larynx should also be focused upon with OCT in pathology. The thyroid function is related to voice and the swallowing function, both hormonally and pathoanatomically. We know too little about voice and thyroid hormones in an updated way as well as the outer anatomic supporting muscular structure of the larynx, related to thyroid immune degeneration and cysts. Also, here OCT analyses might be of value.

  14. Pancreatic cancer: Translational research aspects and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Daniel; Chen, Bi-Cheng; Dong, Lei; Zhou, Meng-Tao; Andersson, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Despite improvements in surgical techniques and adjuvant chemotherapy, the overall mortality rates in pancreatic cancer have generally remained relatively unchanged and the 5-year survival rate is actually below 2%. This paper will address the importance of achieving an early diagnosis and identifying markers for prognosis and response to therapy such as genes, proteins, microRNAs or epigenetic modifications. However, there are still major hurdles when translating investigational biomarkers into routine clinical practice. Furthermore, novel ways of secondary screening in high-risk individuals, such as artificial neural networks and modern imaging, will be discussed. Drug resistance is ubiquitous in pancreatic cancer. Several mechanisms of drug resistance have already been revealed, including human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 status, multidrug resistance proteins, aberrant signaling pathways, microRNAs, stromal influence, epithelial-mesenchymal transition-type cells and recently the presence of cancer stem cells/cancer-initiating cells. These factors must be considered when developing more customized types of intervention (“personalized medicine”). In the future, multifunctional nanoparticles that combine a specific targeting agent, an imaging probe, a cell-penetrating agent, a biocompatible polymer and an anti-cancer drug may become valuable for the management of patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:22509073

  15. Clinical and molecular aspects of varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A.; Mahalingam, Ravi; Mueller, Niklaus H.; Brazeau, Elizabeth A.; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Cohrs, Randall J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A declining cell-mediated immunity to varicella zoster virus (VZV) with advancing age or immunosuppression results in virus reactivation from latently infected human ganglia anywhere along the neuraxis. Virus reactivation produces zoster, often followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia or PHN) as well as vasculopathy, myelopathy, retinal necrosis and cerebellitis. VZV reactivation also produces pain without rash (zoster sine herpete). Vaccination after age 60 reduces the incidence of shingles by 51%, PHN by 66% and the burden of illness by 61%. However, even if every healthy adult over age 60 years is vaccinated, there would still be about 500,000 zoster cases annually in the United States alone, about 200,000 of whom will experience PHN. Analyses of viral nucleic acid and gene expression in latently infected human ganglia and in an animal model of varicella latency in primates are serving to determine the mechanism(s) of VZV reactivation with the aim of preventing reactivation and the clinical sequelae. PMID:19946620

  16. Insecticide resistance in head lice: clinical, parasitological and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Durand, R; Bouvresse, S; Berdjane, Z; Izri, A; Chosidow, O; Clark, J M

    2012-04-01

    Insecticide treatment resistance is considered to be a major factor in the increasing number of infestations by head lice. The large insecticide selection pressure induced by conventional topical pediculicides has led to the emergence and spread of resistance in many parts of the world. Possible mechanisms of resistance include accelerated detoxification of insecticides by enzyme-mediated reduction, esterification, oxidation that may be overcome by synergistic agents such as piperonyl butoxide, alteration of the binding site, e.g. altered acetylcholinesterase or altered nerve voltage-gated sodium channel, and knockdown resistance (kdr). Clinical, parasitological and molecular data on resistance to conventional topical pediculicides show that treatments with neurotoxic insecticides have suffered considerable loss of activity worldwide. In particular, resistance to synthetic pyrethroids has become prominent, probably because of their extensive use. As other treatment options, including non-insecticidal pediculicides such as dimeticone, are now available, the use of older insecticides, such as lindane and carbaryl, should be minimized, owing to their loss of efficacy and safety concerns. The organophosphorus insecticide malathion remains effective, except in the UK, mostly in formulations that include terpineol. PMID:22429458

  17. [Clinical aspects of the link between diabetes and depression].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Géza; Rosta, Klára; Szémán, Barbara; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Somogyi, Anikó

    2011-03-27

    Diabetes mellitus and depression are public health concerns of the present and, as predicted, also the future. The observation that depression is seen more frequently in diabetic patients compared to the non-diabetic population has been proven by several recent studies. The co-occurrence carries further risks for the affected patients, as depression in diabetics may affect sufficient treatment of diabetes and enhance the development of diabetic complications. These may further worsen depressive symptoms causing a vicious cycle in these patients. In the present paper authors discuss in detail the theoretic and practical issues of the complex two directional relationships between diabetes and depression. Their goal is to draw attention to depression as co-morbidity of diabetes that may interfere with the optimization of diabetic patient's carbohydrate metabolism. If sufficient glycaemic control is not achieved using routine clinical methods depression should be evaluated as a probable cause. If needed, depression should be treated to improve the medical outcomes and quality of life of diabetic patients. PMID:21398210

  18. Novel clinical and diagnostic aspects of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Pelkum, Johannes; Radice, Antonella; Norman, Gary L; Lόpez Hoyos, Marcos; Lakos, Gabriella; Buchner, Carol; Musset, Lucile; Miyara, Makoto; Stinton, Laura; Mahler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are the serological hallmark of some idiopathic systemic vasculitides. Besides the investigation of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and constant effort for a standardized nomenclature and classification of the AAV, a main focus of research during the last few years has been to constantly improve the performance of enzyme immunoassays. With the latest so called third generation ELISA, this goal seemed to be fulfilled. The International Consensus Statement on Testing and Reporting of ANCA gave recommendations for standardized strategies for the serological diagnosis of ANCA. New developments now target the system immanent drawbacks of the respective diagnostic methods, be it the need for batching and the long time to result for ELISA, or the high likelihood of error and subjectivity of indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Random access technology and multiplexing for solid phase assays as well as digital imaging for IIF are tools which may help to expedite and simplify routine diagnostics in the lab and in emergency settings. Recent findings indicate that PR3-ANCA have clinical utility beyond the diagnosis of AAV. PR3-ANCA can also serve as an aid for the differentiation between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CrD) and the stratification of UC patients. This review provides a detailed review of what is known about ANCA and highlights the latest research and state-of-the-art developments in this area. PMID:24995343

  19. Novel Clinical and Diagnostic Aspects of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Pelkum, Johannes; Radice, Antonella; Norman, Gary L.; Lόpez Hoyos, Marcos; Buchner, Carol; Musset, Lucile; Miyara, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are the serological hallmark of some idiopathic systemic vasculitides. Besides the investigation of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and constant effort for a standardized nomenclature and classification of the AAV, a main focus of research during the last few years has been to constantly improve the performance of enzyme immunoassays. With the latest so called third generation ELISA, this goal seemed to be fulfilled. The International Consensus Statement on Testing and Reporting of ANCA gave recommendations for standardized strategies for the serological diagnosis of ANCA. New developments now target the system immanent drawbacks of the respective diagnostic methods, be it the need for batching and the long time to result for ELISA, or the high likelihood of error and subjectivity of indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Random access technology and multiplexing for solid phase assays as well as digital imaging for IIF are tools which may help to expedite and simplify routine diagnostics in the lab and in emergency settings. Recent findings indicate that PR3-ANCA have clinical utility beyond the diagnosis of AAV. PR3-ANCA can also serve as an aid for the differentiation between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CrD) and the stratification of UC patients. This review provides a detailed review of what is known about ANCA and highlights the latest research and state-of-the-art developments in this area. PMID:24995343

  20. Angelman syndrome: a review of the clinical and genetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Clayton-Smith, J; Laan, L

    2003-02-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe learning difficulties, ataxia, a seizure disorder with a characteristic EEG, subtle dysmorphic facial features, and a happy, sociable disposition. Most children present with delay in developmental milestones and slowing of head growth during the first year of life. In the majority of cases speech does not develop. Patients with AS have a characteristic behavioural phenotype with jerky movements, frequent and sometimes inappropriate laughter, a love of water, and sleep disorder. The facial features are subtle and include a wide, smiling mouth, prominent chin, and deep set eyes. It is caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities involving the chromosome 15q11-13 region, which is subject to genomic imprinting. These include maternal deletion, paternal uniparental disomy, imprinting defects, and point mutations or small deletions within the UBE3A gene, which lies within this region. UBE3A shows tissue specific imprinting, being expressed exclusively from the maternal allele in brain. The genetic mechanisms identified so far in AS are found in 85-90% of those with the clinical phenotype and all interfere with UBE3A expression. PMID:12566516

  1. Laboratory aspects of clinically significant rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Set, R; Shastri, J

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenic potential of the rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) has started being recognized. This is due to more sensitive and specific techniques in the laboratory. The RGM are generally defined as nontuberculous species of mycobacteria that show visible growth on agar media within 7 days. RGM are widely distributed in nature and have been isolated from natural water, tap water, and soil. Several biochemical tests, high performance liquid chromatography, and molecular techniques have been developed for rapid identification of these species. The American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Disease Society of America recommend that RGM should be identified to the species level using a recognized acceptable methodology such as polymerase chain reaction restriction enzyme analysis or biochemical testing and routine susceptibility testing of RGM should include amikacin, imipenem, doxycycline, the fluorinated quinolones, a sulphonamide or trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, cefoxitin, clarithromycin, linezolid, and tobramycin. The diseases caused by these organisms have varied manifestations. They have been responsible for a number of healthcare-associated outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks. For recognition of outbreaks, it is important to be familiar with the causative organisms like RGM which are most frequently involved in healthcare-associated outbreaks and pseudo outbreaks. It is essential to intervene as soon as possible to interrupt this transmission. Large gaps still exist in our knowledge of RGM. Unquestionably more studies are required. Through this review, we wish to emphasize that reporting of RGM from clinical settings along with their sensitivity patterns is an absolute need of the hour. PMID:22120792

  2. [Beta-thalassemias: molecular, epidemiological, diagnostical and clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Pondarre, Corinne; Badens, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is one of most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. In France, 5 to 10 new major or intermedia forms are diagnosed annually and the global prevalence is about 500 cases. Since 20 years and thanks to the generalization of iron chelator treatments, the life expectancy has dramatically increased. Nearly 90% of the β-thalassemic alleles are point mutations easily identified by Sanger sequencing or dedicated methods. The remaining 10% are deletions detectable by MLPA or CGH Array. The alpha-globin genotype is also essential in the exploration of beta-thalassemia because an alpha-thalassemia improves the clinical state whereas an alpha triplication worsens it. The additional genotyping of a few HbF inducer polymorphisms allows to predict the age of the first transfusion, thanks to a recent dedicated algorithm, making beta-thalassemia one of the first potential application of predictive medicine. Gene therapy, pre-implantatory diagnosis and new drugs (Sotatercept®, hepcidin-like molecules) have also recently contributed to make beta-thalassemia a main scientific topic again. PMID:25486662

  3. [Syphilis. Part 1: Introduction, pathology and clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Gross, G; Flaig, B; Rode, S

    2013-10-01

    In Germany more than 3,500 people become infected with syphilis annually. As elsewhere in Western Europe there is a low level endemicity with a concentration among population subgroups with high rates of partner exchange, such as men who have sex with other men. In Germany after initially reduced numbers of cases, the incidence rate has increased after the turn of the millennium. In 2011 the incidence reached 4.5 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, which is the highest incidence since the introduction of the Infection Protection Act of 2001. Syphilis, like other sexually transmitted infections and diseases with its manifold clinical manifestations and complex diagnostics, is a large global problem for public health systems. The recent resurgence of syphilis presents a challenge for all physicians but particularly for dermatologists and venereologists because the skin and adjacent mucous membranes are initially affected. Rapid diagnosis, differential diagnosis, consequent treatment and monitoring can cure the disease. Prevention of misdiagnosis is essential otherwise severe, sometimes fatal cardiovascular complications, neurosyphilis and transfer to unborn and newborn children can occur. The synergy of syphilis and sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is of special importance. Syphilis together with genital herpes and other sexually transmitted genital and oral ulcers is an important pacemaker for HIV. PMID:24150827

  4. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener): clinical aspects and treatment.

    PubMed

    Comarmond, Cloé; Cacoub, Patrice

    2014-11-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis, which affects small- and medium-sized blood vessels and is often associated with cytoplasmic ANCA. GPA occurs in patients between 45 and 60 years old of both genders, and is rarely observed in blacks. The prevalence of GPA increases along a south-north gradient in Europe (20 to 150/million). The main clinical characteristics involve the upper and/or lower respiratory tract and kidneys. Ear, nose and throat manifestations with recurrent sinusitis and crusting rhinorrhea are usually severe. Lung nodules are frequently seen, sometimes excavated. Renal involvement is characterized by rapidly progressive necrotizing glomerulonephritis with extracapillary crescents. Limited forms of GPA predominantly affect the upper respiratory tract, whereas generalized forms of GPA include renal manifestations and/or alveolar hemorrhage and/or vital organ involvement with an altered general condition. The combination of immunosuppressant drugs and corticosteroids has converted this typically fatal illness into one in which 80% of patients achieve remission. However, despite considerable therapeutic progress over the last decades, relapses remain frequent (50% at 5 years), and maintenance treatment is now the main therapeutic challenge. PMID:25149391

  5. Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of pain in patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mediati, Rocco Domenico; Vellucci, Renato; Dodaro, Lucia

    2014-09-01

    Bone pain is one of the most frequent kinds of chronic pain, mainly in elderly patients. It causes a significant worsening of functional capacity and deterioration in the quality of life in people affected. Mechanisms of pain in osteoporosis are poorly known and often extrapolated by other pathologies or other experimental model. One of principal causes would be a "hyper-remodeling" of bone, that involves osteoclasts activity and pathological modifications of bone innervation. Several studies show that osteoclasts play a significant role in bone pain etiology. Pain in osteoporosis is mainly nociceptive, if it become persistent a sensitization of peripheral and central nervous system can occur, so underlining the transition to a chronic pain syndrome. Central sensitization mechanisms are complex and involve several neuromediators and receptors (Substance P, NMDA, etc.). Most common manifestations of osteoporosis are vertebral compression fractures that cause persistent pain, though to differentiate from pain originating in structures as joint or muscle. First manifestation can be an acute pain due to pathological fracture, those of hip often causes disability. Pain in osteoporosis is an important clinical challenge. Often its complications and consequences on patient quality of life are underestimated with not negligible social implications. A balanced and early multimodal pain therapy including opioids as necessary, even in cases of acute pain, improve the functional capacity of patients and helps to prevent neurological alterations that seems to contribute in significant way in causing irreversible pain chronic syndromes. PMID:25568647

  6. Endodontic retreatment. Aspects of decision making and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Kvist, T

    2001-01-01

    regardless of assessment method. Compared with Standard gamble Visual Analogue Scale systematically produced lower ratings. U-values were found to change considerably in both the short and long-term. Any significant correlation between endodontists' U-values and retreatment prescriptions could not be demonstrated. Surgical and nonsurgical retreatment were randomly assigned to 95 "failed" root filled teeth in 92 patients. Cases were followed clinically and radiographically for four years postoperatively. At the 12-month recall a statistically significant higher healing rate was observed for teeth retreated surgically. At the final 48-month recall no systematic difference was detected. Patients were found to be more subject to postoperative discomfort when teeth were retreated surgically compared with nonsurgically. Consequently, surgical retreatment tended to be associated with higher indirect costs than a nonsurgically approach. In the final part of the thesis it is argued that retreatment decision making in everyday clinical practice normally should be based on simple principles. It is suggested that in order to achieve the best overall consequence a periapical lesion in a root filled tooth that is not expected to heal should be retreated. Arguments to withhold retreatment should be based on (i) respect for patient autonomy, (ii) retreatment risks or (iii) retreatment costs. PMID:11288682

  7. Sensitization to different mite species in German farmers: clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Müsken, H; Franz, J T; Wahl, R; Paap, A; Cromwell, O; Masuch, G; Bergmann, K C

    2000-01-01

    Various mite species referred to collectively as house dust and storage mites are recognized worldwide as a cause of allergic airway disease. Our study aimed to investigate the frequency of sensitization and potential importance of mite species in farmers using a broad mite spectrum. A total of 86 German farmers with rhinitis and/or asthma were studied by skin prick testing and/or enzyme allergosorbent test (EAST) with the following mites: Blomia tjibodas, Blomia tropicalis, Blomia kulagini, Glycyphagus domesticus, Thyreophagus entomophagus, Euroglyphus maynei, Chortoglyphus arcuatus, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Acarus farris and Cheyletus eruditus. Sensitization to at least one mite species was detected in 51 patients (59%) by skin prick testing, and in 31 patients (36%) by EAST. The most frequent sensitizations determined by skin tests were found for the three Blomia species, E. maynei and G. domesticus. Twelve patients (14%) gave a positive EAST with the predator mite C. eruditus. A total of 22 patients gave positive EAST results with the Dermatophagoides species. We were able to document sensitization to C. arcuatus, E. maynei and T. entomophagus for the first time in Germany. A considerable proportion of the German farmers tested were sensitized to storage mites. The allergological potential of various mite species has been recognized, some for the first time. It was concluded that B. tjibodas, G. domesticus, C. arcuatus and C. eruditus in particular should be included in an allergy diagnosis. Further investigations into the clinical relevance of the sensitizations and possible cross-reactivity between the mite species are necessary. PMID:11206935

  8. Microbiological and Clinical Aspects of Infection Associated with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Miles; Kerr, Kevin G.

    1998-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is increasingly recognized as an important cause of nosocomial infection. Infection occurs principally, but not exclusively, in debilitated and immunosuppressed individuals. Management of S. maltophilia-associated infection is problematic because many strains of the bacterium manifest resistance to multiple antibiotics. These difficulties are compounded by methodological problems in in vitro susceptibility testing for which there are, as yet, no formal guidelines. Despite its acknowledged importance as a nosocomial pathogen, little is known of the epidemiology of S. maltophilia, and although it is considered an environmental bacterium, its sources and reservoirs are often not readily apparent. Molecular typing systems may contribute to our knowledge of the epidemiology of S. maltophilia infection, thus allowing the development of strategies to interrupt the transmission of the bacterium in the hospital setting. Even less is known of pathogenic mechanisms and putative virulence factors involved in the natural history of S. maltophilia infection and this, coupled with difficulties in distinguishing colonization from true infection, has fostered the view that the bacterium is essentially nonpathogenic. This article aims to review the current taxonomic status of S. maltophilia, and it discusses the laboratory identification of the bacterium. The epidemiology of the organism is considered with particular reference to nosocomial outbreaks, several of which have been investigated by molecular typing techniques. Risk factors for acquisition of the bacterium are also reviewed, and the ever-expanding spectrum of clinical syndromes associated with S. maltophilia is surveyed. Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, pitfalls in in vitro susceptibility testing, and therapy of S. maltophilia infections are also discussed. PMID:9457429

  9. Research Techniques in Biomechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Terry

    Biomechanics involves the biological human beings interacting with his/her mechanical environment. Biomechanics research is being done in connection with sport, physical education, and general motor behavior, and concerns mechanics independent of implements. Biomechanics research falls in the following two general categories: (1) that specific…

  10. Effects of short-term fatigue on biomechanical and physiological aspects of double poling in high-level cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Zoppirolli, Chiara; Pellegrini, Barbara; Bortolan, Lorenzo; Schena, Federico

    2016-06-01

    The study aim was to evaluate biomechanical and physiological alterations in double poling technique (DP) after a short-term fatiguing exercise. Eight high-level skiers performed a sub-maximal DP trial (20kmh(-1), 1°) before (PRE) and after (POST) a DP test to exhaustion while roller skiing on a treadmill. An integrated analysis of DP technique during PRE and POST included measurement of pole, joint, and centre of mass (COM) kinematics, poling forces, cycle timing, and metabolic parameters. Muscle fatigue in three upper-body muscles was assessed by calculating the Dimitrov' fatigue index (FInms5) of specific electromyographic segments. FInms5 tended to increase in the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles (P=0.023 and P=0.030, respectively) across consecutive DP cycles, as did blood lactate concentration (P=0.001) and rating of perceived exertion (P=0.005). The changes indicated a state of fatigue during POST and coincided with the reduction in poling force exertion capacity (P=0.020). Pole, joint and COM kinematics did not differ between PRE and POST (P>0.050), whereas recovery phase and cycle times were shorter at POST (P<0.001 and P=0.001, respectively). Short-term fatigue led to a reduction in poling force exertion capacity and cycle time in high-level skiers, without altering body and pole kinematics. PMID:26904974

  11. Laser Metrology In Biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    1983-12-01

    Modern treatment of sceletal disharmonies and malocclusions utilizes application of external forces. In order to effectively use these therapeutic forces, knowledge of three-dimensional displacements of bones with correlation to biological changes is required. In the past, this problem has been studied in a number of ways using, for example, strain gauges, brittle coatings, photoelasticity, as well as clinical observations and mathematical modeling. Becouse of their inherent limitations, these techniques did not always provide all the information necessary for development of meaningful relationships between the applied force system and the resulting biological remodeling. However, recent advances in the field of la-ser metrology allowed to overcome some of the dificulties found in the earlier methods and permitted development of new techniques for non-invasive measurements of bone motions in three-dimensional space. These laser techniques are particularly useful in biomechanics because they provide for rapid and accurate determination of displacements over the entire surface of the investigate object. In this paper, application of laser techniques for quantitative in-vivo and in-vitro measurements in biomechanics will be discussed and illustrated with representative examples.

  12. Clinical and biomechanical evaluation of three bioscaffold augmentation devices used for superficial digital flexor tenorrhaphy in donkeys (Equus asinus): An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    El-Shafaey, El-Sayed A.; Karrouf, Gamal I.; Zaghloul, Adel E.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to carry out an in vivo and in vitro comparative evaluation of three bio-scaffold augmentation devices used for superficial digital flexor tenorrhaphy in donkeys. Twenty-four clinically healthy donkeys were assigned for three treatment trials (n = 8) using one of three bioscaffold materials (glycerolized bovine pericardium xenograft, tendon allograft and allograft with glycerolized by bovine pericardium). In addition, eight clinically healthy donkeys were selected to serve as control. Clinical signs of each animal were scored and the sum of all clinical indexes was calculated at each time point of the experiment. Four donkeys from each group were euthanized at 45 and 90 days postoperatively, respectively, for biomechanical and histopathological evaluation of treated superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT). The failure stress in allograft shielding group significantly increased compared to the corresponding values of the other groups at 45 (62.7 ± 6.5 N mm−2) and 90 (88.8 ± 3.5 N mm−2) days postoperatively. The fetlock angle in the allograft shielding group at both 45 (112.8° ± 4.4) and 90 (123.8° ± 1.1) days postoperatively showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) relative to the values of the other groups and a significant decrease (p < 0.05) when compared to normal angle (125° ± 0). However, the histomorphological findings revealed no remarkable changes between the treatment groups. In conclusion, the failure stress, fetlock angle and histomorphological findings may provide useful information about the healing characteristics of SDFT tenorrhaphy. The bio-scaffold augmentation devices, either xenogenic or allogenic, provide good alternative techniques accelerating SDFT healing with minimal adhesions in donkeys. PMID:25685407

  13. Economic aspects of clinical decision making: applications of clinical decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Crane, V S

    1988-03-01

    Clinical decision analysis as a basic tool for decision making is described, and potential applications of decision analysis in six areas of clinical practice are identified. Clinical decision analysis is a systematic method of describing clinical problems in a quantitative fashion, identifying possible courses of action, assessing the probability and value of outcomes, and then making a calculation to select the ultimate course of action. Clinical decision analysis provides a structure for clinical decision problems, helps clarify medical controversies, and encourages decision makers to speak a common language. Applications of clinical decision analysis in the areas of diagnostic testing, patient management, product and program selection, research and education, patient preferences, and health-care-policy evaluation are described. Decision analysis offers health professionals a tool for making quantifiable, cost-effective clinical decisions, especially in terms of clinical outcomes. PMID:3285672

  14. Alternative techniques in trochanteric hip fracture surgery. Clinical and biomechanical studies on the Medoff sliding plate and the Twin hook.

    PubMed

    Olsson, O

    2000-10-01

    In allowing compression along the femoral shaft (uniaxial dynamization) and optional compression along the femoral neck (biaxial dynamization), the Medoff sliding plate (MSP) represents a new principle in the fixation of trochanteric hip fractures. The Twin hook with 2 apical hooks was designed as an alternative to the lag screw. In 3 prospective consecutive case series and 1 prospective randomized study together comprising 342 trochanteric fractures, these alternative techniques were investigated. 3 postoperative fixation failures occurred in the unstable intertrochanteric fractures treated with biaxial dynamization with the MSP (n = 194), and 5 in those treated with the sliding hip screw (n = 62) (p = 0.04). A mean femoral shortening of 15 mm with the MSP and 11 mm with the sliding hip screw was found (p = 0.03). More medialization of the femoral shaft occurred with the sliding hip screw (26%) than with the MSP (12%) in patients with marked femoral shortening (p = 0.03). 3 postoperative fixation failures occurred in subtrochanteric fractures treated with uniaxial dynamization (n = 29) and 2 in those treated with biaxial dynamization (n = 19). Medialization of the femoral shaft occurred in 9 of the 19 biaxially dynamized fractures. The Twin hook was used in 50 patients and appeared to provide similar fixation stability as the lag screw. Biomechanical tests confirmed improved stress transmission over the fracture area with the MSP compared to the sliding hip screw in intertrochanteric fractures, and similar fixation stability with the MSP and the Intramedullary Hip Screw in subtrochanteric fractures. In axial and torsional loading, the Twin hook demonstrated gradually increasing resistance to migration. With the lag screw, the peak load was higher, but after migration with failure of the support by the threads, the loads were similar. Biaxial dynamization with the MSP appears to control fracture impaction effectively and minimizes the rate of postoperative fixation

  15. The clinical and biomechanical effects of fascial-muscular lengthening therapy on tight hip flexor patients with and without low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Daniel; Potvin, Jim R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many patients have tight hip flexors with or without low back pain. Manual fascial-muscular lengthening therapy (FMLT) is one commonly used treatment for this population. Objective: Investigate the clinical and biomechanical effects of manual FMLT on tight hip flexor patients with and without low back pain. Methods: A nonrandomized trial, before-and-after experiment with multiple baselines conducted on two different patient populations: 1) Mechanical low back pain patients with tight hip flexors (n = 10) and 2) Asymptomatic group with tight hip flexors (n = 8). Four treatments of manual FMLT were performed on the hip flexor of the two groups of patients over a two-week period. Primary outcome measures over the two-week period were 1) Maximum voluntary trunk flexor and extensor moments, 2) Disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire) and pain (10-cm Visual Analogue Scale), 3) Passive hip extension mobility. Results: Primary outcome analysis involved within-groups comparisons. Maximum voluntary trunk extension demonstrated increases for the low back pain patients. The low back pain patients demonstrated a small, but significant, reduction in disability and pain. Both groups demonstrated an increase in passive hip extension measurements. Conclusion: This preliminary study demonstrated interesting results from manual FMLT on two tight hip flexor patient populations with and without low back pain. However, there were several significant limitations from this study, which restrict the ability to generalize the results. PMID:25550670

  16. The Clinical Aspects of Mirror Therapy in Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothgangel, Andreas Stefan; Braun, Susy M.; Beurskens, Anna J.; Seitz, Rudiger J.; Wade, Derick T.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of mirror therapy (MT) interventions after stroke, phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome. A systematic literature search of the Cochrane Database of controlled trials, PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PEDro, RehabTrials and Rehadat, was made by two…

  17. Developmental and Clinical Aspects of Young Children's Play. WESTAR Series Paper #17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelz, Ruth, Ed.

    Five papers are presented from a 1982 conference on "Developmental and Clinical Aspects of Young Children's Play." In the first paper ("Cognitive Characteristics of Young Children's Play,") S. Rogers summarizes J. Piaget's theories on developmental stages, discusses the relationship of practice play to learning, and then focuses on the role of…

  18. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging: Technical Aspects and Clinical Applications, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, S.; Wu, Z.; Neelavalli, J.; Haacke, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has continued to develop into a powerful clinical tool to visualize venous structures and iron in the brain and to study diverse pathologic conditions. SWI offers a unique contrast, different from spin attenuation, T1, T2, and T2* (see Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging: Technical Aspects and Clinical Applications, Part 1). In this clinical review (Part 2), we present a variety of neurovascular and neurodegenerative disease applications for SWI, covering trauma, stroke, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, venous anomalies, multiple sclerosis, and tumors. We conclude that SWI often offers complementary information valuable in the diagnosis and potential treatment of patients with neurologic disorders. PMID:19131406

  19. Biomechanics of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Prost, William J.

    1979-01-01

    The foot goes through a complex series of biomechanical movements in a normal gait cycle, which result in smooth and coordinated propulsion. Various biomechanical faults may result in abnormal motion of the foot, the most important of which is abnormal pronation, causing the foot to be unstable in propulsion, leading to hypermobility of the joints, and eventual subluxation with static deformities. This abnormal motion must be treated, usually be biomechanical orthotic devices, sometimes combined with surgery. Emphasis is laid on the early recognition and correction of biomechanical faults to prevent deformities.

  20. Carpal height and postoperative strength after proximal row carpectomy or four-corner arthrodesis: Clinical, anatomical and biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Laronde, Pascale; Christiaens, Nicolas; Aumar, Aurélien; Chantelot, Christophe; Fontaine, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) and four-corner arthrodesis (4CA) are the two most commonly performed surgical procedures to treat wrist arthritis. Postoperative strength is one of the criteria for choosing between the two techniques. Some authors believe that strength is correlated with residual carpal height. The goal of this study was to determine if postoperative carpal height was predictive of postoperative strength. This study consisted of two parts: a clinical evaluation of grip strength after 4CA or PRC; anatomical and radiological measurements of carpal height before and after 4CA or PRC. Grip strength was better preserved after PRC (87.5%) than after 4CA (76.1%), when expressed relative to the opposite hand (P=0.053). There was a significant decrease in carpal height for the PRC group with a Youm's index of 0.37 versus 0.50 for the 4CA group (P<0.0001). Our clinical results and analysis of the literature indicate that 4CA is not superior to PRC when it comes to grip strength, whereas carpal height is significantly decreased after PRC. The decreased tendon excursion after PRC is balanced by an increase in joint stresses after 4CA. PMID:27117123

  1. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation. PMID:25801423

  2. Mitochondrial Disease: Clinical Aspects, Molecular Mechanisms, Translational Science, and Clinical Frontiers

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Ben; Cohen, Bruce; Copeland, William; Maria, Bernard L.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial medicine provides a metabolic perspective on the pathology of conditions linked with inadequate oxidative phosphorylation. Dysfunction in the mitochondrial machinery can result in improper energy production, leading to cellular injury or even apoptosis. Clinical presentations are often subtle, so clinicians must have a high index of suspicion to make early diagnoses. Symptoms could include muscle weakness and pain, seizures, loss of motor control, decreased visual and auditory functions, metabolic acidosis, acute developmental regression, and immune system dysfunction. The 2013 Neurobiology of Disease in Children Symposium, held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to (1) describe accepted clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial disease produced from various mitochondrial mutations, (2) discuss contemporary understanding of molecular mechanisms that contribute to disease pathology, (3) highlight the systemic effects produced by dysfunction within the mitochondrial machinery, and (4) introduce current strategies that are being translated from bench to bedside as potential therapeutics. PMID:24916430

  3. Methodological aspects of clinical trials in tinnitus: A proposal for an international standard

    PubMed Central

    Landgrebe, Michael; Azevedo, Andréia; Baguley, David; Bauer, Carol; Cacace, Anthony; Coelho, Claudia; Dornhoffer, John; Figueiredo, Ricardo; Flor, Herta; Hajak, Goeran; van de Heyning, Paul; Hiller, Wolfgang; Khedr, Eman; Kleinjung, Tobias; Koller, Michael; Lainez, Jose Miguel; Londero, Alain; Martin, William H.; Mennemeier, Mark; Piccirillo, Jay; De Ridder, Dirk; Rupprecht, Rainer; Searchfield, Grant; Vanneste, Sven; Zeman, Florian; Langguth, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is a common condition with a high burden of disease. While many different treatments are used in clinical practice, the evidence for the efficacy of these treatments is low and the variance of treatment response between individuals is high. This is most likely due to the great heterogeneity of tinnitus with respect to clinical features as well as underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. There is a clear need to find effective treatment options in tinnitus, however, clinical trials differ substantially with respect to methodological quality and design. Consequently, the conclusions that can be derived from these studies are limited and jeopardize comparison between studies. Here, we discuss our view of the most important aspects of trial design in clinical studies in tinnitus and make suggestions for an international methodological standard in tinnitus trials. We hope that the proposed methodological standard will stimulate scientific discussion and will help to improve the quality of trials in tinnitus. PMID:22789414

  4. Biomechanics of concussion.

    PubMed

    Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the biomechanics associated with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), also known as concussion. Specifically, the role of angular acceleration in modulating concussion onset and severity is highlighted. Studies conducted and published from the 1960s to the 1980s provided initial estimates for TBI tolerance due to high rate head rotation. However, injury levels in those studies were more severe than what is considered to be concussion in the contemporary environment. Therefore, this issue deserves additional attention to provide quantitative estimates for concussive tolerance due to head rotational acceleration focusing on the types of clinical outcomes described today. Likewise, concussion in military personnel has notably increased in current conflicts due to the incorporation of improvised explosive devices and roadside bombs. Clinical evidence indicates that outcomes from concussion due to blast may be quite different from those due to head rotational acceleration. This report also provides an overview of blast concussion mechanisms and highlights some of the recent preclinical work in this area. As with head rotational acceleration, blast tolerance is necessary to understand the scope of this problem, better protect these personnel, and provide more informed return-to-duty guidelines for service members. PMID:24923389

  5. C-arm cone-beam computed tomography in interventional oncology: technical aspects and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Floridi, Chiara; Radaelli, Alessandro; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Grass, Micheal; Lin, Ming De; Chiaradia, Melanie; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Kobeiter, Hishman; Squillaci, Ettore; Maleux, Geert; Giovagnoni, Andrea; Brunese, Luca; Wood, Bradford; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new imaging technology integrated in modern angiographic systems. Due to its ability to obtain cross-sectional imaging and the possibility to use dedicated planning and navigation software, it provides an informed platform for interventional oncology procedures. In this paper, we highlight the technical aspects and clinical applications of CBCT imaging and navigation in the most common loco-regional oncological treatments. PMID:25012472

  6. Diseases in the cranio-cervical junction: Anatomical and pathological aspects and detailed clinical accounts

    SciTech Connect

    Voth, D.; Glees, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclide imaging of the cranio-cervical region; Magnetic resonance imaging in the cranio-cervical region: Experiences in 194 cases; NMR-finding in a case of Morquio's syndrome with syncope; The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement; and A review of clinical and radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis of head joints.

  7. Clinical aspects and potential clinical applications of laser accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatola, C.; Privitera, G.

    2013-07-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT), as well as the other forms of hadrontherapy, is in use in the treatment of neoplastic diseases, to realize a high selective irradiation with maximum sparing of surrounding organs. The main characteristic of such a particles is to have an increased radiobiological effectiveness compared to conventional photons (about 10% more) and the advantage to deposit the energy in a defined space through the tissues (Bragg peak phenomenon). The goal of ELIMED Project is the realization of a laser accelerated proton beam line to prove its potential use for clinical application in the field of hadrontherapy. To date, there are several potential clinical applications of PBRT, some of which have become the treatment of choice for a specific tumour, for others it is under investigation as a therapeutic alternative to conventional X-ray radiotherapy, to increase the dose to the tumour and reduce the side effects. For almost half of cancers, an increased local tumour control is the mainstay for increased cancer curability.

  8. Biomechanics of interspinous devices.

    PubMed

    Parchi, Paolo D; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Vertuccio, Antonella; Piolanti, Nicola; Andreani, Lorenzo; Cervi, Valentina; Giannetti, Christian; Calvosa, Giuseppe; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    A number of interspinous devices (ISD) have been introduced in the lumbar spine implant market. Unfortunately, the use of these devices often is not associated with real comprehension of their biomechanical role. The aim of this paper is to review the biomechanical studies about interspinous devices available in the literature to allow the reader a better comprehension of the effects of these devices on the treated segment and on the adjacent segments of the spine. For this reason, our analysis will be limited to the interspinous devices that have biomechanical studies published in the literature. PMID:25114923

  9. Biomechanics of Interspinous Devices

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo D.; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Vertuccio, Antonella; Piolanti, Nicola; Andreani, Lorenzo; Cervi, Valentina; Giannetti, Christian; Calvosa, Giuseppe; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    A number of interspinous devices (ISD) have been introduced in the lumbar spine implant market. Unfortunately, the use of these devices often is not associated with real comprehension of their biomechanical role. The aim of this paper is to review the biomechanical studies about interspinous devices available in the literature to allow the reader a better comprehension of the effects of these devices on the treated segment and on the adjacent segments of the spine. For this reason, our analysis will be limited to the interspinous devices that have biomechanical studies published in the literature. PMID:25114923

  10. [Trichophyton species of Arthroderma benhamiae : Clinical therapeutic aspects of a new pathogen in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Hiernickel, C; Wiegand, C; Schliemann, S; Seyfarth, F; Jung, K; Elsner, P; Hipler, U-C

    2016-09-01

    Cutaneous infections with Trichophyton species of Arthroderma (A.) benhamiae are increasingly being detected in Germany. This dermatophyte typically causes tinea corporis, tinea faciei or tinea capitis with in part heavy clinical manifestation like kerion celsi. In special cases diagnosis and therapy can be difficult. In this article, four clinical cases are presented, whereby attention is given to special clinical situations and therapeutic aspects with regard to Trichophyton species of A. benhamiae: Case 1: Kerion celsi by in a 6-year-old boy; Case 2: Deep trichophytia at the mons pubis in a 32-year-old man working in a pet shop and his 27-year-old female partner; Case 3: Tinea manuum in a 7-year-old girl; Case 4: Tinea corporis in an 8‑year-old girl. PMID:27380384