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Sample records for biomedical information services

  1. Introducing meta-services for biomedical information extraction

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Florian; Krallinger, Martin; Rodriguez-Penagos, Carlos; Hakenberg, Jörg; Plake, Conrad; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Hsu, Chun-Nan; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Hung, Hsi-Chuan; Lau, William W; Johnson, Calvin A; Sætre, Rune; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Chen, Yan Hua; Kim, Sun; Shin, Soo-Yong; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Baumgartner, William A; Hunter, Lawrence; Haddow, Barry; Matthews, Michael; Wang, Xinglong; Ruch, Patrick; Ehrler, Frédéric; Özgür, Arzucan; Erkan, Güneş; Radev, Dragomir R; Krauthammer, Michael; Luong, ThaiBinh; Hoffmann, Robert; Sander, Chris; Valencia, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    We introduce the first meta-service for information extraction in molecular biology, the BioCreative MetaServer (BCMS; ). This prototype platform is a joint effort of 13 research groups and provides automatically generated annotations for PubMed/Medline abstracts. Annotation types cover gene names, gene IDs, species, and protein-protein interactions. The annotations are distributed by the meta-server in both human and machine readable formats (HTML/XML). This service is intended to be used by biomedical researchers and database annotators, and in biomedical language processing. The platform allows direct comparison, unified access, and result aggregation of the annotations. PMID:18834497

  2. Categorization of services for seeking information in biomedical literature: a typology for improvement of practice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Jae; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2008-11-01

    Biomedical researchers have to efficiently explore the scientific literature, keeping the focus on their research. This goal can only be achieved if the available means for accessing the literature meet the researchers' retrieval needs and if they understand how the tools filter the perpetually increasing number of documents. We have examined existing web-based services for information retrieval in order to give users guidance to improve their everyday practice of literature analysis. We propose two dimensions along which the services may be categorized: categories of input and output formats; and categories of behavioural usage. The categorization would be helpful for biologists to understand the differences in the input and output formats and the tasks they fulfil in information-retrieval activities. Also, they may inspire future bioinformaticians to further innovative development in this field. PMID:18660511

  3. Ethics and biomedical information.

    PubMed

    France, F H

    1998-03-01

    Ethical rules are similar for physicians in most countries that follow the Hippocratic oath. They have no formal legal force, but can be used as a reference to provide answers to solve individual cases. It appears erroneous to believe that privacy is about information. It is about relationship. In medicine, there is a contract between a patient and a physician, where health care personnel has to respect secrecy, while integrity and availability of information should be obtained for continuity of care. These somewhat contradictory objectives have to be applied very carefully to computerised biomedical information. Ethical principles have to be made clear to everyone, and society should take the necessary steps to organise their enforcement. Several examples are given in the delivery of health care, telediagnosis, patient follow-up. clinical research as well as possible breakthroughs that could jeopardise privacy, using biomedical information. PMID:9723809

  4. A service-oriented distributed semantic mediator: integrating multiscale biomedical information.

    PubMed

    Mora, Oscar; Engelbrecht, Gerhard; Bisbal, Jesus

    2012-11-01

    Biomedical research continuously generates large amounts of heterogeneous and multimodal data spread over multiple data sources. These data, if appropriately shared and exploited, could dramatically improve the research practice itself, and ultimately the quality of health care delivered. This paper presents DISMED (DIstributed Semantic MEDiator), an open source semantic mediator that provides a unified view of a federated environment of multiscale biomedical data sources. DISMED is a Web-based software application to query and retrieve information distributed over a set of registered data sources, using semantic technologies. It also offers a userfriendly interface specifically designed to simplify the usage of these technologies by non-expert users. Although the architecture of the software mediator is generic and domain independent, in the context of this paper, DISMED has been evaluated for managing biomedical environments and facilitating research with respect to the handling of scientific data distributed in multiple heterogeneous data sources. As part of this contribution, a quantitative evaluation framework has been developed. It consist of a benchmarking scenario and the definition of five realistic use-cases. This framework, created entirely with public datasets, has been used to compare the performance of DISMED against other available mediators. It is also available to the scientific community in order to evaluate progress in the domain of semantic mediation, in a systematic and comparable manner. The results show an average improvement in the execution time by DISMED of 55% compared to the second best alternative in four out of the five use-cases of the experimental evaluation. PMID:22929464

  5. Changing the face of reference: adapting biomedical and health information services for the classroom, clinic, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Michele R; Auten, Beth; Botero, Cecilia E; Butson, Linda C; Edwards, Mary E; Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Lyon, Jennifer A; Norton, Hannah F

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how the reference department at a large academic health sciences library evolved to address the clinical and research information needs of the parent organization without losing its close connections to the classroom and curriculum. Closing the reference desk, moving to on-call and house call models, designing positions such as clinical research librarian and basic biomedical sciences librarian, finding alternative funding to grow the department, providing technology and training to facilitate librarians' work, and developing programming for and taking advice from library clients facilitated efforts to create a relevant presence and solidify the library's place in the university community. PMID:22853302

  6. Biomedical information retrieval across languages.

    PubMed

    Daumke, Philipp; Markü, Kornél; Poprat, Michael; Schulz, Stefan; Klar, Rüdiger

    2007-06-01

    This work presents a new dictionary-based approach to biomedical cross-language information retrieval (CLIR) that addresses many of the general and domain-specific challenges in current CLIR research. Our method is based on a multilingual lexicon that was generated partly manually and partly automatically, and currently covers six European languages. It contains morphologically meaningful word fragments, termed subwords. Using subwords instead of entire words significantly reduces the number of lexical entries necessary to sufficiently cover a specific language and domain. Mediation between queries and documents is based on these subwords as well as on lists of word-n-grams that are generated from large monolingual corpora and constitute possible translation units. The translations are then sent to a standard Internet search engine. This process makes our approach an effective tool for searching the biomedical content of the World Wide Web in different languages. We evaluate this approach using the OHSUMED corpus, a large medical document collection, within a cross-language retrieval setting. PMID:17541863

  7. search GenBank: interactive orchestration and ad-hoc choreography of Web services in the exploration of the biomedical resources of the National Center For Biotechnology Information

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the growing number of biomedical entries in data repositories of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), it is difficult to collect, manage and process all of these entries in one place by third-party software developers without significant investment in hardware and software infrastructure, its maintenance and administration. Web services allow development of software applications that integrate in one place the functionality and processing logic of distributed software components, without integrating the components themselves and without integrating the resources to which they have access. This is achieved by appropriate orchestration or choreography of available Web services and their shared functions. After the successful application of Web services in the business sector, this technology can now be used to build composite software tools that are oriented towards biomedical data processing. Results We have developed a new tool for efficient and dynamic data exploration in GenBank and other NCBI databases. A dedicated search GenBank system makes use of NCBI Web services and a package of Entrez Programming Utilities (eUtils) in order to provide extended searching capabilities in NCBI data repositories. In search GenBank users can use one of the three exploration paths: simple data searching based on the specified user’s query, advanced data searching based on the specified user’s query, and advanced data exploration with the use of macros. search GenBank orchestrates calls of particular tools available through the NCBI Web service providing requested functionality, while users interactively browse selected records in search GenBank and traverse between NCBI databases using available links. On the other hand, by building macros in the advanced data exploration mode, users create choreographies of eUtils calls, which can lead to the automatic discovery of related data in the specified databases. Conclusions search Gen

  8. PhysiomeSpace: digital library service for biomedical data.

    PubMed

    Testi, Debora; Quadrani, Paolo; Viceconti, Marco

    2010-06-28

    Every research laboratory has a wealth of biomedical data locked up, which, if shared with other experts, could dramatically improve biomedical and healthcare research. With the PhysiomeSpace service, it is now possible with a few clicks to share with selected users biomedical data in an easy, controlled and safe way. The digital library service is managed using a client-server approach. The client application is used to import, fuse and enrich the data information according to the PhysiomeSpace resource ontology and upload/download the data to the library. The server services are hosted on the Biomed Town community portal, where through a web interface, the user can complete the metadata curation and share and/or publish the data resources. A search service capitalizes on the domain ontology and on the enrichment of metadata for each resource, providing a powerful discovery environment. Once the users have found the data resources they are interested in, they can add them to their basket, following a metaphor popular in e-commerce web sites. When all the necessary resources have been selected, the user can download the basket contents into the client application. The digital library service is now in beta and open to the biomedical research community. PMID:20478910

  9. PhysiomeSpace: digital library service for biomedical data

    PubMed Central

    Testi, Debora; Quadrani, Paolo; Viceconti, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Every research laboratory has a wealth of biomedical data locked up, which, if shared with other experts, could dramatically improve biomedical and healthcare research. With the PhysiomeSpace service, it is now possible with a few clicks to share with selected users biomedical data in an easy, controlled and safe way. The digital library service is managed using a client–server approach. The client application is used to import, fuse and enrich the data information according to the PhysiomeSpace resource ontology and upload/download the data to the library. The server services are hosted on the Biomed Town community portal, where through a web interface, the user can complete the metadata curation and share and/or publish the data resources. A search service capitalizes on the domain ontology and on the enrichment of metadata for each resource, providing a powerful discovery environment. Once the users have found the data resources they are interested in, they can add them to their basket, following a metaphor popular in e-commerce web sites. When all the necessary resources have been selected, the user can download the basket contents into the client application. The digital library service is now in beta and open to the biomedical research community. PMID:20478910

  10. Rising Expectations: Access to Biomedical Information

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, D. A. B.; Humphreys, B. L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective To provide an overview of the expansion in public access to electronic biomedical information over the past two decades, with an emphasis on developments to which the U.S. National Library of Medicine contributed. Methods Review of the increasingly broad spectrum of web-accessible genomic data, biomedical literature, consumer health information, clinical trials data, and images. Results The amount of publicly available electronic biomedical information has increased dramatically over the past twenty years. Rising expectations regarding access to biomedical information were stimulated by the spread of the Internet, the World Wide Web, advanced searching and linking techniques. These informatics advances simplified and improved access to electronic information and reduced costs, which enabled inter-organizational collaborations to build and maintain large international information resources and also aided outreach and education efforts The demonstrated benefits of free access to electronic biomedical information encouraged the development of public policies that further increase the amount of information available. Conclusions Continuing rapid growth of publicly accessible electronic biomedical information presents tremendous opportunities and challenges, including the need to ensure uninterrupted access during disasters or emergencies and to manage digital resources so they remain available for future generations. PMID:18587496

  11. Focus on: Deaconess Hospital Biomedical Services Department.

    PubMed

    Pastorello, R A

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the Biomedical Services Department of Deaconess Hospital, which is centrally located in Oklahoma City, OK. The hospital provides family-centered general and acute care with practically all medical specialties represented. The Department consists of one department supervisor, one technician, and one part-time shared-service secretary. The Department is responsible for the repair, safety testing, and calibration of over 600 instruments, and serves an important role in the selection and support of patient care equipment. Training of users is another major role for this department. PMID:10279020

  12. Biomedical equipment and medical services in India.

    PubMed

    Sahay, K B; Saxena, R K

    Varieties of Biomedical Equipment (BME) are now used for quick diagnosis, flawless surgery and therapeutics etc. Use of a malfunctioning BME could result in faulty diagnosis and wrong treatment and can lead to damaging or even devastating aftermath. Modern Biomedical Equipments inevitably employ highly sophisticated technology and use complex systems and instrumentation for best results. To the best of our knowledge the medical education in India does not impart any knowledge on the theory and design of BME and it is perhaps not possible also. Hence there is need for a permanent mechanism which can maintain and repair the biomedical equipments routinely before use and this can be done only with the help of qualified Clinical Engineers. Thus there is a genuine need for well organized cadre of Clinical Engineers who would be persons with engineering background with specialization in medical instrumentation. These Clinical engineers should be made responsible for the maintenance and proper functioning of BME. Every hospital or group of hospitals in the advanced countries has a clinical engineering unit that takes care of the biomedical equipments and systems in the hospital by undertaking routine and preventive maintenance, regular calibration of equipments and their timely repairs. Clinical engineers should be thus made an essential part of modern health care system and services. Unfortunately such facilities and mechanism do not exist in India. To make BME maintenance efficient and flawless in India, study suggests following measures and remedies: (i) design and development of comprehensive computerized database for BME (ii) cadre of Clinical engineers (iii) online maintenance facility and (iv) farsighted managerial skill to maximize accuracy, functioning and cost effectiveness. PMID:10166967

  13. Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scofield, James

    Newspaper librarians discussed the public use of their newspapers' libraries. Policies run the gamut from well-staffed public information services, within or outside the newspaper library, to no service at all to those outside the staff of the paper. Problems of dealing with tax and law enforcement agencies were covered, as well as cooperative…

  14. Biomedical cloud computing with Amazon Web Services.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Vincent A; Patil, Prasad; Gafni, Erik; Wall, Dennis P; Tonellato, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    In this overview to biomedical computing in the cloud, we discussed two primary ways to use the cloud (a single instance or cluster), provided a detailed example using NGS mapping, and highlighted the associated costs. While many users new to the cloud may assume that entry is as straightforward as uploading an application and selecting an instance type and storage options, we illustrated that there is substantial up-front effort required before an application can make full use of the cloud's vast resources. Our intention was to provide a set of best practices and to illustrate how those apply to a typical application pipeline for biomedical informatics, but also general enough for extrapolation to other types of computational problems. Our mapping example was intended to illustrate how to develop a scalable project and not to compare and contrast alignment algorithms for read mapping and genome assembly. Indeed, with a newer aligner such as Bowtie, it is possible to map the entire African genome using one m2.2xlarge instance in 48 hours for a total cost of approximately $48 in computation time. In our example, we were not concerned with data transfer rates, which are heavily influenced by the amount of available bandwidth, connection latency, and network availability. When transferring large amounts of data to the cloud, bandwidth limitations can be a major bottleneck, and in some cases it is more efficient to simply mail a storage device containing the data to AWS (http://aws.amazon.com/importexport/). More information about cloud computing, detailed cost analysis, and security can be found in references. PMID:21901085

  15. A Computer Based Biomedical Information System. I. Logic Foundation and Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syner, James C.

    A digital computer based biomedical information system was designed to service the needs of physicians engaged in patient care and clinical research, and scientists engaged in laboratory research. The system embraces all functions of information processing which include information collection, storage, retrieval, analyses and display. The…

  16. Autoradiography: Biomedical applications. January, 1975-August, 1981 (citations from the International Information Service for the Physics and Engineering Communities Data Base). Report for January 75-August 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the methods, equipment, and biomedical applications of autoradiography. Electron microscopy (EM) is discussed at length, and sample preparation for EM is detailed. Numerous biological, biochemical and biophysical studies are discussed. (Contains 84 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  17. Mining biomedical images towards valuable information retrieval in biomedical and life sciences

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical images are helpful sources for the scientists and practitioners in drawing significant hypotheses, exemplifying approaches and describing experimental results in published biomedical literature. In last decades, there has been an enormous increase in the amount of heterogeneous biomedical image production and publication, which results in a need for bioimaging platforms for feature extraction and analysis of text and content in biomedical images to take advantage in implementing effective information retrieval systems. In this review, we summarize technologies related to data mining of figures. We describe and compare the potential of different approaches in terms of their developmental aspects, used methodologies, produced results, achieved accuracies and limitations. Our comparative conclusions include current challenges for bioimaging software with selective image mining, embedded text extraction and processing of complex natural language queries. PMID:27538578

  18. Mining biomedical images towards valuable information retrieval in biomedical and life sciences.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical images are helpful sources for the scientists and practitioners in drawing significant hypotheses, exemplifying approaches and describing experimental results in published biomedical literature. In last decades, there has been an enormous increase in the amount of heterogeneous biomedical image production and publication, which results in a need for bioimaging platforms for feature extraction and analysis of text and content in biomedical images to take advantage in implementing effective information retrieval systems. In this review, we summarize technologies related to data mining of figures. We describe and compare the potential of different approaches in terms of their developmental aspects, used methodologies, produced results, achieved accuracies and limitations. Our comparative conclusions include current challenges for bioimaging software with selective image mining, embedded text extraction and processing of complex natural language queries. PMID:27538578

  19. Evaluating Internet Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    The following four papers focus on the topic of evaluating Internet information services: "Some Evaluation Criteria To Assess Internet Information Services" (Carmel Galvin); "The Teacher Librarian's Role as Evaluator of Internet Information Services" (Pru Mitchell); "How Students Evaluate Internet Information Services" (Ross Todd); and "Internet…

  20. OntoGene web services for biomedical text mining.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Clematide, Simon; Marques, Hernani; Ellendorff, Tilia; Romacker, Martin; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Text mining services are rapidly becoming a crucial component of various knowledge management pipelines, for example in the process of database curation, or for exploration and enrichment of biomedical data within the pharmaceutical industry. Traditional architectures, based on monolithic applications, do not offer sufficient flexibility for a wide range of use case scenarios, and therefore open architectures, as provided by web services, are attracting increased interest. We present an approach towards providing advanced text mining capabilities through web services, using a recently proposed standard for textual data interchange (BioC). The web services leverage a state-of-the-art platform for text mining (OntoGene) which has been tested in several community-organized evaluation challenges,with top ranked results in several of them. PMID:25472638

  1. OntoGene web services for biomedical text mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Text mining services are rapidly becoming a crucial component of various knowledge management pipelines, for example in the process of database curation, or for exploration and enrichment of biomedical data within the pharmaceutical industry. Traditional architectures, based on monolithic applications, do not offer sufficient flexibility for a wide range of use case scenarios, and therefore open architectures, as provided by web services, are attracting increased interest. We present an approach towards providing advanced text mining capabilities through web services, using a recently proposed standard for textual data interchange (BioC). The web services leverage a state-of-the-art platform for text mining (OntoGene) which has been tested in several community-organized evaluation challenges, with top ranked results in several of them. PMID:25472638

  2. Use of controlled vocabularies to improve biomedical information retrieval tasks.

    PubMed

    Pasche, Emilie; Gobeill, Julien; Vishnyakova, Dina; Ruch, Patrick; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The high heterogeneity of biomedical vocabulary is a major obstacle for information retrieval in large biomedical collections. Therefore, using biomedical controlled vocabularies is crucial for managing these contents. We investigate the impact of query expansion based on controlled vocabularies to improve the effectiveness of two search engines. Our strategy relies on the enrichment of users' queries with additional terms, directly derived from such vocabularies applied to infectious diseases and chemical patents. We observed that query expansion based on pathogen names resulted in improvements of the top-precision of our first search engine, while the normalization of diseases degraded the top-precision. The expansion of chemical entities, which was performed on the second search engine, positively affected the mean average precision. We have shown that query expansion of some types of biomedical entities has a great potential to improve search effectiveness; therefore a fine-tuning of query expansion strategies could help improving the performances of search engines. PMID:23920842

  3. Crossing the Chasm: Information Technology to Biomedical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Brenda G.; Balke, C. William; Umberger, Gloria H.; Talbert, Jeffery; Canales, Denise Niles; Steltenkamp, Carol L.; Conigliaro, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Accelerating the translation of new scientific discoveries to improve human health and disease management is the overall goal of a series of initiatives integrated in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) “Roadmap for Medical Research.” The Clinical and Translational Research Award (CTSA) program is, arguably, the most visible component of the NIH Roadmap providing resources to institutions to transform their clinical and translational research enterprises along the goals of the Roadmap. The CTSA program emphasizes biomedical informatics as a critical component for the accomplishment of the NIH’s translational objectives. To be optimally effective, emerging biomedical informatics programs must link with the information technology (IT) platforms of the enterprise clinical operations within academic health centers. This report details one academic health center’s transdisciplinary initiative to create an integrated academic discipline of biomedical informatics through the development of its infrastructure for clinical and translational science infrastructure and response to the CTSA mechanism. This approach required a detailed informatics strategy to accomplish these goals. This transdisciplinary initiative was the impetus for creation of a specialized biomedical informatics core, the Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBI). Development of the CBI codified the need to incorporate medical informatics including quality and safety informatics and enterprise clinical information systems within the CBI. This paper describes the steps taken to develop the biomedical informatics infrastructure, its integration with clinical systems at one academic health center, successes achieved, and barriers encountered during these efforts. PMID:21383632

  4. Evaluating a Chat Reference Service at the University of South Alabama's Baugh Biomedical Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clanton, Clista C.; Staggs, Geneva B.; Williams, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    The University of South Alabama's Baugh Biomedical Library recently initiated a chat reference service targeted at distance education students in the biomedical sciences. After one year of service, the library conducted an evaluation of the chat reference to assess the success of this mode of reference service. Both traditional reference and…

  5. MIMI: multimodality, multiresource, information integration environment for biomedical core facilities.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Jacek; Wilson, David L; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2009-10-01

    The rapid expansion of biomedical research has brought substantial scientific and administrative data management challenges to modern core facilities. Scientifically, a core facility must be able to manage experimental workflow and the corresponding set of large and complex scientific data. It must also disseminate experimental data to relevant researchers in a secure and expedient manner that facilitates collaboration and provides support for data interpretation and analysis. Administratively, a core facility must be able to manage the scheduling of its equipment and to maintain a flexible and effective billing system to track material, resource, and personnel costs and charge for services to sustain its operation. It must also have the ability to regularly monitor the usage and performance of its equipment and to provide summary statistics on resources spent on different categories of research. To address these informatics challenges, we introduce a comprehensive system called MIMI (multimodality, multiresource, information integration environment) that integrates the administrative and scientific support of a core facility into a single web-based environment. We report the design, development, and deployment experience of a baseline MIMI system at an imaging core facility and discuss the general applicability of such a system in other types of core facilities. These initial results suggest that MIMI will be a unique, cost-effective approach to addressing the informatics infrastructure needs of core facilities and similar research laboratories. PMID:17999114

  6. Construction of an annotated corpus to support biomedical information extraction

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul; Iqbal, Syed A; McNaught, John; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Background Information Extraction (IE) is a component of text mining that facilitates knowledge discovery by automatically locating instances of interesting biomedical events from huge document collections. As events are usually centred on verbs and nominalised verbs, understanding the syntactic and semantic behaviour of these words is highly important. Corpora annotated with information concerning this behaviour can constitute a valuable resource in the training of IE components and resources. Results We have defined a new scheme for annotating sentence-bound gene regulation events, centred on both verbs and nominalised verbs. For each event instance, all participants (arguments) in the same sentence are identified and assigned a semantic role from a rich set of 13 roles tailored to biomedical research articles, together with a biological concept type linked to the Gene Regulation Ontology. To our knowledge, our scheme is unique within the biomedical field in terms of the range of event arguments identified. Using the scheme, we have created the Gene Regulation Event Corpus (GREC), consisting of 240 MEDLINE abstracts, in which events relating to gene regulation and expression have been annotated by biologists. A novel method of evaluating various different facets of the annotation task showed that average inter-annotator agreement rates fall within the range of 66% - 90%. Conclusion The GREC is a unique resource within the biomedical field, in that it annotates not only core relationships between entities, but also a range of other important details about these relationships, e.g., location, temporal, manner and environmental conditions. As such, it is specifically designed to support bio-specific tool and resource development. It has already been used to acquire semantic frames for inclusion within the BioLexicon (a lexical, terminological resource to aid biomedical text mining). Initial experiments have also shown that the corpus may viably be used to train IE

  7. Information services and information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Attempts made to design and extend space system capabilities are reported. Special attention was given to establishing user needs for information or services which might be provided by space systems. Data given do not attempt to detail scientific, technical, or economic bases for the needs expressed by the users.

  8. Evaluation methods for retrieving information from interferograms of biomedical objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podbielska, Halina; Rottenkolber, Matthias

    1996-04-01

    Interferograms in the form of fringe patterns can be produced in two-beam interferometers, holographic or speckle interferometers, in setups realizing moire techniques or in deflectometers. Optical metrology based on the principle of interference can be applied as a testing tool in biomedical research. By analyzing of the fringe pattern images, information about the shape or mechanical behavior of the object under study can be retrieved. Here, some of the techniques for creating fringe pattern images were presented along with methods of analysis. Intensity based analysis as well as methods of phase measurements, are mentioned. Applications of inteferometric methods, especially in the field of experimental orthopedics, endoscopy and ophthalmology are pointed out.

  9. Information bottleneck based incremental fuzzy clustering for large biomedical data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongli; Wan, Xing

    2016-08-01

    Incremental fuzzy clustering combines advantages of fuzzy clustering and incremental clustering, and therefore is important in classifying large biomedical literature. Conventional algorithms, suffering from data sparsity and high-dimensionality, often fail to produce reasonable results and may even assign all the objects to a single cluster. In this paper, we propose two incremental algorithms based on information bottleneck, Single-Pass fuzzy c-means (spFCM-IB) and Online fuzzy c-means (oFCM-IB). These two algorithms modify conventional algorithms by considering different weights for each centroid and object and scoring mutual information loss to measure the distance between centroids and objects. spFCM-IB and oFCM-IB are used to group a collection of biomedical text abstracts from Medline database. Experimental results show that clustering performances of our approaches are better than such prominent counterparts as spFCM, spHFCM, oFCM and oHFCM, in terms of accuracy. PMID:27260783

  10. Mediator infrastructure for information integration and semantic data integration environment for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Grethe, Jeffrey S; Ross, Edward; Little, David; Sanders, Brian; Gupta, Amarnath; Astakhov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents current progress in the development of semantic data integration environment which is a part of the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN; http://www.nbirn.net) project. BIRN is sponsored by the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). A goal is the development of a cyberinfrastructure for biomedical research that supports advance data acquisition, data storage, data management, data integration, data mining, data visualization, and other computing and information processing services over the Internet. Each participating institution maintains storage of their experimental or computationally derived data. Mediator-based data integration system performs semantic integration over the databases to enable researchers to perform analyses based on larger and broader datasets than would be available from any single institution's data. This paper describes recent revision of the system architecture, implementation, and capabilities of the semantically based data integration environment for BIRN. PMID:19623485

  11. IPPF Co-operative Information Service (ICIS). November 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This is a bibliography of family planning material available from the International Planned Parenthood Cooperative Information Service library and documentation services. Entries are made under the following categories: reference books, biographies, family planning and bio-medical science, social sciences related to family planning, international…

  12. [Information sheet and informed consent in biomedical research with samples].

    PubMed

    Gil Membrado, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines from a practical perspective, the content of the information sheet to the participant in a clinical trial in which pharmacogenetic studies are conducted and/or pharmacogenomics, and scope of informed consent. The text is accompanied by a guide of questions to assess the fit of a participant information sheet on the regulation of clinical trials, biological samples and protection of personal data. PMID:23115824

  13. Improving Validity of Informed Consent for Biomedical Research in Zambia Using a Laboratory Exposure Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zulu, Joseph Mumba; Lisulo, Mpala Mwanza; Besa, Ellen; Kaonga, Patrick; Chisenga, Caroline C.; Chomba, Mumba; Simuyandi, Michelo; Banda, Rosemary; Kelly, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Complex biomedical research can lead to disquiet in communities with limited exposure to scientific discussions, leading to rumours or to high drop-out rates. We set out to test an intervention designed to address apprehensions commonly encountered in a community where literacy is uncommon, and where complex biomedical research has been conducted for over a decade. We aimed to determine if it could improve the validity of consent. Methods Data were collected using focus group discussions, key informant interviews and observations. We designed an intervention that exposed participants to a detailed demonstration of laboratory processes. Each group was interviewed twice in a day, before and after exposure to the intervention in order to assess changes in their views. Results Factors that motivated people to participate in invasive biomedical research included a desire to stay healthy because of the screening during the recruitment process, regular advice from doctors, free medical services, and trust in the researchers. Inhibiting factors were limited knowledge about samples taken from their bodies during endoscopic procedures, the impact of endoscopy on the function of internal organs, and concerns about the use of biomedical samples. The belief that blood can be used for Satanic practices also created insecurities about drawing of blood samples. Further inhibiting factors included a fear of being labelled as HIV positive if known to consult heath workers repeatedly, and gender inequality. Concerns about the use and storage of blood and tissue samples were overcome by a laboratory exposure intervention. Conclusion Selecting a group of members from target community and engaging them in a laboratory exposure intervention could be a useful tool for enhancing specific aspects of consent for biomedical research. Further work is needed to determine the extent to which improved understanding permeates beyond the immediate group participating in the intervention

  14. @neuLink: a service-oriented application for biomedical knowledge discovery.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Christoph M; Dach, Holger; Gattermayer, Tobias; Engelbrecht, Gerhard; Benkner, Siegfried; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We introduce the architecture of @neuLink, a service-oriented environment for biomedical knowledge discovery which has been developed in the course of EU Integrated Project @neurIST. The application integrates data from databases with information extracted from unstructured text sources. Moreover, @neuLink supports the analysis of primary biomolecular data associated with individual patients and thus enables the interpretation of molecular data inside a clinical research environment. Based on an assembly of data services, @neuLink interacts with the complex @neurIST grid infrastructure through a dedicated data access and data mediation service. Data types integrated by @neuLink are covering the entire span of biomolecular entities: from gene names in text to entries in EntrezGene; from mentions of drugs to Drugbank, from information on allelic variants in scientific literature to entries in dbSNP. The architecture of @neuLink allows easy integration of other webservice-based applications and thus the spectrum of analysis capabilities of @neuLink can be extended following the requirements of the users of the @neurIST system. PMID:18560118

  15. Searching for biomedical information on the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R P

    2000-01-01

    The rapid growth of biomedical information available via the Internet and its most popular retrieval system, the World Wide Web, has fostered active research and development directed toward locating resources that are appropriate for answering specific queries. The goal is to create tools that optimize information retrieval (as measured by two quantities, precision and recall) while minimizing the effort required by the user. Existing Web retrieval tools can be divided into the following groups: manually maintained topical lists; automatically generated word-based indices; software agents and multi-index searching aids; network cataloging methods; and miscellaneous hybrid and newer approaches. Improvements in current methods should arise from further research into: methods of describing objects on the Web; improved ways of searching for (and within) collections of documents as opposed to single documents; the ability to search for fielded documents; and ways to describe resources that span intra- and interdisciplinary as well as cross-cultural linguistic differences. For this last problem, the U.S. National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) will be of great help. As online information retrieval improves, efforts are underway to improve the online information itself; quality control over content is being addressed as the peer-review systems of traditional printed journals migrate into the realm of electronic publication. PMID:11183455

  16. Information Services Directory

    SciTech Connect

    1991-03-01

    Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) and its amendments establishing the national policy for safely storing, transporting and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a geologic repository. This legislation created the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an integrated system for the safe and efficient disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The NWPA, as amended, directs DOE to study in detail the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the only candidate site for the Nation`s geologic repository. This Information Services Directory is intended to facilitate dissemination of information. The Directory is produced by the Education and Information Division of OCRWM`s Office of External Relations and will be updated periodically. This is the third such update since its issuance in August 1986. It is a reference document that lists the sources of program information available to states, Indian tribes, and the public.

  17. Information services directory

    SciTech Connect

    1991-01-01

    Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) and its amendments establishing the National policy for safely storing, transporting and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a geologic repository. This legislation created the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an integrated system for the safe and efficient disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The NWPA, as amended, directs DOE to study in detail the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as the only candidate site for the Nation`s geologic repository. In Nevada, the DOE/OCRWM Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office (YMPO) manages scientific investigations to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain for effectively isolating radioactive waste from the public and the environment. This Information Services Directory is intended to facilitate dissemination of information. The Directory is produced by the Education and Information Division of OCRWM`s Office of External Relations and will be updated periodically. This is the third such update since its issuance in August 1986. It is a reference document that lists the sources of program information available to States, Indian Tribes and the public.

  18. Experiences with information locator services

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christian, E.

    1999-01-01

    Over the last few years, governments and other organizations have been using new technologies to create networked Information Locator Services that help people find information resources. These services not only enhance access to information, but also are designed to support fundamental information policy principles. This article relates experiences in developing and promoting services interoperable with the Global Information Locator Service standard that has now been adopted and promoted in many forums worldwide. The article describes sample implementations and touches on the strategic choices made in public policy, standards, and technology. Ten recommendations are offered for successful implementation of an Information Locator Service. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Informed consent among nursing students participating in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Anupama; Christopher, D J; Mammen, Joy; David, Thambu; Kang, Gagandeep; David, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    For consent in biomedical research, it is essential that research participants understand the need for research, the study protocol, the risk and benefits of participation, the freedom to participate or decline and the right to leave the study at any time. A structured questionnaire was used to assess understanding and knowledge among nursing trainees participating in a cohort study investigating exposure and latent tuberculosis at a tertiary care hospital. Data were collected for 138 participants. While 97% were aware of their enrollment into a research protocol, only 78% could state that it was a study on tuberculosis. Approximately two-thirds were aware of plans for blood collection, but not all of them knew the timings or number of samples. The majority (59%) participants had consulted others before making the decision to participate, and only 73% felt that their participation was completely voluntary. Even among healthcare trainees, emphasis needs to be placed on testing both the knowledge and understanding of participants to ensure the principle and practice of truly informed consent. PMID:22864079

  20. Accessing biomedical literature in the current information landscape.

    PubMed

    Khare, Ritu; Leaman, Robert; Lu, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical and life sciences literature is unique because of its exponentially increasing volume and interdisciplinary nature. Biomedical literature access is essential for several types of users including biomedical researchers, clinicians, database curators, and bibliometricians. In the past few decades, several online search tools and literature archives, generic as well as biomedicine specific, have been developed. We present this chapter in the light of three consecutive steps of literature access: searching for citations, retrieving full text, and viewing the article. The first section presents the current state of practice of biomedical literature access, including an analysis of the search tools most frequently used by the users, including PubMed, Google Scholar, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase, and a study on biomedical literature archives such as PubMed Central. The next section describes current research and the state-of-the-art systems motivated by the challenges a user faces during query formulation and interpretation of search results. The research solutions are classified into five key areas related to text and data mining, text similarity search, semantic search, query support, relevance ranking, and clustering results. Finally, the last section describes some predicted future trends for improving biomedical literature access, such as searching and reading articles on portable devices, and adoption of the open access policy. PMID:24788259

  1. Accessing Biomedical Literature in the Current Information Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Ritu; Leaman, Robert; Lu, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    i. Summary Biomedical and life sciences literature is unique because of its exponentially increasing volume and interdisciplinary nature. Biomedical literature access is essential for several types of users including biomedical researchers, clinicians, database curators, and bibliometricians. In the past few decades, several online search tools and literature archives, generic as well as biomedicine-specific, have been developed. We present this chapter in the light of three consecutive steps of literature access: searching for citations, retrieving full-text, and viewing the article. The first section presents the current state of practice of biomedical literature access, including an analysis of the search tools most frequently used by the users, including PubMed, Google Scholar, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase, and a study on biomedical literature archives such as PubMed Central. The next section describes current research and the state-of-the-art systems motivated by the challenges a user faces during query formulation and interpretation of search results. The research solutions are classified into five key areas related to text and data mining, text similarity search, semantic search, query support, relevance ranking, and clustering results. Finally, the last section describes some predicted future trends for improving biomedical literature access, such as searching and reading articles on portable devices, and adoption of the open access policy. PMID:24788259

  2. Information Search Services for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Sharon; And Others

    Based on information provided primarily by two existing state-based information services, this handbook presents a clear, practical look at possible activities, procedures, and requirements of search services for educators. Descriptions of the two services that serve as models--Oklahoma's Sooner Exchange for Educational Knowledge (SEEK) and Texas'…

  3. Experiences with Information Locator Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Eliot

    1999-01-01

    Relates experiences in developing and promoting services interoperable with the Global Information Locator Service (GILS) standard. Describes sample implementations and touches on the strategic choices made in public policy, standards, and technology. Offers 10 recommendations for successful implementation of an Information Locator Service. (AEF)

  4. Databases as an information service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of databases to information services, and the range of information services users and their needs for information is explored and discussed. It is argued that for database information to be valuable to a broad range of users, it is essential that access methods be provided that are relatively unstructured and natural to information services users who are interested in the information contained in databases, but who are not willing to learn and use traditional structured query languages. Unless this ease of use of databases is considered in the design and application process, the potential benefits from using database systems may not be realized.

  5. SimplevisGrid: grid services for visualization of diverse biomedical knowledge and molecular systems data.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical data visualization is a great challenge due to the scale, complexity, and diversity of systems, system component interactions and experimental data. Standards for interoperable data are a good start to addressing these problems, but standardization of visualization technologies is an emerging topic. SimpleVisGrid builds on Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG) common infrastructure for cancer research, and clearly specifies and extends three standard data formats for inputs and outputs to grid services: comma-separated values (CSV), Portable Network Graphics (PNG), and Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). Four prototype visualizations are available: 2D array data quality visualization, correlation heatmaps between high-dimensional data and associated meta-data, feature landscapes, and biochemical or semantic network graphs. The services and data model are prepared for submission for caBIG Silver-level compatibility review and for integration into automated research workflows. Making these tools available to caBIG developers and ultimately to biomedical researchers can (1) help with biomedical communication, discovery, and decision-making, (2) encourage more research on standardization of visualization formats, and (3) improve the efficiency of large data transfers across the grid. PMID:19964624

  6. SimpleVisGrid: Grid Services for Visualization of Diverse Biomedical Knowledge and Molecular Systems Data

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Todd H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical data visualization is a great challenge due to the scale, complexity, and diversity of systems, system component interactions and experimental data. Standards for interoperable data are a good start to addressing these problems, but standardization of visualization technologies is an emerging topic. SimpleVisGrid builds on Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG) common infrastructure for cancer research, and clearly specifies and extends three standard data formats for inputs and outputs to grid services: comma-separated values (CSV), Portable Network Graphics (PNG), and Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). Four prototype visualizations are available: 2D array data quality visualization, correlation heatmaps between high-dimensional data and associated meta-data, feature landscapes, and biochemical or semantic network graphs. The services and data model are prepared for submission for caBIG Silver-level compatibility review and for integration into automated research workflows. Making these tools available to caBIG developers and ultimately to biomedical researchers can (1) help with biomedical communication, discovery, and decision-making, (2) encourage more research on standardization of visualization formats, and (3) improve the efficiency of large data transfers across the grid. PMID:19964624

  7. Computerized Drug Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Smith, Daniel R.

    1972-01-01

    To compare computerized services in chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical medicine of pharmaceutical interest, equivalent profiles were run on magnetic tape files of CA-Condensates," CBAC," Excerpta Medica," MEDLARS" and Ringdoc." The results are tabulated for overlap of services, relative speed of citing references, and unique…

  8. Protein structure databases with new web services for structural biology and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Standley, Daron M; Kinjo, Akira R; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki

    2008-07-01

    The Protein Data Bank Japan (PDBj) curates, edits and distributes protein structural data as a member of the worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) and currently processes approximately 25-30% of all deposited data in the world. Structural information is enhanced by the addition of biological and biochemical functional data as well as experimental details extracted from the literature and other databases. Several applications have been developed at PDBj for structural biology and biomedical studies: (i) a Java-based molecular graphics viewer, jV; (ii) display of electron density maps for the evaluation of structure quality; (iii) an extensive database of molecular surfaces for functional sites, eF-site, as well as a search service for similar molecular surfaces, eF-seek; (iv) identification of sequence and structural neighbors; (v) a graphical user interface to all known protein folds with links to the above applications, Protein Globe. Recent examples are shown that highlight the utility of these tools in recognizing remote homologies between pairs of protein structures and in assigning putative biochemical functions to newly determined targets from structural genomics projects. PMID:18430752

  9. Market Segmentation for Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halperin, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the advantages and limitations of market segmentation as strategy for the marketing of information services made available by nonprofit organizations, particularly libraries. Market segmentation is defined, a market grid for libraries is described, and the segmentation of information services is outlined. A 16-item reference list is…

  10. The World Wide Web: a review of an emerging internet-based technology for the distribution of biomedical information.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, H J; Lomax, E C; Polonkey, S E

    1996-01-01

    The Internet is rapidly evolving from a resource used primarily by the research community to a true global information network offering a wide range of databases and services. This evolution presents many opportunities for improved access to biomedical information, but Internet-based resources have often been difficult for the non-expert to develop and use. The World Wide Web (WWW) supports an inexpensive, easy-to-use, cross-platform, graphic interface to the Internet that may radically alter the way we retrieve and disseminate medical data. This paper summarizes the Internet and hypertext origins of the WWW, reviews WWW-specific technologies, and describes current and future applications of this technology in medicine and medical informatics. The paper also includes an appendix of useful biomedical WWW servers. PMID:8750386

  11. Total Quality Management in Information Services. Information Services Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Guy

    Information services managers have a responsibility to provide the best information delivery possible. The basic principles of total quality management can be used by information professionals to help justify library funding through the creation of an environment where customer-patron satisfaction is paramount. This book reveals how to apply the…

  12. Down syndrome screening information in midwifery practices in the Netherlands: Strategies to integrate biomedical information.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Sophia

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to analyse counselling with regard to prenatal screening in midwifery consultations in the Netherlands where a national prenatal screening programme has only existed since 2007, after years of social and political debates. The methodology is based on in situ observations of 25 counselling consultations in four midwifery practices in two main cities in the Netherlands. The results of this study show that, since midwives are obliged to offer information on Down syndrome screening to all pregnant women (2007), they have to deal with the communication of medical screening information using biostatistical concepts to explain risks, calculations, probabilities and chromosomal anomalies. In order to avoid the risk of medicalization of their consultation, midwives develop strategies that allow them to integrate this new biomedical discourse while maintaining their low medicalized approach of midwife-led care. One of their main strategies is to switch from 'alarming' biomedical messages to 'reassuring words' in order to manage the anxiety induced by the information and to keep the control over their low medicalized consultation. They also tend to distance themselves from the obligation to talk about screening. The way midwives handle these counselling consultations allows them to respect their obligation to propose information, and to remain faithful to their struggle to protect the natural process of pregnancy as well as their professional autonomy. PMID:25504473

  13. Heroin. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    The document presents a collection of articles about heroin. Article 1 provides general information on heroin identification, drug dependence, effects of abuse, cost, source of supply, and penalties for illegal heroin use. Article 2 gives statistical information on heroin-related deaths in the District of Columbia between 1971 and 1982. Article 3…

  14. SOA-based digital library services and composition in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xia; Liu, Enjie; Clapworthy, Gordon J; Viceconti, Marco; Testi, Debora

    2012-06-01

    Carefully collected, high-quality data are crucial in biomedical visualization, and it is important that the user community has ready access to both this data and the high-performance computing resources needed by the complex, computational algorithms that will process it. Biological researchers generally require data, tools and algorithms from multiple providers to achieve their goals. This paper illustrates our response to the problems that result from this. The Living Human Digital Library (LHDL) project presented in this paper has taken advantage of Web Services to build a biomedical digital library infrastructure that allows clinicians and researchers not only to preserve, trace and share data resources, but also to collaborate at the data-processing level. PMID:20846740

  15. New Developments in Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Lois, Ed.

    The purpose of this conference was to: (1) improve reference and research library resources and services within its area by identifying, sharing and developing such resources and services and (2) further inter-library cooperation, communication and transportation of materials within the area of the Council. Aware that many information needs exist…

  16. Strategies for Disseminating Information on Biomedical Research on Autism to Hispanic Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lajonchere, Clara M.; Wheeler, Barbara Y.; Valente, Thomas W.; Kreutzer, Cary; Munson, Aron; Narayanan, Shrikanth; Kazemzadeh, Abe; Cruz, Roxana; Martinez, Irene; Schrager, Sheree M.; Schweitzer, Lisa; Chklovski, Tara; Hwang, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Low income Hispanic families experience multiple barriers to accessing evidence-based information on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). This study utilized a mixed-strategy intervention to create access to information in published bio-medical research articles on ASD by distilling the content into parent-friendly English- and Spanish-language ASD…

  17. Information Services Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherratt, Christine S.; And Others

    In 1991-1992, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Libraries conducted an Information Services Study with support from the Office of the Provost. Its purpose was to study how faculty, research staff, and students in three disciplines on campus gather information for their work. Members of the departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences,…

  18. Information Services for Cultural Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masling, Charles

    1984-01-01

    Describes Houston Public Library's nontraditional programs for cultural minorities which address four areas of library services: outreach, information and referral, and neighborhood information centers; foreign language collection development; coordinated programming; and adult basic education. Ethnic groups that constitute the library's clientele…

  19. Pricing Information Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, H. E., III

    1981-01-01

    Outlines several approaches to the establishment of prices for information products and services by the administrators of libraries and information centers, including optimization, pricing to achieve organizational objectives, pricing for market structures, and types of market structure pricing systems. A reference list is included. (JL)

  20. NASA Ames Research Center R and D Services Directorate Biomedical Systems Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollitt, J.; Flynn, K.

    1999-01-01

    The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate teams with NASA, other government agencies and/or industry investigators for the development, design, fabrication, manufacturing and qualification testing of space-flight and ground-based experiment hardware for biomedical and general aerospace applications. In recent years, biomedical research hardware and software has been developed to support space-flight and ground-based experiment needs including the E 132 Biotelemetry system for the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF), E 100 Neurolab neuro-vestibular investigation systems, the Autogenic Feedback Systems, and the Standard Interface Glove Box (SIGB) experiment workstation module. Centrifuges, motion simulators, habitat design, environmental control systems, and other unique experiment modules and fixtures have also been developed. A discussion of engineered systems and capabilities will be provided to promote understanding of possibilities for future system designs in biomedical applications. In addition, an overview of existing engineered products will be shown. Examples of hardware and literature that demonstrate the organization's capabilities will be displayed. The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate is available to support the development of new hardware and software systems or adaptation of existing systems to meet the needs of academic, commercial/industrial, and government research requirements. The Ames R&D Services Directorate can provide specialized support for: System concept definition and feasibility Mathematical modeling and simulation of system performance Prototype hardware development Hardware and software design Data acquisition systems Graphical user interface development Motion control design Hardware fabrication and high-fidelity machining Composite materials development and application design Electronic/electrical system design and fabrication System performance verification testing and qualification.

  1. The anatomy of a World Wide Web library service: the BONES demonstration project. Biomedically Oriented Navigator of Electronic Services.

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, E H

    1995-01-01

    In 1994, the John A. Prior Health Sciences Library at Ohio State University began to develop a World Wide Web demonstration project, the Biomedically Oriented Navigator of Electronic Services (BONES). The initial intent of BONES was to facilitate the health professional's access to Internet resources by organizing them in a systematic manner. The project not only met this goal but also helped identify the resources needed to launch a full-scale Web library service. This paper discusses the tasks performed and resources used in the development of BONES and describes the creation and organization of documents on the BONES Web server. The paper also discusses the outcomes of the project and the impact on the library's staff and services. PMID:8547903

  2. Access to Biomedical Information: The Unified Medical Language System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the development of a Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) by the National Library of Medicine that will retrieve and integrate information from a variety of information resources. Highlights include the metathesaurus; the UMLS semantic network; semantic locality; information sources map; evaluation of the metathesaurus; future…

  3. Government Services Information Infrastructure Management

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallini, J.S.; Aiken, R.J.

    1995-04-01

    The Government Services Information Infrastructure (GSII) is that portion of the NII used to link Government and its services, enables virtual agency concepts, protects privacy, and supports emergency preparedness needs. The GSII is comprised of the supporting telecommunications technologies, network and information services infrastructure and the applications that use these. The GSII is an enlightened attempt by the Clinton/Gore Administration to form a virtual government crossing agency boundaries to interoperate more closely with industry and with the public to greatly improve the delivery of government services. The GSII and other private sector efforts, will have a significant impact on the design, development, and deployment of the NII, even if only through the procurement of such services. The Federal Government must adopt new mechanisms and new paradigms for the management of the GSII, including improved acquisition and operation of GSII components in order to maximize benefits. Government requirements and applications will continue to evolv. The requirements from government services and users of form affinity groups that more accurately and effectively define these common requirements, that drive the adoption and use of industry standards, and that provide a significant technology marketplace.

  4. Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center (BCTIC). Progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, Jane

    1980-07-30

    The operations and activities of the Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center (BCTIC) for the period 8 April 1980 to 30 July 1980 are summarized. These include mailing list update, software package preparation, software implementation, quality control of software, and Society of Nuclear Medicine support. (ACR)

  5. Music Information Services System (MISS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Paladugu V.

    Music Information Services System (MISS) was developed at the Eastern Illinois University Library to manage the sound recording collection. Operating in a batch mode, MISS keeps track of the inventory of sound recordings, generates necessary catalogs to facilitate the use of the sound recordings, and provides specialized bibliographies of sound…

  6. Recognizing names in biomedical texts using mutual information independence model and SVM plus sigmoid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G D

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we present a biomedical name recognition system, called PowerBioNE. In order to deal with the special phenomena in the biomedical domain, various evidential features are proposed and integrated through a mutual information independence model (MIIM). In addition, a support vector machine (SVM) plus sigmoid is proposed to resolve the data sparseness problem in the MIIM. In this way, the data sparseness problem in MIIM-based biomedical name recognition can be resolved effectively and a biomedical name recognition system with better performance and better portability can be achieved. Finally, we present two post-processing modules to deal with the nested entity name and abbreviation phenomena in the biomedical domain to further improve the performance. Evaluation shows that our system achieves F-measures of 69.1 and 71.2 on the 23 classes of GENIA V1.1 and V3.0, respectively. In particular, our system achieves an F-measure of 77.8 on the "protein" class of GENIA V3.0. It also shows that our system outperforms the best-reported system on GENIA V1.1 and V3.0. PMID:16112894

  7. [Biomedical information on the internet using search engines. A one-year trial].

    PubMed

    Corrao, Salvatore; Leone, Francesco; Arnone, Sabrina

    2004-01-01

    The internet is a communication medium and content distributor that provide information in the general sense but it could be of great utility regarding as the search and retrieval of biomedical information. Search engines represent a great deal to rapidly find information on the net. However, we do not know whether general search engines and meta-search ones are reliable in order to find useful and validated biomedical information. The aim of our study was to verify the reproducibility of a search by key-words (pediatric or evidence) using 9 international search engines and 1 meta-search engine at the baseline and after a one year period. We analysed the first 20 citations as output of each searching. We evaluated the formal quality of Web-sites and their domain extensions. Moreover, we compared the output of each search at the start of this study and after a one year period and we considered as a criterion of reliability the number of Web-sites cited again. We found some interesting results that are reported throughout the text. Our findings point out an extreme dynamicity of the information on the Web and, for this reason, we advice a great caution when someone want to use search and meta-search engines as a tool for searching and retrieve reliable biomedical information. On the other hand, some search and meta-search engines could be very useful as a first step searching for defining better a search and, moreover, for finding institutional Web-sites too. This paper allows to know a more conscious approach to the internet biomedical information universe. PMID:15032337

  8. IAEA reorganizes nuclear information services

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.

    2012-08-15

    As part of an overall restructuring of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Department of Nuclear Energy, the agency has established the Nuclear Information Section (NIS). The restructuring, recently announced by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano, also includes the creation of a separate Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) Section, as demand for assistance in this area is growing among member countries. According to the NIS Web site, 'This restructuring and the creation of the NIS provides an opportunity for further enhancing existing information products and services and introducing new ones-all with an eye towards advancing higher organizational efficiency and effectiveness.'

  9. Scientists, Information Seeking, and Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Seggern, Marilyn

    1995-01-01

    Discusses implications for restructuring library reference services suggested by information needs and information-seeking behavior of scientists. Highlights include scientific and informal communication, accessibility and creativity, and a holistic approach to user-centered services. (AEF)

  10. Strategies for Disseminating Information on Biomedical Research on Autism to Hispanic Parents.

    PubMed

    Lajonchere, Clara M; Wheeler, Barbara Y; Valente, Thomas W; Kreutzer, Cary; Munson, Aron; Narayanan, Shrikanth; Kazemzadeh, Abe; Cruz, Roxana; Martinez, Irene; Schrager, Sheree M; Schweitzer, Lisa; Chklovski, Tara; Hwang, Darryl

    2016-03-01

    Low income Hispanic families experience multiple barriers to accessing evidence-based information on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). This study utilized a mixed-strategy intervention to create access to information in published bio-medical research articles on ASD by distilling the content into parent-friendly English- and Spanish-language ASD Science Briefs and presenting them to participants using two socially-oriented dissemination methods. There was a main effect for short-term knowledge gains associated with the Science Briefs but no effect for the dissemination method. After 5 months, participants reported utilizing the information learned and 90% wanted to read more Science Briefs. These preliminary findings highlight the potential benefits of distilling biomedical research articles on ASD into parent-friendly educational products for currently underserved Hispanic parents. PMID:26563948

  11. Organization of Biomedical Data for Collaborative Scientific Research: A Research Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L.

    2010-01-01

    Biomedical researchers often work with massive, detailed and heterogeneous datasets. These datasets raise new challenges of information organization and management for scientific interpretation, as they demand much of the researchers’ time and attention. The current study investigated the nature of the problems that researchers face when dealing with such data. Four major problems identified with existing biomedical scientific information management methods were related to data organization, data sharing, collaboration, and publications. Therefore, there is a compelling need to develop an efficient and user-friendly information management system to handle the biomedical research data. This study evaluated the implementation of an information management system, which was introduced as part of the collaborative research to increase scientific productivity in a research laboratory. Laboratory members seemed to exhibit frustration during the implementation process. However, empirical findings revealed that they gained new knowledge and completed specified tasks while working together with the new system. Hence, researchers are urged to persist and persevere when dealing with any new technology, including an information management system in a research laboratory environment. PMID:20543892

  12. A System for Information Management in BioMedical Studies—SIMBioMS

    PubMed Central

    Krestyaninova, Maria; Zarins, Andris; Viksna, Juris; Kurbatova, Natalja; Rucevskis, Peteris; Neogi, Sudeshna Guha; Gostev, Mike; Perheentupa, Teemu; Knuuttila, Juha; Barrett, Amy; Lappalainen, Ilkka; Rung, Johan; Podnieks, Karlis; Sarkans, Ugis; McCarthy, Mark I; Brazma, Alvis

    2009-01-01

    Summary: SIMBioMS is a web-based open source software system for managing data and information in biomedical studies. It provides a solution for the collection, storage, management and retrieval of information about research subjects and biomedical samples, as well as experimental data obtained using a range of high-throughput technologies, including gene expression, genotyping, proteomics and metabonomics. The system can easily be customized and has proven to be successful in several large-scale multi-site collaborative projects. It is compatible with emerging functional genomics data standards and provides data import and export in accepted standard formats. Protocols for transferring data to durable archives at the European Bioinformatics Institute have been implemented. Availability: The source code, documentation and initialization scripts are available at http://simbioms.org. Contact: support@simbioms.org; mariak@ebi.ac.uk PMID:19633095

  13. Enabling clinicians, researchers, and educators to build custom web-based biomedical information systems.

    PubMed

    Jakobovits, R; Brinkley, J F; Rosse, C; Weinberger, E

    2001-01-01

    We describe an open-source toolkit that enables clinicians, researchers, and educators to build their own web-based biomedical information systems. The Web Interfacing Repository Manager (Wirm) is a high-level application server aimed at medical professionals, allowing them to create individually tailored systems for managing their multimedia data and knowledge. We provide an overview of the features of Wirm, explaining how they meet the requirements for supporting biomedical information management, and describe four applications that are currently being developed with Wirm: MyPACS, a teaching file authoring system for radiologists, Fathom, an experiment management system for natural language processing, the Digital Anatomist Repository, an image archiving tool for medical schools, and Ontolog, a browser for medical vocabularies. PMID:11825195

  14. Method for Detecting Core Malware Sites Related to Biomedical Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohoon; Choi, Donghee; Jin, Jonghyun

    2015-01-01

    Most advanced persistent threat attacks target web users through malicious code within landing (exploit) or distribution sites. There is an urgent need to block the affected websites. Attacks on biomedical information systems are no exception to this issue. In this paper, we present a method for locating malicious websites that attempt to attack biomedical information systems. Our approach uses malicious code crawling to rearrange websites in the order of their risk index by analyzing the centrality between malware sites and proactively eliminates the root of these sites by finding the core-hub node, thereby reducing unnecessary security policies. In particular, we dynamically estimate the risk index of the affected websites by analyzing various centrality measures and converting them into a single quantified vector. On average, the proactive elimination of core malicious websites results in an average improvement in zero-day attack detection of more than 20%. PMID:25821511

  15. Method for detecting core malware sites related to biomedical information systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohoon; Choi, Donghee; Jin, Jonghyun

    2015-01-01

    Most advanced persistent threat attacks target web users through malicious code within landing (exploit) or distribution sites. There is an urgent need to block the affected websites. Attacks on biomedical information systems are no exception to this issue. In this paper, we present a method for locating malicious websites that attempt to attack biomedical information systems. Our approach uses malicious code crawling to rearrange websites in the order of their risk index by analyzing the centrality between malware sites and proactively eliminates the root of these sites by finding the core-hub node, thereby reducing unnecessary security policies. In particular, we dynamically estimate the risk index of the affected websites by analyzing various centrality measures and converting them into a single quantified vector. On average, the proactive elimination of core malicious websites results in an average improvement in zero-day attack detection of more than 20%. PMID:25821511

  16. BioInfer: a corpus for information extraction in the biomedical domain

    PubMed Central

    Pyysalo, Sampo; Ginter, Filip; Heimonen, Juho; Björne, Jari; Boberg, Jorma; Järvinen, Jouni; Salakoski, Tapio

    2007-01-01

    Background Lately, there has been a great interest in the application of information extraction methods to the biomedical domain, in particular, to the extraction of relationships of genes, proteins, and RNA from scientific publications. The development and evaluation of such methods requires annotated domain corpora. Results We present BioInfer (Bio Information Extraction Resource), a new public resource providing an annotated corpus of biomedical English. We describe an annotation scheme capturing named entities and their relationships along with a dependency analysis of sentence syntax. We further present ontologies defining the types of entities and relationships annotated in the corpus. Currently, the corpus contains 1100 sentences from abstracts of biomedical research articles annotated for relationships, named entities, as well as syntactic dependencies. Supporting software is provided with the corpus. The corpus is unique in the domain in combining these annotation types for a single set of sentences, and in the level of detail of the relationship annotation. Conclusion We introduce a corpus targeted at protein, gene, and RNA relationships which serves as a resource for the development of information extraction systems and their components such as parsers and domain analyzers. The corpus will be maintained and further developed with a current version being available at . PMID:17291334

  17. Implementation and management of a biomedical observation dictionary in a large healthcare information system

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves; Cormont, Sylvie; André, Christophe; Daniel, Christel; Delahousse, Jean; Charlet, Jean; Lepage, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study shows the evolution of a biomedical observation dictionary within the Assistance Publique Hôpitaux Paris (AP-HP), the largest European university hospital group. The different steps are detailed as follows: the dictionary creation, the mapping to logical observation identifier names and codes (LOINC), the integration into a multiterminological management platform and, finally, the implementation in the health information system. Methods AP-HP decided to create a biomedical observation dictionary named AnaBio, to map it to LOINC and to maintain the mapping. A management platform based on methods used for knowledge engineering has been put in place. It aims at integrating AnaBio within the health information system and improving both the quality and stability of the dictionary. Results This new management platform is now active in AP-HP. The AnaBio dictionary is shared by 120 laboratories and currently includes 50 000 codes. The mapping implementation to LOINC reaches 40% of the AnaBio entries and uses 26% of LOINC records. The results of our work validate the choice made to develop a local dictionary aligned with LOINC. Discussion and Conclusions This work constitutes a first step towards a wider use of the platform. The next step will support the entire biomedical production chain, from the clinician prescription, through laboratory tests tracking in the laboratory information system to the communication of results and the use for decision support and biomedical research. In addition, the increase in the mapping implementation to LOINC ensures the interoperability allowing communication with other international health institutions. PMID:23635601

  18. Reinventing information services to increase customer satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, the author presents her view of the role of an information service and proposes means of improving information customer service and satisfaction. The emphasis of the paper is on placing the primary value on the information customer rather than on the information itself. After receiving a request for information, the information service should strive for speed and accuracy of service to provide full-text sources in a language and format convenient to the customer. The author stresses that information professionals need to re-evaluate their roles to correctly assess and rectify customers` information deficiencies.

  19. GILS: The Government Information Locator Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Government Information Locator Service (GILS), designed to help the public identify and acquire federal government information as part of the evolving National Information Infrastructure. Highlights include background information; use of GILS through the Internet; and agency-based information services, including the Government…

  20. Battling the biomedical information explosion: a plan for implementing a quality filtered database.

    PubMed

    Moore, M

    1989-01-01

    In 1980 an article appeared in the Archives of Internal Medicine stating that two-thirds of the studies appearing in the best medical journals contain unwarranted conclusions. In order to deal with the ever increasing mass of biomedical information (termed a "journalistic blastoma" by one editor), IAIMS has extolled the use of quality filters, devices to sort through the literature and sift the good from the bad. The complexity of the task is staggering. Quality is obviously subjective, and its nature raises the question of whether our users can be taught the necessary skills to systematically evaluate the literature. This report is based on a research project that grew into an elective course for medical students at Texas Tech University School of Medicine on "Critical Appraisal of the Biomedical Literature." PMID:10303951

  1. A concept-based interactive biomedical image retrieval approach using visualness and spatial information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md M.; Antani, Sameer K.; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to biomedical image retrieval by mapping image regions to local concepts and represent images in a weighted entropy-based concept feature space. The term concept refers to perceptually distinguishable visual patches that are identified locally in image regions and can be mapped to a glossary of imaging terms. Further, the visual significance (e.g., visualness) of concepts is measured as Shannon entropy of pixel values in image patches and is used to refine the feature vector. Moreover, the system can assist user in interactively select a Region-Of-Interest (ROI) and search for similar image ROIs. Further, a spatial verification step is used as a post-processing step to improve retrieval results based on location information. The hypothesis that such approaches would improve biomedical image retrieval, is validated through experiments on a data set of 450 lung CT images extracted from journal articles from four different collections.

  2. Appropriate information: new products and services.

    PubMed

    Avriel, D; Aronson, B; Bertrand, I

    1993-01-01

    Effective health information services require action on three major levels: identifying and acquiring appropriate resources; applying appropriate methodologies for management of information and its communication; and stimulating local initiatives and applications. WHO's Programme of Library and Health Literature Services proposes its methodologies and products for creating and improving effective information services to health workers. PMID:8185798

  3. 1 CFR 3.1 - Information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Information services. 3.1 Section 3.1 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL SERVICES TO THE PUBLIC § 3.1 Information services. Except in cases where the time required would be excessive, information concerning...

  4. 1 CFR 3.1 - Information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Information services. 3.1 Section 3.1 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL SERVICES TO THE PUBLIC § 3.1 Information services. Except in cases where the time required would be excessive, information concerning...

  5. 1 CFR 3.1 - Information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Information services. 3.1 Section 3.1 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL SERVICES TO THE PUBLIC § 3.1 Information services. Except in cases where the time required would be excessive, information concerning...

  6. 1 CFR 3.1 - Information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information services. 3.1 Section 3.1 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL SERVICES TO THE PUBLIC § 3.1 Information services. Except in cases where the time required would be excessive, information concerning...

  7. 1 CFR 3.1 - Information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Information services. 3.1 Section 3.1 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER GENERAL SERVICES TO THE PUBLIC § 3.1 Information services. Except in cases where the time required would be excessive, information concerning...

  8. Starting the data conversation: informing data services at an academic health sciences library*

    PubMed Central

    Read, Kevin B.; Surkis, Alisa; Larson, Catherine; McCrillis, Aileen; Graff, Alice; Nicholson, Joey; Xu, Juanchan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The research obtained information to plan data-related products and services. Methods Biomedical researchers in an academic medical center were selected using purposive sampling and interviewed using open-ended questions based on a literature review. Interviews were conducted until saturation was achieved. Results Interview responses informed library planners about researchers’ key data issues. Conclusions This approach proved valuable for planning data management products and services and raising library visibility among clients in the research data realm. PMID:26213504

  9. What is biomedical informatics?

    PubMed Central

    Bernstam, Elmer V.; Smith, Jack W.; Johnson, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical informatics lacks a clear and theoretically grounded definition. Many proposed definitions focus on data, information, and knowledge, but do not provide an adequate definition of these terms. Leveraging insights from the philosophy of information, we define informatics as the science of information, where information is data plus meaning. Biomedical informatics is the science of information as applied to or studied in the context of biomedicine. Defining the object of study of informatics as data plus meaning clearly distinguishes the field from related fields, such as computer science, statistics and biomedicine, which have different objects of study. The emphasis on data plus meaning also suggests that biomedical informatics problems tend to be difficult when they deal with concepts that are hard to capture using formal, computational definitions. In other words, problems where meaning must be considered are more difficult than problems where manipulating data without regard for meaning is sufficient. Furthermore, the definition implies that informatics research, teaching, and service should focus on biomedical information as data plus meaning rather than only computer applications in biomedicine. PMID:19683067

  10. Information Services of Maritime Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazov, Atanas; Stefanov, Asen

    2015-04-01

    The ultimate goal of modern oceanography is an end user oriented product. Beneficiaries are the governmental services, coast-based enterprises and research institutions that make use of the products generated by operational oceanography. Direct potential users and customers are coastal managers, shipping, offshore industry, ports and harbours, fishing, tourism and recreation industry, and scientific community. Indirect beneficiaries, through climate forecasting based on ocean observations, are food, energy, water and medical suppliers. Five general classes of users for data and information are specified: (1) operational users that analyze the collected data and produce different forecasts serving to impose regulation measures; (2) authorities and managers of large-scale projects needing timely oceanographic information, including statistics and climatic trends; (3) industrial enterprises, safety of structures and avoiding of pollution; (4) tourism and recreation related users aiming protection of human health; (5) scientists, engineers, and economists carrying out special researches, strategic design studies, and other investigations to advance the application of marine data. The analysis of information received during the extensive inquiry among all potential end users reveals variety of data and information needs encompassing physical, chemical, biological and hydrometeorological observation. Nevertheless, the common requirement concerns development of observing and forecasting systems providing accurate real-time or near-real time data and information supporting decision making and environmental management. Availability of updated information on the actual state as well as forecast for the future changes of marine environment are essential for the success and safety of maritime operations in the offshore industry. For this purpose different systems have been developed to collect data and to produce forecasts on the state of the marine environment and to provide

  11. The University of New Mexico Medical Center Library's Health Information Services Outreach Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Susan B.; And Others

    Begun in 1980, the University of New Mexico Medical Center Library's statewide Outreach Program is a composite of many services and projects designed to meet the medical and health information needs of the state's diverse and scattered population. The only major biomedical library in New Mexico, the Library has built the program on existing…

  12. Informed consent document improvement does not increase patients' comprehension in biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Adeline; Brandt, Christian; Cornu, Catherine; Maison, Patrick; Thalamas, Claire; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    AIMS International guidelines on ethics in biomedical research require that the informed consent of all enrolled participants is obtained. A written document describing the research, the informed consent (IC) document, must be given to all participants by the investigator. Most IC documents are long, containing much information. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the modification of the IC document by a working group or systematic improvement in its lexicosyntactic readability can improve comprehension of the written information given to patients participating in biomedical research. METHODS One hundred and fifty-nine patients were randomized to read one of the three versions of the IC document: unchanged document, document modified using systematic improvement of lexicosyntactic readability and document modified by a working group. RESULTS Neither the improvement in the lexicosyntactic readability, nor the intervention of the working group significantly improved the score of objective comprehension for the subjects included in this study: it was 66.6 (95% confidence interval 64.0, 69.2) for the control group, 68.8 (66.2, 71.4) for the group with the document improved for lexicosyntactic readability and 69.2 (66.0, 72.4) for the group who read the document improved by the working group (P= 0.38). CONCLUSIONS We failed to show that improving IC document comprehension through a lexicosyntactic approach or by a working group leads to better comprehension. PMID:20233193

  13. Telecommunications and Information Services in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarapanoff, Kira; Alvares, Lillian

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the interdependence of telecommunications and information sciences in Brazil. Highlights include new technologies and telecommunications: satellites, fiber optic cables, data communication networks, information superhighways, and cooperative projects; and information services development. (AEF)

  14. 77 FR 37907 - Information Collection; Service Contracting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Information Collection... (OMB) a request to review and approve an extension of a currently approved information collection... collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of functions of the Federal...

  15. Research in Library Reference/Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mary Jo

    1983-01-01

    This review of library reference service research, which focuses on the provision of information in response to questions, covers measurement of reference service, evaluation using unobtrusive techniques, online search services, information needs and uses, the process of asking and answering questions, and artificial intelligence. Eighty-four…

  16. 1 CFR 15.2 - Information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Information services. 15.2 Section 15.2 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PREPARATION, TRANSMITTAL, AND PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS SERVICES TO FEDERAL AGENCIES General § 15.2 Information services. The Director of the...

  17. 1 CFR 15.2 - Information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information services. 15.2 Section 15.2 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PREPARATION, TRANSMITTAL, AND PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS SERVICES TO FEDERAL AGENCIES General § 15.2 Information services. The Director of the...

  18. 1 CFR 15.2 - Information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Information services. 15.2 Section 15.2 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PREPARATION, TRANSMITTAL, AND PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS SERVICES TO FEDERAL AGENCIES General § 15.2 Information services. The Director of the...

  19. Quality Management and Building Government Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Maggie

    1998-01-01

    Discusses serving library-patron needs in terms of customer service and quality control. Highlights include tools for measuring the quality of service (e.g., the SERVQUAL survey), advisory boards or focus groups, library "service statements," changing patron needs, new information formats, and justifying depository library services. (JAK)

  20. Related Services. Alliance Action Information Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Related services" means transportation and any other developmental, corrective or other supportive services that a child needs to benefit from special education. Some children need related services in order to meet the goals in their Individualized Education Program (IEP). This paper presents information about related services.

  1. The University of Washington Health Sciences Library BioCommons: an evolving Northwest biomedical research information support infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Minie, Mark; Bowers, Stuart; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Roberts, Edward; James, Rose A.; Rambo, Neil; Fuller, Sherrilynne

    2006-01-01

    Setting: The University of Washington Health Sciences Libraries and Information Center BioCommons serves the bioinformatics needs of researchers at the university and in the vibrant for-profit and not-for-profit biomedical research sector in the Washington area and region. Program Components: The BioCommons comprises services addressing internal University of Washington, not-for-profit, for-profit, and regional and global clientele. The BioCommons is maintained and administered by the BioResearcher Liaison Team. The BioCommons architecture provides a highly flexible structure for adapting to rapidly changing resources and needs. Evaluation Mechanisms: BioCommons uses Web-based pre- and post-course evaluations and periodic user surveys to assess service effectiveness. Recent surveys indicate substantial usage of BioCommons services and a high level of effectiveness and user satisfaction. Next Steps/Future Directions: BioCommons is developing novel collaborative Web resources to distribute bioinformatics tools and is experimenting with Web-based competency training in bioinformation resource use. PMID:16888667

  2. Leveraging biomedical ontologies and annotation services to organize microbiome data from Mammalian hosts.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2010-01-01

    A better understanding of commensal microbiotic communities ("microbiomes") may provide valuable insights to human health. Towards this goal, an essential step may be the development of approaches to organize data that can enable comparative hypotheses across mammalian microbiomes. The present study explores the feasibility of using existing biomedical informatics resources - especially focusing on those available at the National Center for Biomedical Ontology - to organize microbiome data contained within large sequence repositories, such as GenBank. The results indicate that the Foundational Model of Anatomy and SNOMED CT can be used to organize greater than 90% of the bacterial organisms associated with 10 domesticated mammalian species. The promising findings suggest that the current biomedical informatics infrastructure may be used towards the organizing of microbiome data beyond humans. Furthermore, the results identify key concepts that might be organized into a semantic structure for incorporation into subsequent annotations that could facilitate comparative biomedical hypotheses pertaining to human health. PMID:21347072

  3. Uncertainty in Reference and Information Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanScoy, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Uncertainty is understood as an important component of the information seeking process, but it has not been explored as a component of reference and information service. Method: Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to examine the practitioner perspective of reference and information service for eight academic research…

  4. Deterrents to Information Service for Community Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhegbu, A. N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the impediments to rural information services for community development in Nigeria, including skepticism towards information, poor roads, nonchalance of government officials, and rivalries. Highlights the nature and characteristics of a community and community information needs and services; identifies four components of community…

  5. Modeling and mining term association for improving biomedical information retrieval performance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The growth of the biomedical information requires most information retrieval systems to provide short and specific answers in response to complex user queries. Semantic information in the form of free text that is structured in a way makes it straightforward for humans to read but more difficult for computers to interpret automatically and search efficiently. One of the reasons is that most traditional information retrieval models assume terms are conditionally independent given a document/passage. Therefore, we are motivated to consider term associations within different contexts to help the models understand semantic information and use it for improving biomedical information retrieval performance. Results We propose a term association approach to discover term associations among the keywords from a query. The experiments are conducted on the TREC 2004-2007 Genomics data sets and the TREC 2004 HARD data set. The proposed approach is promising and achieves superiority over the baselines and the GSP results. The parameter settings and different indices are investigated that the sentence-based index produces the best results in terms of the document-level, the word-based index for the best results in terms of the passage-level and the paragraph-based index for the best results in terms of the passage2-level. Furthermore, the best term association results always come from the best baseline. The tuning number k in the proposed recursive re-ranking algorithm is discussed and locally optimized to be 10. Conclusions First, modelling term association for improving biomedical information retrieval using factor analysis, is one of the major contributions in our work. Second, the experiments confirm that term association considering co-occurrence and dependency among the keywords can produce better results than the baselines treating the keywords independently. Third, the baselines are re-ranked according to the importance and reliance of latent factors behind

  6. Visualization of the Meridian System Based on Biomedical Information about Acupuncture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Seon; Lee, Soon-Ho; Kim, Song-Yi; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon; Chae, Younbyoung

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the concept of the meridian system is closely connected with the treatment effects of acupuncture, and it serves as an empirical reference system in the clinical setting. Understanding the meridian channels would be a first step in enhancing the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment. To understand the relationship between the location of the disease and the sites of relevant acupoints, we investigated acupuncture treatment regimens for low-back pain in 37 clinical studies. We found that the most frequently used acupoints in the treatment of low-back pain were BL23 (51%), BL25 (43%), BL24 (32%), BL40 (32%), BL60 (32%), GB30 (32%), BL26 (28%), BL32 (28%), and GB34 (21%). For the example of low-back pain, we visualized the biomedical information (frequency rates) about acupuncture treatment on the meridians of a three-dimensional (3D) model of the human body. We found that both local and distal acupoints were used to treat low-back pain in clinical trials based on the meridian theory. We suggest a new model for the visualization of a data-driven 3D meridian system of biomedical information about the meridians and acupoints. These findings may be helpful in understanding the meridian system and revealing the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment. PMID:23781270

  7. Assessing the impact of case sensitivity and term information gain on biomedical concept recognition.

    PubMed

    Groza, Tudor; Verspoor, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Concept recognition (CR) is a foundational task in the biomedical domain. It supports the important process of transforming unstructured resources into structured knowledge. To date, several CR approaches have been proposed, most of which focus on a particular set of biomedical ontologies. Their underlying mechanisms vary from shallow natural language processing and dictionary lookup to specialized machine learning modules. However, no prior approach considers the case sensitivity characteristics and the term distribution of the underlying ontology on the CR process. This article proposes a framework that models the CR process as an information retrieval task in which both case sensitivity and the information gain associated with tokens in lexical representations (e.g., term labels, synonyms) are central components of a strategy for generating term variants. The case sensitivity of a given ontology is assessed based on the distribution of so-called case sensitive tokens in its terms, while information gain is modelled using a combination of divergence from randomness and mutual information. An extensive evaluation has been carried out using the CRAFT corpus. Experimental results show that case sensitivity awareness leads to an increase of up to 0.07 F1 against a non-case sensitive baseline on the Protein Ontology and GO Cellular Component. Similarly, the use of information gain leads to an increase of up to 0.06 F1 against a standard baseline in the case of GO Biological Process and Molecular Function and GO Cellular Component. Overall, subject to the underlying token distribution, these methods lead to valid complementary strategies for augmenting term label sets to improve concept recognition. PMID:25790125

  8. Assessing the Impact of Case Sensitivity and Term Information Gain on Biomedical Concept Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Groza, Tudor; Verspoor, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Concept recognition (CR) is a foundational task in the biomedical domain. It supports the important process of transforming unstructured resources into structured knowledge. To date, several CR approaches have been proposed, most of which focus on a particular set of biomedical ontologies. Their underlying mechanisms vary from shallow natural language processing and dictionary lookup to specialized machine learning modules. However, no prior approach considers the case sensitivity characteristics and the term distribution of the underlying ontology on the CR process. This article proposes a framework that models the CR process as an information retrieval task in which both case sensitivity and the information gain associated with tokens in lexical representations (e.g., term labels, synonyms) are central components of a strategy for generating term variants. The case sensitivity of a given ontology is assessed based on the distribution of so-called case sensitive tokens in its terms, while information gain is modelled using a combination of divergence from randomness and mutual information. An extensive evaluation has been carried out using the CRAFT corpus. Experimental results show that case sensitivity awareness leads to an increase of up to 0.07 F1 against a non-case sensitive baseline on the Protein Ontology and GO Cellular Component. Similarly, the use of information gain leads to an increase of up to 0.06 F1 against a standard baseline in the case of GO Biological Process and Molecular Function and GO Cellular Component. Overall, subject to the underlying token distribution, these methods lead to valid complementary strategies for augmenting term label sets to improve concept recognition. PMID:25790125

  9. Knowledge-based Method for Determining the Meaning of Ambiguous Biomedical Terms Using Information Content Measures of Similarity

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, Bridget T.; Pedersen, Ted; Liu, Ying; Melton, Genevieve B.; Pakhomov, Serguei V.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel knowledge-based word sense disambiguation method that determines the sense of an ambiguous word in biomedical text using semantic similarity or relatedness measures. These measures quantify the degree of similarity between concepts in the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). The objective of this work was to develop a method that can disambiguate terms in biomedical text by exploiting similarity information extracted from the UMLS and to evaluate the efficacy of information content-based semantic similarity measures, which augment path-based information with probabilities derived from biomedical corpora. We show that information content-based measures obtain a higher disambiguation accuracy than path-based measures because they weight the path based on where it exists in the taxonomy coupled with the probability of the concepts occurring in a corpus of text. PMID:22195148

  10. Evaluating Biomedical Enhancement Research: Assessing Risk & Benefit and Obtaining Informed Consent

    PubMed Central

    Mehlman, Maxwell J.; Berg, Jessica W.

    2013-01-01

    There are two primary human subject protections: assessing and comparing the risks and potential benefits of proposed research, and obtaining potential subjects’ informed consent. While there has been extensive discussion in the literature on these two aspects, no attention has been paid to whether the processes should be different when the objective of an experimental biomedical intervention is to improve individual performance or capacity (“enhancement research”) rather than to prevent, cure, or mitigate disease (“health-oriented research”). This essay examines how both assessment of risks and benefits, and obtaining informed consent in an enhancement experiment might differ from the approaches used in health-oriented investigations, and considers appropriate protections for subjects in enhancement research. PMID:18840248

  11. 76 FR 1593 - Information Collection; Measurement Service Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... Farm Service Agency Information Collection; Measurement Service Records AGENCY: Farm Service Agency... organizations on an extension of a currently approved information collection associated with the Measurement... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Description of Information Collection Title: Measurement Service Records. OMB...

  12. 78 FR 61337 - National Technical Information Service Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... National Technical Information Service National Technical Information Service Advisory Board AGENCY: National Technical Information Service, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of open meeting SUMMARY: This notice announces the next meeting of the National Technical Information Service Advisory Board (the Advisory...

  13. 78 FR 16255 - National Technical Information Service Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... National Technical Information Service National Technical Information Service Advisory Board AGENCY: National Technical Information Service, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces the next meeting of the National Technical Information Service Advisory Board (the Advisory...

  14. Comparison of Online Agricultural Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; Patterson, Richard

    1984-01-01

    Outlines major online agricultural information services--agricultural databases, databases with agricultural services, educational databases in agriculture--noting services provided, access to the database, and costs. Benefits of online agricultural database sources (availability of agricultural marketing, weather, commodity prices, management…

  15. Automobile Service Information in the Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankl, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    Advocates providing automobile repair and service information in public libraries, and discusses collection development issues, reference services, and problems in making repair manuals available. Describes the collection and services for patrons in Tacoma Public Library and results of a survey of other public libraries holding automobile repair…

  16. An intrapreneurial approach to integrating information production services into an academic medical center library.

    PubMed Central

    Lemkau, H L; Burrows, S; Stolz, F

    1991-01-01

    The many challenges faced by health sciences libraries of all types and sizes often require innovative solutions. When an innovative solution involves calculated risk taking, the approach is called intrapreneurial. At the University of Miami School of Medicine, an intrapreneurial approach solved the fiscal problems of the biomedical communications unit. The Louis Calder Memorial Library inherited these problems when the Department of the Library and Biomedical Communications was created in the early 1980s. In this paper, two intrapreneurial programs are described, and the benefit and suitability of this management style to information services are demonstrated. PMID:1884080

  17. An intrapreneurial approach to integrating information production services into an academic medical center library.

    PubMed

    Lemkau, H L; Burrows, S; Stolz, F

    1991-07-01

    The many challenges faced by health sciences libraries of all types and sizes often require innovative solutions. When an innovative solution involves calculated risk taking, the approach is called intrapreneurial. At the University of Miami School of Medicine, an intrapreneurial approach solved the fiscal problems of the biomedical communications unit. The Louis Calder Memorial Library inherited these problems when the Department of the Library and Biomedical Communications was created in the early 1980s. In this paper, two intrapreneurial programs are described, and the benefit and suitability of this management style to information services are demonstrated. PMID:1884080

  18. Information Services in the International Network Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepworth, Mark E.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the internationalism of the network marketplace through case studies of the London Stock Exchange and I. P. Sharp Associates, a Canadian computer service bureau. Discussion focuses on the importance of transnational computer networks to the production of information services and marketplace expansion, and global information policy issues.…

  19. Intranets: Considerations for the Information Services Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Paul

    1997-01-01

    This article identifies benefits of using Internet technologies in an organization's intranet or internal information system: ease-of-use, one interface, implementation cost, access, information services (flat content and interactive intranets), support desks (via Web services and e-mail), document management. Discusses the impact of intranets on…

  20. Issues in collecting, processing and storing human tissues and associated information to support biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Grizzle, William E.; Bell, Walter C.; Sexton, Katherine C.

    2012-01-01

    The availability of human tissues to support biomedical research is critical to advance translational research focused on identifying and characterizing approaches to individualized (personalized) medical care. Providing such tissues relies on three acceptable models – a tissue banking model, a prospective collection model and a combination of these two models. An unacceptable model is the “catch as catch can” model in which tissues are collected, processed and stored without goals or a plan or without standard operating procedures, i.e., portions of tissues are collected as available and processed and stored when time permits. In the tissue banking model, aliquots of tissues are collected according to SOPs. Usually specific sizes and types of tissues are collected and processed (e.g., 0.1 gm of breast cancer frozen in OCT). Using the banking model, tissues may be collected that may not be used and/or do not meet specific needs of investigators; however, at the time of an investigator request, tissues are readily available as is clinical information including clinical outcomes. In the model of prospective collection, tissues are collected based upon investigator requests including specific requirements of investigators. For example, the investigator may request that two 0.15 gm matching aliquots of breast cancer be minced while fresh, put in RPMI media with and without fetal calf serum, cooled to 4°C and shipped to the investigator on wet ice. Thus, the tissues collected prospectively meet investigator needs, all collected specimens are utilized and storage of specimens is minimized; however, investigators must wait until specimens are collected, and if needed, for clinical outcome. The operation of any tissue repository requires well trained and dedicated personnel. A quality assurance program is required which provides quality control information on the diagnosis of a specimen that is matched specifically to the specimen provided to an investigator instead

  1. Architecture for biomedical multimedia information delivery on the World Wide Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Goh, Gin-Hua; Neve, Leif; Thoma, George R.

    1997-10-01

    Research engineers at the National Library of Medicine are building a prototype system for the delivery of multimedia biomedical information on the World Wide Web. This paper discuses the architecture and design considerations for the system, which will be used initially to make images and text from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) publicly available. We categorized our analysis as follows: (1) fundamental software tools: we analyzed trade-offs among use of conventional HTML/CGI, X Window Broadway, and Java; (2) image delivery: we examined the use of unconventional TCP transmission methods; (3) database manager and database design: we discuss the capabilities and planned use of the Informix object-relational database manager and the planned schema for the HNANES database; (4) storage requirements for our Sun server; (5) user interface considerations; (6) the compatibility of the system with other standard research and analysis tools; (7) image display: we discuss considerations for consistent image display for end users. Finally, we discuss the scalability of the system in terms of incorporating larger or more databases of similar data, and the extendibility of the system for supporting content-based retrieval of biomedical images. The system prototype is called the Web-based Medical Information Retrieval System. An early version was built as a Java applet and tested on Unix, PC, and Macintosh platforms. This prototype used the MiniSQL database manager to do text queries on a small database of records of participants in the second NHANES survey. The full records and associated x-ray images were retrievable and displayable on a standard Web browser. A second version has now been built, also a Java applet, using the MySQL database manager.

  2. 78 FR 14822 - Proposed Information Collection; National Park Service Concessions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; National Park Service Concessions AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: We (National Park Service, NPS... Madonna L. Baucum, Information Collection Clearance Officer, National Park Service, 1201 I Street NW.,...

  3. 77 FR 45328 - Information Collection; Measurement Service Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Farm Service Agency Information Collection; Measurement Service Records AGENCY... Measurement Service Records. DATES: We will consider comments that we receive by October 1, 2012. ADDRESSES... INFORMATION: Description of Information Collection Title: Measurement Service Records. OMB Control...

  4. The Government Information Locator Service (GILS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Eliot

    1996-01-01

    Presents a vision of how the agency-based GILS (Government Information Locator Service) will be implemented to help the public locate and access information throughout the Federal Government. Topics include policy context, the user perspective, data and information, the provider perspective, design principles, functional requirements, and GILS…

  5. Generic Information Can Retrieve Known Biological Associations: Implications for Biomedical Knowledge Discovery

    PubMed Central

    van Haagen, Herman H. H. B. M.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; Mons, Barend; Schultes, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Weighted semantic networks built from text-mined literature can be used to retrieve known protein-protein or gene-disease associations, and have been shown to anticipate associations years before they are explicitly stated in the literature. Our text-mining system recognizes over 640,000 biomedical concepts: some are specific (i.e., names of genes or proteins) others generic (e.g., ‘Homo sapiens’). Generic concepts may play important roles in automated information retrieval, extraction, and inference but may also result in concept overload and confound retrieval and reasoning with low-relevance or even spurious links. Here, we attempted to optimize the retrieval performance for protein-protein interactions (PPI) by filtering generic concepts (node filtering) or links to generic concepts (edge filtering) from a weighted semantic network. First, we defined metrics based on network properties that quantify the specificity of concepts. Then using these metrics, we systematically filtered generic information from the network while monitoring retrieval performance of known protein-protein interactions. We also systematically filtered specific information from the network (inverse filtering), and assessed the retrieval performance of networks composed of generic information alone. Results Filtering generic or specific information induced a two-phase response in retrieval performance: initially the effects of filtering were minimal but beyond a critical threshold network performance suddenly drops. Contrary to expectations, networks composed exclusively of generic information demonstrated retrieval performance comparable to unfiltered networks that also contain specific concepts. Furthermore, an analysis using individual generic concepts demonstrated that they can effectively support the retrieval of known protein-protein interactions. For instance the concept “binding” is indicative for PPI retrieval and the concept “mutation abnormality” is

  6. Meeting Report from the Second "Minimum Information for Biological and Biomedical Investigations" (MIBBI) workshop.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Carsten; Field, Dawn; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Taylor, Chris; Aerts, Jan; Binns, Nigel; Blake, Andrew; Britten, Cedrik M; de Marco, Ario; Fostel, Jennifer; Gaudet, Pascale; González-Beltrán, Alejandra; Hardy, Nigel; Hellemans, Jan; Hermjakob, Henning; Juty, Nick; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Maguire, Eamonn; Neumann, Steffen; Orchard, Sandra; Parkinson, Helen; Piel, William; Ranganathan, Shoba; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Santarsiero, Annapaola; Shotton, David; Sterk, Peter; Untergasser, Andreas; Whetzel, Patricia L

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the second workshop of the 'Minimum Information for Biological and Biomedical Investigations' (MIBBI) consortium held on Dec 1-2, 2010 in Rüdesheim, Germany through the sponsorship of the Beilstein-Institute. MIBBI is an umbrella organization uniting communities developing Minimum Information (MI) checklists to standardize the description of data sets, the workflows by which they were generated and the scientific context for the work. This workshop brought together representatives of more than twenty communities to present the status of their MI checklists and plans for future development. Shared challenges and solutions were identified and the role of MIBBI in MI checklist development was discussed. The meeting featured some thirty presentations, wide-ranging discussions and breakout groups. The top outcomes of the two-day workshop as defined by the participants were: 1) the chance to share best practices and to identify areas of synergy; 2) defining a series of tasks for updating the MIBBI Portal; 3) reemphasizing the need to maintain independent MI checklists for various communities while leveraging common terms and workflow elements contained in multiple checklists; and 4) revision of the concept of the MIBBI Foundry to focus on the creation of a core set of MIBBI modules intended for reuse by individual MI checklist projects while maintaining the integrity of each MI project. Further information about MIBBI and its range of activities can be found at http://mibbi.org/. PMID:21304730

  7. Integrating Semantic Information into Multiple Kernels for Protein-Protein Interaction Extraction from Biomedical Literatures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lishuang; Zhang, Panpan; Zheng, Tianfu; Zhang, Hongying; Jiang, Zhenchao; Huang, Degen

    2014-01-01

    Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) extraction is an important task in the biomedical information extraction. Presently, many machine learning methods for PPI extraction have achieved promising results. However, the performance is still not satisfactory. One reason is that the semantic resources were basically ignored. In this paper, we propose a multiple-kernel learning-based approach to extract PPIs, combining the feature-based kernel, tree kernel and semantic kernel. Particularly, we extend the shortest path-enclosed tree kernel (SPT) by a dynamic extended strategy to retrieve the richer syntactic information. Our semantic kernel calculates the protein-protein pair similarity and the context similarity based on two semantic resources: WordNet and Medical Subject Heading (MeSH). We evaluate our method with Support Vector Machine (SVM) and achieve an F-score of 69.40% and an AUC of 92.00%, which show that our method outperforms most of the state-of-the-art systems by integrating semantic information. PMID:24622773

  8. Integrating semantic information into multiple kernels for protein-protein interaction extraction from biomedical literatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Lishuang; Zhang, Panpan; Zheng, Tianfu; Zhang, Hongying; Jiang, Zhenchao; Huang, Degen

    2014-01-01

    Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) extraction is an important task in the biomedical information extraction. Presently, many machine learning methods for PPI extraction have achieved promising results. However, the performance is still not satisfactory. One reason is that the semantic resources were basically ignored. In this paper, we propose a multiple-kernel learning-based approach to extract PPIs, combining the feature-based kernel, tree kernel and semantic kernel. Particularly, we extend the shortest path-enclosed tree kernel (SPT) by a dynamic extended strategy to retrieve the richer syntactic information. Our semantic kernel calculates the protein-protein pair similarity and the context similarity based on two semantic resources: WordNet and Medical Subject Heading (MeSH). We evaluate our method with Support Vector Machine (SVM) and achieve an F-score of 69.40% and an AUC of 92.00%, which show that our method outperforms most of the state-of-the-art systems by integrating semantic information. PMID:24622773

  9. Growth Dynamics of Information Search Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindqvist, Mats

    Computer based information search services, ISS's, of the type that provide on-line literature searches are analyzed from a system's viewpoint using a continuous simulation model. The analysis shows that the observed growth and stagnation of a typical ISS can be explained as a natural consequence of market responses to the service together with a…

  10. Challenges in the Information Services Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Neil

    1997-01-01

    Examines the evolution of the information services market over the past decade, encompassing both supply and demand. Discusses market barriers, political challenges and critical success factors of the Internet, principal service providers, costs/pricing, intellectual property rights and knowledge management, strategic planning, the intranet,…

  11. Simple tricks for improving pattern-based information extraction from the biomedical literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pattern-based approaches to relation extraction have shown very good results in many areas of biomedical text mining. However, defining the right set of patterns is difficult; approaches are either manual, incurring high cost, or automatic, often resulting in large sets of noisy patterns. Results We propose several techniques for filtering sets of automatically generated patterns and analyze their effectiveness for different extraction tasks, as defined in the recent BioNLP 2009 shared task. We focus on simple methods that only take into account the complexity of the pattern and the complexity of the texts the patterns are applied to. We show that our techniques, despite their simplicity, yield large improvements in all tasks we analyzed. For instance, they raise the F-score for the task of extraction gene expression events from 24.8% to 51.9%. Conclusions Already very simple filtering techniques may improve the F-score of an information extraction method based on automatically generated patterns significantly. Furthermore, the application of such methods yields a considerable speed-up, as fewer matches need to be analysed. Due to their simplicity, the proposed filtering techniques also should be applicable to other methods using linguistic patterns for information extraction. PMID:20868467

  12. Biomedical Applications of the Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, S.M.; Levenson, R.

    1999-01-21

    The Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS) approach to spectral imaging seeks to bridge the gap between tuned multispectral and fixed hyperspectral imaging sensors. By allowing the definition of completely general spectral filter functions, truly optimal measurements can be made for a given task. These optimal measurements significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and speed, minimize data volume and data rate, while preserving classification accuracy. The following paper investigates the application of the ISIS sensing approach in two sample biomedical applications: prostate and colon cancer screening. It is shown that in these applications, two to three optimal measurements are sufficient to capture the majority of classification information for critical sample constituents. In the prostate cancer example, the optimal measurements allow 8% relative improvement in classification accuracy of critical cell constituents over a red, green, blue (RGB) sensor. In the colon cancer example, use of optimal measurements boost the classification accuracy of critical cell constituents by 28% relative to the RGB sensor. In both cases, optimal measurements match the performance achieved by the entire hyperspectral data set. The paper concludes that an ISIS style spectral imager can acquire these optimal spectral images directly, allowing improved classification accuracy over an RGB sensor. Compared to a hyperspectral sensor, the ISIS approach can achieve similar classification accuracy using a significantly lower number of spectral samples, thus minimizing overall sample classification time and cost.

  13. Leveraging Information Technology. Track IV: Support Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers from the 1987 CAUSE conference's Track IV, Support Services, are presented. They include: "Application Development Center" (John F. Leydon); "College Information Management System: The Design and Implementation of a Completely Integrated Office Automation and Student Information System" (Karen L. Miselis); "Improving Managerial…

  14. Compatibility Issues Affecting Information Systems and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, F. Wilfrid; Smith, Linda C.

    This UNISIST publication discusses issues related to the compatibility and standardization of bibliograpic records, index languages, software, hardware, and other information systems and services. Following an executive summary, definitions of terms, and other introductory material, existing information systems with common standards are briefly…

  15. Online Information Services. Caught in the Web?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Tim

    1995-01-01

    Provides brief reviews of the sites for several online services of the World Wide Web; the Web as a marketing tool and other aspects of interest to information professionals are highlighted. A sidebar presents information on accessing Internet locations, graphics, online forms, Telnet, saving, printing, mailing, and searching. (AEF)

  16. TeraGrid's integrated information service.

    SciTech Connect

    Liming, L.; Navarro, J.-P.; Blau, E.; Brechin, J.; Catlett, C.; Dahan, M.; Diehl, D.; Dooley, R.; Dwyer, M.; Ericson, K.; Foster, I.; Hanna, E.; Hart, D. L.; Jordan, C.; Light, R.; Martin, S.; McGee, J.; Pearlman, L.; Reilly, J.; Scavo, T.; Shapiro, M.; Smallen, S.; Smith, W.; Wilkins-Diehr, N.

    2009-01-01

    The NSF TeraGrid project has designed and constructed a federated integrated information service (IIS) to serve its capability publishing and discovery needs. This service has also proven helpful in automating TeraGrid's operational activities. We describe the requirements that motivated this work; IIS's system architecture, information architecture, and information content; processes that IIS currently supports; and how various layers of the system architecture are being used. We also review motivating use cases that have not yet been satisfied by IIS and outline approaches for future work.

  17. Information sources in biomedical science and medical journalism: methodological approaches and assessment.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Giovanna F; Vercellesi, Luisa; Bruno, Flavia

    2004-09-01

    Throughout the world the public is showing increasing interest in medical and scientific subjects and journalists largely spread this information, with an important impact on knowledge and health. Clearly, therefore, the relationship between the journalist and his sources is delicate: freedom and independence of information depend on the independence and truthfulness of the sources. The new "precision journalism" holds that scientific methods should be applied to journalism, so authoritative sources are a common need for journalists and scientists. We therefore compared the individual classifications and methods of assessing of sources in biomedical science and medical journalism to try to extrapolate scientific methods of evaluation to journalism. In journalism and science terms used to classify sources of information show some similarities, but their meanings are different. In science primary and secondary classes of information, for instance, refer to the levels of processing, but in journalism to the official nature of the source itself. Scientists and journalists must both always consult as many sources as possible and check their authoritativeness, reliability, completeness, up-to-dateness and balance. In journalism, however, there are some important differences and limits: too many sources can sometimes diminish the quality of the information. The sources serve a first filter between the event and the journalist, who is not providing the reader with the fact, but with its projection. Journalists have time constraints and lack the objective criteria for searching, the specific background knowledge, and the expertise to fully assess sources. To assist in understanding the wealth of sources of information in journalism, we have prepared a checklist of items and questions. There are at least four fundamental points that a good journalist, like any scientist, should know: how to find the latest information (the sources), how to assess it (the quality and

  18. System architecture and information model for integrated access to distributed biomedical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongkyu; Alaoui, Adil; Levine, Betty; Leondaridis, Leonidas; Shields, Peter; Byers, Steve; Cleary, Kevin

    2009-02-01

    The current trend towards systems medicine will rely heavily on computational and bioinformatics capabilities to collect, integrate, and analyze massive amounts of data from disparate sources. The objective is to use this information to make medical decisions that improve patient care. At Georgetown University Medical Center, we are developing an informatics capability to integrate several research and clinical databases. Our long term goal is to provide researchers at Georgetown's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center better access to aggregated molecular and clinical information facilitating the investigation of new hypotheses that impact patient care. We also recognize the need for data mining tools and intelligent agents to help researchers in these efforts. This paper describes our initial work to create a flexible platform for researchers and physicians that provides access to information sources including clinical records, medical images, genomic, epigenomic, proteomic and metabolomic data. This paper describes the data sources selected for this pilot project and possible approaches to integrating these databases. We present the different database integration models that we considered. We conclude by outlining the proposed Information Model for the project.

  19. Function Model for Community Health Service Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Pan, Feng; Liu, Danhong; Xu, Yongyong

    In order to construct a function model of community health service (CHS) information for development of CHS information management system, Integration Definition for Function Modeling (IDEF0), an IEEE standard which is extended from Structured Analysis and Design(SADT) and now is a widely used function modeling method, was used to classifying its information from top to bottom. The contents of every level of the model were described and coded. Then function model for CHS information, which includes 4 super-classes, 15 classes and 28 sub-classed of business function, 43 business processes and 168 business activities, was established. This model can facilitate information management system development and workflow refinement.

  20. The Wisconsin Small Business Development Center Information Service: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awe, Susan C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents the model of the Information Service of the Wisconsin Small Business Development Center Information Service, including the objectives and tasks necessary to develop an information service, and staffing and funding guidelines for the first two years. (EJS)

  1. Discovering biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries for information retrieval and database curation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Identifying relevant papers from the literature is a common task in biocuration. Most current biomedical literature search systems primarily rely on matching user keywords. Semantic search, on the other hand, seeks to improve search accuracy by understanding the entities and contextual relations in user keywords. However, past research has mostly focused on semantically identifying biological entities (e.g. chemicals, diseases and genes) with little effort on discovering semantic relations. In this work, we aim to discover biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries in an automated and unsupervised fashion. Specifically, we focus on extracting and understanding the contextual information (or context patterns) that is used by PubMed users to represent semantic relations between entities such as 'CHEMICAL-1 compared to CHEMICAL-2' With the advances in automatic named entity recognition, we first tag entities in PubMed queries and then use tagged entities as knowledge to recognize pattern semantics. More specifically, we transform PubMed queries into context patterns involving participating entities, which are subsequently projected to latent topics via latent semantic analysis (LSA) to avoid the data sparseness and specificity issues. Finally, we mine semantically similar contextual patterns or semantic relations based on LSA topic distributions. Our two separate evaluation experiments of chemical-chemical (CC) and chemical-disease (CD) relations show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms a baseline method, which simply measures pattern semantics by similarity in participating entities. The highest performance achieved by our approach is nearly 0.9 and 0.85 respectively for the CC and CD task when compared against the ground truth in terms of normalized discounted cumulative gain (nDCG), a standard measure of ranking quality. These results suggest that our approach can effectively identify and return related semantic patterns in a ranked order

  2. Discovering biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries for information retrieval and database curation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Identifying relevant papers from the literature is a common task in biocuration. Most current biomedical literature search systems primarily rely on matching user keywords. Semantic search, on the other hand, seeks to improve search accuracy by understanding the entities and contextual relations in user keywords. However, past research has mostly focused on semantically identifying biological entities (e.g. chemicals, diseases and genes) with little effort on discovering semantic relations. In this work, we aim to discover biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries in an automated and unsupervised fashion. Specifically, we focus on extracting and understanding the contextual information (or context patterns) that is used by PubMed users to represent semantic relations between entities such as ‘CHEMICAL-1 compared to CHEMICAL-2.’ With the advances in automatic named entity recognition, we first tag entities in PubMed queries and then use tagged entities as knowledge to recognize pattern semantics. More specifically, we transform PubMed queries into context patterns involving participating entities, which are subsequently projected to latent topics via latent semantic analysis (LSA) to avoid the data sparseness and specificity issues. Finally, we mine semantically similar contextual patterns or semantic relations based on LSA topic distributions. Our two separate evaluation experiments of chemical-chemical (CC) and chemical–disease (CD) relations show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms a baseline method, which simply measures pattern semantics by similarity in participating entities. The highest performance achieved by our approach is nearly 0.9 and 0.85 respectively for the CC and CD task when compared against the ground truth in terms of normalized discounted cumulative gain (nDCG), a standard measure of ranking quality. These results suggest that our approach can effectively identify and return related semantic patterns in a ranked

  3. BioPortal: enhanced functionality via new Web services from the National Center for Biomedical Ontology to access and use ontologies in software applications

    PubMed Central

    Whetzel, Patricia L.; Noy, Natalya F.; Shah, Nigam H.; Alexander, Paul R.; Nyulas, Csongor; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) is one of the National Centers for Biomedical Computing funded under the NIH Roadmap Initiative. Contributing to the national computing infrastructure, NCBO has developed BioPortal, a web portal that provides access to a library of biomedical ontologies and terminologies (http://bioportal.bioontology.org) via the NCBO Web services. BioPortal enables community participation in the evaluation and evolution of ontology content by providing features to add mappings between terms, to add comments linked to specific ontology terms and to provide ontology reviews. The NCBO Web services (http://www.bioontology.org/wiki/index.php/NCBO_REST_services) enable this functionality and provide a uniform mechanism to access ontologies from a variety of knowledge representation formats, such as Web Ontology Language (OWL) and Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) format. The Web services provide multi-layered access to the ontology content, from getting all terms in an ontology to retrieving metadata about a term. Users can easily incorporate the NCBO Web services into software applications to generate semantically aware applications and to facilitate structured data collection. PMID:21672956

  4. A new model for enhanced information services in an academic medical center.

    PubMed Central

    Panko, W. B.

    1991-01-01

    The information base used in the biomedical enterprise, already large, continues to expand at a striking rate. Networking and desktop computing technology is playing a more important role in the operations of academic medical centers. Integration efforts aimed at enhancing information access by using distributed computing are very substantial technical challenges. However, if these integration efforts focus only on the technical aspects, they are doomed to failure. New organizational approaches are also needed. This paper describes an new model for enhanced information services. This model calls for the central information supplier to provide a set of core services. Users, who may be individuals or units and generally have more insight into the nature of their problems, will be encouraged to add value to these core services in the form of specialization or customization to meet their unique and critical needs. This model provides a way to adapt and transform current organizational elements to effectively use the large information technology investments and to meet the increasing challenges of biomedical information use. PMID:1807648

  5. Information and Referral Service, District Office Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health and Welfare Council of Central Maryland, Inc., Baltimore.

    Within a standard format the details of instruction and training in various areas (units) of information and referral (I and R) services are given for Social Security Administration workers. Each unit is specified by the following categories: objective, special consideration, background, presentation, participation, review, and examples. There are…

  6. The Dynamics of Information Search Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindquist, Mats G.

    Computer-based information search services (ISSs) of the type that provide online literature searches are analyzed from a systems viewpoint using a continuous simulation model. The methodology applied is "system dynamics," and the system language is DYNAMO. The analysis reveals that the observed growth and stagnation of a typical ISS can be…

  7. Information Technology Services Support for Emergencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Donald Z.

    2008-01-01

    For at least the last quarter century, enterprises--including higher education institutions--have increasingly relied on Information Technology Services (ITS) for business functions. As a result, IT organizations have had to develop the discipline of production operations as well as recovery procedures to respond when those operations are…

  8. Marketing Secondary Information Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donald W.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the components of marketing (i.e., consumer markets, product development, sales, advertising and promotion, packaging, distribution, pricing, and market research), how information products and services relate to those components, and the pricing of products from a bibliographic database. Two figures and a 17-item reference list are…

  9. MaROS: Information Management Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Daniel A.; Gladden, Roy E.; Wright, Jesse J.; Hy, Franklin H.; Rabideau, Gregg R.; Wallick, Michael N.

    2011-01-01

    This software is provided by the Mars Relay Operations Service (MaROS) task to a variety of Mars projects for the purpose of coordinating communications sessions between landed spacecraft assets and orbiting spacecraft assets at Mars. The Information Management Service centralizes a set of functions previously distributed across multiple spacecraft operations teams, and as such, greatly improves visibility into the end-to-end strategic coordination process. Most of the process revolves around the scheduling of communications sessions between the spacecraft during periods of time when a landed asset on Mars is geometrically visible by an orbiting spacecraft. These relay sessions are used to transfer data both to and from the landed asset via the orbiting asset on behalf of Earth-based spacecraft operators. This software component is an application process running as a Java virtual machine. The component provides all service interfaces via a Representational State Transfer (REST) protocol over https to external clients. There are two general interaction modes with the service: upload and download of data. For data upload, the service must execute logic specific to the upload data type and trigger any applicable calculations including pass delivery latencies and overflight conflicts. For data download, the software must retrieve and correlate requested information and deliver to the requesting client. The provision of this service enables several key advancements over legacy processes and systems. For one, this service represents the first time that end-to-end relay information is correlated into a single shared repository. The software also provides the first multimission latency calculator; previous latency calculations had been performed on a mission-by-mission basis.

  10. Exposome informatics: considerations for the design of future biomedical research information systems

    PubMed Central

    Martin Sanchez, Fernando; Gray, Kathleen; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    The environment's contribution to health has been conceptualized as the exposome. Biomedical research interest in environmental exposures as a determinant of physiopathological processes is rising as such data increasingly become available. The panoply of miniaturized sensing devices now accessible and affordable for individuals to use to monitor a widening range of parameters opens up a new world of research data. Biomedical informatics (BMI) must provide a coherent framework for dealing with multi-scale population data including the phenome, the genome, the exposome, and their interconnections. The combination of these more continuous, comprehensive, and personalized data sources requires new research and development approaches to data management, analysis, and visualization. This article analyzes the implications of a new paradigm for the discipline of BMI, one that recognizes genome, phenome, and exposome data and their intricate interactions as the basis for biomedical research now and for clinical care in the near future. PMID:24186958

  11. Turning Informal Thesauri Into Formal Ontologies: A Feasibility Study on Biomedical Knowledge re-Use

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a large-scale knowledge conversion and curation experiment. Biomedical domain knowledge from a semantically weak and shallow terminological resource, the UMLS, is transformed into a rigorous description logics format. This way, the broad coverage of the UMLS is combined with inference mechanisms for consistency and cycle checking. They are the key to proper cleansing of the knowledge directly imported from the UMLS, as well as subsequent updating, maintenance and refinement of large knowledge repositories. The emerging biomedical knowledge base currently comprises more than 240 000 conceptual entities and hence constitutes one of the largest formal knowledge repositories ever built. PMID:18629112

  12. Information Service System For Small Forestowners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaochen; Li, Yun

    Individual owned forests have boomed in the last decade in China. Hundreds of millions of private forest owners have emerged since years of afforestation practice and collective forest ownership reform. Most of those private forest owners are former peasants living in afforestation areas. They thirst for forestry information, such as technique knowledge, forestry policies, finance, marketing, etc. Unfortunately the ways they could get certain information are very limit. Before internet time, Local governments are the main channel they search helps for useful information and technique supports. State and local governments have paid much attention to provide necessary forestry technique supports to those small forest owners and provided varies training projects, issued official forestry information through their websites. While, as state government expands household contract system in the management of collective forestry land, the number of individual forest owners is bumping up in future 5 years. There is still a gap between supplying ability and requirement of forestry information. To construct an effective forestry information service system in next 3-5 year can bridge the gap. This paper discusses the framework of such an information service system.

  13. CORBA security services for health information systems.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B; Holena, M

    1998-01-01

    The structure of healthcare systems in developed countries is changing to 'shared care', enforced by economic constraints and caused by a change in the basic conditions of care. That development results in co-operative health information systems across the boundaries of organisational, technological, and policy domains. Increasingly, these distributed and, as far as their domains are concerned, heterogeneous systems are based on middleware approaches, such as CORBA. Regarding the sensitivity of personal and medical data, such open, distributed, and heterogeneous health information systems require a high level of data protection and data security, both with respect to patient information and with respect to users. This paper, relying on experience gained through our activities in CORBAmed, describes the possibilities the CORBA middleware provides to achieve application and communication security. On the background of the overall CORBA architecture, it outlines the different security services previewed in the adopted CORBA specifications which are discussed in the context of the security requirements of healthcare information systems. Security services required in the healthcare domain but not available at the moment are mentioned. A solution is proposed, which on the one hand allows to make use of the available CORBA security services and additional ones, on the other hand remains open to other middleware approaches, such as DHE or HL7. PMID:9848400

  14. [Application of the life sciences platform based on oracle to biomedical informations].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Yun; Li, Tai-Huan; Yang, Hong-Qiao

    2008-03-01

    The life sciences platform based on Oracle database technology is introduced in this paper. By providing a powerful data access, integrating a variety of data types, and managing vast quantities of data, the software presents a flexible, safe and scalable management platform for biomedical data processing. PMID:18581881

  15. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 4: Rethinking User Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Six papers and two abstracts of papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on user services issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "Academic Computing Services: MORE than a Utility" (Scott Bierman and Cathy Smith), which focuses on Carleton College's efforts to serve…

  16. The Government Information Locator Service (GILS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christian, E.

    1996-01-01

    In coordination with the Information Infrastructure Task Force (IITF), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is promoting the establishment of an agency-based Government Information Locator Service (GILS) to help the public locate and access information throughout the Federal Government. This report presents a vision of how GILS will be implemented. Working primarily with OMB and the Locator Subgroup of the Interagency Working Group on Public Access, Eliot Christian of the US Geological Survey prepared this report under the auspices of the IITF Committee on Information Policy. This vision of GILS has also received extensive review by various Federal agencies and other interested parties, including some non-Federal organizations and by the general public through notices in both the Federal Register and the Commerce Business Daily and at a public meeting held in December, 1993. As part of the Federal role in the National Information Infrastructure, GILS will identify and describe information resources throughout the Federal government, and provide assistance in obtaining the information. It will be decentralized and will supplement other agency and commercial information dissemination mechanisms. The public will use GILS directly or through intermediaries, such as the Government Printing Office, the National Technical Information Service, the Federal depository libraries, other public libraries, and private sector information services. Direct users will have access to a GILS Core accessible on the Internet without charge. Intermediate access may include kiosks, "800 numbers", electronic mail, bulletin boards, fax, and off-line media such as floppy disks, CD-ROM, and printed works. GILS will use standard network technology and the American National Standards Institute Z39.50 standard for information search and retrieval so that information can be retrieved in a variety of ways. Direct users will eventually have access to many other Federal and non

  17. Advanced information processing system: Local system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Alger, Linda; Whittredge, Roy; Stasiowski, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a multi-computer architecture composed of hardware and software building blocks that can be configured to meet a broad range of application requirements. The hardware building blocks are fault-tolerant, general-purpose computers, fault-and damage-tolerant networks (both computer and input/output), and interfaces between the networks and the computers. The software building blocks are the major software functions: local system services, input/output, system services, inter-computer system services, and the system manager. The foundation of the local system services is an operating system with the functions required for a traditional real-time multi-tasking computer, such as task scheduling, inter-task communication, memory management, interrupt handling, and time maintenance. Resting on this foundation are the redundancy management functions necessary in a redundant computer and the status reporting functions required for an operator interface. The functional requirements, functional design and detailed specifications for all the local system services are documented.

  18. Education of biomedical engineering in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Kao, Tsair; Wang, Jia-Jung; Chen, Mei-Jung; Su, Fong-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical Engineers (BME) play an important role in medical and healthcare society. Well educational programs are important to support the healthcare systems including hospitals, long term care organizations, manufacture industries of medical devices/instrumentations/systems, and sales/services companies of medical devices/instrumentations/system. In past 30 more years, biomedical engineering society has accumulated thousands people hold a biomedical engineering degree, and work as a biomedical engineer in Taiwan. Most of BME students can be trained in biomedical engineering departments with at least one of specialties in bioelectronics, bio-information, biomaterials or biomechanics. Students are required to have internship trainings in related institutions out of campus for 320 hours before graduating. Almost all the biomedical engineering departments are certified by IEET (Institute of Engineering Education Taiwan), and met the IEET requirement in which required mathematics and fundamental engineering courses. For BMEs after graduation, Taiwanese Society of Biomedical Engineering (TSBME) provides many continue-learning programs and certificates for all members who expect to hold the certification as a professional credit in his working place. In current status, many engineering departments in university are continuously asked to provide joint programs with BME department to train much better quality students. BME is one of growing fields in Taiwan. PMID:25571153

  19. [Modern referral-information service in the Central Medical Library of the University of Zagreb Medical School].

    PubMed

    Hadjina, G; Granić, D; Bekavac, A

    1990-01-01

    New technologies in information and retrieval services of the Central Medical Library are presented, as well as comparison between traditional search of biomedical literature and search of biomedical bases available on CD-ROM and on-line. MeSH thesaurus represents the basis for all modes of searches, either through published indexes (Index Medicus, Biomedicina Iugoslavica), searches through on-line, or via CD-ROM technology. Experience in indexing according to MeSH structure helps us to search and retrieve biomedical literature on new media too. Great interest in new media for search and retrieval of biomedical literature among our users (100%) justifies their introduction into the Library. In the period of four months, 75% of our users chose CD-ROM technology in their search, 25% chose on-line search, and both technologies were combined by 33% of the users. Having these new media in our library we have reached the point from which we join the world biomedical information network and successfully meet the growing need for information in the field of biomedicine. PMID:2233118

  20. A model of clinical query management that supports integration of biomedical information over the World Wide Web.

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, W. M.; Shortliffe, E. H.

    1995-01-01

    A model of clinical query management is described that supports the integration of various types of biomedical information and the delivery of that information through a common interface. The model extends the architecture of the World Wide Web to include a Common Gateway Interface (CGI) mediator, which takes in user queries, performs syntactic and semantic processing to transform the input to a canonical form, selects the appropriate information sources to answer the query, translates the canonical query statement into a query of each information resource, queries the chosen information sources in parallel, and controls the analysis and display of results. We describe WebMedline, a CGI mediator that implements portions of this model, and discuss the benefits and limitations of this approach. PMID:8563422

  1. 76 FR 2348 - National Technical Information Service Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... National Technical Information Service National Technical Information Service Advisory Board AGENCY... announces the next meeting of the National Technical Information Service Advisory Board (the Advisory Board... (NTIS) on policies and operations of the Service. DATES: The Advisory Board will meet on...

  2. 77 FR 779 - National Technical Information Service Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... National Technical Information Service National Technical Information Service Advisory Board AGENCY... announces the next meeting of the National Technical Information Service Advisory Board (the Advisory Board... (NTIS) on policies and operations of the Service. DATES: The Advisory Board will meet on...

  3. 76 FR 59420 - Proposed Information Collection; Alaska Guide Service Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Information Collection; Alaska Guide Service Evaluation AGENCY: Fish... Service Evaluation) to help us evaluate commercial guide services on our national wildlife refuges in the.... Data OMB Control Number: 1018-0141. Title: Alaska Guide Service Evaluation. Service Form Number(s):...

  4. Information Technology in Complex Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Southon, Frank Charles Gray; Sauer, Chris; Dampney, Christopher Noel Grant (Kit)

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To identify impediments to the successful transfer and implementation of packaged information systems through large, divisionalized health services. Design: A case analysis of the failure of an implementation of a critical application in the Public Health System of the State of New South Wales, Australia, was carried out. This application had been proven in the United States environment. Measurements: Interviews involving over 60 staff at all levels of the service were undertaken by a team of three. The interviews were recorded and analyzed for key themes, and the results were shared and compared to enable a continuing critical assessment. Results: Two components of the transfer of the system were considered: the transfer from a different environment, and the diffusion throughout a large, divisionalized organization. The analyses were based on the Scott-Morton organizational fit framework. In relation to the first, it was found that there was a lack of fit in the business environments and strategies, organizational structures and strategy-structure pairing as well as the management process-roles pairing. The diffusion process experienced problems because of the lack of fit in the strategy-structure, strategy-structure-management processes, and strategy-structure-role relationships. Conclusion: The large-scale developments of integrated health services present great challenges to the efficient and reliable implementation of information technology, especially in large, divisionalized organizations. There is a need to take a more sophisticated approach to understanding the complexities of organizational factors than has traditionally been the case. PMID:9067877

  5. National Institute of Standards and Technology measurement service of the optical properties of biomedical phantoms: current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Cooksey, Catherine C.; Levine, Zachary H.; Pintar, Adam L.; Hwang, Jeeseong; Allen, David W.

    2016-03-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has maintained scales for reflectance and transmittance over several decades. The scales are primarily intended for regular transmittance, mirrors, and solid surface scattering diffusers. The rapidly growing area of optical medical imaging needs a scale for volume scattering of diffuse materials that are used to mimic the optical properties of tissue. Such materials are used as phantoms to evaluate and validate instruments under development intended for clinical use. To address this need, a double-integrating sphere based instrument has been installed to measure the optical properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms. The basic system and methods have been described in previous papers. An important attribute in establishing a viable calibration service is the estimation of measurement uncertainties. The use of custom models and comparisons with other established scales enabled uncertainty measurements. Here, we describe the continuation of those efforts to advance the understanding of the uncertainties through two independent measurements: the bidirectional reflectance distribution function and the bidirectional transmittance distribution function of a commercially available solid biomedical phantom. A Monte Carlo-based model is used and the resulting optical properties are compared to the values provided by the phantom manufacturer.

  6. The National Institutes of Health's Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS): Design, Contents, Functionality and Experience to Date

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, James J.; Ayres, Elaine J.; Remennik, Lyubov; Rath, Sachi; Freedman, Robert; Beri, Andrea; Chen, Yang; Huser, Vojtech

    2013-01-01

    The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) has developed the Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS) to support researchers’ access to translational and clinical data. BTRIS includes a data repository, a set of programs for loading data from NIH electronic health records and research data management systems, an ontology for coding the disparate data with a single terminology, and a set of user interface tools that provide access to identified data from individual research studies and data across all studies from which individually identifiable data have been removed. This paper reports on unique design elements of the system, progress to date and user experience after five years of development and operation. PMID:24262893

  7. Information logistics: A production-line approach to information services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Dennis; Lee, Chee-Seng

    1991-01-01

    Logistics can be defined as the process of strategically managing the acquisition, movement, and storage of materials, parts, and finished inventory (and the related information flow) through the organization and its marketing channels in a cost effective manner. It is concerned with delivering the right product to the right customer in the right place at the right time. The logistics function is composed of inventory management, facilities management, communications unitization, transportation, materials management, and production scheduling. The relationship between logistics and information systems is clear. Systems such as Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), Point of Sale (POS) systems, and Just in Time (JIT) inventory management systems are important elements in the management of product development and delivery. With improved access to market demand figures, logisticians can decrease inventory sizes and better service customer demand. However, without accurate, timely information, little, if any, of this would be feasible in today's global markets. Information systems specialists can learn from logisticians. In a manner similar to logistics management, information logistics is concerned with the delivery of the right data, to the ring customer, at the right time. As such, information systems are integral components of the information logistics system charged with providing customers with accurate, timely, cost-effective, and useful information. Information logistics is a management style and is composed of elements similar to those associated with the traditional logistics activity: inventory management (data resource management), facilities management (distributed, centralized and decentralized information systems), communications (participative design and joint application development methodologies), unitization (input/output system design, i.e., packaging or formatting of the information), transportations (voice, data, image, and video communication systems

  8. Designing-and Redesigning-Information Services for Maximum Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca; Dysart, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Discusses innovative information services, including new services and the redesign of existing services. Describes the development process, including assessing the market and developing a marketing plan; and explains the implementation process, including monitoring client satisfaction and quality control. (LRW)

  9. 75 FR 48303 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Veterinary Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Collection; Veterinary Services; Customer Service Survey AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service....gov ). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For information on the Veterinary Services customer service... Coordinator, at (301) 851-2908. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Veterinary Services; Customer Service...

  10. Improving access to computer-based library and drug information services in patient-care areas.

    PubMed

    Tobia, R C; Bierschenk, N F; Knodel, L C; Bowden, V M

    1990-01-01

    A project to increase access to drug and biomedical information through electronic linkage of drug information and library services to three patient-care areas is described. In February 1987, microcomputer work stations were installed in the Bexar County Hospital District's hospital emergency department, medical residents' office, and ambulatory-care clinic, as well as in The University of Texas Health Science Center's library reference area and drug information service office. Drug information was available on compact disk through the Micromedex Computerized Clinical Information System (CCIS) database, which includes DRUGDEX, POISINDEX, EMERGINDEX, and IDENTIDEX. Each work station was also connected to the library's computer via modem, allowing access to the Library Information System, books, journals, audiovisual materials, miniMEDLINE, and an electronic mail system. During the six-month project, the system was used 5487 times by 702 people. The system was successful in providing drug and other information in clinical settings and in introducing clinical staff members to new information technology. To increase access to the system after the project ended, the CD-ROM version was discontinued, and the distributed tape version of CCIS for VAX computers was added to the library's online information system, making drug information more available throughout the campus and teaching hospitals. In 1988-89 an average of 200 people accessed the tape version of CCIS each month. Although it is difficult to replace the convenience of an onsite library, at least some drug and biomedical information needs in the clinical setting can be met through computer networking. PMID:2405657

  11. 41 CFR 105-53.143 - Information Resources Management Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...), office information systems, and telecommunications equipment and services; developing and coordinating... Federal Information Centers; developing and overseeing GSA policy concerning automated information systems... chapter 201, Federal Information Resources Management Regulation (FIRMR), and 48 CFR chapters 1 and...

  12. 41 CFR 105-53.143 - Information Resources Management Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), office information systems, and telecommunications equipment and services; developing and coordinating... Federal Information Centers; developing and overseeing GSA policy concerning automated information systems... chapter 201, Federal Information Resources Management Regulation (FIRMR), and 48 CFR chapters 1 and...

  13. Biomedical text summarization to support genetic database curation: using Semantic MEDLINE to create a secondary database of genetic information

    PubMed Central

    Fiszman, Marcelo; Hurdle, John F; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines the development and evaluation of an automatic summarization system in the domain of molecular genetics. The system is a potential component of an advanced biomedical information management application called Semantic MEDLINE and could assist librarians in developing secondary databases of genetic information extracted from the primary literature. Methods: An existing summarization system was modified for identifying biomedical text relevant to the genetic etiology of disease. The summarization system was evaluated on the task of identifying data describing genes associated with bladder cancer in MEDLINE citations. A gold standard was produced using records from Genetics Home Reference and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Genes in text found by the system were compared to the gold standard. Recall, precision, and F-measure were calculated. Results: The system achieved recall of 46%, and precision of 88% (F-measure = 0.61) by taking Gene References into Function (GeneRIFs) into account. Conclusion: The new summarization schema for genetic etiology has potential as a component in Semantic MEDLINE to support the work of data curators. PMID:20936065

  14. Biomedical information from a national collection of spine x-rays: film to content-based retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Antani, Sameer; Lee, Dah-Jye; Krainak, Daniel M.; Thoma, George R.

    2003-05-01

    We summarize research and development for the extraction and distribution of biomedical information from a collection of 17,000 spine x-ray images collected by the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). We present a history of the technical milestones of this work, including the data collection as film, digitization, quality control, archiving technology, database organization, medical expert content evaluation, and Web data distribution. We conclude by presenting our current work in content-based image retrieval (CBIR) to exploit the information content of these images directly by using image processing. We provide an overview and current research results from this CBIR work, which includes: extensive segmentation research, focusing on Active Shape Modeling and Active Contour methods; alternative techniques for shape representation, including invariant moments, simple polygon approximation, and Fourier descriptors; neural network classification of shapes into biomedical categories, such as "anterior osteophytes present/not present" and the implementation of a prototype CBIR system for the vertebrae that supports hybrid text/image queries using MATLAB and the MySQL relational database system.

  15. Assessing the Government Information Locator Service (GILS): A Multi-Method Approach for Evaluating Networked Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, William E.; McClure, Charles R.; Koelker, June

    1997-01-01

    Describes a multimethod approach used to evaluate the Government Information Locator Service (GILS). Highlights the limitations and opportunities of available approaches to evaluating complex characteristics of networked information services and digital collections. (Author/AEF)

  16. Quantifying spectral changes experienced by plasmonic nanoparticles in a cellular environment to inform biomedical nanoparticle design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) scatter and absorb light in precise, designable ways, making them agile candidates for a variety of biomedical applications. When NPs are introduced to a physiological environment and interact with cells, their physicochemical properties can change as proteins adsorb on their surface and they agglomerate within intracellular endosomal vesicles. Since the plasmonic properties of metal NPs are dependent on their geometry and local environment, these physicochemical changes may alter the NPs' plasmonic properties, on which applications such as plasmonic photothermal therapy and photonic gene circuits are based. Here we systematically study and quantify how metal NPs' optical spectra change upon introduction to a cellular environment in which NPs agglomerate within endosomal vesicles. Using darkfield hyperspectral imaging, we measure changes in the peak wavelength, broadening, and distribution of 100-nm spherical gold NPs' optical spectra following introduction to human breast adenocarcinoma Sk-Br-3 cells as a function of NP exposure dose and time. On a cellular level, spectra shift up to 78.6 ± 23.5 nm after 24 h of NP exposure. Importantly, spectra broaden with time, achieving a spectral width of 105.9 ± 11.7 nm at 95% of the spectrum's maximum intensity after 24 h. On an individual intracellular NP cluster (NPC) level, spectra also show significant shifting, broadening, and heterogeneity after 24 h. Cellular transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electromagnetic simulations of NPCs support the trends in spectral changes we measured. These quantitative data can help guide the design of metal NPs introduced to cellular environments in plasmonic NP-mediated biomedical technologies. PMID:25258596

  17. Drug Information to Biomedical Informatics: A Three-Tier Approach to Building a University System for the Twenty-First Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrill, Mary J.; Norton, Linda L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a University of the Pacific (California) biomedical informatics center that promotes student use of informatics for doctoral courses, facilitates course-related hands-on information seeking, encourages graduate and faculty use of information technology, and is self-supporting. Discusses organization, benefits, and problems encountered,…

  18. 48 CFR 39.104 - Information technology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information technology... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.104 Information technology services. When acquiring information technology services, solicitations must not describe...

  19. Integration of Information Services in the Parliament of Zimbabwe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiwandamira, Lyn

    This paper discusses the integration of information services in the Parliament of Zimbabwe (PoZ). An organizational chart of the information systems at PoZ in 1999 is provided, and each of the four departments managing information services are described, i.e., the library, the research department, public relations, and information technology. An…

  20. The Information-Seeking Habits of In-Service Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Todd; Bannon, Susan H.; Nunes-Bufford, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Research on information literacy and educators has focused on preservice educators and learning information literacy skills. Little research exists on in-service educators and their information literacy skills. Purposes of this study were to identify information sources that in-service educators used; to determine relationships between information…

  1. 48 CFR 39.104 - Information technology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Information technology... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.104 Information technology services. When acquiring information technology services, solicitations must not describe...

  2. 48 CFR 39.104 - Information technology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Information technology... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.104 Information technology services. When acquiring information technology services, solicitations must not describe...

  3. 48 CFR 39.104 - Information technology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information technology... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.104 Information technology services. When acquiring information technology services, solicitations must not describe...

  4. 48 CFR 39.104 - Information technology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Information technology... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY General 39.104 Information technology services. When acquiring information technology services, solicitations must not describe...

  5. 47 CFR 76.1602 - Customer service-general information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Customer service-general information. 76.1602 Section 76.1602 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1602 Customer service—general information. (a)...

  6. 47 CFR 76.1602 - Customer service-general information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Customer service-general information. 76.1602 Section 76.1602 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1602 Customer service—general information. (a)...

  7. 47 CFR 76.1602 - Customer service-general information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Customer service-general information. 76.1602 Section 76.1602 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1602 Customer service—general information. (a)...

  8. 47 CFR 76.1602 - Customer service-general information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Customer service-general information. 76.1602 Section 76.1602 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1602 Customer service—general information. (a)...

  9. U.S. Government Electronic Information Service Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Ridley R., Jr.; Barkley, Dan

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the development of electronic government publications and the resulting standards and service needs. Focuses on results of a report on the impact that electronic information has brought to bear on depository library services. Includes 11 draft Depository Library Public Service Guidelines for government information. (AEF)

  10. 47 CFR 76.1602 - Customer service-general information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer service-general information. 76.1602... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1602 Customer service—general information. (a) A cable franchise authority may enforce the customer service standards set forth in paragraph (b) of...

  11. 75 FR 25833 - Information Collection; Guaranteed Loan Making and Servicing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... contacting Trent Rogers at the above address. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Trent Rogers, Senior Loan... Farm Service Agency Information Collection; Guaranteed Loan Making and Servicing AGENCY: Farm Service... the Guaranteed Farm Loan Program. DATES: We will consider comments that we receive by July 9,...

  12. The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Bandrowski, Anita; Brinkman, Ryan; Brochhausen, Mathias; Brush, Matthew H.; Chibucos, Marcus C.; Clancy, Kevin; Courtot, Mélanie; Derom, Dirk; Dumontier, Michel; Fan, Liju; Fostel, Jennifer; Fragoso, Gilberto; Gibson, Frank; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Haendel, Melissa A.; He, Yongqun; Heiskanen, Mervi; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Jensen, Mark; Lin, Yu; Lister, Allyson L.; Lord, Phillip; Malone, James; Manduchi, Elisabetta; McGee, Monnie; Morrison, Norman; Overton, James A.; Parkinson, Helen; Peters, Bjoern; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Ruttenberg, Alan; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Schober, Daniel; Smith, Barry; Soldatova, Larisa N.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Taylor, Chris F.; Torniai, Carlo; Turner, Jessica A.; Vita, Randi; Whetzel, Patricia L.; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) is an ontology that provides terms with precisely defined meanings to describe all aspects of how investigations in the biological and medical domains are conducted. OBI re-uses ontologies that provide a representation of biomedical knowledge from the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) project and adds the ability to describe how this knowledge was derived. We here describe the state of OBI and several applications that are using it, such as adding semantic expressivity to existing databases, building data entry forms, and enabling interoperability between knowledge resources. OBI covers all phases of the investigation process, such as planning, execution and reporting. It represents information and material entities that participate in these processes, as well as roles and functions. Prior to OBI, it was not possible to use a single internally consistent resource that could be applied to multiple types of experiments for these applications. OBI has made this possible by creating terms for entities involved in biological and medical investigations and by importing parts of other biomedical ontologies such as GO, Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) and Phenotype Attribute and Trait Ontology (PATO) without altering their meaning. OBI is being used in a wide range of projects covering genomics, multi-omics, immunology, and catalogs of services. OBI has also spawned other ontologies (Information Artifact Ontology) and methods for importing parts of ontologies (Minimum information to reference an external ontology term (MIREOT)). The OBI project is an open cross-disciplinary collaborative effort, encompassing multiple research communities from around the globe. To date, OBI has created 2366 classes and 40 relations along with textual and formal definitions. The OBI Consortium maintains a web resource (http://obi-ontology.org) providing details on the people, policies, and issues being addressed

  13. The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations.

    PubMed

    Bandrowski, Anita; Brinkman, Ryan; Brochhausen, Mathias; Brush, Matthew H; Bug, Bill; Chibucos, Marcus C; Clancy, Kevin; Courtot, Mélanie; Derom, Dirk; Dumontier, Michel; Fan, Liju; Fostel, Jennifer; Fragoso, Gilberto; Gibson, Frank; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Haendel, Melissa A; He, Yongqun; Heiskanen, Mervi; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Jensen, Mark; Lin, Yu; Lister, Allyson L; Lord, Phillip; Malone, James; Manduchi, Elisabetta; McGee, Monnie; Morrison, Norman; Overton, James A; Parkinson, Helen; Peters, Bjoern; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Ruttenberg, Alan; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Scheuermann, Richard H; Schober, Daniel; Smith, Barry; Soldatova, Larisa N; Stoeckert, Christian J; Taylor, Chris F; Torniai, Carlo; Turner, Jessica A; Vita, Randi; Whetzel, Patricia L; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) is an ontology that provides terms with precisely defined meanings to describe all aspects of how investigations in the biological and medical domains are conducted. OBI re-uses ontologies that provide a representation of biomedical knowledge from the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) project and adds the ability to describe how this knowledge was derived. We here describe the state of OBI and several applications that are using it, such as adding semantic expressivity to existing databases, building data entry forms, and enabling interoperability between knowledge resources. OBI covers all phases of the investigation process, such as planning, execution and reporting. It represents information and material entities that participate in these processes, as well as roles and functions. Prior to OBI, it was not possible to use a single internally consistent resource that could be applied to multiple types of experiments for these applications. OBI has made this possible by creating terms for entities involved in biological and medical investigations and by importing parts of other biomedical ontologies such as GO, Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) and Phenotype Attribute and Trait Ontology (PATO) without altering their meaning. OBI is being used in a wide range of projects covering genomics, multi-omics, immunology, and catalogs of services. OBI has also spawned other ontologies (Information Artifact Ontology) and methods for importing parts of ontologies (Minimum information to reference an external ontology term (MIREOT)). The OBI project is an open cross-disciplinary collaborative effort, encompassing multiple research communities from around the globe. To date, OBI has created 2366 classes and 40 relations along with textual and formal definitions. The OBI Consortium maintains a web resource (http://obi-ontology.org) providing details on the people, policies, and issues being addressed

  14. Towards Evidence-based Precision Medicine: Extracting Population Information from Biomedical Text using Binary Classifiers and Syntactic Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Kalpana; Dasot, Naman; Goyal, Pawan; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R

    2016-01-01

    Precision Medicine is an emerging approach for prevention and treatment of disease that considers individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person. The dissemination of individualized evidence by automatically identifying population information in literature is a key for evidence-based precision medicine at the point-of-care. We propose a hybrid approach using natural language processing techniques to automatically extract the population information from biomedical literature. Our approach first implements a binary classifier to classify sentences with or without population information. A rule-based system based on syntactic-tree regular expressions is then applied to sentences containing population information to extract the population named entities. The proposed two-stage approach achieved an F-score of 0.81 using a MaxEnt classifier and the rule- based system, and an F-score of 0.87 using a Nai've-Bayes classifier and the rule-based system, and performed relatively well compared to many existing systems. The system and evaluation dataset is being released as open source. PMID:27570671

  15. Towards Evidence-based Precision Medicine: Extracting Population Information from Biomedical Text using Binary Classifiers and Syntactic Patterns.

    PubMed

    Raja, Kalpana; Dasot, Naman; Goyal, Pawan; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R

    2016-01-01

    Precision Medicine is an emerging approach for prevention and treatment of disease that considers individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person. The dissemination of individualized evidence by automatically identifying population information in literature is a key for evidence-based precision medicine at the point-of-care. We propose a hybrid approach using natural language processing techniques to automatically extract the population information from biomedical literature. Our approach first implements a binary classifier to classify sentences with or without population information. A rule-based system based on syntactic-tree regular expressions is then applied to sentences containing population information to extract the population named entities. The proposed two-stage approach achieved an F-score of 0.81 using a MaxEnt classifier and the rule- based system, and an F-score of 0.87 using a Nai've-Bayes classifier and the rule-based system, and performed relatively well compared to many existing systems. The system and evaluation dataset is being released as open source. PMID:27570671

  16. Position Paper on Extra-Library Information Service. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myatt, DeWitt O.; Barclay, Donald A.

    Extra-library information services are helping libraries find solutions to the problems created by the changes in the information environment, the demand for current information, and the media by which the knowledge is distributed. There are three types of these services: (1) document handling systems, (2) data handling systems, and (3)…

  17. Human Services Information Clearinghouses: A Discussion of Policy Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Carol; And Others

    This report on the third phase of a two-year study of human services information clearinghouses discusses clearinghouses in terms of their role in information dissemination and diffusion, planning considerations, operational cost recovery, overlap and duplication in services, and evaluation techniques and measures. Information was gathered from…

  18. Challenges and Benefits of Chemical Information Service in Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Mary E.; Curtis, Jan M.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses chemical information services offered in industrial chemical libraries, based on experiences at the 3M Library. Topics include qualifications of chemical information professionals; corporate culture; clients; services, including reference, current awareness, confidentiality, and end-user support; and information resources, including…

  19. Libraries and E-Commerce: Improving Information Services and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lesley Ellen

    2000-01-01

    Explains e-commerce and discusses how it can be used by special libraries. Highlights include library goals; examples of successful uses of e-commerce; how e-commerce can improve information services, including access to information, new information resources, delivery of information, and broadening information markets; and developing an…

  20. An Effective Approach to Biomedical Information Extraction with Limited Training Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha

    2011-01-01

    In the current millennium, extensive use of computers and the internet caused an exponential increase in information. Few research areas are as important as information extraction, which primarily involves extracting concepts and the relations between them from free text. Limitations in the size of training data, lack of lexicons and lack of…

  1. Europlanet Integrated and Distributed Information Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Capria, M. T.; Chanteur, G.

    2009-04-01

    During the past decades the various disciplines in planetary sciences have developed to a very high international standard. But the collaboration between the different fields should be improved. To overcome the current fragmentation of the EU Planetary Science community and thereby to increase the scientific return of the related investment, the EU commission is funding via its Framework Program 7 the development of the "Europlanet Research Infrastructure -Europlanet RI". The Europlanet RI will consolidate the integration of the European Planetary Science community which started with Europlanet's FP6 project and will integrate major parts of the related distributed European infrastructure to be shared, fed and expanded by all planetary scientists. This infrastructure encompasses as diverse components as space exploration, ground-based observations, laboratory experiments and numerical modeling teams. Europlanet RI aims at bringing scientists from Europe and beyond together who are working in these fields, support the exchange of experts and ideas and make as many resources and data as possible available to the research community. A central part of Europlanet RI is the "Integrated and Distributed Information Service" or Europlanet-IDIS. The task of IDIS as central part of Europlanet is to provide an easy-to-use Web-based platform to locate teams and laboratories with special knowledge needed to support the own research activities, give access to the wealth of already available data, initiate new research activities needed to interpret accumulated data or to solve open questions, and to exploit synergies between space-based missions and capabilities of ground based observatories. It also offers to a wide range of teams and laboratories the possibility to share their data, advertise their capabilities and increase the scientific return by cooperation. IDIS is organized as an EU FP7 Support Activity, consisting of different access nodes which are connected by

  2. Biomedical image representation approach using visualness and spatial information in a concept feature space for interactive region-of-interest-based retrieval.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mahmudur; Antani, Sameer K; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R

    2015-10-01

    This article presents an approach to biomedical image retrieval by mapping image regions to local concepts where images are represented in a weighted entropy-based concept feature space. The term "concept" refers to perceptually distinguishable visual patches that are identified locally in image regions and can be mapped to a glossary of imaging terms. Further, the visual significance (e.g., visualness) of concepts is measured as the Shannon entropy of pixel values in image patches and is used to refine the feature vector. Moreover, the system can assist the user in interactively selecting a region-of-interest (ROI) and searching for similar image ROIs. Further, a spatial verification step is used as a postprocessing step to improve retrieval results based on location information. The hypothesis that such approaches would improve biomedical image retrieval is validated through experiments on two different data sets, which are collected from open access biomedical literature. PMID:26730398

  3. 78 FR 773 - Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc., Commercial/Actuarial/Information Delivery Services (IDS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc., Commercial/Actuarial/ Information Delivery Services (IDS)/Corporate & Financial Reporting Group, Hartford, CT; Notice of...

  4. 75 FR 16445 - Request for Nominations for Members to Serve on the National Technical Information Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... National Technical Information Service Request for Nominations for Members to Serve on the National Technical Information Service Advisory Board AGENCY: National Technical Information Service; Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Technical Information Service (NTIS) is seeking five...

  5. The Marketing of Information Analysis Center Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veazie, Walter H., Jr.; Connolly, Thomas F.

    Information analysis centers (IACs) represent a valuable national resource which has not been fully utilized, often because their products and services are not widely known. Recent Government economy measures demand consideration of increased marketability of these products and services and the institution of service charges as a possible source…

  6. Evaluating the Impact of a Special Library and Information Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botha, Erika; Erasmus, Rene; van Deventer, Martie

    2009-01-01

    The mere fact that a library service is being used does not mean that the service makes a difference or has a positive impact on the user. This has significant implications for Special Library and Information Services (SL&IS) that have to constantly prove that they add value. Because of the difficulty of measuring impact effectively, the majority…

  7. 76 FR 24889 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid® (caBIG®) Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on February 11, 2011 (76 FR 7867) and... Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG ) Support Service Provider (SSP) Program (NCI) Summary: Under the... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG ) Support...

  8. Computerized Information Service--SDI. Annual Report 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjerppe, Roland

    The Information and Documentation Centre of the Royal Institute of Technology Library performs research and development in information science. The two main areas of this continuing research and development programme are (1) development of a comprehensive SDI service and (2) investigations in interactive retrieval services. This annual report…

  9. Excerpta Medica Automated Storage and Retrieval Program of Biomedical Information. Excerpta Mark I System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excerpta Medica Foundation, Amsterdam (Netherlands).

    This is a report of the international operations of the Excerpta Medica Foundation whose aim is to further the progress of medical knowledge by making information available to the medical and related professions on all significant basic research and clinical findings reported in any language, anywhere in the world. To accomplish this task,…

  10. Quality of service management framework for dynamic chaining of geographic information services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchaga, Richard

    2006-06-01

    Dynamic chaining of geographic information services (geo-services) is gaining popularity as a new paradigm for evolving flexible geo-information systems and for providing on-demand access to geo-information. In dynamic chaining, disparate geo-services are discovered and composed at run time to yield more elaborate functionality and create value-added geo-information. Common approaches to service chaining discover and compose disparate geo-services based on the functional capability of individual geo-services. The primary concern of common approaches is thus the emergent behavior of the resulting composite geo-service. However, as geo-services become mundane and take on a greater and more strategic role in mission critical processes, deliverable quality of service (QoS) becomes an important concern. QoS concerns operational characteristics of a service that determine its utility in an application context. To address pertinent QoS requirements, a new approach to service chaining becomes necessary. In this paper we propose a QoS-aware chaining approach in which geo-services are discovered, composed and executed considering both functional and QoS requirements. We prescribe a QoS management framework that defines fundamental principles, concepts and mechanisms which can be applied to evolve an effective distributed computing platform for QoS-aware chaining of geo-services - the so-called geo-service infrastructure. The paper also defines an extensible QoS model for services delivered by dynamic compositions of geo-services. The process of orthophoto generation is used to demonstrate the applicability of the prescribed framework to service-oriented geographic information processing.

  11. An Evaluation of Alternative Designs for a Grid Information Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Warren; Waheed, Abdul; Meyers, David; Yan, Jerry; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Globus information service wasn't working well. There were many updates of data from Globus daemons which saturated the single server and users couldn't retrieve information. We created a second server for NASA and Alliance. Things were great on that server, but a bit slow on the other server. We needed to know exactly how the information service was being used. What were the best servers and configurations? This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the evaluation of alternative designs for a Grid Information Service. Details are given on the workload characterization, methodology used, and the performance evaluation.

  12. Growth Dynamics of Information Search Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindquist, Mats G.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of computer-based search services (ISSs) from a system's viewpoint, using a continuous simulation model to reveal growth and stagnation of a typical system is presented, as well as an analysis of decision making for an ISS. (Author/MBR)

  13. Music Informance as Embodied Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Mary Ann; Hotchkiss, Gwen; Noel, Marie; Huss, Ann; Holmes, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore a number of questions about the type and impact of service learning activities in the preparation programs for preservice teachers. They ask "what kinds of experiences are likely to benefit preservice teachers' understanding of collaborative partnerships?" and "what might they learn from preservice teachers'…

  14. Determining User Preferences for Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halperin, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the various techniques and methods employed to measure user preferences with respect to the provision of particular library services. The ranking of user preferences, direct judgment methods of measurement, tradeoff analysis, and conjoint analysis are among the topics discussed. A reference list is included. (JL)

  15. Information content and analysis methods for Multi-Modal High-Throughput Biomedical Data

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Bisakha; Henaff, Mikael; Ma, Sisi; Efstathiadis, Efstratios; Peskin, Eric R.; Picone, Marco; Poli, Tito; Aliferis, Constantin F.; Statnikov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of modern molecular high-throughput assaying includes diverse technologies such as microarray gene expression, miRNA expression, proteomics, DNA methylation, among many others. Now that these technologies have matured and become increasingly accessible, the next frontier is to collect “multi-modal” data for the same set of subjects and conduct integrative, multi-level analyses. While multi-modal data does contain distinct biological information that can be useful for answering complex biology questions, its value for predicting clinical phenotypes and contributions of each type of input remain unknown. We obtained 47 datasets/predictive tasks that in total span over 9 data modalities and executed analytic experiments for predicting various clinical phenotypes and outcomes. First, we analyzed each modality separately using uni-modal approaches based on several state-of-the-art supervised classification and feature selection methods. Then, we applied integrative multi-modal classification techniques. We have found that gene expression is the most predictively informative modality. Other modalities such as protein expression, miRNA expression, and DNA methylation also provide highly predictive results, which are often statistically comparable but not superior to gene expression data. Integrative multi-modal analyses generally do not increase predictive signal compared to gene expression data. PMID:24651673

  16. Information content and analysis methods for Multi-Modal High-Throughput Biomedical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Bisakha; Henaff, Mikael; Ma, Sisi; Efstathiadis, Efstratios; Peskin, Eric R.; Picone, Marco; Poli, Tito; Aliferis, Constantin F.; Statnikov, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The spectrum of modern molecular high-throughput assaying includes diverse technologies such as microarray gene expression, miRNA expression, proteomics, DNA methylation, among many others. Now that these technologies have matured and become increasingly accessible, the next frontier is to collect ``multi-modal'' data for the same set of subjects and conduct integrative, multi-level analyses. While multi-modal data does contain distinct biological information that can be useful for answering complex biology questions, its value for predicting clinical phenotypes and contributions of each type of input remain unknown. We obtained 47 datasets/predictive tasks that in total span over 9 data modalities and executed analytic experiments for predicting various clinical phenotypes and outcomes. First, we analyzed each modality separately using uni-modal approaches based on several state-of-the-art supervised classification and feature selection methods. Then, we applied integrative multi-modal classification techniques. We have found that gene expression is the most predictively informative modality. Other modalities such as protein expression, miRNA expression, and DNA methylation also provide highly predictive results, which are often statistically comparable but not superior to gene expression data. Integrative multi-modal analyses generally do not increase predictive signal compared to gene expression data.

  17. The Public Library Building and Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Gerard B.

    A library building consultant discusses ways in which public libraries can plan for the participation of their libraries in the National Information Infrastructure (NII). With participants ranging from schools to agencies of local government, large volumes of information will be passing through the NII network. Public libraries will be engaged in…

  18. Human gene mutation database-a biomedical information and research resource.

    PubMed

    Krawczak, M; Ball, E V; Fenton, I; Stenson, P D; Abeysinghe, S; Thomas, N; Cooper, D N

    2000-01-01

    Although 20 years have elapsed since the first single basepair substitution underlying an inherited disease in humans was characterised at the DNA level, the initiative has only recently been taken to establish central database resources for pathological genetic variants. Disease-associated gene lesions are currently collected and publicised by the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) in Cardiff, locus-specific mutation databases, and to some extent also by the Genome Database (GDB) and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). To date, HGMD represents the only comprehensive and publicly available database of gene lesions underlying human inherited disease. By July 1999, HGMD contained over 18,000 different mutations from some 900 human genes, the majority being single basepair substitutions. In addition to its potential as an information resource for clinicians and genetic counsellors, HGMD has allowed molecular geneticists to address a variety of biological questions through meta-analysis of the collated data. HGMD also promises to assist research workers in optimising mutation search strategies for a given gene. A questionnaire sent out to, and answered by, the editors of 20 key journals revealed that human genetics journals are increasingly reluctant to publish mutation reports. Electronic data submission and publication facilities are therefore urgently required. The World Wide Web (WWW) provides an excellent medium within which to combine the centralised management of basic mutation data, including rigorous quality control, with the possibility of publishing additional mutation-related information. In response to these needs, HGMD has both instituted a collaboration with Springer-Verlag GmbH, Heidelberg, to potentiate free online submission and electronic publication of human gene mutation data and developed links with the curators of locus-specific mutation databases. PMID:10612821

  19. Biomedical digital assistant for ubiquitous healthcare.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Soo; Hong, Joo-Hyun; Cho, Myeong-Chan

    2007-01-01

    The concept of ubiquitous healthcare service, which emerged as one of measures to solve healthcare problems in aged society, means that patients can receive services such as prevention, diagnosis, therapy and prognosis management at any time and in any place with the help of advanced information and communication technology. This service requires not only biomedical digital assistant that can monitor continuously the patients' health condition regardless of time and place, but also wired and wireless communication devices and telemedicine servers that provide doctors with data on patients' present health condition. In order to implement a biomedical digital assistant that is portable and wearable to patients, the present study developed a device that minimizes size, weight and power consumption, measures ECG and PPG signals, and even monitors moving patients' state. The biomedical sensor with the function of wireless communication was designed to be highly portable and wearable, to be operable 24 hours with small-size batteries, and to monitor the subject's heart rate, step count and respiratory rate in his daily life. The biomedical signal receiving device was implemented in two forms, PDA and cellular phone. The movement monitoring device embedded in the battery pack of a cellular phone does not have any problem in operating 24 hours, but the real-time biomedical signal receiving device implemented with PDA operated up to 6 hours due to the limited battery capacity of PDA. This problem is expected to be solved by reducing wireless communication load through improving the processing and storage functions of the sensor. The developed device can transmit a message on the patient's emergency to the remote server through the cellular phone network, and is expected to play crucial roles in the health management of chronic-aged patients in their daily life. PMID:18002325

  20. 75 FR 45600 - Information Collection; Customer Data Worksheet Request for Service Center Information Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... Farm Service Agency Information Collection; Customer Data Worksheet Request for Service Center... a currently approved information collection to support Customer Data Worksheet Request for Service.... Specifically, FSA is requesting comment on the form AD-2047, ``Customer Data Worksheet Request for SCIMS...

  1. Scientific and Technological Information Services in Australia: II. Discipline Formation in Information Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This second part of an analysis of scientific and technical information (STI) services in Australia considers their development in the context of discipline formation in information management. The case studies used are the STI services from Part I. A case study protocol is used to consider the extent to which the development of the services may…

  2. 78 FR 62658 - Proposed Information Collection; National Park Service Leasing Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; National Park Service Leasing Program AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: We (National Park Service... Madonna L. Baucum, Information Collection Clearance Officer, National Park Service, 1849 C Street...

  3. A Biomedical Information System for Retrieval and Manipulation of NHANES Data

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sukrit; Martins, David; Norris, Keith C.; Jenders, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The retrieval and manipulation of data from large public databases like the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) may require sophisticated statistical software and significant expertise that may be unavailable in the university setting. In response, we have developed the Data Retrieval And Manipulation System (DReAMS), an automated information system to handle all processes of data extraction and cleaning and then joining different subsets to produce analysis-ready output. The system is a browser-based data warehouse application in which the input data from flat files or operational systems are aggregated in a structured way so that the desired data can be read, re-coded, queried and extracted efficiently. The current pilot implementation of the system provides access to a limited amount of NHANES database. We plan to increase the amount of data available through the system in the near future and to extend the techniques to other large databases from CDU archive with a current holding of about 53 databases. PMID:23920922

  4. Scenario for Information Service, 19XX; A Forecast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Edward J.

    Information service in 19xx is the province of a relatively new, highly professionalized group of people known as Certified Information Consultants (CIC). The training of a CIC emphasizes first a grounding in various subject fields, followed by intensive study in the information characteristics and needs of established clientele groups, and the…

  5. A Comparison of Three Online Information Retrieval Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zais, Harriet W.

    Three firms which offer online information retrieval are compared. The firms are Lockheed Information Service, System Development Corporation and the Western Research Application Center. Comparison tables provide information such as hours accessible, coverage, file update, search elements and cost figures for 15 data bases. In addition, general…

  6. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information services. (a) Agreements for exchange of information. Subject to such terms and conditions as the...) Purpose of sharing agreements. Agreements for the exchange of information shall be used to the maximum... such an agreement, an environment of academic medicine which will help the hospital attract and...

  7. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information services. (a) Agreements for exchange of information. Subject to such terms and conditions as the...) Purpose of sharing agreements. Agreements for the exchange of information shall be used to the maximum... such an agreement, an environment of academic medicine which will help the hospital attract and...

  8. Facilitating biomedical researchers' interrogation of electronic health record data: Ideas from outside of biomedical informatics.

    PubMed

    Hruby, Gregory W; Matsoukas, Konstantina; Cimino, James J; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) are a vital data resource for research uses, including cohort identification, phenotyping, pharmacovigilance, and public health surveillance. To realize the promise of EHR data for accelerating clinical research, it is imperative to enable efficient and autonomous EHR data interrogation by end users such as biomedical researchers. This paper surveys state-of-art approaches and key methodological considerations to this purpose. We adapted a previously published conceptual framework for interactive information retrieval, which defines three entities: user, channel, and source, by elaborating on channels for query formulation in the context of facilitating end users to interrogate EHR data. We show the current progress in biomedical informatics mainly lies in support for query execution and information modeling, primarily due to emphases on infrastructure development for data integration and data access via self-service query tools, but has neglected user support needed during iteratively query formulation processes, which can be costly and error-prone. In contrast, the information science literature has offered elaborate theories and methods for user modeling and query formulation support. The two bodies of literature are complementary, implying opportunities for cross-disciplinary idea exchange. On this basis, we outline the directions for future informatics research to improve our understanding of user needs and requirements for facilitating autonomous interrogation of EHR data by biomedical researchers. We suggest that cross-disciplinary translational research between biomedical informatics and information science can benefit our research in facilitating efficient data access in life sciences. PMID:26972838

  9. Biomedical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Biomedical problems encountered by man in space which have been identified as a result of previous experience in simulated or actual spaceflight include cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone loss, muscle atrophy, red cell alterations, fluid and electrolyte loss, radiation effects, radiation protection, behavior, and performance. The investigations and the findings in each of these areas were reviewed. A description of how biomedical research is organized within NASA, how it is funded, and how it is being reoriented to meet the needs of future manned space missions is also provided.

  10. Information Persistence Services Designed to Support Home Care

    PubMed Central

    Queirós, Alexandra; Augusto, Filipe; Rodríguez, Yosvany Llerena; Cardoso, Carlos; Grade, José Miguel; Quintas, João

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the challenges faced by health and social care systems, in particular those related to actual demographic trends, home care emerges as a potentially cost-effective solution to answer the needs of citizens, and to allow the reallocation of resources to alternatives to hospitalization or institutionalization. Objective Home care services require cooperation between different actors, including health and social caregivers, care receivers, and their informal caregivers (eg, relatives or friends), across time, space, and organizational boundaries. Therefore, it is foreseeable that eHealth services can contribute to their improvement. The aim of this study is to evaluate information persistence services based on the Reference Information Model (RIM) of the Health Level Seven (HL7) version 3 to support formal caregivers, both health and social care providers, and informal caregivers in the context of home care services. Methods A pilot study was set up involving two Portuguese institutions that provide home care services for the elderly. Defining of information requirements was performed according to a comprehensive process. This included a review of the literature, observations of work activities, interviews with caregivers, care receivers and their relatives, analysis of paper documentation related to care receivers’ histories, health conditions and care plans, and brainstorming groups involving specialized professionals. Following this, information objects were implemented and validated. Results The methodological approach, as well as the information persistence services, proved to be robust and adequate to specify, implement, and validate different types of information objects related to home care services for the elderly. This study also reinforces the application of the RIM of the HL7 version 3 beyond the strict scope of health care, allowing the persistence of not only health care information, but also information related to social assistance

  11. 31 CFR 560.523 - Exportation of equipment and services relating to information and informational materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exportation of equipment and services relating to information and informational materials. 560.523 Section 560.523 Money and Finance: Treasury... services necessary for the establishment of news wire feeds or other transmissions of information...

  12. 31 CFR 560.523 - Exportation of equipment and services relating to information and informational materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exportation of equipment and services relating to information and informational materials. 560.523 Section 560.523 Money and Finance: Treasury... services necessary for the establishment of news wire feeds or other transmissions of information...

  13. Ohio White House Conference on Library and Information Services: Speak Out. Conference Background Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Library, Columbus.

    Developed as background material for the 1978 Ohio White House Conference on Library and Information Services, this document provides information in six areas of concern for Ohio libraries: (1) library and information services--library users, library collections, special user needs; (2) public awareness--definition, current status, suggestions for…

  14. The Importance of Information Analysis Centers in the Performance of Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Herman M.

    It is necessary to distinguish the functions, services and products of various types of information services. For example, document centers, clearinghouses, referral centers, and special libraries deal mainly with information in a broad sense. The main function of information analysis centers, however, is to optimize the ratio of knowledge to…

  15. FEDIX on-line information service: Design, develop, test, and implement, an on-line research and education information service

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The FEDIX Annual Status Report provides details regarding an on-line information project designed, developed and implemented by Federal Information Exchange, Inc., a diversified information services company. This document details the project design activities, summarizes the developmental phases of the project and describes the implementation activities generated to fulfill the project's objectives. The information contained in this document illustrates FIE's continuing commitment to serve as the link that facilitates the dissemination of federal information to the education community. This report reviews the project accomplishments and describes intended service enhancements.

  16. Reference and Information Service: The Inner Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagers, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Applies Timothy Gallwey's consciousness-altering techniques for physical activity (from his books on tennis and skiing) to the library reference situation, explaining methods that could help librarians overcome barriers in their activities while relying upon natural information-seeking abilities. (Author/JD)

  17. T's and Blues. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    This compilation of journal articles provides basic information on abuse of Talwin, a mild prescription painkiller (T's), and Pyribenzamine, a nonprescription antihistimine (Blues). These two drugs, taken in combination, produce an effect similar to that produced by heroin. Stories from "Drug Survival News,""Emergency Medicine," and "FDA Consumer"…

  18. Making Money: Fees for Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Alice Sizer

    1987-01-01

    Describes a continuing education course which addresses the dollar value of access to information and the mechanics of how to charge fees within an institution or as an entrepreneur. The significance of the topic, characteristics of students taking the class, and the course outline are reviewed. (MES)

  19. Pricing and Marketing Online Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Sheila Anne Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the pricing of online information in the broader context of marketing. Highlights include changes in the marketing context and issues of value relating to price; other reviews of online pricing; trends affecting price, including public sector involvement and the Internet; promotional pricing; price discrimination; and price aggregation…

  20. Experimental climate information services in support of risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, R. S.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Davidson, M. A.; Shea, E. E.; Nierenberg, C.; Dole, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    Climate variability and change impact national and local economies and environments. Developing and communicating climate and climate impacts information to inform decision making requires an understanding of context, societal objectives, and identification of factors important to the management of risk. Information sensitive to changing baselines or extremes is a critical emergent need. Meeting this need requires timely production and delivery of useful climate data, information and knowledge within familiar pathways. We identify key attributes for a climate service , and the network and infrastructure to develop and coordinate the resulting services based on lessons learned in experimental implementations of climate services. "Service-type" activities already exist in many settings within federal, state, academic, and private sectors. The challenge for a climate service is to find effective implementation strategies for improving decision quality (not just meeting user needs). These strategies include upfront infrastructure investments, learning from event to event, coordinated innovation and diffusion, and highlighting common adaptation interests. Common to these strategies is the production of reliable and accessible data, analyses of emergent conditions and needs, and deliberative processes to identify appropriate entry points and uses for improved knowledge. Experimental climate services show that the development of well-structured paths among observations, projections, risk assessments and usable information requires sustained participation in “knowledge management systems” for early warning across temporal and spatial scales. Central to these systems is a collaborative framework between research and management to ensure anticipatory coordination between decision makers and information providers, allowing for emerging research findings and their attendant uncertainties to be considered. Early warnings in this context are not simply forecasts or

  1. Government Information Locator Service (GILS). Draft report to the Information Infrastructure Task Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a draft report on the Government Information Locator Service (GILS) to the National Information Infrastructure (NII) task force. GILS is designed to take advantage of internetworking technology known as client-server architecture which allows information to be distributed among multiple independent information servers. Two appendices are provided -- (1) A glossary of related terminology and (2) extracts from a draft GILS profile for the use of the American National Standard Information Retrieval Application Service Definition and Protocol Specification for Library Applications.

  2. Promotion of Information Services: An Evaluation of Alternative Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Louis W.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The research reported here deals with the formulation and subsequent evaluation of different promotional programs for a batch-processed current awareness service provided by the Mechanized Information Center (MIC) at Ohio State University. (7 references) (Author)

  3. Information services platforms at geosynchronous earth orbit: A requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The potential user requirements for Information Services Platforms at geosynchronous orbits were investigated. A rationale for identifying the corollary system requirements and supporting research and technology needs was provided.

  4. Managing Technological Change in Libraries and Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klobas, Jane E.

    1990-01-01

    Examines factors to be considered in the management of technological change in libraries and information services. The organizational climate for change is discussed, and factors to consider when developing a strategy for introducing a new product, service, or system are described, including leadership, goals, political processes, marketing, and…

  5. Library and Information Services to Individuals with Disabilities. Reference Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussbaum, Ruth, Comp.; Strauss, Carol, Comp.

    This bibliography lists selective sources of information on providing library services for adults and children with disabilities. Its emphasis is on visual or physical disabilities that prevent reading or using standard printed materials. The selections, based on the holdings of the Reference Section, National Library Service for the Blind and…

  6. Commission of the European Communities and Its Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskell, Eric

    1978-01-01

    Following a brief outline of the library/documentation services available to the various departments of the European Communities located in Brussels and Luxembourg, the current information services provided by the main library of the commission are described. Plans for automation and conversion to microfiche format are outlined. (Author/JAB)

  7. Planning Microcomputer Information Services: The Institutional Research Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paschke, Barbara; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The need for information services offers institutional researchers with experience in systems design, data management, and analysis an opportunity to study the key issue involved in providing this service to the campus administrative community. The case of the University of Kansas is described. (Author/MLW)

  8. Academic Library Services Support for Research Information Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Jia Tina; Evans, Nina

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the use of a university library academic service to assist in research information seeking, and the role and value of the academic services in support of research from the viewpoints of both academic users and librarians. Ten Ph.D. students completed questionnaires followed by face-to-face discussions and four academic…

  9. Library and Information Services for Productivity. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamber, Linda

    For the purposes of this digest, productivity is defined as ways in which library and information services can assist agencies, industries, and individuals in producing goods and services effectively and profitably. Two fundamental issues that affect productivity are access and control; two major strategies for improving productivity are…

  10. Web 2.0 Strategy in Libraries and Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 challenges libraries to change from their predominantly centralised service models with integrated library management systems at the hub. Implementation of Web 2.0 technologies and the accompanying attitudinal shifts will demand reconceptualisation of the nature of library and information service around a dynamic, ever changing, networked,…