Sample records for biomphalaria alexandrina snails

  1. BOTANICAL EXTRACTS EXHIBIT DUAL ACTION AGAINST CULEX PIPIENS LARVAE AND BIOMPHALARIA ALEXANDRINA SNAILS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. M. ELYASSAKI; M. M. EL-SAYED

    Some extracts of Euphorbia helioscopia (Euphorbiaceae), Calendula micrantha (Compositae) and Azadriachta indica (Meliaceae) were screened for the control of Culex pipiens larvae, the vector of Filariasis and Biomphalaria alexandrina snails the vector of Schistosomiasis in Egypt. These plants exhibit dual effect on both pests which share the same aquatic breeding habitat and are of medical importance. B. alexandrina snails were

  2. The relationship between genetic variability and the susceptibility of Biomphalaria alexandrina snails to Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Azza H; El-Din, Ahmed T Sharaf; Mohamed, Ahmed M; Habib, Mohamed R

    2012-05-01

    In the present study, Biomphalaria snails collected from five Egyptian governorates (Giza, Fayoum, Kafr El-Sheikh, Ismailia and Damietta), as well as reference control Biomphalaria alexandrina snails from the Schistosome Biological Supply Center (SBSC) (Theodor Bilharz Research Institute, Egypt), were subjected to species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to identify the collected species. All of the collected snails were found to be B. alexandrina and there was no evidence of the presence of Biomphalaria glabrata. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR assays showed different fingerprints with varying numbers of bands for the first generation (F?) of B. alexandrina snail populations (SBSC, Giza, Fayoum, Kafr El-Sheikh, Ismailia and Damietta). The primer OPA-1 produced the highest level of polymorphism and amplified the greatest number of specific bands. The estimated similarity coefficients among the B. alexandrina populations based on the RAPD-PCR profiles ranged from 0.56 (between SBSC and Ismailia snails) to 0.72 (between Ismailia and Kafr El-Sheikh snails). Experimental infection of the F? of progeny from the collected snails with Schistosoma mansoni (SBSC strain) showed variable susceptibility rates ranging from 15% in the Fayoum snail group to 50.3% in SBSC snails. A negative correlation was observed between the infection rates in the different snail groups and the distances separating their corresponding governorates from the parasite source. The infection rates of the snail groups and their similarity coefficients with SBSC B. alexandrina snails were positively correlated. The variations in the rates of infection of different B. alexandrina groups with S. mansoni, as well as the differences in the similarity coefficients among these snails, are dependent not only on the geographical distribution of the snails and the parasite, but also on the genetic variability of the snails. Introduction of this variability into endemic areas may reduce the ability of the parasite to infect local hosts and consequently reduce schistosomiasis epidemiology. PMID:22510827

  3. The endocrine disrupter effect of atrazine and glyphosate on Biomphalaria alexandrina snails.

    PubMed

    Omran, Nahla Elsayed; Salama, Wesam Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Atrazine (AZ) and glyphosate (GL) are herbicides that are widely applied to cereal crops in Egypt. The present study was designed to investigate the response of the snail Biomphalaria alexandrina (Mollusca: Gastropoda) as a bioindicator for endocrine disrupters in terms of steroid levels (testosterone (T) and 17?-estradiol (E)), alteration of microsomal CYP4501B1-like immunoreactivity, total protein (TP) level, and gonadal structure after exposure to sublethal concentrations of AZ or GL for 3 weeks. In order to study the ability of the snails' recuperation, the exposed snails were subjected to a recovery period for 2 weeks. The results showed that the level of T, E, and TP contents were significantly decreased (p ? 0.05) in both AZ- and GL-exposed groups compared with control (unexposed) group. The level of microsomal CYP4501B1-like immunoreactivity increased significantly (p ? 0.05) in GL- and AZ-exposed snails and reach nearly a 50% increase in AZ-exposed group. Histological investigation of the ovotestis showed that AZ and GL caused degenerative changes including azoospermia and oocytes deformation. Interestingly, all the recovered groups did not return back to their normal state. It can be concluded that both herbicides are endocrine disrupters and cause cellular toxicity indicated by the decrease of protein content and the increase in CYP4501B1-like immunoreactivity. This toxicity is irreversible and the snail is not able to recover its normal state. The fluctuation of CYP4501B1 suggests that this vertebrate-like enzyme may be functional also in the snail and may be used as a biomarker for insecticide toxicity. PMID:24215068

  4. Spotlight on the in vitro effect of artemisinin-naphthoquine phosphate on Schistosoma mansoni and its snail host Biomphalaria alexandrina.

    PubMed

    El-Beshbishi, Samar N; El Bardicy, Samia; Tadros, Menerva; Ayoub, Magda; Taman, Amira

    2015-01-01

    Malaria and schistosomiasis are the two most important parasitic diseases in the tropics and sub-tropics with geographic overlap. Efforts have been made for developing new schistosomicidal drugs, or testing existing drugs originally used for non-related diseases. The antimalarial artemisinin-naphthoquine phosphate combination (CO-ArNp) was recently reported to be a promising novel antischistosomal therapy with potent in vivo activity against Schistosoma mansoni. In this work, we report the in vitro dose- and time-response effect of CO-ArNp against the Egyptian strain of S. mansoni, and its snail host, Biomphalaria alexandrina. Incubation of adult S. mansoni with CO-ArNp at 40 or 20 ?g/ml for 48 or 72 h killed all worms. Exposure of S. mansoni miracidia and cercariae to the molluscicidal LC50 of CO-ArNp (16.8 ?g/ml) resulted in 100% mortality of the free larval stages within 90 and 15 min, respectively. Moreover, incubation of adult B. alexandrina snails with this drug combination killed all snails at 40 ?g/ml within 24h. Scanning electron microscope revealed marked morphological and tegumental alterations on the different stages of the parasite and its snail soft tissue. Our study highlights the schistosomicidal and molluscicidal effects of artemisinin-naphthoquine phosphate. No doubt more studies are needed to clarify its potential value to control schistosomiasis. PMID:25291045

  5. Molluscicidal Activity of the Methanol Extract of Callistemon viminalis (Sol. ex Gaertner) G.Don ex Loudon Fruits, Bark and Leaves against Biomphalaria alexandrina Snails

    PubMed Central

    A Gohar, Ahmed; T Maatooq, Galal; R Gadara, Sahar; S Aboelmaaty, Walaa; M El-Shazly, Atef

    2014-01-01

    Methanol extracts of Callistemon viminalis (Sol. Ex Gaertner) G.Don Ex Loudon fruits, bark and leaves were tested for molluscicidal activity. Snails were collected and kept in dechlorinated water under standard condition. Ten adults Biomphalaria Alexandrina, of the same size, were introduced in plastic acquaria for each experiment. The fruits, barks and leaves were extracted with methanol and the methanol extracts were kept for testing as molluscicides. Different extracts proved to have molluscicidal activity against the vector of schistosomiasis, B. alexandrina snails. LC50 values for C. viminalis fruits, bark and leaves were 6.2, 32 and 40 ppm respectively. The C. viminalis fruits extract showed the highest effect against the tested snails. Histopathological studies proved that the site of action of all tested extracts was localized in the digestive system and hermaphrodite gland. PMID:25237345

  6. Biological and biochemical studies on Biomphalaria alexandrina snails, treated with low concentrations of certain molluscicides (synthetic and of plant origin).

    PubMed

    Abdel Kader, Ahmed; Hamdi, Salwa A H; Rawi, Sayed M

    2005-12-01

    The effect of low concentrations of different synthetic and natural mollusciciding agents may introduce to fresh water environment on reproduction and biochemical aspects of Biomphalaria alexandrina was studied. Different mollusciciding agents (copper sulphate, Bayluscide, Uccmaluscide, Agave filifera & A. attenuate) inhibited egg production, induced marked increased the percent of abnormal laid eggs and induced marked reduction in their hatchability. The maximal reductions in egg hatchability resulted with Bayluscide (0.0%) and Uccmaluscide (18%), A. filifera (21%) and A. attenuata (15%). All the antimolluscal materials caused a successful killing effect against miracidia and cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni. CuSo4, Bayluscide and Uccmaluscide killed 40% of the exposed miracidia and 50% of cercariae after an hour exposure. The plants sublethal concentration killed 100% of cercariae and miracidia after 6 hours exposure. Water leaving behaviour among the exposed snails was noticed especially during the first three weeks, showing maximal percentage (60%) after one week of exposure to Bayluscide. A general decrease in the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) especially with Bayluscide (48.4%) and in acetylcholine esterase activity in the haemolymph especially on applying plant molluscicide A. filifera (50.8%) was noticed. Transaminases showed marked elevations in activities during the 1st three weeks, then began to drop (ASAT: 61.5%, with Bayluscide & ALAT: 50.8% with Uccmaluscide). The results reflect the effect of the metabolic disorders on life, egg laying, egg hatchability, hepatic cells damages, lack of smooth transmission at nerve junction, loss of muscular coordination and convulsions, then snails' death. PMID:16333894

  7. Heavy metal concentrations in the freshwater snail Biomphalaria alexandrina uninfected or infected with cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni and/or Echinostoma liei in Egypt: the potential use of this snail as a bioindicator of pollution.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, O M S; Mossa, A-T H; El Einin, H M A

    2014-12-01

    In spite of using aquatic snails as bioindicators for water pollution, little attention has been paid to the effect of parasitism upon the concentration of heavy metals (Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn) in these organisms. The present study therefore aimed to compare the concentrations of heavy metals in trematode-infected Biomphalaria alexandrina collected from Kafer Alsheikh and Menofia provinces, Egypt, with uninfected snails from the same sites, in order to assess the effect of parasitism on the use of these snails as bioindicators. The concentrations of heavy metals in the soft parts and shells of snails were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results showed that the heavy metal profile in snails infected with Echinostoma liei was very different from that in snails infected with Schistosoma mansoni. The total concentration of heavy metals in E. liei-infected snails collected from Kafer Alsheikh or Menofia province was greater than in uninfected snails. In contrast, the total concentration of heavy metals in S. mansoni-infected snails was reduced compared with uninfected snails. In conclusion, the status of snails with respect to parasitic infection must be taken into consideration when these snails are used as bioindicators. PMID:23710821

  8. Characterization of Biomphalaria alexandrina-derived lectins recognizing a fucosyllactose-related determinant on schistosomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohamed H. Mansour; Hoda I. Negm; Abdel Hakim Saad; Nagwa I. Taalab

    1995-01-01

    Two novel lectins that bind selectively to a schistosome-associated fucosyllactose-related determinant have been characterized and purified from the hemolymph of Biomphalaria alexandrina, the snail vector of Schistosoma mansoni. Both lectins were purified by affinity chromatography on a column of equimolar mixture of d- and l-glucose coupled to epoxy-activated Sepharose 6B and sequential elution by d-glucose (designated BaSI) and l-fucose (designated

  9. Induced Changes in the Amino Acid Profile of Biomphalaria alexandrina Molluscan Host to Schistosoma mansoni Using Sublethal Concentrations of Selected Plant Molluscicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanad Soliman, Mahmoud; El-Ansary, Afaf

    Amino acid profiles of control and Solanum nigrum, Ambrosia maritima, Thymelaea hirsute, Sinapis arvensis, Peganum haramala and Callistemon lanceolatus-treated Biomphalaria alexandrina snails were investigated in a trial to correlate the amino acid profile of treated snails to their previously reported molluscicidal and biological effects. Amino acid profiles of the snails were greatly manipulated with the treatment of dry powdered sublethal concentrations of the six studied plant molluscicides. The disturbed amino acid profiles of treated snails were discussed in relation to the decrease in snail's egg laying capacity, reduction of their compatibility for the development of the schistosome larvae and cercarial penetration of mammalian skin.

  10. Bioactivity of Anagallis arvensis and Calendula micrantha plants, treated with ammonium nitrate, superphosphate and potassium sulphate fertilizers, on Biomphalaria alexandrina.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, B B; Tantawy, A A

    2000-12-01

    The survival rate of B. alexandrina snails maintained in aqueous solutions of the two tested plants (Calendula micrantha and Anagallis arvensis) decreased gradually with time until the 9th week and 10th week where the survival rate was zero in the high concentration of A. arvensis and C. micrantha, respectively, meanwhile, the survival rate of the control was 20%. Also, the two plants caused reduction in hatchability of snails egg masses. Thus, the percent of hatching in A. arvensis (82 ppm) was 46% and in C. micrantha was 72% compared with control (97.29%). Both plants reduced the infection rate of Biomphalaria alexandrina snails with Schistosoma mansoni miracidia to 41.17% and 61.9%, respectively, compared with control (90%). C. micrantha caused much higher reduction in snail infection rate than A. arvensis. The prepatent period was significantly prolonged in snails maintained at higher concentration of both plants. The cercarial output (expressed as mean number/snail) revealed that, A. arevensis caused a significant reduction in cercarial production than control. While, high concentration (120 ppm) of C. micrantha caused a significant elevation in the mean number of cercariae/snail. However, the total number of cercariae produced by all snails in each group showed a reverse relation with the tested concentrations in both plants. PMID:11198390

  11. Localization of tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactivity in the nervous systems of Biomphalaria glabrata and Biomphalaria alexandrina, intermediate hosts for schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Deborah; Habib, Mohamed R; Delgado, Nadia; Vaasjo, Lee O; Croll, Roger P; Miller, Mark W

    2014-08-01

    Planorbid snails of the genus Biomphalaria are major intermediate hosts for the digenetic trematode parasite Schistosoma mansoni. Evidence suggests that levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) are reduced during the course of S. mansoni multiplication and transformation within the snail. This investigation used immunohistochemical methods to localize tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, in the nervous system of Biomphalaria. The two species examined, Biomphalaria glabrata and Biomphalaria alexandrina, are the major intermediate hosts for S. mansoni in sub-Saharan Africa, where more than 90% of global cases of human intestinal schistosomiasis occur. TH-like immunoreactive (THli) neurons were distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and labeled fibers were present in all commissures, connectives, and nerves. Some asymmetries were observed, including a large distinctive neuron (LPeD1) in the pedal ganglion described previously in several pulmonates. The majority of TH-like immunoreactive neurons were detected in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), especially in lip and foot regions of the anterior integument. Independent observations supporting the dopaminergic phenotype of THli neurons included 1) block of LPeD1 synaptic signaling by the D2/3 antagonist sulpiride, and 2) the similar localization of aqueous aldehyde (FaGlu)-induced fluorescence. The distribution of THli neurons indicates that, as in other gastropods, dopamine functions as a sensory neurotransmitter and in the regulation of feeding and reproductive behaviors in Biomphalaria. It is hypothesized that infection could stimulate transmitter release from dopaminergic sensory neurons and that dopaminergic signaling could contribute to modifications of both host and parasite behavior. PMID:24477836

  12. Biomphalaria species in Alexandria water channels.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Naga, Iman F; El-Nassery, Suzanne M F; Allam, Sonia R; Shaat, Eman A; Mady, Rasha F M

    2011-09-01

    Of the several species of Biomphalaria snails worldwide that serve as the intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, Biomphalaria alexandrina is a species that is indigenous to Egypt. Recently, there has been much debate concerning the presence of Biomphalaria glabrata and the hybrid of the species with Biomphalaria alexandrina. Due to this debate, the absence of a clear explanation for the presence of B. glabrata in Egyptian water channels and the probability that they may be reintroduced, we conducted this field study to identify Biomphalaria species present in Alexandria water channels. Laboratory-adapted susceptible snails to Schistosoma mansoni of the following species were used as a reference; Biomphalaria alexandrina, Biomphalaria glabrata and their hybrid. These snails were used to perpetuate the Schistosoma life cycle at the Theodor Bilharz Research Institute (TBRI), Cairo, Egypt. Morphological and molecular studies were conducted on these reference snails as well as on the first generation of Biomphalaria snails from two areas in the Alexandria governorate. The morphological study included both external shell morphology and internal anatomy of the renal ridge. The molecular study used a species-specific PCR technique. The results demonstrated that there was an absence of Biomphalaria glabrata and the hybrid from Alexandria water channels. Moreover, the susceptibility patterns of these reference snails were studied by measuring the different parasitological parameters. It was found that Biomphalaria glabrata and the hybrid were significantly more susceptible than Biomphalaria alexandrina to the Egyptian strain of Schistosoma mansoni. The results demonstrated that if Biomphalaria glabrata was reintroduced and adapted to the local environment in Egypt, it would have important epidemiologic impacts that would have a serious effect on the health of Egyptian people. PMID:21458594

  13. Distinct binding patterns of fucose-specific lectins from Biomphalaria alexandrina and Lotus tetragonolobus to murine lymphocyte subsets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohamed H. Mansour; Fatma Abdul-Salam; Tahany Al-Shemary

    2005-01-01

    The putative expression of distinct terminally fucosylated glycoconjugates among murine lymphocyte subpopulations was sought using a Biomphalaria alexandrina-derived lectin (BaSI), of proven specificity to a fucosyllactose determinant, and the fucose-binding lectin from Lotus tetragonolobus seeds. Direct labeling of isolated lymphocyte subsets in suspension as well as immuno-histochemical and two-dimensional Western blotting assays demonstrated the exclusive expression of the BaSI-reactive ligand

  14. Semi field trials to control Biomphalaria alexandrina by different modes of exposure to certain plant and chemical molluscicides.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Bayaumy B; el-Khayat, Hanaa M M; Ragab, Fawzy M A; Tantawy, Ahmed A A

    2005-12-01

    Semi-field trials were carried out in Snail Research Station under simulated natural conditions to evaluate different modes of exposure to Anagallis arvensis and Calendula micrantha as plant molluscicides and bayluscide and copper sulphate as chemical molluscicides. Firstly, B. alexandrina were exposed to the tested molluscicides alone and in addition to two densities of aquatic plants. No apparent effect of aquatic plants on the activity of both plant and chemical molluscicides, this may be due that the two densities of the aquatic plants used were insufficient to interfere with the molluscicides action. Secondly, snails were pre-exposed to three sub-lethal concentrations of the plant molluscicides for 24h then to three concentrations of the chemical molluscicides and vice versa. The results indicate that the pre-exposure increases the snail mortality significantly in all treatments of bayluscide and A. arvensis (except in the highest concentration when the snails firstly exposed to bayluscide then to A. arvensis, where the two compared treatment showed 100%) and in all treatments of bayluscide and C. micrantha. Also, in one treatment of copper sulphate and A. arvensis (in the highest concentration when the snails firstly exposed to A. arvensis then to copper sulphate) and in three treatments of copper sulphate and C. micrantha, (in least and moderate concentrations when snails firstly exposed to C. micrantha then to copper sulphate and in the highest concentration when snails firstly exposed to copper sulphate then to C. micrantha). Thirdly, snails were exposed to mixtures of six different ratios of bayluscide and each of A. arvensis and C. micrantha. The results indicated that the snail mortality increased significantly only in the first treatment of bayluscide and A. arvensis mixtures and in treatment number 6 of bayluscide and C. micrantha. PMID:16333900

  15. Distinct binding patterns of fucose-specific lectins from Biomphalaria alexandrina and Lotus tetragonolobus to murine lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mohamed H; Abdul-Salam, Fatma; Al-Shemary, Tahany

    2005-01-01

    The putative expression of distinct terminally fucosylated glycoconjugates among murine lymphocyte subpopulations was sought using a Biomphalaria alexandrina-derived lectin (BaSI), of proven specificity to a fucosyllactose determinant, and the fucose-binding lectin from Lotus tetragonolobus seeds. Direct labeling of isolated lymphocyte subsets in suspension as well as immuno-histochemical and two-dimensional Western blotting assays demonstrated the exclusive expression of the BaSI-reactive ligand among multiple isoforms of two major 95 and 92 kDa and a minor 82 kDa acidic glycoproteins, selectively localized to the splenic marginal zone B lymphocytes of adult mice. The expression of the L. tetragonolobus lectin-reactive ligand was, on the other hand, restricted primarily to a single homogeneous 50 kDa acidic glycoprotein associated with a subset of the mature (PNA-) medullary thymocytes of adult mice as well as a minority of the immature (PNA +) thymocytes within the deep cortical region in newly born mice. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to mechanisms that govern lymphocyte development and homing. PMID:16164040

  16. Prey selection by molluscivorous cichlids foraging on a schistosomiasis vector snail, Biomphalaria glabrata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Slootweg

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers prey size selection by four molluscivorous cichlids feeding on the intermediate host snail of Schistosoma parasites, Biomphalaria glabrata. Haplochromis ishmaeli obtains its prey by crushing the snails between the pharyngeal jaws, whereas H. xenognathus, H. sauvagei and Macropleurodus bicolor apply both pharyngeal crushing and oral shelling. The fishes crushed significantly more snails with the highest reward in

  17. Molluscicidal activity of some Saudi Arabian euphorbiales against the snail Biomphalaria pfeifferi.

    PubMed

    Al-Zanbagi, N A; Banaja, A A; Barrett, J

    2000-05-01

    The comparative susceptibility of the snail vector of intestinal schistosomiasis, Biomphalaria pfeifferi to the action of extracts from Saudi Arabian Euphorbiales has been determined. Methanol and chloroform extracts of the plants tested (Jatropha glauca, Euphorbia helioscopia and Euphorbia schimperiana) were the most promising from the molluscicidal point of view with LD(50) values in the range 10-100 ppm. PMID:10771201

  18. Molluscicidal activity of some Saudi Arabian Euphorbiales against the snail Biomphalaria pfeifferi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Najia A Al-Zanbagi; Abdul-Elah A Banaja; John Barrett

    2000-01-01

    The comparative susceptibility of the snail vector of intestinal schistosomiasis, Biomphalaria pfeifferi to the action of extracts from Saudi Arabian Euphorbiales has been determined. Methanol and chloroform extracts of the plants tested (Jatropha glauca, Euphorbia helioscopia and Euphorbia schimperiana) were the most promising from the molluscicidal point of view with LD50 values in the range 10–100 ppm.

  19. Measurement of Selected Enzymatic Activities in Solanum nigrum-Treated Biomphalaria arabica Snails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Daihan, Sooad

    In the present study, glucose, acid and alkaline phosphatases (ACP and ALP), ?-amylase and lipase were measured for the first time in tissue homogenates of Biomphalaria arabica snails, molluscan intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni in Saudi Arabia. Also, the effect of sublethal concentrations (LC25) of dry powdered Solanum nigrum leaf was tested as plant molluscicide against this snail species. The tested enzymes were altered in molluscicide-treated snails compared to control. While ALP and amylase were slightly affected, ACP and lipase were significantly altered. Glucose as an important energy source for a successful schistosome-snail relationship was significantly reduced in molluscicide-treated snails. In conclusion, sublethal concentration of the molluscicide showed potent effect in disturbing snail biochemistry which may render them physiologically unsuitable for the developing of schistosome parasite. This could be considered as a promising strategy to control the disease.

  20. Compatibility of Ugandan Schistosoma mansoni isolates with Biomphalaria snail species from Lake Albert and Lake Victoria.

    PubMed

    Adriko, Moses; Standley, Claire J; Tinkitina, Benjamin; Mwesigwa, Gerald; Kristensen, Thomas K; Stothard, J Russell; Kabatereine, Narcis B

    2013-11-01

    In order to investigate the capacity of being intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, the Ugandan F1 generation of Biomphalaria snail species that were laboratory-bred from parent populations originally collected from either Lake Victoria or Lake Albert was challenged with sympatric and non-sympatric S. mansoni isolates. After a prepatent period of 20 days, a daily 10-hourly snail shedding for cercariae was done to determine the infection rate, cercarial production per hour and survival period of infected snails. The study suggests that when parasite strains from a different geographical origin is used for infection, survival of infected snails increase, leading to an increased transmission potential. Although earlier literature had indicated that the Lake Victoria Biomphalaria sudanica is refractory to S. mansoni, we showed that all Ugandan Biomphalaria spp., including B. sudanica from all locations, were highly susceptible to the S. mansoni isolates. Thus if B. choanomphala, which is an efficient intermediate host in Lake Victoria, is given an opportunity to occupy Lake Albert, it will most likely be compatible with the Albertine S. mansoni parasites. Equally, if B. stanleyi, currently restricted to Lake Albert invades Lake Victoria, it is likely to act as an efficient intermediate host. Future work should concentrate on intraspecific population-level differences in compatibility. PMID:23454225

  1. Reversing the Resistance Phenotype of the Biomphalaria glabrata Snail Host Schistosoma mansoni Infection by Temperature Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Knight, Matty

    2012-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata snails that display either resistant or susceptible phenotypes to the parasitic trematode, Schistosoma mansoni provide an invaluable resource towards elucidating the molecular basis of the snail-host/schistosome relationship. Previously, we showed that induction of stress genes either after heat-shock or parasite infection was a major feature distinguishing juvenile susceptible snails from their resistant counterparts. In order to examine this apparent association between heat stress and snail susceptibility, we investigated the effect of temperature modulation in the resistant snail stock, BS-90. Here, we show that, incubated for up to 4 hrs at 32°C prior to infection, these resistant snails became susceptible to infection, i.e. shedding cercariae at 5 weeks post exposure (PE) while unstressed resistant snails, as expected, remained resistant. This suggests that susceptibility to infection by this resistant snail phenotype is temperature-sensitive (ts). Additionally, resistant snails treated with the Hsp 90 specific inhibitor, geldanamycin (GA) after heat stress, were no longer susceptible to infection, retaining their resistant phenotype. Consistently, susceptible snail phenotypes treated with 100 mM GA before parasite exposure also remained uninfected. These results provide direct evidence for the induction of stress genes (heat shock proteins; Hsp 70, Hsp 90 and the reverse transcriptase [RT] domain of the nimbus non-LTR retrotransposon) in B. glabrata susceptibility to S. mansoni infection and characterize the resistant BS-90 snails as a temperature-sensitive phenotype. This study of reversing snail susceptibility phenotypes to S. mansoni provides an opportunity to directly track molecular pathway(s) that underlie the B. glabrata snail's ability to either sustain or destroy the S. mansoni parasite. PMID:22577362

  2. Purification and characterization of SM 37: a fucosyllactose determinant-bearing glycoprotein probed by a Biomphalaria alexandrina lectin on adult male schistosomes.

    PubMed

    Mansour, M H

    1996-08-01

    Utilizing a Biomphalaria alexandrina-derived lectin (BaSII) of proven specificity to a Schistosoma mansoni-associated fucosyllactose [(Fuc alpha 1-2)Gal beta 1-4 Glc] determinant, a 37-kDa determinant-bearing glycoprotein (Sm 37) was identified selectively on adult male schistosomes. Sm 37 was purified to homogeneity from extracts of adult male worms metabolically radiolabeled with [35S] methionine by BaSII affinity chromatography followed by separation on an HPLC column. Treatments with endoglycosidases, alkaline borohydride, as well as serial lectin affinity chromatography and analysis on 2-dimensional gels indicated that Sm 37 is synthesized as a 33-kDa polypeptide backbone that expresses the fucosyllactose determinant on the outer chain of a single N-linked complex-type glycan unit of either the biantennary or, to a lesser extent, the tri- or tetra-antennary types. The distinct structures of the complex oligosaccharides accounted for the expression of 2 isomorphs of Sm 37. the glycoprotein lacks other conventional high mannose-type or O-linked oligosaccharides and, as deduced from the N-terminal amino acid sequence, the Sm 37 polypeptide may be distinct from other schistosome polypeptides of known sequence. Based on the structural relatedness of the Sm 37-associated fucosyllactose determinant to the antigenic blood group H trisaccharide, these observations may have implications for mechanisms of these host-parasite interactions. PMID:8691365

  3. Evidence for a family of schistosome glycan-binding lectins in Biomphalaria afexandrina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohamed H. Mansour

    1995-01-01

    A novel family of isolectins that selectively recognize a schistosome-associated fucosyllactose determinant was identified in the hemolymph of Biomphalaria alexandrina, a snail vector of Schistosoma mansoni. Three lectins of this family were purified by serial affinity chromatography on a column of l-fucose and elution with a gradient of 0.1-1 Ml-fucose (designated BaSII and BaSIII), followed by a column of d-glucose

  4. Determination and quantification of Schistosoma mansoni cercarial emergence from Biomphalaria glabrata snails.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Matthew S; Lewis, Fred A; Driver, James D; Granath, Willard O

    2014-12-01

    Living and fixed samples of Schistosoma mansoni -infected Biomphalaria glabrata snails were used to determine the relative contributions of different snail tissues to cercarial emergence (shedding). Three methods of observations were employed: (1) direct microscopical observations of shedding snails; (2) microscopic analysis of 5 ?m serial sections (H&E stained) of actively shedding snails; and (3) scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations of snails that were fixed while actively shedding. For this investigation, there were advantages and disadvantages to using each method. We confirmed the results of others that there were 3 tissues of the snail that contributed most prominently to cercarial release (mantle collar, pseudobranch, and headfoot). Based on histological analysis of cercarial accumulations in presumed shedding sites in these 3 tissues, 57% of the cercariae could be seen in the mantle collar, 30.6% in the pseudobranch, and 12.5% in the headfoot. Other anterior structures were involved to a much lesser extent. SEM observations clearly showed cercariae emerging either body first, tail first, or likely emerging en masse from blebs, especially from the mantle collar. These studies provide a more quantitative appraisal of the role the different anterior snail tissues play in cercarial emergence. PMID:25019357

  5. Characterization of fucosyllactose determinant-bearing glycoproteins probed by a Biomphalaria alexandrina lectin in Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hoda I. Negm

    1996-01-01

    Utilizing a Biomphalaria alex-andrina-derived lectin (BaSII) of proven specificity to a Schistosoma mansoni-associated fucosyllactose [(Fuc ?1–2) Gal ?1–4 Glc] determinant, two determinant-bearing glycoproteins of 40 and 37 kDa were found to be synthesized by the cercarial stage of the parasite. The two glycoproteins were isolated by BaSII affinity column chromatography from extracts of cercariae metabolically radiolabelled with 35S-methionine. Treatments with

  6. Development of the Statocyst in the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria Glabrata (Pulmonata, Basommatophora)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Wenyuan; Wiederhold, Michael; Hejl, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The development of the statocyst of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata has been examined from embryo to adult. Special emphasis was put on the growth of the statoconia in the statocysts. In the statocysts of embryonic snails (90-120 h after oviposition) there is not a single statolith but an average of 40-50 statoconia per statocyst. The number of statoconia increases to 385-400 when the snails reach a shell diameter of 4 mm and remains relatively constant thereafter, irrespective of shell size. Small statoconia are found in supporting cells, which suggests that the statoconia are produced within these cells. The average diameter of statoconia and the total mass of statoconia increase with increasing shell diameter. The average number of large statoconia (diameter greater than 7 micrometers) per statocyst continues to increase from 2 to 10 mm animals while the number of small ones (diameter less than 4 micrometers) initially rises and then decreases after 4 mm. These results demonstrate continuous growth of the statoconia in the cyst lumen of Biomphalaria. The single statoconia vibrate in a regular pattern in vivo, indicating beating of the statocyst cilia. The statoconia sink under the influence of gravity to load and stimulate receptor cells which are at the bottom. The length of cilia and the size of statocyst gradually increase as the animal grows. However, the increase in the volume of the statocyst is relatively small compared with the increase in body weight during normal development.

  7. Advances in the Genomics and Proteomics of the Freshwater Intermediate Snail Host of Schistosoma mansoni, Biomphalaria glabrata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wannaporn Ittiprasert; Jocelyn Myers; Edwin C. Odoemelam; Nithya Raghavan; Fred Lewis; Joanna M. Bridger; Matty Knight

    \\u000a Molecular events governing the interplay between the intermediate snail host, Biomphalaria glabrata, and its parasitic trematodes are gradually being unraveled. The last 20 years has seen an upsurge in the number of gene\\u000a sequences and proteins that are expressed, differentially regulated, and diversified in this snail in relation to its role\\u000a as an obligate host for an important human pathogen,

  8. Effects of 17?-methyltestosterone on the reproduction of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Wendt, C L G; Borges, A C; Oliveira-Filho, E C; Miranda-Vilela, A L; Ferreira, M F N; Grisolia, C K

    2014-01-01

    17-?-methyltestosterone (MT) is a synthetic hormone used in fish hatcheries to induce male monosex. Snails hold promise as possible test models to assess chemicals acting on the endocrine system. Biomphalaria glabrata is an aquatic gastropod mollusk (Pulmonata, Planorbidae) that can be easily maintained in aquaria, predisposing the species for use in ecotoxicological testing. This study evaluated the reproductive effects of MT on B. glabrata by examining histological changes and its reproductive performance. Ten snails per group were exposed for 4 weeks to different concentrations of MT (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg/L). The total number of laid eggs, egg mass per group, size of type V oocytes, and production of spermatozoids were determined. Reproduction of B. glabrata was affected by MT. At the lowest concentration (0.01 mg/L), MT caused a statistically significant increase in the number of egg mass per snail compared with controls unexposed to MT. Histopathology analyses showed an increase in the sperm production at the higher MT concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/L. Chromatographic analyses of water samples showed that MT concentrations rapidly declined within a 96-h period. These results highlight the importance of giving more support to regulatory authorities, since MT is not registered for use on fish hatcheries in many countries around the world. Wastewater from fish farms discharged into aquatic ecosystems should be monitored for MT residues, since its presence could compromise the reproduction of other native snail species. PMID:24615026

  9. Diagnostic of Biomphalaria snails and Schistosoma mansoni: DNA obtained from traces of shell organic materials.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Roberta L; Jannotti-Passos, Liana K; Lira, Pollanah M; Carvalho, Omar S

    2004-08-01

    Freshwater snails belonging to the genus Biomphalaria act as intermediate hosts for the parasite trematode Schistosoma mansoni in Africa and in the neotropical region. Identification of such molluscs is carried out based on morphological characters and the presence of cercariae is verified through squeezing snails between two glass slides or by exposing them to artificial light. However, sometimes, the material collected includes molluscs with decomposed bodies or, yet, only empty shells, which precludes their identification and S. mansoni detection. Due to these difficulties, we have developed a methodology in which DNA may be extracted from traces of organic material from inside shells in order to identify molluscs through polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism and to detect S. mansoni into these snails, by using low stringency polymerase chain reaction. Species-specific profiles obtained from B. glabrata, B. straminea, and B. tenagophila snails and their shells, maintained in laboratory for ten years, showed the same profiles. S. mansoni profiles showed to be present in shell specimens as far as the eighth week after being removed from aquarium. PMID:15543413

  10. Schistosoma mansoni infection of juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata induces a differential stress response between resistant and susceptible snails

    PubMed Central

    Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Nene, Rahul; Miller, André; Raghavan, Nithya; Lewis, Fred; Hodgson, Jacob; Knight, Matty

    2009-01-01

    Schistosomes develop successfully in susceptible snails but are encapsulated and killed in resistant ones. Mechanism(s) shaping these outcomes involves the parasites ability to evade the snail’s defenses. RNA analysis from resistant (BS-90), non-susceptible (LAC2) and susceptible (NMRI) juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata to Schistosoma mansoni revealed that stress related genes, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp 70) and reverse transcriptase (RT), were dramatically co-induced early in susceptible snails, but not in resistant/non-susceptible ones. These transcripts were, however, down regulated upon exposure to irradiated parasites although penetration behavior of irradiated vs normal parasites were the same, indicating that Hsp 70 regulation was elicited by infection and not injury. Understanding molecular events involved in stress response transcriptional regulation of Hsp 70 in juvenile snails could pave a way towards the identification of genes involved in schistosome/snail interactions. PMID:19660454

  11. Schistosomin from the snail Biomphalaria glabrata: Expression studies suggest no involvement in trematode-mediated castration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si-Ming; Nian, Hong; Wang, Bo; Loker, Eric S.; Adema, Coen M

    2013-01-01

    By inhibiting reproductive hormones, the neuropeptide schistosomin produced by the snail Lymnaea stagnalis plays an essential role in parasitic castration mediated by the schistosome parasite Trichobilharzia ocellata during late stage infection. Here we report on the presence and expression of schistosomin in the snail Biomphalaria glabrata, a prominent intermediate host of the parasite Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequences from complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from B. glabrata contain a 17 aa signal peptide and a 79 aa mature peptide with 62–64% identity to schistosomin from L. stagnalis. Ontogenic expression at the protein and mRNA levels showed that schistosomin was in higher abundance in embryos and juveniles relative to mature snails, suggesting that schistosomin is likely involved in developmental processes, not in reproduction. Moreover, expression data demonstrated that infection with two different digenetic trematodes, S. mansoni and Echinostoma paraensei, did not provoke elevated expression of schistosomin in B. glabrata from early stage infection (4 days post exposure; dpe) to patent infection (up to 60 dpe), by which time parasitic castration has been accomplished. In conclusion, our data suggest that a role of schistosomin in parasitic castration cannot be established in B. glabrata infected with either of two trematode species. PMID:19393164

  12. Regulation of hydrogen peroxide release in circulating hemocytes of the planorbid snail Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Judith E.; Yoshino, Timothy P.

    2008-01-01

    Biomphalaria spp. serve as obligate intermediate hosts for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. Following S. mansoni penetration of Biomphalaria glabrata, hemocytes of resistant snails migrate towards the parasite, encasing the larva in a multicellular capsule resulting in its destruction via a cytotoxic reaction. Recent studies have revealed the importance of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (H2O2, NO) in parasite killing [1, 2]. It is assumed H2O2 and NO production is tightly regulated although the specific molecules involved remain largely unknown. Consequently, the potential role of cell signaling pathways in B. glabrata hemocyte H2O2 production was investigated by evaluating the effects of specific inhibitors of selected signaling proteins. Results suggest that both ERK and p38 MAPKs are involved in the regulation of B. glabrata H2O2 release in response to stimulation by PMA and galactose-conjugated BSA. However, the involvement of the signaling proteins PKC, PI3 kinase and PLA2 differs between PMA- and BSA-gal-induced H2O2 production. PMID:17981329

  13. The Structure of the Statocyst of the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria Glabrata (Pulmonata, Basommatophora)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Wenyuan; Wiederhold, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the statocyst of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata has been examined by light and electron microscopy. The two statocysts are located on the dorsal-lateral side of the left and right pedal ganglion. The statocysts are spherical, fluid-filled capsules with a diameter of approximately 60 microns for young and 110 microns for adult snails. The wall of the cyst is composed of large receptor cells and many smaller supporting cells. The receptor cells bear cilia which are evenly distributed on the apical surface. The cilia have the typical 9+2 internal tubule configuration. Striate rootlets originate from the base of the basal body and run downward into the cytoplasm. Side-roots arise from one side of the basal body and a basal foot from the other. For each receptor cell, the basal foot always points to the periphery of the surface, indicating that the receptor cell is non-polarized. The receptor cells contain cytoplasmic organelles such as mitochondria, ribosomes, rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, compact Golgi bodies and multivesicular bodies. Supporting cells bearing microvilli are interposed between the receptor cells. The junction complex between the supporting cells and the receptor cells is composed of adherens and septate junctions, while between supporting cells only the adherens junctions are present. The static nerve arises from the lateral side of the cyst and contains axons in which parallel neurotubules and mitochondria are found. The axons arise directly from the base of the receptor cells without synapse. In the cyst lumen there are unattached statoconia. The statoconia have a plate-like or concentric membranous ring structure. Based on the morphology, the function of the statocyst in Biomphalaria is discussed.

  14. Predation and control of laboratory populations of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata by the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J K; Kuris, A M

    1990-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted on predation by the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, on Biomphalaria glabrata, a snail intermediate host of human schistosomiasis. Prawns greater than 22 mm carapace length could consume snails of any size. Smaller prawns exhibited a size-specific upper limit on the size of snail they could kill. Below the maximum size of prey consumed, little selectivity for prey size was demonstrated. All prawns heavier than 2.5 g killed the largest size of snail offered (16 mm diameter). Consumption, in terms of the numbers of snails killed, and the snails' wet weight and percentage of prawn body weight eaten per day, increased with prawn size. Large prawns consumed snails at a high rate (39% of body weight per day). Population experiments demonstrated that a prawn of 25 mm carapace length could eliminate 95% of a population of 80 snails in a 20-1 aquarium within 20 days and all snails by day 40. A prawn of 15 mm carapace length could not eliminate all snails. Large snails (24% of the initial population) had some protection from predation because of their size. Although the snails bred continuously, no snails were able to recruit to these populations in the presence of small prawns. In contrast, snail populations in control aquaria without prawns expanded to a mean of 919 snails by the end of the experiment (day 70). Since M. rosenbergii are voracious predators on B. glabrata, exhibit considerable habitat overlap with the snail prey, and are likely to treat snails as highly preferred food, further experimentation on these prawns in the context of biological control of schistosomiasis is warranted. The ready availability of prawns through established prawn hatcheries and the synergistic use of these prawns in aquaculture may ensure the reliability of stocking procedures and meet the standards of availability and cost-effectiveness required of a biological control agent. Polyculture of Macrobrachium with fin fish (Tilapia) indicates that these prawns may be a particularly useful control agent in aquacultural environments. PMID:2260905

  15. Study of the snail intermediate hosts for Schistosoma mansoni on Itamaracá Island in northeast Brazil: spatial displacement of Biomphalaria glabrata by Biomphalaria straminea.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Constança S; Barbosa, Verônica S; Nascimento, Wheverton C; Pieri, Otavio S; Araújo, Karina C G M

    2014-05-01

    In 2012 a malacological survey of the breeding sites of Biomphalaria glabrata and B. straminea , the two intermediate host snails of Schistosoma mansoni , was carried out on Itamaraca Island in Pernambuco, Brazil. This study has now been extended by studying the competition between the two species. Snails were collected and dissected to identify the species and tests were performed to verify S. mansoni infection. Student's t test was used to compare the proportion between the two species and their breeding sites and a parasitological survey was conducted among local residents, using the Kato-Katz method. The spatial distribution of the two snail species was determined using TerraView, while a snail density map was constructed by Kernel estimate. The survey identified two breeding sites for B. glabrata with 17 specimens and 19 breeding sites for B. straminea with 459 snails, all of them negative for S. mansoni infection. The statistical analysis revealed that the proportion of the numbers of specimens and breeding sites of B. straminea (37.84 ± 9.01) were significantly greater than those of B. glabrata (8.50 ± 6.50). Parasitological examinations from 41 residents diagnosed two cases of schistosomiasis with parasite loads of 60 and 84 eggs per 1 g of stool, respectively. This indiction of a competitive process between the two snail species requires monitoring of schistosomiasis in the resident and travelling human populations occupying this environment, which could potentially result in social and economic changes on the island risking its attraction as a centre for eco-tourism. PMID:24893012

  16. Schistosoma mansoni in Susceptible and Resistant Snail Strains Biomphalaria tenagophila: In Vivo Tissue Response and In Vitro Hemocyte Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nacif-Pimenta, Rafael; de Mattos, Ana Carolina Alves; Orfanó, Alessandra da Silva; Barbosa, Luciene; Pimenta, Paulo Filemon Paolucci; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that is highly prevalent, especially in developing countries. Biomphalaria tenagophila is an important invertebrate host of Schistosoma mansoni in Brazil, with some strains (e.g. Cabo Frio) being highly susceptible to the parasite, whereas others (e.g. Taim) are completely resistant to infection. Therefore, B. tenagophila is an important research model for studying immune defense mechanisms against S. mansoni. The internal defense system (IDS) of the snail comprises hemocytes and hemolymph factors acting together to recognize self from non-self molecular patterns to eliminate the threat of infection. We performed experiments to understand the cellular defenses related to the resistance and/or susceptibility of B. tenagophila to S. mansoni. During the early stages of infection, fibrous host cells of both snail strains were arranged as a thin layer surrounding the sporocysts. However, at later stages of infection, the cellular reactions in resistant snails were increasingly more intense, with thicker layers surrounding the parasites, in contrast to susceptible strains. All parasites were damaged or destroyed inside resistant snails after 10 h of infection. By contrast, parasites inside susceptible snails appeared to be morphologically healthy. We also performed experiments using isolated hemocytes from the two strains interacting with sporocysts. Hemocyte attachment started as early as 1 h after initial infection in both strains, but the killing of sporocysts was exclusive to hemocytes from the resistant strain and was time course dependent. The resistant strain was able to kill all sporocysts. In conclusion, our study revealed important aspects of the initial process of infection related to immune defense responses of strains of B. tenagophila that were resistant to S. mansoni compared with strains that were susceptible. Such information is relevant for the survival or death of the parasites and so is important in the development of control measures against this parasite. PMID:23049828

  17. Fucoidan stimulates cell division in the amebocyte-producing organ of the schistosome-transmitting snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, John T; Belloir, Joseph A; Beltran, Roxxana V; Grivakis, Aris; Ransone, Kathryn A

    2014-11-01

    Adult Salvador (schistosome-resistant) strain Biomphalaria glabrata snails were injected with 5 ?l of 10 mg/ml solutions of the sulfated polysaccharides ? carageenan, dextran sulfate, fucoidan, and heparin, the nonsulfated polysaccharide laminarin, and the monosaccharides L-fucose and L-galactose, and mitotic activity in the amebocyte-producing organ (APO) was measured in histological sections at 24 h post injection. Among the substances tested, only fucoidan induced elevated mitotic activity. Desulfated fucoidan was not mitogenic, indicating that sulfate groups are required for activity. Schistosome-susceptible M-line snails possessed minimal or no hematopoietic tissue in their APO, which did not respond to fucoidan. Immersion of juvenile Salvador snails in 1 or 10 mg/ml solutions of fucoidan for 3 h did not elevate mitotic activity at 24 h post immersion, suggesting that the external and digestive tract epithelia of B. glabrata are impermeable to this molecule. These results provide support for the hypothesis that fucosylated glycans on the tegument and in excretory-secretory products of sporocysts of Schistosoma mansoni are in part responsible for increased mitotic activity in the APO of B. glabrata infected with this trematode or injected with its extracts. PMID:25233872

  18. The spatial and seasonal distribution of Bulinus truncatus, Bulinus forskalii and Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the intermediate host snails of schistosomiasis, in N'Djamena, Chad.

    PubMed

    Moser, Wendelin; Greter, Helena; Schindler, Christian; Allan, Fiona; Ngandolo, Bongo N R; Moto, Daugla D; Utzinger, Jürg; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2014-11-01

    There is a paucity of epidemiological and malacological data pertaining to schistosomiasis in Chad. In view of a recently articulated elimination agenda, a deeper understanding of the spatio-temporal distribution of schistosomiasis intermediate host snails is pivotal. We conducted cross-sectional malacological surveys during the dry season (April/May 2013) and after the short rainy season (October 2013) in N'Djamena, the capital of Chad. Snails were identified at the genus and species level using morphological keys and molecular DNA barcoding approaches. Those belonging to Bulinus and Biomphalaria were examined for cercarial shedding. Snail habitats were characterised and their predictive potential for the presence of schistosomiasis intermediate host snails explored. Seasonal patterns were studied using geographical information system and kriging in order to interpolate snail abundance data to make predictions at non-sampled locations across N'Djamena. Overall, 413 Bulinus truncatus, 369 Bulinus forskalii and 108 Biomphalaria pfeifferi snails were collected and subjected to cercarial shedding. During the dry season, one Bu. truncatus of 119 snails collected shed Schistosoma spp. cercariae (0.84%), while S. mansoni was shed by one of 108 Bi. pfeifferi snails (0.93%). None of the snails collected after the rainy season shed Schistosoma spp. cercariae. The abundance of Bu. truncatus and Bu. forskalii showed an inverse U-shape relationship with the square term of conductivity, i.e. low abundance at the lowest and highest levels of conductivity and high abundance at intermediate levels. Bi. pfeifferi showed a negative, linear association with pH in the dry seasons. It is planned to link these intermediate host snail data to infection data in human populations with the goal to draw a predictive risk map that can be utilised for control and elimination of schistosomiasis in N'Djamena. PMID:25545929

  19. Expression profiling and binding properties of fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs), plasma proteins from the schistosome snail host Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si-Ming; Zeng, Yong; Loker, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests an important role for fibrinogen-like proteins in innate immunity in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It has been shown that fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs), plasma proteins present in the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata, the intermediate host for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, are diverse and involved in snail innate defense responses. To gain further insight into the functions of FREPs, recombinant FREP proteins (rFREPs) were produced in Escherichia coli and antibodies (Abs) were raised against the corresponding rFREPs. We first show that most FREP proteins exist in their native conformation in snail hemolymph as multimeric proteins. Western blot analyses reveal that expression of multiple FREPs including FREP4 in plasma from M line and BS-90 snails, which are susceptible and resistant to S. mansoni infection, respectively, is up-regulated significantly after infection with the trematode Echinostoma paraensei. Moreover, our assays demonstrate that FREPs are able to bind E. paraensei sporocysts and their secretory/excretory products (SEPs), and a variety of microbes (Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeast). Furthermore, this binding capability shows evidence of specificity with respect to pathogen type; for example, 65–75-kDa FREPs (mainly FREP4) bind to E. paraensei sporocysts and their SEPs whereas 95-kDa and 125-kDa FREPs bind the microbes assayed. Our results suggest that FREPs can recognize a wide range of pathogens, from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, and different categories of FREPs seem to exhibit functional specialization with respect to the pathogen encountered. PMID:18562576

  20. Nimbus (BgI): An active non-LTR retrotransposon of the Schistosoma mansoni snail host Biomphalaria glabrata?

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Nithya; Tettelin, Hervé; Miller, André; Hostetler, Jessica; Tallon, Luke; Knight, Matty

    2009-01-01

    The freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata is closely associated with the transmission of human schistosomiasis. An ecologically sound method has been proposed to control schistosomiasis using genetically modified snails to displace endemic, susceptible ones. To assess the viability of this form of biological control, studies towards understanding the molecular makeup of the snail relative to the presence of endogenous mobile genetic elements are being undertaken since they can be exploited for genetic transformation studies. We previously cloned a 1.95 Kb BamHI fragment in B. glabrata (BGR2) with sequence similarity to the human long interspersed nuclear element (LINE or L1). A contiguous, full-length sequence corresponding to BGR2, hereafter-named nimbus (BgI), has been identified from a B. glabrata bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Sequence analysis of the 65,764 bp BAC insert contained one full-length, complete nimbus (BgI) element (element I), two full-length elements (elements II and III) containing deletions and flanked by target site duplications and 10 truncated copies. The intact nimbus (BgI) contained two open reading frames (ORFs 1 and 2) encoding the characteristic hallmark domains found in non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons belonging to the I clade; a nucleic acid binding protein in ORF1 and an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, reverse transcriptase and RNase H in ORF2. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that nimbus (BgI) is closely related to Drosophila (I factor), mosquito Aedes aegypti (MosquI) and chordate ascidian Ciona intestinalis (CiI) retrotransposons. Nimbus (BgI) represents the first complete mobile element characterized from a mollusk that appears to be transcriptionally active and is widely distributed in snails of the neotropics and the Old World. PMID:17521654

  1. Bibliotheca Alexandrina

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The ancient library at Alexandria was rightfully one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World and its spirit and commitment to the pursuit of learning is embodied in the modern Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt. As their mission statement notes, the library is to be "a center for dialogue between peoples and civilizations". This is no easy feat, and the web-browsing public can learn about their laudable efforts on this website. Visitors may first want to learn about the remarkable structure that houses the library, along with a variety of facts about this building's construction. While visitors who may be planning a visit to Egypt may wish to learn about tours of the building and the ways in which they may utilize their research collections, others may want to peruse the "Initiatives" area. Here they will find links to some of their digital projects, which include "Eternal Egypt", which offers an extremely media-rich site that allows visitors to explore over 5000 years of Egyptian civilization through timelines, objects, and interactive maps.

  2. Developmental toxicity, acute toxicity and mutagenicity testing in freshwater snails Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) exposed to chromium and water samples.

    PubMed

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Hamada, Natália; Grazeffe, Vanessa Siqueira; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Okazaki, Kayo; Granatelli, Amanda Tosatte; Pereira, Ivana Wuo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Nakano, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    A protocol combining acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and mutagenicity analysis in freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata for application in ecotoxicological studies is described. For acute toxicity testing, LC50 and EC50 values were determined; dominant lethal mutations induction was the endpoint for mutagenicity analysis. Reference toxicant potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) was used to characterize B. glabrata sensitivity for toxicity and cyclophosphamide to mutagenicity testing purposes. Compared to other relevant freshwater species, B. glabrata showed high sensitivity: the lowest EC50 value was obtained with embryos at veliger stage (5.76mg/L). To assess the model applicability for environmental studies, influent and effluent water samples from a wastewater treatment plant were evaluated. Gastropod sensitivity was assessed in comparison to the standardized bioassay with Daphnia similis exposed to the same water samples. Sampling sites identified as toxic to daphnids were also detected by snails, showing a qualitatively similar sensitivity suggesting that B. glabrata is a suitable test species for freshwater monitoring. Holding procedures and protocols implemented for toxicity and developmental bioassays showed to be in compliance with international standards for intra-laboratory precision. Thereby, we are proposing this system for application in ecotoxicological studies. PMID:25259848

  3. Contrasting the distribution of phenotypic and molecular variation in the freshwater snail Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Tian-Bi, Y-NT; Jarne, P; Konan, J-NK; Utzinger, J; N'Goran, E K

    2013-01-01

    Population differentiation was investigated by confronting phenotypic and molecular variation in the highly selfing freshwater snail Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni. We sampled seven natural populations separated by a few kilometers, and characterized by different habitat regimes (permanent/temporary) and openness (open/closed). A genetic analysis based on five microsatellite markers confirms that B. pfeifferi is a selfer (s?0.9) and exhibits limited variation within populations. Most pairwise FST were significant indicating marked population structure, though no isolation by distance was detected. Families from the seven populations were monitored under laboratory conditions over two generations (G1 and G2), allowing to record several life-history traits, including growth, fecundity and survival, over 25 weeks. Marked differences were detected among populations for traits expressed early in the life cycle (up to sexual maturity). Age and size at first reproduction had high heritability values, but such a trend was not found for early reproductive traits. In most populations, G1 snails matured later and at a larger size than G2 individuals. Individuals from permanent habitats matured at a smaller size and were more fecund than those from temporary habitats. The mean phenotypic differentiation over all populations (QST) was lower than the mean genetic differentiation (FST), suggesting stabilizing selection. However, no difference was detected between QST and FST for both habitat regime and habitat openness. PMID:23321708

  4. The Effect of Simulating Different Intermediate Host Snail Species on the Link between Water Temperature and Schistosomiasis Risk

    PubMed Central

    McCreesh, Nicky; Booth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A number of studies have attempted to predict the effects of climate change on schistosomiasis risk. The importance of considering different species of intermediate host snails separately has never previously been explored. Methods An agent-based model of water temperature and Biomphalaria pfeifferi population dynamics and Schistosoma mansoni transmission was parameterised to two additional species of snail: B. glabrata and B. alexandrina. Results Simulated B. alexandrina populations had lower minimum and maximum temperatures for survival than B. pfeifferi populations (12.5–29.5°C vs. 14.0–31.5°C). B. glabrata populations survived over a smaller range of temperatures than either B. pfeifferi or B. alexandrina (17.0°C–29.5°C). Infection risk peaked at 16.5°C, 25.0°C and 19.0°C respectively when B. pfeifferi, B. glabrata and B. alexandrina were simulated. For all species, infection risk increased sharply once a minimum temperature was reached. Conclusions The results from all three species suggest that infection risk may increase dramatically with small increases in temperature in areas at or near the currents limits of schistosome transmission. The effect of small increases in temperature in areas where schistosomiasis is currently found will depend both on current temperatures and on the species of snail acting as intermediate host(s) in the area. In most areas where B. pfeifferi is the host, infection risk is likely to decrease. In cooler areas where B. glabrata is the host, infection risk may increase slightly. In cooler areas where B. alexandrina is the host, infection risk may more than double with only 2°C increase in temperature. Our results show that it is crucial to consider the species of intermediate host when attempting to predict the effects of climate change on schistosomiasis. PMID:24988377

  5. Regulation of laboratory populations of snails (Biomphalaria and Bulinus spp.) by river prawns, Macrobrachium spp. (Decapoda, Palaemonidae): implications for control of schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2014-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis is a common parasitic disease endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. One barrier to achieving long-term control of this disease has been re-infection of treated patients when they swim, bathe, or wade in surface fresh water infested with snails that harbor and release larval parasites. Because some snail species are obligate intermediate hosts of schistosome parasites, removing snails may reduce parasitic larvae in the water, reducing re-infection risk. Here, we evaluate the potential for snail control by predatory freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii and M. vollenhovenii, native to Asia and Africa, respectively. Both prawn species are high value, protein-rich human food commodities, suggesting their cultivation may be beneficial in resource-poor settings where few other disease control options exist. In a series of predation trials in laboratory aquaria, we found both species to be voracious predators of schistosome-susceptible snails, hatchlings, and eggs, even in the presence of alternative food, with sustained average consumption rates of 12% of their body weight per day. Prawns showed a weak preference for Bulinus truncatus over Biomphalaria glabrata snails. Consumption rates were highly predictable based on the ratio of prawn: snail body mass, suggesting satiation-limited predation. Even the smallest prawns tested (0.5–2g) caused snail recruitment failure, despite high snail fecundity. With the World Health Organization turning attention toward schistosomiasis elimination, native prawn cultivation may be a viable snail control strategy that offers a win-win for public health and economic development. PMID:24388955

  6. Regulation of laboratory populations of snails (Biomphalaria and Bulinus spp.) by river prawns, Macrobrachium spp. (Decapoda, Palaemonidae): implications for control of schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Sokolow, Susanne H; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Human schistosomiasis is a common parasitic disease endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. One barrier to achieving long-term control of this disease has been re-infection of treated patients when they swim, bathe, or wade in surface fresh water infested with snails that harbor and release larval parasites. Because some snail species are obligate intermediate hosts of schistosome parasites, removing snails may reduce parasitic larvae in the water, reducing re-infection risk. Here, we evaluate the potential for snail control by predatory freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii and M. vollenhovenii, native to Asia and Africa, respectively. Both prawn species are high value, protein-rich human food commodities, suggesting their cultivation may be beneficial in resource-poor settings where few other disease control options exist. In a series of predation trials in laboratory aquaria, we found both species to be voracious predators of schistosome-susceptible snails, hatchlings, and eggs, even in the presence of alternative food, with sustained average consumption rates of 12% of their body weight per day. Prawns showed a weak preference for Bulinus truncatus over Biomphalaria glabrata snails. Consumption rates were highly predictable based on the ratio of prawn: snail body mass, suggesting satiation-limited predation. Even the smallest prawns tested (0.5-2g) caused snail recruitment failure, despite high snail fecundity. With the World Health Organization turning attention toward schistosomiasis elimination, native prawn cultivation may be a viable snail control strategy that offers a win-win for public health and economic development. PMID:24388955

  7. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein in the Hemolymph of the Planorbid Snail Biomphalaria glabrata Is a Pentagonal Dodecahedron (60 Subunits)

    PubMed Central

    Kapetanopoulos, Katharina; Braukmann, Sandra; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Tenzer, Stefan; Markl, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) play important neurophysiological roles and are of considerable medical relevance. They have been studied extensively, greatly facilitated by the gastropod acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBP) which represent soluble structural and functional homologues of the ligand-binding domain of nAChR. All these proteins are ring-like pentamers. Here we report that AChBP exists in the hemolymph of the planorbid snail Biomphalaria glabrata (vector of the schistosomiasis parasite) as a regular pentagonal dodecahedron, 22 nm in diameter (12 pentamers, 60 active sites). We sequenced and recombinantly expressed two ?25 kDa polypeptides (BgAChBP1 and BgAChBP2) with a specific active site, N-glycan site and disulfide bridge variation. We also provide the exon/intron structures. Recombinant BgAChBP1 formed pentamers and dodecahedra, recombinant BgAChBP2 formed pentamers and probably disulfide-bridged di-pentamers, but not dodecahedra. Three-dimensional electron cryo-microscopy (3D-EM) yielded a 3D reconstruction of the dodecahedron with a resolution of 6 Å. Homology models of the pentamers docked to the 6 Å structure revealed opportunities for chemical bonding at the inter-pentamer interfaces. Definition of the ligand-binding pocket and the gating C-loop in the 6 Å structure suggests that 3D-EM might lead to the identification of functional states in the BgAChBP dodecahedron. PMID:22916297

  8. Infectivity of Echinostoma friedi miracidia to different snail species under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Antoli, C; Trelis, M; Toledo, R; Esteban, J G

    2006-09-01

    The infectivity of Echinostoma friedi (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) miracidia was studied experimentally in a range of laboratory-reared snails that coexist in the same natural locality, namely Radix peregra, Lymnaea fuscus, L. truncatula (Lymnaeidae), Gyraulus chinensis, Helisoma duryi (Planorbidae) and Physella acuta (Physidae), and snails from different geographical origins acting naturally or experimentally as intermediate hosts of Schistosoma spp., namely Planorbarius metidjensis (from Málaga, Spain), Biomphalaria glabrata (Guadeloupe), B. alexandrina (Egypt) (Planorbidae), Bulinus cernicus (Mauritius), B. globosus (Zambia), B. natalensis (South Africa) and B. truncatus (Niger) (Bulinidae). Six species of snails were found to be susceptible, with the rate of infection ranging from 0 to 36.7%. The highest infection was detected in R. peregra. The low host specificity of E. friedi might have an epidemiological significance as a requisite for a recent establishment in a new geographical area. PMID:16923279

  9. Correlation between snails and fish in fish ponds of World Fish Center (ICLARM) with special reference to snail vectors of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nahed M M; El Gamal, Abd El Rahman A

    2003-08-01

    The abundance of snail species in earthen fish ponds, irrigation and drainage canals at World Fish Center (ICLARM) in descending order was Bellamya unicolor (50.89%) > Physa acuta (18.94%) > Cleopatra bulimoides (7.6%) > Lanistes carinatus (6.73%) > Bulinus truncatus (5.19%) > Melanoides tuberculata (4.83%) > Lymnaea natalensis (3.14%) > Gabbiella senaariensis (0.9%) > Biomphalaria alexandrina (0.55%) > Lym naea truncatula (0.4%) > Planorbis planorbis and Succinea cleopatra (0.33%) > Ferrissia isseli (0.18%). Dead snails constituted about 5.19% of all the collected specimens. There were dramatic decrease in the total number of pulmonates in fish ponds which contained only Tilapia sp., and a very small number of cat fish, whereas the numbers of prosobranchia snails were much higher in these ponds. In fish ponds which accommodated a variety of fish species, the most dominant snail was B. unicolor followed by L. carinatus. However, pulmonate snails were absent in these ponds. B. truncatus was the only snail species found in concrete tank which contained only young tilapias with a very small size (5-8 cm in standard length). In irrigation canals, the number of snails and diversity was much higher than those in fish ponds. Out of 191 snails collected from inlet irrigation canal, 71 were dead, but in the outside irrigation canals, seven out of 564 snails were dead. P. acuta was absent in all examined fish ponds, but it was alive and in a high number (497 snails) in the outside irrigation canals. The number of snails collected from Bahnasawy drain was remarkably low (128 snails), however the diversity of snails was much higher compared to those in fish ponds and irrigation canals. Snail populations were stable with constant recruitment of young to adult snails for all the studied species. PMID:14964656

  10. A family of variable immunoglobulin and lectin domain containing molecules in the snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Duval, David; Mouahid, Gabriel; Emans, Rémi; Allienne, Jean-François; Galinier, Richard; Genthon, Clémence; Dubois, Emeric; Du Pasquier, Louis; Adema, Coen M; Grunau, Christoph; Mitta, Guillaume; Gourbal, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Technical limitations have hindered comprehensive studies of highly variable immune response molecules that are thought to have evolved due to pathogen-mediated selection such as fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) from Biomphalaria glabrata. FREPs combine upstream immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) domains with a C-terminal fibrinogen-related domain (FreD) and participate in reactions against trematode parasites. From RNAseq data we assembled a de novo reference transcriptome of B. glabrata to investigate the diversity of FREP transcripts. This study increased over two fold the number of bonafide FREP subfamilies and revealed important sequence diversity within FREP12 subfamily. We also report the discovery of related molecules that feature one or two IgSF domains associated with different C-terminal lectin domains, named C-type lectin-related proteins (CREPs) and Galectin-related protein (GREP). Together, the highly similar FREPs, CREPs and GREP were designated VIgL (Variable Immunoglobulin and Lectin domain containing molecules). PMID:25451302

  11. Impact of certain plants and synthetic molluscicides on some fresh water snails and fish.

    PubMed

    Mosta-Fa, B B; el-Deeb, Fatma A; Ismail, Nahid M; el-Said, K M

    2005-12-01

    The LC50 (78, 85 ppm) and LC90 (88, 135 ppm) of Anagalis arvensis and Calendula micrantha respectively against Biomphalaria alexandrina were higher than those of the non-target snails, Physa acuta, Planorbis planorbis, Helisoma duryi and Melanoides tuberculata. In contrast, the LC50 of Niclosamide (0.11 ppm) and Copper sulphate (CuSO4) (0.42 ppm) against B. alexandrina were lower than those of the non-target snails. The mortalities percentage among non-target snails ranged between 0.0 & 20% when sublethal concentrations of CuSO4 against B. alexandrina mixed with those of C. micrantha and between 0.0 & 40% when mixed with A. arvensis. Mortalities ranged between 0.0 & 50% when Niclosamide was mixed with each of A. arvensis and C. micrantha. A. arvensis induced 100% mortality on Oreochromis niloticus after 48 hrs exposure and after 24 hrs for Gambusia affinis. C. micrantha was non-toxic to the fish. The survival rate of O. niloticus and G. affinis after 48 hrs exposure to 0.11 ppm of Niclosamide were 83.3% & 100% respectively. These rates were 91.7% & 93.3% respectively when each of the two fish species was exposed to 0.42 ppm of CuSO4. Mixture of sub-lethal concentrations of A. arvensis against B. alexandrina and those of Niclosamide or CuSO4 at ratios 10:40 & 25:25 induced 66.6% mortalities on O. niloticus and 83.3% at 40:10. These mixtures caused 100% mortalities on G. affinis at all ratios. A. arvensis CuSO4 mixtures at 10:40 induced 83.3% & 40% mortalities on O. niloticus and G. affinis respectively and 100% mortalities on both fish species at ratios 25:25 & 40:10. A mixture of sub-lethal concentrations of C. micrantha against B. alexandrina and of Niclosamide or CuSO4 caused mortalities of O. niloticus between 0.0 & 33.3% and between 5% & 35% of G. affinis. The residue of Cu in O. niloticus were 4.69, 19.06 & 25.37 mg/1kgm fish after 24, 48 & 72 hrs exposure to LC0 of CuSO4 against B. alexandrina respectively. PMID:16333905

  12. UDP-N-acetyl-?-D-galactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferase from the snail Biomphalaria glabrata - substrate specificity and preference of glycosylation sites.

    PubMed

    Taus, Christopher; Windwarder, Markus; Altmann, Friedrich; Grabherr, Reingard; Staudacher, Erika

    2014-12-01

    O-glycosylation is a widely occurring posttranslational modification of proteins. The glycosylation status of a specific site may influence the location, activity and function of a protein. The initiating enzyme of mucin-type O-glycosylation is UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide GalNAc transferase (ppGalNAcT; EC 2.4.1.41). Using electron-transfer dissociation mass spectrometry, ppGalNAcT from the snail Biomphalaria glabrata was characterized regarding its ability to glycosylate threonine and serine residues in different peptide sequence environments. The preferences of the snail enzyme for flanking amino acids of the potential glycosylation site were very similar to vertebrate and insect members of the family. Acceptor sites with adjacent proline residues were highly preferred, while other residues caused less pronounced effects. No specific O-glycosylation consensus sequence was found. The results obtained from synthetic peptides were in good correlation with the observed glycosylation patterns of native peptides and with the order of attachment in a multi-glycosylated peptide. The snail enzyme clearly preferred threonine over serine in the in vitro assays. No significant differences of transfer speed or efficiency could be detected using a mutant of the enzyme lacking the lectin domain. This is the first characterisation of the substrate specificity of a member of the ppGalNAcT family from mollusc origin. PMID:25338825

  13. Notocotylus biomphalariae n. sp. (Digenea: Notocotylidae)from Biomphalaria peregrina (Gastropoda: Pulmonata) in Patagonia, Argentina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Verónica Flores; Norma Brugni

    2005-01-01

    A new species of Notocotylus was found parasiting a freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria peregrina. Naturally infected snails were collected from two temporary ponds in the Nahuel Huapí National Park in Patagonia. The characteristics of the larval stages are presented. Experimental adults were recovered from the intestinal caeca of ducks and chicks. Adults of Notocotylus biomphalariae n. sp. exhibit an aspinose

  14. Fibrinogen-bearing protein genes in the snail Biomphalaria glabrata: characterization of two novel genes and expression studies during ontogenesis and trematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si-Ming; Nian, Hong; Zeng, Yong; DeJong, Randall J.

    2008-01-01

    All fibrinogen (FBG)-bearing proteins documented to date in the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata, the intermediate host of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, possess the same molecular structure; one or two immunoglobin superfamily (IgSF) domains at the N-terminus and a FBG domain at the C-terminus (named as FBG-related protein (FREP)). Here we report two novel genes that encode FBG-bearing proteins from B. glabrata. Different from all known FREPs, the first gene encodes a protein (657 amino acids (aa)) composed of a long N-terminal region with no sequence homology to any known protein, a middle epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeat region and a C-terminal FBG domain, designated FBG-related molecule (FReM). A differential expression at 2 days post exposure (dpe) to the trematode S. mansoni or Echinostoma paraensei has been found in the S. mansoni susceptible M line and resistant BS-90 snail strains. The second gene is a new member of the FREP family, designated FREP14, which encodes a 399 aa putative secreted protein. FREP14 is different from known FREPs in that it is encoded by a single locus and is not upregulated in early or late stage S. mansoni exposure, but is upregulated in late stage E. paraensei infection. Furthermore, gene expression during the snail’s ontogenesis and at a late stage of trematode-infection (52 dpe) has been investigated in the two newly-identified genes (FReM and FREP14) described in this paper and five representative members of known FREPs (FREPs 2, 3, 4, 12, and 13). A variety of expression patterns were observed, suggestive of functional diversity among the members of FBG-bearing proteins. Our findings further broaden our understanding of the diversity and function of the FBG-bearing protein encoded genes in B. glabrata. PMID:18417215

  15. Characterization of immune genes from the schistosome host snail Biomphalaria glabrata that encode peptidoglycan recognition proteins and gram-negative bacteria binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yong; Loker, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PGN) recognition proteins (PGRPs) and gram-negative bacteria binding proteins (GNBPs) play an essential role in Toll/Imd signaling pathways in arthropods. The existence of homologous pathways involving PGRPs and GNBPs in other major invertebrate phyla such as the Mollusca remains unclear. In this paper, we report four full-length PGRP cDNAs and one full-length GNBP cDNA cloned from the snail Biomphalaria glabrata, the intermediate host of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, designated as BgPGRPs and BgGNBP, respectively. Three transcripts are generated from a long form PGRP gene (BgPGRP-LA) by alternative splicing and one from a short form PGRP gene (BgPGRP-SA). BgGNBP encodes a putative secreted protein. Northern blots demonstrated that expression of BgPGRP-SA and BgGNBP was down-regulated in B. glabrata at 6 h after exposure to three types of microbes. No significant changes in expression were observed in snails at 2 days post-exposure (dpe) to the trematodes Echinostoma paraensei or S. mansoni. However, up-regulation of BgPGRP-SA in M line snails at later time points of infection with E. paraensei (i.e., 12 and 17 dpe) was observed. Our study revealed that exposure to either microbes or trematodes did not alter the expression levels of BgPGRP-LAs, which were consistently low. This study provides new insights into the potential pathogen recognition capabilities of molluscs, indicates that further studies of the Toll/Imd pathways in this phylum are in order, and provides additional ways to judge the importance of this pathway in the evolution of internal defense across the animal phyla. PMID:17805526

  16. Update of fasciolosis-transmitting snails in Egypt (review and comment).

    PubMed

    Dar, Y D; Rondelaud, D; Dreyfuss, G

    2005-08-01

    Several snail species may contribute in transmission of fasciolosis in Egypt. These molluscs show a variable sensibility to natural infections with Fasciola species. Radix natalensis is considered to be the essential intermediate host for F. gigantica based on field and experimental studies. Cercarial production from R. natalensis experimentally infected with F. gigantica is affected by the species of definitive host from which the eggs are obtained, as well as the different laboratory conditions. Another lymnaeid, Galba truncatula, may play a role in transmitting this parasite in Egypt, as it was found naturally infected with F. gigantica. Latter snail species, originated from France, was susceptible to experimental infections with Egyptian miracidia of F. gigantica and it had a cercarial production close to that of local R. natalensis. Two other snails, Pseudosuccinea columella and Biomphalaria alexandrina, were naturally found harboring larvae of Fasciola sp. At the level of intermediate hosts of F. gigantica, the conditions are thus favorable in Egypt to transmit fasciolosis which could also be caused by another fasciolid, F. hepatica, as the existance of this fluke was confirmed in Egypt. PMID:16083061

  17. Effect of Agave attenuata extracts on detoxification enzymes of Biomphlaria alexandrina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. R. Hamed; T. M. Maharem; N. M. Farid; Kh. Ramadan; M. H. Abdel Aziz

    2006-01-01

    The toxicity and rising costs of synthetic molluscicides have led to interest in compounds derived from locally growing plants\\u000a that can be used as molluscicides. The aim of the present work was to study the effect of extracts of some Egyptian plants\\u000a having lethal effect on snails of medical importance (Biomphlaria alexandrina) as well as on antioxidant and glutathione detoxification

  18. INTRODUCTION Embryos of the freshwater common pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    E-print Network

    Grosell, Martin

    4092 INTRODUCTION Embryos of the freshwater common pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis complete direct retention (Baldwin, 1935). Metamorphosis and shell formation have been observed for Lymnaea palustris (Morrill, 1982), L. stagnalis (Ebanks et al., 2010) and another freshwater pulmonate snail Biomphalaria

  19. 5-methyl-cytosine and 5-hydroxy-methyl-cytosine in the genome of Biomphalaria glabrata, a snail intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomphalaria glabrata is the mollusc intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, a digenean flatworm parasite that causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. An estimated 200 million people in 74 countries suffer from schistosomiasis, in terms of morbidity this is the most severe tropical disease after malaria. Epigenetic information informs on the status of gene activity that is heritable, for which changes are reversible and that is not based on the DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms generate variability that provides a source for potentially heritable phenotypic variation and therefore could be involved in the adaptation to environmental constraint. Phenotypic variations are particularly important in host-parasite interactions in which both selective pressure and rate of evolution are high. In this context, epigenetic changes are expected to be major drivers of phenotypic plasticity and co-adaptation between host and parasite. Consequently, with characterization of the genomes of invertebrates that are parasite vectors or intermediate hosts, it is also essential to understand how the epigenetic machinery functions to better decipher the interplay between host and parasite. Methods The CpGo/e ratios were used as a proxy to investigate the occurrence of CpG methylation in B. glabrata coding regions. The presence of DNA methylation in B. glabrata was also confirmed by several experimental approaches: restriction enzymatic digestion with isoschizomers, bisulfite conversion based techniques and LC-MS/MS analysis. Results In this work, we report that DNA methylation, which is one of the carriers of epigenetic information, occurs in B. glabrata; approximately 2% of cytosine nucleotides are methylated. We describe the methylation machinery of B. glabrata. Methylation occurs predominantly at CpG sites, present at high ratios in coding regions of genes associated with housekeeping functions. We also demonstrate by bisulfite treatment that methylation occurs in multiple copies of Nimbus, a transposable element. Conclusions This study details DNA methylation for the first time, one of the carriers of epigenetic information in B. glabrata. The general characteristics of DNA methylation that we observed in the B. glabrata genome conform to what epigenetic studies have reported from other invertebrate species. PMID:23742053

  20. Compatibility of Biomphalaria tenagophila with Schistosoma mansoni: a study of homologous plasma transference.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João R; Bezerra, Fernando S M

    2006-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the importance of the serum factors present in the plasma of resistant Biomphalaria tenagophila snails, when transferred to susceptible conspecific. Susceptible B. tenagophila (CF) received plasma from resistant B. tenagophila (Taim), and both were later infected with Schistosoma mansoni. We noticed that the plasma transfer showed an increase on the resistance of susceptible snails of about 86% when compared to the non-immunized group (p < 0.001). PMID:16699720

  1. Biomphalaria glabrata peroxiredoxin: Effect of Schistosoma mansoni infection on differential gene regulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matty Knight; Nithya Raghavan; Cheri Goodall; Carolyn Cousin; Wannaporn Ittiprasert; Ahmed Sayed; Andre Miller; David L. Williams; Christopher J. Bayne

    2009-01-01

    To identify gene(s) that may be associated with resistance\\/susceptibility in the intermediate snail host Biomphalaria glabrata to Schistosoma mansoni infection, a snail albumen gland cDNA library was differentially screened and a partial cDNA encoding an antioxidant enzyme thioredoxin peroxidase (Tpx), or peroxiredoxin (Prx), was identified. The 753bp full-length, single-copy, constitutively expressed gene now referred to as BgPrx4 was later isolated.

  2. Freshwater snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda) from the Commonwealth of Dominica with a discussion of their roles in the transmission of parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We collected six species of freshwater snails from Dominica, including Biomphalaria kuhniana, Gundlachia radiata Helisoma (= Planorbella) trivolvis, Melanoides tuberculata, Neritina punctulata, and Physa marmorata. Our collections indicate that un-reported species such as Gundlachia radiata and Hel...

  3. Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria: past history and future trends.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J A; Dejong, R J; Snyder, S D; Mkoji, G M; Loker, E S

    2001-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is one of the most abundant infectious agents of humankind. Its widespread distribution is permitted by the broad geographic range of susceptible species of the freshwater snail genus Biomphalaria that serve as obligatory hosts for its larval stages. Molecular phylogenetic studies suggest that Schistosoma originated in Asia, and that a pulmonate-transmitted progenitor colonized Africa and gave rise to both terminal-spined and lateral-spined egg species groups, the latter containing S. mansoni. Schistosoma mansoni likely appeared only after the trans-Atlantic dispersal of Biomphalaria from the Neotropics to Africa, an event that, based on the present African fossil record, occurred only 2-5 million years ago. This parasite became abundant in tropical Africa and then entered the New World with the slave trade. It prospered in the Neotropics because a remarkably susceptible and productive host, B. glabrata, was widely distributed there. Indeed, a snail similar to B. glabrata may have given rise to the African species of Biomphalaria. Schistosoma mansoni has since spread into other Neotropical Biomphalaria species and mammalian hosts. The distribution of S. mansoni is in a state of flux. In Egypt, S. mansoni has nearly completely replaced S. haematobium in the Nile Delta, and has spread to other regions of the country. A susceptible host snail, B. straminea, has been introduced into Asia and there is evidence of S. mansoni transmission in Nepal. Dam and barrage construction has lead to an epidemic of S. mansoni in Senegal, and the parasite continues its spread in Brazil. Because of competition with introduced aquatic species and environmental changes, B. glabrata and consequently S. mansoni have become less abundant on the Caribbean islands. Control of S. mansoni using praziquantel and oxamniquine has reduced global prevalence but control is difficult to sustain, and S. mansoni can develop tolerance/resistance to praziquantel, raising concerns about its future efficacy. Because of legitimate environmental concerns, snail control is unlikely to be an option in future control efforts. Global warming will impact the distribution of Biomphalaria and S. mansoni, but the magnitude and nature of the effects are poorly understood. PMID:11769285

  4. The population genetic structure of Biomphalaria choanomphala in Lake Victoria, East Africa: implications for schistosomiasis transmission.

    PubMed

    Standley, Claire J; Goodacre, Sara L; Wade, Christopher M; Stothard, J

    2014-11-19

    BackgroundThe freshwater snail Biomphalaria acts as the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, a globally important human parasite. Understanding the population structure of intermediate host species can elucidate transmission dynamics and assist in developing appropriate control methods.MethodsWe examined levels of population genetic structure and diversity in 29 populations of Biomphalaria choanomphala collected around the shoreline of Lake Victoria in Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania, where S. mansoni is hyper-endemic. Molecular markers were utilized to estimate the degree to which snail populations are genetically differentiated from one another.ResultsHigh levels of snail genetic diversity were found coupled with evidence of geographically-determined population structure but low levels of local inbreeding. The data are consistent with an effect of schistosome infection on population structure of intermediate host snails, but other factors, such as habitat and historical demographic changes, could also be important determinants of the degree of population genetic structure in Biomphalaria choanomphala.ConclusionsThe low stratification of populations and high genetic diversity indicates potentially less local compatibility with intermediate snail populations than previously theorized, and highlights the importance of coordinated parasite control strategies across the region. PMID:25406437

  5. Update on the distribution and phylogenetics of Biomphalaria (Gastropoda: Planorbidae) populations in Guangdong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Stephen W; Huo, Guan-Nan; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    In 1973 planorbid snails then identified as Biomphalaria straminea were discovered in Hong Kong, China. It was assumed that these snails had been introduced to Hong Kong via the import of tropical fish by air from South America. In 2012 Biomphalaria were found for the first time in Guangdong Province, China. In view of the renewed interest in these invasive snails, a morphological and DNA-sequence based phylogenetic study was undertaken for seven populations of Biomphalaria snails collected in Guangdong. Morphologically and phylogenetically, five of the populations clustered more closely with Biomphalaria kuhniana than with B. straminea. Levels of genetic diversity among the populations were about half those of autochthonous populations in Brazil, the phylogenetic relationships did not correlate with a radiation from any one international port in China, and different lineages appeared associated with different ports. Consequently in explaining the current distribution of the snails, multiple colonization events, each establishing a new local snail population near to maritime international container ports, were considered more likely than the spread of snails from Hong Kong to China. The displacement of B. straminea by B. kuhniana in Guangdong is considered as an explanation for the habitat changes observed among the snails between Hong Kong in the 1980s and the present. The conclusions of the study are that any risk of Schistosoma mansoni transmission in China is more likely to come from parasite importation in the intramolluscan stage, than from transmission by migrant workers from South America or Africa. In addition, although likely to be rare, sporadic outbreaks of imported schistosomiasis (caused by invading infected snails) could be a threat to public health in the vicinity of International container ports (not only in Guangdong Province). Further work is called for to investigate further the presence of B. kuhniana and its potential interactions with B. straminea (the former is thought to be incompatible with S. mansoni), and the responses of Chinese Biomphalaria to potential competitors such as Thiaridae. The current expansion of container ports in Brazil and Venezuela, and the increase in trade with China, is likely to accentuate any current risk of imported schistosomiasis, and surveillance around ports in China, together with further research, are necessary. PMID:24811366

  6. [Molluscicide activity of some natural products on Biomphalaria glabrata].

    PubMed

    Mendes, N M; de Souza, C P; Araújo, N; Pereira, J P; Katz, N

    1986-01-01

    The molluscicide activity of aqueous (macerated and boiled), hexanic and ethylic extracts of Aristolochia brasiliensis, Caesalpinia peltophoroides, Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Delonix regia, Spathodea campanulata and Tibouchina scrobiculata was evaluated in the laboratory. The solutions obtained from those extracts were tested on adults and egg masses of Biomphalaria glabrata reared in the laboratory at 1, 10, 20, 100 and 1000 ppm concentrations. The most active of the extracts studied was D. regia flowers' (flamboyant) ethylic extracts which presented molluscicidal activity on adult snails at 20 ppm. PMID:3796282

  7. A Novel Bacterial Pathogen of Biomphalaria glabrata: A Potential Weapon for Schistosomiasis Control?

    PubMed Central

    Duval, David; Galinier, Richard; Mouahid, Gabriel; Toulza, Eve; Allienne, Jean François; Portela, Julien; Calvayrac, Christophe; Rognon, Anne; Arancibia, Nathalie; Mitta, Guillaume; Théron, André; Gourbal, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is the second-most widespread tropical parasitic disease after malaria. Various research strategies and treatment programs for achieving the objective of eradicating schistosomiasis within a decade have been recommended and supported by the World Health Organization. One of these approaches is based on the control of snail vectors in endemic areas. Previous field studies have shown that competitor or predator introduction can reduce snail numbers, but no systematic investigation has ever been conducted to identify snail microbial pathogens and evaluate their molluscicidal effects. Methodology/Principal findings In populations of Biomphalaria glabrata snails experiencing high mortalities, white nodules were visible on snail bodies. Infectious agents were isolated from such nodules. Only one type of bacteria, identified as a new species of Paenibacillus named Candidatus Paenibacillus glabratella, was found, and was shown to be closely related to P. alvei through 16S and Rpob DNA analysis. Histopathological examination showed extensive bacterial infiltration leading to overall tissue disorganization. Exposure of healthy snails to Paenibacillus-infected snails caused massive mortality. Moreover, eggs laid by infected snails were also infected, decreasing hatching but without apparent effects on spawning. Embryonic lethality was correlated with the presence of pathogenic bacteria in eggs. Conclusions/Significance This is the first account of a novel Paenibacillus strain, Ca. Paenibacillus glabratella, as a snail microbial pathogen. Since this strain affects both adult and embryonic stages and causes significant mortality, it may hold promise as a biocontrol agent to limit schistosomiasis transmission in the field. PMID:25719489

  8. Water snails

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Scott Bauer (USDA; ARS)

    2005-08-03

    Water snails have a shell for protection. They have two tentacles, a foot, and a head and a tail region. Water snails have eyes at the base of their sensory stalks. The stalks are used to smell and feel around the snail's environment.

  9. Malacological survey and geographical distribution of vector snails for schistosomiasis within informal settlements of Kisumu City, western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although schistosomiasis is generally considered a rural phenomenon, infections have been reported within urban settings. Based on observations of high prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni infection in schools within the informal settlements of Kisumu City, a follow-up malacological survey incorporating 81 sites within 6 informal settlements of the City was conducted to determine the presence of intermediate host snails and ascertain whether active transmission was occurring within these areas. Methods Surveyed sites were mapped using a geographical information system. Cercaria shedding was determined from snails and species of snails identified based on shell morphology. Vegetation cover and presence of algal mass at the sites was recorded, and the physico-chemical characteristics of the water including pH and temperature were determined using a pH meter with a glass electrode and a temperature probe. Results Out of 1,059 snails collected, 407 (38.4%) were putatively identified as Biomphalaria sudanica, 425 (40.1%) as Biomphalaria pfeifferi and 227 (21.5%) as Bulinus globosus. The spatial distribution of snails was clustered, with few sites accounting for most of the snails. The highest snail abundance was recorded in Nyamasaria (543 snails) followed by Nyalenda B (313 snails). As expected, the mean snail abundance was higher along the lakeshore (18 ± 12 snails) compared to inland sites (dams, rivers and springs) (11 ± 32 snails) (F1, 79 = 38.8, P < 0.0001). Overall, 19 (1.8%) of the snails collected shed schistosome cercariae. Interestingly, the proportion of infected Biomphalaria snails was higher in the inland (2.7%) compared to the lakeshore sites (0.3%) (P = 0.0109). B. sudanica was more abundant in sites along the lakeshore whereas B. pfeifferi and B. globosus were more abundant in the inland sites. Biomphalaria and Bulinus snails were found at 16 and 11 out of the 56 inland sites, respectively. Conclusions The high abundance of Biomphalaria and Bulinus spp. as well as observation of field-caught snails shedding cercariae confirmed that besides Lake Victoria, the local risk for schistosomiasis transmission exists within the informal settlements of Kisumu City. Prospective control interventions in these areas need to incorporate focal snail control to complement chemotherapy in reducing transmission. PMID:22152486

  10. Lethal and Sub-lethal Effects of UVB on Juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Pulmonata)

    PubMed Central

    Ruelas, Debbie S.; Karentz, Deneb; Sullivan, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Although Schistosoma mansoni occurs mainly in the tropics, where intense levels of solar radiation are present, the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on schistosome transmission is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential effects of UVB (290–320 nm) on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of S. mansoni. Albino and wild type snails were exposed to doses of UVB from UV-fluorescent lamps, and the following were measured: survival, photoreactivation (light-mediated DNA repair), effects on feeding behavior, and morphological tissue abnormalities. Irradiation with UVB is lethal to B. glabrata in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to white light subsequent to UVB irradiation enhances survival, probably by photoreactivation. The shell offers some, but not complete, protection. Experiments in which UVB transmittance through the shell was blocked with black nail polish suggest that injury to both exposed (headfoot) and shell-enclosed (mantle and visceral mass) tissues contributes to mortality in lethally-irradiated snails. Wild-type (pigmented) snails are less susceptible to lethal effects of UVB than albino snails, and they may be more capable of photoreactivation. UVB exposure inhibits snail feeding behavior, and causes tentacle forks and growths on the headfoot. Thus, UVB may influence the life cycle of S. mansoni by both lethal and sub-lethal damage to the snail intermediate host. However, the ability of snails to photoreactivate may mitigate these effects. PMID:16996081

  11. Biomphalaria glabrata peroxiredoxin: effect of Schistosoma mansoni infection on differential gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Matty; Raghavan, Nithya; Goodall, Cheri; Cousin, Carolyn; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Sayed, Ahmed; Miller, Andre; Williams, David L; Bayne, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    To identify gene(s) that may be associated with resistance/susceptibility in the intermediate snail host Biomphalaria glabrata to Schistosoma mansoni infection, a snail albumen gland cDNA library was differentially screened and a partial cDNA encoding an antioxidant enzyme thioredoxin peroxidase (Tpx), or peroxiredoxin (Prx), was identified. The 753 bp full-length, single-copy, constitutively expressed gene now referred to as BgPrx4 was later isolated. BgPrx4 is a 2-Cys peroxiredoxin containing the conserved peroxidatic cysteine (CP) in the N-terminus and the resolving cysteine (CR) in the C-terminus. Sequence analysis of BgPrx4 from both resistant and susceptible snails revealed the presence of several (at least 7) Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). Phylogenetic analysis indicated BgPrx4 to resemble a homolog of human peroxiredoxin, PRDX4. Northern analysis of hepatopancreas RNA from both resistant and susceptible snails showed that upon parasite exposure there were qualitative changes in gene expression. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed differences in the levels of BgPrx4 transcript induction following infection, with the transcript up-regulated in resistant snails during the early phase (5 h) of infection compared to susceptible snails in which it was down-regulated within the early time period. While there was an increase in transcription in susceptible snails later (48 h) post- infection, this never reached the levels detected in resistant snails. A similar trend - higher, earlier up-regulation in the resistant snails but lower, slower protein expression in susceptible snails - was observed by Western blot analysis. Enzymatic analysis of the purified, recombinant BgPrx4 revealed the snail sequence to function as Prx but with an unusual ability to use both thioredoxin and glutathione as substrates. PMID:19439374

  12. Environmental Epidemiology of Intestinal Schistosomiasis in Uganda: Population Dynamics of Biomphalaria (Gastropoda: Planorbidae) in Lake Albert and Lake Victoria with Observations on Natural Infections with Digenetic Trematodes

    PubMed Central

    Rowel, Candia; Fred, Besigye; Sousa-Figueiredo, Jose C.; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Stothard, J. Russell

    2015-01-01

    This study documented the population dynamics of Biomphalaria and associated natural infections with digenetic trematodes, along the shores of Lake Albert and Lake Victoria, recording local physicochemical factors. Over a two-and-a-half-year study period with monthly sampling, physicochemical factors were measured at 12 survey sites and all freshwater snails were collected. Retained Biomphalaria were subsequently monitored in laboratory aquaria for shedding trematode cercariae, which were classified as either human infective (Schistosoma mansoni) or nonhuman infective. The population dynamics of Biomphalaria differed by location and by lake and had positive relationship with pH (P < 0.001) in both lakes and negative relationship with conductivity (P = 0.04) in Lake Albert. Of the Biomphalaria collected in Lake Albert (N = 6,183), 8.9% were infected with digenetic trematodes of which 15.8% were shedding S. mansoni cercariae and 84.2% with nonhuman infective cercariae. In Lake Victoria, 2.1% of collected Biomphalaria??(N = 13,172) were infected with digenetic trematodes with 13.9% shedding S. mansoni cercariae, 85.7% shedding nonhuman infective cercariae, and 0.4% of infected snails shedding both types of cercariae. Upon morphological identification, species of Biomphalaria infected included B. sudanica, B. pfeifferi, and B. stanleyi in Lake Albert and B. sudanica, B. pfeifferi, and B. choanomphala in Lake Victoria. The study found the physicochemical factors that influenced Biomphalaria population and infections. The number and extent of snails shedding S. mansoni cercariae illustrate the high risk of transmission within these lake settings. For better control of this disease, greater effort should be placed on reducing environmental contamination by improvement of local water sanitation and hygiene. PMID:25705680

  13. Environmental epidemiology of intestinal schistosomiasis in Uganda: population dynamics of biomphalaria (gastropoda: planorbidae) in lake albert and lake victoria with observations on natural infections with digenetic trematodes.

    PubMed

    Rowel, Candia; Fred, Besigye; Betson, Martha; Sousa-Figueiredo, Jose C; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Stothard, J Russell

    2015-01-01

    This study documented the population dynamics of Biomphalaria and associated natural infections with digenetic trematodes, along the shores of Lake Albert and Lake Victoria, recording local physicochemical factors. Over a two-and-a-half-year study period with monthly sampling, physicochemical factors were measured at 12 survey sites and all freshwater snails were collected. Retained Biomphalaria were subsequently monitored in laboratory aquaria for shedding trematode cercariae, which were classified as either human infective (Schistosoma mansoni) or nonhuman infective. The population dynamics of Biomphalaria differed by location and by lake and had positive relationship with pH (P < 0.001) in both lakes and negative relationship with conductivity (P = 0.04) in Lake Albert. Of the Biomphalaria collected in Lake Albert (N = 6,183), 8.9% were infected with digenetic trematodes of which 15.8% were shedding S. mansoni cercariae and 84.2% with nonhuman infective cercariae. In Lake Victoria, 2.1% of collected Biomphalaria??(N = 13,172) were infected with digenetic trematodes with 13.9% shedding S. mansoni cercariae, 85.7% shedding nonhuman infective cercariae, and 0.4% of infected snails shedding both types of cercariae. Upon morphological identification, species of Biomphalaria infected included B. sudanica, B. pfeifferi, and B. stanleyi in Lake Albert and B. sudanica, B. pfeifferi, and B. choanomphala in Lake Victoria. The study found the physicochemical factors that influenced Biomphalaria population and infections. The number and extent of snails shedding S. mansoni cercariae illustrate the high risk of transmission within these lake settings. For better control of this disease, greater effort should be placed on reducing environmental contamination by improvement of local water sanitation and hygiene. PMID:25705680

  14. Schistosomes and snails: a molecular encounter

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Matty; Arican-Goktas, Halime D.; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Odoemelam, Edwin C.; Miller, André N.; Bridger, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata snails play an integral role in the transmission of Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent for human schistosomiasis in the Western hemisphere. For the past two decades, tremendous advances have been made in research aimed at elucidating the molecular basis of the snail/parasite interaction. The growing concern that there is no vaccine to prevent schistosomiasis and only one effective drug in existence provides the impetus to develop new control strategies based on eliminating schistosomes at the snail-stage of the life cycle. To elucidate why a given snail is not always compatible to each and every schistosome it encounters, B. glabrata that are either resistant or susceptible to a given strain of S. mansoni have been employed to track molecular mechanisms governing the snail/schistosome relationship. With such snails, genetic markers for resistance and susceptibility were identified. Additionally, differential gene expression studies have led to the identification of genes that underlie these phenotypes. Lately, the role of schistosomes in mediating non-random relocation of gene loci has been identified for the first time, making B. glabrata a model organism where chromatin regulation by changes in nuclear architecture, known as spatial epigenetics, orchestrated by a major human parasite can now be investigated. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in using molecular approaches to describe snail/schistosome compatibility issues. Uncovering the signaling networks triggered by schistosomes that provide the impulse to turn genes on and off in the snail host, thereby controlling the outcome of infection, could also yield new insights into anti-parasite mechanism(s) that operate in the human host as well. PMID:25101114

  15. Snails home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstan, D. J.; Hodgson, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    Many gardeners and horticulturalists seek non-chemical methods to control populations of snails. It has frequently been reported that snails that are marked and removed from a garden are later found in the garden again. This phenomenon is often cited as evidence for a homing instinct. We report a systematic study of the snail population in a small suburban garden, in which large numbers of snails were marked and removed over a period of about 6 months. While many returned, inferring a homing instinct from this evidence requires statistical modelling. Monte Carlo techniques demonstrate that movements of snails are better explained by drift under the influence of a homing instinct than by random diffusion. Maximum likelihood techniques infer the existence of two groups of snails in the garden: members of a larger population that show little affinity to the garden itself, and core members of a local garden population that regularly return to their home if removed. The data are strongly suggestive of a homing instinct, but also reveal that snail-throwing can work as a pest management strategy.

  16. Snail Shell

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Plant seems to be a Heliotropum sp. Huge snail shells litter the wetland around Asuncion Bay. Near 25°15’49’’S, 57°37’47’’W. La plantita detrás del caracol parece ser un Heliotropium sp., Boraginaceae....

  17. Early Differential Gene Expression in Haemocytes from Resistant and Susceptible Biomphalaria glabrata Strains in Response to Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Lockyer, Anne E.; Emery, Aidan M.; Kane, Richard A.; Walker, Anthony J.; Mayer, Claus D.; Mitta, Guillaume; Coustau, Christine; Adema, Coen M.; Hanelt, Ben; Rollinson, David; Noble, Leslie R.; Jones, Catherine S.

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of infection in the host snail Biomphalaria glabrata with the digenean parasite Schistosoma mansoni is determined by the initial molecular interplay occurring between them. The mechanisms by which schistosomes evade snail immune recognition to ensure survival are not fully understood, but one possibility is that the snail internal defence system is manipulated by the schistosome enabling the parasite to establish infection. This study provides novel insights into the nature of schistosome resistance and susceptibility in B. glabrata at the transcriptomic level by simultaneously comparing gene expression in haemocytes from parasite-exposed and control groups of both schistosome-resistant and schistosome-susceptible strains, 2 h post exposure to S. mansoni miracidia, using an novel 5K cDNA microarray. Differences in gene expression, including those for immune/stress response, signal transduction and matrix/adhesion genes were identified between the two snail strains and tests for asymmetric distributions of gene function also identified immune-related gene expression in resistant snails, but not in susceptible. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport, ubiquinone biosynthesis and electron carrier activity were consistently up-regulated in resistant snails but down-regulated in susceptible. This supports the hypothesis that schistosome-resistant snails recognize schistosomes and mount an appropriate defence response, while in schistosome-susceptible snails the parasite suppresses this defence response, early in infection. PMID:23300533

  18. Early differential gene expression in haemocytes from resistant and susceptible Biomphalaria glabrata strains in response to Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Lockyer, Anne E; Emery, Aidan M; Kane, Richard A; Walker, Anthony J; Mayer, Claus D; Mitta, Guillaume; Coustau, Christine; Adema, Coen M; Hanelt, Ben; Rollinson, David; Noble, Leslie R; Jones, Catherine S

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of infection in the host snail Biomphalaria glabrata with the digenean parasite Schistosoma mansoni is determined by the initial molecular interplay occurring between them. The mechanisms by which schistosomes evade snail immune recognition to ensure survival are not fully understood, but one possibility is that the snail internal defence system is manipulated by the schistosome enabling the parasite to establish infection. This study provides novel insights into the nature of schistosome resistance and susceptibility in B. glabrata at the transcriptomic level by simultaneously comparing gene expression in haemocytes from parasite-exposed and control groups of both schistosome-resistant and schistosome-susceptible strains, 2 h post exposure to S. mansoni miracidia, using an novel 5K cDNA microarray. Differences in gene expression, including those for immune/stress response, signal transduction and matrix/adhesion genes were identified between the two snail strains and tests for asymmetric distributions of gene function also identified immune-related gene expression in resistant snails, but not in susceptible. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport, ubiquinone biosynthesis and electron carrier activity were consistently up-regulated in resistant snails but down-regulated in susceptible. This supports the hypothesis that schistosome-resistant snails recognize schistosomes and mount an appropriate defence response, while in schistosome-susceptible snails the parasite suppresses this defence response, early in infection. PMID:23300533

  19. Assessment of the potential of competitor snails and African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) as biocontrol agents against snail hosts transmitting schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Gashaw, Fikru; Erko, Berhanu; Teklehaymanot, Tilahun; Habtesellasie, Redeat

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the potential of the snails Physa acuta and Melanoides tuberculata and the African catfish Clarias gariepinus as biological control agents against the Schistosoma mansoni intermediate host Biomphalaria pfeifferi under laboratory conditions. Groups of five target and five competitor snails were raised together in experimental aquaria and same number in separate aquaria as controls. Shell size, number of eggs and mortality rate were recorded for twelve consecutive weeks. The stocking density for C. gariepinus was one fish per aquarium. Fish were provided with adequate or inadequate supplementary food and fifteen B. pfeifferi were added to each aquarium. The snails and their eggs were counted daily. Significant differences in shell growth and fecundity were noted between B. pfeifferi and M. tuberculata. Physa acuta was noted to be voracious in food consumption. Snail consumption was faster by fish provided with inadequate supplementary food. Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the two competitor snails and African catfish could be used as biological control agents against B. pfeifferi. Nevertheless, the susceptibility of the competitor snails to other trematodes in Ethiopia must first be ruled out before introducing these snails into new habitats. Follow-up field observation and rigorous laboratory studies remain areas for further research. PMID:18582914

  20. Freshwater snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda) from the Commonwealth of Dominica with a discussion of their roles in the transmission of parasites

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    and H. trivolvis are established on Dominica, West Indies. We tested a limited number of M. tuberculata Indies The Commonwealth of Dominica is a small (790 km2 ) mountainous island nation in the West Indies and veterinary health significance of these snails. Key words: Biomphalaria, Gundlachia, Helisoma, Physa, West

  1. Physiological changes and molluscicidal effects of crude latex and Milin on Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Subhash C; Jagannadham, M V

    2008-04-01

    Euphorbian latex is commonly used as molluscicides and the Euphorbia milii latex was reported as most powerful molluscicidal agents. The physiological and lethal effects of the latex components of Euphorbia milii, on the intermediate host Biomphalaria spp., of the human liver parasite Schistosoma mansoni were described in this study. The standard methodologies for testing plant derived molluscicides formulated by World Health Organisation (WHO) were followed with some modifications. The young specimen of fresh water snails showed altered physiological and physical response towards latex components. The working concentration of non-proteinaceous fraction (up to 0.1%) of the latex reduced the active physiological behaviour but was non-lethal to young specimen of snails. However, proteinaceous fractions (0.1mg/l) of the latex were found lethal to snail population, and lethality was enhanced with small amount of the non-proteinaceous fraction (0.01%) of the latex. Milin, a serine protease(up to 0.1mg/l), isolated from the latex of Euphorbia milii significantly reduced the growth and feeding activity but was not lethal to young specimen of snails. With an addition of 0.01% of non-proteinaceous fractions to Milin, lethality result was similar to that of crude latex. Milin is likely to be responsible for alteration of normal physiological functions and lethality of snails, thus it may be used as a molluscicide to control transmission of the endemic disease schistosomiasis. PMID:18262588

  2. Bibliotheca Alexandrina--Reviving a Legacy of the Past for a Brighter Common Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tocatlian, Jacques

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the ancient library at Alexandria and describes plans for the development of the new Bibliotheca Alexandrina. The administrative organization is discussed; the building design is explained; international cooperation between Egypt, UNESCO, UNDP (United Nations Development Programme), and the library community is described; and future…

  3. Susceptibility and compatibility of Biomphalaria tenagophila from the Río de la Plata basin with Schistosoma mansoni from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Borda, Carlos Edgardo; Rea, María Josefa F

    2010-07-01

    Schistosomiasis has expanded to southern parts of Brazil. Between 2005-2007 the dispersion and the proliferation of Biomphalaria tenagophila was verified in the province of Corrientes near the Brazilian border. In order to study the possibility that schistosomiasis might spread into the basins of the Paraná and Uruguay Rivers, 440 B. tenagophila collected from 10 populations groups were experimentally exposed to infection with Schistosoma mansoni of the SJ2 strain. Snails from five localities were susceptible. Frandsen's index (TCP/100) shows that those snails from Mirungá (11%), Aguacerito (2%) and Curupicay (2%) were Class I and not very compatible. Meanwhile, snails from Copra (6%) and Pay-Ubre (22%), in the Paraná River basin, were Class II and poorly compatible. PMID:20721498

  4. Differences in the Gene Expression Profiles of Haemocytes from Schistosome-Susceptible and -Resistant Biomphalaria glabrata Exposed to Schistosoma mansoni Excretory-Secretory Products

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Angela J.; Kirk, Ruth S.; Emery, Aidan M.; Rollinson, David; Jones, Catherine S.; Noble, Leslie R.; Walker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    During its life cycle, the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni uses the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata as an intermediate host to reproduce asexually generating cercariae for infection of the human definitive host. Following invasion of the snail, the parasite develops from a miracidium to a mother sporocyst and releases excretory-secretory products (ESPs) that likely influence the outcome of host infection. To better understand molecular interactions between these ESPs and the host snail defence system, we determined gene expression profiles of haemocytes from S. mansoni-resistant or -susceptible strains of B. glabrata exposed in vitro to S. mansoni ESPs (20 ?g/ml) for 1 h, using a 5K B. glabrata cDNA microarray. Ninety-eight genes were found differentially expressed between haemocytes from the two snail strains, 57 resistant specific and 41 susceptible specific, 60 of which had no known homologue in GenBank. Known differentially expressed resistant-snail genes included the nuclear factor kappa B subunit Relish, elongation factor 1?, 40S ribosomal protein S9, and matrilin; known susceptible-snail specific genes included cathepsins D and L, and theromacin. Comparative analysis with other gene expression studies revealed 38 of the 98 identified genes to be uniquely differentially expressed in haemocytes in the presence of ESPs, thus identifying for the first time schistosome ESPs as important molecules that influence global snail host-defence cell gene expression profiles. Such immunomodulation may benefit the schistosome, enabling its survival and successful development in the snail host. PMID:24663063

  5. Screening for novel plant sources of prenyloxyanthraquinones: Senna alexandrina Mill. and Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F.

    PubMed

    Epifano, Francesco; Fiorito, Serena; Locatelli, Marcello; Taddeo, Vito Alessandro; Genovese, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of our ongoing studies aimed to reveal the presence of oxyprenylated anthraquinones in plants claimed to have a laxative effect, in this article, we describe the extraction and HPLC separation of madagascin (3-isopentenyloxyemodin) and 3-geranyloxyemodine from dried leaves and fruits of Senna alexandrina Mill. (Leguminosae) and leaves and gel of Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F. (Xanthorrhoeaceae). Both compounds are described herein for the first time as components of extracts of the title plants. PMID:25342202

  6. The geographic mosaic of sex and infection in lake populations of a New Zealand snail at multiple spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Daniela; Lively, Curtis M; King, Kayla C; Jokela, Jukka

    2013-10-01

    Understanding how sexual and asexual forms of the same species coexist is a challenge for evolutionary biology. The Red Queen hypothesis predicts that sex is favored by parasite-mediated selection against common asexual genotypes, leading to the coexistence of sexual and asexual hosts. In a geographic mosaic, where the risk of infection varies in space, the theory also predicts that sexual reproduction would be positively correlated with disease prevalence. We tested this hypothesis in lake populations of a New Zealand freshwater snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, by comparing pairwise difference matrices for infection frequency and male frequency using partial Mantel tests. We conducted the test at three spatial scales: among lakes on the South Island, among depths within an intensively sampled lake (Lake Alexandrina), and within depths at Lake Alexandrina. We found that the difference in infection risk and the difference in the proportion of sexual snails were significantly and positively correlated at all spatial scales. Our results thus suggest that parasite-mediated selection contributes to the long-term coexistence of sexual and asexual individuals in coevolutionary hotspots, and that the "warmth" of hotspots can vary on small spatial scales. PMID:24021401

  7. The susceptibility of Biomphalaria glabrata throughout its life-history to N-tritylmorpholine

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, C. B. C.; Tieze-Dagevos, J. W.; Larman, V. N.

    1967-01-01

    This study was undertaken as part of a detailed investigation of the molluscicidal properties of N-tritylmorpholine (Frescon, WL 8008). It is shown that the stage of development of Biomphalaria glabrata has a pronounced influence on its susceptibility to N-tritylmorpholine. As the snails grow from hatching to a diameter of 3 mm, the LC50 falls from 0.04 ppm to 0.02 ppm, but further growth results in a progressive increase in LC50 until, at a shell diameter of 20 mm, it is 0.17 ppm. N-Tritylmorpholine is much less toxic to snail eggs when used in short exposures. However, young embryos in capsules treated with 5 ppm for 24 hours developed abnormally and died without hatching. Older embryos developed normally but died after hatching. This delayed effect is attributed to contact, during hatching, with N-tritylmorpholine which is associated with the jelly. The difference in susceptibility between snails and eggs is attributed to a slow rate of penetration of the egg membrane. ImagesFIG. 5 PMID:5300047

  8. The Effect of Increasing Water Temperatures on Schistosoma mansoni Transmission and Biomphalaria pfeifferi Population Dynamics: An Agent-Based Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    McCreesh, Nicky; Booth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There is increasing interest in the control and elimination of schistosomiasis. Little is known, however, about the likely effects of increasing water-body temperatures on transmission. Methods We have developed an agent-based model of the temperature-sensitive stages of the Schistosoma and intermediate host snail life-cycles, parameterised using data from S. mansoni and Biomphalaria pfeifferi laboratory and field-based observations. Infection risk is calculated as the number of cercariae in the model, adjusted for their probability of causing infection. Results The number of snails in the model is approximately constant between 15–31°C. Outside this range, snail numbers drop sharply, and the snail population cannot survive outside the range 14–32°C. Mean snail generation time decreases with increasing temperature from 176 days at 14°C to 46 days at 26°C. Human infection risk is highest between 16–18°C and 1 pm and 6–10 pm in calm water, and 20–25°C and 12–4 pm in flowing water. Infection risk increases sharply when temperatures increase above the minimum necessary for sustained transmission. Conclusions The model suggests that, in areas where S. mansoni is already endemic, warming of the water at transmission sites will have differential effects on both snails and parasites depending on abiotic properties of the water-body. Snail generation times will decrease in most areas, meaning that snail populations will recover faster from natural population reductions and from snail-control efforts. We suggest a link between the ecological properties of transmission sites and infection risk which could significantly affect the outcomes of interventions designed to alter water contact behaviour – proposing that such interventions are more likely to reduce infection levels at river locations than lakes, where infection risk remains high for longer. In cooler areas where snails are currently found, increasing temperatures may significantly increase infection risk, potentially leading to new, high-intensity foci of infection. PMID:24987963

  9. Apple Snails (Ampullariidae)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stijn A. I. Ghesquiere

    This web site provides information on apple snails (family Ampullariidae), the largest living freshwater snails on earth, often kept as aquarium pets because of their attractive appearance and size. Topics include the care of apple snails, their anatomy, species and genera, and information on snail pests, embryology, and genetics. There is also a frequently-asked-questions feature, photos, links to web sites and literature, and an online discussion forum.

  10. Spatial distribution of Biomphalaria mollusks at São Francisco River Basin, Minas Gerais, Brazil, using geostatistical procedures.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Ricardo J P S; Freitas, Corina C; Dutra, Luciano V; Felgueiras, Carlos A; Moura, Ana C M; Amaral, Ronaldo S; Drummond, Sandra C; Scholte, Ronaldo G C; Oliveira, Guilherme; Carvalho, Omar S

    2009-03-01

    Geostatistics is used in this work to make inferences about the presence of the species of Biomphalaria (B. glabrata, B. tenagophila and/or B. straminea), intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni, at the São Francisco River Basin, in Minas Gerais, Brazil. One of these geostatistical procedures, known as indicator kriging, allows the classification of categorical data, in areas where the data are not available, using a punctual sample set. The result is a map of species and risk area definition. More than a single map of the categorical attribute, the procedure also permits the association of uncertainties of the stochastic model, which can be used to qualify the inferences. In order to validate the estimated data of the risk map, a fieldwork in five municipalities was carried out. The obtained results showed that indicator kriging is a rather robust tool since it presented a very good agreement with the field findings. The obtained risk map can be thought as an auxiliary tool to formulate proper public health strategies, and to guide other fieldwork, considering the places with higher occurrence probability of the most important snail species. Also, the risk map will enable better resource distribution and adequate policies for the mollusk control. This methodology will be applied to other river basins to generate a predictive map for Biomphalaria species distribution for the entire state of Minas Gerais. PMID:19046937

  11. Localization of Serotonin in the Nervous System of Biomphalaria glabrata, an Intermediate Host for Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Nadia; Vallejo, Deborah; Miller, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    The digenetic trematode Schistosoma mansoni that causes the form of schistosomiasis found in the Western Hemisphere requires the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata as its primary intermediate host. It has been proposed that the transition from the free-living S. mansoni miracidium to parasitic mother sporocyst depends on uptake of biogenic amines, e.g. serotonin, from the snail host. However, little is known about potential sources of serotonin in B. glabrata tissues. This investigation examined the localization of serotonin-like immunoreactivity (5HTli) in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues of B. glabrata. Emphasis was placed on the cephalic and anterior pedal regions that are commonly the sites of S. mansoni miracidium penetration. The anterior foot and body wall were densely innervated by 5HTli fibers but no peripheral immunoreactive neuronal somata were detected. Within the CNS, clusters of 5HTli neurons were observed in the cerebral, pedal, left parietal, and visceral ganglia, suggesting that the peripheral serotonergic fibers originate from the CNS. Double-labeling experiments (biocytin backfill × serotonin immunoreactivity) of the tentacular nerve and the three major pedal nerves (Pd n. 10, Pd n. 11, and Pd n. 12) disclosed central neurons that project to the cephalopedal periphery. Overall, the central distribution of 5HTli neurons suggests that, as in other gastropods, serotonin regulates the locomotion, reproductive, and feeding systems of Biomphalaria. The projections to the foot and body wall indicate that serotonin may also participate in defensive, nociceptive, or inflammation responses. These observations identify potential sources of host-derived serotonin in this parasite-host system. PMID:22434538

  12. Distribution and Schistosoma mansoni infection of Biomphalaria glabrata in different habitats in a rural area in the Jequitinhonha Valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil: environmental and epidemiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kloos, Helmut; Passos, Liana Kanovaloff Janotti; Loverde, Philip; Oliveira, Rodrigo Correa; Gazzinelli, Andréa

    2004-11-01

    This paper examines the distribution and infection of Biomphalaria glabrata with Schistosoma mansoni in all aquatic snail habitats in a rural area in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, in relation to physico/biotic and behavioral factors. Snail and environmental surveys were carried out semi-annually between July 2001 and November 2002 at 106 sites. Collected snails were examined in the laboratory for infection. B. glabrata densities were highest in overflow ponds, irrigation ponds, springs, canals and wells, and lowest in fishponds and water tanks. Snail densities were higher during the hot, rainy season except for streams and canals and were statistically associated with the presence of fish, pollution, and vegetation density. Tilapia fish and an unidentified Diptera larva were found to be predators of B. glabrata but ducks were not. Twenty-four of the 25 infected snails were collected in 2001(1.4% infection rate) and only one in 2002, after mass chemotherapy. The occurrence of B. glabrata in all 11 snail habitats both at and away from water contact sites studied indicates widespread risk of human infection in the study area. In spite of the strong association between B. glabrata and tilapia in fishponds we do not recommend its use in schistosomiasis control for ecological reasons and its relative inefficiency in streams and dams. PMID:15654420

  13. Key to the identification of East and Central African freshwater snails of medical and veterinary importance*

    PubMed Central

    Mandahl-Barth, G.

    1962-01-01

    This identification key has been prepared to enable field workers in eastern and centra Africa to identify the species and subspecies of snails acting as intermediate hosts of various flukes causing bilharziasis and related diseases in man and his domestic stock. The area covered by the key is eastern Africa from the Sudan and Somalia in the north to Southern Rhodesia in the south. The key includes all species and subspecies of the three medically and veterinarily important genera, Lymnaea, Bulinus and Biomphalaria. All other freshwater pulmonates of the area can be identified as to genus only. Those features of the shells and soft parts of snails which are used in identification are discussed in some detail, and indications are given as to methods of collection, preservation and dissection of snails. PMID:14469160

  14. Distribution and abundance of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis host snails along the Mara River in Kenya and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Dida, Gabriel O; Gelder, Frank B; Anyona, Douglas N; Matano, Ally-Said; Abuom, Paul O; Adoka, Samson O; Ouma, Collins; Kanangire, Canisius K; Owuor, Phillip O; Ofulla, Ayub V O

    2014-01-01

    We purposively selected 39 sampling sites along the Mara River and its two perennial tributaries of Amala and Nyangores and sampled snails. In addition, water physicochemical parameters (temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, alkalinity, salinity and pH) were taken to establish their influence on the snail abundance and habitat preference. Out of the 39 sites sampled, 10 (25.6%) had snails. The snail species encountered included Biomphalaria pfeifferi Krauss - the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, Bulinus africanus - the intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium, and Lymnaea natalensis Krauss - the intermediate host of both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica Cobbold. Ceratophallus spp., a non-vector snail was also encountered. Most (61.0%) of the snails were encountered in streamside pools. Schistosomiasis-transmitting host snails, B. pfeifferi and B. africanus, were fewer than fascioliasis-transmitting Lymnaea species. All the four different snail species were found to be attached to different aquatic weeds, with B. pfeifferi accounting for over half (61.1%) of the snails attached to the sedge, followed by B. africanus and Lymnaea spp., accounting for 22.2 and 16.7%, respectively. Ceratophallus spp. were non-existent in sedge. The results from this preliminary study show that snails intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis exists in different habitats, in few areas along the Mara River, though their densities are still low to have any noticeable impacts on disease transmission in case they are infected. The mere presence of the vector snails in these focal regions calls for their immediate control and institution of proper regulations, management, and education among the locals that can help curtail the spread of the snails and also schistosomiasis and fascioliasis within the Mara River basin. PMID:25405008

  15. Distribution and abundance of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis host snails along the Mara River in Kenya and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Dida, Gabriel O.; Gelder, Frank B.; Anyona, Douglas N.; Matano, Ally-Said; Abuom, Paul O.; Adoka, Samson O.; Ouma, Collins; Kanangire, Canisius K.; Owuor, Phillip O.; Ofulla, Ayub V. O.

    2014-01-01

    We purposively selected 39 sampling sites along the Mara River and its two perennial tributaries of Amala and Nyangores and sampled snails. In addition, water physicochemical parameters (temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, alkalinity, salinity and pH) were taken to establish their influence on the snail abundance and habitat preference. Out of the 39 sites sampled, 10 (25.6%) had snails. The snail species encountered included Biomphalaria pfeifferi Krauss – the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, Bulinus africanus – the intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium, and Lymnaea natalensis Krauss – the intermediate host of both Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica Cobbold. Ceratophallus spp., a non-vector snail was also encountered. Most (61.0%) of the snails were encountered in streamside pools. Schistosomiasis-transmitting host snails, B. pfeifferi and B. africanus, were fewer than fascioliasis-transmitting Lymnaea species. All the four different snail species were found to be attached to different aquatic weeds, with B. pfeifferi accounting for over half (61.1%) of the snails attached to the sedge, followed by B. africanus and Lymnaea spp., accounting for 22.2 and 16.7%, respectively. Ceratophallus spp. were non-existent in sedge. The results from this preliminary study show that snails intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis exists in different habitats, in few areas along the Mara River, though their densities are still low to have any noticeable impacts on disease transmission in case they are infected. The mere presence of the vector snails in these focal regions calls for their immediate control and institution of proper regulations, management, and education among the locals that can help curtail the spread of the snails and also schistosomiasis and fascioliasis within the Mara River basin. PMID:25405008

  16. Parental Transfer of the Antimicrobial Protein LBP/BPI Protects Biomphalaria glabrata Eggs against Oomycete Infections

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Olga Lucia; van West, Pieter; Industri, Benoit; Ponchet, Michel; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Gourbal, Benjamin; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Coustau, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate females transfer antibodies via the placenta, colostrum and milk or via the egg yolk to protect their immunologically immature offspring against pathogens. This evolutionarily important transfer of immunity is poorly documented in invertebrates and basic questions remain regarding the nature and extent of parental protection of offspring. In this study, we show that a lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bactericidal permeability increasing protein family member from the invertebrate Biomphalaria glabrata (BgLBP/BPI1) is massively loaded into the eggs of this freshwater snail. Native and recombinant proteins displayed conserved LPS-binding, antibacterial and membrane permeabilizing activities. A broad screening of various pathogens revealed a previously unknown biocidal activity of the protein against pathogenic water molds (oomycetes), which is conserved in human BPI. RNAi-dependent silencing of LBP/BPI in the parent snails resulted in a significant reduction of reproductive success and extensive death of eggs through oomycete infections. This work provides the first functional evidence that a LBP/BPI is involved in the parental immune protection of invertebrate offspring and reveals a novel and conserved biocidal activity for LBP/BPI family members. PMID:24367257

  17. Parental transfer of the antimicrobial protein LBP/BPI protects Biomphalaria glabrata eggs against oomycete infections.

    PubMed

    Baron, Olga Lucia; van West, Pieter; Industri, Benoit; Ponchet, Michel; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Gourbal, Benjamin; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Coustau, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate females transfer antibodies via the placenta, colostrum and milk or via the egg yolk to protect their immunologically immature offspring against pathogens. This evolutionarily important transfer of immunity is poorly documented in invertebrates and basic questions remain regarding the nature and extent of parental protection of offspring. In this study, we show that a lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bactericidal permeability increasing protein family member from the invertebrate Biomphalaria glabrata (BgLBP/BPI1) is massively loaded into the eggs of this freshwater snail. Native and recombinant proteins displayed conserved LPS-binding, antibacterial and membrane permeabilizing activities. A broad screening of various pathogens revealed a previously unknown biocidal activity of the protein against pathogenic water molds (oomycetes), which is conserved in human BPI. RNAi-dependent silencing of LBP/BPI in the parent snails resulted in a significant reduction of reproductive success and extensive death of eggs through oomycete infections. This work provides the first functional evidence that a LBP/BPI is involved in the parental immune protection of invertebrate offspring and reveals a novel and conserved biocidal activity for LBP/BPI family members. PMID:24367257

  18. Bleeding of pulmonate snails.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J E

    1994-07-01

    A technique for removing blood (haemolymph) by syringe from African land snails (Achatina spp.) is described. The method avoids the need for shell perforation or incision of soft tissues and appears to have few adverse effects on the snail. PMID:7967469

  19. Snail Shell Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Presents three inquiry-based lessons to develop the science process skills of observation, identification, and classification. Activities use whelk eggs and snail shells as the focus of the students' inquiries. Provides a list of 19 facts about whelks and snails. (MDH)

  20. Differential transcriptomic responses of Biomphalaria glabrata (Gastropoda, Mollusca) to bacteria and metazoan parasites, Schistosoma mansoni and Echinostoma paraensei (Digenea, Platyhelminthes)

    PubMed Central

    Adema, Coen M; Hanington, Patrick C.; Lun, Cheng-Man; Rosenberg, George H.; Aragon, Anthony D; Stout, Barbara A; Richard, Mara L. Lennard; Gross, Paul S.; Loker, Eric S

    2009-01-01

    A 70-mer oligonucleotide-based microarray (1152 features) that emphasizes stress and immune responses factors was constructed to study transcriptomic responses of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata to different immune challenges. In addition to sequences with relevant putative ID and Gene Ontology (GO) annotation, the array features non-immune factors and unknown B. glabrata ESTs for functional gene discovery. The transcription profiles of B. glabrata (3 biological replicates, each a pool of 5 snails) were recorded at 12 hours post wounding, exposure to Gram negative or Gram positive bacteria (Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus, respectively), or infection with compatible trematode parasites (S. mansoni or E. paraensei, 20 miracidia/snail), relative to controls, using universal reference RNA. The data were subjected to Significance Analysis for Microarrays (SAM), with a false positive rate (FPR) ?10%. Wounding yielded a modest differential expression profile (27 up/21 down) with affected features mostly dissimilar from other treatments. Partially overlapping, yet distinct expression profiles were recorded from snails challenged with E. coli (83 up/20 down) or M. luteus (120 up/42 down), mostly showing up-regulation of defense and stress-related features. Significantly altered expression of selected immune features indicates that B. glabrata detects and responds differently to compatible trematodes. Echinostoma paraensei infection was associated mostly with down regulation of many (immune-) transcripts (42 up/68 down), whereas S. mansoni exposure yielded a preponderance of up-regulated features (140 up/23 down), with only few known immune genes affected. These observations may reflect the divergent strategies developed by trematodes during their evolution as specialized pathogens of snails to negate host defense responses. Clearly, the immune defenses of B. glabrata distinguish and respond differently to various immune challenges. PMID:19962194

  1. The Nuclear Receptors of Biomphalaria glabrata and Lottia gigantea: Implications for Developing New Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Satwant; Jobling, Susan; Jones, Catherine S.; Noble, Leslie R.; Routledge, Edwin J.; Lockyer, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcription regulators involved in an array of diverse physiological functions including key roles in endocrine and metabolic function. The aim of this study was to identify nuclear receptors in the fully sequenced genome of the gastropod snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni and compare these to known vertebrate NRs, with a view to assessing the snail's potential as a invertebrate model organism for endocrine function, both as a prospective new test organism and to elucidate the fundamental genetic and mechanistic causes of disease. For comparative purposes, the genome of a second gastropod, the owl limpet, Lottia gigantea was also investigated for nuclear receptors. Thirty-nine and thirty-three putative NRs were identified from the B. glabrata and L. gigantea genomes respectively, based on the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain and/or ligand-binding domain. Nuclear receptor transcript expression was confirmed and sequences were subjected to a comparative phylogenetic analysis, which demonstrated that these molluscs have representatives of all the major NR subfamilies (1-6). Many of the identified NRs are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, however differences exist, most notably, the absence of receptors of Group 3C, which includes some of the vertebrate endocrine hormone targets. The mollusc genomes also contain NR homologues that are present in insects and nematodes but not in vertebrates, such as Group 1J (HR48/DAF12/HR96). The identification of many shared receptors between humans and molluscs indicates the potential for molluscs as model organisms; however the absence of several steroid hormone receptors indicates snail endocrine systems are fundamentally different. PMID:25849443

  2. Usnic Acid Potassium Salt: An Alternative for the Control of Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818)

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Vera L. M.; Pereira, Eugênia C.; Falcão, Emerson P. S.; Melo, Ana M. M. A.; da Silva, Nicácio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata is the most important vector of schistosomiasis due to its wide geographical distribution, high infection rate and efficient disease transmission. Among the methods of schistosomiasis control, the World Health Organization recommends the use of synthetic molluscicides, such as niclosamide. However, different substances of natural origin have been tested as alternatives for the control or eradication of mollusks. The literature describes the antitumor, antimicrobial and antiviral properties of usnic acid as well as other important activities of common interest between medicine and the environment. However, usnic acid has a low degree of water solubility, which can be a limiting factor for its use, especially in aquatic environments, since the organic solvents commonly used to solubilize this substance can have toxic effects on aquatic biota. Thus, the aim of the present study was to test the potassium salt of usnic acid (potassium usnate) with regard to molluscicidal activity and toxicity to brine shrimp (Artemia salina). To obtain potassium usnate, usnic acid was extracted with diethyl ether isolated and purified from the lichen Cladonia substellata. Biological assays were performed with embryos and adult snails of B. glabrata exposed for 24 h to the usnate solution solubilized in dechlorinated water at 2.5; 5 and 10 µg/ml for embryos, 0.5; 0.9; 1;5 and 10 µg/ml for mollusks and 0.5; 1; 5; 10 µg/ml for A. salina. The lowest lethal concentration for the embryos and adult snails was 10 and 1 µg/ml, respectively. No toxicity to A. salina was found. The results show that modified usnic acid has increased solubility (100%) without losing its biological activity and may be a viable alternative for the control of B. glabrata. PMID:25375098

  3. Usnic acid potassium salt: an alternative for the control of Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818).

    PubMed

    Martins, Mônica C B; Silva, Monique C; Silva, Luanna R S; Lima, Vera L M; Pereira, Eugênia C; Falcão, Emerson P S; Melo, Ana M M A; da Silva, Nicácio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata is the most important vector of schistosomiasis due to its wide geographical distribution, high infection rate and efficient disease transmission. Among the methods of schistosomiasis control, the World Health Organization recommends the use of synthetic molluscicides, such as niclosamide. However, different substances of natural origin have been tested as alternatives for the control or eradication of mollusks. The literature describes the antitumor, antimicrobial and antiviral properties of usnic acid as well as other important activities of common interest between medicine and the environment. However, usnic acid has a low degree of water solubility, which can be a limiting factor for its use, especially in aquatic environments, since the organic solvents commonly used to solubilize this substance can have toxic effects on aquatic biota. Thus, the aim of the present study was to test the potassium salt of usnic acid (potassium usnate) with regard to molluscicidal activity and toxicity to brine shrimp (Artemia salina). To obtain potassium usnate, usnic acid was extracted with diethyl ether isolated and purified from the lichen Cladonia substellata. Biological assays were performed with embryos and adult snails of B. glabrata exposed for 24 h to the usnate solution solubilized in dechlorinated water at 2.5; 5 and 10 µg/ml for embryos, 0.5; 0.9; 1;5 and 10 µg/ml for mollusks and 0.5; 1; 5; 10 µg/ml for A. salina. The lowest lethal concentration for the embryos and adult snails was 10 and 1 µg/ml, respectively. No toxicity to A. salina was found. The results show that modified usnic acid has increased solubility (100%) without losing its biological activity and may be a viable alternative for the control of B. glabrata. PMID:25375098

  4. Involvement of protein kinase C signalling and mitogen-activated protein kinase in the amebocyte-producing organ of Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Salamat, Zahra; Sullivan, John T

    2009-06-01

    Mechanisms that regulate hemocyte production in molluscs, at either the organismal or cellular levels, are not well understood. In the present study, 24-h saline cultures of the amebocyte-producing organ (APO) of the schistosome-transmitting snail Biomphalaria glabrata were used to test for the potential involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) signalling in hematopoiesis. Exposure to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), an activator of PKC, resulted in an increase in the number of dividing hematopoietic cells in APOs from schistosome-resistant Salvador snails. PMA-induced cell division was blocked by treatment with U0126, an inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, MEK1/2. These results suggest that PKC-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, ERK1/2, is involved in cell division in the APO. PMID:19183562

  5. Digenean-gastropod host associations inform on aspects of specific immunity in snails.

    PubMed

    Adema, C M; Loker, E S

    2015-02-01

    Gastropod immunology is informed importantly by the study of the frequent encounters snails endure with digeneans (digenetic trematodes). One of the hallmarks of gastropod-digenean associations is their specificity: any particular digenean parasite species is transmitted by a limited subset of snail taxa. We discuss the nature of this specificity, including its immunological basis. We then review studies of the model gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata indicating that the baseline responses of snails to digeneans can be elevated in a specific manner. Studies incorporating molecular and functional approaches are then highlighted, and are further suggestive of the capacity for specific gastropod immune responses. These studies have led to the compatibility polymorphism hypothesis: the interactions between diversified fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) and diverse carbohydrate-decorated polymorphic parasite antigens determine recognition and trigger specific immunity. Complex glycan structures are also likely to play a role in the host specificity typifying snail-digenean interactions. We conclude by noting the dynamic and consequential interactions between snails and digeneans can be considered as drivers of diversification of digenean parasites and in the development and maintenance of specific immunity in gastropods. PMID:25034871

  6. Large-scale determinants of intestinal schistosomiasis and intermediate host snail distribution across Africa: does climate matter?

    PubMed

    Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope; Hürlimann, Eveline; Schur, Nadine; Saarnak, Christopher F L; Simoonga, Christopher; Mubita, Patricia; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; Rahbek, Carsten; Kristensen, Thomas K

    2013-11-01

    The geographical ranges of most species, including many infectious disease agents and their vectors and intermediate hosts, are assumed to be constrained by climatic tolerances, mainly temperature. It has been suggested that global warming will cause an expansion of the areas potentially suitable for infectious disease transmission. However, the transmission of infectious diseases is governed by a myriad of ecological, economic, evolutionary and social factors. Hence, a deeper understanding of the total disease system (pathogens, vectors and hosts) and its drivers is important for predicting responses to climate change. Here, we combine a growing degree day model for Schistosoma mansoni with species distribution models for the intermediate host snail (Biomphalaria spp.) to investigate large-scale environmental determinants of the distribution of the African S. mansoni-Biomphalaria system and potential impacts of climatic changes. Snail species distribution models included several combinations of climatic and habitat-related predictors; the latter divided into "natural" and "human-impacted" habitat variables to measure anthropogenic influence. The predictive performance of the combined snail-parasite model was evaluated against a comprehensive compilation of historical S. mansoni parasitological survey records, and then examined for two climate change scenarios of increasing severity for 2080. Future projections indicate that while the potential S. mansoni transmission area expands, the snail ranges are more likely to contract and/or move into cooler areas in the south and east. Importantly, we also note that even though climate per se matters, the impact of humans on habitat play a crucial role in determining the distribution of the intermediate host snails in Africa. Thus, a future contraction in the geographical range size of the intermediate host snails caused by climatic changes does not necessarily translate into a decrease or zero-sum change in human schistosomiasis prevalence. PMID:22142789

  7. A water snail catches a ride on STS-90 as part of Neurolab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A water snail (Biomphalaria glabrata), like those that are part of the Neurolab payload on Space Shuttle Mission STS-90, is held up for inspection in the Operations and Checkout Building. The snails will fly in the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) Minimodule, a middeck locker-sized fresh water habitat, designed to allow the controlled incubation of aquatic species in a self-stabilizing, artifical ecosystem for up to three weeks under space conditions. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, includes Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D.

  8. Electrophoretic studies on the digestive gland esterases of some biomphalarid and lymnaeid snails

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Emile A.; File, Sharon K.

    1971-01-01

    Because of the problems encountered in the classification of snails of medical importance, biochemical methods have been sought to help clarify the situation. Of these, the separation of the enzymes of adult snails by electrophoresis seems the most promising but very few attempts have been made so far to use the results for taxonomic studies. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the use of the enzyme systems of neotropical planorbid and of lymnaeid snails to elucidate their taxonomy and also snail—schistosome relationships at the species and population levels. The findings show the characteristic electrophoretic patterns of digestive gland esterases of the planorbid and lymnaeid snails used, as well as their variation and the level of such variation among certain populations and the consistency of the patterns among others. The results also show that, in general, the extent of variation between some populations of the same species is greater than the differences between species of the same group. However, at the specific level, there are similarities suggesting close relationships between some populations of Biomphalaria glabrata and B. tenagophila on the one hand, and of certain populations of B. peregrina and of B. obstructa on the other hand. The present study has thrown some light on the question of electrophoretic variation in enzymes, and the ways in which this can be applied to studies of the genetics of snails. A correlation is suggested between certain patterns that indicate biochemical similarities or differences among the planorbid snail populations and the susceptibility of the species or the population to infection with the schistosomes. ImagesFig. 4Fig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 2 PMID:5317015

  9. The biology of Biomphalaria choanomphala and B. sudanica in relation to their role in the transmission of Schistosoma mansoni in Lake Victoria at Mwanza, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Magendantz, M

    1972-01-01

    A study of the intermediate snail hosts of Schistosoma mansoni in Lake Victoria at Mwanza, Tanzania, was begun in October 1969, the main aims being to investigate the distribution and seasonal variations in population densities of Biomphalaria choanomphala and B. sudanica in relation to the nature of the lake bottom and the biological features of the lake shore, the factors influencing variations in the intensity of S. mansoni transmission along the Mwanza shoreline, and the age structure of populations of B. choanomphala. Field surveys were made at 70 sites near Mwanza and in nearby bays, B. choanomphala being collected from the lake bottom by means of a wire-mesh dredge. Variations in the distribution and population density of B. choanomphala were correlated with the nature of the bottom and its depth profiles at depths of 0.5-6.0 m. Approximately 1-20 snails/m(2) were found on mixed sand and mud but only about 1 snail/m(2) on the predominantly muddy bottom farther out from the shore. Seasonal variations in the age structure and fluctuations in the population densities of B. choanomphala of as much as 10-13-fold were observed. A large and a small form of B. choanomphala, possibly ecophenotypes, were found. S. mansoni infection rates in B. choanomphala ranged from 0.2% to 3.3%, suggesting a tendency to higher infection rates in mature snails. PMID:4539821

  10. Reduced Susceptibility of a Biomphalaria tenagophila Population to Schistosoma mansoni after Introducing the Resistant Taim/RS Strain of B. tenagophila into Herivelton Martins Stream

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Daisymara Priscila de Almeida; Rosa, Florence Mara; Maciel, Engels; Negrão-Corrêa, Deborah; Teles, Horácio Manuel Santana; Caldeira, Roberta Lima; Jannotti-Passos, Liana Konovaloff; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech

    2014-01-01

    Studies performed in the last 30 years demonstrated that a strain of B. tenagophila from the Taim Biological Reserve is completely resistant to Schistosoma mansoni infection. This resistance to parasite infection is a dominant characteristic during crossbreeding with susceptible B. tenagophila strains. These experiments also identified a 350 bp molecular marker that is exclusive to the Taim strain and does not occur in other geographic strains of this snail species. The Taim strain (Taim/RS) of Biomphalaria tenagophila was bred on a large scale, physically marked and introduced into a stream in which previous malacological analyses had revealed the presence of only parasite-susceptible B. tenagophila. Samples of offspring captured 4, 11 and 14 months after the introduction of the Taim strain were examined, and the susceptibility of the snails to S. mansoni infection dropped from 38.6–26.5% to 2.1% during the 14 months after the introduction of the Taim snail strain. A significant correlation was also observed between the absence of infection and the identification of the Taim molecular marker. These results demonstrate that the genetic marker from the Taim strain was successfully introduced into the wild snail population. In addition, a significant relationship exists between the marker and resistance to infection. PMID:24941324

  11. Revised karyotyping and gene mapping of the Biomphalaria glabrata embryonic (Bge) cell line.

    PubMed

    Odoemelam, Edwin; Raghavan, Nithya; Miller, Andrè; Bridger, Joanna M; Knight, Matty

    2009-05-01

    The fresh water snail Biomphalaria glabrata (2n=36) belongs to the taxonomic class Gastropoda (family Planorbidae) and is integral to the spread of the human parasitic disease schistosomiasis. The importance of this mollusc is such that it has been selected as a model molluscan organism for whole genome sequencing. In order to understand the structure and organisation of the B. glabrata's genome it is important that gene mapping studies are established. Thus, we have studied the genomes of two B. glabrata embryonic (Bge) cell line isolates 1 and 2 grown in separate laboratories, but both derived from Eder L. Hansen's original culture from the 1970s. This cell line continues to be an important tool and model system for schistosomiasis and B. glabrata. Using these cell line isolates, we have investigated the genome content and established a revised karyotype based on chromosome size and centromere position for these cells. Unlike the original karyotype (2n=36) established for the cell line, our investigations now show the existence of extensive aneuploidy in both cell line isolates to the extent that the total complement of chromosomes in both greatly exceeds the original cell line's diploid number of 36 chromosomes. The isolates, designated Bge 1 and 2, had modal chromosome complements of 64 and 67, respectively (calculated from 50 metaphases). We found that the aneuploidy was most pronounced, for both isolates, amongst chromosomes of medium metacentric morphology. We also report, to our knowledge for the first time using Bge cells, the mapping of single-copy genes peroxiredoxin (BgPrx4) and P-element induced wimpy testis (piwi) onto Bge chromosomes. These B. glabrata genes were mapped onto pairs of homologous chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Thus, we have now established a FISH mapping technique that can eventually be utilized for physical mapping of the snail genome. PMID:19133265

  12. 3D-Ultrastructure, Functions and Stress Responses of Gastropod (Biomphalaria glabrata) Rhogocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinopoulou, Maria; Güler, M. Alptekin; Lieb, Bernhard; Barbeck, Mike; Ghanaati, Shahram; Markl, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Rhogocytes are pore cells scattered among the connective tissue of different body parts of gastropods and other molluscs, with great variation in their number, shape and size. They are enveloped by a lamina of extracellular matrix. Their most characteristic feature is the “slit apparatus”, local invaginations of the plasma membrane bridged by cytoplasmic bars, forming slits of ca. 20 nm width. A slit diaphragm creates a molecular sieve with permeation holes of 20×20 nm. In blue-blooded gastropods, rhogocytes synthesize and secrete the respiratory protein hemocyanin, and it has been proposed–though not proven–that in the rare red-blooded snail species they might synthesize and secrete the hemoglobin. However, the cellular secretion pathway for respiratory proteins, and the functional role(s) of the enigmatic rhogocyte slit apparatus are still unclear. Additional functions for rhogocytes have been proposed, notably a role in protein uptake and degradation, and in heavy metal detoxification. Here we provide new structural and functional information on the rhogocytes of the red-blooded freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata. By in situ hybridization of mantle tissues, we prove that rhogocytes indeed synthesize hemoglobin. By electron tomography, the first three dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the slit apparatus are provided, showing detail of highly dense material in the cytoplasmic bars close to the slits. By immunogold labelling, we collected evidence that a major component of this material is actin. By genome databank mining, the complete sequence of a B. glabrata nephrin was obtained, and localized to the rhogocytes by immunofluorescence microscopy. The presence of both proteins fit the ultrastructure-based hypothesis that rhogocytes are related to mammalian podocytes and insect nephrocytes. Reactions of the rhogocytes to deprivation of food and cadmium toxification are also documented, and a possible secretion pathway of newly synthesized respiratory proteins through the slit apparatus is discussed. PMID:24971744

  13. Hyperdiverse Gene Cluster in Snail Host Conveys Resistance to Human Schistosome Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Tennessen, Jacob A.; Théron, André; Marine, Melanie; Yeh, Jan-Ying; Rognon, Anne; Blouin, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, a neglected global pandemic, may be curtailed by blocking transmission of the parasite via its intermediate hosts, aquatic snails. Elucidating the genetic basis of snail-schistosome interaction is a key to this strategy. Here we map a natural parasite-resistance polymorphism from a Caribbean population of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata. In independent experimental evolution lines, RAD genotyping shows that the same genomic region responds to selection for resistance to the parasite Schistosoma mansoni. A dominant allele in this region conveys an 8-fold decrease in the odds of infection. Fine-mapping and RNA-Seq characterization reveal a <1Mb region, the Guadeloupe Resistance Complex (GRC), with 15 coding genes. Seven genes are single-pass transmembrane proteins with putative immunological roles, most of which show strikingly high nonsynonymous divergence (5-10%) among alleles. High linkage disequilibrium among three intermediate-frequency (>25%) haplotypes across the GRC, a significantly non-neutral pattern, suggests that balancing selection maintains diversity at the GRC. Thus, the GRC resembles immune gene complexes seen in other taxa and is likely involved in parasite recognition. The GRC is a potential target for controlling transmission of schistosomiasis, including via genetic manipulation of snails. PMID:25775214

  14. Thai koi-hoi snail dish and angiostrongyliasis due to Angiostrongylus cantonensis: Effects of food flavoring and alcoholic drink on the third-stage larvae in infected snail meat.

    PubMed

    Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yoolek, Adisak; Punthuprapasa, Paibulaya; Yong, Hoi-Sen

    2009-04-01

    Human infection with the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Parastrongylus cantonensis) in Thailand, especially in the northeastern region, is associated with the habit of eating koi-hoi, which contains raw snail meat. Infection results from the snails being carriers of the larval parasite. The present study was conducted to assess the effect of food flavorings in koi-hoi, alcohol, and exposure time of the two variable on the infective larvae of A. cantonensis. Infected Biomphalaria glabrata snails were used for koi-hoi preparation. Raw snail meat was mixed with koi-hoi flavoring and left at room temperature for various time periods ranging from 5 to 60 minutes. At a predetermined time, two pieces of snail meat were removed at random and examined for viability (as determined by motility) of the parasitic third-stage larvae. At the same time, two random pieces of snail meat were removed and treated with 10 mL of a local 40% alcoholic drink for 30 minutes before examination of larval viability. Exposure of infected snail meat for 10 minutes or more to koi-hoi food flavoring resulted in significantly more nonmotile (dying or dead) larvae. Addition of the local alcoholic drink after exposure to the flavoring exerted an additional killing effect on the larvae. Despite long exposure time, both the koi-hoi flavoring and addition of alcoholic drink were not completely effective in killing the infective larvae in the snail meat. Thorough cooking of the food intended for human consumption should still be practiced. PMID:19272010

  15. Biomphalysin, a New ? Pore-forming Toxin Involved in Biomphalaria glabrata Immune Defense against Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Moné, Yves; Allienne, Jean François; Henri, Hélène; Delbecq, Stéphane; Mitta, Guillaume; Gourbal, Benjamin; Duval, David

    2013-01-01

    Aerolysins are virulence factors belonging to the ? pore-forming toxin (?-PFT) superfamily that are abundantly distributed in bacteria. More rarely, ?-PFTs have been described in eukaryotic organisms. Recently, we identified a putative cytolytic protein in the snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, whose primary structural features suggest that it could belong to this ?-PFT superfamily. In the present paper, we report the molecular cloning and functional characterization of this protein, which we call Biomphalysin, and demonstrate that it is indeed a new eukaryotic ?-PFT. We show that, despite weak sequence similarities with aerolysins, Biomphalysin shares a common architecture with proteins belonging to this superfamily. A phylogenetic approach revealed that the gene encoding Biomphalysin could have resulted from horizontal transfer. Its expression is restricted to immune-competent cells and is not induced by parasite challenge. Recombinant Biomphalysin showed hemolytic activity that was greatly enhanced by the plasma compartment of B. glabrata. We further demonstrated that Biomphalysin with plasma is highly toxic toward Schistosoma mansoni sporocysts. Using in vitro binding assays in conjunction with Western blot and immunocytochemistry analyses, we also showed that Biomphalysin binds to parasite membranes. Finally, we showed that, in contrast to what has been reported for most other members of the family, lytic activity of Biomphalysin is not dependent on proteolytic processing. These results provide the first functional description of a mollusk immune effector protein involved in killing S. mansoni. PMID:23555242

  16. Biomphalaria straminea (Mollusca: Planorbidae) as an intermediate host of Ribeiroia sp. (Trematoda: Psilostomidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinto, H A; Jadin, R C; Orlofske, S A; Johnson, P T J; Melo, A L

    2013-10-01

    Species of Ribeiroia are trematode parasites of birds and mammals that have acquired notoriety since Ribeiroia ondatrae was identified as a cause of mortality and malformations in North American amphibians. Although species of Ribeiroia have been reported in vertebrate hosts in South America, the snails involved in its transmission remain unknown in Brazil. During malacological studies conducted at Pampulha Reservoir, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, between January 2009 and February 2012, in total 14,264 specimens of Biomphalaria straminea were collected, of which 192 (1.35%) were infected with gymnocephalous cercariae. The larvae were used for experimental infection of laboratory-reared guppies ( Poecilia reticulata ); metacercariae obtained in these fishes were orally administered to domestic ducks (Cairina moschata); and adult parasites were obtained from the proventriculus 10 days after infection. Based on morphological and molecular analyses, the parasite was identified as Ribeiroia sp., a species morphologically similar to R. ondatrae , but distinctly different at the molecular level. This is the first report of larvae of Ribeiroia in Brazil and B. straminea as a new intermediate host for this genus. PMID:23421393

  17. Lichen endozoochory by snails.

    PubMed

    Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Werth, Silke; Rüetschi, Jörg; Fischer, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Endozoochory plays a prominent role for the dispersal of seed plants. However, for most other plant taxa it is not known whether this mode of dispersal occurs at all. Among those other taxa, lichens as symbiotic associations of algae and fungi are peculiar as their successful dispersal requires movement of propagules that leaves the symbiosis functional. However, the potential for endozoochorous dispersal of lichen fragments has been completely overlooked. We fed sterile thalli of two foliose lichen species (Lobaria pulmonaria and Physcia adscendens) differing in habitat and air-quality requirements to nine snail species common in temperate Europe. We demonstrated morphologically that L. pulmonaria regenerated from 29.0% of all 379 fecal pellets, whereas P. adscendens regenerated from 40.9% of all 433 fecal pellets, showing that lichen fragments survived gut passage of all snail species. Moreover, molecular analysis of regenerated lichens confirmed the species identity for a subset of samples. Regeneration rates were higher for the generalist lichen species P. adscendens than for the specialist lichen species L. pulmonaria. Furthermore, lichen regeneration rates varied among snail species with higher rates after gut passage of heavier snail species. We suggest that gastropods generally grazing on lichen communities are important, but so far completely overlooked, as vectors for lichen dispersal. This opens new ecological perspectives and questions the traditional view of an entirely antagonistic relationship between gastropods and lichens. PMID:21533256

  18. Lichen Endozoochory by Snails

    PubMed Central

    Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Werth, Silke; Rüetschi, Jörg; Fischer, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Endozoochory plays a prominent role for the dispersal of seed plants. However, for most other plant taxa it is not known whether this mode of dispersal occurs at all. Among those other taxa, lichens as symbiotic associations of algae and fungi are peculiar as their successful dispersal requires movement of propagules that leaves the symbiosis functional. However, the potential for endozoochorous dispersal of lichen fragments has been completely overlooked. We fed sterile thalli of two foliose lichen species (Lobaria pulmonaria and Physcia adscendens) differing in habitat and air-quality requirements to nine snail species common in temperate Europe. We demonstrated morphologically that L. pulmonaria regenerated from 29.0% of all 379 fecal pellets, whereas P. adscendens regenerated from 40.9% of all 433 fecal pellets, showing that lichen fragments survived gut passage of all snail species. Moreover, molecular analysis of regenerated lichens confirmed the species identity for a subset of samples. Regeneration rates were higher for the generalist lichen species P. adscendens than for the specialist lichen species L. pulmonaria. Furthermore, lichen regeneration rates varied among snail species with higher rates after gut passage of heavier snail species. We suggest that gastropods generally grazing on lichen communities are important, but so far completely overlooked, as vectors for lichen dispersal. This opens new ecological perspectives and questions the traditional view of an entirely antagonistic relationship between gastropods and lichens. PMID:21533256

  19. Small Snails, Enormous Elephants

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    This activity (located on page 2 of PDF) introduces learners to the real size of animals using nonstandard measurement. Learners use Unifix cubes and yarn lengths to measure a variety of animals (photos), from the very small like a snail to the very large like an elephant. As an extension, learners can use the cubes to create a bar graph depicting the animals' lengths.

  20. Eye to Eye With Garden Snails

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:2.1 FN:Kathy Liu N:Liu; Kathy ORG:Access Excellence REV:2005-04-19 END:VCARD

    1994-07-30

    This Snail Unit encourages students to explore the external characteristics and behavior of snails. It effectively gets students past the "ugh, slime" reaction to recognizing individual differences in snails and challenges students to learn enough about the snail to be able to predict their behavior under a variety of conditions. Detailed observations are requested as are preparation and testing of hypotheses. This unit works very well with all levels of students and with heterogeneously grouped students. This Snail Unit consists of six lessons: (1) Introduction to a Snail (2) How do snails move? How fast is a snail's pace? (3) What and how do snails eat? (4) Are snails attracted to, or repelled by particular substances? (5) Can snails be enticed to travel faster or in a certain direction? (6) How are snails like other animals? How are they different?

  1. Effects of Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (sod1) Genotype and Genetic Background on Growth, Reproduction and Defense in Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Kaitlin M.; Bayne, Christopher J.; Larson, Maureen K.; Blouin, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata to the trematode Schistosoma mansoni is correlated with allelic variation at copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (sod1). We tested whether there is a fitness cost associated with carrying the most resistant allele in three outbred laboratory populations of snails. These three populations were derived from the same base population, but differed in average resistance. Under controlled laboratory conditions we found no cost of carrying the most resistant allele in terms of fecundity, and a possible advantage in terms of growth and mortality. These results suggest that it might be possible to drive resistant alleles of sod1 into natural populations of the snail vector for the purpose of controlling transmission of S. mansoni. However, we did observe a strong effect of genetic background on the association between sod1 genotype and resistance. sod1 genotype explained substantial variance in resistance among individuals in the most resistant genetic background, but had little effect in the least resistant genetic background. Thus, epistatic interactions with other loci may be as important a consideration as costs of resistance in the use of sod1 for vector manipulation. PMID:22724037

  2. Effects of infection by larvae of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda, Metastrongylidae) on the lipid metabolism of the experimental intermediate host Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Tunholi, Victor Menezes; Gôlo, Patrícia; Lima, Mariana; Garcia, Juberlan; Júnior, Arnaldo Maldonado; Pontes, Emerson Guedes; Bittencourt, Vânia Rita Elias Pinheiro; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2013-05-01

    Experimental infection of Biomphalaria glabrata by Angiostrongylus cantonensis induces significant changes in the concentrations of triacylglycerol and cholesterol in the hemolymph and of neutral lipids in the digestive gonad-gland (DGG) complex of the host snail. In this study, snails were dissected after 1, 2, and 3 weeks of infection to collect the hemolymph and DGG and to measure the levels of cholesterol and triacylglycerol in the hemolymph and neutral lipid fractions in the tissues. The results show that infection by this nematode resulted in a significant decrease in the concentrations of both cholesterol and triacylglycerol in the hemolymph of B. glabrata during the parasite's initial ontogenic development period. This reduction indicates the possible use of these molecules by both parasite and host not only as energy substrates but also as structural factors required during development of the parasite's larval stages. In parallel, changes in the neutral lipid profile in the DGG and lipase activity of the infected snails were observed, indicating the importance of these molecules for successful infection. PMID:23377121

  3. Baldomero Olivera: Cone Snail Peptides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Olivera, Baldomero

    Have you ever considered the venom of a snail? Most people think of snakes when they think of venom but overlook snails. There are, however, almost 10,000 species of venomous predatory snails according to this engaging lecture from Professor Baldomero Olivera. In his talk, Professor Olivera explores how these venoms have been used to understand the nervous system and develop new drugs. The lecture is divided into three different sections, and visitors shouldn't miss Part 2 ("How a Fish Hunting Snail Captures Its Prey"). Visitors are also welcome to download the entire lecture and the accompanying slides.

  4. Effect of crude lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli O127:B8 on the amebocyte-producing organ of Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Sullivan, John T; Bulman, Christina A; Salamat, Zahra

    2011-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) to which the internal defense system (IDS) of both vertebrates and invertebrates responds. We measured the mitotic response of the hematopoietic tissue of the schistosome-transmitting snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, to crude LPS from Escherichia coli 0127:B8. In a dose-response study, snails were injected with a range of concentrations of crude LPS, and mitotic figures were enumerated in histological sections of amebocyte-producing organ (APO) fixed at 24h post-injection (PI) following a 6h treatment with 0.1% colchicine. In APOs from Salvador strain snails, which are genetically resistant to infection with Schistosoma mansoni, LPS concentrations of 0.01 mg/ml and above triggered a large increase in mitotic activity, whereas in APOs from schistosome-susceptible NIH albino snails, concentrations of 0.1mg/ml elicited a much smaller, but statistically significant increase. A time course study, without colchicine treatment, revealed that in Salvador APOs the mitotic response to 0.1mg/ml occurred by 18 h PI, peaked at 24h, and returned to control levels by 72 h; NIH albino APOs showed no detectible response. When Salvador APOs were exposed to crude LPS in vitro, no increase in mitotic activity occurred, a result suggesting the possible requirement for a peripheral tissue or hemolymph factor. The increased cell proliferation induced by crude LPS represents a novel systemic response of an invertebrate IDS to one or more PAMPs from a Gram-negative bacterium. PMID:21530581

  5. Susceptibility of Biomphalaria straminea from Peixe Angical dam, Tocantins, Brazil to infection with three strains of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Monica Ammon; Thiengo, Silvana Carvalho

    2010-07-01

    Environmental changes from water resource developmental projects affect the epidemiology of water-associated diseases, as well as malaria and schistosomiasis. Aiming to investigate the occurrence and distribution of freshwater snails of medical and veterinary importance in the area of influence of the Peixe Angical hydroelectric dam, a survey has been conducted over four years (2004-2008). The study has revealed the occurrence of populations of Biomphalaria straminea (Dunker) in all municipalities surrounding the lake. Studies on parasite-mollusc compatibility were undertaken using 35 populations of B. straminea, descendants of specimens obtained from that area and three strains of Schistosoma mansoni (Sambon) (BH, CM and CMO). The main results are as follows: (i) among the 1,314 specimens used, eight had been infected (infection index of 0.6%) with only the BH strain, (ii) for B. straminea populations, the mortality index was 6.8% and, depending on the strain used, the indexes were 4.6%, 8.49% and 19% with BH, CM and CMO strains, respectively, (iii) the infection indexes varied according to the B. straminea populations, ranging from 0-12.5% and (iv) the duration of the precercarial period varied from 25-49 days. These results, in addition to environmental and social changes that took place in the Peixe Angical dam region, indicate the possibility of B. straminea emerging as a schistosomiasis vector in this area. PMID:20721496

  6. Demographic responses to multi-generation cadmium exposure in two strains of the freshwater gastropod, Biomphalaria glabrata.

    SciTech Connect

    Salice, Christopher J.; Miller, Thomas J.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2008-08-20

    A life table response experiment (LTRE) was used to quantify the population-level effects of continuous, multi-generation cadmium exposure on two strains of the freshwater gastropod, Biomphalaria glabrata; the parasite resistant BS90 and parasite susceptible NMRI strains. Snails were exposed to waterborne cadmium for three consecutive generations. Survival, growth and reproduction were measured empirically and incorporated into a stage-based, deterministic population model. Cadmium significantly affected hatching success, time to maturity and juvenile and adult survival in both strains. There were significant effects of generation on fecundity, hatching success time to maturity and juvenile survival in NMRI and time to maturity and adult survival in BS90. Cadmium significantly affected the population growth rate, lambda (?), in BS90. Cadmium, generation and the cadmium x generation interaction had significant effects on ? in NMRI. At the high cadmium exposure, ? for NMRI showed a decrease from generation 1 to generation 2 followed by and increase from generation 2 to 3. Lambda in high cadmium BS90 steadily decreased over the three generations while NMRI at this same concentration was similar to the controls. The results indicated that strain-specific differences in response to multi-generation cadmium exposure are evident in B. glabrata. Moreover, effects seen in the first generation are not necessarily indicative of effects in subsequent generations. Changes in ? over the course of the three-generation exposure suggest that acclimation and/or adaptation to cadmium may have occurred, particularly in NMRI at the high cadmium exposure level.

  7. Identification of protein components of egg masses indicates parental investment in immunoprotection of offspring by Biomphalaria glabrata (Gastropoda, Mollusca)

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Jennifer J M; Adema, Coen M.; Stout, Barbara A.; Mobarak, Charlotte D; Loker, Eric S

    2009-01-01

    The macromolecules contributed by the freshwater gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, to developing offspring inside egg masses are poorly known. SDS-PAGE fractionated egg mass fluids (EMF) of M line and BB02 B. glabrata were analyzed by MALDI-TOF (MS and tandem MS). A MASCOT database was assembled with EST data from B. glabrata and other molluscs to aid in sequence characterization. Of approximately 20 major EMF polypeptides, 16 were identified as defense-related, including protease inhibitors, a hemocyanin-like factor and tyrosinase (each with possible phenoloxidase activity), extracellular Cu-Zn SOD, two categories of C-type lectins, Gram negative bacteria-binding protein (GNBP), aplysianin/achacin-like protein, as well as versions of lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bacterial permeability increasing proteins (LBP/BPI) that differed from those previously described from hemocytes. Along with two sequences that were encoded by “unknown” ESTs, EMF also yielded a compound containing a vWF domain that is likely involved in defense and a polypeptide with homology to the Aplysia pheromone temptin. Further study of B. glabrata pheromones is warranted as these could be useful in efforts to control these schistosome-transmitting snails. Several of the EMF polypeptides were contained in the albumen gland, the organ that produces most EMF. Thus parental investment of B. glabrata in immunoprotection of its offspring is indicated to be considerable. PMID:19995576

  8. EVALUATION OF THE MOLLUSCICIDAL POTENTIAL OF HYDROALCOHOLIC EXTRACTS OF Jatropha gossypiifolia Linnaeus, 1753 ON Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818)

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Adalberto Alves; França, Clícia Rosane Costa; Oliveira, Dorlam's da Silva; Mendes, Renato Juvino de Aragão; Gonçalves, José de Ribamar Santos; Rosa, Ivone Garros

    2014-01-01

    The action of extracts from the stem, leaves, and fruit of Jatropha gossypiifolia on Biomphalaria glabrata was studied by analyzing survival, feeding capacity and oviposition ability. The extracts were obtained by macerating the plant parts in 92% ethanol, which were then evaporated until a dry residue was obtained and phytochemically studied. The molluscicidal activity on B. glabrata was investigated using the procedures recommended by WHO (1965). The amount of food ingested and oviposition were measured during each experiment. The extract of leaves from J. gossypiifolia was shown to be a strong molluscicidal agent, causing 100% mortality of B. glabrata, even in the lowest concentration tested, of 25 ppm. Regarding the fruit extract, there was variation in the mortality, depending on the concentration used (100, 75, 50 and 25 ppm). The snails that were in contact with the fruit extract had significant reduction in feeding and number of embryos in comparison to the control. The stem extract did not present molluscicidal activity nor had any influence on the feeding and oviposition abilities of B. glabrata, in the concentrations tested. In conclusion, the extracts of leaves and fruits of J. gossypiifolia investigated in this work show molluscicidal effect and may be sources of useful compounds for the schistosomiasis control. PMID:25351545

  9. Description of two new cercariae (an echinostome cercaria and a xiphidiocercaria) procured from Biomphalaria pfeifferi (Krauss) from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Fouad; Ayoub, Magda; Tadros, Menerva; El Bardicy, Samia; Abolarinwa, Simon

    2014-08-01

    During parasitological examination of Biomphalaria pfeifferi snails obtained from Niger state (Nigeria), 2 new types of cercariae were found. They are identified to the level of referring to the major group and described here for the first time. They were examined viable and stained with vital stains as well as fixed in 70% alcohol. They were drawn with a camera lucida and photographed. They are identified as an echinostome cercaria and a xiphidiocercaria. The echinostome is characterized by having a ventral sucker almost double in size the oral one. It has a semicircular structure located beyond the oral sucker. Three pairs of penetration glands are found at the anterior portion of the body. The number of collar spines is relatively large (44-46). The flame cellsare 17 x 2 in number. Two main lateral excretory ducts extend anteriorly, form two typical echinostome loops then pass posteriorly to open together in a diverticulated excretory vesicle. Its tail is relatively long and flattened with 3 fin folds. The tail (640 ?m) is longer than the body (475 ?m). The xiphidiocercaria belongs to the "ornatae" group. It is relatively small (180.5 x 110 ?m) with a long stylet (30 ?m). Its oral sucker is one and half times the size of the ventral sucker. Two excretory ducts extend posteriorly in both sides and become dilated and unite to open in a circular excretoryvesicle. Tail is slender shorter than the body and has a dorso-ventral fin fold. PMID:25597151

  10. Evaluation of the molluscicidal potential of hydroalcoholic extracts of Jatropha gossypiifolia Linnaeus, 1753 on Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818).

    PubMed

    Pereira Filho, Adalberto Alves; França, Clícia Rosane Costa; Oliveira, Dorlam's da Silva; Mendes, Renato Juvino de Aragão; Gonçalves, José de Ribamar Santos; Rosa, Ivone Garros

    2014-01-01

    The action of extracts from the stem, leaves, and fruit of Jatropha gossypiifolia on Biomphalaria glabrata was studied by analyzing survival, feeding capacity and oviposition ability. The extracts were obtained by macerating the plant parts in 92% ethanol, which were then evaporated until a dry residue was obtained and phytochemically studied. The molluscicidal activity on B. glabrata was investigated using the procedures recommended by WHO (1965). The amount of food ingested and oviposition were measured during each experiment. The extract of leaves from J. gossypiifolia was shown to be a strong molluscicidal agent, causing 100% mortality of B. glabrata, even in the lowest concentration tested, of 25 ppm. Regarding the fruit extract, there was variation in the mortality, depending on the concentration used (100, 75, 50 and 25 ppm). The snails that were in contact with the fruit extract had significant reduction in feeding and number of embryos in comparison to the control. The stem extract did not present molluscicidal activity nor had any influence on the feeding and oviposition abilities of B. glabrata, in the concentrations tested. In conclusion, the extracts of leaves and fruits of J. gossypiifolia investigated in this work show molluscicidal effect and may be sources of useful compounds for the schistosomiasis control. PMID:25351545

  11. The Development of Snail Control Methods on an Irrigated Sugar-Cane Estate in Northern Tanzania*

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, A.

    1970-01-01

    In an attempt to prevent the transmission of Schistosoma mansoni on an irrigated sugar-cane estate, molluscicide experiments were carried out to find the optimum methods for controlling the intermediate-host snails, Biomphalaria pfeifferi. The ease of application of N-tritylmorpholine led to its adoption as the molluscicide of choice for the two separate irrigation systems on the estate. Experiments on the frequency and duration of molluscicide treatments were carried out, and from these it was concluded that 5-day applications of N-tritylmorpholine at 0.025 ppm every 7 weeks might lead to a break in transmission by control of the snails. In another set of trials, drainage ditches were treated alternately with N-tritylmorpholine and niclosamide ethanolamine salt, and although the chemicals differed only slightly in their effect, the latter—being ovicidal—was chosen to be applied at approximately 4 ppm by knapsack sprayer every 8 weeks. Extra treatment of small pools with the same compound was carried out during the long rains when irrigation was unnecessary and most of the canals were dry. It is pointed out that the effect of the control methods on S. mansoni transmission will need to be evaluated by studying the incidence of the disease in the population. PMID:5310954

  12. Red blood with blue-blood ancestry: Intriguing structure of a snail hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Bernhard; Dimitrova, Konstantina; Kang, Hio-Sun; Braun, Sabrina; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Martin, Andreas; Hanelt, Ben; Saenz, Steven A.; Adema, Coen M.; Markl, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic enigma of snail hemoglobin, its isolated occurrence in a single gastropod family, the Planorbidae, and the lack of sequence data, stimulated the present study. We present here the complete cDNA and predicted amino acid sequence of two hemoglobin polypeptides from the planorbid Biomphalaria glabrata (intermediate host snail for the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni). Both isoforms contain 13 different, cysteine-free globin domains, plus a small N-terminal nonglobin “plug” domain with three cysteines for subunit dimerization (total Mr ? 238 kDa). We also identified the native hemoglobin molecule and present here a preliminary 3D reconstruction from electron microscopical images (3 nm resolution); it suggests a 3 × 2-mer quaternary structure (Mr ? 1.43 MDa). Moreover, we identified a previously undescribed rosette-like hemolymph protein that has been mistaken for hemoglobin. We also detected expression of an incomplete hemocyanin as trace component. The combined data show that B. glabrata hemoglobin evolved from pulmonate myoglobin, possibly to replace a less-efficient hemocyanin, and reveals a surprisingly simple evolutionary mechanism to create a high molecular mass respiratory protein from 78 similar globin domains. PMID:16877545

  13. [Molluscacide activity of piquerol A isolated from Piqueria trinervia (Compositae) on 8 species of pulmonate snails].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Reyes, A; Chavarin, C; Campos Arias, M P; Taboada, J; Jimenez, M

    1989-01-01

    In laboratory trials an aqueous solution of Piquerol A from Piqueria trinervia, collected in several regions of Mexico, showed a molluscicide action on the adults of eight different pulmonates snails species: Fossaria (Fossaria) humilis, F. (Bakerilymnaea) sp., Pseudosuccinea columella and Stagnicola attenuata from Mexico; F. (B.) cubensis and Physa cubensis from Cuba; P. columella and Biomphalaria glabrata from Brazil; B. glabrata from Puerto Rico; and S. elodes from U.S.A. The solution was tested at 50, 25 and 5 ppm concentration, for two periods of 6 and 24 hours, at room temperature (20-22 degrees C). A 100% mortality was obtained for all species at 50 ppm concentration after 6 hours of exposure; the same percentage at 25 ppm after 24 hours; and 60 to 100% mortality at 5 ppm concentration during 24 hours of exposure. No recovery was observed among any of the treated snails. Piquerol A is a sesquiterpene with low stability in nature and has previously only been tested as an insecticide and as an inhibitor of metabolism in cell cultures: no field trails have been made on its toxicity to other aquatic fauna as yet, but it is believed Piquerol A could be an excellent molluscicide for use in areas where focal transmission of schistosomiasis and fascioliasis are taking place. This is the first time experiments on molluscicides have been carried out in Mexico. PMID:2319950

  14. Eradication of Slugs and Snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. Hall

    1932-01-01

    IN the note on the ``Eradication of Slugs and Snails'' in NATURE of July 16, p. 90, reference is made to many of the accepted methods of dealing with these pests. The trouble with barriers of repellent material is that spreading plants such as violas, certain asters, carnations, etc., are difficult to surround without injurious contact to the foliage, and

  15. APPLE SNAILS AS DISEASE VECTORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apple snails (Ampullariidae) are intermediate hosts of parasites causing at least three diseases in humans: cercarial dermatitis (“swimmer’s itch”) caused by trematode cercaria, intestinal problems caused by flukes in the genus Echinostoma, and eosinophilic meningitis caused by the nematode Angiostr...

  16. Freshwater snails and schistosomiasis mansoni in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: V - Norte fluminense mesoregion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silvana C Thiengo; Aline C Mattos; M Fernanda Boaventura; Monica A Fernandez; Sonia B Santos

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the forth of a series dealing with the survey of freshwater gastropods of the state of Rio de Janeiro, the results of collections carried out in the Sul Fluminense Mesoregion from 2000 to 2002 are presented and revealed the occurrence of 18 species: Antillorbis nordestensis; Biomphalaria glabrata; Biomphalaria peregrina; Biomphalaria straminea; Biomphalaria tenagophila; Drepanotrema anatinum; Drepanotrema cimex;

  17. Toxic effects of Microgramma vacciniifolia rhizome lectin on Artemia salina, human cells, and the schistosomiasis vector Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Lidiane Pereira; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Santana, Giselly Maria de Sá; Silva, Luanna Ribeiro Santos; Aguiar, Jaciana dos Santos; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Rêgo, Moacyr Jesus Barreto de Melo; Pitta, Maira Galdino da Rocha; da Silva, Teresinha Gonçalves; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2014-10-01

    The present study evaluated the toxicity of Microgramma vacciniifolia rhizome lectin (MvRL) to Artemia salina, human tumour cell lines (larynx epidermoid carcinoma Hep-2, NCI-H292 lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and chronic myelocytic leukaemia K562), and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as to Biomphalaria glabrata embryos and adults. MvRL was toxic to A. salina (LC50=159.9 ?g/mL), and exerted cytotoxic effects on NCI-H292 cells (IC50=25.23 ?g/mL). The lectin (1-100 ?g/mL) did not affect the viability of K562 and Hep-2 tumour cells, as well as of PBMCs. MvRL concentration of 1, 10, and 100 ?g/mL promoted malformations (mainly exogastrulation) in 7.8%, 22.5%, and 27.7% of embryos, respectively, as well as delayed embryo development in 42.0%, 69.5%, and 54.7% of embryos, respectively. MvRL at a concentration of 100 ?g/mL killed B. glabrata embryos (17.7%) and adults (25%). Further, MvRL damaged B. glabrata reproductive processes, which was evidenced by observations that snails exposed to the lectin (100 ?g/mL) deposited fewer eggs than those in the control group, and approximately 40% of the deposited eggs exhibited malformations. Comparison of these results with that from A. salina assay indicates that MvRL is adulticidal at the concentration range which is toxic to environment. In conclusion, the cytotoxicity of MvRL on tumour cell and absence of toxicity to normal cell indicate its potential as chemotherapeutic drug. Also, the study revealed that the lectin is able to promote deleterious effects on B. glabrata embryos at environmentally safe concentrations. PMID:24954527

  18. Taxonomy: A Precursor to Understanding Ecological Interactions among Schistosomes, Snail Hosts, and Snail-Eating Fishes

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    , and Snail-Eating Fishes JAY RICHARD STAUFFER, JR.* Pennsylvania State University, 420 Forest Resources decrease in the abundance of snail-eating fishes and an increase in the prevalence of schistosomiasis among decrease in fish molluscivores permitted an increase in the abundance of snails that are intermediate hosts

  19. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Misako, E-mail: haraguci@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Indo, Hiroko P. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Iwasaki, Yasumasa [Health Care Center, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan)] [Health Care Center, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Iwashita, Yoichiro [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Fukushige, Tomoko [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Majima, Hideyuki J. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa [Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kanekura, Takuro [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Furukawa, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ozawa, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ? MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ? MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ? TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ? MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ? MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of key enzymes. This results in enhanced glucose dependency and leads to cell death under low-glucose conditions. On the other hand, the reduced requirements for oxygen and nutrients from the surrounding environment, might confer the resistance to cell death induced by hypoxia and malnutrition.

  20. F-LE Snail Invasion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-05-01

    This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: In 1966, a Miami boy smuggled three Giant African Land Snails into the country. His grandmother eventually released them into the garden, and in seven ...

  1. Production of apple snail for space diet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Motoki, Shigeru; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.; Katayama, Naomi

    For food production in space at recycling bio-elements under closed environment, appropriate organisms should be chosen to drive the closed materials recycle loop. We propose a combination of green algae, photosynthetic protozoa, and aquatic plants such as Wolffia spp., for the primary producer fixing solar energy to chemical form in biomass, and apple snail, Pomacea bridgesii, which converts this biomass to animal meat. Because of high proliferation rate of green algae or protozoa compared to higher plants, and direct conversion of them to apple snail, the efficiency of food production in this combination is high, in terms of energy usage, space for rearing, and yield of edible biomass. Furthermore, green algae and apple snail can form a closed ecological system with exchanging bio-elements between two member, i.e. excreta of snail turn to fertilizer of algae, and grown algae become feed for snail. Since apple snail stays in water or on wet substrate, control of rearing is easy to make. Mass production technology of apple snail has been well established to utilize it as human food. Nutrients of apple snail are also listed in the standard tables of food composition in Japan. Nutrients for 100 g of apple snail canned in brine are energy 340 kJ, protein 16.5 g, lipid 1.0 g, cholesterol 240 mg, carbohydrate 0.8 g, Ca 400 mg, Fe 3.9 mg, Zn 1.5 mg. It is rich in minerals, especially Ca and Fe. Vitamin contents are quite low, but K 0.005 mg, B2 0.09 mg, B12 0.0006 mg, folate 0.001 mg, and E 0.6 mg. The amino acid score of apple snail could not be found in literature. Overall, apple snail provides rich protein and animal lipid such as cholesterol. It could be a good source of minerals. However, it does not give enough vitamin D and B12 , which are supposed to be supplemented by animal origin foods. In terms of acceptance in food culture, escargot is a gourmet menu in French dishes, and six to ten snail, roughly 50 g, are served for one person. Apple snail reaches to 30 g of body weight within two or three month from its egg. Several hundreds of egg are laid by one snail. It start egg laying after three months from hatching. In order to harvest 50 g for every day's meal, 3 m2 is required for rearing space. Eating apple snail and establishing its rearing system might save the food crisis on Earth.

  2. Identification and characterisation of functional expressed sequence tags-derived simple sequence repeat (eSSR) markers for genetic linkage mapping of Schistosoma mansoni juvenile resistance and susceptibility loci in Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Miller, André; Su, Xin-zhuan; Mu, Jianbing; Bhusudsawang, Ganlayarat; Ukoskit, Kitipat; Knight, Matty

    2013-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata susceptibility to Schistosoma mansoni has a strong genetic component, offering the possibility for investigating host–parasite interactions at the molecular level, perhaps leading to novel control approaches. The identification, mapping and molecular characterisation of genes that influence the outcome of parasitic infection in the intermediate snail host is, therefore, seen as fundamental to the control of schistosomiasis. To better understand the evolutionary processes driving disease resistance/susceptibility phenotypes, we previously identified polymorphic random amplification of polymorphic DNA and genomic simple sequence repeats from B. glabrata. In the present study we identified and characterised polymorphic expressed simple sequence repeats markers (Bg-eSSR) from existing B. glabrata expressed sequence tags. Using these markers, and with previously identified genomic simple sequence repeats, genetic linkage mapping for parasite refractory and susceptibility phenotypes, the first known for B. glabrata, was initiated. Data mining of 54,309 expressed sequence tag, produced 660 expressed simple sequence repeats of which dinucleotide motifs (TA)n were the most common (37.88%), followed by trinucleotide (29.55%), mononucleotide (18.64%) and tetranucleotide (10.15%). Penta- and hexanucleotide motifs represented <3% of the Bg-eSSRs identified. While the majority (71%) of Bg-eSSRs were monomorphic between resistant and susceptible snails, several were, however, useful for the construction of a genetic linkage map based on their inheritance in segregating F2 progeny snails derived from crossing juvenile BS-90 and NMRI snails. Polymorphic Bg-eSSRs assorted into six linkage groups at a logarithm of odds score of 3. Interestingly, the heritability of four markers (Prim1_910, Prim1_771, Prim6_1024 and Prim7_823) with juvenile snail resistance were, by t-test, significant (P < 0.05) while an allelic marker, Prim24_524, showed linkage with the juvenile snail susceptibility phenotype. On the basis of our results it is possible that the gene(s) controlling juvenile resistance and susceptibility to S. mansoni infection in B. glabrata are not only on the same linkage group but lie within a short distance (42 cM) of each other. PMID:23643514

  3. Toxicity evaluation of ammonium sulphate and urea to three developmental stages of freshwater snails.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, P B; Englande, A J; Malek, E A

    1991-09-01

    Studies were performed to evaluate the toxic effects of ammonium sulphate and urea (chemical fertilizers currently applied in ricelands of Cameroon) against eggs, juveniles, and adults of two species of freshwater snails (Helisoma trivolvis and Biomphalaria havanensis). Results obtained from ammonium sulphate tests indicated 24-h LC50 values of 558 mg/L and 669 mg/L for eggs; 393 mg/L and 526 mg/L for juveniles, and 701 mg/L and 657 mg/L for adults of H. trivolvis and B. havanensis, respectively. Similar analysis with urea revealed LC50 values of 14,241 mg/L and 13,532 mg/L for eggs; 18,255 mg/L and 24,504 mg/L for juveniles and 30,060 mg/L and 26,024 mg/L for adults of H. trivolvis and B. havanensis, respectively. Following 48 h exposure, the concentrations of ammonium sulphate killing 100% of snails were 1,250 mg/L and 1,000 mg/L for the adults of H. trivolvis and of B. havanensis, respectively. Those of urea were computed to be 25,000 mg/L for H. trivolvis and 35,000 mg/L for B. havanensis. In rice culture in Cameroon, these fertilizers are applied at doses of 100 kg/ha (ammonium sulphate) and of 150 kg/ha (urea); hence, the above found concentrations lethal to snails appeared to be 10 to 13 times (ammonium sulphate) and to be 165 to 235 times (urea) higher assuming an average water depth of 10 cm in these ricefields. Therefore, the use of ammonium sulphate and urea as chemical fertilizers in ricelands of the Republic of Cameroon might adversely affect the survival of freshwater snails only in the case of spills or of stressful environmental conditions. Under normal laboratory conditions, both chemicals show a low molluscicidal activity with urea being about 25 to 35 times less potent than ammonium sulphate. PMID:1953026

  4. Susceptibility of Biomphalaria straminea (Dunker, 1848) from Serra da Mesa Dam, Goiás, Brazil to infection with three strains of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, 1907.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Monica Ammon; Thiengo, Silvana Carvalho

    2002-01-01

    Ecological changes from water resources development projects often affect the epidemiology of water-associated diseases. In order to investigate the occurrence and distribution of freshwater snails of medical and veterinary importance in the area of influence of the Serra da Mesa Hydroelectric a survey has been performed since 1997 and revealed the occurrence of well-established populations of Biomphalaria straminea (Dunker, 1848) in the 8 municipalities surrounding the lake. Areas of epidemiologic risk for schistosomiasis were selected and studies of parasite-mollusc compatibility were undertaken using specimens from 19 populations of B. straminea and 3 strains (CM, EC and PB) originally isolated from B. straminea. Among 1,135 specimens used 15 became infected (infection index of 1.3%) and 8 populations were susceptible to the schistosome strains: B. straminea from Campinorte (Castelão, susceptible to CM and EC strains, and Planeta Agua, EC strain), Colinas (Tocantinzinho river, CM and EC strains), Minaçu (Canabrava river, EC strain), Niquelândia (Codemin, CM and PB strains, and Almas river, CM strain), Uruaçu (touristic area, PB strain) and Santa Rita do Novo Destino (Maranhão river, CM and EC strains). These results, associated with marked social and ecological changes occurred, strongly suggest the possibility of B. straminea coming to act as a vector of schistosomiasis in the studied area. PMID:12426596

  5. Controlling slugs and snails in orchids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slugs and snails are pests of orchids, preferring tender plant tissues such as flowers and root tips. Unlike many insect pests which feed only on certain types of plants, most species of slugs and snails are generalists, feeding on green plants, algae, fungi, decaying plant matter, or decaying anima...

  6. Inquiry, Land Snails, and Environmental Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Krantz, Patrick D.

    2005-01-01

    Land snails are common invertebrates that fascinate children. Unfortunately, they are seldom used for activities in the science classroom. Snails are inexpensive, take up little space in the classroom, and require only low maintenance, and their learning dividends can be enormous. For example, students can use them in inquiry-based activities that…

  7. Environmental calcium modifies induced defences in snails.

    PubMed Central

    Rundle, Simon D; Spicer, John I; Coleman, Ross A; Vosper, Jo; Soane, Julie

    2004-01-01

    Inducible defences are adaptive phenotypes that arise in response to predation threats. Such plasticity incurs costs to individuals, but there has been little interest in how such induced traits in animals may be constrained by environmental factors. Here, we demonstrate that calcium availability interacts with predation cues to modify snail shell growth and form. Small snails increased their growth and were heavier when exposed to fish chemical cues, but this response was calcium limited. There was also an interactive effect of fish cues and calcium on the shell growth of larger snails, but shell strength and aperture narrowness were affected by calcium alone. For small snails, behavioural avoidance was greatest for snails exhibiting least morphological plasticity, suggesting a trade-off. There was no trade-off of somatic growth with plasticity. We suggest that the expression of defensive traits in molluscs can be constrained by calcium availability, which has implications for molluscan ecology and evolution. PMID:15101422

  8. Biomphalaria straminea and Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Planorbidae) as new intermediate hosts of the fish eyefluke Austrodiplostomum compactum (Trematoda: Diplostomidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinto, H A; Melo, A L

    2013-08-01

    Austrodiplostomum compactum has been involved in cases of ocular diplostomiasis in several species of fish in Brazil, but the molluscan intermediate hosts of the parasite remain unknown. In the present study, malacological surveys were carried out at Pampulha Reservoir, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, between January 2009 and July 2012. A total of 16,119 specimens of Biomphalaria spp. were collected and examined, of which 68/14,948 specimens (0.45%) of Biomphalaria straminea and 6/541 (1.11%) of Biomphalaria glabrata were found harboring a strigeid cercariae. Groups of 5 specimens of Cyprinius carpio were experimentally infected with these cercariae (100 larvae/fish), and metacercariae were recovered from the eyes of the fish, 65 days after infection, with a mean intensity of infection of 10.4 (8-13) metacercariae/fish. Morphological study on cercariae and metacercariae identified them as A. compactum . This is the first record of cercariae of A. compactum in Brazil, and B. straminea and B. glabrata as new intermediate hosts for the parasite. PMID:23360402

  9. Ultrastructural study of the in vitro interaction between Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes and Schistosoma mansoni miracidia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfan Araque; Emilia E Barrios; Pedro Rodríguez; Víctor S Delgado; Héctor J Finol

    2003-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata and Schistosoma mansoni relationship was studied by light microscopy (LM) and freeze- fracture replica technique (FFR). We observed very thin cytoplasmic extensions of hemocytes in the LM, which then surround immobilize the miracidia. FFR images showed that the contact site between hemocytes cytoplasmic extensions and the external tegumentary coat involved only superficial layers of miracidia. Numerous vacuoles and

  10. Size Polymorphism in Alleles of the Myoglobin Gene from Biomphalaria Mollusks

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Kádima N.; Souza, Karyne N.; Vidigal, Teofânia H.D.A.; Brito, Cristiane A.; Santos, Alexandre M.C.; Santoro, Marcelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Introns are common among all eukaryotes, while only a limited number of introns are found in prokaryotes. Globin, globin-like proteins are widely distributed in nature, being found even in prokaryotes, a wide range of patterns of intron-exon have been reported in several eukaryotic globin genes. Globin genes in invertebrates show considerable variation in the positions of introns; globins can be found without introns, with only one intron or with three introns in different positions. In this work we analyzed the introns in the myoglobin gene from Biomphalaria glabrata, B. straminea, B. tenagophila. In the Biomphalaria genus, the myoglobin gene has three introns; these were amplified by PCR, analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Results showed that the size (number or nucleotides), the nucleotide sequence of the coding gene of the myoglobin are variable in the three species. We observed the presence of size polymorphisms in intron 2, 3; this characterizes a homozygous/heterozygous profile, it indicates the existence of two alleles which are different in size in each species of Biomphalaria. This polymorphism could be explored for specific identification of Biomphalaria individuals. PMID:24710092

  11. Spatial distribution of Biomphalaria mollusks at São Francisco River Basin, Minas Gerais, Brazil, using geostatistical procedures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ricardo J. P. S. Guimarães; Corina C. Freitas; Luciano V. Dutra; Carlos A. Felgueiras; Ana C. M. Moura; Ronaldo S. Amaral; Sandra C. Drummond; Ronaldo G. C. Scholte; Guilherme Oliveira; Omar S. Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Geostatistics is used in this work to make inferences about the presence of the species of Biomphalaria (B. glabrata, B. tenagophila and\\/or B. straminea), intermediate hosts of Schistosoma mansoni, at the São Francisco River Basin, in Minas Gerais, Brazil. One of these geostatistical procedures, known as indicator kriging, allows the classification of categorical data, in areas where the data are

  12. Cercarial Dermatitis Transmitted by Exotic Marine Snail

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Andrew N.; James, David; Hui, Lucia; Hom, Albert; Loker, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer’s itch) is caused by the penetration of human skin by cercariae of schistosome parasites that develop in and are released from snail hosts. Cercarial dermatitis is frequently acquired in freshwater habitats, and less commonly in marine or estuarine waters. To investigate reports of a dermatitis outbreak in San Francisco Bay, California, we surveyed local snails for schistosome infections during 2005–2008. We found schistosomes only in Haminoea japonica, an Asian snail first reported in San Francisco Bay in 1999. Genetic markers place this schistosome within a large clade of avian schistosomes, but do not match any species for which there are genetic data. It is the second known schistosome species to cause dermatitis in western North American coastal waters; these species are transmitted by exotic snails. Introduction of exotic hosts can support unexpected emergence of an unknown parasite with serious medical or veterinary implications. PMID:20735918

  13. Haemolymph Components of Infected & None Infected Lymnaea snails with Xiphidiocercariae

    PubMed Central

    Saboor Yaraghi, AA; Farahnak, A; Eshraghian, MR

    2011-01-01

    Background In this study the haemolymph components of infected and none infected Lymnaea gedrosiana with xiphidiocercaria larvae was compared. Methods Five hundred Fifty Lymnaea snails were collected from Ilam and Mazandaran provinces, Iran, during 2008–2009. The snails were transported to the lab at Tehran University of Medical Sciences and their cercarial sheddings were studied. Haemolmyphs of snails were extracted and cells were counted using haemocytometer and cell-surface carbohydrate were recognized by conjugated lectin (Lentil). Haemolymph protein concentrations were measured by Bradford protein assay method and soluble protein compositions were determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results From the 550 examined Lymnaea snails for cercariae, 27 snails were infected with xiphidiocercariae. Mean of haemolymph cells (haemocyte) number were obtained 93480±2.43 (cells/ml) for none infected snails (25 snail) and 124560±2800 (cells/ml) for infected snails (25 snail). Mannose carbohydrate was recognized on haemocyte of none infected and infected snails. Mean of protein concentration of haemolymph plasma was obtained as 1354±160 µg/ml (1.4 mg/ml) for none infected snails (25 snails) and 1802±138 µg/ml (1.8 mg/ml) for infected snail (25 snails). Comparing to none infected snails, the SDS-PAGE results of haemolymph plasma of infected snails, showed an extra protein band (70 kDa). The results showed a significant difference between the amounts and the kinds of proteins in haemolymph of infected and none infected snails. Conclusion This information might be useful to understand of parasite detection, adhesion, engulfment and antigen agglutination by snail. PMID:22347279

  14. Snail destabilizes cell surface Crumbs3a.

    PubMed

    Harder, Jennifer L; Whiteman, Eileen L; Pieczynski, Jay N; Liu, Chia-Jen; Margolis, Ben

    2012-08-01

    During epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), cells modulate expression of proteins resulting in loss of apical-basal polarity. Effectors of this EMT switch target the polarity protein Crumbs3a, a small transmembrane protein that is essential for generation of the apical membrane and tight junctions of mammalian epithelial cells. We previously showed that the Crumbs3 gene is a direct target of transcriptional regulation by Snail, a potent inducer of EMT. However, Snail has also been shown to have multiple non-transcriptional roles, including regulation of cell adhesion, proliferation and survival. Using SNAP-tag labeling, we determined that cell surface Crumbs3a has a half-life of approximately 3?h and that this cell surface half-life is significantly reduced when EMT is induced by Snail. We further observe that Snail induces differential glycosylation of Crumbs3a, including sialylation, suggesting a mechanism by which Crumbs3a may be destabilized. These results indicate that Crumbs3a is a post-translational target of Snail, in addition to being a transcriptional target. We conclude that Snail's ability to post-translationally modify and destabilize Crumbs3a augments the depolarizing process of EMT. PMID:22554228

  15. The role of Snail in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bethany N.; Odero-Marah, Valerie A.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer and the sixth leading cause of death from cancer in men. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process by which cancer cells invade and migrate, and is characterized by loss of cell-cell adhesion molecules such as E-cadherin and increased expression of mesenchymal proteins such as vimentin; EMT is also associated with resistance to therapy. Snail, a master regulator of EMT, has been extensively studied and reported in cancers such as breast and colon; however, its role in prostate cancer is not as widely reported. The purpose of this review is to put together recent facts that summarize Snail signaling in human prostate cancer. Snail is overexpressed in prostate cancer and its expression and activity is controlled via phosphorylation and growth factor signaling. Snail is involved in its canonical role of inducing EMT in prostate cancer cells; however, it plays a role in non-canonical pathways that do not involve EMT such regulation of bone turnover and neuroendocrine differentiation. Thus, studies indicate that Snail signaling contributes to prostate cancer progression and metastasis and therapeutic targeting of Snail in prostate cancer holds promise in ?future. PMID:23076049

  16. Octopamine boosts snail locomotion: behavioural and cellular analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer C. Ormshaw; Christopher J. H. Elliott

    2006-01-01

    We measured the reduction in locomotion of unrestrained pond snails, Lymnaea stagnalis, subsequent to transdermal application of two selective octopamine antagonists, epinastine and phentolamine. After 3 h in fresh standard snail water following treatment with 4 mM epinastine or 3.5 mM phentolamine, the snails’ speed was reduced to 25 and 56% of the controls (P P = 0.02, respectively). The snails’ speed decreased as the drug

  17. Trematode infection alters the antipredator behavior of a pulmonate snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RANDALL J. BERNOT

    2003-01-01

    Parasites can alter the behavior, life history, and morphology of their host. Many trem- atodes parasitize freshwater pulmonate snails, resulting in a reduction or the elimination of repro- duction in those individuals. However, parasite effects on freshwater snail behavior are unclear. I measured trematode infection rates, size, and covered habitat use of the freshwater pulmonate snail Physa integra in a

  18. Snail populations in arctic lakes: competition mediated by predation?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne E. Hershey

    1990-01-01

    For 2 species of snails in arctic Alaskan lakes, I studied the patterns of snail distribution with respect to habitat, distribution of predatory fish, and the potential for interspecific competition. The snails Lymnaea elodes and Valvata lewisi co-exist in these arctic lakes, either in the presence of lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, or in the absence of predation. Intensive sediment core

  19. Substratum heterogeneity, crypsis, and colourpolymorphism in an intertidal snail (Littorinamariue)

    E-print Network

    Reimchen, Thomas E.

    Substratum heterogeneity, crypsis, and colourpolymorphism in an intertidal snail (Littorinamariue. Substratum heterogeneity, crypsis, and colour polymorphism in an intertidal snail (Liltorina mariae).Can. J, crypsis, and colour polymorphism in an intertidal snail (Littorina mariae). Can. J . Zool. 57: 1070- 1085

  20. Images of Minute Minnesota Land Snails Matt Barthel

    E-print Network

    Nekola, Jeffrey C.

    Images of Minute Minnesota Land Snails Matt Barthel January 2000 This disk contains diagnostic images representative of minute land snail taxa from Minnesota. The snails imaged are from throughout at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay (UWGB). The shells imaged were assigned to species (or subspecies) based

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of EMT: The Snail Story

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yiwei; Dong, Chenfang; Zhou, Binhua P.

    2014-01-01

    While the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a fundamental role during development, its deregulation can adversely promote tumor metastasis. The phenotypic and cellular plasticity of EMT indicates that it is subject to epigenetic regulation. In this review, we try to embrace recent findings on the mechanisms of the transcription factor Snail-mediated E-cadherin silencing, which is a hallmark of EMT. Our studies as well as those of others have clearly demonstrated that Snail can recruit multiple chromatin enzymes including LSD1, HDAC1/2, PRC2, G9a and Suv39H1 to the E-cadherin promoter. These enzymes function in a highly orchestrated fashion to generate heterochromatin and promote DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)-mediated DNA methylation at the promoter region. Disruption of the connection between Snail and these chromatin-modifying enzymes may represent an efficient strategy for the treatment of EMT-related diseases. PMID:23888971

  2. The Dual Protection of a Micro Land Snail against a Micro Predatory Snail

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Shinichiro; Chiba, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Defense against a single predatory attack strategy may best be achieved not by a single trait but by a combination of different traits. We tested this hypothesis experimentally by examining the unique shell traits (the protruded aperture and the denticles within the aperture) of the micro land snail Bensonella plicidens. We artificially altered shell characteristics by removing the denticles and/or cutting the protruded aperture. These snails were offered to the carnivorous micro land snail Indoennea bicolor, which preys on the snails by gaining entry to their shell. B. plicidens exhibited the best defence when both of the traits studied were present; the defensive ability of B. plicidens decreased if either trait was removed and was further reduced if both traits were removed. These results suggest that a combination of different traits provides more effective defence against attack by the predator than either single trait by itself. PMID:23326582

  3. Complex interactions among fish, snails and macrophytes: implications for biological control of an invasive snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pak Ki Wong; King Lun Kwong; Jian-Wen Qiu

    2009-01-01

    The golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata), a native of freshwater wetlands of South America, has invaded many Asian countries and grazed heavily in agricultural and\\u000a wild areas. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) has been proposed as a biological control agent against this snail, but little is known about its impact on non-target aquatic\\u000a plants and animals. In a 8-week enclosure experiment,

  4. Biological invasions: the case of planorbid snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Pointier; P. David; P. Jarne

    2005-01-01

    A large number of planorbid snails are now commonly transported by man mainly through the aquatic plant trade. However, only a restricted number of species establish viable populations in a new habitat and a more restricted number spread. Only five planorbid species can be ranked in this last category and can be considered as pests because of their role in

  5. What happens when snails get sick?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS; )

    2004-07-09

    Scientists used to think that the two major groups of animals, vertebrates and invertebrates, protected themselves from getting sick in very different ways. A new study in snails suggests that both groups' immune systems might be slightly more similar than previously thought.

  6. Toxicity of Azadirachta indica to freshwater snails and fish, with reference to the physicochemical factor effect on potency.

    PubMed

    Osuala, F O; Okwuosa, V N

    1993-02-01

    A preliminary crude screening of plants in Jos Metropolis showed that at a concentration of 100 mg/l-1 the stem bark extract of the Neem plant Azadirachta indica caused a 100 percent mortality when tested against three common snail intermediate host species, Biomphalaria pfeifferi, Bulinus truncatus, and Lymnaea natalensis after 24 hours exposure. Toxicity test with freeze-dried aqueous extract of the plant gave 96 hours LC50 values of 19.00 mg/l-1 (p > 0.05), 10.96 mg/l-1 (p > 0.05) and 15.13 mg/l-1 (p > 0.05) against B. pfeifferi, B. truncatus and L. natalensis, respectively. When a similar test was carried out on fish, Aphyosemon giardneri a 96 hour LC50 of 15.1 mg/l-1 was recorded. Extraction with alcohol, increase in temperature within the optimal range, increase in acidity of aquatic medium and cold storage improved the potency of the extract while boiling and room storage reduced it. PMID:8508220

  7. Differential Role of Snail1 and Snail2 Zinc Fingers in E-cadherin Repression and Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition*

    PubMed Central

    Villarejo, Ana; Cortés-Cabrera, Álvaro; Molina-Ortíz, Patricia; Portillo, Francisco; Cano, Amparo

    2014-01-01

    Snail1 (Snail) and Snail2 (Slug) are transcription factors that share a similar DNA binding structure of four and five C2H2 zinc finger motifs (ZF), respectively. Both factors bind specifically to a subset of E-box motifs (E2-box: CAGGTG/CACCTG) in target promoters like the E-cadherin promoter and are key mediators of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, there are differences in the biological actions, in binding affinities to E-cadherin promoter, and in the target genes of Snail1 and Snail2, although the molecular bases are presently unknown. In particular, the role of each Snail1 and Snail2 ZF in the binding to E-boxes and in EMT induction has not been previously explored. We have approached this question by modeling Snail1 and Snail2 protein-DNA interactions and through mutational and functional assays of different ZFs. Results show that Snail1 efficient repression and binding to human and mouse E-cadherin promoter as well as EMT-inducing ability require intact ZF1 and ZF2, while for Snail2, either ZF3 or ZF4 is essential for those functions. Furthermore, the differential distribution of E2-boxes in mouse and human E-cadherin promoters also contributes to the differential Snail factor activity. These data indicate a non-equivalent role of Snail1 and Snail2 ZFs in gene repression, contributing to the elucidation of the molecular differences between these important EMT regulators. PMID:24297167

  8. JUVENILE SNAILS, ADULT APPETITES: CONTRASTING RESOURCE CONSUMPTION BETWEEN TWO SPECIES OF APPLESNAILS

    E-print Network

    Burks, Romi

    ., 2006). Beyond size differences between species, larger size of adult snails compared to their juvenileJUVENILE SNAILS, ADULT APPETITES: CONTRASTING RESOURCE CONSUMPTION BETWEEN TWO SPECIES October 2007) ABSTRACT Research on aquatic snails usually examines consumption of periphyton

  9. Competitive displacement of a detritivorous salt marsh snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah C. Lee; Brian Reed Silliman

    2006-01-01

    Here we examine the role of competitive interactions in controlling distributions of the most abundant omnivore–detritivore snails in East Coast U.S. salt marshes (Melampus bidentatus and Littoraria irrorata). Both snails prefer to eat fungi growing on plant material, and the periwinkle Littoraria, a much larger snail, destroys marsh canopy when grazing fungal-infected plants, resulting in increased local desiccation stress. To

  10. Karyological Studies of Biomphalaria tenagophila (d'Orbigny, 1835) (Gastropoda: Planobidae) from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Tai-Soon

    2014-01-01

    The karyotypes of Biomphalaria tenagophila collected from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil were studied using the air-drying method. Somatic cells of this species had 2n=36. The 18 chromosome pairs were identified and classified into 3 groups. The diploid cell has 7 pairs of metacentric, 8 pairs of submetacentric, and 3 pairs of subtelocentric chromosomes. Observed chromosomes ranged from 2.4 to 6.4 µm, and the total length was 122.3 µm. This is the first report on the chromosome of B. tenagophila. PMID:25246727

  11. Biological studies on the snail, Bulinus truncatus, in central Iraq*

    PubMed Central

    Najarian, H. H.

    1961-01-01

    This paper presents some results of field and laboratory studies on Bulinus truncatus, the snail intermediate host of urinary bilharziasis in Iraq, made in 1958 as part of the work of the WHO Bilharziasis Control Project in that country. Observations on the linear distribution and size composition of Bulinus populations in the canals of central Iraq indicate that molluscicides might most suitably be applied in May before the entire snail population reaches breeding size, or early in November when most snails are juveniles. However, laboratory experiments appear to show that isolation of individual bulinid snails does not diminish, but may actually increase, their egg-laying capacity in comparison with that of grouped snails; this suggests that, even if the snail population were drastically reduced by treatment of the canals and all further importation of snails rendered impossible, the snail population would nevertheless soon renew itself from the few individuals remaining. Results are also given of laboratory experiments on egg masses, hatching and growth of B. truncatus and on the egg-laying of random populations of that snail. PMID:14478049

  12. Fecundity of the Chinese mystery snail in a Nebraska reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephen, Bruce J.; Allen, Craig R.; Chaine, Noelle M.; Fricke, Kent A.; Haak, Danielle M.; Hellman, Michelle L.; Kill, Robert A.; Nemec, Kristine T.; Pope, Kevin L.; Smeenk, Nicholas A.; Uden, Daniel R.; Unstad, Kody M.; VanderHam, Ashley E.; Wong, Alec

    2013-01-01

    The Chinese mystery snail (Bellamya chinensis) is a non-indigenous, invasive species in freshwater ecosystems of North America. We provide fecundity estimates for a population of these snails in a Nebraska reservoir. We dissected 70 snails, of which 29 were females. Nearly all female snails contained developing young, with an average of 25 young per female. Annual fecundity was estimated at between 27.2 and 33.3 young per female per year. Based on an estimated adult population and the calculated fecundity, the annual production for this reservoir was between 2.2 and 3.7 million young.

  13. Crayfish predation on the common pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis): the effect of habitat complexity and snail size on foraging efficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Per Nyström; Jose R. Pérez

    1998-01-01

    Optimal foraging theory was used to explain selective foraging by the introduced signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus)\\u000a on the thin-shelled common pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis). Crayfish predation efficiency was studied in relation to habitat\\u000a complexity and snail size. In a pool experiment (area 1.3 m2) single adult crayfish were allowed to feed on four size classes of snails for one week.

  14. How a single gene twists a snail.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Reiko

    2014-10-01

    The gastropod Lymnaea has unique features, that is, chirality, sinistrality, or dextrality, is displayed externally as well as internally, and is hereditary, being determined by a single-locus that functions maternally at the very early embryonic stage. Both sinistral and dextral snails exist in nature with the dextral one being dominant. Thus, the genus Lymnaea is an ideal target for studying chiromorphogenesis. This article gives a brief overview of the current state of research on chiromorphogenesis of Lymnaea (L.) stagnalis, mainly focusing on our own studies. Breeding experiments were performed and embryonic development was closely observed for the both chiralities. By fluorescently labeling filamentous actin and microtubules, cytoskeletal dynamics of spiral cleavages for the sinistral and dextral embryos were shown not to be mirror images of each other at the critical third-cleavage. The spiral deformation and spindle inclination were uniquely observed only in the dominant dextral embryos, and they were shown to be strongly linked to the gene determining the direction of chirality. Based on these findings, we created fertile snails of situs inversus by micromanipulation at the third-cleavage. Surprisingly, the arrangement of the blastomere regulates asymmetric expression of nodal-Pitx genes in later development. The expression patterns display interesting similarity and dissimilarity with those of the vertebrates. Thus, study of L. stagnalis has given an insight into "how a single gene twists a snail." PMID:24994072

  15. Dragonfly predators influence biomass and density of pond snails.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew M; Chislock, Michael F

    2007-08-01

    Studies in lakes show that fish and crayfish predators play an important role in determining the abundance of freshwater snails. In contrast, there are few studies of snails and their predators in shallow ponds and marshes. Ponds often lack fish and crayfish but have abundant insect populations. Here we present the results of field surveys, laboratory foraging trials, and an outdoor mesocosm experiment, testing the hypothesis that insects are important predators of pulmonate snails. In laboratory foraging trials, conducted with ten species of insects, most insect taxa consumed snails, and larval dragonflies were especially effective predators. The field surveys showed that dragonflies constitute the majority of the insect biomass in fishless ponds. More focused foraging trials evaluated the ability of the dragonflies Anax junius and Pantala hymenaea to prey upon different sizes and species of pulmonate snails (Helisoma trivolvis, Physa acuta, and Stagnicola elodes). Anax junius consumed all three species up to the maximum size tested. Pantala hymenaea consumed snails with a shell height of 3 mm and smaller, but did not kill larger snails. P. acuta were more vulnerable to predators than were H. trivolvis or S. elodes. In the mesocosm experiment, conducted with predator treatments of A. junius, P. hymenaea, and the hemipteran Belostoma flumineum, insect predators had a pronounced negative effect on snail biomass and density. A. junius and B. flumineum reduced biomass and density to a similar degree, and both reduced biomass more than did P. hymenaea. Predators did not have a strong effect on species composition. A model suggested that A. junius and P. hymenaea have the largest effects on snail biomass in the field. Given that both pulmonate snails and dragonfly nymphs are widespread and abundant in marshes and ponds, snail assemblages in these water bodies are likely regulated in large part by odonate predation. PMID:17457617

  16. The Snail Resource of the Eastern Berin9 Sea

    E-print Network

    of highest concentration also supporting a high biomass of fish and epibenthic inverte- brates. Snail biomassThe Snail Resource of the Eastern Berin9 Sea and Its Fishery RICHARD A. MaciNTOSH Buccinum sp resources. Fish and crab resources are well known and have long been exploited by many fishing nations

  17. Competitive displacement and predation between introduced and native mud snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret Seluk Race

    1982-01-01

    Experimental field and laboratory studies indicate that Cerithidea californica, a native mud snail, is restricted to only a portion of its normal habitat range in San Francisco Bay as a result of direct interactions with an introduced ecological equivalent, Ilyanassa obsoleta. The native snail typically inhabits marsh pans, tidal creeks and mudflats in estuaries along the Pacific coast. However, in

  18. Supercharged Snails for Stream Ecology & Water-Quality Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Arthur J.; Ryon, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Gill-breathing freshwater snails (Family "Pleuroceridae") are ecologically important, abundant in many streams in the United States, and easy to collect and maintain under classroom conditions. These snails can be used in classroom tests to demonstrate effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms. In more advanced classes, students can cage the…

  19. Vineyard snail Cernuella virgata Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-print Network

    and snail-contaminated crops had reduced marketability. Michigan risk maps for exotic plant pests. Other and plant hosts The snail primarily feeds on decaying organic matter. It also feeds on seedlings of cereals to the heads and stalks of plants or fences and enter dormancy (called aestivation). The life cycle is annual

  20. Snail silencing effectively suppresses tumour growth and invasiveness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D Olmeda; M Jordá; H Peinado; Á Fabra; A Cano

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factor Snail has been recently proposed as an important mediator of tumour invasion because of its role in downregulation of E-cadherin and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMT). This behaviour has led to the consideration of Snail as a potential therapeutic target to block tumour progression. In this report, we provide evidence for this hypothesis. We show that silencing

  1. Snails as Biomonitors of Oil-Spill and Bioremediation Strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. E. J. Lee; J. Stassen; A. McDonald; C. Culshaw; A. D. Venosa; K. Lee

    2002-01-01

    Aquatic and pulmonate snails were evaluated for their suitability as biomonitors of habitat recovery following an experimental oil spill in a freshwater marshland. The mystery snail, Viviparus georgianus, and the mimic pondsnail, Pseudosuccinea columella, were used as sediment quality biomonitors for a controlled oil-spill experiment at a wetland site along the St. Lawrence River (Ste. Croix, Quebec) to assess the

  2. Octopamine boosts snail locomotion: behavioural and cellular analysis.

    PubMed

    Ormshaw, Jennifer C; Elliott, Christopher J H

    2006-12-01

    We measured the reduction in locomotion of unrestrained pond snails, Lymnaea stagnalis, subsequent to transdermal application of two selective octopamine antagonists, epinastine and phentolamine. After 3 h in fresh standard snail water following treatment with 4 mM epinastine or 3.5 mM phentolamine, the snails' speed was reduced to 25 and 56% of the controls (P < 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectively). The snails' speed decreased as the drug concentration increased. In the isolated CNS, 0.5 mM octopamine increased the firing rate of the pedal A cluster motoneurons, which innervate the cilia of the foot. In normal saline the increase was 26% and in a high magnesium/low calcium saline 22% (P < 0.05 and 0.01, respectively). We conclude that octopamine is likely to modulate snail locomotion, partially through effects on pedal motoneurons. PMID:17072577

  3. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Venomous Cone Snail Conus consors

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Age; Kurz, Alexander; Stockwell, Tim; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Heidler, Juliana; Wittig, Ilka; Kauferstein, Silke; Mebs, Dietrich; Stöcklin, Reto; Remm, Maido

    2012-01-01

    Cone snails are venomous predatory marine neogastropods that belong to the species-rich superfamily of the Conoidea. So far, the mitochondrial genomes of two cone snail species (Conus textile and Conus borgesi) have been described, and these feed on snails and worms, respectively. Here, we report the mitochondrial genome sequence of the fish-hunting cone snail Conus consors and describe a novel putative control region (CR) which seems to be absent in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of other cone snail species. This possible CR spans about 700 base pairs (bp) and is located between the genes encoding the transfer RNA for phenylalanine (tRNA-Phe, trnF) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). The novel putative CR contains several sequence motifs that suggest a role in mitochondrial replication and transcription. PMID:23236512

  4. The Effect of Aquatic Plant Abundance on Shell Crushing Resistance in a Freshwater Snail

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Steven G.

    -occurs with a specialized snail crushing fish. Aquatic snails are excellent model systems to study anti- predator mechanismThe Effect of Aquatic Plant Abundance on Shell Crushing Resistance in a Freshwater Snail Johel, Baja California Sur, Me´xico Abstract Most of the shell material in snails is composed of calcium

  5. Field heritabilities and lack of correlation of snail shell form and anti-predator function

    E-print Network

    DeWitt, Thomas J.

    species, the fish Herichthys minckleyi, is also endemic to the valley. We studied the free-ranging snailField heritabilities and lack of correlation of snail shell form and anti-predator function and performance. Organisms: A freshwater aquatic snail species, the Mexican banded spring snail Mexipyrgus

  6. Limestone and the problem of radiocarbon dating of land-snail shell carbonate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glenn A. Goodfriend; Jerry J. Stipp

    1983-01-01

    In order to test the role of limestone in producing anomalously old radiocarbon ages in land-snail shells, 14C analyses were performed on shell carbonate of modern land snails from limestone and nonlimestone areas of Jamaica. No anomaly was found in snails from the nonlimestone area, implying that such material is suitable for radiocarbon dating. Snails from limestone areas produced variable

  7. How parasitism, stream substrate, and movement patterns mediate response to disturbance in the snail Elimia flava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomba, A. M.; Feminella, J. W.

    2005-05-01

    Snails in the genus Elimia are abundant in southeastern USA streams, and also serve as intermediate hosts to parasitic trematodes. Previous work indicated that high-flows decrease snail abundance and trematode prevalence, and others have shown substrate type and snail size affect likelihood of snail dislodgement. To investigate how parasitism, size, substrate, and snail behavior influenced dislodgement, we placed Elimia flava in artificial streams containing tile or gravel substrates, and then exposed them to progressively increasing flow velocities ( ~10, 40, 90 cm/s) for 5 minutes each. We recorded snail behavior and time to dislodgement, and then preserved snails to quantify their size and parasite load. Snails on tile dislodged significantly faster than snails on gravel, and snails with high parasite loads also dislodged faster than snails without parasites. Parasitism also appeared to affect movement patterns: snails showing predominantly downstream movement had higher parasite loads than those that did not. Behavior also affected dislodgement probability, as snails moving upstream or to the waterline remained on the substrate longer than snails not showing those behaviors. Parasitism, substrate composition, and snail movement are useful predictors of the likelihood of dislodgement, and parasitism and substrate may both increase snail vulnerability to flow disturbance.

  8. Biological Control of Aquatic Pest Snails by the Black Carp Mylopharyngodon piceus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frida Ben-Ami; Joseph Heller

    2001-01-01

    Some freshwater snail species are severe pests to human health or agriculture. We tested the hypothesis that the fish Mylopharyngodon piceus, the black carp, may serve as a biological control agent of two pest snails, Physella acuta (a bank-dwelling snail) and Melanoides tuberculata (a substratum-dwelling snail). Experiments were carried out in the laboratory and under controlled field conditions. In the

  9. Responses of Mud Snails and Periwinkles to Environmental Odors and Disaccharide Mimics of Fish Odor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasmin J. Rahman; Richard B. Forward; Dan Rittschof

    2000-01-01

    Estuarine snails, periwinkles (Littoraria irorata), and mud snails (Ilyanassa obsoleta) were tested for behavioral responses to aqueous extracts of tissue macerates, odors of living intact organisms, and to disaccharides derived from heparin. Extracts included salt-marsh cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora), pink shrimp (Penaeus duorarum), crushed periwinkles, and crushed mud snails. Odors included live periwinkles, mud snails, stone crab (Menippe mercenaria), striped hermit

  10. A SNAIL'S SPACE SETS A SNAIL'S PACE: MOVEMENT RATES OF LAVIGERIA GASTROPODS IN LAKE TANGANYIKA, EAST AFRICA

    E-print Network

    McIntyre, Peter

    A SNAIL'S SPACE SETS A SNAIL'S PACE: MOVEMENT RATES OF LAVIGERIA GASTROPODS IN LAKE TANGANYIKA gastropods are diverse and common in the benthos of Lake Tanganyika. We used in situ studies of marked of three closely related species of gastropods in Lake Tanganyika. In addition to potential interspecific

  11. Toxicity of Common Aquaculture Disinfectants to New Zealand Mud Snails and Mud Snail Toxicants to Rainbow Trout Eggs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall W. Oplinger; Eric J. Wagner

    2009-01-01

    The New Zealand mud snail (NZMS) Potamopyrgus antipodarum is an invasive species that threatens North American fish populations. Establishment of NZMS in fish hatcheries is a concern because fish stocking practices could expedite the spread of the species. We evaluated the potential use of chemicals to remove snails that are inadvertently collected during egg take operations involving wild broodstock from

  12. Modeling snail breeding in Bioregenerative Life Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Vladimir; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Nickolay Manukovsky, D..

    It is known that snail meat is a high quality food that is rich in protein. Hence, heliciculture or land snail farming spreads worldwide because it is a profitable business. The possibility to use the snails of Helix pomatia in Biological Life Support System (BLSS) was studied by Japanese Researches. In that study land snails were considered to be producers of animal protein. Also, snail breeding was an important part of waste processing, because snails were capable to eat the inedible plant biomass. As opposed to the agricultural snail farming, heliciculture in BLSS should be more carefully planned. The purpose of our work was to develop a model for snail breeding in BLSS that can predict mass flow rates in and out of snail facility. There are three linked parts in the model called “Stoichiometry”, “Population” and “Mass balance”, which are used in turn. Snail population is divided into 12 age groups from oviposition to one year. In the submodel “Stoichiometry” the individual snail growth and metabolism in each of 12 age groups are described with stoichiometry equations. Reactants are written on the left side of the equations, while products are written on the right side. Stoichiometry formulas of reactants and products consist of four chemical elements: C, H, O, N. The reactants are feed and oxygen, products are carbon dioxide, metabolic water, snail meat, shell, feces, slime and eggs. If formulas of substances in the stoichiometry equations are substituted with their molar masses, then stoichiometry equations are transformed to the equations of molar mass balance. To get the real mass balance of individual snail growth and metabolism one should multiply the value of each molar mass in the equations on the scale parameter, which is the ratio between mass of monthly consumed feed and molar mass of feed. Mass of monthly consumed feed and stoichiometry coefficients of formulas of meat, shell, feces, slime and eggs should be determined experimentally. An age structure and size of snail population are optimized on the base of individual growth and metabolic characteristics with the help of the second submodel "Population". In this simulation a daily amount of snail meat consumed by crewmembers is a guideline which specifies population productivity. Also, the daily amount of snail meat may have an optional value. Prescribed population characteristics are used in the third submodel "Mass balance" to equalize input and output mass flow rates of snail facility. In this submodel we add a water and ash to the organic masses of feed, meat, feces, shell and eggs. Moreover, masses of calcium carbonate and potable water are added to the left side of mass balance equations. Mass of calcium carbonate is distributed among shell, feces and eggs. Summarizing the twelve equations for each snail age, we get the mass balance equation for the snail facility. All simulations are performed by using Solver Add-In for Excel 2007.

  13. A Somatically Diversified Defense Factor, FREP3, Is a Determinant of Snail Resistance to Schistosome Infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick C. Hanington; Michelle A. Forys; Eric S. Loker

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease, owes its continued success to freshwater snails that support production of prolific numbers of human-infective cercariae. Encounters between schistosomes and snails do not always result in the snail becoming infected, in part because snails can mount immune responses that prevent schistosome development. Fibrinogen-related protein 3 (FREP3) has been previously associated with snail defense against digenetic

  14. Crawling beneath the free surface: Water snail locomotion

    E-print Network

    Sungyon Lee; John W. M. Bush; A. E. Hosoi; Eric Lauga

    2008-06-23

    Land snails move via adhesive locomotion. Through muscular contraction and expansion of their foot, they transmit waves of shear stress through a thin layer of mucus onto a solid substrate. Since a free surface cannot support shear stress, adhesive locomotion is not a viable propulsion mechanism for water snails that travel inverted beneath the free surface. Nevertheless, the motion of the freshwater snail, Sorbeoconcha physidae, is reminiscent of that of its terrestrial counterparts, being generated by the undulation of the snail foot that is separated from the free surface by a thin layer of mucus. Here, a lubrication model is used to describe the mucus flow in the limit of small amplitude interfacial deformations. By assuming the shape of the snail foot to be a traveling sine wave and the mucus to be Newtonian, an evolution equation for the interface shape is obtained and the resulting propulsive force on the snail is calculated. This propulsive force is found to be non-zero for moderate values of Capillary number but vanishes in the limits of high and low Capillary numbers. Physically, this force arises because the snail's foot deforms the free surface, thereby generating curvature pressures and lubrication flows inside the mucus layer that couple to the topography of the foot.

  15. Chiral Speciation in Terrestrial Pulmonate Snails

    PubMed Central

    Gittenberger, Edmund; Hamann, Thomas D.; Asami, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of data in the literature, the percentages of dextral versus sinistral species of snails have been calculated for western Europe, Turkey, North America (north of Mexico), and Japan. When the family of Clausiliidae is represented, about a quarter of all snail species may be sinistral, whereas less than one per cent of the species may be sinistral where that family does not occur. The number of single-gene speciation events on the basis of chirality, resulting in the origin of mirror image species, is not closely linked to the percentage of sinistral versus dextral species in a particular region. Turkey is nevertheless exceptional by both a high percentage of sinistral species and a high number of speciation events resulting in mirror image species. Shell morphology and genetic background may influence the ease of chirality-linked speciation, whereas sinistrality may additionally be selected against by internal selection. For the Clausiliidae, the fossil record and the recent fauna suggest that successful reversals in coiling direction occurred with a frequency of once every three to four million years. PMID:22532825

  16. [Ecological observations on Biomphalaria straminea (Dunker, 1848) in areas of the northeast, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Rosas, E

    1987-01-01

    The different climatic regions determine the zoogeographic distribution of various animal species depending on their particular conditions and ecological preferences. The host schistosomiasis planorbid is one of these species. This paper deals with the distribution of Biomphalaria straminea in northeast Brazil. It starts from the analysis of different climatic peculiarities in this region, associated to limnological observation done by the author in three different hydric collections in the state of Sergipe. It has been concluded that this is an "eurióioca" species. Its broad ecological valence permits this species to survive in regions where climate asperties are evident, requiring behavior and physiological adaptations. The species survives in all northeast region, from "zona da mata", in the coast, to the semi-arid "sertão". PMID:3509188

  17. The Role of Snail in EMT and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Kequn; Ying, Xuhua; Zhou, Binhua P.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved process in which polarized, immotile epithelial cells lose adherent and tight junctions, and become migratory mesenchymal cells. As a key transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin expression in EMT, Snail plays an important role in embryonic development and cancer progression. Emerging evidences indicate that Snail confers tumor cells with cancer stem cell-like traits, and promotes drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. In this review, we summarize recent developments underlying the regulation and functions of Snail in tumor progression, and discuss new approaches against EMT in preventing metastatic cancers. PMID:24168186

  18. Laboratory experiments on snail predation by Sargochromis codringtoni, a candidate for biological control of the snails that transmit schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Chimbari, M J; Madsen, H; Ndamba, J

    1997-01-01

    The potential efficacy of Sargochromis codringtoni, a species of cichlid fish, in the biological control of snails carrying the Schistosoma spp. infecting man has long been recognized. A laboratory study to produce much-needed data on the malacophagous characteristics of this fish was conducted, to see if field studies on its possible role as a biological agent for snail control in Zimbabwe were likely to be worthwhile. The fish can consume large numbers of snails within a short period: a single fish, provided with trout pellets as an alternative food, not only chose to eat the snails but also consumed > 800 within 3 weeks. Addition of macrophytes to the aquaria used appeared to offer the snails no protection from predation. For fish measuring 15-18 cm in length, there was no size preference among snails measuring up to 12 mm in shell height nor was any species preference observed in experiments involving Bulinus globosus, B. tropicus and Melanoides tuberculata. The fish crushed B. globosus which were > 3.0 mm in shell height in their pharynges but swallowed smaller snails of this species whole. Before field trials are conducted, further laboratory studies, in which field conditions are simulated, should be carried out. PMID:9093434

  19. Taxonomy: A Precursor to Understanding Ecological Interactions among Schistosomes, Snail Hosts, and Snail-Eating Fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jay Richard Stauffer Jr; Henry Madsen; Adrianus Konings; Paul Bloch; Cecilia Paola Ferreri; Jeremy Likongwe; Kenneth R. McKaye; Kristin E. Black

    2007-01-01

    We have observed a dramatic decrease in the abundance of snail-eating fishes and an increase in the prevalence of schistosomiasis among village residents and expatriate tourists at Lake Malawi, Africa, over the past two decades. We hypothesized that these observations were linked by a cause-and-effect relationship and that the observed decrease in fish molluscivores permitted an increase in the abundance

  20. Analysis of a cone snail’s killer cocktail – The milked venom of Conus geographus?

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Jon-Paul; Baker, Margaret R.; Chun, Joycelyn B.

    2013-01-01

    Snails can kill” is a statement that receives much disbelief. Yet the venom from Conus geographus, as delivered by a disposable hypodermic-like needle, has indeed killed many unsuspecting human victims. Our understanding of their milked venom the essence of these fatalities, is in itself non-existent. Here, we present the molecular mass analysis of the milked venom of C. geographus, providing the first insight into the composition of its deadly cocktail. PMID:22884604

  1. Controlled Chaos of Polymorphic Mucins in a Metazoan Parasite (Schistosoma mansoni) Interacting with Its Invertebrate Host (Biomphalaria glabrata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuel Roger; Christoph Grunau; Raymond J. Pierce; Hirohisa Hirai; Benjamin Gourbal; Richard Galinier; Rémi Emans; Italo M. Cesari; Céline Cosseau; Guillaume Mitta

    2008-01-01

    Invertebrates were long thought to possess only a simple, effective and hence non-adaptive defence system against microbial and parasitic attacks. However, recent studies have shown that invertebrate immunity also relies on immune receptors that diversify (e.g. in echinoderms, insects and mollusks (Biomphalaria glabrata)). Apparently, individual or population-based polymorphism-generating mechanisms exists that permit the survival of invertebrate species exposed to parasites.

  2. METHODS FOR EXCLUDING SLUGS AND SNAILS ON EXPORTED HORTICULTURAL COMMODITIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasingly, slugs and snails (mollusks) are recognized as important quarantine pests threatening agriculture, export markets and the environment. This increased awareness results from the rapid spread of damaging species concurrent with higher levels of international trade of horticultural commodi...

  3. Dragonfly predators influence biomass and density of pond snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew M. Turner; Michael F. Chislock

    2007-01-01

    Studies in lakes show that fish and crayfish predators play an important role in determining the abundance of freshwater snails.\\u000a In contrast, there are few studies of snails and their predators in shallow ponds and marshes. Ponds often lack fish and crayfish\\u000a but have abundant insect populations. Here we present the results of field surveys, laboratory foraging trials, and an

  4. Effect of Molasses on Golden Apple Snail Silage Production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kittipong Rattanaporn; Soykaew Ieng-ubol; Watcharee Songsi-oon

    The production of golden apple snail silage was carried out by fermenting the minced golden apple snail with locally screened lactic acid bacteria; L1\\/2, at ambient temperature using molasses as the carbon source for bacterial growth. The pH value rapidly decreased to 5.0 after 3 days of fermentation, allowing an increase of free amino acid that was released from protein

  5. Sequestration of lichen compounds by three species of terrestrial snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonja Hesbacher; Bruno Baur; Anette Baur; Peter Proksch

    1995-01-01

    Three species of lichen-grazing snails,Balea perversa, Chondria clienta, andHelicigona lapicida, all from the Swedish island of Öland, were found to sequester lichen compounds when feeding on the crustous lichen speciesAspicila calcarea, Caloplaca flavovirescens, Lecanora muralis, Physcia adscendens, Tephromela atra, andXanthoria parietina. The lichen compounds detected in the soft bodies of the snail species analyzed included the anthraquinone parietin, the depside

  6. A Mathematical Model of Schistosoma mansoni in  Biomphalaria glabrata with Control Strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruijun Zhao; Fabio Augusto Milner

    2008-01-01

    We describe and analyze a mathematical model for schistosomiasis in which infected snails are distinguished from susceptible\\u000a through increased mortality and no reproduction. We based the model on the same derivation as Anderson and May (J. Anim. Ecol.\\u000a 47:219–247, 1978), Feng and Milner (A New Mathematical Model of Schistosomiasis, Mathematical Models in Medical and Health Science, Nashville,\\u000a TN, 1997. Innov. Appl. Math.,

  7. Foci of Schistosoma mansoni in Assiut province in middle Egypt.

    PubMed

    Medhat, A; Abdel-Aty, M A; Nafeh, M; Hammam, H; Abdel-Samia, A; Strickland, G T

    1993-01-01

    Following detection of Schistosoma mansoni in a 12 years old boy who had both schistosomal polyposis and periportal fibrosis with hepatosplenomegaly, epidemiological studies to confirm local transmission were performed in his and 30 other villages in Assiut Governorate, Egypt. The index case's brother and 6 of 380 inhabitants of his village who provided stool specimens were infected with S. mansoni and a farmer with dysentery and hepatosplenomegaly had a positive rectal snip biopsy. All had hepatic abnormalities on ultrasound examination. Two of 221 schoolchildren in another village had mixed infections with S. mansoni and S. haematobium; 17 others had only S. haematobium. None of 419 inhabitants living near the infected boys had S. mansoni infection. Snails from canals and drains near both villages were netted, identified, counted and checked for infection: in the second village one of 1039 Bulinus truncatus was infected with Schistosoma sp. but none of 859 Biomphalaria alexandrina was infected. Schistosomiasis mansoni is being focally transmitted in 2 villages in Assiut Governorate and appears to be spreading from Lower to Middle and Upper Egypt. We believe B. alexandrina, which has been present in some of the waterways for at least 15 years, were infected recently by local inhabitants returning from Iraq or by cattle traders or military recruits from the Delta. PMID:8249064

  8. Camouflaged or tanned: plasticity in freshwater snail pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Johan; Yang, Xi; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Brönmark, Christer

    2013-10-23

    By having phenotypically plastic traits, many organisms optimize their fitness in response to fluctuating threats. Freshwater snails with translucent shells, e.g. snails from the Radix genus, differ considerably in their mantle pigmentation patterns, with snails from the same water body ranging from being completely dark pigmented to having only a few dark patterns. These pigmentation differences have previously been suggested to be genetically fixed, but we propose that this polymorphism is owing to phenotypic plasticity in response to a fluctuating environment. Hence, we here aimed to assess whether common stressors, including ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and predation, induce a plastic response in mantle pigmentation patterns of Radix balthica. We show, in contrast to previous studies, that snails are plastic in their expression of mantle pigmentation in response to changes in UVR and predator threats, i.e. differences among populations are not genetically fixed. When exposed to cues from visually hunting fish, R. balthica increased the proportion of their dark pigmentation, suggesting a crypsis strategy. Snails increased their pigmentation even further in response to UVR, but this also led to a reduction in pattern complexity. Furthermore, when exposed to UVR and fish simultaneously, snails responded in the same way as in the UVR treatment, suggesting a trade-off between photoprotection and crypsis. PMID:24046875

  9. Camouflaged or tanned: plasticity in freshwater snail pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ahlgren, Johan; Yang, Xi; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Brönmark, Christer

    2013-01-01

    By having phenotypically plastic traits, many organisms optimize their fitness in response to fluctuating threats. Freshwater snails with translucent shells, e.g. snails from the Radix genus, differ considerably in their mantle pigmentation patterns, with snails from the same water body ranging from being completely dark pigmented to having only a few dark patterns. These pigmentation differences have previously been suggested to be genetically fixed, but we propose that this polymorphism is owing to phenotypic plasticity in response to a fluctuating environment. Hence, we here aimed to assess whether common stressors, including ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and predation, induce a plastic response in mantle pigmentation patterns of Radix balthica. We show, in contrast to previous studies, that snails are plastic in their expression of mantle pigmentation in response to changes in UVR and predator threats, i.e. differences among populations are not genetically fixed. When exposed to cues from visually hunting fish, R. balthica increased the proportion of their dark pigmentation, suggesting a crypsis strategy. Snails increased their pigmentation even further in response to UVR, but this also led to a reduction in pattern complexity. Furthermore, when exposed to UVR and fish simultaneously, snails responded in the same way as in the UVR treatment, suggesting a trade-off between photoprotection and crypsis. PMID:24046875

  10. Rapid spread of an invasive snail in South America: the giant African snail, Achatina fulica , in Brasil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silvana C. Thiengo; Fábio André Faraco; Norma C. Salgado; Robert H. Cowie; Monica A. Fernandez

    2007-01-01

    Beginning around 1800, but primarily since the early and mid-twentieth century, the giant African snail, Achatina (Lissachatina) fulica Bowdich, 1822, has been introduced throughout the tropics and subtropics and has been considered the most important snail\\u000a pest in these regions. In Brasil, specimens probably brought from Indonesia were introduced into the state of Paran? in the\\u000a 1980s for commercial purposes

  11. Toxicity of snail attractant pellets containing eugenol with respect to abiotic factors against the vector snail Lymnaea acuminata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pooja Agrahari; V. K. Singh; D. K. Singh

    2012-01-01

    Every month during the year 2010–2011, the 24 to 96 h LC50 values of molluscicide eugenol, in snail attractant pellets (SAP), were determined against a snail Lymnaea acuminata, with concomitant determination of levels of temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, and electrical conductivity in test water. On the basis of a 24 h toxicity assay, it was noted that LC50 values 2.55,

  12. A conserved role for Snail as a potentiator of active transcription

    PubMed Central

    Rembold, Martina; Ciglar, Lucia; Yáñez-Cuna, J. Omar; Zinzen, Robert P.; Girardot, Charles; Jain, Ankit; Welte, Michael A.; Stark, Alexander; Leptin, Maria; Furlong, Eileen E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factors of the Snail family are key regulators of epithelial–mesenchymal transitions, cell morphogenesis, and tumor metastasis. Since its discovery in Drosophila ?25 years ago, Snail has been extensively studied for its role as a transcriptional repressor. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Snail can positively modulate transcriptional activation. By combining information on in vivo occupancy with expression profiling of hand-selected, staged snail mutant embryos, we identified 106 genes that are potentially directly regulated by Snail during mesoderm development. In addition to the expected Snail-repressed genes, almost 50% of Snail targets showed an unanticipated activation. The majority of “Snail-activated” genes have enhancer elements cobound by Twist and are expressed in the mesoderm at the stages of Snail occupancy. Snail can potentiate Twist-mediated enhancer activation in vitro and is essential for enhancer activity in vivo. Using a machine learning approach, we show that differentially enriched motifs are sufficient to predict Snail's regulatory response. In silico mutagenesis revealed a likely causative motif, which we demonstrate is essential for enhancer activation. Taken together, these data indicate that Snail can potentiate enhancer activation by collaborating with different activators, providing a new mechanism by which Snail regulates development. PMID:24402316

  13. Snails and trematode infection after Indian Ocean tsunami in Phang-Nga Province, southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sri-Aroon, Pusadee; Chusongsang, Phiraphol; Chusongsang, Yupa; Pornpimol, Surinthwong; Butraporn, Piyarat; Lohachit, Chantima

    2010-01-01

    The tsunami and non-tsunami affected areas of Takua Pa District, Phang-Nga Province were investigated for fresh- and brackish-water snails that transmit human parasitic diseases during 2006 and 2007. Among 46 snail species found, 17 species of 8 families were freshwater snails, 28 species of another 7 families were brackish-water snails, and 1 species was a land snail. Of these species, 11 freshwater snails, 4 brackish-water snails and 1 land snail were of medical importance. The fresh-water snails were Pomacea canaliculata, Pila angelica, P. gracilis, P. polita, Filopaludina (S.) martensi, F. (F.) s. polygramma, Melanoides tuberculata, Indoplanorbis exuxtus, Radix rubiginosa, Helicorbis umbilicalis, Gyraulus convexiusculus. Four brackish-water snails were Cerithidea cingulata, C. djadjarensis, C. alata, Sermyla riqueti and Achatina fulica was the land snail. I. exutus, M. tuberculata and F. (F.) s. polygramma harbored Xiphidio, Microcercus, Furocercus, Echinostome cercariae, and cercaria without eyespots or tail with hair. Three species of brackish-water snails, Cerithidia cingulata, C. djadjariensis, and C. alata presented with 6 types of trematode cercariae and rediae. Knowledge of medically important snails and their parasitic diseases, and prevention were given to Takua Pa people by poster, pamphlets and broadcasting through community radio. PMID:20578482

  14. Functional Changes in the Snail Statocyst System Elicited by Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Pavel M.; Malyshev, Aleksey Y.; Ierusalimsky, Victor N.; Aseyev, Nikolay; Korshunova, Tania A.; Bravarenko, Natasha I.; Lemak, M. S.; Roshchin, Matvey; Zakharov, Igor S.; Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background The mollusk statocyst is a mechanosensing organ detecting the animal's orientation with respect to gravity. This system has clear similarities to its vertebrate counterparts: a weight-lending mass, an epithelial layer containing small supporting cells and the large sensory hair cells, and an output eliciting compensatory body reflexes to perturbations. Methodology/Principal Findings In terrestrial gastropod snail we studied the impact of 16- (Foton M-2) and 12-day (Foton M-3) exposure to microgravity in unmanned orbital missions on: (i) the whole animal behavior (Helix lucorum L.), (ii) the statoreceptor responses to tilt in an isolated neural preparation (Helix lucorum L.), and (iii) the differential expression of the Helix pedal peptide (HPep) and the tetrapeptide FMRFamide genes in neural structures (Helix aspersa L.). Experiments were performed 13–42 hours after return to Earth. Latency of body re-orientation to sudden 90° head-down pitch was significantly reduced in postflight snails indicating an enhanced negative gravitaxis response. Statoreceptor responses to tilt in postflight snails were independent of motion direction, in contrast to a directional preference observed in control animals. Positive relation between tilt velocity and firing rate was observed in both control and postflight snails, but the response magnitude was significantly larger in postflight snails indicating an enhanced sensitivity to acceleration. A significant increase in mRNA expression of the gene encoding HPep, a peptide linked to ciliary beating, in statoreceptors was observed in postflight snails; no differential expression of the gene encoding FMRFamide, a possible neurotransmission modulator, was observed. Conclusions/Significance Upregulation of statocyst function in snails following microgravity exposure parallels that observed in vertebrates suggesting fundamental principles underlie gravi-sensing and the organism's ability to adapt to gravity changes. This simple animal model offers the possibility to describe general subcellular mechanisms of nervous system's response to conditions on Earth and in space. PMID:21479267

  15. 50 CFR 17.45 - Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved] 17.45 Section... Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...Wildlife § 17.45 Special rules—snails and clams....

  16. 50 CFR 17.45 - Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved] 17.45 Section... Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...Wildlife § 17.45 Special rules—snails and clams....

  17. 50 CFR 17.45 - Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved] 17.45 Section... Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...Wildlife § 17.45 Special rules—snails and clams....

  18. 50 CFR 17.45 - Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved] 17.45 Section... Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...Wildlife § 17.45 Special rules—snails and clams....

  19. 50 CFR 17.45 - Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved] 17.45 Section... Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...Wildlife § 17.45 Special rules—snails and clams....

  20. The toxicity and physiological effects of copper on the freshwater pulmonate snail, Lymnaea stagnalis

    E-print Network

    Grosell, Martin

    Keywords: Gastropods Lymnaea stagnalis Copper Water quality criteria Ionoregulation Acid­base balance Several recent studies have demonstrated that the freshwater pulmonate snail Lymnaea stagnalisThe toxicity and physiological effects of copper on the freshwater pulmonate snail, Lymnaea

  1. Differential regulation of Snail by hypoxia and hyperglycemia in human proximal tubule cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siska Sumual; Sonia Saad; Owen Tang; Rachel Yong; Stella McGinn; Xin-Ming Chen; Carol A. Pollock

    2010-01-01

    The centrality of the transcriptional regulator Snail in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation (EMT), known to occur in models of diabetic nephropathy, has not been established. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF?1) is induced in diabetic nephropathy and induces both Snail and EMT. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are known to induce Snail, independent of TGF?1. Notch induction is integral to Snail induction and EMT

  2. Angiostrongylus cantonensis : morphological and behavioral investigation within the freshwater snail Pomacea canaliculata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shan Lv; Yi Zhang; He-Xiang Liu; Chao-Wei Zhang; Peter Steinmann; Xiao-Nong Zhou; Jürg Utzinger

    2009-01-01

    An infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the main causative agent for human eosinophilic encephalitis, can be acquired through the consumption of the freshwater\\u000a snail Pomacea canaliculata. This snail also provides a suitable model to study the developmental morphology and behavior of A. cantonensis larvae, facilitated by the snail’s distinct lung structure. We used microanatomy for studying the natural appearance and\\u000a behavior

  3. Larvicidal Activity against Aedes aegypti and Molluscicidal Activity against Biomphalaria glabrata of Brazilian Marine Algae.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Elíca Amara Cecília; de Carvalho, Cenira M; Ribeiro Junior, Karlos Antonio Lisboa; Lisboa Ribeiro, Thyago Fernando; de Barros, Lurdiana Dayse; de Lima, Maria Raquel Ferreira; Prado Moura, Flávia de Barros; Goulart Sant'ana, Antônio Euzebio

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the biological activities of five benthic marine algae collected from Northeastern Region of Brazil. The tested activities included larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti, molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata, and toxicity against Artemia salina. Extracts of Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta), Padina gymnospora, Sargassum vulgare (Phaeophyta), Hypnea musciformis, and Digenea simplex (Rhodophyta) were prepared using different solvents of increasing polarity, including dichloromethane, methanol, ethanol, and water. Of the extracts screened, the dichloromethane extracts of H. musciformis and P. gymnospora exhibited the highest activities and were subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation in hexane and chloroform. The chloroform fractions of the P. gymnospora and H. musciformis extracts showed molluscicidal activity at values below 40? ? g·mL(-1) (11.1460? ? g·mL(-1) and 25.8689? ? g·mL(-1), resp.), and the chloroform and hexane fractions of P. gymnospora showed larvicidal activity at values below 40? ? g·mL(-1) (29.018? ? g·mL(-1) and 17.230? ? g·mL(-1), resp.). The crude extracts were not toxic to A. salina, whereas the chloroform and hexane fractions of P. gymnospora (788.277? ? g·mL(-1) and 706.990? ? g·mL(-1)) showed moderate toxicity, indicating that the toxic compounds present in these algae are nonpolar. PMID:24688787

  4. Population structure and coil dimorphism in a tropical land snail.

    PubMed

    Schilthuizen, M; Scott, B J; Cabanban, A S; Craze, P G

    2005-09-01

    Tree snails of the subgenus Amphidromus s. str. are unusual because of the chiral dimorphism that exists in many species, with clockwise (dextrally) and counter-clockwise (sinistrally) coiled individuals co-occurring in the same population. Given that mating in snails is normally impeded when the two partners have opposite coil, positive frequency-dependent selection should prevent such dimorphism from persisting. We test the hypothesis that a strong population structure with little movement between tree-based demes may result in the fixation of coiling morphs at a very small spatial scale, but apparent dimorphism at all larger scales. To do so, we describe the spatial structure in a Malaysian population of A. inversus (Müller, 1774) with 36% dextrals. We marked almost 700 juvenile and adult snails in a piece of forest consisting of 92 separate trees, and recorded dispersal and the proportions of dextrals and sinistrals in all trees over a 7-day period. We observed frequent movement between trees (155 events), and found that no trees had snail populations with proportions of dextrals and sinistrals that were significantly different from random. Upon recapture 1 year later, almost two-thirds of the snails had moved away from their original tree. We conclude that population structure alone cannot stabilise the coil dimorphism in Amphidromus. PMID:16077741

  5. Resource limitation, competition and the influence of life history in a freshwater snail community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig W. Osenberg

    1989-01-01

    Previous work on a snail community occurring throughout lakes in southwestern Michigan showed that predation by molluscivorous sunfish had large impacts on only the rarest snail species. Thus, competition might play a major role in population limitation because dominant members of the snail community are relatively immune to predation. The present experiments were conducted to determine the extent to which

  6. AN EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, AND COMBINED CHEMICAL-BIOLOGICAL APROACHES FOR CONTROLLING SNAILS IN AQUACULTURE

    E-print Network

    the marketability of food fish. Aquatic snails are intermediate hosts in the trematode lifecycle and are commonly. Ponds stocked with sunfish at 494 fish/ha had snail densities significantly (P 0.05) lower than control SNAILS IN AQUACULTURE PONDS by Matthew R. Noatch B.S., Missouri State University, 2007 A Thesis Submitted

  7. Predation and the distribution and abundance of a pulmonate pond snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth M. Brown; Dennis R. DeVries

    1985-01-01

    The abundances of a freshwater pulmonate snail, Lymnaea elodes were studied in a temporary pond and a permanent, more productive pond in northeastern Indiana, USA. When snails from both populations were reared in each of the ponds in containers excluding predators, snails grew to be 1.3 to 2 times as large in the more productive pond, and laid 9 times

  8. Fluorescent pigment distinguishes between sibling snail species.

    PubMed

    Seki, Keiichi; Wiwegweaw, Amporn; Asami, Takahiro

    2008-12-01

    Traditional taxonomy of shell-bearing molluscs does not generally use soft-body coloration. However, the land snails Bradybaena pellucida and B. similaris have been distinguished only on the basis of the color of the soft-body visible through the shell. Thus, the taxonomic status of the two species has traditionally been questionable. We found that dense spots of pigments embedded in the dorsal mantle are responsible for the yellow coloration of B. pellucida . Similar spots in B. similaris are white and less densely aggregated in whorls further from the apex, and the brown color of the hepatopancreas is visible through the shell. The yellow pigments of B. pellucida seep out with mucus from the body in natural and laboratory conditions. The two species became externally indistinguishable after 30 days of laboratory feeding, because the yellow spots disappeared in B. pellucida and the color of the hepatopancreas changed from dark brown to pale brown in both species. Irradiation with ultraviolet A demonstrated that the yellow pigment of B. pellucida fluoresces. Adult specimens of the two species were distinct in penial microsculpture, with F(1) hybrids intermediate in form. Populations of the two species differed significantly in allelic frequencies at four allozyme loci. Therefore, B. pellucida and B. similaris are morphologically and genetically distinct. The fluorescent yellow pigment distinguishes B. pellucida from B. similaris under natural conditions despite its environmental dependence. PMID:19267648

  9. Interference with Fasciola hepatica snail finding by various aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Christensen, N O; Nansen, P; Frandsen, F

    1977-06-01

    Previous studies using radioactive miracidia have shown that a number of non-host snails and bivalves, interposed as 'decoys' in linear test channels, may interfere with the capacity of Fasciola hepatica miracidia to infect Lymnaea truncatula. Applying similar experimental principles, the role of several other potential interferents have been analysed in the present study. Daphnia pulex (Cladocera) and larvae of Corethra sp. (Diptera) exercised significant interfering effects by protecting 'target' snails from infection. Evidence suggested that this effect was a result of their normal predatory behaviour. Other organisms including Herpobdella testacea and Helobdella stagnalis (Hirudinea), Acellus aquaticus (Isopoda), Planaria lugubris (Turbellaria) and L. truncatula egg clusters failed to interfere with miracidial host-finding. Nor did P. lugubris and L. truncatula 'conditioned water' interfere with the capacity of the miracidia to infect their host snail. PMID:876683

  10. Hitchhiking behaviour in the obligatory upstream migration of amphidromous snails

    PubMed Central

    Kano, Yasunori

    2009-01-01

    Migratory animals endure high stress during long-distance travel in order to benefit from spatio-temporally fluctuating resources, including food and shelter or from colonization of unoccupied habitats. Along with some fishes and shrimps, nerite snails in tropical to temperate freshwater systems are examples of amphidromous animals that migrate upstream for growth and reproduction after a marine larval phase. Here I report, to my knowledge, the first example of ‘hitchhiking’ behaviour in the obligatory migration of animals: the nerite snail Neritina asperulata appears to travel several kilometres as minute juveniles by firmly attaching to the shells of congeneric, subadult snails in streams of Melanesian Islands, presumably to increase the success rate of migration. PMID:19411267

  11. MTA3 regulates CGB5 and Snail genes in trophoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Miyazaki, Jun [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan) [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Nishizawa, Haruki [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Kurahashi, Hiroki [Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan)] [Division of Molecular Genetics, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science, Fujita Health University, Toyoake (Japan); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.Leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States) [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai, E-mail: Kai.Wang@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Impaired MTA3, raised CGB5 and Snail expression are associated with preeclampsia. •Knock-down of MTA3 causes up-regulation of CGB5 and Snail genes in BeWo cells. •MTA3 occupies CGB5 and Snail gene promoters in BeWo cells. -- Abstract: Secreted by the placental trophoblast, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important hormone during pregnancy and is required for the maintenance of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that dys-regulation of hCG expression is associated with preeclampsia. However, the exact relationship between altered hCG levels and development of preeclampsia is unknown. Metastasis associated protein 3 (MTA3), a chromatin remodeling protein, is abundantly expressed in the placental trophoblasts, but its function is unknown. In breast cancer, MTA3 has been shown to repress the expression of Snail and cell migration. However, whether MTA3 acts similarly in the trophoblast has not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the role of MTA3 in regulating the hCG ?-subunit gene (gene name: CGB5) and Snail expression in the trophoblast cell line, BeWo, as well as its relevance to the high hCG expression levels seen in preeclampsia. First, we investigated MTA3 expression in preeclamptic placenta as compared to normal control placenta via gene expression microarray and qRT-PCR and found that MTA3 was significantly down-regulated, whereas both CGB5 and Snail were up-regulated in preeclamptic placenta. Secondly, we knocked down MTA3 gene in trophoblast cell line BeWo and found Snail and hCG were both up-regulated, suggesting that MTA3 represses Snail and hCG gene expression in trophoblasts. Next, we cloned the CGB5 and Snail promoters into the pGL3-basic vector individually and found that silencing of MTA3 by siRNA resulted in an increase of both CGB5 and Snail promoter activities. To confirm that this MTA3 inhibition is a direct effect, we performed a chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) assay and found that MTA3 occupied the proximal promoter regions of both Snail and hCG within BeWo cells. Furthermore, we examined MTA3 expression in placental trophoblast by immunohistochemistry and found that MTA3 expression was higher in villous cytotrophoblasts versus syncytiotrophoblasts, which supports an inverse association of MTA3 with hCG expression. Lastly, using the well-characterized trophoblast fusion model, we examined MTA3 and hCG levels in forskolin-treated BeWo cells and found that MTA3 down-regulation was accompanied by an up-regulation of hCG. These data further suggest that MTA3 is repressing placental hCG expression. In summary, MTA3 plays a critical role in repressing hCG and Snail in placenta trophoblast and its deregulation is associated with preeclampsia.

  12. Movements of florida apple snails in relation to water levels and drying events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darby, P.C.; Bennetts, R.E.; Miller, S.J.; Percival, H.F.

    2002-01-01

    Florida apple snails (Pomacea Paludosa) apparently have only a limited tolerance to wetland drying events (although little direct evidence exists), but their populations routinely face dry downs under natural and managed water regimes. In this paper, we address speculation that apple snails respond to decreasing water levels and potential drying events by moving toward refugia that remain inundated. We monitored the movements of apple snails in central Florida, USA during drying events at the Blue Cypress Marsh (BC) and at Lake Kissimmee (LK). We monitored the weekly movements of 47 BC snails and 31 LK snails using radio-telemetry. Snails tended to stop moving when water depths were 10 cm. Snails moved along the greatest positive depth gradient (i.e., towards deeper water) when they encountered water depths between 10 and 20 cm. Snails tended to move toward shallower water in water depths ???50 cm, suggesting that snails were avoiding deep water areas such as canals and sloughs. Of the 11 BC snails originally located in the area that eventually went dry, three (27%) were found in deep water refugia by the end of the study. Only one of the 31 LK snails escaped the drying event by moving to deeper water. Our results indicate that some snails may opportunistically escape drying events through movement. The tendency to move toward deeper water was statistically significant and indicates that this behavioral trait might enhance survival when the spatial extent of a dry down is limited. However, as water level falls below 10 cm, snails stop moving and become stranded. As the spatial extent of a dry down increases, we predict that the number of snails stranded would increase proportionally. Stranded Pomacea paludosa must contend with dry marsh conditions, possibly by aestivation. Little more than anecdotal information has been published on P. paludosa aestivation, but it is a common adaptation among other apple snails (Caenogastropoda: Ampullaridae). ?? 2002, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  13. In vitro mitotic responses of the amebocyte-producing organ of Biomphalaria glabrata to extracts of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Salamat, Zahra; Sullivan, John T

    2008-10-01

    Amebocyte-producing organs (APOs) of Biomphalaria glabrata were maintained in nonnutritive saline with, or without, extracts of miracidia and adults of Schistosoma mansoni, and examined histologically. The hematopoietic cells remained viable and showed measurable mitotic activity for up to 6 days, with little evidence of tissue death. APOs accumulated fluid and became swollen by as soon as 24 hr, but no cell exomigration was observed. Parasite extracts elicited an increase in the number of dividing cells in the APO, suggesting that the extract may directly stimulate a response from the hematopoietic cells by providing either nutrients or mitogenic growth factors. PMID:18973421

  14. Biomphalaria glabrata embryonic cells express a protein with a domain homologous to the lectin domain of mammalian selectins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Duclermortier; V. Lardans; E. Serra; F. Trottein; C. Dissous

    1999-01-01

    We have cloned from Biomphalaria glabrata, the intermediate host of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, a 36-kDa apparent-molecular-mass molecule (BgSel) that shares sequence identity with selectins of the cell-adhesion-molecule\\u000a superfamily. BgSel exhibited in its C-terminal part a putative C-type lectin domain similar to the selectin lectin domain.\\u000a Using antibodies to the recombinant BgSel protein, we demonstrated the presence of BgSel

  15. Mechanisms and consequences of shell fouling in the kelp snail, Norrisia norrisi (Sowerby) (Trochidae): Indirect effects of octopus drilling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RUSSELL J. SCHMITT; CRAIG W. OSENBERG; MARC G. BERCOVITCH

    1983-01-01

    The kelp snail, Nowisia norrisi (Sowerby), dwells on the large kelps Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) and Eisenia arborea Areschoug, and is rare on benthic substrata. Approximately 4% of the snail population is dislodged from plants each day. Per capita mortality of snails on the benthos is an order of magnitude greater than individuals on kelp. Even though snails displaced to the

  16. Survival of the faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bithynia tentaculata, the faucet snail, is a non indigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia that was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871. The snail’s distribution in the United States has expanded to the mid-Atlantic states and the drainage basin of the Great Lakes and most recently to the Mississippi...

  17. Laboratory evaluation of Gambusia affinis fish as predators of the schistosome-bearing snails Bulinus truncatus.

    PubMed

    Acra, A; Milki, R; Raffoul, Z; Karahagopian, Y; Fletcher, M

    1986-02-01

    In this laboratory-based study involving numerous experiments, it was demonstrated that the mosquito fish Gambusia affinis preys effectively upon the schistosome-bearing snail Bulinus truncatus, even in the presence of an alternative source of food. Egg masses and juvenile snails less than or equal to 2 mm in size are preferred. Individual eggs are nibbled, and the tiny snails with fragile shells are swallowed and digested. In the absence of other foods, the fish consume the flesh of snails 3 to 6 mm in size, leaving their empty shells intact. The larger snails are unharmed, but their offspring could be eradicated by the fish under favourable conditions. PMID:3755766

  18. Efficacy of Euphorbia hirta latex as plant derived molluscicides against freshwater snails.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ram P; Singh, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    The toxic effect of binary and tertiary combinations of Euphorbia hirta Linn latex powder with other plant molluscicidal compounds, were evaluated against the freshwater snails Lymnaea (Radix) acuminata and Indoplanorbis exustus in pond. These combinations showed significant time and dose dependent effect against both the snails. These compounds at higher doses were also lethal to freshwater fish Channa punctatus (Bloch) (Channidae {Ophicephalidae}), which shares the habitat with these snails, but the LC90 (24h) doses of snails have no apparent killing properties in fish populations when treated in mixed population of snails and fish. PMID:21537758

  19. Effect of the digenean parasite Proterometra macrostoma on host morphology in the freshwater snail Elimia livescens.

    PubMed

    Krist, A C

    2000-04-01

    Parasitism can affect size in gastropods by altering the host's growth rate, but other morphological effects of parasitism have rarely been examined. In this study, the relationship between variation in host morphology and parasitism was examined in a population of the freshwater snail Elimia livescens. Differences were found in the morphology of snails infected with the digenean Proterometra macrostoma and uninfected snails. In order to differentiate between 2 hypotheses to explain these differences in morphology, snails were experimentally infected in the laboratory and several morphological traits were measured after 180 days. One hypothesis suggests that parasite-induced changes in shell development explain differences in morphology between infected and uninfected snails. The other hypothesis suggests that selective mortality of infected hosts explains the difference. In the experiment, differences were found between infected snails and uninfected snails in overall size but not in any measurements of shape. The short duration of the experiment relative to the duration of most infections may account for why field-infected snails differed in shape but experimentally infected snails did not. Parasite-induced changes in growth rate are the most likely explanation for the larger size of infected snails relative to uninfected snails. PMID:10780543

  20. Snail coordinately regulates downstream pathways to control multiple aspects of mammalian neural precursor development.

    PubMed

    Zander, Mark A; Burns, Sarah E; Yang, Guang; Kaplan, David R; Miller, Freda D

    2014-04-01

    The Snail transcription factor plays a key role in regulating diverse developmental processes but is not thought to play a role in mammalian neural precursors. Here, we have examined radial glial precursor cells of the embryonic murine cortex and demonstrate that Snail regulates their survival, self-renewal, and differentiation into intermediate progenitors and neurons via two distinct and separable target pathways. First, Snail promotes cell survival by antagonizing a p53-dependent death pathway because coincident p53 knockdown rescues survival deficits caused by Snail knockdown. Second, we show that the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc25b is regulated by Snail in radial precursors and that Cdc25b coexpression is sufficient to rescue the decreased radial precursor proliferation and differentiation observed upon Snail knockdown. Thus, Snail acts via p53 and Cdc25b to coordinately regulate multiple aspects of mammalian embryonic neural precursor biology. PMID:24719096

  1. Snail Coordinately Regulates Downstream Pathways to Control Multiple Aspects of Mammalian Neural Precursor Development

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Mark A.; Burns, Sarah E.; Yang, Guang; Kaplan, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The Snail transcription factor plays a key role in regulating diverse developmental processes but is not thought to play a role in mammalian neural precursors. Here, we have examined radial glial precursor cells of the embryonic murine cortex and demonstrate that Snail regulates their survival, self-renewal, and differentiation into intermediate progenitors and neurons via two distinct and separable target pathways. First, Snail promotes cell survival by antagonizing a p53-dependent death pathway because coincident p53 knockdown rescues survival deficits caused by Snail knockdown. Second, we show that the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc25b is regulated by Snail in radial precursors and that Cdc25b coexpression is sufficient to rescue the decreased radial precursor proliferation and differentiation observed upon Snail knockdown. Thus, Snail acts via p53 and Cdc25b to coordinately regulate multiple aspects of mammalian embryonic neural precursor biology. PMID:24719096

  2. Euparyphium albuferensis and Echinostoma friedi (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae): experimental cercarial transmission success in sympatric snail communities.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Antoli, Carla; Marin, Antoni; Vidal, Amparo; Toledo, Rafael; Esteban, José Guillermo

    2008-06-01

    Euparyphium albuferensis and Echinostoma friedi cercarial infectivity to four species of sympatric snails was examined under single- or multiple-choice laboratory conditions to show the level of parasite-snail host compatibility. Radix peregra, Lymnaeafuscus, Physella acuta and Gyraulus chinensis act as second intermediate hosts of both parasite species although different cercarial transmission success (CTS) was observed. In single-host experiments, R. peregra and P. acuta showed a high degree of compatibility with E. albuferensis, while only P. acuta in the case of E. friedi. In two-choice snail communities, a snail with high CTS increased the values of another with low compatibility, in both parasite species. In multiple-choice snail communities, high CTS of some hosts decreased, while low CTS of other hosts increased. The degree of parasite-host compatibility of each snail species could be determined by the presence of other snails in the community. PMID:18666415

  3. Effect of amphotericin B on the infection success of Schistosoma mansoni in Biomphalaria1 Yves Mon, Guillaume Mitta, David Duval and Benjamin E.F. Gourbal

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of amphotericin B on the infection success of Schistosoma mansoni in Biomphalaria1 glabrata examined the effect of amphotericin B on larval stages (miracidia and24 primary sporocyst) of the helminth Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent of human25 schistosomiasis. Amphotericin B (AmB) is a polyene

  4. Schistosomiasis Control Using Piplartine against Biomphalaria glabrata at Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Rapado, Ludmila Nakamura; Pinheiro, Alessandro de Sá; Lopes, Priscila Orechio de Moraes Victor; Fokoue, Harold Hilarion; Scotti, Marcus Tullius; Marques, Joaquim Vogt; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Kato, Massuo Jorge; Nakano, Eliana; Yamaguchi, Lydia Fumiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most significant diseases in tropical countries and affects almost 200 million people worldwide. The application of molluscicides to eliminate the parasite's intermediate host, Biomphalaria glabrata, from infected water supplies is one strategy currently being used to control the disease. Previous studies have shown a potent molluscicidal activity of crude extracts from Piper species, with extracts from Piper tuberculatum being among the most active. Methods and Findings The molluscicidal activity of P. tuberculatum was monitored on methanolic extracts from different organs (roots, leaves, fruit and stems). The compounds responsible for the molluscicidal activity were identified using 1H NMR and ESIMS data and multivariate analyses, including principal component analysis and partial least squares. These results indicated that the high molluscicidal activity displayed by root extracts (LC50 20.28 µg/ml) was due to the presence of piplartine, a well-known biologically-active amide. Piplartine was isolated from P. tuberculatum root extracts, and the molluscicidal activity of this compound on adults and embryos of B. glabrata was determined. The compound displayed potent activity against all developmental stages of B. glabrata. Next, the environmental toxicity of piplartine was evaluated using the microcrustacean Daphnia similis (LC50 7.32 µg/ml) and the fish Danio rerio (1.69 µg/ml). The toxicity to these organisms was less compared with the toxicity of niclosamide, a commercial molluscicide. Conclusions The development of a new, natural molluscicide is highly desirable, particularly because the commercially available molluscicide niclosamide is highly toxic to some organisms in the environment (LC50 0.25 µg/ml to D. similis and 0.12 µg/ml to D. rerio). Thus, piplartine is a potential candidate for a natural molluscicide that has been extracted from a tropical plant species and showed less toxic to environment. PMID:23755312

  5. Flying shells: historical dispersal of marine snails across Central America

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Osamu; Torchin, Mark E.; Bermingham, Eldredge; Jacobs, David K.; Hechinger, Ryan F.

    2012-01-01

    The geological rise of the Central American Isthmus separated the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans about 3 Ma, creating a formidable barrier to dispersal for marine species. However, similar to Simpson's proposal that terrestrial species can ‘win sweepstakes routes’—whereby highly improbable dispersal events result in colonization across geographical barriers—marine species may also breach land barriers given enough time. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether intertidal marine snails have crossed Central America to successfully establish in new ocean basins. We used a mitochondrial DNA genetic comparison of sister snails (Cerithideopsis spp.) separated by the rise of the Isthmus. Genetic variation in these snails revealed evidence of at least two successful dispersal events between the Pacific and the Atlantic after the final closure of the Isthmus. A combination of ancestral area analyses and molecular dating techniques indicated that dispersal from the Pacific to the Atlantic occurred about 750 000 years ago and that dispersal in the opposite direction occurred about 72 000 years ago. The geographical distribution of haplotypes and published field evidence further suggest that migratory shorebirds transported the snails across Central America at the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in southern Mexico. Migratory birds could disperse other intertidal invertebrates this way, suggesting the Central American Isthmus may not be as impassable for marine species as previously assumed. PMID:21920976

  6. [Evaluation of molluscicidal effect of nicotinanilide against Oncomelania snails].

    PubMed

    Chen, Z P; Tao, H Q; Hua, D S; Shen, B R; Chan, H L

    1991-01-01

    Both nicotinanilide hydrochloride and nicotinanilide sulfate are water-soluble, their IC50 and LC90 against Oncomelania snails being around 0.3 mg/L and 0.5 mg/L, respectively, during 24 hour exposure at 25 degrees C followed by a 7-day recovery period. The laboratory tests and field trials showed that over 90% of snails were killed within 3 days exposure at 1-2 mg/L, and that 18.4%-100% snails on moist soil were killed at over 20 degrees C, exposed to spraying dosage of 1-2 g/m2 for 1-3 days. The chemical is highly effective against snails eggs at early stage (cell stage). The LC50 of nicotinanilide to Aristichthys nobilis and Pseudorasbora parva is about 200 mg/L. The acute oral LD50 in mice is about 2 g/kg. Plants tolerate the chemical at 1-2 g/m2, but some leaves wilted at greater than or equal to 5 g/m2, dicotyledon in particular. Dermatitis has been reported in individuals frequently exposing to nicotinanilide wettable powder during massive spraying. PMID:1959178

  7. The snail superfamily of zinc-finger transcription factors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Angela Nieto

    2002-01-01

    The Snail superfamily of zinc-finger transcription factors is involved in processes that imply pronounced cell movements, both during embryonic development and in the acquisition of invasive and migratory properties during tumour progression. Different family members have also been implicated in the signalling cascade that confers left–right identity, as well as in the formation of appendages, neural differentiation, cell division and

  8. A new glycosaminoglycan from the giant African snail Achatina fulica.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y S; Jo, Y Y; Chang, I M; Toida, T; Park, Y; Linhardt, R J

    1996-05-17

    A new glycosaminoglycan has been isolated from the giant African snail Achatina fulica. This polysaccharide had a molecular weight of 29,000, calculated based on the viscometry, and a uniform repeating disaccharide structure of -->4)-2-acetyl,2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranose (1-->4)-2-sulfo-alpha-L-idopyranosyluronic acid (1-->. This polysaccharide represents a new, previously undescribed glycosaminoglycan. It is related to the heparin and heparan sulfate families of glycosaminoglycans but is distinctly different from all known members of these classes of glycosaminoglycans. The structure of this polysaccharide, with adjacent N-acetylglucosamine and 2-sulfo-iduronic acid residues, also poses interesting questions about how it is made in light of our current understanding of the biosynthesis of heparin and heparan sulfate. This glycosaminoglycan represents 3-5% of the dry weight of this snail's soft body tissues, suggesting important biological roles for the survival of this organism, and may offer new means to control this pest. Snail glycosaminoglycan tightly binds divalent cations, such as copper(II), suggesting a primary role in metal uptake in the snail. Finally, this new polysaccharide might be applied, like the Escherichia coli K5 capsular polysaccharide, to the study of glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis and to the semisynthesis of new glycosaminoglycan analogs having important biological activities. PMID:8662607

  9. Bioconcentration ratio of diazinon by freshwater fish and snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Kanazawa

    1978-01-01

    Summary The bioconcentration ratios of diazinon from water by freshwater fishes were generally larger than that of crayfish and snails. Among fishes, the bioconcentration ratio of diazinon by topmouth gudgeon was the highest value, 152 being average. However, elimination of diazinon from fish body was linearly rapid. The influence of test concentration on the bioconcentration ratio was not so much

  10. Allying with armored snails: the complete genome of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont.

    E-print Network

    Tachizawa, Kazuya

    25 8 8 Allying with armored snails: the complete genome 23687004 20109005 TEL: 0138-40-5570 FAX :0138-40-5570 E-mail: nakagawa@fish.hokudai.ac.jp http://micro.fish.hokudai.ac.jp/labs/Site/Scaly-Foot.html #12; 1. 4.5cm 1. #12; 2. #12; 1 2001 4 Van

  11. Food Choice in the Common Snail (Helix Aspersa).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, John; Howell, Pauline

    1985-01-01

    The easily obtained common snail shows interesting dietary preferences which can be the source of several simple experiments. Specific student instructions are given for quantitative and comparative studies using cabbage, lettuce, carrot, rutabaga, and onion. Suggestions for laboratory setup and further work are included. (DH)

  12. Mitochondrial Phylogeny of Extant Hawaiian Tree Snails (Achatinellinae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert W Thacker; Michael G Hadfield

    2000-01-01

    Hawaiian tree snails in the endemic subfamily Achatinellinae display a staggering variety of shell colors and banding patterns. Despite numerous attempts to classify this morphological variation, a conclusive phylogeny has not been proposed. To improve conservation efforts, we sought to better understand the species identities and phylogenetic relationships among the extant species of Achatinella and Partulina using partial mitochondrial 16S

  13. Accelerated Mutation Accumulation in Asexual Lineages of a Freshwater Snail

    E-print Network

    Neiman, Maurine

    Sexual reproduction is both extremely costly and widespread relative to asexual reproduction, meaning to contribute to the short-term evolutionary mechanisms that favor sexual reproduction. Key words: sex, asexualAccelerated Mutation Accumulation in Asexual Lineages of a Freshwater Snail Maurine Neiman,*,1 Gery

  14. MOLLUSCICIDAL ACTIVITY OF VULGARONE B AGAINST RAM'S HORN SNAIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ram's horn snail (Planorbdella trivolvis) is an intermediate host for a digenetic trematode (Bolbophorus confusus) that has recently been discovered to be a significant problem in commercial catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) production ponds in the Mississippi Delta region of the USA. In these catf...

  15. Control of feeding movements in the freshwater snail Planorbis corneus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. I. Arshavsky; T. G. Deliagina; E. S. Meizerov; G. N. Orlovsky; Yu. V. Panchin

    1988-01-01

    (1) The buccal mass of the freshwater snail Planorbis corneus, dissected together with the buccal ganglia, performs rhythmic feeding movements. Radula movements and the electrical activity in various nerves of buccal ganglia were recorded in such a preparation. The cycle of radula movements consisted of three phases: quiescence (Q), protraction (P) and retraction (R). The activity in the radular nerve

  16. Land Snail Ecology and Biogeography of Eastern Maine

    E-print Network

    Nekola, Jeffrey C.

    in the state (Nesovitrea binneyana, Planogyra asteriscus, Striatura ferrea, Striatura milium, VertigoLand Snail Ecology and Biogeography of Eastern Maine Vertigo bollesiana Vertigo nylanderi Vertigo bollesiana, and Vertigo ventricosa). In the early 20th Century, Olaf Nylander of Caribou also made extensive

  17. Sequestration of lichen compounds by three species of terrestrial snails.

    PubMed

    Hesbacher, S; Baur, B; Baur, A; Proksch, P

    1995-02-01

    Three species of lichen-grazing snails,Balea perversa, Chondria clienta, andHelicigona lapicida, all from the Swedish island of Öland, were found to sequester lichen compounds when feeding on the crustous lichen speciesAspicila calcarea, Caloplaca flavovirescens, Lecanora muralis, Physcia adscendens, Tephromela atra, andXanthoria parietina. The lichen compounds detected in the soft bodies of the snail species analyzed included the anthraquinone parietin, the depside atranorin, as well as a presumable degradation product of the latter. Other lichen compounds such as (+)-usnic acid or ?-collatolic acid were not found in the soft bodies but were only detected in the feces, suggesting selective uptake of lichen compounds by the snails. In individuals ofC. clienta initially fed on the lichenX. parietina, the amount of sequestered parietin decreased over time on a parietin-free diet but was still detectable in the soft bodies after 28 days. In the ovoviviparous land snail,B. perversa, sequestered parietin was transferred from the mother to the eggs in the reproductive tract. PMID:24234022

  18. The maintenance of hybrids by parasitism in a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Guttel, Yonathan; Ben-Ami, Frida

    2014-11-01

    Hybrids have often been labelled evolutionary dead-ends due to their lower fertility and viability. However, there is growing awareness that hybridisation between different species may play a constructive role in animal evolution as a means to create variability. Thus, hybridisation and introgression may contribute to adaptive evolution, for example with regards to natural antagonists (parasites, predators, competitors) and adaptation to local environmental conditions. Here we investigated whether parasite intensity contributes to the continuous recreation of hybrids in 74 natural populations of Melanopsis, a complex of freshwater snails with three species. We also examined, under laboratory conditions, whether hybrids and their parental taxa differ in their tolerance of low and high temperatures and salinity levels. Infections were consistently less prevalent in males than in females, and lower in snails from deeper habitats. Infection prevalence in hybrids was significantly lower than in the parental taxa. Low hybrid infection rates could not be explained by sediment type, snail density or geographic distribution of the sampling sites. Interestingly, infected hybrid snails did not show signs of parasite-induced gigantism, whereas all parental taxa did. We found that hybrids mostly coped with extreme temperatures and salinity levels as well as their parental taxa did. Taken together, our results suggest that Melanopsis hybrids perform better in the presence of parasites and environmental stress. This may explain the widespread and long-term occurrence of Melanopsis hybrids as evidenced by paleontological and biogeographic data. Hybridisation may be an adaptive host strategy, reducing infection rates and resisting gigantism. PMID:25173837

  19. Survey of Pulmonate Snails of Central Minnesota. I. Lymnaeidae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey R. Laursen; Gary A. Averbeck; Gary A. Conboy; Bert E. Stromberg

    1992-01-01

    Aquatic snails were collected at 148 sites from various wetland habitats in central Minnesota between May and September, 1988. Ten lymnaeid species were collected, including Lymnaea palustris, L. stagnalis, L. exilis, L. caperata, L. catascopium, L. megasoma, L. (Fossaria) modicella, L. (F.) parva, L. (E.) bulimoides, and L. (F.) dalli. These species were found at 30-, 18-, 15, 12-, 11-,

  20. Molecular phylogeny and evolution of the cone snails (Gastropoda, Conoidea).

    PubMed

    Puillandre, N; Bouchet, P; Duda, T F; Kauferstein, S; Kohn, A J; Olivera, B M; Watkins, M; Meyer, C

    2014-09-01

    We present a large-scale molecular phylogeny that includes 320 of the 761 recognized valid species of the cone snails (Conus), one of the most diverse groups of marine molluscs, based on three mitochondrial genes (COI, 16S rDNA and 12S rDNA). This is the first phylogeny of the taxon to employ concatenated sequences of several genes, and it includes more than twice as many species as the last published molecular phylogeny of the entire group nearly a decade ago. Most of the numerous molecular phylogenies published during the last 15years are limited to rather small fractions of its species diversity. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses are mostly congruent and confirm the presence of three previously reported highly divergent lineages among cone snails, and one identified here using molecular data. About 85% of the species cluster in the single Large Major Clade; the others are divided between the Small Major Clade (?12%), the Conus californicus lineage (one species), and a newly defined clade (?3%). We also define several subclades within the Large and Small major clades, but most of their relationships remain poorly supported. To illustrate the usefulness of molecular phylogenies in addressing specific evolutionary questions, we analyse the evolution of the diet, the biogeography and the toxins of cone snails. All cone snails whose feeding biology is known inject venom into large prey animals and swallow them whole. Predation on polychaete worms is inferred as the ancestral state, and diet shifts to molluscs and fishes occurred rarely. The ancestor of cone snails probably originated from the Indo-Pacific; rather few colonisations of other biogeographic provinces have probably occurred. A new classification of the Conidae, based on the molecular phylogeny, is published in an accompanying paper. PMID:24878223

  1. Targeted Inactivation of Snail Family EMT Regulatory Factors by a Co(III)-Ebox Conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Meade, Thomas J.; LaBonne, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Snail family proteins are core EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition) regulatory factors that play essential roles in both development and disease processes and have been associated with metastasis in carcinomas. Snail factors are required for the formation of neural crest stem cells in most vertebrate embryos, as well as for the migratory invasive behavior of these cells. Snail factors have recently been linked to the formation of cancer stem cells, and expression of Snail proteins may be associated with tumor recurrence and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We report that Co(III)-Ebox is a potent inhibitor of Snail- mediated transcriptional repression in breast cancer cells and in the neural crest of Xenopus. We further show that the activity of Co(III)-Ebox can be modulated by temperature, increasing the utility of this conjugate as a Snail inhibitor in model organisms. We exploit this feature to further delineate the requirements for Snail function during neural crest development, showing that in addition to the roles that Snail factors play in neural crest precursor formation and neural crest EMT/migration, inhibition of Snail function after the onset of neural crest migration leads to a loss of neural crest derived melanocytes. Co(III)-Ebox-mediated inhibition therefore provides a powerful tool for analysing the function of these core EMT factors with unparalleled temporal resolution. Moreover, the potency of Co(III)-Ebox as a Snail inhibitor in breast cancer cells suggests its potential as a therapeutic inhibitor of tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:22393397

  2. Pseudosuccinea columella: age resistance to Calicophoron daubneyi infection in two snail populations

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Yasser; Rondelaud, Daniel; Vignoles, Philippe; Dreyfuss, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Individual infections of Egyptian and French Pseudosuccinea columella with five miracidia of Calicophoron daubneyi were carried out to determine whether this lymnaeid was capable of sustaining larval development of this parasite. On day 42 post-exposure (at 23 °C), infected snails were only noted in groups of individuals measuring 1 or 2 mm in height at miracidial exposure. Snail survival in the 2-mm groups was significantly higher than that noted in the 1-mm snails, whatever the geographic origin of snail population. In contrast, prevalence of C. daubneyi infection was significantly greater in the 1-mm groups (15–20% versus 3.4–4.0% in the 2-mm snails). Low values were noted for the mean shell growth of infected snails at their death (3.1–4.0 mm) and the mean number of cercariae (<9 in the 1-mm groups, <19 in the 2-mm snails). No significant differences between snail populations and snails groups were noted for these last two parameters. Most infected snails died after a single cercarial shedding wave. Both populations of P. columella showed an age resistance to C. daubneyi infection and only juveniles measuring 2 mm or less in shell height at exposure can ensure larval development of this digenean up to cercarial shedding. PMID:25664810

  3. Snail Recruits Ring1B to Mediate Transcriptional Repression and Cell Migration in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiangzhi; Xu, Hong; Zou, Xiuqun; Wang, Jiamin; Zhu, Yi; Chen, Hao; Shen, Baiyong; Deng, Xiaxing; Zhou, Aiwu; Chin, Y. Eugene; Rauscher, Frank J.; Peng, Chenghong; Hou, Zhaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional repressor Snail is a master regulator of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), yet the epigenetic mechanism governing Snail to induce EMT is not well understood. Here, we report that in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), elevated levels of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Ring1B and Snail, along with elevated monoubiquitination of H2A at K119 (H2AK119Ub1), are highly correlated with poor survival. Mechanistic investigations identified Ring1B as a Snail-interacting protein and showed that the carboxyl zinc fingers of Snail recruit Ring1B and its paralog Ring1A to repress its target promoters. Simultaneous depletion of Ring1A and Ring1B in pancreatic cancer cells decreased Snail binding to the target chromatin, abolished H2AK119Ub1 modification, and thereby compromised Snail-mediated transcriptional repression and cell migration. We found that Ring1B and the SNAG-associated chromatin modifier EZH2 formed distinct protein complexes with Snail and that EZH2 was required for Snail-Ring1A/B recruitment to the target promoter. Collectively, our results unravel an epigenetic mechanism underlying transcriptional repression by Snail, suggest Ring1A/B as a candidate therapeutic target, and identify H2AK119Ub1 as a potential biomarker for PDAC diagnosis and prognosis. Cancer Res; 74(16); 4353-63. ©2014 AACR PMID:24903147

  4. Overexpression of Snail in retinal pigment epithelial triggered epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Li, Min; Xu, Ding; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Guodong; Wang, Fang

    2014-03-28

    Snail transcription factor has been implicated as an important regulator in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during tumourigenesis and fibrogenesis. Our previous work showed that Snail transcription factor was activated in transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1) induced EMT in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and may contribute to the development of retinal fibrotic disease such as proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). However, whether Snail alone has a direct role on retinal pigment epithelial-mesenchymal transition has not been investigated. Here, we analyzed the capacity of Snail to drive EMT in human RPE cells. A vector encoding Snail gene or an empty vector were transfected into human RPE cell lines ARPE-19 respectively. Snail overexpression in ARPE-19 cells resulted in EMT, which was characterized by the expected phenotypic transition from a typical epithelial morphology to mesenchymal spindle-shaped. The expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin and Zona occludin-1 (ZO-1) were down-regulated, whereas mesenchymal markers a-smooth muscle actin (a-SMA) and fibronectin were up-regulated in Snail expression vector transfected cells. In addition, ectopic expression of Snail significantly enhanced ARPE-19 cell motility and migration. The present data suggest that overexpression of Snail in ARPE-19 cells could directly trigger EMT. These results may provide novel insight into understanding the regulator role of Snail in the development of retinal pigment epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:24607896

  5. Pseudosuccinea columella: age resistance to Calicophoron daubneyi infection in two snail populations.

    PubMed

    Dar, Yasser; Rondelaud, Daniel; Vignoles, Philippe; Dreyfuss, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Individual infections of Egyptian and French Pseudosuccinea columella with five miracidia of Calicophoron daubneyi were carried out to determine whether this lymnaeid was capable of sustaining larval development of this parasite. On day 42 post-exposure (at 23 °C), infected snails were only noted in groups of individuals measuring 1 or 2 mm in height at miracidial exposure. Snail survival in the 2-mm groups was significantly higher than that noted in the 1-mm snails, whatever the geographic origin of snail population. In contrast, prevalence of C. daubneyi infection was significantly greater in the 1-mm groups (15-20% versus 3.4-4.0% in the 2-mm snails). Low values were noted for the mean shell growth of infected snails at their death (3.1-4.0 mm) and the mean number of cercariae (<9 in the 1-mm groups, <19 in the 2-mm snails). No significant differences between snail populations and snails groups were noted for these last two parameters. Most infected snails died after a single cercarial shedding wave. Both populations of P. columella showed an age resistance to C. daubneyi infection and only juveniles measuring 2 mm or less in shell height at exposure can ensure larval development of this digenean up to cercarial shedding. PMID:25664810

  6. Trematode communities in snails can indicate impact and recovery from hurricanes in a tropical coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Macedo, María Leopoldina; Vidal-Martínez, Victor M; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2011-11-01

    In September 2002, Hurricane Isidore devastated the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. To understand its effects on the parasites of aquatic organisms, we analyzed long-term monthly population data of the horn snail Cerithidea pliculosa and its trematode communities in Celestún, Yucatán, Mexico before and after the hurricane (February 2001 to December 2009). Five trematode species occurred in the snail population: Mesostephanus appendiculatoides, Euhaplorchis californiensis, two species of the genus Renicola and one Heterophyidae gen. sp. Because these parasites use snails as first intermediate hosts, fishes as second intermediate hosts and birds as final hosts, their presence in snails depends on food webs. No snails were present at the sampled sites for 6 months after the hurricane. After snails recolonised the site, no trematodes were found in snails until 14 months after the hurricane. It took several years for snail and trematode populations to recover. Our results suggest that the increase in the occurrence of hurricanes predicted due to climate change can impact upon parasites with complex life cycles. However, both the snail populations and their parasite communities eventually reached numbers of individuals and species similar to those before the hurricane. Thus, the trematode parasites of snails can be useful indicators of coastal lagoon ecosystem degradation and recovery. PMID:22079832

  7. Metabolic acceleration in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Elke I.; Ducrot, V.; Jager, T.; Koene, J.; Lagadic, L.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.

    2014-11-01

    Under constant environmental conditions, most animals tend to grow following the von Bertalanffy growth curve. Deviations from this curve can point to changes in the environment that the animals experience, such as food limitation when the available food is not sufficient or suitable. However, such deviations can also point to a phenomenon called metabolic acceleration, which is receiving increasing attention in the field of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) modeling. Reasons for such an acceleration are usually changes in shape during ontogeny, which cause changes in the surface area to volume ratio of the organism. Those changes, in turn, lead to changes in some of the model parameters that have length in their dimension. The life-history consequences of metabolic acceleration as implemented in the DEB theory are an s-shaped growth curve (when body size is expressed as a length measure) and a prolongation of the hatching time. The great pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis was earlier found to be food limited during the juvenile phase in laboratory experiments conducted under classical ecotoxicity test protocols. The pond snail has isomorphic shell growth but yet does not exhibit the expected von Bertalanffy growth curve under food limitation. When applying the standard DEB model to data from such life-cycle experiments, we also found that the hatching time is consistently underestimated, which could be a sign of metabolic acceleration. We here present an application of the DEB model including metabolic acceleration to the great pond snail. We account for the simultaneous hermaphroditism of the snail by including a model extension that describes the relative investment into the male and female function. This model allowed us to adequately predict the life history of the snail over the entire life cycle. However, the pond snail does not change in shape substantially after birth, so the original explanation for the metabolic acceleration does not hold. Since the change in shape is not the only explanation for metabolic acceleration in animals, we discuss the possible other explanations for this pattern in L. stagnalis.

  8. A speciation gene for left–right reversal in snails results in anti-predator adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hoso, Masaki; Kameda, Yuichi; Wu, Shu-Ping; Asami, Takahiro; Kato, Makoto; Hori, Michio

    2010-01-01

    How speciation genes can spread in a population is poorly understood. In land snails, a single gene for left–right reversal could be responsible for instant speciation, because dextral and sinistral snails have difficulty in mating. However, the traditional two-locus speciation model predicts that a mating disadvantage for the reversal should counteract this speciation. In this study, we show that specialized snake predation of the dextral majority drives prey speciation by reversal. Our experiments demonstrate that sinistral Satsuma snails (Stylommatophora: Camaenidae) survive predation by Pareas iwasakii (Colubroidea: Pareatidae). Worldwide biogeography reveals that stylommatophoran snail speciation by reversal has been accelerated in the range of pareatid snakes, especially in snails that gain stronger anti-snake defense and reproductive isolation from dextrals by sinistrality. Molecular phylogeny of Satsuma snails further provides intriguing evidence of repetitive speciation under snake predation. Our study demonstrates that a speciation gene can be fixed in populations by positive pleiotropic effects on survival. PMID:21139578

  9. Thermal susceptibility of Salmonella in the Moroccan food snail, Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    Andrews, W H; Wilson, C R

    1975-11-01

    Thirty samples of 10-15 Helix aspersa food snails were examined for Salmonella by a surface rinsing method and by analysis of whole snails rinsed with 70% ethanol. Thirteen samples were positive by the rinsing method and 6 were positive by whole snail analysis, with this difference being significant (P less than 0.01). Although Salmonella contamination in H. aspersa appeared to be predominantly surface, the pathogen was also found within the snail meat. The ability of surface and subsurface Salmonella organisms to survive in cooked snails was determined in 90 samples. Thermocouple readings indicated that an internal temperature of at least 200 degrees F (93 degrees C) was reached within the snail meat during cooking by a typical recipe. This temperature was sufficient to kill both surface and subsurface Salmonella in 29 samples positive for the pathogen prior to heating. A variety of serotypes representing several somatic groups was isolated. PMID:1194178

  10. Determination of wing cell fate by the escargot and snail genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fuse, N; Hirose, S; Hayashi, S

    1996-04-01

    Inset appendages such as the wing and the leg are formed in response to inductive signals in the embryonic field. In Drosophila, cells receiving such signals initiate developmental programs which allow them to become imaginal discs. Subsequently, these discs autonomously organize patterns specific for each appendage. We here report that two related transcription factors, Escargot and Snail that are expressed in the embryonic wing disc, function as intrinsic determinants of the wing cell fate. In escargot or snail mutant embryos, wing-specific expression of Snail, Vestigial and beta-galactosidase regulated by escargot enhancer were found as well as in wild-type embryos. However, in escargot snail double mutant embryos, wing development proceeded until stage 13, but the marker expression was not maintained in later stages, and the invagination of the primordium was absent. From such analyses, it was concluded that Escargot and Snail expression in the wing disc are maintained by their auto- and crossactivation. Ubiquitous escargot or snail expression induced from the hsp70 promoter rescued the escargot snail double mutant phenotype with the effects confined to the prospective wing cells. Similar DNA binding specificities of Escargot and Snail suggest that they control the same set of genes required for wing development. We thus propose the following scenario for early wing disc development. Prospective wing cells respond to the induction by turning on escargot and snail transcription, and become competent for regulation by Escargot and Snail. Such cells initiate auto- and crossregulatory circuits of escargot and snail. The sustained Escargot and Snail expression then activates vestigial and other target genes that are essential for wing development. This maintains the commitment to the wing cell fate and induces wing-specific cell shape change. PMID:8620833

  11. Use of Bayluscide (Bayer 73) for Snail Control in Fish Ponds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruth Francis-Floyd; James Gildea; Peggy Reed; Ruthellen Klinger

    1997-01-01

    Bayluscide applied to ponds on two commercial fish farms at five rates (from L1 to 13.5 kilogram per surface hectare) effectively controlled aquatic snails. Laboratory toxicity tests confirmed susceptibility of three endemic species of aquatic snail—Melanoides tuberculatus, Physella hendersoni, and Planorbella duryi—to Bayluscide. Observed 24-h concentrations lethal to 50% of snails (LC50) ranged from 0.062 to 0.085 mg\\/L, and 24-h

  12. Removal of corallivorous snails as a proactive tool for the conservation of acroporid corals.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dana E; Miller, Margaret W; Bright, Allan J; Cameron, Caitlin M

    2014-01-01

    Corallivorous snail feeding is a common source of tissue loss for the threatened coral, Acropora palmata, accounting for roughly one-quarter of tissue loss in monitored study plots over seven years. In contrast with larger threats such as bleaching, disease, or storms, corallivory by Coralliophila abbreviata is one of the few direct sources of partial mortality that may be locally managed. We conducted a field experiment to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of snail removal. Long-term monitoring plots on six reefs in the upper Florida Keys were assigned to one of three removal treatments: (1) removal from A. palmata only, (2) removal from all host coral species, or (3) no-removal controls. During the initial removal in June 2011, 436 snails were removed from twelve 150 m(2) plots. Snails were removed three additional times during a seven month "removal phase", then counted at five surveys over the next 19 months to track recolonization. At the conclusion, snails were collected, measured and sexed. Before-After-Control-Impact analysis revealed that both snail abundance and feeding scar prevalence were reduced in removal treatments compared to the control, but there was no difference between removal treatments. Recolonization by snails to baseline abundance is estimated to be 3.7 years and did not differ between removal treatments. Recolonization rate was significantly correlated with baseline snail abundance. Maximum snail size decreased from 47.0 mm to 34.6 mm in the removal treatments. The effort required to remove snails from A. palmata was 30 diver minutes per 150 m(2) plot, compared with 51 min to remove snails from all host corals. Since there was no additional benefit observed with removing snails from all host species, removals can be more efficiently focused on only A. palmata colonies and in areas where C. abbreviata abundance is high, to effectively conserve A. palmata in targeted areas. PMID:25469321

  13. Carbaryl induced alterations in the reproduction and metabolism of freshwater snail Lymnaea acuminata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pankaj Kumar Tripathi; Ajay Singh

    2004-01-01

    When the freshwater snail Lymnaea acuminata was exposed to sub-lethal doses (2.0, 5.0, and 8.0mg\\/L) of carbaryl, fecundity was significantly reduced and even stopped at higher sub-lethal doses and altered metabolic activity in the body tissue of the snail was observed. The change from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism results in lesser energy production in the body tissues of the snails,

  14. Creosote compounds in snails obtained from Pensacola Bay, Florida, near an onshore hazardous-waste site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Pereira, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Snails, Thais haemostoma, were collected from two areas offshore in Pensacola Bay, Florida, near an onshore hazardous-waste site. Tissue from the snails was extracted to isolate the lipophilic compounds and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Along with naturally occurring compounds, the snail tissue contained large concentrations of polycyclic aromatic compounds, such as phenanthrene, acridine, dibenzothiophene, dibenzofuran, and benzo[a]pyrene. Many of these compounds were characteristic of creosote contamination associated with the onshore hazardous-waste site.

  15. Snail1 Protein in the Stroma as a New Putative Prognosis Marker for Colon Tumours

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clara Francí; Manel Gallén; Francesc Alameda; Teresa Baró; Mar Iglesias; Ismo Virtanen; Antonio García de Herreros; Patrick Callaerts

    2009-01-01

    Over-expression of Snail1 gene transcriptional repressor promotes an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in epithelial tumour cell lines. Expression of Snail1 RNA has been associated to the pathogenesis of a number of malignancies; however, the lack of good monoclonal antibodies against this protein has precluded a definitive analysis of Snail1 protein. In this study, we aimed to determine the expression of this transcriptional

  16. The LIM Protein AJUBA Recruits Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 To Mediate SNAIL-Dependent Transcriptional Repression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhaoyuan Hou; Hongzhuang Peng; Kasirajan Ayyanathan; Kai-Ping Yan; Ellen M. Langer; Gregory D. Longmore; Frank J. Rauscher

    2008-01-01

    The SNAIL transcription factor contains C-terminal tandem zinc finger motifs and an N-terminal SNAG repression domain. The members of the SNAIL family have recently emerged as major contributors to the processes of development and metastasis via the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition events during embryonic development and tumor progression. However, the mechanisms by which SNAIL represses gene expression are largely undefined.

  17. Snail and Sonic Hedgehog activation in neuroendocrine tumors of the ileum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Volker Fendrich; Jens Waldmann; Farzad Esni; Annette Ramaswamy; Michael Mullendore; Malte Buchholz; Anirban Maitra; Georg Feldmann

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factor Snail represses E-cadherin and induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a process also exploited by invasive cancer cells. Aberrant Hedgehog (Hh) signaling was recently observed in a variety of epithelial cancers and it has been shown that the Hh target geneGli1 induces expression of Snail. In this study, we examined whether Snail and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) are expressed in neuroendocrine

  18. Removal of corallivorous snails as a proactive tool for the conservation of acroporid corals

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Margaret W.; Bright, Allan J.; Cameron, Caitlin M.

    2014-01-01

    Corallivorous snail feeding is a common source of tissue loss for the threatened coral, Acropora palmata, accounting for roughly one-quarter of tissue loss in monitored study plots over seven years. In contrast with larger threats such as bleaching, disease, or storms, corallivory by Coralliophila abbreviata is one of the few direct sources of partial mortality that may be locally managed. We conducted a field experiment to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of snail removal. Long-term monitoring plots on six reefs in the upper Florida Keys were assigned to one of three removal treatments: (1) removal from A. palmata only, (2) removal from all host coral species, or (3) no-removal controls. During the initial removal in June 2011, 436 snails were removed from twelve 150 m2 plots. Snails were removed three additional times during a seven month “removal phase”, then counted at five surveys over the next 19 months to track recolonization. At the conclusion, snails were collected, measured and sexed. Before-After-Control-Impact analysis revealed that both snail abundance and feeding scar prevalence were reduced in removal treatments compared to the control, but there was no difference between removal treatments. Recolonization by snails to baseline abundance is estimated to be 3.7 years and did not differ between removal treatments. Recolonization rate was significantly correlated with baseline snail abundance. Maximum snail size decreased from 47.0 mm to 34.6 mm in the removal treatments. The effort required to remove snails from A. palmata was 30 diver minutes per 150 m2 plot, compared with 51 min to remove snails from all host corals. Since there was no additional benefit observed with removing snails from all host species, removals can be more efficiently focused on only A. palmata colonies and in areas where C. abbreviata abundance is high, to effectively conserve A. palmata in targeted areas. PMID:25469321

  19. The role of the transcriptional regulator snail in cell detachment, reattachment and migration

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In order to metastasize, cancer cells must first detach from the primary tumor, migrate, invade through tissues and attach to a second site. The transcription factor snail is an important mediator of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions and is involved in tumor progression. Recent data have provided evidence for a requirement for snail expression in metastatic dissemination. Although very little is known about the molecular mechanisms governing metastatic dissemination, we review the possible roles of snail expression in this process. We also review the regulation of snail expression. PMID:19287205

  20. Population estimate of Chinese mystery snail (Bellamya chinensis) in a Nebraska reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaine, Noelle M.; Allen, Craig R.; Fricke, Kent A.; Haak, Danielle M.; Hellman, Michelle L.; Kill, Robert A.; Nemec, Kristine T.; Pope, Kevin L.; Smeenk, Nicholas A.; Stephen, Bruce J.; Uden, Daniel R.; Unstad, Kody M.; VanderHam, Ashley E.

    2012-01-01

    The Chinese mystery snail (Bellamya chinensis) is an aquatic invasive species in North America. Little is known regarding this species' impacts on freshwater ecosystems. It is be lieved that population densities can be high, yet no population estimates have been reported. We utilized a mark-recapture approach to generate a population estimate for Chinese mystery snail in Wild Plum Lake, a 6.47-ha reservoir in southeast Nebraska. We calculated, using bias-adjusted Lincoln-Petersen estimation, that there were approximately 664 adult snails within a 127 m2 transect (5.2 snails/m2). If this density was consistent throughout the littoral zone (<3 m in depth) of the reservoir, then the total adult population in this impoundment is estimated to be 253,570 snails, and the total Chinese mystery snail wet biomass is estimated to be 3,119 kg (643 kg/ha). If this density is confined to the depth sampled in this study (1.46 m), then the adult population is estimated to be 169,400 snails, and wet biomass is estimated to be 2,084 kg (643 kg/ha). Additional research is warranted to further test the utility of mark-recapture methods for aquatic snails and to better understand Chinese mystery snail distributions within reservoirs.

  1. Sexual selection maintains whole-body chiral dimorphism in snails

    PubMed Central

    SCHILTHUIZEN, M.; CRAZE, P. G.; CABANBAN, A. S.; DAVISON, A.; STONE, J.; GITTENBERGER, E.; SCOTT, B. J.

    2007-01-01

    Although the vast majority of higher animals are fixed for one chiral morph or another, the cause for this directionality is known in only a few cases. In snails, for example, rare individuals of the opposite coil are unable to mate with individuals of normal coil, so directionality is maintained by frequency-dependent selection. The snail subgenus Amphidromus presents an unexplained exception, because dextral (D) and sinistral (S) individuals occur sympatrically in roughly equal proportions (so-called ‘antisymmetry’) in most species. Here we show that in Amphidromus there is sexual selection for dimorphism, rather than selection for monomorphism. We found that matings between D and S individuals occur more frequently than expected by chance. Anatomical investigations showed that the chirality of the spermatophore and the female reproductive tract probably allow a greater fecundity in such inter-chiral matings. Computer simulation confirms that under these circumstances, sustained dimorphism is the expected outcome. PMID:17714311

  2. Sexual selection maintains whole-body chiral dimorphism in snails.

    PubMed

    Schilthuizen, M; Craze, P G; Cabanban, A S; Davison, A; Stone, J; Gittenberger, E; Scott, B J

    2007-09-01

    Although the vast majority of higher animals are fixed for one chiral morph or another, the cause for this directionality is known in only a few cases. In snails, for example, rare individuals of the opposite coil are unable to mate with individuals of normal coil, so directionality is maintained by frequency-dependent selection. The snail subgenus Amphidromus presents an unexplained exception, because dextral (D) and sinistral (S) individuals occur sympatrically in roughly equal proportions (so-called 'antisymmetry') in most species. Here we show that in Amphidromus there is sexual selection for dimorphism, rather than selection for monomorphism. We found that matings between D and S individuals occur more frequently than expected by chance. Anatomical investigations showed that the chirality of the spermatophore and the female reproductive tract probably allow a greater fecundity in such inter-chiral matings. Computer simulation confirms that under these circumstances, sustained dimorphism is the expected outcome. PMID:17714311

  3. Mercury residues in south Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisemann, J.D.; Beyer, W.N.; Morton, A. [National Biological Services, Laurel, MD (United States)] [National Biological Services, Laurel, MD (United States); Bennetts, R.E. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Mercury concentrations in the sediments of south Florida wetlands have increased three fold in the last century. Because south Florida is home to many endemic and endangered species, it is important to understand the potential impacts of mercury in this ecosystem`s food web. Recent research by Malley et al. has shown mollusks to be sensitive indicators of methyl mercury which can reflect small differences in background methyl mercury concentrations. In this study, we attempted to determine if the apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) or its eggs are good indicators of bioavailable mercury. Then, using the apple snail as an indicator, we attempted to determine geographic differences in the concentrations of mercury in south Florida. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Mercury residues in south Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisemann, J.D.; Beyer, W.N.; Bennetts, R.E.; Morton, A.

    1997-01-01

    Mercury concentrations in the sediments of south Florida wetlands have increased three fold in the last century (Rood et al. 1993). Because south Florida is home to many endemic and endangered species, it is important to understand the potential impacts of mercury in this ecosystem's food web. Recent research by Malley et al. (1996) has shown mollusks to be sensitive indicators of methyl mercury which can reflect small differences in background methyl mercury concentrations. In this study, we attempted to determine if the apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) or its eggs are good indicators of bioavailable mercury. Then, using the apple snail as an indicator, we attempted to determine geographic differences in the concentrations of mercury in south Florida.

  5. Multiple paternity in the freshwater snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum

    PubMed Central

    Soper, Deanna M; Delph, Lynda F; Lively, Curt M

    2012-01-01

    Mating multiply may incur costs, such as exposure to predators and to sexually transmitted diseases. Nevertheless, it may be favored, in spite of these costs, as a way to increase the genetic diversity of offspring through fertilization by multiple males. Here, we tested for multiple paternity in a freshwater snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), which is host to several species of sterilizing trematode worms. Using microsatellites markers, we found multiple paternity in two different snail populations, with as many as seven males fertilizing a single female. In addition, high evenness of sire fertilization was found within individual broods. Multiple paternity can occur for a variety of reasons; however, given that these populations experience high risk of infection by a sterilizing trematode, one potential explanation may be that multiple paternity and high evenness of sire fertilizations increase the chances of the production of parasite-resistant offspring. PMID:23301182

  6. Neurohormonal control of cardiac activity in the snail, Helix aspersa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip E. Lloyd

    1978-01-01

    1.The characteristics of a cardioactive peptide(s), LCP, were investigated in the snail,Helix aspersa, to determine if LCP functions as a neurohormone.2.Fractionation of isotonic homogenates of the auricle and sub-esophageal ganglia indicate that LCP is associated with microsomal elements, probably granules observed in electron micrographs of the microsomal pellets.3.Ligation experiments carried out under culture conditions suggest that LCP is transported from

  7. Functional Changes in the Snail Statocyst System Elicited by Microgravity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pavel M. Balaban; Aleksey Y. Malyshev; Victor N. Ierusalimsky; Nikolay Aseyev; Tania A. Korshunova; Natasha I. Bravarenko; M. S. Lemak; Matvey Roshchin; Igor S. Zakharov; Yekaterina Popova; Richard Boyle; Hiromu Tanimoto

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundThe mollusk statocyst is a mechanosensing organ detecting the animal's orientation with respect to gravity. This system has clear similarities to its vertebrate counterparts: a weight-lending mass, an epithelial layer containing small supporting cells and the large sensory hair cells, and an output eliciting compensatory body reflexes to perturbations.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsIn terrestrial gastropod snail we studied the impact of 16- (Foton

  8. Effect of Glyphosate on the Development of Pseudosuccinea columella Snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Tate; J. O. Spurlock; F. A. Christian

    1997-01-01

    .   Glyphosate (Roundup) is one of the most commonly used broad-spectrum herbicides with little to no hazard to animals, man,\\u000a or the environment. Due to its widespread use, there is continuous contamination of the environment in both soil and water\\u000a with this herbicide. There is a paucity of long-term exposure studies with sublethal concentrations of glyphosate on aquatic\\u000a snails. This

  9. Clonal diversity driven by parasitism in a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Y; Liljeroos, K; Jokela, J; Ben-Ami, F

    2013-11-01

    One explanation for the widespread abundance of sexual reproduction is the advantage that genetically diverse sexual lineages have under strong pressure from virulent coevolving parasites. Such parasites are believed to track common asexual host genotypes, resulting in negative frequency-dependent selection that counterbalances the population growth-rate advantage of asexuals in comparison with sexuals. In the face of genetically diverse asexual lineages, this advantage of sexual reproduction might be eroded, and instead sexual populations would be replaced by diverse assemblages of clonal lineages. We investigated whether parasite-mediated selection promotes clonal diversity in 22 natural populations of the freshwater snail Melanoides tuberculata. We found that infection prevalence explains the observed variation in the clonal diversity of M. tuberculata populations, whereas no such relationship was found between infection prevalence and male frequency. Clonal diversity and male frequency were independent of snail population density. Incorporating ecological factors such as presence/absence of fish, habitat geography and habitat type did not improve the predictive power of regression models. Approximately 11% of the clonal snail genotypes were shared among 2-4 populations, creating a web of 17 interconnected populations. Taken together, our study suggests that parasite-mediated selection coupled with host dispersal ecology promotes clonal diversity. This, in return, may erode the advantage of sexual reproduction in M. tuberculata populations. PMID:24118641

  10. Phenoloxidase activity of Helix aspersa maxima (garden snail, gastropod) hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Raynova, Yuliana; Doumanova, Lyuba; Idakieva, Krassimira Nikolova

    2013-12-01

    The oxygen-transporting protein, hemocyanin (Hc), of the garden snail Helix aspersa maxima (HaH) was isolated and kinetically characterized. Kinetic parameters of the reaction of catalytic oxidation of catechol to quinone, catalyzed by native HaH were determined: the V max value amounted to 22 nmol min(-1) mg(-1), k cat to 1.1 min(-1). Data were compared to those reported for other molluscan Hcs and phenoloxidases (POs). The o-diphenoloxidase activity of the native HaH is about five times higher than the activity determined for the Hcs of the terrestrial snail Helix pomatia and of the marine snail Rapana thomasiana (k cat values of 0.22 and 0.25 min(-1), respectively). The K m values obtained for molluscan Hcs from different species are comparable to those for true POs, but the low catalytic efficiency of Hcs is probably related to inaccessibility of the active sites to potential substrates. Upon treatment of HaH with subtilisin DY, the enzyme activity against substrate catechol was considerably increased. The relatively high proteolytically induced o-diPO activity of HaH allowed using it for preparation of a biosensor for detection of catechol. PMID:24243490

  11. Occurrence of a blood group A-like substance in eggs of the prosobranch snail Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Uhlenbruck, G; Steinhausen, G; Cheesman, D F; Helm, B

    1976-03-15

    In the eggs of the prosobranch snails Pomacea canaliculata and Pomacea insularum a blood group A-like substance has been detected by anti-A from the snails Helix pomatia, Helix aspersa and Cepaea nemoralis. PMID:815102

  12. THE BIOCIDE TRIBUTYLTIN REDUCES THE ACCUMULATION OF TESTOSTERONE AS FATTY ACID ESTERS IN THE MUD SNAIL (ILYANASSA OBSOLETA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Imposex, the development of male sex characteristics by female gonochoristic snails, has been documented globally and is causally associated with exposure to the ubiquitous environmental contaminant tributyltin (TBT). Elevated testosterone levels in snails also are associated wit...

  13. Field prevalence and laboratory susceptibility of southern Australian land snails to Brachylaima cribbi sporocyst infection.

    PubMed

    Butcher, A R; Grove, D I

    2003-06-01

    Brachylaima cribbi is a terrestrial trematode of birds and mammals with helicid and hygromiid land snails reported as first and second intermediate hosts. However, reports describing the first intermediate host range of B. cribbi have been limited to those snail species present in a small number of geographical locations in South Australia. The natural first intermediate host range, distribution and prevalence of B. cribbi in land snails in southern Australia were determined. A total of 6,432 introduced and native land snails were collected from eight geographical districts across 3,000 km of southern Australia and examined microscopically for B. cribbi sporocysts. Four introduced European snails, Theba pisana, Cernuella virgata, Cochlicella acuta and Cochlicella barbara were natural first intermediate hosts. Sporocyst-infected snails were detected in all districts from Victoria to the west coast of South Australia, a distance of over 1,300 km. Natural sporocyst infection was not observed in introduced European snails Microxeromagna armillata and Helix aspersa or in native Australian land snails Succinea australis and Strangesta gawleri. Egg feeding experiments in the laboratory with B. cribbi confirmed the susceptibility of those species of snails found to be natural first intermediate hosts. Of those species not found to be infected in nature, only M. armillata could be infected in the laboratory. Although this study has shown that five different species of European land snails are suitable first intermediate hosts for B. cribbi there are as yet no reports of B. cribbi from these snails in Europe or from other countries where they have been introduced. Further investigations are needed in Europe to clarify the origins of this parasite. PMID:12847918

  14. The effect of isolation on reproduction and growth of Pseudosuccinea columella (Pulmonata: Lymnaeidae): a snail-conditioned water experiment.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alfredo; Yong, Mary; Wong, Lin; Sánchez, Jorge

    2002-09-01

    A snail-conditioned water experiment was conducted in Pseudosuccinea columella to test the possible role of a chemical interaction between snails on the diminished growth and fecundity rates found for snails raised in pairs compared to those raised in complete isolation. The results permit to discard the hypothesis of an inhibition of growth and reproduction between snails due to factors released into the water. PMID:12386712

  15. Measuring Animal Movements in a Natural Ecosystem: A Mark-Recapture Investigation Using Stream-Dwelling Snails

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Timothy W.

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation, students measure and describe movements of animals in a natural ecosystem. Students mark stream-dwelling snails with nail polish, then search for these snails 1-7 days later. Distances and directions moved by recaptured snails are recorded. Simple statistical techniques are used to answer specific research questions and…

  16. EFFECTS OF SNAIL SIZE AND AGE ON THE PREVALENCE AND INTENSITY OF AVIAN SCHISTOSOME INFECTION: RELATING LABORATORY TO FIELD STUDIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea L. Graham

    2003-01-01

    Both the prevalence and intensity of patent infection by avian schistosomes (Trichobilharzia ocellata) increase with increasing size of lymnaeid snails (Stagnicola elrodi) collected in Flathead Lake, Montana. Because the size and age of a snail are positively correlated, snails of different sizes may have experienced differential duration of exposure to and development of infection. Another possibility is that infection itself

  17. Effects of body size and resource availability on dispersal in a native and a non-native estuarine snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James E. Byers

    2000-01-01

    I manipulated snail densities of two coexisting species of salt marsh snail, Cerithidea californica Haldeman (native) and Batillaria attramentaria Sowerby (non-indigenous) to investigate how resource levels set by intraspecific competition may influence dispersal rates. I used two distinct size classes of the snails (mature and immature) to determine if the effects of competition on dispersal differed between developmental stages of

  18. Temperature Tolerance of Red-Rim Melania Melanoides tuberculatus, an Exotic Aquatic Snail Established in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew J. Mitchell; Thomas M. Brandt

    2005-01-01

    The red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus (family Thiaridae), a tropical, nonindigenous aquatic snail, has become established and is spreading in the United States. Concerns associated with the spread of this snail include its potential to displace native snail populations and to transmit trematodes. Of particular concern is the gill trematode Centrocestus formosanus now found in U.S. commercial and wild fish stocks.

  19. EFFECTS OF DIETARY EXPOSURE TO FOREST PESTICIDES ON THE BROWN GARDEN SNAIL HELIX ASPERSA MULLER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brown garden snails, Helix aspersa, were fed prepared diets with 12 pesticides used in forest spraying practices where endangered arboreal and terrestrial snails may be at risk. cephate, atrazine, glyphosate, hexazinone, and picloram were not lethal at concentrations of 5,000 mg/...

  20. Local adaptation of the trematode Fasciola hepatica to the snail Galba truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Dreyfuss, G.; Vignoles, P.; Rondelaud, D.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental infections of six riverbank populations of Galba truncatula with Fasciola hepatica were carried out to determine if the poor susceptibility of these populations to this digenean might be due to the scarcity or the absence of natural encounters between these snails and the parasite. The first three populations originated from banks frequented by cattle in the past (riverbank group) whereas the three others were living on islet banks without any known contact with local ruminants (islet group). After their exposure, all snails were placed in their natural habitats from the end of October up to their collection at the beginning of April. Compared to the riverbank group, snails, which died without cercarial shedding clearly predominated in the islet group, while the other infected snails were few in number. Most of these last snails released their cercariae during a single shedding wave. In islet snails dissected after their death, the redial and cercarial burdens were significantly lower than those noted in riverbank G. truncatula. Snails living on these islet banks are thus able to sustain larval development of F. hepatica. The modifications noted in the characteristics of snail infection suggest the existence of an incomplete adaptation between these G. truncatula and the parasite, probably due to the absence of natural contact between host and parasite. PMID:22910670

  1. [Effect of the population density on growth and regeneration in the snail Achatina fulica].

    PubMed

    Sidel'nikov, A P; Stepanov, I I

    2000-01-01

    In the laboratory, the growth rate of the giant African snail Achatina fulica, as estimated by the weight and shell length was shown to decrease when the population density increased from 10 to 60 snails/m2 of the total terrarium area for five months. In the second experiment, when the population density increased from 48 to 193 snails/m2, the growth rate had already decreased by six weeks. In the groups with a high population density the feeding behavior was weakened, expressed by a greater amount of nonconsumed food, according to visual observations, than in the groups with lower population densities. At the population density of 10 to 60 snails/m2, the proliferative activity in the course of the optic tentacle regeneration, as expressed by the mitotic index, did not differ reliably within five months. In the second experiment, the mitotic indices at the population densities of 96 and 193 snails/m2 within 1.5 months exceeded that of 48 snails/m2. Recommendations are given concerning the population density from the viewpoint of commercial growth of the snails. It was proposed that, based on the analysis of the mechanism underlying the inhibition of feeding behavior in populations with extra high densities, one may develop a new approach to the production of chemical agents to control land snails as agricultural pests. PMID:11042956

  2. Differential parasitism of native and introduced snails: replacement of a parasite fauna

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Differential parasitism of native and introduced snails: replacement of a parasite fauna Mark E February 2004 Key words: Batillaria attramentaria, Batillaria cumingi, Cerithidea californica, fish in the introduced Japanese mud snail, Batillaria cumingi (= B. attramentaria), in nearly all of its introduced range

  3. Potential of Metriaclima lanisticola (Teleostei: Cichlidae) for biological control of schistosome intermediate host snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Lundeba; Jeremy S. Likongwe; Henry Madsen; Jay R. Stauffer

    2007-01-01

    Metriaclima lanisticola, a native cichlid of Lake Malawi, was studied under laboratory conditions to evaluate its possible role as a predator of snails (Bulinus spp.). Bulinus globosus, B. nyassanus and B. tropicus were used as prey. B. globosus and B. nyassanus are intermediate hosts of human schistosomes in Lake Malawi. M. lanisticola orally shelled snails of all three species. Even

  4. A Comparison of Black Carp, Redear Sunfish, and Blue Catfish as Biological Controls of Snail Populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan J. Ledford; Anita M. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Redear sunfish Lepomis microlophus and blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus were compared with black carp Mylopharyngodon piceus as potential biological controls for rams-horn snails Planorbella spp. Comparisons were made with regard to snail size selection, total consumption, and the effects of alternative prey and temperature on consumption rates of two size-classes for each species, small (?100 mm total length [TL]) and

  5. Dynamics of Diplostomum spathaceum infection in snail hosts at a fish farm.

    PubMed

    Karvonen, Anssi; Savolainen, Miia; Seppälä, Otto; Valtonen, E Tellervo

    2006-09-01

    Ecologically sustainable disease prevention in intensive monocultures, such as fish farming, is based on the knowledge of the ecology of parasites and the identification of the key proportion of host populations for parasite life cycles. In this paper, we examined the life cycle dynamics of the pathogenic trematode Diplostomum spathaceum at a fish farm during a period of 1 year, focusing especially on the pattern of infection in the snail host (Lymnaea stagnalis) population, which is the key phase in the parasite life cycle regarding preventative actions. We found that (1) the infection varied seasonally in snails, being highest in late August; (2) the prevalence of infection and the proportion of individuals releasing cercariae were strongly dependent on snail size; (3) the parasite over-wintered in snails as dormant sporocysts and 4) the mortality of infected snails was not likely to differ from uninfected individuals during winter. Furthermore, the seasonality and development of the infection in the snails corresponded to the pattern of infection observed in the tracer rainbow trout caged in the farm area. This pattern of infection also indicated strong spatiality of the infection, probably because of differences in the size of the snail population between the ponds rather than differences in the prevalence of infection. Overall, present results indicate a possibility for late-summer outbreaks of D. spathaceum, but also that snail prevention at farms could be conducted more efficiently by considering both size-dependent infection and the timing of cercarial release. PMID:16565817

  6. The biological control of snail intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis by fish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Slootweg; E. A. Malek; F. S. McCullough

    1994-01-01

    Summary The use of molluscivorous fish for biological control of snail intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis is a regularly reappearing theme in the literature on schistosomiasis control. The effectiveness of this control method has not yet been demonstrated, and conclusive field evidence is lacking. In this article the literature on snail control by fish is critically reviewed. Special attention is paid

  7. Buffering role of the intertidal anemone Anthopleura aureoradiata in cercarial transmission from snails to crabs

    E-print Network

    Poulin, Robert

    snails to crabs J.V. Hopper, R. Poulin, D.W. Thieltges Department of Zoology, University of Otago, P-host organisms on the transmission of the microphallid trematode Maritrema novaezealandensis from its snail first., 2002). For trematodes, accumulation of metacercariae in crustaceans, molluscs or fish serving as second

  8. LETTER Exclusive male care despite extreme female promiscuity and low paternity in a marine snail

    E-print Network

    Grosberg, Rick

    LETTER Exclusive male care despite extreme female promiscuity and low paternity in a marine snail to expectations based on paternity assurance: despite high levels of female promiscuity, males of a marine snail paternity has been characterised, including fishes (Jones et al. 1999, 2001), sea spiders (Barreto & Avise

  9. Snail ( Helix aspersa ) exposure history and possible adaptation to lead as reflected in shell composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Newman; M. Mulvey; A. Beeby; R. W. Hurst; L. Richmond

    1994-01-01

    Lead sequestration in shell was examined for English and Welsh populations of the common garden snail (Helix aspersa) with different Pb exposure histories. Isotopic Pb ratios provided signatures for Pb source and a means of implying duration of population exposure from decades to millennia. Total Pb concentrations were used to quantify the intensity of exposure experienced by the populations. Snails

  10. Dynamic control of a central pattern generator circuit: a computational model of the snail feeding network

    E-print Network

    Feng, Jianfeng

    ­Huxley models, Lymnaea stagnalis Abstract Central pattern generators (CPGs) are networks underlying rhythmic to the rhythmogenic circuit. In the feeding system of the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, the extrinsic slow oscillator the CPG-driven motor pattern underlying feeding in the pond snail, Lymnaea (Fig. 1). One type of cell

  11. A molecular phylogeography approach to biological invasions of the New World by parthenogenetic Thiarid snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. FACON; J.-P. POINTIER; M. GLAUBRECHT; C. POUX; P. JARNE; P. DAVID

    2003-01-01

    The parthenogenetic snail Melanoides tuberculata , present in tropical fresh waters of most of the Old World before 1950, has now invaded the Neotropical area. The phylogeography of this snail was studied to evaluate the pathways and number of such invasions. Because of parthenogenetic reproduction, individuals are structured into genetical clones. Within populations from both the original and invaded areas,

  12. Dry down impacts on apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) demography: Implications for wetland water management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darby, P.C.; Bennetts, R.E.; Percival, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa Say) are prey for several wetland-dependent predators, most notably for the endangered Florida snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis Vieillot). Management concerns for kites have been raised regarding the impacts of wetland dry downs on snails, but little data exists to validate these concerns. We simulated drying events in experimental tanks, where we observed that snail survival patterns, regardless of hydrology, were driven by a post-reproductive die off. In contrast to earlier reports of little to no dry down tolerance, we found that 70% of pre-reproductive adult-sized snails survived a 12-week dry down. Smaller size classes of snails exhibited significantly lower survival rates (< 50% after eight weeks dry). Field surveys showed that 77% of egg production occurs in April-June. Our hydrologic analyses of six peninsular Florida wetlands showed that most dry downs overlapped a portion of the peak snail breeding season, and 70% of dry downs were ??? 12 weeks in duration. Dry down timing can affect recruitment by truncating annual egg production and stranding juveniles. Dry down survival rates and seasonal patterns of egg cluster production helped define a range of hydrologic conditions that support robust apple snail populations, and illustrate why multiple characteristics of dry down events should be considered in developing target hydrologic regimes for wetland fauna. ?? 2008, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  13. Down-regulation of SNAIL suppresses MIN mouse tumorigenesis: Modulation of apoptosis,

    E-print Network

    Ottino, Julio M.

    evidence implicates the SNAIL family of transcriptional repressors in cancer development; however, the role- histochemical analysis of the uninvolved intestinal mucosa for SNAIL and E-cadherin levels along with rates-cadherin, p16INKa, and hMLH-1 (2). This frequently occurs at the transcriptional level, most commonly either

  14. Structure of terrestrial snail communities of Euro Siberian alder swamps (Cl. Alnetea glutinosae) in Latvia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Digna Pilate

    2009-01-01

    Studies on the terrestrial snail communities of Euro-Siberian alder swamps (Cl. alnetea glutinosae) of Latvia were carried out during the period of 2004–2005, by examining samples from 12 forest districts located in different parts of the country. In total, 38 species, constituting half of all terrestrial snail species recorded in Latvia, were found. The examined alder swamps can be divided

  15. INTRODUCTION Predator avoidance in aquatic snails is facilitated by surfacing and

    E-print Network

    Grosell, Martin

    shell-crushing sunfish or crayfish (Alexander and Covich, 1991; Brown, 1991). Additionally, and central to the intensity of the predatory attack (Arshavsky et al., 1994). Pulmonate snails, such as the common pond snail more vulnerable to benthic predators such as crayfish during that time. A, presumably, sub

  16. TREMATODE INFECTIONS OF THE FRESHWATER SNAIL FAMILY THIARIDAE IN THE KHEK RIVER, THAILAND

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wivitchuta Dechruksa; Duangduen Krailas; Suluck Ukong; Wasin Inkapatanakul; Tunyarut Koonchornboon

    The freshwater snail family Thiaridae was studied at five different locations: water sources for the Khek River, Thailand. Snail samples were collected by hand using counts per unit of time sampling method between December 2004 and October 2005. The physico-chemi- cal quality of the water changed with the seasons and affected the sampling areas during both the dry season and

  17. The influence of TCS on the growth and behavior of the freshwater snail, Physa acuta

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jenell Brown; Melody J. Bernot; Randall J. Bernot

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is among the top 10 most persistent contaminants found in U.S. rivers, streams, lakes, and aquifers. Although TCS has not been found to be hazardous to humans, it can be toxic to aquatic environments and animals. The effects of TCS on growth rates and the locomotive behavior of the freshwater snail, Physa acuta, were studied by exposing snails

  18. Hormetic effects of heavy metals in aquatic snails: is a little bit of pollution good?

    PubMed

    Lefcort, Hugh; Freedman, Zachary; House, Sherman; Pendleton, Mathew

    2008-03-01

    Hormesis is the term to describe a stimulatory effects associated with a low dose of a potentially toxic substance or stress. We had anecdotal evidence of hormetic effects in some of our previous experiments concerning the influence of heavy metals on aquatic snail growth and recruitment. We therefore repeated a version of an earlier experiment but this time we expanded our low-dose treatments and increased our sample size. We also explored if metals had a hormetic effect on algae periphyton. We raised snails in outdoor mini-ecosystems containing lead, zinc, and cadmium-contaminated soil from an Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site in the Silver Valley of northern Idaho. The snails came from two sites. One population (Physella columbiana) has evolved for 120 years in the presence of heavy metals and one (Lymnaea palustris) has not. We found that P. columbiana exhibited hormesis with snails exposed to small amounts of metals exhibiting more reproduction and growth than snails not exposed to metals. Naturally occurring Oscillatoria algae also exhibited a hormetic effect of heavy metals but L. palustris did not display hormesis. Large doses negatively impacted all three species. Overall the levels of cadmium, lead, and zinc measured in the tissues of the snails were inversely correlated to the number of snails recruited into the tub populations. Only in comparisons of the lowest metal treatment to the control treatment is a positive effect detected. Indirect effects on competing species of snails, periphyton, and also fishermen, may be less favorable. PMID:18648792

  19. THE EFFECT OF CHEMICAL TREATMENTS ON MELANOIDES TUBERCULATUS, A SNAIL THAT VECTORS AN IMPORTANT FISH TREMATODE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States, Melanoides tuberculatus is a nonindigenous aquatic snail that vectors a trematode infecting both cultured and wild fish species. This snail is now found in 16 states and among other ways is believed to be spread from place to place by the use of contaminated fisheries equipmen...

  20. A repetitive DNA probe for the sensitive detection of Fasciola hepatica infected snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Kaplan; J. B. Dame; G. R. Reddy; C. H. Courtney

    1995-01-01

    Epizootiologic studies on F. hepatica frequently use microscopic techniques for the detection of infected snails, however, the poor efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity associated with these techniques limit their usefulness. A DNA-based test for the identification of snails infected with larval stages of F. hepatica would solve these problems and enable a level of detection accuracy previosly unavailable. We have cloned

  1. Snail shells and acid rain - an alternative to marble chips and acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sue Howarth

    2004-01-01

    An original project carried out by a UK year 9 (13-14 year-old) science class is described. The reaction between acid and snail shells was investigated, and the effects of different acids, acid concentration, temperature and shell size were studied. The results were related to the effects of acid rain on snails in the wild. Students responded with interest and the

  2. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    SciTech Connect

    Scherbakov, Alexander M., E-mail: alex.scherbakov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Clinical Oncology, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Berstein, Lev M. [Laboratory of Oncoendocrinology, N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology, St. Petersburg 197758 (Russian Federation); Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well the level of AMPK phosphorylation may be considered as predictors of the tumor sensitivity to anti-angiogenic drugs. - Highlights: • Snail1 protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia. • Protective effect of Snail1 is mediated via ?-catenin/HIF-1 pathway. • Snail/?-catenin signaling is negatively controlled by the energy sensor – AMPK. • The failure in AMPK phosphorylation drives cells to the hypoxia-tolerant state.

  3. Snail modulates the assembly of fibronectin via ?5 integrin for myocardial migration in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liangjun; Gao, Hongwei; Zhang, Ting; Jing, Lulu; Xiao, Chun; Xiao, Yue; Luo, Ning; Zhu, Hongyan; Meng, Wentong; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2014-01-01

    The Snail family member snail encodes a zinc finger-containing transcriptional factor that is involved in heart formation. Yet, little is known about how Snail regulates heart development. Here, we identified that one of the duplicated snail genes, snai1b, was expressed in the heart region of zebrafish embryos. Depletion of Snai1b function dramatically reduced expression of ?5 integrin, disrupted Fibronectin layer in the heart region, especially at the midline, and prevented migration of cardiac precursors, resulting in defects in cardiac morphology and function in zebrafish embryos. Injection of ?5?1 protein rescued the Fibronectin layer and then the myocardial precursor migration in snai1b knockdown embryos. The results provide the molecular mechanism how Snail controls the morphogenesis of heart during embryonic development. PMID:24667151

  4. Effects of parasitism and stress on hemolymph protein of the African giant snail, Achatina fulica.

    PubMed

    Brockelman, C R

    1978-10-31

    Effects of parasitism and stress on the protein concentration of hemolymph have been investigated using the rat lungworm Angiostromgylus cantonensis in the snail host Achatina fulica. The normal hemolymph protein concentration, averaging 1.77 g/100 ml in noninfected snails, did not show any reduction when the hosts were infected with third stage larvae. When the infected snails were bled repeatedly, protein concentration showed a significant decrease by 0.6 g/100 ml. Starved, infected snails were capable of maintaining their hemolymph protein level within the normal range. This treatment, however, in combination with frequent bleeding, caused much stress to the snails and reduced survival. The number of survivors depended on the frequency of bleeding and on the food level. PMID:735303

  5. Why are there few algae on snail shells? The effects of grazing, nutrients and shell chemistry on the algae on shells of Helisoma trivolvis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LINDSEY L. ABBOTT; ELIZABETH A. BERGEY

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. Freshwater snails often lack visible growths of algae on their shells. We tested three possible mechanisms that may account for this (grazing, snail-derived nutrients and chemical defences), using the ramshorn snail Helisoma trivolvis. 2. The experiments were carried out in floating plastic enclosures in a pond and comprised seven treatments. Grazing treatments were: a lone snail (ungrazed, as

  6. Snails and slugs damaging the cut foliage, Cordyline fruticosa and use of biorationals towards their management.

    PubMed

    Karthiga, S; Jegathambigai, V; Karunarathne, M D S D; Svinningen, A; Mikunthan, G

    2012-01-01

    Snails and slugs became a serious molluscan pests and damaging leaves of purple compacta, Cordyline fruticosa extensively grown for export at Green Farm Ltd, Sri Lanka. The export quality of leaves of C. fruticosa is lowered due to feeding of snails, Achantina fulica (Bowditch), Opeas pyrgula Schmacker and Boettgerx and Helix aspersa Muller and slugs incurring great loss to cut foliage industry. Paucity of information is available to understand snails and slugs damage and their host range that limits to develop suitable management practices. Therefore this study was aimed to determine damage, alternate hosts and to develop possible management practices. Snails and slugs damaged mainly fresh leaves of C. fruticosa. The severity of damage was 44.5% in infested field based on the visual rating method. Leaves of cassava, sting bean, okra, cucumber, passion fruit, papaya, Glyricidia and shoe flower were identified as alternate hosts and neem, Ixora and Dracaena spp were not served as alternate hosts. Among the plant materials tested for their repellence against snails and slugs revealed that neem seed powder was an irritant; neem leaves, mint leaves and Lantana leaves were acted as anti-feedant and Salt as chemical repellent. Among the barrier and bait experiments Bordeaux mixture exhibited a significant barrier effect against horizontal movement of snails. Baits made out of Metaldehyde bait, vegetables bait and jaggery had a strong effect in repelling the snails and slugs. Mulching with Madhuca longifolia punnac was the best to reduce the snails and slugs population compared to M. longifolia seed kernel powder. Oil from M. longifolia failed to reduce their population. Hence the results revealed that saponin containing M. longifolia punnac helped to eliminate snails and slugs when used as mulch. Metaldehyde, vegetable and jaggery baits are also useful to minimize their colonization further. Hence combination of these methods will help to prevent snails and slugs from damaging C. fruticosa and benefit to the cut foliage industry to sustain its export quality. PMID:23885439

  7. Speciation and Gene Flow between Snails of Opposite Chirality

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Left-right asymmetry in snails is intriguing because individuals of opposite chirality are either unable to mate or can only mate with difficulty, so could be reproductively isolated from each other. We have therefore investigated chiral evolution in the Japanese land snail genus Euhadra to understand whether changes in chirality have promoted speciation. In particular, we aimed to understand the effect of the maternal inheritance of chirality on reproductive isolation and gene flow. We found that the mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of Euhadra is consistent with a single, relatively ancient evolution of sinistral species and suggests either recent “single-gene speciation” or gene flow between chiral morphs that are unable to mate. To clarify the conditions under which new chiral morphs might evolve and whether single-gene speciation can occur, we developed a mathematical model that is relevant to any maternal-effect gene. The model shows that reproductive character displacement can promote the evolution of new chiral morphs, tending to counteract the positive frequency-dependent selection that would otherwise drive the more common chiral morph to fixation. This therefore suggests a general mechanism as to how chiral variation arises in snails. In populations that contain both chiral morphs, two different situations are then possible. In the first, gene flow is substantial between morphs even without interchiral mating, because of the maternal inheritance of chirality. In the second, reproductive isolation is possible but unstable, and will also lead to gene flow if intrachiral matings occasionally produce offspring with the opposite chirality. Together, the results imply that speciation by chiral reversal is only meaningful in the context of a complex biogeographical process, and so must usually involve other factors. In order to understand the roles of reproductive character displacement and gene flow in the chiral evolution of Euhadra, it will be necessary to investigate populations in which both chiral morphs coexist. PMID:16149849

  8. Spectroscopic characterization of metallothionein from the terrestrial snail, Helix pomatia.

    PubMed

    Dallinger, R; Wang, Y; Berger, B; Mackay, E A; Kägi, J H

    2001-08-01

    The Cd-sequestering metallothionein (MT) isoform isolated from the midgut gland of Roman snails exposed to Cd supplements in the feed was characterized by compositional and spectroscopic analysis. The preparations contained nearly 5 mol of Cd, small amounts of Cu and about 1 mol of Zn per chain mass of 6620 Da, in numerical agreement with the apoprotein's measured capacity of firmly binding a maximum of 6 equivalents of Cd per molecule. As with other Cd-containing MTs the occurrence of a prominent Cd-mercaptide-specific shoulder at 250 nm in its absorption spectrum showed that Cd is complexed in tetrahedral symmetry by the cysteine residues of the protein, and the multiphasic ellipticity profile in the CD spectrum revealed that these complexes are joined to form one or more oligonuclear Cd-mercapto clusters. Both spectral features vanished with the removal of the metal but were reconstituted to maximum amplitudes by readdition of Cd to the metal-free apoprotein, provided precautions were taken to prevent air oxidation of the latter. Quantitative analysis of snail MT reconstituted with Cd established that the 18 cysteine side chains bind the metal in a 3-to-1 ratio; spectroscopic studies on fractionally restored forms demonstrated that the six Cd ions were bound to the apoprotein molecule in succession in two sets of three Cd ions each. Thus, one can infer from the observed stoichiometry and the coordinating preferences of Cd that this gastropod MT, like the Cd-bearing MTs of marine crustaceans, harboured the metal in two separate cyclically constructed Cd3Cys9 clusters. The snail clusters differed, however, from other MTs in their response to acidification. Their protolytic dissociation proceeded through two separate protonation steps with the manifestation of spectroscopically distinguishable intermediate forms. Thus, this snail isoform displays in its metal composition and its chemical and spectroscopic features both similarities and differences to other animal kingdom MTs. Its properties suggest that it serves an important role in the protection of the terrestrial gastropod from Cd. PMID:11488904

  9. [Equipment for biological experiments with snails aboard piloted orbital stations].

    PubMed

    Gorgiladze, G I; Korotkova, E V; Kuznetsova, E E; Mukhamedieva, L N; Begrov, V V; Pepeliaev, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    To fly biological experiments aboard piloted orbital stations, research equipment was built up of an incubation container, filter system and automatic temperature controller. Investigations included analysis of the makeup and concentrations of gases produced by animals (snails) during biocycle, and emitted after death. Filters are chemisorption active fibrous materials (AFM) with high sorption rate and water receptivity (cation exchange fiber VION-KN-1 and anion exchange fiber VION-AS-1), and water-repellent carbon adsorbent SKLTS. AFM filters were effective in air cleaning and practically excluded ingress of chemical substances from the container into cabin atmosphere over more than 100 days. PMID:21033402

  10. The repressor function of snail is required for Drosophila gastrulation and is not replaceable by Escargot or Worniu.

    PubMed

    Hemavathy, Kirugaval; Hu, Xiaodi; Ashraf, Shovon I; Small, Stephen J; Ip, Y Tony

    2004-05-15

    Mesoderm formation in the Drosophila embryo depends on the maternal Toll signaling pathway. The Toll pathway establishes the Dorsal nuclear gradient, which regulates many zygotic genes to establish the mesodermal fate and promote the invagination of ventral cells. An important target gene of Dorsal is snail, which is required for proper mesoderm invagination. The Snail protein contains five zinc fingers and is a transcriptional repressor. However, it is not clear whether repressing target genes is a requirement for Snail to control ventral invagination. To examine such requirement, we conducted a series of genetic rescue experiments in snail mutant embryos. Snail, Worniu, and Escargot are closely related zinc-finger proteins and have equal functions during neuroblast development. However, among these three proteins, only Snail can rescue the mesoderm invagination phenotype. Moreover, the ability of various Snail mutant constructs to repress gene expression correlates with their ability to control invagination. This unique property of Snail in mesoderm formation can be attributed mostly to the CtBP co-repressor interaction motifs in the N-terminus, not to the C-terminal DNA-binding zinc fingers. Ectopic expression of Snail outside the ventral domain is not sufficient to induce cell movement even though repression of target genes still occurs. Together, the results show that the repressor function of Snail is essential for gastrulation. The repression of target genes by Snail may permit other factors in the ventral cells to positively promote mesoderm invagination. PMID:15110709

  11. The influence of Plagiorchis mutationis larval infection on the cellular immune response of the snail host Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Kryukova, Natalia A; Yurlova, Natalia I; Rastyagenko, Natalia M; Antonova, Elena V; Glupov, Viktor V

    2014-06-01

    The effects of trematode Plagiorchis mutationis parasitism on the cellular immune responses of the snail host Lymnaea stagnalis were investigated. The number of spreading blood cells (hemocytes) from infected snails was significantly less (69.5%) than in uninfected individuals (79.2%). The phagocytic activity of blood cells in infected snails was also significantly less (17.2%) compared to uninfected snails (27.8%). The hemocytes from the infected snails did not form a complete capsule around Sephadex beads in vitro. The protective reactions of the snail hosts were independent of the parasite load (daily cercariae production). In vitro, dead cercariae of P. mutationis were encapsulated by hemocytes from uninfected snails. The hemocytes of the infected snails formed a complete capsule around only 20% of dead cercariae in vitro, with remaining cercariae either unencapsulated (50% of cercariae) or incompletely encapsulated (30% of cercariae). The total number of hemocytes in the infected snails was twofold less than in uninfected individuals. The results of this study showed that the cellular response of snail host L. stagnalis to P. mutationis trematode infection is similar to the previously studied snail-trematode model systems. PMID:24428684

  12. PKD1 phosphorylation-dependent degradation of SNAIL by SCF-FBXO11 regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hanqiu; Shen, Minhong; Zha, Yin-Lian; Li, Wenyang; Wei, Yong; Blanco, Mario Andres; Ren, Guangwen; Zhou, Tianhua; Storz, Peter; Wang, Hui-Yun; Kang, Yibin

    2014-09-01

    Metastatic dissemination is often initiated by the reactivation of an embryonic development program referred to as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The transcription factor SNAIL promotes EMT and elicits associated pathological characteristics such as invasion, metastasis, and stemness. To better understand the posttranslational regulation of SNAIL, we performed a luciferase-based, genome-wide E3 ligase siRNA library screen and identified SCF-FBXO11 as an important E3 that targets SNAIL for ubiquitylation and degradation. Furthermore, we discovered that SNAIL degradation by FBXO11 is dependent on Ser-11 phosphorylation of SNAIL by protein kinase D1 (PKD1). FBXO11 blocks SNAIL-induced EMT, tumor initiation, and metastasis in multiple breast cancer models. These findings establish the PKD1-FBXO11-SNAIL axis as a mechanism of posttranslational regulation of EMT and cancer metastasis. PMID:25203322

  13. Effects of snail grazing and nutrient release on growth of the macrophytes Ceratophyllum demersum and Elodea canadensis and the filamentous green alga Cladophora sp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Agnieszka Pinowska

    2002-01-01

    The effects of snail (Lymnaea (Galba) turricula) nutrient release and grazing on young macrophytes and filamentous green algae were examined in a laboratory experiment. Snails released an average of 24.2 µg PO4-P and 48.9 µg NH4-N g-1 snail FW d-1. Snails consumed Cladophora sp. at the highest rate (45 mg g-1 snail FW d-1), Elodea canadensis at a lower rate

  14. The mesoderm determinant snail collaborates with related zinc-finger proteins to control Drosophila neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, S I; Hu, X; Roote, J; Ip, Y T

    1999-11-15

    The Snail protein functions as a transcriptional regulator to establish early mesodermal cell fate. Later, in germ band-extended embryos, Snail is also expressed in most neuroblasts. Here we present evidence that this expression of Snail is required for central nervous system (CNS) development. The neural function of snail is masked by two closely linked genes, escargot and worniu. Both Escargot and Worniu contain zinc-finger domains that are highly homologous to that of Snail. Although not affecting expression of early neuroblast markers, the deletion of the region containing all three genes correlates with loss of expression of CNS determinants including fushi tarazu, pdm-2 and even-skipped. Transgenic expression of each of the three Snail family proteins can rescue efficiently the fushi tarazu defects, and partially the pdm-2 and even-skipped CNS patterns. These results demonstrate that the Snail family proteins have essential functions during embryonic CNS development, around the time of ganglion mother cell formation. PMID:10562554

  15. Epidemiology of cercarial stage of trematodes in freshwater snails from Chiang Mai province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chontananarth, Thapana; Wongsawad, Chalobol

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the epidemiological situation of cercarial trematodes infection in freshwater snails from different water resources in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Methods The snail specimens were collected from 13 districts of Chiang Mai province during April 2008 to February 2012. The prevalence of cercarial infection in snails was investigated using the crushing method. The drawing was done with the help of a camera lucida for the morphological study. Results A total of 2?479 snail individuals were collected and classified into 7 families, 11 genera, and 14 species, Among them, 8 snails species were found to be infected with an overall prevalence of 17.27% (428/2?479), which infected with nine groups of cercariae; gymnocephalous cercaria, strigea cercaria, megalurous cercaria, monostome cercaria, parapleurolophocercous cercaria (Haplorchis cercaria), pleurolophocercous cercaria, furcocercous cercaria (Transversotrema cercaria), xiphidiocercaria, and virgulate cercaria. The parapleurolophocercous cercaria was found to be the dominant type among the cercarial infection in the snails (64.25%). Conclusions The various species of snails found in the research location act as the intermediate hosts for the high prevalence of parasitic infection of many species of mammals. This work will provide new information on both the distribution and first intermediate host of trematodes. PMID:23620846

  16. Experimental infection of five subspecies of Oncomelania snails with Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Y

    1995-12-01

    Five subspecies of Oncomelania snails, Oncomelania hupensis nosophora, O.h. hupensis, O.h.chiui, O.h.formosana and O.h.quadrasi, were experimentally exposed to the first stage larvae of Angiostrongylus cantonesis. The presence of third stage larvae was observed in all of the five subspecies of Oncomelania snails 20 days after infection. Infection rates of the third stage larvae of the parasite in Oncomelania snails were 38.0-40.0%. There were no differences in preferences among Oncomelania snails. The third stage larvae in Oncomelania snails almost distributed in kidney and intestine region, and most of the larvae were active and free in tissues. The distribution pattern of the larvae in Oncomelania snails was quite different from that in Achatina fulica and Ampullarium sp. These third stage larvae were ingested by rats, and developed to adults. These data suggest that Oncomelania snails may play important role when A. cantonensis will spread, and indicate the possibility of human infection with A. cantonensis. PMID:9139392

  17. Temperature dependence of Opisthorchis viverrini infection in first intermediate host snail, Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos.

    PubMed

    Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Kulsantiwong, Jutharat; Piratae, Supawadee; Khampoosa, Panita; Thammasiri, Chalida; Suwannatrai, Apiporn; Laha, Thewarach; Grams, Rudi; Loukas, Alex; Tesana, Smarn

    2015-01-01

    Determining of the success of a parasite's infectiveness in its snail host clearly depends on environmental conditions. Temperature, one of the most influential factors impinging on metabolism of cold-blooded animals, is believed to be an important factor in parasitic infection in snails. In order to elucidate the influence of temperature, sex and size of snails on infectivity of Opisthorchis viverrini to its first intermediate host, Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos, 960 snails were divided into 2 groups by sex. Each group was subdivided by their size into small and medium sub-groups. Each snail was fed with embryonated uterine-eggs of O. viverrini at different temperatures (16-37°C, 3°C intervals). Dissections were carried out 1, 7, 14, 28 and 56 days thereafter and detection of O. viverrini infection was undertaken by PCR using specific primers. Infection was strongly temperature-dependent, as temperature increases of 1°C resulted in increased odds of infection 5.4% (P<0.01). A temperature of 34°C gave the highest rate of infection of 44.14%. We also found that the odds of infection in small sized snails was 39.8% higher relative to medium sized snails (P<0.05). Relative to day 1, the decrease in the odds of infection was detected when the day post infection was longer (P<0.01). Proportion of infection in female was not different to male significantly. PMID:24161535

  18. Maternal Inheritance of racemism in the terrestrial snail Bradybaena similaris.

    PubMed

    Utsuno, Hiroki; Asami, Takahiro

    2010-01-01

    In metazoan animals, almost every known mutation of visceral asymmetry, which presents the polarity of primary asymmetry established in early development, reverses development in only about half or fewer of homozygotes. However, in pulmonate snails, the dextral and sinistral alleles are traditionally known to determine the polarity of offspring with complete dominance, and thus, each parent should produce either dextral or sinistral progeny. Contrary to this expectation, we found a mutant that produces both chiral morphs (enantiomorphs) within the same clutches in Bradybaena similaris. This study demonstrates that the consistent production of both enantiomorphs is determined by a maternal effect of a recessive allele, which probably randomizes the polarity. In snails that copulate simultaneously and reciprocally, a left-right reversed strain cannot usually be established or rescued from inbreeding depression by ad hoc outbreeding because a rarely found single mutant cannot reproduce due to great difficulties of mating with the wild type and selfing. Moreover, the rare recessive homozygote cannot easily be detected because it often exhibits the wild-type phenotype in maternal inheritance and breeding difficulty hampers genotyping it by phenotyping its progeny. The present strain established by virtue of rare advantages will, therefore, provide unique opportunities to investigate whole-body enantiomorphs. PMID:19617526

  19. Allying with armored snails: the complete genome of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Satoshi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yohey; Murakami, Shun-ichi; Watanabe, Tamaki; Fujiyoshi, So; Mino, Sayaka; Sawabe, Tomoo; Maeda, Takahiro; Makita, Hiroko; Nemoto, Suguru; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Hiromi; Watsuji, Tomo-o; Takai, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea vents harbor dense populations of various animals that have their specific symbiotic bacteria. Scaly-foot gastropods, which are snails with mineralized scales covering the sides of its foot, have a gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont in their enlarged esophageal glands and diverse epibionts on the surface of their scales. In this study, we report the complete genome sequencing of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont. The endosymbiont genome displays features consistent with ongoing genome reduction such as large proportions of pseudogenes and insertion elements. The genome encodes functions commonly found in deep-sea vent chemoautotrophs such as sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation. Stable carbon isotope (13C)-labeling experiments confirmed the endosymbiont chemoautotrophy. The genome also includes an intact hydrogenase gene cluster that potentially has been horizontally transferred from phylogenetically distant bacteria. Notable findings include the presence and transcription of genes for flagellar assembly, through which proteins are potentially exported from bacterium to the host. Symbionts of snail individuals exhibited extreme genetic homogeneity, showing only two synonymous changes in 19 different genes (13?810 positions in total) determined for 32 individual gastropods collected from a single colony at one time. The extremely low genetic individuality in endosymbionts probably reflects that the stringent symbiont selection by host prevents the random genetic drift in the small population of horizontally transmitted symbiont. This study is the first complete genome analysis of gastropod endosymbiont and offers an opportunity to study genome evolution in a recently evolved endosymbiont. PMID:23924784

  20. Suitability of six lymnaeid snails for infection with Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Reyes, A; Malek, E A

    1987-05-01

    The suitability of Fossaria (Bakerilymnaea) cubensis and Pseudosuccinea columella from Louisiana as intermediate hosts for Fasciola hepatica was compared to P. columella and Stagnicola elodes from Ann Arbor, MI, S. attenuata from Hidalgo, Mexico, Lymnaea gedrosiana from Iran and L. natalensis from Senegal. P. columella from LA was shown to be a more suitable host (51.3% became infected) than F. (B.) cubensis (15.2% and 26.4% of two populations became infected). The infection rate for P. columella from MI, was 50% and for L. gedrosiana was 32.5%, whereas L. natalensis, S. elodes and S. attenuata were refractory. F. (B.) cubensis and P. columella have some degree of suitability as intermediate hosts for F. hepatica under laboratory conditions, but field observations of their habitat in southern LA and characteristic management of cattle indicate that the former snail is more important as an intermediate host in this enzootic area. Tissue sections of suitable snails had few histopathological effects but physical damage caused by rediae was pronounced, mainly in the digestive gland and in the mantle. PMID:3617426

  1. Allying with armored snails: the complete genome of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Satoshi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yohey; Murakami, Shun-ichi; Watanabe, Tamaki; Fujiyoshi, So; Mino, Sayaka; Sawabe, Tomoo; Maeda, Takahiro; Makita, Hiroko; Nemoto, Suguru; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Hiromi; Watsuji, Tomo-o; Takai, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea vents harbor dense populations of various animals that have their specific symbiotic bacteria. Scaly-foot gastropods, which are snails with mineralized scales covering the sides of its foot, have a gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont in their enlarged esophageal glands and diverse epibionts on the surface of their scales. In this study, we report the complete genome sequencing of gammaproteobacterial endosymbiont. The endosymbiont genome displays features consistent with ongoing genome reduction such as large proportions of pseudogenes and insertion elements. The genome encodes functions commonly found in deep-sea vent chemoautotrophs such as sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation. Stable carbon isotope ((13)C)-labeling experiments confirmed the endosymbiont chemoautotrophy. The genome also includes an intact hydrogenase gene cluster that potentially has been horizontally transferred from phylogenetically distant bacteria. Notable findings include the presence and transcription of genes for flagellar assembly, through which proteins are potentially exported from bacterium to the host. Symbionts of snail individuals exhibited extreme genetic homogeneity, showing only two synonymous changes in 19 different genes (13?810 positions in total) determined for 32 individual gastropods collected from a single colony at one time. The extremely low genetic individuality in endosymbionts probably reflects that the stringent symbiont selection by host prevents the random genetic drift in the small population of horizontally transmitted symbiont. This study is the first complete genome analysis of gastropod endosymbiont and offers an opportunity to study genome evolution in a recently evolved endosymbiont. PMID:23924784

  2. Snail Transcription Factor Regulates Neuroendocrine Differentiation in LNCaP Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    McKeithen, Danielle; Graham, Tisheeka; Chung, Leland W. K.; Odero-Marah, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Background Snail transcription factor induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via decreased cell adhesion-associated molecules like E-cadherin, and increased mesenchymal markers like vimentin. We previously established Snail-mediated EMT model utilizing androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. These cells express increased vimentin protein and relocalization of E-cadherin from the cell membrane to the cytosol. Interestingly, Snail transfection in LNCaP cells resulted in cells acquiring a neuroendocrine-like morphology with long neurite-like processes. Methods We tested for expression of neuroendocrine markers neuron specific enolase (NSE) and chromogranin A (CgA) by Western blot analysis, and performed proliferation assays to test for paracrine cell proliferation. Results LNCaP cells transfected with Snail displayed increase in the neuroendocrine markers, NSE and CgA as well as translocation of androgen receptor to the nucleus. LNCaP C-33 cells that have been previously published as a Neuroendocrine Differentiation (NED) model exhibited increased expression levels of Snail protein as compared to LNCaP parental cells. Functionally, conditioned medium from the LNCaP-Snail transfected cells increased proliferation of parental LNCaP and PC-3 cells, which could be abrogated by NSE/CgA siRNA. Additionally, NED in LNCaP-C33 cells or that induced in parental LNCaP cells by serum starvation could be inhibited by knockdown of Snail with siRNA. Conclusion Overall our data provide evidence that Snail transcription factor may promote tumor aggressiveness in the LNCaP cells through multiple processes; induction of EMT may be required to promote migration, while NED may promote tumor proliferation by a paracrine mechanism. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail may prove beneficial in not only abrogating EMT but also NED. PMID:20166136

  3. [Study on the effect of bromoacetamide upon the development of snail eggs].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Guo, Y H

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of bromoacetamide on the development of snail eggs, its effect on inducing diapause of snail eggs at different developmental stages (blastula, gastrula, trochophore and veliger) both at different concentrations of bromoacetamide at the same time and at same concentration at different times. Besides, the oviposition of the snails and the eggs within snails have also been studied. The results are as follows: 1. When the snail eggs were immersed in bromoacetamide at concentrations of 0.034ppm-0.067ppm, deformation of snail eggs appeared from unicellular to gastrula stages, but it was not observed after the trochophore-veliger stages. When the eggs at different stages were separately immersed in bromoacetamide, they were all found deformed. The molluscicidal concentration for inducing deformation of eggs was higher at the trochophore-veliger and metamophotic stages than that at the blastula and gastrula stages (Figs. 1-5). 2. After immersed in bromoacetamide solution, the development of the snail eggs were obviously retarded. The effects varied with different concentrations. Within the same exposure time, the higher the bromoacetamide concentration, the higher the diapause rate. 3. The longer the immersion time, the lower concentration was needed to delay the development and the lower hatching rate was for the eggs at the same or different stages. 4. After treatment with bromoacetamide, the average number of eggs laid by a female snail was reduced. 5. By using 3H-labeled bromoacetamide, it was found that the radioactivity of 3H-labeled bromoacetamide per hundred snail eggs was raised along with the increasing of the molluscicide concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1303331

  4. Experimental and Molecular Study of Cercariae of Clinostomum sp. (Trematoda: Clinostomidae) from Biomphalaria spp. (Mollusca: Planorbidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinto, H A; Caffara, M; Fioravanti, M L; Melo, A L

    2015-02-01

    Despite the large number of reports of species of Clinostomum from vertebrate hosts in South America, studies evaluating the molluscan transmitters of these parasites are scarce. In the present study, clinostomatoid cercariae shed from 0.02% (4/17,485) specimens of Biomphalaria spp., collected at the Pampulha reservoir, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, were used for experimental infection of Poecilia reticulata . Samples of cercariae from molluscs and metacercariae experimentally obtained from fish were subjected to morphological and molecular analyses and compared with species of Clinostomum reported in the Americas. The cercariae and metacercariae, here identified as Clinostomum sp., present general morphology similar to that reported for Clinostomum marginatum , however, from molecular point of view, differ significantly from North American C. marginatum and other species of Clinostomum reported in South America. These results suggest that the diversity of Clinostomum found in Brazil may be underestimated. Additional studies aimed at molecular characterization of South American species of Clinostomum, including the finding of specimens with sequences similar to that reported for C. marginatum in North America are required. PMID:25090192

  5. Spermatheca gland extract of snail (Telescopium telescopium) has wound healing potential: an experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saurabh; Ghosh, Debaki; Biswas, Tuhin Kanti; Dutta, Uttam; Das, Partho; Kundu, Subarna

    2008-12-01

    The effects of spermatheca gland extract of snail (Telescopium telescopium) to promote wound healing were studied in an animal model. The spermatheca gland extract of the snail was used as a topical medicament to treat experimentally created full thickness wounds in 12 rabbits (Oryctologous cuniculus). Wound healing was assessed on the basis of physical, histomorphological, and histochemical changes on days 0, 3, 7, and 14. Statistically significant differences were observed between the groups in all measured parameters. These exciting findings suggest that the data should be further tested in animal models to better understand the potential for wound healing in the spermatheca gland extract of the marine snail. PMID:19019846

  6. Snail2 promotes osteosarcoma cell motility through remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and regulates tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Sharili, Amir-Shaya; Allen, Steve; Smith, Ken; Price, Joanna; McGonnell, Imelda M.

    2013-01-01

    The function of Snail2 in mesenchymal tumors is, to date unknown. Using knockdown and overexpression studies, we show that Snail2 regulates migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells. Knockdown resulted in significantly decreased motility, remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, and loss of cellular protrusions. Over-expression increased motility, formation of actin-rich cellular protrusions, and altered expression of some non-canonical Wnt pathway components whilst decreasing expression of the adhesion molecule OB-cadherin. Unexpectedly, knockdown also resulted in significantly smaller tumors in an in vivo CAM assay. Therefore Snail2 may be a potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention of osteosarcoma. PMID:23352643

  7. The population density effects on the reproductive biology of the snail Bradybaena similaris (Férussac, 1821) (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C S de; Vasconcellos, M C; Pinheiro, J

    2008-05-01

    The influence of population density on some aspects of the reproductive biology of the snail Bradybaena similaris was studied. Molluscs were maintained under 0.2 (isolated), 0.3, 0.6, 1.0, 1.3 and 1.7 snail/m(2) densities. The animals maintained under 0.3 and 0.6 snail/m(2) showed the lowest numbers of eggs laid/snail, being the highest value observed to the 1.7 snail/m(2). The hatching of the snails maintained under 0.3 snail/m(2) density, begun at the 21st day after laying, and the maximum time required to the hatching was 36 days was observed to the eggs came from snails maintained under the densities 0.6, 1.0, 1.3 snail/m(2), respectively. The highest percentage hatchability (55.56%) was observed to isolated snails. The galactogen content in the albumen gland did not seem to accompany the alterations occurred in the reproduction of B. similaris in response to the different population densities. PMID:18660965

  8. Effects of snail size and age on the prevalence and intensity of avian schistosome infection: relating laboratory to field studies.

    PubMed

    Graham, Andrea L

    2003-06-01

    Both the prevalence and intensity of patent infection by avian schistosomes (Trichobilharzia ocellata) increase with increasing size of lymnaeid snails (Stagnicola elrodi) collected in Flathead Lake, Montana. Because the size and age of a snail are positively correlated, snails of different sizes may have experienced differential duration of exposure to and development of infection. Another possibility is that infection itself induces snail gigantism. Each of these possibilities could lead to increased prevalence and intensity of infection among the oldest-largest snails. To decouple size variation from many correlated effects of age and to test for parasite-induced gigantism, laboratory experiments standardized snail size-age-at-infection, exposure history, inoculating dose, and duration of infection. The positive relationship between size and prevalence was eliminated in the laboratory, but the relationship between size and infection intensity remained. Laboratory results thus suggest that infection intensity is related to snail size per se, whereas prevalence in the field is related to snail size only through the correlation between size and age. In addition, under these experimental conditions, infected snails were no larger than uninfected snails, so the patterns observed in the field might not be attributable to gigantism. PMID:12880242

  9. Central role of Snail1 in the regulation of EMT and resistance in cancer: a target for therapeutic intervention

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Snail1 is the founding member of the Snail superfamily of zinc-finger transcription factors, which also includes Snail2 (Slug) and Snail3 (Smuc). The superfamily is involved in cell differentiation and survival, two processes central in cancer research. Encoded by the SNAI1 gene located on human chromosome 20q13.2, Snail1 is composed of 264 amino acids and usually acts as a transcriptional repressor. Phosphorylation and nuclear localization of Snail1, governed by PI3K and Wnt signaling pathways crosstalk, are critical in Snail1’s regulation. Snail1 has a pivotal role in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the process by which epithelial cells acquire a migratory, mesenchymal phenotype, as a result of its repression of E-cadherin. Snail1-induced EMT involves the loss of E-cadherin and claudins with concomitant upregulation of vimentin and fibronectin, among other biomarkers. While essential to normal developmental processes such as gastrulation, EMT is associated with metastasis, the cancer stem cell phenotype, and the regulation of chemo and immune resistance in cancer. Snail1 expression is a common sign of poor prognosis in metastatic cancer, and tumors with elevated Snail1 expression are disproportionately difficult to eradicate by current therapeutic treatments. The significance of Snail1 as a prognostic indicator, its involvement in the regulation of EMT and metastasis, and its roles in both drug and immune resistance point out that Snail1 is an attractive target for tumor growth inhibition and a target for sensitization to cytotoxic drugs. PMID:25084828

  10. Suppression of SCARA5 by Snail1 is essential for EMT-associated cell migration of A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Hu, G; Chen, D; Gong, A-Y; Soori, G S; Dobleman, T J; Chen, X-M

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) might be a key event for cancer progression. The upregulation of Snail1, one of the most extensively studied EMT regulators, has been implicated in cancer metastasis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to identify that Snail1 targets regulating EMT-associated cancer cell migration. Human lung carcinoma A549 cells were treated with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-?1), and EMT-associated phenotypic and functional alterations were monitored. TGF-?1 induced typical EMT-like morphological changes, ‘cadherin switching' and cell migration in A549 cells. TGF-?1 stimulation induced rapid and persistent upregulation of Snail1. Moreover, Snail1 upregulation was required for EMT-associated cell migration. Several metastasis suppressors with putative Snail1-binding sites in their promoters were dramatically repressed in A549 cells during TGF-?1-induced EMT. Gain- and loss-of Snail1 function experiments demonstrated that scavenger receptor class A member 5 (SCARA5) was negatively regulated by Snail1. Importantly, SCARA5 downregulation was essential for EMT-induced migration in A549 cells. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that Snail1 could bind to the E-box elements in SCARA5 promoter, implying that SCARA5 is a direct Snail1 target modulating cancer cell mobility during EMT. In addition, we showed that DNA methyltransferase 1 was physically associated with Snail1 to silence SCARA5 expression with an unidentified DNA methylation-independent mechanism, suggesting the complexity of Snail1-mediated epigenetic regulation. Collectively, our data demonstrated that EMT-regulator Snail1 suppresses the expression of SCARA5 to promote cancer progression, highlighting the possibility to target Snail1 and SCARA5 for cancer treatment. PMID:24061576

  11. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  12. Palatability and chemical defense of Phragmites australis to the marsh periwinkle snail Littoraria irrorata.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Lindsey G; Mossop, Hannah E; Kicklighter, Cynthia E

    2011-08-01

    Coastal marsh habitats are impacted by many disturbances, including habitat destruction, pollution, and the introduction of invasive species. The common reed, Phragmites australis, has been particularly invasive in the mesohaline regions of the Chesapeake Bay, but few studies have investigated its role in trophic interactions with North American marsh consumers. The marsh periwinkle snail Littoraria irrorata is a common grazer in marshes and grazes on the native grass Spartina alterniflora. Whether this snail grazes on Phragmites has not been addressed. We found Spartina leaves to be tougher than those of Phragmites, but despite this, snails consumed significantly more Spartina than Phragmites. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that Phragmites is chemically deterrent to snails by an unknown, moderately polar, compound. Further studies are required to more fully understand the interactions between Phragmites, herbivores, and Spartina, and how they may impact marsh ecosystems. PMID:21691807

  13. Toxicity of imidazolium-based ionic liquids on Physa acuta and the snail antioxidant stress response.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junguo; Dong, Xiangyi; Fang, Qian; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jianji

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, the acute and developmental toxicities of imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) with different alkyl chain lengths, as well as the antioxidant response and lipid peroxidation levels were evaluated in the snail, Physa acuta. Longer alkyl chains corresponded to increased IL toxicity in snails. Long-term IL exposure at lower concentrations inhibited snail growth and reproduction. We also found that IL inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), promoted the activity of catalase (CAT), and increased the glutathione content. However, SOD, GST, and CAT activities returned to control levels after 96 h of recovery. In addition, malondialdehyde levels were increased in treatment groups compared with the control and did not return to control levels even after a recovery period, indicating that ILs induced lipid peroxidation in snail viscera. These results suggest that oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation may be involved in the mechanism of toxicity for ILs. PMID:24497176

  14. High molecular weight lectin isolated from the mucus of the giant African snail Achatina fulica.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigeru; Shimizu, Masahiro; Nagatsuka, Maki; Kitajima, Seiji; Honda, Michiyo; Tsuchiya, Takahide; Kanzawa, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    To understand better the host defense mechanisms of mollusks against pathogens, we examined the anti-microbial activity of mucus from the giant African snail Achatina fulica. Hemagglutination activity of the mucus secreted by the integument of snails inoculated with Escherichia coli was observed to increase and to cause hemagglutination of rabbit red blood cells. Purification of the snail mucus lectin by sequential column chromatography revealed that the relative molecular mass of the lectin was 350 kDa. The hemagglutination activity of the lectin was Ca(2+)-dependent and was inhibited by galactose. Growth arrest tests showed that the lectin did not inhibit bacterial growth, but did induce agglutination of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Tissue distribution analyses using a polyclonal antibody revealed that the lectin was expressed in the tissues of the mantle collar. The lectin isolated from the mucus of the snail appeared to contribute to its innate immunity. PMID:21228483

  15. Bioluminescent signals spatially amplified by wavelength-specific diffusion through the shell of a marine snail

    PubMed Central

    Deheyn, Dimitri D.; Wilson, Nerida G.

    2011-01-01

    Some living organisms produce visible light (bioluminescence) for intra- or interspecific visual communication. Here, we describe a remarkable bioluminescent adaptation in the marine snail Hinea brasiliana. This species produces a luminous display in response to mechanical stimulation caused by encounters with other motile organisms. The light is produced from discrete areas on the snail's body beneath the snail's shell, and must thus overcome this structural barrier to be viewed by an external receiver. The diffusion and transmission efficiency of the shell is greater than a commercial diffuser reference material. Most strikingly, the shell, although opaque and pigmented, selectively diffuses the blue-green wavelength of the species bioluminescence. This diffusion generates a luminous display that is enlarged relative to the original light source. This unusual shell thus allows spatially amplified outward transmission of light communication signals from the snail, while allowing the animal to remain safely inside its hard protective shell. PMID:21159673

  16. Oil, Beer, and Snails -Sustainable Forest Management Means More than Just Wood JUL 20 2010 | ITALY

    E-print Network

    factor supporting the income of forest owners and the welfare of rural populations in such marginal areas 'protoccle'), Pliny (who thought that the snail increased the speed of child delivery and was "a sovereign

  17. Dynamic Chromatin Modification Sustains Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition following Inducible Expression of Snail-1

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Sarah; Zhang, Jianmin; Anderssen, Endre; Black, Josh C.; Wittner, Ben S.; Tajima, Ken; Ting, David T.; Smolen, Gromoslaw A.; Zubrowski, Matthew; Desai, Rushil; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Whetstine, Johnathan R.; Haber, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is thought to contribute to cancer metastasis, but its underlying mechanisms are not well understood. To define early steps in this cellular transformation, we analyzed human mammary epithelial cells with tightly regulated expression of Snail-1, a master regulator of EMT. After Snail-1 induction, epithelial markers were repressed within 6 hr, and mesenchymal genes were induced at 24 hr. Snail-1 binding to its target promoters was transient (6–48 hr) despite continued protein expression, and it was followed by both transient and long-lasting chromatin changes. Pharmacological inhibition of selected histone acetylation and demethylation pathways suppressed the induction as well as the maintenance of Snail-1-mediated EMT. Thus, EMT involves an epigenetic switch that may be prevented or reversed with the use of small-molecule inhibitors of chromatin modifiers. PMID:24360956

  18. Effects of eutrophication and snails on Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) invasion

    E-print Network

    Effects of eutrophication and snails on Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) invasion; accepted in revised form 10 October 2005 Key words: eutrophication, food web, invasive species) run- off, which causes eutrophication. Eutrophication has a myriad of negative consequences, including

  19. THE BIOCIDE TRIBUTYLTIN ALTERS TESTOSTERONE ESTERIFICATION IN MUD SNAILS (ILYANASSA OBSOLETA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Biocide Tributyltin Alters Testosterone Esterification in Mud Snails (Ilyanassa obsoleta) Meredith P. Gooding and Gerald A. LeBlanc Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7633 Tributyltin (TBT...

  20. Survey of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in rats and giant African land snails in Phitsanulok province, Thailand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Apichat Vitta; Raxsina polseela; Seangchai Nateeworanart; Muncharee Tattiyapong

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveTo survey the Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) or the rat lungworm in a rat, definitive host, and in a giant African land snail (Achatina fulica), the intermediate host, in Phitsanulok, Thailand.

  1. Proteomic profile of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails upon infection with the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    E-print Network

    Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Tesana, Smarn; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Laha, Thewarach; Mulvenna, Jason; Grams, Rudi; Loukas, Alex; Gallego, Javier Sotillo

    2014-10-02

    parasite infections [16-19], and snail lectins and opsonins 91 have also been shown to impact on trematode infections [20-23]. 92 93 The biological interactions between trematodes and their intermediate hosts are 94 crucial events that determine...

  2. Bioaccumulative and conchological assessment of heavy metal transfer in a soil-plant-snail food chain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) can pose serious threats to environmental health because they tend to bioaccumulate in terrestrial ecosystems. We investigated under field conditions the transfer of these heavy metals in a soil-plant-snail food chain in Banat area, Romania. The main goal of this paper was to assess the Roman snail (Helix pomatia) usefulness in environmental monitoring as bioindicator of heavy metal accumulation. Eight sampling sites, selected by different history of heavy metal (HM) exposure, were chosen to be sampled for soil, nettle leaves, and newly matured snails. This study also aimed to identify the putative effects of HM accumulation in the environment on phenotypic variability in selected shell features, which included shell height (SH), relative shell height (RSH), and whorl number (WN). Results Significantly higher amounts of HMs were accumulated in snail hepatopancreas and not in foot. Cu, Zn, and Cd have biomagnified in the snail body, particularly in the hepatopancreas. In contrast, Pb decreased when going up into the food chain. Zn, Cd, and Pb correlated highly with each other at all levels of the investigated food chain. Zn and Pb exhibited an effective soil–plant transfer, whereas in the snail body only foot Cu concentration was correlated with that in soil. There were significant differences among sampling sites for WN, SH, and RSH when compared with reference snails. WN was strongly correlated with Cd and Pb concentrations in nettle leaves but not with Cu and Zn. SH was independent of HM concentrations in soil, snail hepatopancreas, and foot. However, SH correlated negatively with nettle leaves concentrations for each HM except Cu. In contrast, RSH correlated significantly only with Pb concentration in hepatopancreas. Conclusions The snail hepatopancreas accumulates high amounts of HMs, and therefore, this organ can function as a reliable biomarker for tracking HM bioavailability in soil. Long-term exposure to HMs via contaminated food might influence the variability of shell traits in snail populations. Therefore, our results highlight the Roman snail (Helix pomatia) potential to be used in environmental monitoring studies as bioindicator of HM pollution. PMID:22703871

  3. Pesticide concentrations in snail kite eggs and nestlings in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sykes, P.W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    From 1970-1977, unhatched snail kite eggs and young that were found dead at nests in Florida were analyzed by gas chromatography for residues of organochlorine pollutants. The 1970 and 1974 material showed measurable amounts of p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT, and dieldrin. Dieldrin and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) residues were less than 0.1 ppm in the eggs and were detected in only one sample of muscle tissue at 0.11 ppm. Concentrations in ppm wet weight of p,p'-DDE, p,p' DDD, p,p'-DDT, dieldrin, and PCB for two samples of muscle and three of brain tissue (all 1977 material) were not detected at the limit of quantification (0.05 ppm).

  4. The Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Factor SNAIL Paradoxically Enhances Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Unternaehrer, Juli J.; Zhao, Rui; Kim, Kitai; Cesana, Marcella; Powers, John T.; Ratanasirintrawoot, Sutheera; Onder, Tamer; Shibue, Tsukasa; Weinberg, Robert A.; Daley, George Q.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) entails a mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). While attempting to dissect the mechanism of MET during reprogramming, we observed that knockdown (KD) of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) factor SNAI1 (SNAIL) paradoxically reduced, while overexpression enhanced, reprogramming efficiency in human cells and in mouse cells, depending on strain. We observed nuclear localization of SNAI1 at an early stage of fibroblast reprogramming and using mouse fibroblasts expressing a knockin SNAI1-YFP reporter found cells expressing SNAI1 reprogrammed at higher efficiency. We further demonstrated that SNAI1 binds the let-7 promoter, which may play a role in reduced expression of let-7 microRNAs, enforced expression of which, early in the reprogramming process, compromises efficiency. Our data reveal an unexpected role for the EMT factor SNAI1 in reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotency. PMID:25316190

  5. Copper toxicity to the fresh water snail, Lymnaea luteola

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, N.M.; Rao, P.V.

    1987-07-01

    Haemocyanins are found in arthropoda and mollusca and show a copper content characteristic for each phylum. Heavy metal accumulation by mollusks is widely reported. Approximately one third of the enzymes either required addition of a metal ion as a cofactor in order to exhibit maximum activity or contained a slightly bound metal ion which appeared to be involved in the catalytic process. Copper is the only metal which has been detected in significant amounts in amino oxidase. The present study is designed to evaluate the influence of such copper, which is of such common occurrence in biological material, on some of the lipolytic enzymes of fresh water pulmonate snail, Lymnaea luteola when added to ambient medium. The present study also highlights the possible detoxification mechanism prevailing in this fresh water mollusk.

  6. Solar radio-transmitters on snail kites in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, N.F.R.; Beissinger, S.R.; Fuller, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness and safety of one- and two-stage solar radio-transmitters in tracking the movements and survival of adult and fledgling Snail Kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis) were evaluated between 1979 and 1983 in southern Florida. Transmitters were attached to birds with back-pack arrangements using teflon ribbon straps. Accessory plastic shields minimized feather coverage of the solar cells. Intact transmitters were seen on birds up to 47 mo after installation. Operating lives ranged from 8 to 21 mo for one-stage, and 10 to 14 mo for two-stage transmitters. Because survival of adult and nestling radio-marked kites was high, we conclude that our transmitter-attachment method had little effect on the birds.

  7. Associative learning phenomena in the snail (Helix aspersa): conditioned inhibition.

    PubMed

    Acebes, Félix; Solar, Patricia; Moris, Joaquín; Loy, Ignacio

    2012-03-01

    Two experiments using garden snails (Helix aspersa) showed conditioned inhibition using both retardation and summation tests. Conditioned inhibition is a procedure by which a stimulus becomes a predictor of the absence of a relevant event--the unconditioned stimulus (US). Typically, conditioned inhibition consists of pairings between an initially neutral conditioned stimulus, CS(2), and an effective excitatory conditioned stimulus, CS(1), in the absence of the US. Retardation and summation tests are required in order to confirm that CS(2) has acquired inhibitory properties. Conditioned inhibition has previously been found in invertebrates; however, these demonstrations did not use the retardation and summation tests required for an unambiguous demonstration of inhibition, allowing for alternative explanations. The implications of our results for the fields of comparative cognition and invertebrate physiological models of learning are discussed. PMID:21877176

  8. [Occurrence of Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 (Mollusca, Gastropoda) in Brazil: intermediate snail host of angiostrongyliasis].

    PubMed

    Teles, H M; Vaz, J F; Fontes, L R; Domingos, M de F

    1997-06-01

    Achatina fulica, the intermediate snail host of angiostrongyliasis and also an agricultural pest, is being bred in Brazil for human consumption as "escargot". The snail has escaped from its artificial breeding sites and its dispersal in Itariri country, State of S. Paulo, is reported here for the first time. A. fulica is a transmitter of the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis, nematode which causes meningoencephalic angiostrongyliasis; the risks of human contamination are commented on. PMID:9515269

  9. Refuge function of marine algae complicates selection in an intertidal snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petri Kemppainen; Solveig van Nes; Christofer Ceder; Kerstin Johannesson

    2005-01-01

    Species with restricted gene flow often show trait-shifts from one type of environment to another. In those rock-dwelling marine gastropods that lack larval dispersal, size generally decreases in wave-exposed habitats reducing risk of dislodgement, while increases in less exposed habitats to resist crab-crushing. In Littorina fabalis, however, snails of moderately exposed shores are generally much larger (11–14 mm) than snails of

  10. Expression of transcription factors snail, slug, and twist in human bladder carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qinchao Yu; Kejun Zhang; Xinsheng Wang; Xiangping Liu; Zemi Zhang

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Slug, Snail, and Twist are transcription factors that regulate the expression of tumor suppressors such as E-cadherin. In this study, we aimed to examine the expression of these transcription factors in human bladder carcinoma. METHODS: We first investigated expression of Slug, Snail, Twist and E-cadherin in five bladder Carcinoma cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting.

  11. The effects of wetland habitat structure on Florida apple snail density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karunaratne, L.B.; Darby, P.C.; Bennetts, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    Wetlands often support a variety of juxtaposed habitat patches (e.g., grass-, shrub- or tree-dominated) differentially suited to support the inhabiting fauna. The proportion of available habitat types has been affected by human activity and consequently has contributed to degrading habitat quality for some species. The Florida apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) has drawn attention as a critical prey item for wetlands wildlife and as an indicator of wetlands restoration success in peninsular Florida, USA. An apparent contradiction has evolved wherein this species appears intolerant of drying events, but these disturbances may be necessary to maintain suitable habitat structure for apple snails. We recently reported that assertions regarding intolerance to dry downs in this species were inaccurate. Here, we compared snail density in habitats with (wet prairie) and without (slough) emergent macrophytes, as well as evaluating the effects of structural attributes within the broad wet prairie habitat type. Snail densities were greater in prairies relative to sloughs (??2= 12.90, df=1, P=0.0003), often by a factor of two to three. Within wet prairie habitats, we found greater snail densities in Panicum hemitomon as compared to Eleocharis cellulosa (??2=31.45, df=1, P=0.0001). Significantly fewer snails were found in dense E. cellulosa as compared to habitats with lower stem density (??2= 10.73, df=1, P=0.011). Our results indicate that wet prairie habitat supports greater snail densities than nymphaea-dominatd slough. Our results have implications for wetlands water management in that continuous inundation has been shown to convert wet prairie to slough habitat, and we suggest this should be avoided in support of apple snails and their predators. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  12. Shading decreases the abundance of the herbivorous California horn snail, Cerithidea californica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorda, Julio; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the intertidal zone in estuaries of California, USA and Baja California, Mexico is covered with vascular vegetation. Shading by these vascular plants influences abiotic and biotic processes that shape benthic community assemblages. We present data on the effects of shading on the California horn snail, Cerithidea californica. This species is important because it is the most common benthic macrofaunal species in these systems and acts as an obligate intermediate host of several species of rematode parasites that infect several other species. Using observational and experimental studies, we found a negative effect of shade on the distribution and abundance of the California horn snail. We hypothesized that shading reduces the abundance of the epipelic diatoms that the snails feeds on, causing snails to leave haded areas. We observed a negative relationship between vascular plant cover, sub-canopy light levels, and snail density in Mugu Lagoon. Then we experimentally manipulated light regimes, by clipping vegetation and adding shade structures, and found higher snail densities at higher light levels. In Goleta Slough, we isolated the effect of shade from vegetation by documenting a negative relationship between the shade created by two bridges and diatom and snail densities. We also found that snails moved the greatest distances over shaded channel banks compared to unshaded channel banks. Further, we documented the effect of water depth and channel bank orientation on shading in this system. An additional effect of shading is the reduction of temperature, providing an alternative explanation for some of our results. These results broaden our knowledge of how variation in the light environment influences the ecology of estuarine ecosystems.

  13. The Giant Snail Achatina fulica as a Candidate Species for Advanced Bioregenerative Life Support Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbitskaya, Olga; Manukovsky, Nickolay; Kovalev, Vladimir

    Maintenance of crew health is of paramount importance for long duration space missions. Weight loss, bone and calcium loss, increased exposure to radiation and oxidative stress are critical concerns that need to be alleviated. Rational nutrition is a resource for mitigating the influence of unfavorable conditions. The insufficiency of vegetarian diet has been examined by the Japanese, Chinese and U.S. developers of bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). Hence, inclusion of animals such as silkworm in BLSS looks justified. The giant snail is currently under studying as a source of animal food and a species of reducing waste in BLSS. An experimental system to conduct cultivation of giant snail was developed. It was established that there are some reasons to use the giant snails in BLSS. It could be a source of delicious meat. A. fulica is capable of consuming a wide range of feedstuffs including plant residues. Cultivation of snail in the limited volume does not demand the big expenditures of labor. The production of crude edible biomass and protein of A. fulica was 60±15 g and 7±1.8 g respectively per 1 kg of consumed forage (fresh salad leaves, root and leafy tops of carrot). To satisfy daily animal protein needs (30-35 g) a crewman has to consume 260-300 g of snail meat. To produce such amount of snail protein it takes to use 4.3-5.0 kg of plant forage daily. The nutritional composition of A. fulica whole bodies (without shell) and a meal prepared in various ways was quantitatively determined. Protein, carbohydrate, fat acid and ash content percentages were different among samples prepared in various ways. The protein content was highest (68 %) in the dry sample washed with CH3 COOH solution. Taking into consideration the experimental results a conceptual configuration of BLSS with inclusion of giant snail was developed and mass flow rates between compartments were calculated. Keywords: animal food; protein; giant snail; BLSS; conceptual configuration.

  14. Novel Snail1 Target Proteins in Human Colon Cancer Identified by Proteomic Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    María Jesús Larriba; Juan Casado-Vela; Natalia Pendás-Franco; Raúl Peña; Antonio García de Herreros; María Teresa Berciano; Miguel Lafarga; J. Ignacio Casal; Alberto Muñoz; Juan Valcarcel

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundThe transcription factor Snail1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process responsible for the acquisition of invasiveness during tumorigenesis. Several transcriptomic studies have reported Snail1-regulated genes in different cell types, many of them involved in cell adhesion. However, only a few studies have used proteomics as a tool for the characterization of proteins mediating EMT.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsWe identified by proteomic analysis using

  15. Differential regulation of Snail by hypoxia and hyperglycemia in human proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Sumual, Siska; Saad, Sonia; Tang, Owen; Yong, Rachel; McGinn, Stella; Chen, Xin-Ming; Pollock, Carol A

    2010-10-01

    The centrality of the transcriptional regulator Snail in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation (EMT), known to occur in models of diabetic nephropathy, has not been established. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFbeta1) is induced in diabetic nephropathy and induces both Snail and EMT. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are known to induce Snail, independent of TGFbeta1. Notch induction is integral to Snail induction and EMT in tumour cells, but its role in the kidney is unknown. The present study was undertaken to determine the upstream regulators of Snail in the kidney in high glucose and hypoxic conditions. HK-2 cells were cultured in normoxic, hypoxic, high glucose and combined hypoxic/high glucose conditions. The expression of HIF1alpha, NotchIC, Snail, Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (Loxl2), and Hairy and Enhancer Split-1 (Hes1) were measured. We found that hypoxia increased HIF1alpha expression; however, concurrent exposure to high glucose blunted this effect. A similar pattern was observed in Lox12 expression, suggesting that Loxl2 was downstream of HIF1alpha, which was confirmed using siRNA techniques. Snail was upregulated by hypoxia and high glucose and in combination the effect was additive, suggesting independent upstream activation pathways by the two stimuli. Hes1 was upregulated by high glucose and to a lesser extent by hypoxia, but the effect of the combined stimuli was no greater than that observed with high glucose alone. NotchIC was downregulated by both hypoxia and high glucose, and in combination the effect was additive. Therefore, this study suggests that hypoxia and high glucose induce Snail expression through distinct pathways, independent of Notch signalling. PMID:20620220

  16. The Effect of Aquatic Plant Abundance on Shell Crushing Resistance in a Freshwater Snail

    PubMed Central

    Chaves-Campos, Johel; Coghill, Lyndon M.; García de León, Francisco J.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the shell material in snails is composed of calcium carbonate but the organic shell matrix determines the properties of calcium carbonate crystals. It has been shown that the deposition of calcium carbonate is affected by the ingestion of organic compounds. We hypothesize that organic compounds not synthesized by the snails are important for shell strength and must be obtained from the diet. We tested this idea indirectly by evaluating whether the abundance of the organic matter that snails eat is related to the strength of their shells. We measured shell crushing resistance in the snail Mexipyrgus churinceanus and the abundance of the most common aquatic macrophyte, the water lily Nymphaea ampla, in ten bodies of water in the valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. We used stable isotopes to test the assumption that these snails feed on water lily organic matter. We also measured other factors that can affect crushing resistance, such as the density of crushing predators, snail density, water pH, and the concentration of calcium and phosphorus in the water. The isotope analysis suggested that snails assimilate water lily organic matter that is metabolized by sediment bacteria. The variable that best explained the variation in crushing resistance found among sites was the local abundance of water lilies. We propose that the local amount of water lily organic matter provides organic compounds important in shell biomineralization, thus determining crushing resistance. Hence, we propose that a third trophic level could be important in the coevolution of snail defensive traits and predatory structures. PMID:22970206

  17. Molecular identification of first putative aquaporins in snails.

    PubMed

    Pie?kowska, Joanna R; Kosicka, Ewa; Wojtkowska, Ma?gorzata; Kmita, Hanna; Lesicki, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs), also known as water channel proteins, are members of a large protein family termed Major Intrinsic Proteins (MIP). The mammalian AQPs have been most comprehensively described, while knowledge about AQPs in invertebrates is limited mainly to insects. Not a single AQP protein has been described in snails to date. Consequently, we decided to search for the proteins in gastropod representatives, namely Lymnaea stagnalis, Catascopia occulta, and Stagnicola palustris (Mollusca; Gastropoda; Pulmonata; Lymnaeidae). Using the molecular approach, we identified L. stagnalis, C. occulta, and S. palustris open reading frames (ORFs) showing homology to AQP genes available in GenBank database, and characterized the encoded proteins, referred to as LsAQP1, CoAQP1, and SpAQP1, respectively. The putative snail aquaporins contain 299 amino acids, have a molecular mass of about 32 kDa, display the general AQP topology and three-dimensional structure congruent with orthodox AQPs, i.e., water-specific ones. Due to high levels of similarity in their characteristics, LsAQP1 was chosen for further studies, as the obtained results were supposed to be applicable for CoAQP1 and SpAQP1. Expression analysis revealed the presence of LsAQP1 transcript in the digestive tract, the cerebral ganglia, the kidney, the reproductive system, and the foot, suggesting that LsAQP1 as well as CoAQP1 and SpAQP1 are ubiquitous proteins and may play important roles in many essential water transport processes. The role appears to be confirmed by results of the yeast growth complementation assay pointing at functionality of LsAQP1. Thus, the obtained results support the AQP expression in gastropod tissues for the first time. PMID:24445747

  18. Are Sick Individuals Weak Competitors? Competitive Ability of Snails Parasitized by a Gigantism-Inducing Trematode

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Otto; Karvonen, Anssi; Kuosa, Marja; Haataja, Maarit; Jokela, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Parasitized individuals are often expected to be poor competitors because they are weakened by infections. Many trematode species, however, although extensively exploiting their mollusc hosts, also induce gigantism (increased host size) by diverting host resources towards growth instead of reproduction. In such systems, alternatively to reduced competitive ability due to negative effects of parasitism on host performance, larger size could allow more efficient resource acquisition and thus increase the relative competitive ability of host individuals. We addressed this hypothesis by testing the effect of a trematode parasite Diplostomum pseudospathaceum on the competitive ability of its snail host Lymnaea stagnalis. We experimentally examined the growth of snails kept in pairs in relation to their infection status and intensity of resource competition (i.e. food availability). We found that parasitized snails grew faster and their reproduction was reduced compared to unparasitized individuals indicating parasite-induced gigantism. However, growth of the snails was faster when competing with parasitized individuals compared to unparasitized snails indicating reduced competitive ability due to parasitism. The latter effect, however, was relatively weak suggesting that the effects of the parasite on snail physiology may partly override each other in determining competitive ability. PMID:24205383

  19. Snail2/Slug cooperates with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) to regulate neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Tien, Chih-Liang; Jones, Amanda; Wang, Hengbin; Gerigk, Magda; Nozell, Susan; Chang, Chenbei

    2015-02-15

    Neural crest cells arise from the border of the neural plate and epidermal ectoderm, migrate extensively and differentiate into diverse cell types during vertebrate embryogenesis. Although much has been learnt about growth factor signals and gene regulatory networks that regulate neural crest development, limited information is available on how epigenetic mechanisms control this process. In this study, we show that Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) cooperates with the transcription factor Snail2/Slug to modulate neural crest development in Xenopus. The PRC2 core components Eed, Ezh2 and Suz12 are expressed in the neural crest cells and are required for neural crest marker expression. Knockdown of Ezh2, the catalytic subunit of PRC2 for histone H3K27 methylation, results in defects in neural crest specification, migration and craniofacial cartilage formation. EZH2 interacts directly with Snail2, and Snail2 fails to expand the neural crest domains in the absence of Ezh2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that Snail2 regulates EZH2 occupancy and histone H3K27 trimethylation levels at the promoter region of the Snail2 target E-cadherin. Our results indicate that Snail2 cooperates with EZH2 and PRC2 to control expression of the genes important for neural crest specification and migration during neural crest development. PMID:25617436

  20. Doxorubicin enhances Snail/LSD1-mediated PTEN suppression in a PARP1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yiwei; Kang, Tiebang; Zhou, Binhua P

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Snail not only functions as a master regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), but also mediates cell proliferation and survival. While previous studies have showed that Snail protects tumor cells from apoptosis through transcriptional repression of PTEN, the specific mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that Snail cooperates with LSD1 to repress PTEN in a PARP1-dependent manner. Upon doxorubicin treatment, Snail becomes tightly associated with PARP1 through its pADPr-binding motif and is subject to poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. This modification can enhance Snail-LSD1 interaction and promote the recruitment of LSD1 to PTEN promoter, where LSD1 removes methylation on histone H3 lysine 4 for transcription repression. Furthermore, treatment of tumor cells with PARP1 inhibitor AZD2281 can compromise doxorubicin-induced PTEN suppression and enhance the inhibitory effect of doxorubicin. Together, we proposed a tentative drug-resistant mechanism through which tumor cells defend themselves against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PARP1 inhibitors in combination with DNA damaging reagents might represent a promising treatment strategy targeting tumors with over-activated Snail and LSD1. PMID:24675890

  1. Bacterial diversity in different regions of gastrointestinal tract of Giant African snail (Achatina fulica).

    PubMed

    Pawar, Kiran D; Banskar, Sunil; Rane, Shailendra D; Charan, Shakti S; Kulkarni, Girish J; Sawant, Shailesh S; Ghate, Hemant V; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2012-12-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of invasive land snail Achatina fulica is known to harbor metabolically active bacterial communities. In this study, we assessed the bacterial diversity in the different regions of GI tract of Giant African snail, A. fulica by culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. Five 16S rRNA gene libraries from different regions of GI tract of active snails indicated that sequences affiliated to phylum ?-Proteobacteria dominated the esophagus, crop, intestine, and rectum libraries, whereas sequences affiliated to Tenericutes dominated the stomach library. On phylogenetic analysis, 30, 27, 9, 27, and 25 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from esophagus, crop, stomach, intestine, and rectum libraries were identified, respectively. Estimations of the total bacterial diversity covered along with environmental cluster analysis showed highest bacterial diversity in the esophagus and lowest in the stomach. Thirty-three distinct bacterial isolates were obtained, which belonged to 12 genera of two major bacterial phyla namely ?-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Among these, Lactococcus lactis and Kurthia gibsonii were the dominant bacteria present in all GI tract regions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis indicated significant differences in bacterial load in different GI tract regions of active and estivating snails. The difference in the bacterial load between the intestines of active and estivating snail was maximum. Principal component analysis (PCA) of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism suggested that bacterial community structure changes only in intestine when snail enters estivation state. PMID:23233413

  2. Bacterial diversity in different regions of gastrointestinal tract of Giant African Snail (Achatina fulica)

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kiran D; Banskar, Sunil; Rane, Shailendra D; Charan, Shakti S; Kulkarni, Girish J; Sawant, Shailesh S; Ghate, Hemant V; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of invasive land snail Achatina fulica is known to harbor metabolically active bacterial communities. In this study, we assessed the bacterial diversity in the different regions of GI tract of Giant African snail, A. fulica by culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. Five 16S rRNA gene libraries from different regions of GI tract of active snails indicated that sequences affiliated to phylum ?-Proteobacteria dominated the esophagus, crop, intestine, and rectum libraries, whereas sequences affiliated to Tenericutes dominated the stomach library. On phylogenetic analysis, 30, 27, 9, 27, and 25 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from esophagus, crop, stomach, intestine, and rectum libraries were identified, respectively. Estimations of the total bacterial diversity covered along with environmental cluster analysis showed highest bacterial diversity in the esophagus and lowest in the stomach. Thirty-three distinct bacterial isolates were obtained, which belonged to 12 genera of two major bacterial phyla namely ?-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Among these, Lactococcus lactis and Kurthia gibsonii were the dominant bacteria present in all GI tract regions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis indicated significant differences in bacterial load in different GI tract regions of active and estivating snails. The difference in the bacterial load between the intestines of active and estivating snail was maximum. Principal component analysis (PCA) of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism suggested that bacterial community structure changes only in intestine when snail enters estivation state. PMID:23233413

  3. Small mammals cause non-trophic effects on habitat and associated snails in a native system.

    PubMed

    Huntzinger, Mikaela; Karban, Richard; Maron, John L

    2011-12-01

    Legacy effects occur when particular species or their interactions with others have long-lasting impacts, and they are increasingly recognized as important determinants of ecological processes. However, when such legacy effects have been explicitly explored, they most often involve the long-term direct effects of species on systems, as opposed to the indirect effects. Here, we explore how a legacy of small mammal exclusion on the abundance of a shrub, bush lupine (Lupinus arboreus), influences the abundance of a native land snail (Helminthoglypta arrosa) in coastal prairie and dune habitats in central California. The factors that limit populations of land snails are very poorly known despite the threats to the persistence of this group of species. In grasslands, prior vole (Microtus californicus) exclusion created long-lasting gains in bush lupine abundance, mediated through the seedbank, and was associated with increased snail numbers (10×) compared to control plots where mammals were never excluded. Similar plots in dune habitat showed no difference in snail numbers due to previous mammal exclusion. We tested whether increased competition for food, increased predation, and/or lower desiccation explained the decline in snail numbers in plots with reduced lupine cover. Tethering experiments supported the hypothesis that voles can have long-lasting impacts as ecosystem engineers, reducing woody lupine habitat required for successful aestivation by snails. These results add to a growing list of studies that have found that non-trophic interactions can be limiting to invertebrate consumers. PMID:21691854

  4. Impact of invasive apple snails on the functioning and services of natural and managed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, Finbarr G.; Stuart, Alexander M.; Kudavidanage, Enoka P.

    2014-01-01

    At least 14 species of apple snail (Ampullariidae) have been released to water bodies outside their native ranges; however, less than half of these species have become widespread or caused appreciable impacts. We review evidence for the impact of apple snails on natural and managed wetlands focusing on those studies that have elucidated impact mechanisms. Significant changes in wetland ecosystems have been noted in regions where the snails are established: Two species in particular (Pomacea canaliculata and Pomacea maculata) have become major pests of aquatic crops, including rice, and caused enormous increases in molluscicide use. Invasive apple snails have also altered macrophyte community structure in natural and managed wetlands through selective herbivory and certain apple snail species can potentially shift the balance of freshwater ecosystems from clear water (macrophyte dominated) to turbid (plankton dominated) states by depleting densities of native aquatic plants. Furthermore, the introductions of some apple snail species have altered benthic community structure either directly, through predation, or indirectly, through exploitation competition or as a result of management actions. To date much of the evidence for these impacts has been based on correlations, with few manipulative field or mesocosm experiments. Greater attention to impact monitoring is required, and, for Asia in particular, a landscape approach to impact management that includes both natural and managed-rice wetlands is recommended.

  5. Species- and size-specific infection of snails by Cyclocoelum mutabile (Digenea: Cyclocoelidae).

    PubMed

    McKindsey, C W; McLaughlin, J D

    1995-08-01

    Infectivity of Cyclocoelum mutabile miracidia to 9 species and up to 4 size classes of pulmonate snails at 14, 16, and 20 C was studied under laboratory conditions. Of the 9 species examined, 6 (Stagnicola elodes, Lymnaea stagnalis, Gyraulus parvus, Gyraulus circumstriatus, Promenetus exacuous, and Armiger crista) were highly susceptible (infection success > or = 25%), 2 (Physa jennessi and Helisoma trivolvis) had low susceptibility (infection success < 25%, > 0), and 1 (Physa gyrina) was not susceptible to infection. Within highly susceptible species, snail size was negatively related to susceptibility and temperature had variable effects. Infection success was not affected by temperature or snail size in species with low susceptibility. Production of cercariae was negatively correlated with susceptibility among snails of different sizes and species, but was not influenced by snail size for a given species. Among species, metacercariae production was typically higher in lymnaeids than in either planorbids or physids. Results of experiments where miracidia were provided with a choice of 2 different snails suggest that they do not discriminate between species with high and low susceptibility. PMID:7623190

  6. Parasites alter host phenotype and may create a new ecological niche for snail hosts

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Osamu; Kuris, Armand M; Torchin, Mark E; Hechinger, Ryan F; Chiba, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    By modifying the behaviour and morphology of hosts, parasites may strongly impact host individuals, populations and communities. We examined the effects of a common trematode parasite on its snail host, Batillaria cumingi (Batillariidae). This widespread snail is usually the most abundant invertebrate in salt marshes and mudflats of the northeastern coast of Asia. More than half (52.6%, n=1360) of the snails in our study were infected. We found that snails living in the lower intertidal zone were markedly larger and exhibited different shell morphology than those in the upper intertidal zone. The large morphotypes in the lower tidal zone were all infected by the trematode, Cercaria batillariae (Heterophyidae). We used a transplant experiment, a mark-and-recapture experiment and stable carbon isotope ratios to reveal that snails infected by the trematode move to the lower intertidal zone, resume growth after maturation and consume different resources. By simultaneously changing the morphology and behaviour of individual hosts, this parasite alters the demographics and potentially modifies resource use of the snail population. Since trematodes are common and often abundant in marine and freshwater habitats throughout the world, their effects potentially alter food webs in many systems. PMID:16777719

  7. A repetitive DNA probe for the sensitive detection of Fasciola hepatica infected snails.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, R M; Dame, J B; Reddy, G R; Courtney, C H

    1995-05-01

    Epizootiologic studies on F. hepatica frequently use microscopic techniques for the detection of infected snails, however, the poor efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity associated with these techniques limit their usefulness. A DNA-based test for the identification of snails infected with larval stages of F. hepatica would solve these problems and enable a level of detection accuracy previously unavailable. We have cloned and sequenced a 124 bp fragment of repetitive DNA from F. hepatica which hybridizes specifically with DNA of F. hepatica but not with DNA of its snail intermediate hosts Fossaria cubensis and Pseudosuccinea columella, or with DNA of Fascioloides magna and Paramphistomum liorchis, ruminant trematodes which share the same intermediate host and same enzootic range as F. hepatica. Using this 124 bp fragment as a probe, infection in snails was detected immediately following miracidial penetration, thus a sensitivity equivalent to the minimum biologic unit of the parasite was achieved. This 124 bp repeated sequence belongs to a large family of 124 bp repeats that share a high level of sequence identity and constitute approximately 15% of the F. hepatica genome. We also report here the development of a quick and inexpensive DNA extraction protocol for use in field-collected snails. Thus, we have developed both a highly sensitive and specific DNA probe and a means to use the probe in a large epizootiologic study of F. hepatica where thousands of field-collected snails need to be assayed for infection. PMID:7635638

  8. Integrating nonindigenous aquatic plant control with protection of snail kite nests in Florida.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, J A; Smith, H T; Thayer, D D

    2001-07-01

    The endangered snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) feeds primarily on the freshwater apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) in Florida. The nonindigenous, floating water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) impede kites from finding snails. Effective control of these aquatic plants in the littoral zone of central and south Florida lakes benefits kites by maintaining open foraging habitat. However, incidental herbicide spraying of nesting substrates result in nest collapse when kites breed in nonwoody, emergent plants [cattail (Typha spp.) and giant bulrush (Scirpus validus)] in the outer littoral zone during lower lake levels. Many endangered species recovery plans and their implementation have experienced problems due to inaction and/or noncooperation by various governmental agencies and their personnel. Herein, we describe the development and implementation of a buffer zone strategy to prevent secondary impacts from an aquatic plant control program to snail kites nesting on lakes in central and south Florida. A strategy was jointly developed by personnel of five state and federal agencies to control herbicide application near kite nesting areas during the normal breeding season. Although requiring various modifications during its implementation, this cooperative effort successfully integrated aquatic plant control objectives with snail kite conservation on Lake Okeechobee during 1988. The program was expanded the following year to lakes Kissimmee and Tohopekaliga. Since the implementation of the snail kite impact preclusion program, no nest loss was attributed to incidental herbicide applications on lakes Okeechobee, Kissimmee, and Tohopekaliga. PMID:11436998

  9. Foraging and refuge use by a pond snail: Effects of physiological state, predators, and resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojdak, Jeremy M.

    2009-09-01

    The costs and benefits of anti-predator behavioral responses should be functions of the actual risk of predation, the availability of the prey's resources, and the physiological state of the prey. For example, a food-stressed individual risks starvation when hiding from predators, while a well-fed organism can better afford to hide (and pay the cost of not foraging). Similarly, the benefits of resource acquisition are probably highest for the prey in the poorest state, while there may be diminishing returns for prey nearing satiation. Empirical studies of state-dependent behavior are only beginning, however, and few studies have investigated interactions between all three potentially important factors. Here I present the results of a laboratory experiment where I manipulated the physiological state of pond snails ( Physa gyrina), the abundance of algal resources, and predation cues ( Belostoma flumineum waterbugs consuming snails) in a full factorial design to assess their direct effects on snail behavior and indirect effects on algal biomass. On average, snails foraged more when resources were abundant, and when predators were absent. Snails also foraged more when previously exposed to physiological stress. Snails spent more time at the water's surface (a refuging behavior) in the presence of predation cues on average, but predation, resource levels, and prey state had interactive effects on refuge use. There was a consistent positive trait-mediated indirect effect of predators on algal biomass, across all resource levels and prey states.

  10. The biocide tributyltin reduces the accumulation of testosterone as fatty acid esters in the mud snail (Ilyanassa obsoleta).

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Meredith P; Wilson, Vickie S; Folmar, Leroy C; Marcovich, Dragoslav T; LeBlanc, Gerald A

    2003-01-01

    Imposex, the development of male sex characteristics by female gonochoristic snails, has been documented globally and is causally associated with exposure to the ubiquitous environmental contaminant tributyltin (TBT). Elevated testosterone levels in snails also are associated with TBT, and direct exposure to testosterone has been shown to cause imposex. We discovered previously that the mud snail (Ilyanassa obsoleta)biotransforms and retains excess testosterone primarily as fatty acid esters. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TBT interferes with the esterification of testosterone, resulting in the elevated free (unesterified) testosterone levels associated with imposex. Exposure of snails to environmentally relevant concentrations of TBT (> or = 1.0 ng/L as tin) significantly increased the incidence of imposex. Total (free + esterified) testosterone levels in snails were not altered by TBT; however, free testosterone levels increased with increasing exposure concentration of TBT. TBT-exposed snails were given [14C

  11. WWamide-1, -2 and -3: novel neuromodulatory peptides isolated from ganglia of the African giant snail, Achatina fulica.

    PubMed

    Minakata, H; Ikeda, T; Muneoka, Y; Kobayashi, M; Nomoto, K

    1993-05-24

    Three novel neuropeptides, isolated from ganglia of the African giant snail, Achatina fulica, were named WWamide-1, -2 and -3. These substances were biologically active heptapeptide amides with a Trp residue at both the N- and C-termini. WWamide-1, which displayed an inhibitory activity on a central neuron of the snail, exhibited peripherally modulatory effects on muscular contractions of not only the gut and other tissues of the snail but also certain tissues of other molluscs. PMID:8495720

  12. Comparison of snail density, standing stock, and body size between Caribbean karst wetlands and other freshwater ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clifton B. RuehlJoel; Joel C. Trexler

    2011-01-01

    Synthesizing data from multiple studies generates hypotheses about factors that affect the distribution and abundance of species\\u000a among ecosystems. Snails are dominant herbivores in many freshwater ecosystems, but there is no comprehensive review of snail\\u000a density, standing stock, or body size among freshwater ecosystems. We compile data on snail density and standing stock, estimate\\u000a body size with their quotient, and

  13. The effect of life-history variation on the population size structure of a rocky intertidal snail ( Littorina sitkana)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rémy Rochette; Karen Dunmall; Lawrence M. Dill

    2003-01-01

    On wave-sheltered shores of the northeastern Pacific, the population size structure of Littorina sitkana varies with intertidal height, as larger snails are mostly found only in the upper intertidal. This pattern has been attributed to high predation rates by crabs (and perhaps fish) on large snails inhabiting low-intertidal areas; i.e., large snails are presumed to be rare there simply because

  14. [Occurrence of the flagellated protozoan, Cryptobia helicis Leidy, 1846 (Kinetoplasta: Bodonea: Cryptobiidae) in the garden snail, Helix aspersa].

    PubMed

    Göçmen, Bayram; Gürelli, Gözde

    2008-01-01

    In this survey, the prevalence and cytological features of the flagellated protozoan, Cryptobia helicis living in the bursa copulatrix of the garden snail, Helix aspersa Müller 1774 found in the vicinity of Izmir, Turkey was investigated. The prevalence of Cryptobia helicis in garden snails collected in the spring of 2005 was found to be 68.65%. This study is the first record of the occurrence of Cryptobia helicis in the garden snail Helix aspersa found in Turkey. PMID:18351561

  15. The detection and quantification of a digenean infection in the snail host with special emphasis on Fasciola sp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yannick Caron; Daniel Rondelaud; Bertrand Losson

    2008-01-01

    In this review, ten methods used to study digenean infections in their intermediate hosts were compared to determine which\\u000a one should be used either in the field or in the lab to establish the prevalence and intensity of infections in snails. Snail\\u000a crushing and snail dissection allow quick establishing of prevalence in natural or experimental infections, whereas histology\\u000a is considered

  16. Effects of Washing Produce Contaminated with the Snail and Slug Hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with Three Common Household Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms. PMID:23901391

  17. Effects of washing produce contaminated with the snail and slug hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with three common household solutions.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A; Cowie, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms. PMID:23901391

  18. FBXO11 promotes ubiquitination of the Snail family of transcription factors in cancer progression and epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Shenoy, Anitha K; Doernberg, Samuel; Chen, Hao; Luo, Huacheng; Shen, Huangxuan; Lin, Tong; Tarrash, Miriam; Cai, Qingsong; Hu, Xin; Fiske, Ryan; Chen, Ting; Wu, Lizi; Mohammed, Kamal A; Rottiers, Veerle; Lee, Siu Sylvia; Lu, Jianrong

    2015-06-28

    The Snail family of transcription factors are core inducers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we show that the F-box protein FBXO11 recognizes and promotes ubiquitin-mediated degradation of multiple Snail family members including Scratch. The association between FBXO11 and Snai1 in vitro is independent of Snai1 phosphorylation. Overexpression of FBXO11 in mesenchymal cells reduces Snail protein abundance and cellular invasiveness. Conversely, depletion of endogenous FBXO11 in epithelial cancer cells causes Snail protein accumulation, EMT, and tumor invasion, as well as loss of estrogen receptor expression in breast cancer cells. Expression of FBXO11 is downregulated by EMT-inducing signals TGF? and nickel. In human cancer, high FBXO11 levels correlate with expression of epithelial markers and favorable prognosis. The results suggest that FBXO11 sustains the epithelial state and inhibits cancer progression. Inactivation of FBXO11 in mice leads to neonatal lethality, epidermal thickening, and increased Snail protein levels in epidermis, validating that FBXO11 is a physiological ubiquitin ligase of Snail. Moreover, in C. elegans, the FBXO11 mutant phenotype is attributed to the Snail factors as it is suppressed by inactivation/depletion of Snail homologs. Collectively, these findings suggest that the FBXO11-Snail regulatory axis is evolutionarily conserved and critically governs carcinoma progression and mammalian epidermal development. PMID:25827072

  19. Inhibition of Snail1-DNA-PKcs Protein-Protein Interface Sensitizes Cancer Cells and Inhibits Tumor Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ga-Young; Pyun, Bo-Jeong; Seo, Haeng Ran; Jin, Yeung Bae; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study suggested that the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) interacts with Snail1, which affects genomic instability, sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, and migration of tumor cells by reciprocal regulation between DNA-PKcs and Snail1. Here, we further investigate that a peptide containing 7-amino acid sequences (amino acids 15–21) of Snail1 (KPNYSEL, SP) inhibits the endogenous interaction between DNA-PKcs and Snail1 through primary interaction with DNA-PKcs. SP restored the inhibited DNA-PKcs repair activity and downstream pathways. On the other hand, DNA-PKcs-mediated phosphorylation of Snail1 was inhibited by SP, which resulted in decreased Snail1 stability and Snail1 functions. However, these phenomena were only shown in p53 wild-type cells, not in p53-defective cells. From these results, it is suggested that interfering with the protein interaction between DNA-PKcs and Snail1 might be an effective strategy for sensitizing cancer cells and inhibiting tumor migration, especially in both Snail1-overexpressing and DNA-PKcs-overexpressing cancer cells with functional p53. PMID:24085291

  20. Changes in epilithic communities due to individual and combined treatments of zinc and snail grazing in stream mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Genter, R.B.; Colwell, F.S.; Pratt, J.R.; Cherry, D.S.; Cairns, J. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    Effects of 0.5 mg/liter zinc (Zn) and snail grazing (400 snails/m2) on density of dominant algal and protozoan taxa, epilithic glucose respiration, and ash-free dry weight (AFDW) were examined using established (12-day colonization) periphyton communities in flow-through stream mesocosms with four treatments (Zn, snails, Zn and snails, control) for 30 days. Grazing and Zn similarly reduced the abundance of 5 of 10 dominant algal taxa and AFDW during the first 10 days of treatment. Abundance of these taxa and AFDW in grazed (ambient Zn) treatments approached control levels after 10 days as the effect due to snails decreased. Decreasing temperatures may have reduced snail activity. Snails, Zn, and the combination of these treatments contributed to higher rates of glucose respiration per unit AFDW. Protozoan species abundance was reduced to less than half by Zn but was unaffected by snails. Although Zn and snails individually altered structural and functional aspects of this microbial community, the effects when both treatments were combined could not always be inferred from the individual effects. Testing individual and combined variables that affect periphyton with a corresponding assessment of population dynamics, biomass, and community functional attributes will enhance understanding of the overall effects of pollutants on periphyton communities.

  1. [Thermal compensation of respiration in pulmonate snails (Pulmonata) of Arion and Deroceras genera living in polar and temperate climatic zone].

    PubMed

    Zotin, A A; Ozerniuk, N D

    2002-01-01

    Comparison of respiration rate in pulmonate snails living in various climatic zones demonstrated higher constant a in representatives of Arion genus (A. subfucus and A. fasciatus) from Polar Area (Murmansk Region) as compared to inhabitants of temperate latitudes (Moscow Region). The snails of Deroceras genus (D. reticulatum) from these two climatic zones were indistinguishable by relative standard metabolism. Different effects of climatic thermal conditions on respiration rates in representatives of these two snail genera can be due to their specific biology. Representatives of Deroceras genus are short-cycle synanthropic species, while the snails of Arion genus are long-cycle species living mostly in the forest zone. PMID:12400380

  2. Release of Lungworm Larvae from Snails in the Environment: Potential for Alternative Transmission Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Giannelli, Alessio; Colella, Vito; Abramo, Francesca; do Nascimento Ramos, Rafael Antonio; Falsone, Luigi; Brianti, Emanuele; Varcasia, Antonio; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Knaus, Martin; Fox, Mark T.; Otranto, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastropod-borne parasites may cause debilitating clinical conditions in animals and humans following the consumption of infected intermediate or paratenic hosts. However, the ingestion of fresh vegetables contaminated by snail mucus and/or water has also been proposed as a source of the infection for some zoonotic metastrongyloids (e.g., Angiostrongylus cantonensis). In the meantime, the feline lungworms Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior are increasingly spreading among cat populations, along with their gastropod intermediate hosts. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of alternative transmission pathways for A. abstrusus and T. brevior L3 via the mucus of infected Helix aspersa snails and the water where gastropods died. In addition, the histological examination of snail specimens provided information on the larval localization and inflammatory reactions in the intermediate host. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-four specimens of H. aspersa received ~500 L1 of A. abstrusus and T. brevior, and were assigned to six study groups. Snails were subjected to different mechanical and chemical stimuli throughout 20 days in order to elicit the production of mucus. At the end of the study, gastropods were submerged in tap water and the sediment was observed for lungworm larvae for three consecutive days. Finally, snails were artificially digested and recovered larvae were counted and morphologically and molecularly identified. The anatomical localization of A. abstrusus and T. brevior larvae within snail tissues was investigated by histology. L3 were detected in the snail mucus (i.e., 37 A. abstrusus and 19 T. brevior) and in the sediment of submerged specimens (172 A. abstrusus and 39 T. brevior). Following the artificial digestion of H. aspersa snails, a mean number of 127.8 A. abstrusus and 60.3 T. brevior larvae were recovered. The number of snail sections positive for A. abstrusus was higher than those for T. brevior. Conclusions Results of this study indicate that A. abstrusus and T. brevior infective L3 are shed in the mucus of H. aspersa or in water where infected gastropods had died submerged. Both elimination pathways may represent alternative route(s) of environmental contamination and source of the infection for these nematodes under field conditions and may significantly affect the epidemiology of feline lungworms. Considering that snails may act as intermediate hosts for other metastrongyloid species, the environmental contamination by mucus-released larvae is discussed in a broader context. PMID:25884402

  3. Distribution of trematodes in snails in ponds at integrated small-scale aquaculture farms.

    PubMed

    Boerlage, Annette S; Graat, Elisabeth A M; Verreth, Johan A; de Jong, Mart C M

    2013-03-01

    In integrated small-scale aquaculture farming, animal and human excreta maybe used as fish feed and pond fertilizer, thereby enhancing transmission of fish-borne zoonotic trematodes (FZTs) from final hosts, like humans, pigs and chickens, to snails. Areas within a pond could vary in trematode egg-load due to the immediate bordering land, and this might provide implications for control of these trematodes or sampling in field studies measuring FZT prevalence in snails. We therefore estimated the effect of bordering land use on prevalence and FZT burden in snails in different areas within small-scale aquaculture ponds. Nine sampling areas within a pond were assigned in six ponds. For each sampling area, about 120 Melanoides tuberculata snails were collected. Based on land use bordering a sampling area, these were categorized in 5 risk-categories: low-risk (road, rice planted in pond, agriculture, or middle of pond), human access point to pond, livestock sty (pigs or poultry), both human access point and livestock sty, and water connection to canal. In total, 5392 snails were collected. Percentages of snails with parapleurolophocercous cercariae varied between 6% in areas categorized as low-risk and areas with livestock sty only to 15% in areas with both human access point and livestock sty; only this 15% was significantly different from the prevalence in the low-risk category. Percentages of snails with xiphidio cercariae did not differ between risk-categories and varied between 5% and 10%. Mean snail size was 15.2mm, and was significantly associated with both the probability of infection as well as parasite burden. Very small differences in parasite burden were found at different land use areas; the maximum difference was about 11 cercariae. This study demonstrated only small differences between areas surrounding a pond on risk of snails to be infected with fish-borne trematodes within different pond areas. In field studies on FZTs in M. tuberculata snails in ponds, sampling from ponds can therefore be done without considering areas within ponds. PMID:23200642

  4. 24 ENDANGERED SPECIES BULLETIN JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2003 VOLUME XXVIII NO. 1 Atiny snail, a relict from the last great ice age,

    E-print Network

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    in the leaf litter, preferring a diet of birch and maple leaves. The snail shares its habitat with a Shell snail found its current home with desirable temperature, moisture, and food resources about 10,000 years

  5. Prehistoric inter-archipelago trading of Polynesian tree snails leaves a conservation legacy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taehwan; Burch, John B; Coote, Trevor; Fontaine, Benoît; Gargominy, Olivier; Pearce-Kelly, Paul; Foighil, Diarmaid Ó

    2007-01-01

    Inter-archipelago exchange networks were an important aspect of prehistoric Polynesian societies. We report here a novel genetic characterization of a prehistoric exchange network involving an endemic Pacific island tree snail, Partula hyalina. It occurs in the Society (Tahiti only), Austral and Southern Cook Islands. Our genetic data, based on museum, captive and wild-caught samples, establish Tahiti as the source island. The source lineage is polymorphic in shell coloration and contains a second nominal species, the dark-shelled Partula clara, in addition to the white-shelled P. hyalina. Prehistoric inter-island introductions were non-random: they involved white-shelled snails only and were exclusively inter-archipelago in scope. Partulid shells were commonly used in regional Polynesian jewellery, and we propose that the white-shelled P. hyalina, originally restricted to Tahiti, had aesthetic value throughout these archipelagoes. Demand within the Society Islands could be best met by trading dead shells, but a low rate of inter-archipelago exchange may have prompted the establishment of multiple founder populations in the Australs and Southern Cooks. The alien carnivorous land snail Euglandina rosea has recently devastated populations of all 61 endemic species of Society Island partulid snails. Southern Cooks and Australs P. hyalina now represent the only unscathed wild populations remaining of this once spectacular land snail radiation. PMID:17848368

  6. Snail-type zinc finger proteins prevent neurogenesis in Scutoid and transgenic animals of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fuse, N; Matakatsu, H; Taniguchi, M; Hayashi, S

    1999-10-01

    Scutoid is a classical dominant gain-of-function mutation of Drosophila, causing a loss of bristles and roughening of the compound eye. Previous genetic and molecular analyses have shown that Scutoid is associated with a chromosomal transposition resulting in a fusion of no-oceli and snail genes. How this gene fusion event leads to the defects in neurogenesis was not known until now. Here have found that snail is ectopically expressed in the eye-antennal and wing imaginal discs in Scutoid larvae, and that this expression is reduced in Scutoid revertants. We have also shown that the expressivity of Scutoid is enhanced by zeste mutations. snail and escargot encode evolutionarily conserved zinc-finger proteins involved in the development of mesoderm and limbs. Snail and Escargot proteins share a common target DNA sequence with the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) type proneural gene products. When expressed in the developing external sense organ precursors of the thorax and the eye, these proteins cause a loss of mechanosensory bristles in the thorax and perturbed the development of the compound eye. Such phenotypes resemble those associated with Scutoid. Furthermore, the effect of ectopic Escargot on bristle development is antagonized by coexpression of the bHLH gene asense. Thus, our results suggest that the Scutoid phenotype is due to an ectopic snail expression under the control of no-oceli enhancer, antagonizing neurogenesis through its inhibitory interaction with bHLH proteins. PMID:10552298

  7. The Drosophila gene escargot encodes a zinc finger motif found in snail-related genes.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, M; Noguchi, P D; Sensabaugh, S M; Odenwald, W F; Kassis, J A

    1992-02-01

    Two independent P-element enhancer detection lines were obtained that express lacZ in a pattern of longitudinal stripes early in germband elongation. In this paper, molecular and genetic characterization of a gene located near these transposons is presented. Sequence analysis of a cDNA clone from the region reveals that this gene has a high degree of similarity with the Drosophila snail gene (Boulay et al., 1987). The sequence similarity extends over 400 nucleotides, and includes a region encoding five tandem zinc finger motifs (72% nucleotide identity; 76% amino acid identity). This region is also conserved in the snail homologue from Xenopus laevis (76% nucleotide identity; 83% amino acid identity) (Sargent and Bennett, 1990). We have named the Drosophila snail-related gene escargot (esg), and the region of sequence conservation common to all three genes the 'snailbox'. A number of Drosophila genomic DNA fragments cross-hybridize to a probe from the snailbox region suggesting that snail and escargot are members of a multigene family. The expression pattern of escargot is dynamic and complex. Early in germband elongation, escargot RNA is expressed in a pattern of longitudinal stripes identical to the one observed in the two enhancer detection lines. Later in development, escargot is expressed in cells that will form the larval imaginal tissues, escargot is allelic with l(2)35Ce, an essential gene located near snail in the genome. PMID:1571289

  8. Fascioliasis control: in vivo and in vitro phytotherapy of vector snail to kill fasciola larva.

    PubMed

    Sunita, Kumari; Singh, D K

    2011-01-01

    Snail is one of the important components of an aquatic ecosystem, it acts as intermediate host of Fasciola species. Control of snail population below a certain threshold level is one of the important methods in the campaign to reduce the incidence of fascioliasis. Life cycle of the parasite can be interrupted by killing the snail or Fasciola larva redia and cercaria in the snail body. In vivo and in vitro toxicity of the plant products and their active component such as citral, ferulic acid, umbelliferone, azadirachtin, and allicin against larva of Fasciola in infected snail Lymnaea acuminata were tested. Mortality of larvae were observed at 2?h, 4?h, 6?h, and 8?h, of treatment. In in vivo treatment, azadirachtin caused highest mortality in redia and cercaria larva (8?h, LC(50) 0.11, and 0.05?mg/L) whereas in in vitro condition allicin was highly toxic against redia and cercaria (8?h, LC(50) 0.01, and 0.009?mg/L). Toxicity of citral was lowest against redia and cercaria larva. PMID:22132306

  9. Transmission of Angiostrongylus cantonensis through the giant African snail Achatina fulica: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Sithithaworn, P; Brockelman, W Y; Brockelman, C

    1991-12-01

    Observations on transmission of the rat lung worm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, from rats to the snail intermediate host. Achatina fulica, in a vacant lot in Bangkok are described. The prevalence of A. cantonensis increased with snail age until 200 days of age when it attained a plateau of 50-60%. The overall prevalence was 53%. The worm burden slowly rose with age until 200 days of age beyond which it remained relatively constant. The highest mean worm burden of 5,478 was observed in the oldest age group. The parasite distribution in the snail population was highly aggregated both within each age class and in the overall population. Experiments on susceptibility of snails to laboratory infection revealed that worm recovery was dependent on dose of first stage larval infection but was independent of snail size in the range of 4-8 cm. The percent worm recovery of third stage larvae was negatively correlated with dose of infection, and no density-dependent effects of worm burden on worm size were observed. PMID:1822886

  10. Tales of two snails: sexual selection and sexual conflict in Lymnaea stagnalis and Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    Koene, Joris M

    2006-08-01

    Sexual selection and sexual conflict have been shown to play key roles in the evolution of species with separate sexes. Experimental evidence is accumulating that this is also true for simultaneous hermaphrodites. For example, many species of land snails forcefully stab their mating partners with love darts. In the brown garden snail (Helix aspersa, now called Cantareus asperses), this dart increases sperm storage and paternity, probably via the transfer of an allohormone that inhibits sperm digestion. A recent interspecies comparison of dart-possessing land snails revealed coevolution between darts and spermatophore-receiving organs that is consistent with counteradaptation against an allohormonal manipulation. The great pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis) seems to use a seminal product to manipulate its partner and mates in the male role when enough seminal fluid is available in the prostate gland. Receipt of semen not only initiates egg laying in virgin animals, but also feminizes the mating partner later in life. These increases in the female function have been shown to go at the expense of growth and seminal fluid production of the sperm recipient. Although in Helix, and probably also Lymnaea, the sperm donor benefits from the induced changes through increased fertilization success, the sperm recipient may experience injury, imposed reallocation of resources, and altered sperm storage. These findings support the existence of sexual conflict in simultaneously hermaphroditic snails, and its importance for the evolution of mating behaviors and reproductive morphologies is discussed. PMID:21672754

  11. An overview of freshwater snails in Asia with main focus on Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Madsen, H; Hung, N M

    2014-12-01

    Freshwater snails have received much attention for their role as intermediate hosts for trematodes causing disease in people and animals such as schistosomiasis and various food-borne trematodes. While effective medical treatment exists for some of these diseases there is need for preventive measures to reduce transmission, e.g. control of intermediate hosts because transmission patterns are often complicated due to presence of reservoir final hosts. In order to implement control measures against the intermediate host snails with minimal impact on the freshwater ecosystems and their biodiversity, a profound knowledge on transmission patterns of the trematodes is required and this is partly related to distribution, habitat preferences, and seasonal variation in density of the intermediate host species. Identification of snail species can be problematic on the basis of morphological and anatomical characters alone as some species show morphological plasticity and similarly morphological differentiation of cercariae found in snails may be difficult and this could lead to biased perceptions of intermediate host spectra and transmission patterns. In this paper, we give an overview of the snail families and their medical and veterinary importance in Asia but with main focus on Vietnam. PMID:25149356

  12. Specialized insulin is used for chemical warfare by fish-hunting cone snails.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Gajewiak, Joanna; Karanth, Santhosh; Robinson, Samuel D; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Douglass, Adam D; Schlegel, Amnon; Imperial, Julita S; Watkins, Maren; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K; Yandell, Mark; Li, Qing; Purcell, Anthony W; Norton, Raymond S; Ellgaard, Lars; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2015-02-10

    More than 100 species of venomous cone snails (genus Conus) are highly effective predators of fish. The vast majority of venom components identified and functionally characterized to date are neurotoxins specifically targeted to receptors, ion channels, and transporters in the nervous system of prey, predators, or competitors. Here we describe a venom component targeting energy metabolism, a radically different mechanism. Two fish-hunting cone snails, Conus geographus and Conus tulipa, have evolved specialized insulins that are expressed as major components of their venoms. These insulins are distinctive in having much greater similarity to fish insulins than to the molluscan hormone and are unique in that posttranslational modifications characteristic of conotoxins (hydroxyproline, ?-carboxyglutamate) are present. When injected into fish, the venom insulin elicits hypoglycemic shock, a condition characterized by dangerously low blood glucose. Our evidence suggests that insulin is specifically used as a weapon for prey capture by a subset of fish-hunting cone snails that use a net strategy to capture prey. Insulin appears to be a component of the nirvana cabal, a toxin combination in these venoms that is released into the water to disorient schools of small fish, making them easier to engulf with the snail's distended false mouth, which functions as a net. If an entire school of fish simultaneously experiences hypoglycemic shock, this should directly facilitate capture by the predatory snail. PMID:25605914

  13. How subcellular partitioning can help to understand heavy metal accumulation and elimination kinetics in snails.

    PubMed

    Gimbert, Frédéric; Vijver, Martina G; Coeurdassier, Michaël; Scheifler, Renaud; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Badot, Pierre-Marie; de Vaufleury, Annette

    2008-06-01

    To understand bioaccumulation kinetics of metals within biota inhabiting industrially contaminated soils, toxicokinetic dynamics and subcellular fractionation were carried out with the terrestrial snail Helix aspersa in a long-term (six-month) laboratory experiment. Accumulation and elimination kinetics were determined for Cd, Pb, and Zn in both viscera and foot of snails and were described accurately by one-compartment models. The subcellular fractions were obtained by sequential centrifugations and were analyzed by isolating metal-rich granules, tissue fragments, and cytosolic fractions. Different fractions showed metal-specific binding capacities that might be useful in identifying the biological significance of accumulated metal levels in snails. Cadmium was retrieved mainly from the cytosolic fraction, where it was stored in the long term and not excreted, thus explaining the linear accumulation patterns. Most of the accumulated Pb was found in the granular fraction, and snails appeared able to excrete these concretions, leading to achievement of a steady state in internal Pb body burdens. Significant levels of Pb, however, were retrieved at the end of the depuration phase and retained in the cell debris fraction. Zinc showed affinities for both cytosolic and granular fractions, leading to intermediate uptake and excretion patterns. The dynamics of the different sequestration forms at the subcellular level support the observed kinetics of metal body burdens and, in association with the determination of uptake fluxes, allow precise assessment of metal accumulation in snails. PMID:18229974

  14. Neurogenesis in the procerebrum of the snail Helix aspersa: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Longley, Roger D

    2011-10-01

    The procerebrum, a specialized structure for olfaction in terrestrial pulmonate molluscs, contains 20,000 to 50,000 small, uniformly sized neurons that increase in number with age. Here I show the likely source of neurons added to the procerebrum of Helix aspersa and that the rate of neuron addition depends on snail weight. After hatching, during the initial exponential growth phase, H. aspersa adds neurons to the procerebral apex by mitosis and from a cerebral tube. In the logistic growth phase beginning 30-40 days post-hatch, neurons also seem to be added to the procerebrum from the peritentacular and olfactory nerves, causing the rate of neuron addition to approximately double; but as in the earlier exponential growth phase, this rate remains a function of snail weight. This neuron addition throughout the life of the snail can be predicted by snail weight. In the two growth phases, the number of neurons in the procerebrum is given by logarithmic functions of snail weight. The results here for H. aspersa provide the basis for experiments to determine the peripheral origin and destination of neuronal precursors that are added to the procerebrum and to determine how neuron addition affects the function of the procerebrum. PMID:22042440

  15. Imidacloprid induced alterations in enzyme activities and energy reserves of the land snail, Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    Radwan, M A; Mohamed, M S

    2013-09-01

    The in vivo sublethal toxic effects (0.2 and 0.6 LD50) of topically applied imidacloprid on biochemical biomarkers in the land snail, Helix aspersa was examined. Biochemical perturbations were assessed by measuring the three enzymatic (Acetylcholinesterase, AChE; catalase, CAT and glutathione-S-transferase, GST) activities and three energy reserves (protein, glycogen and lipids) in the snails. Snail samples were taken from each sublethal dose and control groups at 1, 3 and 7 days after treatment. The results revealed that there were overall decrease in AChE activity as well as depletion of lipids and glycogen contents in the imidacloprid-treated snails compared to control groups. The CAT and GST activities of treated snails with the sublethal doses of imidacloprid were significantly higher than those of untreated controls along the three times of exposure. Moreover, an increase in the level of total proteins was observed in animals treated with 0.6 LD50 imidacloprid compared to control groups. The alterations in all tested biochemical perturbations were most pronounced with the 0.6 LD50 than 0.2 LD50. This study suggests that alterations of the enzyme activities and energy reserves in this species that could be useful as biomarkers of imidacloprid exposure in the evaluation of terrestrial impacts of this insecticide. PMID:23756058

  16. Development of the feline lungworms Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior in Helix aspersa snails.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Alessio; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Annoscia, Giada; Di Cesare, Angela; Colella, Vito; Brianti, Emanuele; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Mutafchiev, Yasen; Otranto, Domenico

    2014-04-01

    Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Strongylida, Angiostrongylidae) and Troglostrongylus brevior (Strongylida, Crenosomatidae) are regarded as important lungworm species of domestic felids, with the latter considered an emerging threat in the Mediterranean region. The present study aimed to assess their concurrent development in the mollusc Helix aspersa (Pulmonata, Helicidae). Thirty snails were infested with 100 first-stage larvae (L1) of A. abstrusus and T. brevior, isolated from a naturally infested kitten. Larval development was checked by digesting five specimens at 2, 6 and 11 days post infestation. Larvae retrieved were morphologically described and their identification was confirmed by specific PCR and sequencing. All H. aspersa snails were positive for A. abstrusus and T. brevior, whose larval stages were simultaneously detected at each time point. In addition, snails were exposed to outdoor conditions and examined after overwintering, testing positive up to 120 days post infestation. Data herein presented suggest that A. abstrusus and T. brevior develop in H. aspersa snails and may eventually co-infest cats. Data on the morphology of both parasitic species in H. aspersa provide additional information on their development and identification, to better understand the population dynamics of these lungworms in receptive snails and paratenic hosts. PMID:24477103

  17. A Snail1/Notch1 Signaling Axis Controls Embryonic Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhao-Qiu; Rowe, R. Grant; Lim, Kim-Chew; Lin, Yongshun; Willis, Amanda; Tang, Yi; Li, Xiao-Yan; Nor, Jacques E; Maillard, Ivan; Weiss, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Notch1-Delta-like 4 (Dll4) signaling controls vascular development by regulating endothelial cell (EC) targets that modulate vessel wall remodeling and arterial-venous specification. The molecular effectors that modulate Notch signaling during vascular development remain largely undefined. Here we demonstrate that the transcriptional repressor, Snail1, acts as a VEGF-induced regulator of Notch1 signaling and Dll4 expression. EC-specific Snail1 loss-of-function conditional knockout mice die in utero with defects in vessel wall remodeling in association with losses in mural cell investment and disruptions in arterial-venous specification. Snail1 loss-of-function conditional knockout embryos further display up-regulated Notch1 signaling and Dll4 expression that is partially reversed by inhibiting ?-secretase activity in vivo with Dll4 identified as a direct target of Snail1-mediated transcriptional repression. These results document a Snail1-Dll4/Notch1 axis that controls embryonic vascular development. PMID:24894949

  18. Activation of the immune defence of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis by different immune elicitors.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Otto; Leicht, Katja

    2013-08-01

    Understanding the outcomes of host-parasite interactions in nature is in high demand as parasites and pathogens are important for several ecological and evolutionary processes. Ecological immunology (ecoimmunology) has a key role in reaching this goal because immune defence is the main physiological barrier against infections. To date, ecoimmunological studies largely lean on measuring constitutive immune defences (components of defence that are always active). However, understanding the role of inducible components of immune function is important as the immune system is largely an inducible defence. Measuring such defences can be complicated as different parasites may activate different immune cascades, and expression of different immune traits may not be independent. We examined the suitability of different immune activation techniques for the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. By experimentally challenging snails with different immune elicitors [injection with snail saline (i.e. wounding), lyophilized Escherichia coli cells, lyophilized Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells, healthy snail gonad, and trematode-infected snail gonad; maintenance in microorganism-enriched water] and measuring phenoloxidase-like and antibacterial activity of their haemolymph, we found increased immune activity against some immune elicitors, but also decreased activity. Our findings suggest potentially complicated relationships among immune traits, and propose suitable techniques for ecological studies in this study system. PMID:23842628

  19. Distribution of fasciolosis in Kansas, with results of experimental snail susceptibility studies.

    PubMed

    McKown, R D; Ridley, R K

    1995-02-01

    A total of 278 veterinarians throughout Kansas were sent mail-in survey forms asking specific questions relating to their experience with fasciolosis in their practice area. Replies were received from 178 (64%) veterinarians representing six practice types; one-third reported having seen cases of fasciolosis in their practice. The results of our survey indicate that the majority of the cattle diagnosed with liver fluke disease in Kansas are imported from other areas of the USA. However, in both central and southeastern regions of Kansas, some cattle that had never been out of the state were infected with Fasciola hepatica. Thus, these areas of Kansas should be considered endemic for liver fluke disease. Methods of diagnosis, types of operations, and improvements seen after treatment were also discussed. In order to ascertain the existence of one or more possible snail intermediate hosts within Kansas, five species of lymnaeid snails were collected from central and southeastern parts of the state and tested for their susceptibility to infection by Fasciola hepatica. The snails collected included Pseudosuccinea columella, Fossaria obrussa, Fossaria bulimoides, Fossaria parva and Fossaria dalli. Of these, Pseudosuccinea columella and Fossaria bulimoides proved susceptible to experimental infection by Fasciola hepatica. Metacercariae obtained from experimentally infected snails were used to infect both a weanling calf thereby completing the life cycle of the parasite. This report is the first to identify the existence of suitable snail intermediate hosts for Fasciola hepatica in Kansas. PMID:7754605

  20. Use of ice water and salt treatments to eliminate an exotic snail, red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus, from small immersible fisheries equipment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ice water and salt treatments were evaluated for disinfection of fisheries equipment contaminated with a non-indigenous tropical snail, the red-rim melania Melanoides tuberculatus. The snail can displace native snails and can transmit trematodes directly to fishes and indirectly to other animals, i...

  1. Sensory innervation of the ovotestis in the snail Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    Antkowiak, Tomasz; Chase, Ronald

    2003-11-01

    Because oviposition in the land snail Helix aspersa is a metabolically expensive process coupled to a high fixed cost, one expects oviposition to occur only when the clutch size surpasses a minimum value at which the reproductive benefit exceeds the cost. We propose that neural innervation of the gonad allows H. aspersa to monitor oocyte production and ensure an adequate supply of gametes prior to ovulation. The ovotestis is innervated by a branch of the intestinal nerve in which the majority of axon fibres measure <0.2 microm in diameter. We found a strong positive correlation between the number of mature oocytes in the ovotestis and the frequency of spontaneous afferent spikes in the nerve branch. Tactile stimulation of the ovotestis resulted in a 20-fold increase in afferent spikes and an efferent reflex directed towards the ovotestis and the pericardium. Afferent activity also increased 10-fold after an experimentally induced increase in the volume of the ovotestis. These results suggest that the growing oocytes expand the walls of the acini and trigger action potentials in the mechanosensitive nerve terminals that lie within the acinar walls. We hypothesize that the resulting tonic signal is permissive for ovulation. In addition, a phasic sensory signal may occur during ovulation to trigger CNS motor output related to oviposition. PMID:14555733

  2. The snail's love-dart delivers mucus to increase paternity

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Ronald; Blanchard, Katrina C

    2006-01-01

    Many of the seemingly bizarre animal behaviours can be understood only by acknowledging the power of sex to shape evolution. A case in point is the so-called love-dart that some terrestrial molluscs shoot at their prospective sexual partners. Given that the likelihood of copulation is not different after solid hits than after complete misses, why do these suitors act so violently towards their chosen mates? Previously, it was shown that successful dart shooting enhances paternity. We conducted an experiment to determine whether the dart achieves its effect by a purely mechanical action or by transferring a bioactive substance. We found that injections of mucus from a gland associated with the dart more than doubled paternity relative to injections of saline. These results support the hypothesis that the dart transfers a substance capable of reconfiguring the spermatophore-receiving organs. While dart shooting probably evolved as the result of sperm competition, a role for cryptic female choice cannot be excluded. Our results imply that if cryptic female choice is operating in this system, it is likely to be based on the properties of the mucus and not on properties of the dart itself. Since we also found evidence of early-male sperm precedence, we conclude that snails can optimize their reproductive success by mating with virgins and shooting their darts accurately. PMID:16777740

  3. A phylogeny of the land snails (Gastropoda: Pulmonata).

    PubMed Central

    Wade, C. M.; Mordan, P. B.; Clarke, B.

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken the first large-scale molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Stylommatophora. Sequences of the ribosomal RNA gene-cluster were examined in 104 species of snails and slugs from 50 families, encompassing all the currently recognized major groups. It allows an independent test of the present classification based on morphology. At the level of families our molecular phylogeny closely supports the current taxonomy, but the deep branches within the tree do not. Surprisingly, a single assemblage including the families Achatinidae, Subulinidae and Streptaxidae lies near the base of the tree, forming a sister group to all remaining stylommatophorans. This primary division into 'achatinoid' and 'non-achatinoid' taxa is unexpected, and demands a radical reinterpretation of early stylommatophoran evolution. In particular, the Orthurethra appear to be relatively advanced within the 'non-achatinoid clade', and broadly equivalent to other super-familial clusters. This indicates that supposedly primitive features such as the orthurethran kidney are derived. The molecular tree also suggests that the origin of the Stylommatophora is much earlier than the main period of their diversification. PMID:11270439

  4. Eosinophilic meningitis in a child raising snails as pets.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kong-Sang; Weng, Wen-Chein

    2004-03-01

    The rat lungworm (Angiostrongylus cantonensis) is the principal cause of eosinophilic meningitis or meningoencephalitis worldwide. It is endemic in Taiwan and the Asia Pacific area. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy who was referred to us suffering from intermittent headache, low-grade fever and blurred vision of 4-5 days' duration. He had been treated for gastroenteritis just prior to referral. The patient's history was unremarkable, except that he raised snail (Ampullarium canaliculatus) as pet at home. On physical examination, the patient's consciousness was alert and well oriented. No papilledema was found on fundal examination. The neurological examination revealed normal cranial nerve function, mild weakness of both lower limbs and normal deep tendon reflexes, but positive Babinski and Kernig signs. Laboratory findings showed peripheral eosinophilia, elevated immunoglobulin E level, cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilic pleocytosis and the presence of stage 3 A. cantonensis larvae, which confirmed the diagnosis of eosinophilic meningitis. A 2-week course of mebendazole combined the glucocorticosteroids was beneficial in relieving headache, paresthesia and the other eosinophilic meningitis symptoms in the patient. PMID:14739022

  5. Measuring exposure to Schistosoma japonicum in China. III. Activity diaries, snail and human infection, transmission ecology and options for control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuesheng Li; Adrian C. Sleigh; Gail M. Williams; Allen G. P. Ross; Y. Li; Simon J. Forsyth; Marcel Tanner; Donald P. McManus

    2000-01-01

    We used activity diaries and snail detection to relate water contact and Schistosoma japonicum infection among a cohort of 178 residents on two islands in the Dongting Lake, China. Water exposure to each of 12 mapped water zones around the islands was calculated (m2 min\\/day) for each subject. Infected Oncomelania hupensis hupensis snails in this area are focal and were

  6. Functional diversity among predators of a freshwater snail imposes an adaptive trade-off for shell morphology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J. DeWitt; Beren W. Robinson; David Sloan Wilson

    2000-01-01

    We explored how functional diversity among predators of the freshwater snail Physa creates an adaptive trade-off for the snail's shell morphology. Physid shells range continuously between elongate and rotund in overall shape. The protection conferred by alternative shell shapes depends on the mode of attack employed by predators. Predators attack Physa primarily through shell entry (by crayfish, Orconectes obscurus) and

  7. Host effect on size structure and timing of sex change in the coral-inhabiting snail Coralliophila violacea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming-Hui Chen; Keryea Soong; Min-Li Tsai

    2004-01-01

    The distribution, size and reproductive characteristics of the snail Coralliophila violacea (Lamarck), which inhabits the surface of both the branching coral Porites nigrescens and the massive corals P. lobata and P. lutea, were surveyed to examine the host effect on: (1) population structure and (2) reproductive characteristics, including the size at sex change of symbionts. On branching hosts, most snails

  8. Lethal and non-lethal effects of multiple indigenous predators on the invasive golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nils Carlsson; Asa Kestrup; Monica Martensson; Per Nystrom

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. We investigated the individual and combined effects of two predators (the climbing perch, Anabas testudineus, and the wetland crab, Esanthelphusa nimoafi) indigenous to wetlands in Laos, on the behaviour and survival of the invasive South American golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata). The snail is considered a pest, consuming large amounts of rice and other aquatic vegetation in the

  9. The effect of life-history variation on the population size structure of a rocky intertidal snail (Littorina sitkana)

    E-print Network

    Dill, Lawrence M.

    The effect of life-history variation on the population size structure of a rocky intertidal snail structure of Littorina sitkana varies with intertidal height, as larger snails are mostly found only in the upper intertidal. This pattern has been attributed to high predation rates by crabs (and perhaps fish

  10. The Projectile Tooth of a Fish-Hunting Cone Snail: Conus catus Injects Venom Into Fish Prey Using a

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Ron

    The Projectile Tooth of a Fish-Hunting Cone Snail: Conus catus Injects Venom Into Fish Prey Using, California 93950 Conus catus, a fish-hunting cone snail (Fig. 1A), delivers venom into its prey by means, when injected into a fish through the hollow harpoon-shaped tooth, causes tetanus of the body

  11. Failure of transmission of low-pathogenic avian influenza virus between Mallards and freshwater snails: an experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Oesterle, Paul T; Huyvaert, Kathryn P; Orahood, Darcy; Mooers, Nicole; Sullivan, Heather; Franklin, Alan B; Root, J Jeffrey

    2013-10-01

    In aquatic bird populations, the ability of avian influenza (AI) viruses to remain infectious in water for extended periods provides a mechanism that allows viral transmission to occur long after shedding birds have left the area. However, this also exposes other aquatic organisms, including freshwater invertebrates, to AI viruses. Previous researchers found that AI viral RNA can be sequestered in snail tissues. Using an experimental approach, we determined whether freshwater snails (Physa acuta and Physa gyrina) can infect waterfowl with AI viruses by serving as a means of transmission between infected and naïve waterfowl via ingestion. In our first experiment, we exposed 20 Physa spp. snails to an AI virus (H3N8) and inoculated embryonated specific pathogen-free (SPF) chicken eggs with the homogenized snail tissues. Sequestered AI viruses remain infectious in snail tissues; 10% of the exposed snail tissues infected SPF eggs. In a second experiment, we exposed snails to water contaminated with feces of AI virus-inoculated Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) to evaluate whether ingestion of exposed freshwater snails was an alternate route of AI virus transmission to waterfowl. None of the immunologically naïve Mallards developed an infection, indicating that transmission via ingestion likely did not occur. Our results suggest that this particular trophic interaction may not play an important role in the transmission of AI viruses in aquatic habitats. PMID:24502718

  12. Thermal Compensation of Respiration in Pulmonate Snails (Pulmonata) of Arion and Deroceras Genera Living in Polar and Temperate Climatic Zone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Zotin; N. D. Ozernyuk

    2002-01-01

    Comparison of respiration rate in pulmonate snails living in various climatic zones demonstrated higher constant a in representatives of Arion genus (A. subfuscus and A. fasciatus) from Polar Area (Murmansk Region) as compared to inhabitants of temperate latitudes (Moscow Region). The snails of Deroceras genus (D. reticulatum) from these two climatic zones were indistinguishable by relative standard metabolism. Different effects

  13. The Snail as a Target Organism for the Evaluation of Industrial Waste Dump Contamination and the Efficiency of Its Remediation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Pihan; A. de Vaufleury

    2000-01-01

    The diagnosis of contamination and the efficiency of remediation of an industrial waste dump (IWD) were done before and after remediation. For this study, two species of snails were used for passive and active biomonitoring: a nonnative species, Helix pomatia and young garden snails (Helix aspersa aspersa) of standardized rearing (age, 2 months). Bioaccumulation analysis of pollutants (cadmium, nickel, iron,

  14. USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK MODELS TO INTEGRATE HYDROLOGIC AND ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF THE SNAIL KITE IN THE EVERGLADES, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PAUL A. CONRADS; EDWIN ROEHL; RUBY DAAMEN; WILEY M. KITCHENS

    Hydrologists and ecologists have been working in the Everglades on integrating a long- term hydrologic data network and a short-term ecological database to support ecological models of the habitat of the snail kite, a threatened and endangered bird. Data mining techniques, including artificial neural network (ANN) models, were applied to simulate the hydrology of snail kite habitat in the Water

  15. Snail and Slug, key regulators of TGF-?-induced EMT, are sufficient for the induction of single-cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Naber, Hildegonda P H; Drabsch, Yvette; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; ten Dijke, Peter; van Laar, Theo

    2013-05-24

    TGF-? plays a dual role in cancer; in early stages it inhibits tumor growth, whereas later it promotes invasion and metastasis. TGF-? is thought to be pro-invasive by inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via induction of transcriptional repressors, including Slug and Snail. In this study, we investigated the role of Snail and Slug in TGF-?-induced invasion in an in vitro invasion assay and in an embryonic zebrafish xenograft model. Ectopic expression of Slug or Snail promoted invasion of single, rounded amoeboid cells in vitro. In an embryonic zebrafish xenograft model, forced expression of Slug and Snail promoted single cell invasion and metastasis. Slug and Snail are sufficient for the induction of single-cell invasion in an in vitro invasion assay and in an embryonic zebrafish xenograft model. PMID:23618854

  16. Effect of water plants and non-target snails on the infectivity of Bulinus truncatus with Schistosoma haematobium.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Fayez A; Abd-el-Monem, Sayed

    2005-12-01

    The application of the water plant (Ceratophyllum demersum, Eichhornia crassipes and Lemna gibba) and/or non-target snails (Planorbis planorbis, Physa acuta and Melanoides tuberculata) gave a significant degree of reduction in the infection rate of B. truncatus subjected to S. haematobium miracidia. The data also indicated a reduction in mean total number of cercarial production/snail. However, no significant difference was detected in the prepatent period and duration of cercarial shedding of the parasite when compared with the control group. So, the results revealed that the snails exhibited a competitive ability against B. truncatus. Both survival rate and egg production of B. truncatus were greatly reduced when existed in mixed cultures with non-target snails and the magnitude of this reduction increased by increasing the number of the non-target snails. PMID:16333895

  17. Storage and incubation of Echinostoma revolutum eggs recovered from wild Branta canadensis, and their infectivity to Lymnaea tomentosa snails.

    PubMed

    Davis, N E

    2005-12-01

    Echinostoma revolutum eggs recovered from naturally infected wild Canada geese (Branta canadensis) were cold stored (4-6 degrees C) for up to 72 weeks. Successful hatching followed incubation for from 6 to 8 days at an optimum temperature of between 25 and 30 degrees C. A partial life cycle from adult worm to metacercarial encystment in Lymnaea tomentosa snails was completed in the laboratory. Snails were infected both by free miracidia and by ingestment of unhatched embryonated eggs. Infection was equally successful in environmental temperature ranges from 10 to 25 degrees C, and at challenge levels of 2, 5 or 10 embryonated eggs per snail. Exposure to 10 eggs was lethal. Ingestion by snails of embryonated eggs with successful infection at 10 degrees C suggests that embryonated eggs may be used to infect wild snails when the environmental water temperature has reached 10 degrees C. PMID:16336715

  18. Scope for growth in a tropical freshwater snail -- Implications for monitoring sublethal toxic stressors

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, P.C.C.; Lam, P.K.S. [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Biology and Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    Scope for growth (SfG), the difference between the energy input to an organism from its food and the output from respiratory metabolism, has been used as a bioassay for environmental stress in the temperate region. Here, the same technique was applied to a tropical freshwater snail, Brotia hainanensis (Thiaridae), to investigate whether the technique is applicable to biological systems at lower latitudes. In this study, the effects of copper and low pH on the SfG of the snails were examined. The results show that both copper and low pH can significantly reduce the SfG of individual snails through a decrease in the amount of energy absorbed, while the change in energy expenditure is not apparent. It was also found that the SfG assay is most informative at stress levels too low to be detected by the corresponding acute tests.

  19. The ecology of vector snail habitats and mosquito breeding-places

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead-Thomson, R. C.

    1958-01-01

    The ecology of freshwater snails—in particular those which act as intermediate hosts of bilharziasis—is reviewed in the light of the much more extensive knowledge available on the breeding-places of anopheline mosquitos. Experimental ecological methods are recommended for the field and laboratory investigation of a number of common problems involved in the study of snail habitats and mosquito breeding-places. Among the environmental factors discussed are temperature, oxygen concentration, water movement, pollution and salinity. Sampling methods for estimating populations of both snails and mosquito larvae are also described. An attempt is made to show how malacologists and entomologists alike would benefit from improved facilities for keeping abreast of general developments in the wider field of freshwater ecology. PMID:13596888

  20. Seasonal transmission of Fasciola hepatica in cattle and Lymnaea (Fossaria) humilis snails in central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Mendoza, I; Ibarra-Velarde, F; Quintero-Martínez, M T; Naranjo-García, E; Lecumberri-López, J; Correa, D

    2005-03-01

    A 19-month study on the prevalence of fasciolosis in 30 naturally infected cows, the presence of infected and non-infected Lymnaea (Fossaria) humilis snails, and variation in soil temperature and humidity is reported. The prevalence of fasciolosis in cattle declined from around 50% in March to 30% in July, then, it increased from August, reaching a plateau of 100% in November-January, before gradually declining thereafter. A rise in soil humidity and temperature in June and July, respectively, which peaked between August and November was observed. In July, L. (F.) humilis snails appeared, but the infection could only be found in these in August and November. The number of infected snails did not reflect the infestation rate in cows, even though the infestation kinetics in both hosts behaved as predicted from the life cycle of the parasite. PMID:15682338

  1. Prevalence of larval helminths in freshwater snails of the Kinmen Islands.

    PubMed

    Chao, D; Wang, L C; Huang, T C

    1993-12-01

    A survey of larval helminths in freshwater snails of Kinmen was conducted from 1986 to 1987. Parasitological examinations of a total of 726 live snails collected from 25 loci revealed that 20 of 80 Bithynia fuchsiana were infected with metacercariae of Echinostoma gotoi and 36 with metacercariae of other echinostomes. Among 57 Radix auricularia swinhoei snails, 27 were infected with echinostomes and eight with metacercariae of other flukes. Of 20 Cipangopaludina chinensis, 18 were found with larvae of echinostomes. Larval trematodes were also found in three of 37 Austropeplea ollula and two of 87 Gyraulus spirillus. Third-stage larvae of Parastrongylus cantonensis were found in Ampullarius canaliculatus (5/103), Sinotaia quadrata (20/141), Hippeutis umbilicalis cantori (1/70) and Gyraulus spirillus (2/87). Segmentina hemisphaerula were not infected. Cercariae of Centrocestus formosanus, Haplorchis pumilio and a xiphidiocercaria were found in three, two and two specimens, respectively, of 37 Thiara tuberculata. PMID:8132969

  2. Bugs as drugs, part two: worms, leeches, scorpions, snails, ticks, centipedes, and spiders.

    PubMed

    Cherniack, E Paul

    2011-03-01

    In this second of a two-part series analyzing the evidence for the use of organisms as medicine, the use of a number of different "bugs" (worms, leeches, snails, ticks, centipedes, and spiders) is detailed. Several live organisms are used as treatments: leeches for plastic surgery and osteoarthritis and the helminths Trichuris suis and Necator americanus for inflammatory bowel disease. Leech saliva is the source of a number of anticoagulants, including the antithrombin agent hirudin and its synthetic analogues, which have been approved for human use. Predatory arthropods, such as certain species of snails, spiders, scorpions, centipedes, and ticks provide a trove of potential analgesic peptides in their venom. A synthetic analogue of a snail venom peptide, ziconotide, has been approved for human use and is used as an alternative to opioids in severe pain cases. Arthropods, such as ticks, have venom that contains anticoagulants and centipede venom has a protein that corrects abnormalities in lipid metabolism. PMID:21438646

  3. Mucus trail tracking in a predatory snail: olfactory processing retooled to serve a novel sensory modality

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kinjal; Shaheen, Nagma; Witherspoon, Jessica; Robinson, Natallia; Harrington, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The rosy wolfsnail (Euglandina rosea), a predatory land snail, finds prey snails and potential mates by following their mucus trails. Euglandina have evolved unique, mobile lip extensions that detect mucus and aid in following trails. Currently, little is known of the neural substrates of the trail-following behavior. Methods To investigate the neural correlates of trail following we used tract-tracing experiments in which nerves were backfilled with either nickel-lysine or Lucifer yellow, extracellular recording of spiking neurons in snail procerebra using a multielectrode array, and behavioral assays of trail following and movement toward the source of a conditioned odor. Results The tract-tracing experiments demonstrate that in Euglandina, the nerves carrying mucus signals innervate the same region of the central ganglia as the olfactory nerves, while the electrophysiology studies show that mucus stimulation of the sensory epithelium on the lip extensions alters the frequency and pattern of neural activity in the procerebrum in a manner similar to odor stimulation of the olfactory epithelium on the optic tentacles of another land snail species, Cantareus aspersa (previously known as Helix aspersa). While Euglandina learn to follow trails of novel chemicals that they contact with their lip extensions in one to three trials, these snails proved remarkably resistant to associative learning in the olfactory modality. Even after seven to nine pairings of odorant molecules with food, they showed no orientation toward the conditioned odor. This is in marked contrast to Cantareus snails, which reliably oriented toward conditioned odors after two to three trials. Conclusions The apparent inability of Euglandina to learn to associate food with odors and use odor cues to drive behavior suggests that the capability for sophisticated neural processing of nonvolatile mucus cues detected by the lip extensions has evolved at the expense of processing of odorant molecules detected by the olfactory system. PMID:24653958

  4. Using snails as bioindicators of heavy metal exposure at a Department of Defense facility

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, C.; Randolph, J.C.; Henshel, D.S. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). School of Public and Environmental Affairs

    1995-12-31

    Mollusks are useful bioindicators of aquatic contamination. They are easy to identify and handle, are widely distributed, and are known to accumulate heavy metals. The authors evaluated the accumulation of heavy metals in snails at points both upstream and downstream from potential contaminant sources, indigenous snails (Elimia livescens) were collected from an upstream site and placed in plastic mesh cages in 6 sites in 3 watersheds on base, upstream and downstream of 3 potential contamination sources. At each site there were 3 cages containing 12 snails each. In a parallel laboratory study snails were placed in 6 jars in 3 different treatments. One treatment contained stream water taken from the same sites where the snails were collected. The other two treatments had the same stream water spiked with 2 different concentrations of metals. The higher concentration of metals reflected the level of each metal detected in surface water downstream of one of the potentially contaminated sites. The lower metal concentration jars were spiked with metals at 1/2 the concentrations used in the higher level treatment. The animals were left in the cages and the jars for 12 weeks. After being removed from the cages and jars the snails were freeze-dried, weighed whole, then dissected into shelf and organic tissue. Tissue and shell were separately analyzed for metal content. Water and sediment samples were collected in the beginning and end of the field study and also analyzed for heavy metals. The heavy metal analysis was done on an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Fe, Mn, Pb and Ni have been analyzed. Initial results show that there are differences in the concentrations of the metals in the three watersheds. Also, there is a higher concentration of Fe and Mn in tissue compared to shell, and higher concentration of Pb in shell compared to tissue.

  5. Experimental Quantification of Long Distance Dispersal Potential of Aquatic Snails in the Gut of Migratory Birds

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Casper H. A.; van der Velde, Gerard; van Lith, Bart; Klaassen, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Many plant seeds and invertebrates can survive passage through the digestive system of birds, which may lead to long distance dispersal (endozoochory) in case of prolonged retention by moving vectors. Endozoochorous dispersal by waterbirds has nowadays been documented for many aquatic plant seeds, algae and dormant life stages of aquatic invertebrates. Anecdotal information indicates that endozoochory is also possible for fully functional, active aquatic organisms, a phenomenon that we here address experimentally using aquatic snails. We fed four species of aquatic snails to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and monitored snail retrieval and survival over time. One of the snail species tested was found to survive passage through the digestive tract of mallards as fully functional adults. Hydrobia (Peringia) ulvae survived up to five hours in the digestive tract. This suggests a maximum potential transport distance of up to 300 km may be possible if these snails are taken by flying birds, although the actual dispersal distance greatly depends on additional factors such as the behavior of the vectors. We put forward that more organisms that acquired traits for survival in stochastic environments such as wetlands, but not specifically adapted for endozoochory, may be sufficiently equipped to successfully pass a bird's digestive system. This may be explained by a digestive trade-off in birds, which maximize their net energy intake rate rather than digestive efficiency, since higher efficiency comes with the cost of prolonged retention times and hence reduces food intake. The resulting lower digestive efficiency allows species like aquatic snails, and potentially other fully functional organisms without obvious dispersal adaptations, to be transported internally. Adopting this view, endozoochorous dispersal may be more common than up to now thought. PMID:22403642

  6. Predator-Induced Morphological Plasticity Across Local Populations of a Freshwater Snail

    PubMed Central

    Brönmark, Christer; Lakowitz, Thomas; Hollander, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The expression of anti-predator adaptations may vary on a spatial scale, favouring traits that are advantageous in a given predation regime. Besides, evolution of different developmental strategies depends to a large extent on the grain of the environment and may result in locally canalized adaptations or, alternatively, the evolution of phenotypic plasticity as different predation regimes may vary across habitats. We investigated the potential for predator-driven variability in shell morphology in a freshwater snail, Radix balthica, and whether found differences were a specialized ecotype adaptation or a result of phenotypic plasticity. Shell shape was quantified in snails from geographically separated pond populations with and without molluscivorous fish. Subsequently, in a common garden experiment we investigated reaction norms of snails from populations' with/without fish when exposed to chemical cues from tench (Tinca tinca), a molluscivorous fish. We found that snails from fish-free ponds had a narrow shell with a well developed spire, whereas snails that coexisted with fish had more rotund shells with a low spire, a shell morphology known to increase survival rate from shell-crushing predators. The common garden experiment mirrored the results from the field survey and showed that snails had similar reaction norms in response to chemical predator cues, i.e. the expression of shell shape was independent of population origin. Finally, we found significant differences for the trait means among populations, within each pond category (fish/fish free), suggesting a genetic component in the determination of shell morphology that has evolved independently across ponds. PMID:21818264

  7. [Neuroeffector connections of multimodal neurons in the African snail (Achatina fulica)].

    PubMed

    Buga?, V V; Zhuravlev, V L; Safonova, T A

    2004-02-01

    Using a new method of animal preparation, the efferent connections of giant paired neurons on the dorsal surface of visceral and right parietal ganglia of snail, Achatina fulica, were examined. It was found that spikes in giant neurons d-VLN and d-RPLN evoke postjunctional potentials in different points of the snail body and viscerae (in the heart, in pericardium, in lung cavity and kidney walls, in mantle and body wall muscles, in tentacle retractors and in cephalic artery). The preliminary analysis of synaptic latency and facilitation suggests a direct connections between giant neurons and investigated efferents. PMID:15143504

  8. Wetland Restoration and Invasive Species: Apple snail ( Pomacea insularum ) Feeding on Native and Invasive Aquatic Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lyubov E. Burlakova; Alexander Y. Karatayev; Dianna K. Padilla; Leah D. Cartwright; David N. Hollas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The apple snail Pomacea,insularum,is an aquatic invasive gastropod,native to South America,that has the potential to cause harm to aquatic ecosystems, wetland restoration, and,agriculture. To predict,the potential,impact,of this snail on aquatic ecosystems, we tested the feeding rate of P. insularum, under laboratory nonchoice experiments, for 3 species of invasive,macrophytes,and,13 species of native aquatic plants that are important,for wetland,resto­ ration and,health.

  9. The annual reproductive cycle of the snail Megalobulimus abbreviatus (Bequaert, 1948) (Gastropoda, Pulmonata).

    PubMed

    Horn, A C M; Achaval, A; Zancan, D M

    2005-08-01

    Morphological changes in the sexual organs of the pulmonates were observed throughout a year and correlated with reproductive-cycle periods. Reproductive-organ weights of the snail Megalobulimus abbreviatus were recorded seasonally and gonad sections were analyzed morphologically. The weights were used to obtain the organosomatic index. Mean oocytic diameter and oocytic maturation index were based on gonad sections. It was concluded that M. abbreviatus is an iteroparous snail whose annual reproductive cycle is characterized by mating and egg laying throughout spring and early summer, and also by reproductive system preparation, occurring over the remainder of the summer until the end of winter, for a new breeding season. PMID:16341424

  10. Paraphyly and budding speciation in the hairy snail (Pulmonata, Hygromiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kruckenhauser, Luise; Duda, Michael; Bartel, Daniela; Sattmann, Helmut; Harl, Josef; Kirchner, Sandra; Haring, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Delimitation of species is often complicated by discordance of morphological and genetic data. This may be caused by the existence of cryptic or polymorphic species. The latter case is particularly true for certain snail species showing an exceptionally high intraspecific genetic diversity. The present investigation deals with the Trochulus hispidus complex, which has a complicated taxonomy. Our analyses of the COI sequence revealed that individuals showing a T. hispidus phenotype are distributed in nine highly differentiated mitochondrial clades (showing p-distances up to 19%). The results of a parallel morphometric investigation did not reveal any differentiation between these clades, although the overall variability is quite high. The phylogenetic analyses based on 12S, 16S and COI sequences show that the T. hispidus complex is paraphyletic with respect to several other morphologically well-defined Trochulus species (T. clandestinus, T. villosus, T. villosulus and T. striolatus) which form well-supported monophyletic groups. The nc marker sequence (5.8S–ITS2–28S) shows only a clear separation of T. o. oreinos and T. o. scheerpeltzi, and a weakly supported separation of T. clandestinus, whereas all other species and the clades of the T. hispidus complex appear within one homogeneous group. The paraphyly of the T. hispidus complex reflects its complicated history, which was probably driven by geographic isolation in different glacial refugia and budding speciation. At our present state of knowledge, it cannot be excluded that several cryptic species are embedded within the T. hispidus complex. However, the lack of morphological differentiation of the T. hispidus mitochondrial clades does not provide any hints in this direction. Thus, we currently do not recommend any taxonomic changes. The results of the current investigation exemplify the limitations of barcoding attempts in highly diverse species such as T. hispidus. PMID:25170185

  11. Difference in the susceptibility to certain molluscicides and Schistosoma mansoni infection of three forms Egyptian Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ragab, F M A; El Khayat, H M M; Mostafa, B B; Gawish, F A

    2003-12-01

    The first generation of 3 morphologically different forms of B. glabrata collected from Giza were compared for LC50 values susceptibility to bayluscide and copper sulphate (chemical molluscicides) and Anagallis arvensis and Calendula micrantha (plant molluscicides) and to Schistosoma mansoni infection. Form (2) as juvenile and adult were less sensitive to C. micrantha and A. arvensis. Form (3) as juvenile and form (1) as adult were least sensitive to CuSO4. Approximately the same susceptibility to bayluscide was observed in the 3 forms either as juvenile or adult. The sublethal concentrations of the molluscicides on B. glabrata 3 forms showed no significant difference in the growth or survival rate in between. Form (2) was significantly higher in the egg lying capacity. The total protein concentration was not affected except in certain cases where the increase was primarily due to the increase in the globulin concentrations which indicate with the marked increase observed in the urea concentration and marked increase or inhibition in the activity of either AST or ALT that the digestive gland of the 3 forms of snails is seriously affected by molluscicides. The 3 forms of B. glabrata showed low susceptibility to infection with the local strain of S. mansoni. PMID:14708851

  12. Ecological factors in schistosome transmission, and an environmentally benign method for controlling snails in a recreational lake with a record of schistosome dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Leighton, B J; Zervos, S; Webster, J M

    2000-03-01

    The avian schistosomes, Trichobilharzia stagnicolae, T. physellae and Gigantobilharzia sp., that cause Schistosome Dermatitis (Swimmers' Itch) in humans were studied in the laboratory and at Cultus Lake, British Columbia, Canada in relation to the biology and behavior of their intermediate snail hosts, Stagnicola catascopium, Physa sp. and Gyraulus parvus, respectively, and their definite bird hosts. Wind-driven, surface currents were measured. Populations of snails, close to host-bird roosting logs had a very high prevalence of schistosome infections. An experiment that mechanically disturbed the epilithic habitat of the snails using a boat-mounted rototiller or a tractor and rake, eliminated almost all of the snails if the disturbance was done in areas of high snail concentration in shallow areas of the lake during the breeding and early development phase of the snail. It is proposed that the incorporation of snail habitat disturbance into management programs is an effective way to control Schistosome Dermatitis. PMID:10729712

  13. Reduced expression of Snail decreases breast cancer cell motility by downregulating the expression and inhibiting the activity of RhoA GTPase

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ALI; WANG, QUANSHENG; HAN, ZHIQIANG; HU, WEI; XI, LING; GAO, QINLEI; WANG, SHIXUAN; ZHOU, JIANFENG; XU, GANG; MENG, LI; CHEN, GANG; MA, DING

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support an important role for Snail, a transcriptional factor, in breast cancer. Overexpression of Snail has been associated with breast cancer metastasis, although the specific role of Snail in the process remains unclear. To address this issue, the expression levels of Snail, RhoA and fibronectin, as well as MMP-2, were reduced in the breast tumor cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435S, and their biological responses were studied in vitro and in vivo. For the first time, it was observed that downregulated Snail expression is correlated with a significant inhibition of the expression and activity of RhoA GTPase, as well as MMP-2. The present data provide evidence that Snail promotes tumor cell motility and angiogenesis which is mainly mediated through the regulation of RhoA activity. In conclusion, the present findings demonstrate a key regulatory role for Snail in breast tumor growth and progression. PMID:24137327

  14. Dispersal at a snail's pace: historical processes affect contemporary genetic structure in the exploited wavy top snail (Megastraea undosa).

    PubMed

    Haupt, Alison J; Micheli, Fiorenza; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2013-01-01

    We used population genetics to assess historical and modern demography of the exploited wavy top snail, Megastraea undosa, which has a 5-10 day pelagic larval duration. Foot tissue was sampled from an average of 51 individuals at 17 sites across the range of M. undosa. Genetic structure at the mtDNA locus is strikingly high (?ST of 0.19 across 1000 km), and a major cline occurs in northern Baja California (?CT of 0.29 between northern and southern populations). Genetic data indicate that the northern region is highly connected through larval dispersal, whereas the southern region exhibits low genetic structure. However, additional analyses based on patterns of haplotype diversity and relationships among haplotypes indicate that M. undosa has likely recently expanded into the Southern California Bight or expanded from a small refugial population, and analysis using isolation by distance to calculate dispersal distance indicates surprisingly short estimates of dispersal from 30 m to 3 km. This scenario of a northward expansion and limited larval dispersal is supported by coalescent-based simulations of genetic data. The different patterns of genetic variation between northern and southern populations are likely artifacts of evolutionary history rather than differences in larval dispersal and this may have applications to management of this species. Specifically, these data can help to inform the scale at which this species should be managed, and given the potentially very small dispersal distances, this species should be managed at local scales. Consideration of the evolutionary history of target species allows for a more accurate interpretation of genetic data for management. PMID:23450089

  15. Reversibility of the Snail-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition revealed by the Cre-loxP system.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Wakako

    2015-03-13

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in the tumor metastatic cascade, is characterized by the loss of cell-cell junctions and cell polarity, as well as the acquisition of migratory and invasive properties. Snail is an EMT-inducer whose expression in several different epithelial cells, e.g., Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK), leads to EMT. To further understand EMT induced by Snail expression, the Cre-loxP site-specific recombination system was used to investigate its reversibility. Transfection of MDCK cells with loxP-flanked Snail (Snail-loxP) resulted in EMT induction, which included the acquisition of a spindle-shaped fibroblastic morphology, the downregulation of epithelial markers, and the upregulation of mesenchymal markers. DNA methylation of the E-cadherin promoter, which often occurs during E-cadherin downregulation, was not observed in Snail+ cells. After Cre-mediated excision of Snail-loxP, the cells reacquired an epithelial morphology, upregulated epithelial markers, and downregulated mesenchymal markers. Thus, EMT induced by Snail expression was reversible. PMID:25681770

  16. Survival of the faucet snail after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, A.J.; Cole, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata, a nonindigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia, was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871 and has spread to the mid-Atlantic states, the Great Lakes region, Montana, and most recently, the Mississippi River. The faucet snail serves as intermediate host for several trematodes that have caused large-scale mortality among water birds, primarily in the Great Lakes region and Montana. It is important to limit the spread of the faucet snail; small fisheries equipment can serve as a method of snail distribution. Treatments with chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water baths were tested to determine their effectiveness as a disinfectant for small fisheries equipment. Two treatments eliminated all test snails: (1) a 24-h exposure to Hydrothol 191 at a concentration of at least 20 mg/L and (2) a treatment with 50??C heated water for 1 min or longer. Faucet snails were highly resistant to ethanol, NaCl, formalin, Lysol, potassium permanganate, copper sulfate, Baquacil, Virkon, household bleach, and pH extremes (as low as 1 and as high as 13).

  17. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) induction on Snail expression during mouse decidualization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Hong; Liang, Xuan; Wang, Tong-Song; Liang, Xiao-Huan; Zuo, Ru-Juan; Deng, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; Qin, Fu-Niu; Zhao, Zhen-Ao; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Embryo implantation requires a precise synchronism between the receptive uterus and activated blastocyst and is regulated by complicated molecular networks. Although many implantation-related genes have been identified, the crosstalk among them is still unknown. Snail, a transcription repressor, plays a central role during epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Our previous study showed that Snail is highly expressed at implantation site in mouse uterus. This study was to examine how Snail is related with other implantation-related genes in mice. Uterine stromal cells were isolated from mouse uteri on day 4 of pregnancy and treated with HB-EGF. Snail was induced significantly by HB-EGF. By using specific inhibitors and siRNA, we demonstrated that HB-EGF induction on Snail expression is dependent on the EGFR-ERK-Stat3 pathway. Cox-2 was regulated by Snail. The current findings demonstrate that Snail can relate with HB-EGF, Stat3 and Cox-2 and may play a role during mouse embryo implantation and decidualization. PMID:23994020

  18. Field studies on the transmission and survival of Cyclocoelum mutabile (Digenea) infections in natural snail populations in southern Manitoba, Canada.

    PubMed

    McKindsey, C W; McLaughlin, J D

    1995-08-01

    The transmission of Cyclocoelum mutabile to snails was examined under natural conditions by sampling the snail communities of 4 natural ponds that had been exposed experimentally to infection by laboratory-infected coots (Fulica americana). Five of 6 snail species in the ponds, Physa jennessi, Promenetus exacuous, Armiger crista, Gyraulus parvus, and Stagnicola elodes, became infected. No natural infections were found in the few Helisoma trivolvis examined. The second most abundant species Promenetus exacuous was infected most often, whereas Physa jennessi, the most abundant species present, was rarely infected. The temporal pattern of infections in the snail community suggests the transmission window of this parasite in southern Manitoba is limited by both the 14 C hatching threshold of the fluke eggs and the seasonality of ovigerous infections in the coot host. No naturally overwintering infections were found in snails from these ponds, which were examined the following spring. None of the 1,120 laboratory-infected snails placed in cages and held overwinter in the ponds survived, whereas 14 of the 1,120 uninfected control snails kept in the same cages survived. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that C. mutabile must be reestablished in northern waterfowl breeding areas each spring. PMID:7623191

  19. Snail regulates the motility of oral cancer cells via RhoA/Cdc42/p-ERM pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao-Yin; Zhou, Chuan-Xiang; Gao, Yan

    2014-09-26

    The transcriptional factor Snail has been reported to possess properties related to cancer progression; however, the mechanism for it is not fully understood. Our data showed that Snail knockdown by small interfering RNA in two OSCC cell lines, WSU-HN6 and CAL27, significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion which also resulted in decreased cell motility, such as impaired cell spreading on type I collagen substrate, reduced filopodia, and premature assembly of stress fibers. In addition, Snail-silencing decreased Cdc42 activity but increased RhoA activity, accompanied by the downregulation in both p-ERM expression and cell motility. Meanwhile, endogenous p-ERM was found specifically co-precipitated with activated Cdc42, but not RhoA, and this co-association was decreased by Snail-silencing. The small molecule inhibitors of Rho-associated kinase (Y27632) markedly enhanced Cdc42 activity and the association of p-ERM with activated Cdc42, increasing cell motility remarkably. Using immunohistochemistry, Snail and p-ERM overexpressions were found in OSCC tissues correlated with nodal metastasis and shorter survival. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Snail regulates cell motility through RhoA/Cdc42/p-ERM pathway and may serve as a biomarker to predict prognosis for OSCC patients. Although RhoA and Cdc42 are concurrently regulated downstream of Snail, there is a direct interplay between them, which indicates RhoA has to be inactivated at some point in cell motility cycle. PMID:25172658

  20. Elevated Snail Expression Mediates Tumor Progression in Areca Quid Chewing-Associated Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma via Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Tsai, Chung-Hung; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Background Snail is an important transcription factor implicated in several tumor progression and can be induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Areca quid chewing is a major risk factor of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Therefore, we hypothesize that the major areca nut alkaloid arecoline may induce Snail via ROS and involve in the pathogenesis of areca quid chewing-associated OSCC. Methodology/Principal Finding Thirty-six OSCC and ten normal oral epithelium specimens were examined by immunohistochemistry and analyzed by the clinico-pathological profiles. Cytotoxicity, 2?, 7?-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay, and western blot were used to investigate the effects of arecoline in human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) and oral epithelial cell line OECM-1 cells. In addition, antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), curcumin, and epigallocatechin-3 gallate (EGCG) were added to find the possible regulatory mechanisms. Initially, Snail expression was significantly higher in OSCC specimens (p<0.05). Elevated Snail expression was associated with lymph node metastasis (p?=?0.031) and poor differentiation (p?=?0.017). Arecoline enhanced the generation of intracellular ROS at the concentration higher than 40 µg/ml (p<0.05). Arecoline was also found to induced Snail expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p<0.05). Treatment with NAC, curcumin, and EGCG markedly inhibited arecoline induced Snail expression (p<0.05). Conclusion/Significance: Our results suggest that Snail overexpression in areca quid chewing-associated OSCC is associated with tumors differentiation and lymph node metastasis. Arecoline-upregulated Snail expression may be mediated by ROS generation. In addition, arecoline induced Snail expression was downregulated by NAC, curcumin, and EGCG. PMID:23874481

  1. Field and laboratory evaluation of the influence of copper-diquat on apple snails in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Imlay, M.J.; McMillan, W.E.; Martin, T.W.; Takekawa, J.; Johnson, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    The recent decline of apple snail (Pomacea paludosa) populations in canals surrounding Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in southern Florida coincided with the use of copper-diquat for the control of the aquatic weed hydrilla (Hydrilla ver/icillara). Field and laboratory studies were designed to assess the effects of copper-diquat on apple snails, which are the primary food of the endangered snail kite Rostrhamus sociabilis (formerly known as the Everglade kite). Acute toxicities (96-h LC50 values) of Cutrine-Plus and Komeen (chelated formulations of copper) to immature apple snails were 22 and 241-?g/L, respectively. Diquat was toxic at a concentration of 1,800 I-?g/L and did not increase the toxicity of copper when the chemicals were used in combination. Evaluation of field samples indicated that copper concentrations were higher in detritus than in water. plants and mud, and that there was a gradient of copper concentration from the canal to the interior, the highest residues being in samples from the canal. Copper associated with detritus (up to 150 ?g/g) had no effect on growth or survival of apple snails in field cage and tank studies. Also, field applications of copper.diquat to hydrilla had no effect on survival of caged adult and immature snails. Copper from field applications was rapidly taken out of solution by plants and organic material in the water and subsequently incorporated into the bottom detritus. Although the effects of repeated applications of copper-diquat and high body burdens of copper (accumulated during exposure to herbicidal treatment) on survival and reproduction of apple snails are not known, the information available indicates that treatment of hydrilla with copper-diquat was probably not responsible for the decline in the apple snail population. Application at recommended rates should pose no threat to these snails in the organically rich waters of southern Florida.

  2. Population Genetics and the Effects of a Severe Bottleneck in an Ex Situ Population of Critically Endangered Hawaiian Tree Snails

    PubMed Central

    Price, Melissa R.; Hadfield, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    As wild populations decline, ex situ propagation provides a potential bank of genetic diversity and a hedge against extinction. These programs are unlikely to succeed if captive populations do not recover from the severe bottleneck imposed when they are founded with a limited number of individuals from remnant populations. In small captive populations allelic richness may be lost due to genetic drift, leading to a decline in fitness. Wild populations of the Hawaiian tree snail Achatinella lila, a hermaphroditic snail with a long life history, have declined precipitously due to introduced predators and other human impacts. A captive population initially thrived after its founding with seven snails, exceeding 600 captive individuals in 2009, but drastically declined in the last five years. Measures of fitness were examined from 2,018 captive snails that died between 1998 and 2012, and compared with genotypic data for six microsatellite loci from a subset of these deceased snails (N?=?335), as well as live captive snails (N?=?198) and wild snails (N?=?92). Surprisingly, the inbreeding coefficient (Fis) declined over time in the captive population, and is now approaching values observed in the 2013 wild population, despite a significant decrease in allelic richness. However, adult annual survival and fecundity significantly declined in the second generation. These measures of fitness were positively correlated with heterozygosity. Snails with higher measures of heterozygosity had more offspring, and third generation offspring with higher measures of heterozygosity were more likely to reach maturity. These results highlight the importance of maintaining genetic diversity in captive populations, particularly those initiated with a small number of individuals from wild remnant populations. Genetic rescue may allow for an increase in genetic diversity in the captive population, as measures of heterozygosity and rarified allelic richness were higher in wild tree snails. PMID:25470182

  3. Biotic interactions modify the transfer of cesium-137 in a soil-earthworm-plant-snail food web.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Clémentine; Scheifler, Renaud; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Hubert, Philippe; Coeurdassier, Michaël; de Vaufleury, Annette; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2008-08-01

    The present study investigated the possible influence of the earthworm Aporrectodea tuberculata on the transfer of cesium-137 ((137)Cs) from a contaminated (130 Bq/kg) deciduous forest soil to the lettuce Lactuca sativa and to the snail Cantareus aspersus (formerly Helix aspersa) in two laboratory experiments. In the first experiment, the International Organization for Standardization 15952 test was used to expose snails for five weeks to contaminated soil with or without earthworms. In these conditions, the presence of earthworms caused a two- to threefold increase in (137)Cs concentrations in snails. Transfer was low in earthworms as well as in snails, with transfer factors (TFs) lower than 3.7 x 10(-2). Activity concentrations were higher in earthworms (2.8- 4.8 Bq/kg dry mass) than in snails (<1.5 Bq/kg). In the second experiment, microcosms were used to determine the contribution of soil and lettuce in the accumulation of (137)Cs in snails. Results suggest that the contribution of lettuce and soil is 80 and 20%, respectively. Microcosms also were used to study the influence of earthworms on (137)Cs accumulation in snail tissues in the most ecologically relevant treatment (soil-earthworm-plant-snail food web). In this case, soil-to-plant transfer was high, with a TF of 0.8, and was not significantly modified by earthworms. Conversely, soil-to-snail transfer was lower (TF, approximately 0.1) but was significantly increased in presence of earthworms. Dose rates were determined in the microcosm study with the EDEN (elementary dose evaluation for natural environment) model. Dose rates were lower than 5.5 x 10(-4) mGy/d, far from values considered to have effects on terrestrial organisms (1 mGy/d). PMID:18266477

  4. Invasive Snails and an Emerging Infectious Disease: Results from the First National Survey on Angiostrongylus cantonensis in China

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Shan; Zhang, Yi; Liu, He-Xiang; Hu, Ling; Yang, Kun; Steinmann, Peter; Chen, Zhao; Wang, Li-Ying; Utzinger, Jürg; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2009-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic meningitis (angiostrongyliasis) caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis is emerging in mainland China. However, the distribution of A. cantonensis and its intermediate host snails, and the role of two invasive snail species in the emergence of angiostrongyliasis, are not well understood. Methodology/Principal Findings A national survey pertaining to A. cantonensis was carried out using a grid sampling approach (spatial resolution: 40×40 km). One village per grid cell was randomly selected from a 5% random sample of grid cells located in areas where the presence of the intermediate host snail Pomacea canaliculata had been predicted based on a degree-day model. Potential intermediate hosts of A. cantonensis were collected in the field, restaurants, markets and snail farms, and examined for infection. The infection prevalence among intermediate host snails was estimated, and the prevalence of A. cantonensis within P. canaliculata was displayed on a map, and predicted for non-sampled locations. It was confirmed that P. canaliculata and Achatina fulica were the predominant intermediate hosts of A. cantonensis in China, and these snails were found to be well established in 11 and six provinces, respectively. Infected snails of either species were found in seven provinces, closely matching the endemic area of A. cantonensis. Infected snails were also found in markets and restaurants. Two clusters of A. cantonensis–infected P. canaliculata were predicted in Fujian and Guangxi provinces. Conclusions/Significance The first national survey in China revealed a wide distribution of A. cantonensis and two invasive snail species, indicating that a considerable number of people are at risk of angiostrongyliasis. Health education, rigorous food inspection and surveillance are all needed to prevent recurrent angiostrongyliasis outbreaks. PMID:19190771

  5. Zeb1 and Snail1 engage miR-200f transcriptional and epigenetic regulation during EMT.

    PubMed

    Díaz-López, Antonio; Díaz-Martín, Juan; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Cuevas, Eva P; Santos, Vanesa; Olmeda, David; Portillo, Francisco; Palacios, José; Cano, Amparo

    2015-02-15

    Cell plasticity is emerging as a key regulator of tumor progression and metastasis. During carcinoma dissemination epithelial cells undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes characterized by the acquisition of migratory/invasive properties, while the reverse, mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) process, is also essential for metastasis outgrowth. Different transcription factors, called EMT-TFs, including Snail, bHLH and Zeb families are drivers of the EMT branch of epithelial plasticity, and can be post-transcriptionally downregulated by several miRNAs, as the miR-200 family. The specific or redundant role of different EMT-TFs and their functional interrelations are not fully understood. To study the interplay between different EMT-TFs, comprehensive gain and loss-of-function studies of Snail1, Snail2 and/or Zeb1 factors were performed in the prototypical MDCK cell model system. We here describe that Snail1 and Zeb1 are mutually required for EMT induction while continuous Snail1 and Snail2 expression, but not Zeb1, is needed for maintenance of the mesenchymal phenotype in MDCK cells. In this model system, EMT is coordinated by Snail1 and Zeb1 through transcriptional and epigenetic downregulation of the miR-200 family. Interestingly, Snail1 is involved in epigenetic CpG DNA methylation of the miR-200 loci, essential to maintain the mesenchymal phenotype. The present results thus define a novel functional interplay between Snail and Zeb EMT-TFs in miR-200 family regulation providing a molecular link to their previous involvement in the generation of EMT process in vivo. PMID:25178837

  6. Effects of body size and resource availability on dispersal in a native and a non-native estuarine snail.

    PubMed

    Byers

    2000-05-31

    I manipulated snail densities of two coexisting species of salt marsh snail, Cerithidea californica Haldeman (native) and Batillaria attramentaria Sowerby (non-indigenous) to investigate how resource levels set by intraspecific competition may influence dispersal rates. I used two distinct size classes of the snails (mature and immature) to determine if the effects of competition on dispersal differed between developmental stages of a consumer. Dispersal attempts were measured within enclosure pens by counting snails climbing the sides of the enclosure. The influence of snail density per se and resource levels (which were set by snail densities) on dispersal rates were separated by comparing responses of snails to density before and after resources became depleted. For large snails of both species, dispersal increased as resource levels decreased, supporting the hypothesis that competition influences dispersal rates. Small snails of both species, in contrast, always dispersed at relatively higher rates than larger individuals, but were not influenced by variation in resource levels. This result corroborates other studies that have shown reduced competition in these species at smaller size, and suggests that another mechanism, such as genetically coded behavior to disperse when young, influences their behavior. Previous experiments demonstrated Batillaria's superior resource conversion efficiency; therefore, I had hypothesized that for any given resource level, Cerithidea would disperse more, because it was more affected by resource availability. Adult Batillaria, however, responded more sensitively to resource levels (i.e., dispersed more at any given resource level) than Cerithidea. This counter-intuitive result illustrates the potential importance of genetic limitations on behavioral responses available to a species. Constraints on behavioral responses may have been accentuated since Batillaria is a non-indigenous species whose evolved behavioral responses are not necessarily adapted to its present, non-native environment. PMID:10771298

  7. ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? CULTIVATION OF BABYLONIA SNAIL LARVAE USING CLOSED RECIRCULATING SEAWATER SYSTEM WITH SEMI-CONTINUOUS ALGAL PRODUCTION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuwadee Aunthasoot; Chansawang Ngamphongsai; Seri Donnua; Sorawit Powtongsook; Ninnaj Chaitanawisuti; Somkiat Piyatiratitivorakul

    With this study, veliger larvae of Babylonia snail (marine gastropod) were reared in the recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) in comparison with control tank with water exchange. The RAS consisted of five components including (1) algal photobioreactor, (2) Babylonia larviculture tank, (3) fluidizing biofilter tank, (4) sedimentation tank, and (5) algal medium preparation tank. Liquid culture of the microalga (Isochrysis galbana)

  8. Morphology of Interneurons in the Procerebrum of the Snail Helix aspersa

    E-print Network

    Chase, Ronald

    of cells and is located at the entry site of the olfactory nerve into the brain, the structure is thought Terrestrial snails have a high sensitivity for odors and sophisticated learning abilities in the olfactory at the entry site of the olfactory nerve into the cerebral ganglion (Fig. 1). Nerve backfills

  9. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on AntiAdhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil J. Shirtcliffe; Glen McHale; Michael I. Newton

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However,

  10. Diet alters delayed selfing, inbreeding depression, and reproductive senescence in a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Auld, Josh R; Henkel, John F

    2014-07-01

    Reproductive success is a critical fitness attribute that is directly influenced by resource availability. Here, we investigate the effects of diet-based resource availability on three interrelated aspects of reproductive success: a change in mating system based on mate availability, consequent inbreeding depression, and the deterioration of reproductive efficiency with age (senescence). We employed a factorial experimental design using 22 full-sib families of the hermaphroditic freshwater snail Physa acuta to explore these interactions. Individual snails were reared in one of two mate-availability treatments (isolated [selfing] or occasionally paired [outcrossing]) and one of two diet treatments (boiled lettuce or Spirulina, an algae that is rich in protein, vitamins, and minerals). Spirulina-fed snails initiated reproduction at a 13% earlier age and 7% larger size than lettuce-fed snails. Spirulina also resulted in a 30% reduction in the time delay before selfing. Compared to lettuce, a diet of Spirulina increased inbreeding depression by 52% for egg hatching rate and 64% for posthatching juvenile survival. Furthermore, Spirulina led to a 15-fold increase in the rate of reproductive senescence compared with a diet of lettuce. These transgenerational, interactive effects of diet on inbreeding depression and reproductive senescence are discussed in the context of diet-induced phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25165532

  11. A magazine providing a snapshot of the latest developments across the chemical Substitutes for snail slime

    E-print Network

    . Substitutes for snail slime 20 March 2007 A team of engineers set a small robot climbing walls in order is not required for robots to climb walls. We can make our own adhesive locomotion material with commercial the ideal slime properties that climbing robots would need, and found a wide range of likely candidates

  12. Effects of phosphorus enrichment and grazing snails on modern stromatolitic microbial communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JAMES J. E LSER; JOHN H. S CHAMPEL; FERRAN G ARCIA-PICHEL; BRIAN D. W ADE; VALERIA S OUZA; LUIS E GUIARTE; ANA E SCALANTE; J ACK; D. F ARMER

    2005-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. The effects of phosphorus enrichment and grazing snails on a benthic microbial community that builds stromatolic oncolites were examined in an experiment at Rio Mesquites, Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico. Chemical analyses of stream water samples indicated that overall atomic ratios of total nitrogen (N) to total phosphorus (P) were approximately 110, indicating a strong potential for P-limitation of microbial

  13. Neem crude extract as Biomolluscicide for sustainable control of golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosdiyani Massaguni

    2011-01-01

    Golden apple snail, (Pomacea canaliculata) was reported could cause severe damage on food crop especially paddy, which is a staple food for more than 60% of the world population. The farmers mostly rely on chemical and synthetic molluscicides to overcome this problem which improper use of pesticide could give negative impact on environmental. Therefore, there is a need to determine

  14. European Valve Snail Valvata piscinalis (Müller) in the Laurentian Great Lakes Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Igor A. Grigorovich; Edward L. Mills; Carl B. Richards; Dan Breneman; Jan J. H. Ciborowski

    2005-01-01

    Previously reported from the lower Great Lakes basin and St. Lawrence and Hudson rivers, the nonindigenous gastropod Valvata piscinalis was found for the first time in Superior Bay (Minnesota) of Lake Superior, Lake Michigan (Wisconsin), and Oneida Lake (New York) of the Lake Ontario basin. This snail was not abundant in Lakes Superior and Michigan, whereas in eutrophic Oneida Lake

  15. Plasticity as Phenotype: G x E Interaction in a Freshwater Snail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunkow, P. E.; Calloway, S. A.

    2005-05-01

    Plasticity in morphological development allows species to accommodate environmental variation experienced during growth; however, genetic variation for phenotypic plasticity per se has been relatively under-studied. We utilized the well-documented plastic response of shell development to predator cues in a freshwater snail to quantify genetic variation for plasticity in growth rate and shell shape. Field-caught pairs of snails reproduced in the laboratory to create families of full siblings, which were then divided and allowed to grow in control and predator cue treatments. Predator (crayfish) cues had significant effects on both size-corrected growth rate and shell shape; family identity also significantly affected both final shell shape and growth rate. The interaction between predator treatment and family identity significantly affected snail growth rate but not final shell shape, suggesting genetic variation in the plastic response to predator cues for a physiological variable (growth rate) but not for a variable known to mechanically reduce the risk of predation (shell shape), at least in this population of snails. The possibility that risk of multiple modes of predation (i.e., both fish and crayfish) in some populations might maintain genetic variation in morphological plasticity is discussed.

  16. Pleistocene glaciation is implicated in the phylogeographical structure of Potamopyrgus antipodarum , a New Zealand snail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MAURINE NEIMAN; CURTIS M. L IVELY

    Pleistocene glaciation has been identified as an important factor shaping present-day patterns of phylogeographical structure in a diverse array of taxa. The purpose of this study was to use mitochondrial sequence data to address whether Pleistocene glaciation is also a major determinant of phylogeographical patterns in Potamopyrgus antipodarum , a freshwater snail native to New Zealand. We found that haplotypes

  17. Correlating Molecular Phylogeny with Venom Apparatus Occurrence in Panamic Auger Snails (Terebridae)

    E-print Network

    Collin, Rachel

    Correlating Molecular Phylogeny with Venom Apparatus Occurrence in Panamic Auger Snails (Terebridae those species with a venom apparatus. Previous analyses of western Pacific terebrid specimens has shown that some Terebridae groups have secondarily lost their venom apparatus. In order to efficiently

  18. [Dynamics of the dominance of identified cardioregulatory neurons in the snail Achatina fulica] .

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, V L; Buga?, V V; Safronova, T A

    2000-08-01

    9 cardioregulating neurones belonging to 5 different functional groups were studied in visceral and right parietal ganglia of the Giant African snail Achatina fulica. The neuronal network included multimodal and multifunctional cells exerting short- or long-lasting chronoionotropic effects on the cardiac electro- and mechanograms. Mechanisms of the differences in the cardioregulating effectiveness of these groups were discussed. PMID:11059016

  19. Sperm transfer is affected by mating history in the simultaneously hermaphroditic snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mathieu J. Loose; J. M. Koene

    2008-01-01

    Males are predicted to strategically allocate sperm across mating partners in order to maximize their chances of paternity. This requires that males have the ability to detect aspects of their partner's mating history or the number of potential mates. We investigated whether simultaneous hermaphrodites mating in the male role strategically adjust sperm transfer depending on rearing conditions. The pond snail

  20. Fish predation and offspring survival in the prosobranch snail Viviparus ater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Keller; G. Ribi

    1993-01-01

    In this study we identified some of the predators of the freshwater snail Viviparus ater and estimated offspring survival to the end of the first summer in a natural population. Newborn V. ater were eaten by the fish Barbus barbus, Rutilus rutilus, Scardinius erythrophtalmus and Tinca tinca. Out of 137 guts of Abramis brama caught in Lake Zürich 1 contained

  1. Within-reach spatial variability of snails and molluscivory by brown trout

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph R Holomuzki

    2010-01-01

    Linking habitat distributions of prey to the probability of predation is important to understanding consumptive effects of predators on prey populations. This study reports how within-reach spatial variability of two snails, the hydrobiid Potamopyrgus antipodarum and the physid Physella acuta, was linked to habitat-based predation risk by young brown trout (Salmo trutta) of different age classes. Potamopyrgus is endemic to

  2. The maintenance of shore-level size gradients in an intertidal snail ( Littorina sitkana )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan M. D. McCormack

    1982-01-01

    The size of many intertidal animals varies with tidal height. These size gradients could be produced by growth or survival varying with tidal height, or by animals moving to a preferred tidal level. The body size of the snail, Littorina sitkana, increases steadily with tidal height in rocky high intertidal habitats of British Columbia. To determine how size gradients were

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER Do sex-changing male snails use mate choice to get a jump

    E-print Network

    ORIGINAL PAPER Do sex-changing male snails use mate choice to get a jump on their ``size advantage, it is a common and obvious trait for male choice; size preference has been observed in species from fish (Ptacek may gain a ``size advantage'' from that sex change; that is, as males become larger, they become

  4. Trait compensation and cospecialization in a freshwater snail: size, shape and antipredator behaviour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J. Dewitt; Andrew Sih; Jeffrey A. Hucko

    1999-01-01

    We examined relationships between individual differences in antipredator behaviour and prey morphological characters (size, shape) that influence prey vulnerability. Behavioural responses of Physa gyrina to chemical cues associated with predation by crayfish Orconectes rusticus, were assayed in the laboratory for 6 days over a 13-day period. Snails displayed consistent, individually repeatable responses to the predation cues, including hiding (refuge use)

  5. Body size--dependent gender role in a simultaneous hermaphrodite freshwater snail, Physa acuta

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kako Ohbayashi-Hodoki; Fumiko Ishihama; Masakazu Shimada

    2004-01-01

    We examined whether gender role in the simultaneous hermaphrodite freshwater snail, Physa acuta, is determined by relative body size in a manner predicted by the size-advantage model. We observed the body-size combinations of pairs in the laboratory by using field-collected populations. Smaller individuals tended to play the \\

  6. Using Chemistry to Reconstruct Evolution: On the Origins of Fish-hunting in Venomous Cone Snails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JULITA S. IMPERIAL; NATALIE SILVERTON; BALDOMERO M. OLIVERA; PRADIP K. BANDYOPADHYAY; ANNETT SPORNING; MICHAEL FERBER; HEINRICH TERLAU

    HEMICAL COMPOUNDS derived from living organisms are similar to non-biological substances in that their composition and structure can be characterized, and many can be directly syn- thesized by standard chemical methods. However, biological compounds are fundamentally different in that each has an underlying evolutionary history. We describe several compounds from an unusual source, the venoms of fish-hunting cone snails. The

  7. Sensitive and species-specific detection of Clonorchis sinensis by PCR in infected snails and fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris Müller; Jürgen Schmidt; Heinz Mehlhorn

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, PCR procedures have been established for a rapid and easy preparation of DNA of parasite stages from\\u000a the intermediate hosts, i.e. sporocysts and rediae in snails and metacercariae in fishes. Primers have been developed, which\\u000a enable a highly sensitive and species-specific detection of Clonorchis sinensis.

  8. Effect of snails (Elimia clavaeformis) on phosphorus cycling in stream periphyton and leaf detritus communities

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, E.A. [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1993-10-01

    In this study, the author examined the effect of grazing on phosphorus cycling in stream periphyton and leaf detritus communities using the snail Elimia clavaeformis. Phosphorus cycling fluxes and turnover rates were measured in a laboratory and in a natural stream, respectively, using radioactive tracer techniques.

  9. Tropical sea snail shells: Possible exotic sources for ceramic biomaterial synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Oktar, F. N. [Bioengineering Dept., Faculty of Engineering, Marmara Univ., Istanbul, Turkey, and Medical Imaging Technics Dept., School of Health Related Professions, Marmara Univ., Istanbul, Turkey, and Nanotechnology and Biomaterials Research and Application Cen (Turkey); Kiyici, I. A. [Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Kocaeli University, Kocaeli (Turkey); Gökçe, H. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Dept., Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul, Turkey, and Prof. Dr. Adnan Tekin Material Sciences and Production Technologies Applied Research Center, Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey); A?aogullar?, D.; Kayali, E. S. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Dept., Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-12-16

    In this study, chemical and structural properties of sea snail shell based bioceramic materials (i.e. hydroxyapatite, whitlockite and other phases) are produced by using mechano-chemical (ultrasonic) conversion method. For this purpose, differential thermal and gravimetric analysis (DTA/TG), X-ray diffraction, infra-red (IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies are performed.

  10. Schistosomes in the North: A unique finding from a prosobranch snail using molecular tools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jitka Asma Aldhoun; Anna Faltýnková; Anssi Karvonen; Petr Horák

    2009-01-01

    Samples of schistosome cercariae from three different snail species (Lymnaea stagnalis, Radix auricularia and Valvata (Tropidina) macrostoma) collected from lakes in Central Finland were analyzed using molecular techniques. Based on sequences of ITS region of rDNA, the parasite isolates from L. stagnalis and R. auricularia belong to Trichobilharzia szidati and T. franki, respectively. This confirms a wide distribution of these

  11. Plastic changes in the spontaneous activity of snail neurons under rhythmic and associated intracellular electrostimulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ya. I. Verbnyi

    1987-01-01

    Conclusions 1.A comparison of the effects of intracellular rhythmic and associated electrostimulation on the character of spontaneous activity of individual snail neurons showed that the cells are capable of long adaptive reorganizations of the initial rhythm, which are observed only under the effect of automatic reinforcing stimulation. In this case the changes in the frequency and character of the spontaneous

  12. Intervention Analysis of Hurricane Effects on Snail Abundance in a Tropical Forest Using

    E-print Network

    Willig, Michael

    Intervention Analysis of Hurricane Effects on Snail Abundance in a Tropical Forest Using Long disturbances, such as hurricanes, have profound effects on pop- ulations, either directly by causing mortality of resources. In the last 20 years, two major disturbances, Hurricane Hugo in 1989 and Hurricane Georges

  13. Integrating genetic and environmental forces that shape the evolution of geographic variation in a marine snail.

    PubMed

    Trussell, G C; Etter, R J

    2001-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of phenotypic variation have traditionally been thought to reflect genetic differentiation produced by natural selection. Recently, however, there has been growing interest in how natural selection may shape the genetics of phenotypic plasticity to produce patterns of geographic variation and phenotypic evolution. Because the covariance between genetic and environmental influences can modulate the expression of phenotypic variation, a complete understanding of geographic variation requires determining whether these influences covary in the same (cogradient variation) or in opposing (countergradient variation) directions. We focus on marine snails from rocky intertidal shores as an ideal system to explore how genetic and plastic influences contribute to geographic and historical patterns of phenotypic variation. Phenotypic plasticity in response to predator cues, wave action, and water temperature appear to exert a strong influence on small and large-scale morphological variation in marine snails. In particular, plasticity in snail shell thickness: (i) may contribute to phenotypic evolution, (ii) appears to have evolved across small and large spatial scales, and (iii) may be driven by life history trade-offs tied to architectural constraints imposed by the shell. The plasticity exhibited by these snails represents an important adaptive strategy to the pronounced heterogeneity of the intertidal zone and undoubtedly has played a key role in their evolution. PMID:11838773

  14. Density compensation suggests interspecific competition is weak among terrestrial snails in tabonuco forest of Puerto Rico

    E-print Network

    Willig, Michael

    in response to intense and large-scale disturbances such as hurricanes (Bloch 2004; Willig et al. 2007). One to intense hurricanes. One might therefore expect snail assemblages to be equilibrial and structured the most often cited as an important force shaping communities. It can do so in several ways

  15. Symptoms of behavioural anapyrexia--reverse fever as a defence response of snails to fluke invasion.

    PubMed

    Zbikowska, El?bieta; Cichy, Anna

    2012-03-01

    The subject of the research was the thermal preferences of Planorbarius corneus individuals infected by larvae of digenetic trematodes. Snails were obtained over two consecutive years, 2009 and 2010, from 10 water bodies located in central Poland. The relationship between the seasons and the occurrence of patent invasions in hosts found in the shore-zone of lakes was observed. Behavioural experiments conducted on P. corneus individuals placed in a thermal gradient demonstrated that parasite infection had an impact on the thermal preferences of the snails. Individuals that shed cercariae of Bilharziella polonica, Cotylurus sp., Notocotylus ephemera, Rubenstrema exasperatum/Neoglyphe locellus, Rubenstrema opisthovitellinum, or Tylodelphys excavata displayed symptoms of behavioural anapyrexia, similarly to experimentally injured snails. This response increased the survival of infected individuals while simultaneously prolonging the period of shedding of dispersive forms of parasites. This point of view was upheld by the observation that infected snails bred at 19°C lived longer than at 26°C and the shedding rate of cercariae at a lower temperature was lower than at a higher one. PMID:22244795

  16. Unpredictable responses of garden snail ( Helix aspersa) populations to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezemer, T. Martijn; Knight, Kevin J.

    2001-08-01

    We studied the impact of climate change on the population dynamics of the garden snail ( Helix aspersa) in the Ecotron controlled environment facility. The experimental series ran for three plant generations, allowing the snails to reproduce. We investigated the isolated and combined effects of elevated CO 2 (current + 200 ?mol mol -1) and warming (current + 2ºC) in three consecutive runs (CO 2, Temperature and Combined). In the CO 2 Run, the number of juvenile snails recorded at the end of the experiment did not differ between ambient and elevated CO 2, whereas in the Temperature Run, fewer juveniles were found at elevated temperatures. An opposite response was observed in the Combined Run, where significantly more juveniles were found in elevated temperature and CO 2 compared to elevated CO 2 on its own. Within each run, juvenile emergence was not affected by treatments but juvenile presence was first observed about 70 days earlier in the Combined Run than in the Temperature Run. The differences in snail performance in the different runs were not correlated with differences in community structure or leaf quality measured as C:N ratios and neither with the abundance of the most preferred host plant species, Cardamine hirsuta. The abundance of this species, however, was significantly altered in all runs. The results illustrate clearly the degree of difficulty in making predictable generalisations about the consequences of climate change for certain species.

  17. The role of the Snail2 transcription factor in Twist1- induced EMT and metastasis

    E-print Network

    Ruiz, Esmeralda Casas

    2011-01-01

    including, TGF", NF-$", Wnt, FGF and IGF. Twist is presentincluding TGF-", Notch1, Wnt, FGF, EGF, and SCF. TGF-"1Wnt signaling Outgrowth of the chick limb bud requires maintenance Snail2 expression through the actions of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF-

  18. [Serotonin simulates the neuronal effects of nociceptive sensitization in the snail].

    PubMed

    Shevelkin, A V; Nikitin, V P; Kozyrev, S A; Samo?lov, M O; Sherstnev, V V

    1997-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) application (10 mcM) onto L-PPl1 neurons of the pleural ganglia of land snail Helix lucorum produced the synaptic facilitation of the neuronal response evoked by sensory stimulation. At the same time, it did not change the parameters of the neuronal membrane (resting potential and membrane excitability). In addition to synaptic facilitation, the higher 5-HT concentration (100 mcM) produced an increase in membrane excitability and a slight membrane depolarization. The 5-HT effects were modality-dependent: the duration of facilitation of the response evoked by tactile stimulation of the snail head was about 1 h while that of the response evoked by quinine application (0.3% solution) onto the snail lip was 2-3 h. The 5-HT effects were site-specific: its application facilitated only the neuronal responses evoked by tactile stimulation of the snail head but not other body sites. The dynamics of the electrophysiological effects and the level of bound calcium were similar in L-PPl1 neurons. The described neuronal effects resemble those observed after the nociceptive sensitization of these neurons. The data obtained suggest the 5-HT involvement in the mechanisms of short-term changes and consolidation of long-term plasticity underlying the sensitization in Helix L-PPl1 neurons. PMID:9273793

  19. Regulation of heterochromatin transcription by Snail1/LOXL2 during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Millanes-Romero, Alba; Herranz, Nicolás; Perrera, Valentina; Iturbide, Ane; Loubat-Casanovas, Jordina; Gil, Jesús; Jenuwein, Thomas; García de Herreros, Antonio; Peiró, Sandra

    2013-12-12

    Although heterochromatin is enriched with repressive traits, it is also actively transcribed, giving rise to large amounts of noncoding RNAs. Although these RNAs are responsible for the formation and maintenance of heterochromatin, little is known about how their transcription is regulated. Here, we show that the Snail1 transcription factor represses mouse pericentromeric transcription, acting through the H3K4 deaminase LOXL2. Since Snail1 plays a key role in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), we analyzed the regulation of heterochromatin transcription in this process. At the onset of EMT, one of the major structural heterochromatin proteins, HP1?, is transiently released from heterochromatin foci in a Snail1/LOXL2-dependent manner, concomitantly with a downregulation of major satellite transcription. Moreover, preventing the downregulation of major satellite transcripts compromised the migratory and invasive behavior of mesenchymal cells. We propose that Snail1 regulates heterochromatin transcription through LOXL2, thus creating the favorable transcriptional state necessary for completing EMT. PMID:24239292

  20. Some aspects of snail ecology in South Africa; a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    DE MEILLON, B; FRANK, G H; ALLANSON, B R

    1958-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present the preliminary results of a recent ecological survey of some rivers in the Transvaal, Union of South Africa.Representative samples of the molluscan fauna of the rivers were collected and chemical analyses of the river waters were carried out. In addition, such characteristics as current speed, temperature, turbidity, biochemical oxygen demand, and amount of oxygen absorbed from potassium permanganate were determined.No evidence was obtained to show that the chemical composition of natural, unpolluted waters plays any part in determining vector snail habitats. Current speed was found to have some effect, bilharzia vector snails not being found in fast-flowing waters.Of the other factors, turbidity was shown to be of some importance, probably because it affects the growth of the algae on which certain snails seem to depend for their proper development, and severe pollution with sewage and industrial wastes also appeared to have an adverse affect on the snail population. PMID:13573112